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Sample records for porcine experimental model

  1. Experimental porcine model of complex fistula-in-ano

    PubMed Central

    A Ba-Bai-Ke-Re, Ma-Mu-Ti-Jiang; Chen, Hui; Liu, Xue; Wang, Yun-Hai

    2017-01-01

    AIM To establish and evaluate an experimental porcine model of fistula-in-ano. METHODS Twelve healthy pigs were randomly divided into two groups. Under general anesthesia, the experimental group underwent rubber band ligation surgery, and the control group underwent an artificial damage technique. Clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathological evaluation were performed on the 38th d and 48th d after surgery in both groups, respectively. RESULTS There were no significant differences between the experimental group and the control group in general characteristics such as body weight, gender, and the number of fistula (P > 0.05). In the experimental group, 15 fistulas were confirmed clinically, 13 complex fistulas were confirmed by MRI, and 11 complex fistulas were confirmed by histopathology. The success rate in the porcine complex fistula model establishment was 83.33%. Among the 18 fistulas in the control group, 5 fistulas were confirmed clinically, 4 complex fistulas were confirmed by MRI, and 3 fistulas were confirmed by histopathology. The success rate in the porcine fistula model establishment was 27.78%. Thus, the success rate of the rubber band ligation group was significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Rubber band ligation is a stable and reliable method to establish complex fistula-in-ano models. Large animal models of complex anal fistulas can be used for the diagnosis and treatment of anal fistulas. PMID:28348488

  2. Experimental Porcine Toxoplasma gondii Infection as a Representative Model for Human Toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Nau, Julia; Eller, Silvia Kathrin; Wenning, Johannes; Spekker-Bosker, Katrin Henrike; Schroten, Horst; Schwerk, Christian; Hotop, Andrea; Groß, Uwe; Däubener, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Porcine infections are currently not the state-of-the-art model to study human diseases. Nevertheless, the course of human and porcine toxoplasmosis is much more comparable than that of human and murine toxoplasmosis. For example, severity of infection, transplacental transmission, and interferon-gamma-induced antiparasitic effector mechanisms are similar in pigs and humans. In addition, the severe immunosuppression during acute infection described in mice does not occur in the experimentally infected ones. Thus, we hypothesise that porcine Toxoplasma gondii infection data are more representative for human toxoplasmosis. We therefore suggest that the animal model chosen must be critically evaluated for its assignability to human diseases.

  3. Taenia solium: Development of an Experimental Model of Porcine Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Agnès; Trejo, Armando; Cisneros, Humberto; García-Navarrete, Roberto; Villalobos, Nelly; Hernández, Marisela; Villeda Hernández, Juana; Hernández, Beatriz; Rosas, Gabriela; Bobes, Raul J.; S. de Aluja, Aline; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis

    2015-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. NC is a severe disease still affecting the population in developing countries of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. While great improvements have been made on NC diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, the management of patients affected by extraparenchymal parasites remains a challenge. The development of a T. solium NC experimental model in pigs that will allow the evaluation of new therapeutic alternatives is herein presented. Activated oncospheres (either 500 or 1000) were surgically implanted in the cerebral subarachnoid space of piglets. The clinical status and the level of serum antibodies in the animals were evaluated for a 4-month period after implantation. The animals were sacrificed, cysticerci were counted during necropsy, and both the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of cysts were described. Based on the number of established cysticerci, infection efficiency ranged from 3.6% (1000 oncospheres) to 5.4% (500 oncospheres). Most parasites were caseous or calcified (38/63, 60.3%) and were surrounded by an exacerbated inflammatory response with lymphocyte infiltration and increased inflammatory markers. The infection elicited specific antibodies but no neurological signs. This novel experimental model of NC provides a useful tool to evaluate new cysticidal and anti-inflammatory approaches and it should improve the management of severe NC patients, refractory to the current treatments. PMID:26252878

  4. Taenia solium: Development of an Experimental Model of Porcine Neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Agnès; Trejo, Armando; Cisneros, Humberto; García-Navarrete, Roberto; Villalobos, Nelly; Hernández, Marisela; Villeda Hernández, Juana; Hernández, Beatriz; Rosas, Gabriela; Bobes, Raul J; de Aluja, Aline S; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis

    2015-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. NC is a severe disease still affecting the population in developing countries of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. While great improvements have been made on NC diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, the management of patients affected by extraparenchymal parasites remains a challenge. The development of a T. solium NC experimental model in pigs that will allow the evaluation of new therapeutic alternatives is herein presented. Activated oncospheres (either 500 or 1000) were surgically implanted in the cerebral subarachnoid space of piglets. The clinical status and the level of serum antibodies in the animals were evaluated for a 4-month period after implantation. The animals were sacrificed, cysticerci were counted during necropsy, and both the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of cysts were described. Based on the number of established cysticerci, infection efficiency ranged from 3.6% (1000 oncospheres) to 5.4% (500 oncospheres). Most parasites were caseous or calcified (38/63, 60.3%) and were surrounded by an exacerbated inflammatory response with lymphocyte infiltration and increased inflammatory markers. The infection elicited specific antibodies but no neurological signs. This novel experimental model of NC provides a useful tool to evaluate new cysticidal and anti-inflammatory approaches and it should improve the management of severe NC patients, refractory to the current treatments.

  5. Medtentia double helix mitral annuloplasty system evaluated in a porcine experimental model.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Henrik; Simpanen, Jarmo; Smerup, Morten; Bjerre, Marianne; Bramsen, Morten; Werkkala, Kalervo; Vainikka, Tiina; Hasenkam, J Michael; Wierup, Per

    2010-03-01

    : To further develop and improve minimally invasive surgical procedures, dedicated appropriate surgical devices are mandatory. In this study, the safety and feasibility of implanting the novel Medtentia double helix mitral annuloplasty ring, which uses the key-ring principle to potentially allow faster and sutureless implantation, was assessed using both minimally invasive and conventional surgical techniques. Because of ethical concerns, a human compatible porcine experimental model of mitral valve surgery was used. : Twelve 50-kg pigs were allocated to implantation of the Medtentia double helix annuloplasty ring using conventional midline sternotomy including cardioplegic arrest or a minimally invasive approach using peripheral cannulation and left ventricular fibrillation. Ten weeks after surgery, echocardiography was performed to assess mitral valve function. Animals were then killed, and gross mitral valve anatomy was examined ex vivo. : All animals survived 10 weeks without developing mitral regurgitation, structural leaflet damage, ring dehiscence, or endocarditis. In the minimally invasive compared with the midline sternotomy group (mean ± SD), significantly reduced recovery time (80 ± 16 vs. 327 ± 23 minutes, P < 0.01) and a tendency toward increased operating time (199 ± 33 vs. 168 ± 15 minutes, P > 0.05) and cardiopulmonary bypass time (98 ± 12 vs. 91 ± 11 minutes, P > 0.05) were observed. : By using a both minimally invasive and conventional midline sternotomy implantation techniques, the Medtentia double helix annuloplasty ring showed no mitral valve dysfunction or tissue damage 10 weeks postoperatively.

  6. Localization of the corticospinal tract within the porcine spinal cord: Implications for experimental modeling of traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Anna Victoria; Menendez, Joshua York; Pat, Betty Maki; Hadley, Mark N; Floyd, Candace Lorraine

    2017-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) researchers have predominately utilized rodents for SCI modeling and experimentation. Unfortunately, a large number of novel therapies developed in rodent models have failed to demonstrate efficacy in human clinical trials which suggests that improved animal models are an important translational tool. Recently, porcine models of SCI have been identified as a valuable intermediary model for preclinical evaluation of promising therapies to aid clinical translation. However, the localization of the major spinal tracts in pigs has not yet been described. Given that significant differences exist in the location of the corticospinal tract (CST) between rodents and humans, determining its location in pigs will provide important information related to the translational potential of the porcine pre-clinical model of SCI. Thus, the goal of this study is to investigate the localization of the CST within the porcine spinal cord. Mature female domestic pigs (n=4, 60kg) received microinjections of fluorescent dextran tracers (Alexa Fluor, 10,000MW) into the primary motor cortex, using image-guided navigation (StealthStation(®)), to label the CST. At 5 weeks post-tracer injection animals were euthanized, the entire neuroaxis harvested and processed for histological examination. Serial sections of the brain and spinal cord were prepared and imaged using confocal microscopy to observe the location of the CST in pigs. Results demonstrate that the CST of pigs is located in the lateral white matter, signifying greater similarity to human anatomical structure compared to that of rodents. We conclude that the corticospinal tract in pigs demonstrates anatomical similarity to human, suggesting that the porcine model has importance as a translational intermediary pre-clinical model. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. A new prosthetic implant for inguinal hernia repair: its features in a porcine experimental model.

    PubMed

    Amato, Giuseppe; Lo Monte, Attilio I; Cassata, Giovanni; Damiano, Giuseppe; Romano, Giorgio; Bussani, Rossana

    2011-08-01

    using inherent radial recoil, vertical buffering, friction, and delivering the device in a constrained state. A secondary benefit of this "dynamic" design is that the implant moves in a three-dimensional way in unison with the movements of the myotendineal structures of the groin. The results appear to show that the three-dimensional structure not only acts as a suitable scaffold for a full thickness ingrowth of a tissue barrier but also seems to induce an ordered, supple, elastic tissue, which allows for neorevascularization and neoneural growth. The outcomes indicate a reduced impact of fibrotic shrinkage on the implant/scar tissue when compared with shrinkage of polypropylene meshes reported in the literature. This pilot study shows the features of such an implant in a porcine experimental model.

  8. Functional recovery after experimental RPE debridement, mfERG studies in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Nina Buus; Lassota, Nathan; Kyhn, Maria Voss; Prause, Jan Ulrik; Qvortrup, Klaus; la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens

    2013-10-01

    The correlation between histologically identified regeneration of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and functional outcome measured by multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) following surgical debridement is examined in a porcine model. In humans, visual acuity is reduced in diseases with RPE loss such as RPE tears and geographic atrophy. Hypopigmented RPE is known to cover the lesion after RPE debridement in the pig, but it is unclear whether this leads to a return of photoreceptor function. RPE debridement was performed in ten pigs by vitrectomy and retinotomy, and by brushing the Bruch's membrane with a silicone catheter. Immediately following surgery (baseline) and after 2 and 6 weeks respectively, the animals were examined by mfERG, fundus photographs (FPs), fluorescein angiograms (FAs), and histopathology. The mfERG P1 amplitude was decreased 2 weeks (T₂) after surgery; it returned to baseline 6 weeks (T₆) after surgery. FPs, FAs, and histology showed partial repopulation of Bruch's membrane by hypopigmented RPE cells and atrophied outer segments at T₂. At T₆, normally pigmented RPE cells were identified, and the photoreceptor layer was restored. This is the first study to show that the histological regeneration of hypopigmented RPE correlates to a return of the retinal function, measured by mfERG.

  9. New Radiofrequency Device to Reduce Bleeding after Core Needle Biopsy: Experimental Study in a Porcine Liver Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sanghyeok; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Young-sun; Lim, Hyo Keun

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the in vivo efficiency of the biopsy tract radiofrequency ablation for hemostasis after core biopsy of the liver in a porcine liver model, including situations with bleeding tendency and a larger (16-gauge) core needle. Materials and Methods A preliminary study was performed using one pig to determine optimal ablation parameters. For the main experiment, four pigs were assigned to different groups according to heparinization use and biopsy needle caliber. In each pig, 14 control (without tract ablation) and 14 experimental (tract ablation) ultrasound-guided core biopsies were performed using either an 18- or 16-gauge needle. Post-biopsy bleeding amounts were measured by soaking up the blood for five minutes. The results were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results The optimal parameters for biopsy tract ablation were determined as a 2-cm active tip electrode set at 40-watt with a tip temperature of 70–80℃. The bleeding amounts in all experimental groups were smaller than those in the controls; however they were significant in the non-heparinized pig biopsied with an 18-gauge needle and in two heparinized pigs (p < 0.001). In the heparinized pigs, the mean blood loss in the experimental group was 3.5% and 13.5% of the controls biopsied with an 18- and 16-gauge needle, respectively. Conclusion Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic core biopsy tract ablation may reduce post-biopsy bleeding even under bleeding tendency and using a larger core needle, according to the result from in vivo porcine model experiments. PMID:28096727

  10. New Radiofrequency Device to Reduce Bleeding after Core Needle Biopsy: Experimental Study in a Porcine Liver Model.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sanghyeok; Rhim, Hyunchul; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Young-Sun; Lim, Hyo Keun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the in vivo efficiency of the biopsy tract radiofrequency ablation for hemostasis after core biopsy of the liver in a porcine liver model, including situations with bleeding tendency and a larger (16-gauge) core needle. A preliminary study was performed using one pig to determine optimal ablation parameters. For the main experiment, four pigs were assigned to different groups according to heparinization use and biopsy needle caliber. In each pig, 14 control (without tract ablation) and 14 experimental (tract ablation) ultrasound-guided core biopsies were performed using either an 18- or 16-gauge needle. Post-biopsy bleeding amounts were measured by soaking up the blood for five minutes. The results were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The optimal parameters for biopsy tract ablation were determined as a 2-cm active tip electrode set at 40-watt with a tip temperature of 70-80℃. The bleeding amounts in all experimental groups were smaller than those in the controls; however they were significant in the non-heparinized pig biopsied with an 18-gauge needle and in two heparinized pigs (p < 0.001). In the heparinized pigs, the mean blood loss in the experimental group was 3.5% and 13.5% of the controls biopsied with an 18- and 16-gauge needle, respectively. Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic core biopsy tract ablation may reduce post-biopsy bleeding even under bleeding tendency and using a larger core needle, according to the result from in vivo porcine model experiments.

  11. A fiber reinforced poroelastic model of nanoindentation of porcine costal cartilage: a combined experimental and finite element approach.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shikha; Lin, Jeremy; Ashby, Paul; Pruitt, Lisa

    2009-08-01

    Nanoindentation has shown promise as a mechanical characterization tool for orthopaedic biomaterials since it can probe the properties of small, heterogeneous, irregularly shaped tissue volumes in physiological environments. However, the majority of nanoindentation analyses have been limited to the determination of linear elastic and viscoelastic properties. Since biomaterials possess complex nonlinear, hydrated, time-dependent constitutive behavior, the objective of the present study is to explore the ability of nanoindentation to determine physiologically relevant material properties using a fibril reinforced poroelastic (FRPE) model. A further goal is to ascertain the sensitivity of nanoindentation load-displacement curves to different FRPE parameters, including the elastic properties of the nonfibrillar matrix, the composition and distribution of fibers, and nonlinearity in the fluid permeability. Porcine costal cartilage specimens are experimentally tested with nanoindentation load relaxation experiments at two different loading depths and loading rates. The FRPE material properties are extracted from comparisons to finite element simulations. The study demonstrates the behavior of the model in nanoindentation is distinct from bulk indentation; the static response of the nanoindentation is determined almost exclusively by the elastic properties of the nonfibrillar matrix and the volume fraction of fibers, while the transient response is dominated by the fluid permeability of the tissue. The FRPE model can accurately describe the time-dependent mechanical behavior of costal cartilage in nanoindentation, with good agreement between experimental and numerical curve fits (R(2)=0.98+/-0.01) at multiple indentation depths and indentation rates.

  12. Amniotic membrane as part of a skin substitute for full-thickness wounds: an experimental evaluation in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Loeffelbein, Denys J; Baumann, Claudia; Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild; Hasler, Rafael; Mücke, Thomas; Steinsträßer, Lars; Drecoll, Enken; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kesting, Marco R

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the use of human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a graft material for the treatment of iatrogenic full-thickness (FT) skin wounds in a porcine model with a view to reducing donor site morbidity in free flap transfer. Forty experimental FT-wounds were covered with an autologous split-thickness skin graft (STSG) alone or in combination with a mono- or multilayer HAM or Integra(®). Untreated wounds served as controls. Clinical evaluation and biopsy-sampling for histological and immunohistochemical staining with von-Willebrand-factor (vWF) antibody, laminin antibody, Ki-67 antibody, and smooth muscle actin (αSMA) antibody were performed on days 5, 7, 10, 20, 40, and 60 after surgical intervention. Considerable disparities in the estimated criteria were observed between the various treatment groups of the FT-wounds. The use of HAM was found to have an accelerating impact on re-epithelialization. The multilayered amnion membrane showed better results than the Integra(®) and monolayer technique in terms of contraction rate, inflammation, and scarring and seemed useful as a dermal substitute in FT-wounds giving comparable results to STSG coverage alone. This study demonstrates the successful application of HAM as part of a skin substitute in FT-wounds in minipigs. The results offer promise as a simple and effective technique for the application of multilayer HAM in iatrogenic human skin defects and the acceleration of wound healing. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Hemofiltration with the Cascade system in an experimental porcine model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Rimmelé, Thomas; Wey, Pierre-François; Bernard, Nicolas; Monchi, Mehran; Semenzato, Nicolas; Benatir, Farida; Boselli, Emmanuel; Etienne, Jérôme; Goudable, Joëlle; Chassard, Dominique; Bricca, Giampiero; Allaouchiche, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    High-volume hemofiltration (HVHF) has been suggested as an adjuvant treatment of septic shock because of its capacities to remove inflammatory mediators from blood. Nevertheless, HVHF presents some important drawbacks, such as the depletion of low molecular weight molecules (nutriments, vitamins, trace elements and antibiotics) due to the high ultrafiltration rate, or the significant financial cost and nursing workload due to the frequent changes of large amounts of expensive sterile substitution fluids. A new hemofiltration system called "Cascade" has been developed, allowing very high ultrafiltration rates (120 mL/kg/h) limiting these drawbacks by using a special extracorporeal circuit. The objective of this study was to assess the technical feasibility of the Cascade system and to compare its hemodynamic impact to that of the standard HVHF system. Twenty sepsis-induced pigs were randomized in two groups: one group was hemofiltered with the standard HVHF system and the other with the Cascade system during a six-hour session. No technical problems were observed with the Cascade system during the experiment. At the end of the experiment, colloid requirements (989 +/- 355 mL vs. 1913 +/- 538 mL, P = 0.006), epinephrine requirements (0.82 +/- 0.42 mg vs. 3.27 +/- 3.02 mg, P < 0.001), lactic acidosis (pH = 7.33 +/- 0.08 vs. 7.10 +/- 0.07, P < 0.001) and mean pulmonary arterial pressure were less pronounced in the Cascade group. These results suggest that Cascade hemofiltration is technically feasible and safe. Moreover, compared with standard HVHF, it can reduce the severity of porcine septic shock.

  14. Effect of double-balloon enteroscopy on pancreas: An experimental porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Rafael; Soria, Federico; López-Albors, Octavio; Sarriá, Ricardo; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco; Esteban, Pilar; Carballo, Fernando; Pérez-Cuadrado, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) on pancreas histology and levels of pancreatic enzymes. METHODS: Conventional upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed on five control pigs. Oral DBE was performed with an EN-450T5 enteroscope on 20 pigs. Two experimental groups (10 pigs each) were defined according to DBE duration: 90 min for Group 1 and 140 min for Group 2. During oral insertion, the balloons were not inflated in the descending part of the duodenum to avoid the minor duodenal papilla. Serum amylase, lipase and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were monitored before the procedure and repeated every 30 min until the exploration was finished, as well as 24 h and 7 d after. After the procedure and for a total of 7 d, the pigs were observed twice a day for signs of decreased activity, irritability, vomiting or anorexia. Gross and microscopic examination of the pancreas was performed on day 7. RESULTS: All animals tolerated DBE without clinical manifestations of acute pancreatitis. Experimental groups had higher levels of enzymes than the control group at 24 h. Throughout the exploration, the amylase levels increased significantly above the baseline 24 h after DBE, although the increase was not statistically significant and did not reach 20% of the baseline. An increase in lipase and CRP was observed at 24 h after the procedure, although by day 7, all enzymatic levels had returned to baseline. No differences between Groups 1 and 2 were found for any enzyme and sampling site during and after the procedure. Similarly, no correlation between insertion depth and enzyme levels was observed. Direct in situ and post-removal inspection of the pancreas did not show any evidence of fluid collection, abscesses or hemorrhage. Histological examination of the pancreas from Groups 1 and 2 revealed the existence of focal areas (0.14-0.26 mm2) of ischemic necrosis in 47.4% of the animals. In the pigs with damaged pancreas, the left lobe (tail) was

  15. [A novel self-growing rod technique for early onset scoliosis: an experimental study based on a porcine scoliosis model].

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Qiu, Y; Sun, X; Qian, B P; Wang, B; Yu, Y; Zhu, Z Z

    2016-06-21

    To evaluate the efficacy of a growth-guidance growing rod in an established porcine scoliosis model via the Cobb angle correction and the continued spinal growth. Immature pigs (age: 6 weeks old, weight: 6-8 kg) were instrumented and tethered using a three separate incisions fashion.After considerable scoliosis was induced, the pigs were randomly assigned to an experiment group (EG) and a sham group (SG). In EG, the growing rod was implanted and the pigs were euthanized 8 weeks postoperatively; while in SG, the whole instrumentations were only removed and the pigs were followed up over a 8-week period.Dorsoventral (DV) X-ray radiographs were taken prior to and immediately after the growing rod implanting surgery, and at 4-week intervals to assess the Cobb angle orrection and instrumentation positioning.The continued spinal growth and the rod sliding were also assessed from the radiographs. Of the 16 pigs, one pig encountered infection during the inducement of the experimental scoliosis and thus was excluded from analysis.Of the remaining 15 pigs, all animals developed progressive, structural scoliosis.The 15 pigs were randomized into EG(n=10) and SG(n=5). Two pigs in EG encountered infection and were also excluded from analysis.Of the remaining 8 pigs in EG, no neurologic complications, implant failure or infection were observed.In EG, the Cobb angle of the scoliosis before the growing rod implanted was (52.1 ±14.1)° and it decreased to (25.4±15.2)° postoperatively.After 8 weeks, the Cobb angle was (20.2±11.4)°.In SG, the Cobb angle of the scoliosis after 8-week tethering period was (55.2±15.7)° and it decreased to (53.6±15.8)° after removal of the tethering.The curvature remained stable (51.2°) during the subsequent 8 weeks.During the 8-16th week, the spinal height increased 14.2 cm and radiographic analysis of the growing rod sliding revealed an average distraction of 39.8 mm in EG; while in SG, the increased spinal height was 14.9 cm.The difference of

  16. Blood gas and hematological changes in experimental peracute porcine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiorpes, A L; MacWilliams, P S; Schenkman, D I; Bäckström, L R

    1990-01-01

    The effect of experimental, peracute, porcine pleuropneumonia on arterial blood gases, acid base status, the leukogram, and gross and microscopic lung structure was studied in nine growing pigs (mean weight +/- SD 10.6 +/- 2.0 kg). Pigs were inoculated intranasally with a virulent serotype 5 isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and all showed signs typical of the disease within four hours. Death occurred in all pigs from 4.5 to 32 hours postinoculation (mean 14 hours). Gross and microscopic changes were typical of porcine pleuropneumonia in all pigs. Changes in the leukogram included a rapid decline in total white cells, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and eosinophils. Pigs maintained alveolar ventilation throughout the study as arterial CO2 tension was unchanged; however, arterial O2 tension and pH decreased from (mean +/- SD) 95.2 +/- 5.7 torr and 7.463 +/- 0.018 at baseline to 62.1 +/- 12.3 torr and 7.388 +/- 0.045, respectively, within 90 minutes prior to death. The data showed that in this model of peracute porcine pleuropneumonia, progressive ventilatory failure was not a feature of the disease, and the blood gas values and acid base status were maintained within physiological ranges. The histopathological hematological and physiological findings were consistent with the hypothesis that peracute porcine pleuropneumonia resembles septic shock. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2106382

  17. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T; Ross, Jason W; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease.

  18. A porcine model of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Saalfrank, A; Janssen, K-P; Ravon, M; Flisikowski, K; Eser, S; Steiger, K; Flisikowska, T; Müller-Fliedner, P; Schulze, É; Brönner, C; Gnann, A; Kappe, E; Böhm, B; Schade, B; Certa, U; Saur, D; Esposito, I; Kind, A; Schnieke, A

    2016-01-01

    We previously produced pigs with a latent oncogenic TP53 mutation. Humans with TP53 germline mutations are predisposed to a wide spectrum of early-onset cancers, predominantly breast, brain, adrenal gland cancer, soft tissue sarcomas and osteosarcomas. Loss of p53 function has been observed in >50% of human cancers. Here we demonstrate that porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) convert to a transformed phenotype after activation of latent oncogenic TP53R167H and KRASG12D, and overexpression of MYC promotes tumorigenesis. The process mimics key molecular aspects of human sarcomagenesis. Transformed porcine MSCs exhibit genomic instability, with complex karyotypes, and develop into sarcomas on transplantation into immune-deficient mice. In pigs, heterozygous knockout of TP53 was sufficient for spontaneous osteosarcoma development in older animals, whereas homozygous TP53 knockout resulted in multiple large osteosarcomas in 7–8-month-old animals. This is the first report that engineered mutation of an endogenous tumour-suppressor gene leads to invasive cancer in pigs. Unlike in Trp53 mutant mice, osteosarcoma developed in the long bones and skull, closely recapitulating the human disease. These animals thus promise a model for juvenile osteosarcoma, a relatively uncommon but devastating disease. PMID:26974205

  19. Quantitative analysis of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) viremia profiles from experimental infection: a statistical modelling approach

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is the most economically significant viral disease facing the global swine industry. Viremia profiles of PRRS virus challenged pigs reflect the severity and progression of the infection within the host and provide crucial information for subsequen...

  20. Porcine model of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Kashiwakura, Yuji; Mimuro, Jun; Onishi, Akira; Iwamoto, Masaki; Madoiwa, Seiji; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Suzuki, Misae; Sembon, Shoichiro; Ishiwata, Akira; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Sakata, Asuka; Ohmori, Tsukasa; Hashimoto, Michiko; Yazaki, Satoko; Sakata, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X chromosome-linked genetic bleeding disorder caused by abnormalities in the coagulation factor VIII gene (F8). Hemophilia A patients suffer from a bleeding diathesis, such as life-threatening bleeding in the brain and harmful bleeding in joints and muscles. Because it could potentially be cured by gene therapy, subhuman animal models have been sought. Current mouse hemophilia A models generated by gene targeting of the F8 have difficulties to extrapolate human disease due to differences in the coagulation and immune systems between mice and humans. Here, we generated a porcine model of hemophilia A by nuclear transfer cloning from F8-targeted fibroblasts. The hemophilia A pigs showed a severe bleeding tendency upon birth, similar to human severe hemophiliacs, but in contrast to hemophilia A mice which rarely bleed under standard breed conditions. Infusion of human factor VIII was effective in stopping bleeding and reducing the bleeding frequency of a hemophilia A piglet but was blocked by the inhibitor against human factor VIII. These data suggest that the hemophilia A pig is a severe hemophilia A animal model for studying not only hemophilia A gene therapy but also the next generation recombinant coagulation factors, such as recombinant factor VIII variants with a slower clearance rate.

  1. Persistence of porcine rubulavirus in experimentally infected boars.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Martínez-Bautista, Rebeca; Pérez-Torres, Armando; García-Contreras, Adelfa Del Carmen; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández, Jesús; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2013-03-23

    Porcine rubulavirus is the etiological agent of blue eye disease in pigs. In boars, this virus causes orchitis and epididymitis and reduces seminal quality. The objective of this study was to determine the persistence of porcine rubulavirus in experimentally infected boars. Nine 12-month-old boars were infected with 5 ml of the PAC-3 strain of porcine rubulavirus at 1 × 10(5) TCID(50)/ml and held for 142 days post infection (DPI) to evaluate humoral immune response. The virus was isolated in cell cultures and detected by RT-PCR. Infection with porcine rubulavirus produced clinical signs beginning at 5 DPI. Necropsy results showed that 3 boars had lesions in the testicles and epididymes. Histological analysis showed the characteristic lesions in all infected boars. Porcine rubulavirus antibodies were detected in the second week post infection and increased significantly (P<0.05) over time. Isolation of the virus from semen was achieved between 5 DPI and 48 DPI and from the testicles and epididymes between 64 DPI and 142 DPI. Viral RNA was detected in the serum between 2 DPI and 64 DPI and in the semen until 142 DPI. These results confirm that the RNA of the porcine rubulavirus persists in the semen and that this virus remains in the reproductive tract for prolonged periods of infection. Semen of persistently infected boars, therefore, represents an important source of the virus and a risk factor for the spread of blue eye disease in swine populations.

  2. Time-dependent image changes after ethanol injection into the pancreas: an experimental study using a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Fushimi, Soichiro; Iwamuro, Masaya; Oda, Shinsuke; Mizukawa, Sho; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Ethanol, a commonly available agent, has been used to successfully ablate cystic and solid lesions in the pancreas. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of an ethanol injection into the porcine pancreas and observe the time-dependent image changes in the pancreatic parenchyma. Methods Pure ethanol was injected into the pancreatic tail using a 25-gauge EUS needle with direct ultrasound guidance under celiotomy: 1 mL and 2 mL were injected, respectively. The abdomen was closed after the injection. MRI was performed before the procedure, immediately after, and on postoperative day (POD) seven. Blood samples were taken before the procedure and on PODs one, three, five, and seven. The pigs were euthanised on POD seven. Results Immediately after the injection, linear high signal areas in the pancreatic tail on T2 and rounded speckled high signal areas on DWI images were detected in both animals, measuring 35 × 32 mm in the 1 mL injected pig and 42 × 38mm in the 2 mL injected pig. After POD seven, rounded high signal areas were noted on T2 images, measuring 22 × 18 mm and 36 × 28 mm respectively. On POD one, the 1 mL injected animal had a 53% elevation in serum amylase while the 2 mL injected animal had a 66% elevation. Histologically, cystic and necrotic changes in the parenchyma were observed, measuring 23 × 22 mm and 40 × 35 mm respectively. Conclusions Our results, which are limited to normal pancreas, suggested that a 1 mL injection caused localised changes within the pancreas while a 2 mL injection induced more widespread changes beyond the pancreas. The effective area of ethanol was widespread immediately after injection, and then the area was reduced with cystic and necrosis changes. PMID:27594908

  3. Use of an experimental model to test the efficacy of planned exposure to live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, Tanja; Baker, Rodney B; Halbur, Patrick G

    2007-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the efficacy and safety of planned exposure to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in protecting naïve and previously exposed pigs against PRRSV challenge and to gain information on the dose of PRRSV necessary to induce a protective immune response. Fifty 2-week-old pigs were randomly assigned to one of five groups: a group exposed to a low dose of autogenous PRRSV vaccine (the L-VAC group), a group exposed to a high dose of autogenous vaccine (the H-VAC group), a group exposed to a low dose of a heterologous PRRSV strain (strain SDSU73) prior to planned exposure (the SDSU73-L-VAC group), a group exposed to a high dose of a heterologous PRRSV strain (strain SDSU73) prior to planned exposure (the SDSU73-H-VAC group), and a control group. All groups were challenged with PRRSV VR2385 5 weeks after the planned exposure. Necropsy was done 2 weeks after the PRRSV challenge. The H-VAC, SDSU73-L-VAC, and SDSU73-H-VAC groups had significantly (P < 0.05) less severe clinical disease (sneezing, respiratory scores, and weight gain), significantly (P < 0.05) less severe macroscopic and microscopic lung lesions, and significantly (P < 0.05) lower numbers of PRRSV genomic copy numbers in their sera compared to the results for the control group. Planned exposure to live PRRSV can be used as an inexpensive and effective way to decrease the severity of PRRSV-induced disease following subsequent challenge.

  4. The use of composite meshes in laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernias: are there differences in biocompatibily?: experimental results obtained in a laparoscopic porcine model.

    PubMed

    Schug-Pass, Christine; Sommerer, Florian; Tannapfel, Andrea; Lippert, Hans; Köckerling, Ferdinand

    2009-03-01

    In recent years, laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernias has become increasingly established in routine clinical practice thanks to the myriad advantages it confers. Apart from the risk of intestinal damage following adhesiolysis, to date no information is available on the best way of preventing the formation of new adhesions in the vicinity of the implanted meshes. Numerous experimental investigations, mainly conducted on an open small-animal model, have demonstrated the advantages of coating meshes, inter alia with absorbable materials, compared with uncoated polypropylene meshes. In our established laparoscopic porcine model we set about investigating three of these meshes, which are already available on the market. In total, 18 domestic pigs underwent laparoscopic surgery and three different composite meshes were tested in each case on six animals (Dynamesh IPOM, Proceed, Parietene Composite). At 4 months, postmortem diagnostic laparoscopy was carried out, followed by full-wall excision of the specimens. Planimetric analysis was conducted to investigate the size of the entire surface area and the extent of adhesions. Histological investigations were performed on five sections for each specimen. These focused on the partial volumes of inflammatory cells, the proliferation marker Ki67, apoptotic index, inflammatory cell marker CD68 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) as a marker of the extracellular matrix. A similar value of 14% was obtained for shrinkage of Dynamesh IPOM and Parietene Composite, while Proceed showed a 25% reduction in its surface area. Markedly lower values of 12.8% were obtained for Parietene Composite in respect of adhesions to the greater omentum, compared with 31.7% for Proceed and 33.2% for Dynamesh IPOM (p = 0.01). Overall, Parietene Composite performed best in the histological and immunhistochemistry tests. On the whole, all composite meshes showed evidence of good biocompatibility. However, none of the coatings was

  5. Experimental and numerical assessment of hyperthermic laser lipolysis with 1,064 nm Nd: YAG laser on a porcine fatty tissue model.

    PubMed

    Milanic, Matija; Muc, Blaz Tasic; Jezersek, Matija; Lukac, Matjaz

    2017-09-20

    The aim of this study was to develop experimental and numerical models for a better understanding of hyperthermic laser lipolysis (HHL). A 3 cm thick porcine fat sample was irradiated over a 4.3 × 4.7 cm(2) area for 2 minutes with a 1,064 nm Nd:YAG laser using 1.2 W/cm(2) irradiance. Two irradiation scenarios were considered: without and with forced air cooling. Following the irradiation, the sample was left to cool down by natural convection. During the irradiation period, the surface temperature of the sample was continuously recorded by an infrared camera. Additionally, temperature depth profiles during the cooling period were also obtained. A one-dimensional model of the laser irradiation procedure was developed, including light and heat transport. The model was used to determine the absorption coefficient of the fat and the heat convection coefficients from the measured data, and to evaluate the treatment by varying the parameters. The measured temperature depth profiles revealed a maximum temperature (45.5°C) at the surface for a non-cooled sample, and a surface temperature of 38°C with a subsurface temperature peak of 42.6°C at a depth of 5.7 mm for a cooled sample. This corresponded well with the measured surface temperature increase following the irradiation as a result of heat diffusion from the heated deeper fat layers. The developed numerical model was used to fit the measured data. A good agreement between the model and the measurements was obtained. By varying the treatment parameters, basic empirical relations connecting the treatment, thermal signal, and temperature depth profile parameters were found. The results of this study provide a better understanding of transcutaneous laser lipolysis. The developed numerical model can be extended to transcutaneous laser lipolysis of human subjects. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Tissue Sampling Guides for Porcine Biomedical Models.

    PubMed

    Albl, Barbara; Haesner, Serena; Braun-Reichhart, Christina; Streckel, Elisabeth; Renner, Simone; Seeliger, Frank; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    This article provides guidelines for organ and tissue sampling adapted to porcine animal models in translational medical research. Detailed protocols for the determination of sampling locations and numbers as well as recommendations on the orientation, size, and trimming direction of samples from ∼50 different porcine organs and tissues are provided in the Supplementary Material. The proposed sampling protocols include the generation of samples suitable for subsequent qualitative and quantitative analyses, including cryohistology, paraffin, and plastic histology; immunohistochemistry;in situhybridization; electron microscopy; and quantitative stereology as well as molecular analyses of DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and electrolytes. With regard to the planned extent of sampling efforts, time, and personnel expenses, and dependent upon the scheduled analyses, different protocols are provided. These protocols are adjusted for (I) routine screenings, as used in general toxicity studies or in analyses of gene expression patterns or histopathological organ alterations, (II) advanced analyses of single organs/tissues, and (III) large-scale sampling procedures to be applied in biobank projects. Providing a robust reference for studies of porcine models, the described protocols will ensure the efficiency of sampling, the systematic recovery of high-quality samples representing the entire organ or tissue as well as the intra-/interstudy comparability and reproducibility of results. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  8. Laser tissue interaction in the porcine otic capsule tissue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Brian J.; Lee, Jon P.; Berns, Michael W.; White, Joel M.; Neev, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    The absence of a hard tissue model reflecting the properties of the inner and middle ear has made it difficult to draw consistent conclusions on the many experimental laser studies in ear surgery. Porcine otic capsule tissue has been studied by our group extensively in a wide variety of laser-tissue interaction studies and is an economically attractive and simple to use hard tissue source. Porcine otic capsule was harvested from the temporal bone of freshly sacrificed domestic pigs via a craniotomy approach. The technique when performed with power instruments takes less than 5 minutes and the entire otic capsule bone is removed intact as the suture line is not fused to the remaining petrous apex. The tissue specimen contains a vestibule, cochlea, oval and round windows, and internal auditory canals which can be used as an intact middle ear/inner ear system. The tissue can also be micromachined into thin slabs of bone varying for 100 - 1000 micrometers in thickness. In order to quantify more precisely the laser-tissue interactions in otic capsule, optical properties (absorption and scattering) and physical properties were determined (acoustic impedance). The tissue has been used in a wide variety of basic studies investigating the laser-tissue interactions with argon, KTP, (Nd:YAG), carbon dioxide, Ho:YAG, Er:YAG, and XeCl lasers. Porcine otic capsule is an ideal tissue on which standardized test can be performed to compare the relative effects of various laser in otosurgical models.

  9. Myocardial scar imaging by standard single-energy and dual-energy late enhancement CT: Comparison with pathology and electroanatomic map in an experimental chronic infarct porcine model.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quynh A; Thai, Wai-Ee; Wai, Bryan; Cordaro, Kevin; Cheng, Teresa; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Xiong, Guanglei; Cheung, Jim W; Altman, Robert; Min, James K; Singh, Jagmeet P; Barrett, Conor D; Danik, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial scar is a substrate for ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death. Late enhancement CT imaging can detect scar, but it remains unclear whether newer late enhancement dual-energy (LE-DECT) acquisition has benefit over standard single-energy late enhancement (LE-CT). We aim to compare late enhancement CT using newer LE-DECT acquisition and single-energy LE-CT acquisitions with pathology and electroanatomic map (EAM) in an experimental chronic myocardial infarction (MI) porcine study. In 8 pigs with chronic myocardial infarction (59 ± 5 kg), we performed dual-source CT, EAM, and pathology. For CT imaging, we performed 3 acquisitions at 10 minutes after contrast administration: LE-CT 80 kV, LE-CT 100 kV, and LE-DECT with 2 postprocessing software settings. Of the sequences, LE-CT 100 kV provided the best contrast-to-noise ratio (all P ≤ .03) and correlation to pathology for scar (ρ = 0.88). LE-DECT overestimated scar (both P = .02), whereas LE-CT images did not (both P = .08). On a segment basis (n = 136), all CT sequences had high specificity (87%-93%) and modest sensitivity (50%-67%), with LE-CT 100 kV having the highest specificity of 93% for scar detection compared to pathology and agreement with EAM (κ = 0.69). Standard single-energy LE-CT, particularly 100 kV, matched better to pathology and EAM than dual-energy LE-DECT for scar detection. Larger human trials as well as more technical studies that optimize varying different energies with newer hardware and software are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hybrid Transureteral Nephrectomy in a Survival Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kirk M.; Alsyouf, Muhannad; Richards, Gideon; Agarwal, Gautum; Heldt, Jonathan P.; Schlaifer, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Natural-orifice approaches for nephrectomy have included access via the stomach, vagina, bladder, and rectum. Recently, the feasibility of using the ureter as a natural orifice for natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery nephrectomy has been demonstrated in a nonsurvival porcine model. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcomes of transureteral laparoscopic natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery nephrectomy in a survival porcine model. Methods: Three pigs underwent hybrid transureteral natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery nephrectomy. An experimental balloon/dilating sheath was inserted over a wire to dilate the urethra, ureteral orifice, and ureter. Through a bariatric 12-mm laparoscopic port, the ureter was opened medially and the hilar dissection was performed. Next, 2 needlescopic ports were placed transabdominally to facilitate hilar transection. The kidney was morcellated using a bipolar sealing device and extracted via the ureter using the housing of a bariatric stapling device. The ureteral orifice was closed with a laparoscopic suturing device. The bladder was drained by a catheter for 10 to 14 days postoperatively. Pigs were euthanized on postoperative day 21. Results: All surgical procedures were successfully completed, with no intraoperative complications. One pig had an episode of postoperative clot retention that resolved with catheter irrigation. Each pig was healthy and eating a normal diet prior to euthanasia. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid transureteral approach to nephrectomy in a survival porcine model. This technique avoids the intentional violation of a second organ system and the risk for peritoneal contamination. Improved instrumentation is needed prior to implementation in the human population. PMID:25489210

  11. Experimental research of mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue under rotational shear stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Kan; Wang, Mingyu; Gao, Changqing; Ma, Chao

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue with a series of rotational shear stress control experiments. To this end, several experiments including stress sweep tests, frequency sweep tests and quasi-static creep tests were designed and conducted with a standard rheometer (HAAKE RheoStress6000). The effects of the loading stress rates to mechanical properties of brain tissue were also studied in stress sweep tests. The results of stress sweep tests performed on the same brain showed that brain tissue had an obvious regional inhomogeneity and the mechanical damage occurred at the rotational shear stress of 10-15Pa. The experimental data from three different loading stress rates demonstrated that the mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue was loading stress rate dependent. With the decrease of loading stress rate, a stiffer mechanical characteristic of brain tissue was observed and the occurrence of mechanical damage can be delayed to a higher stress. From the results of frequency sweep tests we found that brain tissue had almost completely elastic properties at high frequency area. The nonlinear creep response under the rotational shear stress of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9Pa was shown in results of creep tests. A new nonlinear viscoelastic solid model was proposed for creep tests and matched well with the test data. Considering the regional differences, loading stress rates and test conditions effects, loss tangent tan δ in porcine brain tissue showed a high uniformity of 0.25-0.45.

  12. Dose-dependent vascular response following delivery of sirolimus via fast releasing, biodegradable polymer stent matrix: an experimental study in the porcine coronary model of restenosis.

    PubMed

    Buszman, Piotr P; Orlik, Bartłomiej; Pająk, Jacek; Jelonek, Michał; Krauze, Agata; Janas, Adam; Legutko, Jacek; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Buszman, Paweł E; Milewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Fast releasing, rapamycin-eluting stents, although safe, showed inferior results with regard to inhibition of restenosis. Therefore, we report vascular effects of a novel, biodegradable polymer stent matrix with elevated sirolimus dose and fast release kinetics (ed-frSES, Alex, Balton) in the porcine coronary in-stent restenosis model. A total of 19 stents were implanted with 120% overstretch in the coronary arteries of seven domestic pigs: seven ed-frSES with 1.3 μg/mm2 of sirolimus, eight frSES with 1 μg/mm2 of sirolimus, and eight bare metal stents (BMS). For the following 28 days, coronary angiography was performed, animals were sacrificed, and the stented segments harvested for histopathological evaluation. In angiography at 28 days the late lumen loss was lowest in the elevated dose sirolimus eluting stent (SES) (ed-frSES: 0.20 ± 0.2 vs. frSES: 0.80 ± 0.5 vs. BMS: 0.96 ± 0.5 mm, p < 0.01). This was confirmed in the morphometric evaluation in histopathology as represented by a significant and dose-dependent decrease in the percentage area of stenosis (ed-frSES: 22.4 ± 12.7% vs. frSES: 35 ± 10.7% vs. BMS: 47.5 ± 12.5%, p < 0.01). There was no peri-strut inflammation in any of the groups. However, the endothelialisation score was numerically not meaningfully decreased in ed-frSES (ed-frSES: 2.93 vs. frSES: 3. vs. BMS: 3, p = 0.05). Signs of fibrin were also noted in ed-frSES (ed-frSES: 0.4 vs. frSES: 0 vs. BMS: 0, p = 0.05). Sirolimus dose-dependent vascular response was reported. The elevated dose, fast releasing SES shows satisfactory vascular healing, similar to regular dose, fast release SES, with improved efficacy in restenosis inhibition.

  13. Respiratory disease in growing pigs after Porcine rubulavirus experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Cuevas-Romero, Sandra; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández, Jesús; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the pathogenicity and distribution of Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) in the respiratory tract of experimentally infected pigs. Nine 6-week-old pigs were infected with PorPV and examined clinically. Blood, nasal swab, and tissue samples were collected on different days post-infection (DPI). The humoral immune responses and viral loads were evaluated. The infected pigs exhibited an increase in the respiratory clinical signs. In addition, the excretion of PorPV was extended to 23 DPI in the nasal fluid. The distribution of PorPV in the respiratory tract tissues was extended until the end of the experiment; soft palate tonsil and lymph nodes exhibited high viral loads. The major microscopic lesions observed in the lungs corresponded to interstitial pneumonia and hyperplasia of the associated lymphoid tissue. In conclusion, PorPV infection causes a pneumonic disease characterized by a prolonged virus excretion and high viral load in the lymphoid tissues.

  14. A Genetic Porcine Model of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schook, Lawrence B.; Collares, Tiago V.; Hu, Wenping; Liang, Ying; Rodrigues, Fernanda M.; Rund, Laurie A.; Schachtschneider, Kyle M.; Seixas, Fabiana K.; Singh, Kuldeep; Wells, Kevin D.; Walters, Eric M.; Prather, Randall S.; Counter, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The large size of the pig and its similarity in anatomy, physiology, metabolism, and genetics to humans make it an ideal platform to develop a genetically defined, large animal model of cancer. To this end, we created a transgenic “oncopig” line encoding Cre recombinase inducible porcine transgenes encoding KRASG12D and TP53R167H, which represent a commonly mutated oncogene and tumor suppressor in human cancers, respectively. Treatment of cells derived from these oncopigs with the adenovirus encoding Cre (AdCre) led to KRASG12D and TP53R167H expression, which rendered the cells transformed in culture and tumorigenic when engrafted into immunocompromised mice. Finally, injection of AdCre directly into these oncopigs led to the rapid and reproducible tumor development of mesenchymal origin. Transgenic animals receiving AdGFP (green fluorescent protein) did not have any tumor mass formation or altered histopathology. This oncopig line could thus serve as a genetically malleable model for potentially a wide spectrum of cancers, while controlling for temporal or spatial genesis, which should prove invaluable to studies previously hampered by the lack of a large animal model of cancer. PMID:26132737

  15. Experimental model of bone response to collagenized xenografts of porcine origin (OsteoBiol® mp3): a radiological and histomorphometric study.

    PubMed

    Calvo Guirado, Jose Luis; Ramírez Fernández, Maria Piedad; Negri, Bruno; Delgado Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Maté Sánchez de-Val, José Eduardo; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo

    2013-02-01

    Adequate alveolar ridges are fundamental to successful rehabilitation with implants. There are diverse techniques for reconstructing atrophied ridges, of which bone substitute grafts is one possibility. The aim of this study was to carry out radiological and histomorphometric evaluations of bone response to collagenized porcine bone xenografts over a 4-month period following their insertion in rabbits' tibiae. Twenty New Zealand rabbits were used. Twenty collagenized porcine bone xenografts (Osteobiol® mp3, Tecnoss Dental s.r.l., Torino, Italy), in granulated form of 600 to 1,000 µm, were inserted in the proximal metaphyseal area of the animals' tibiae and 20 control areas were created. Following implantation, the animals were sacrificed in four groups of five, after 1, 2, 3, and 4 months, respectively. Radiological and histomorphometric studies were made. After 4 months, radiological images revealed bone defects with a decrease in graft volume and the complete repair of the osseous defect. No healed or residual bone alterations attributable to the presence of the implants were observed. Histomorphometric analysis at 4 months found mean values for newly formed bone, residual graft material, and non-mineralized connective tissue of 25.4 ± 1.8%, 36.37 ± 3.0%, and 38.22 ± 2.5%, respectively. There were no statistical differences in the length of cortical formation with collagenized porcine xenograft (98.9 ± 1.1%) compared with the control samples (99.1 ± 0.7%) at the end of the study period. The biomaterial used proved to be biocompatible, bioabsorbable, and osteoconductive and as such, a possible bone substitute that did not interfere with the bone's normal reparative processes. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Laparoscopic anatrophic nephrolithotomy: feasibility study in a chronic porcine model.

    PubMed

    Kaouk, Jihad H; Gill, Inderbir S; Desai, Mihir M; Banks, Kevin L W; Raja, Shanker S; Skacel, Marek; Sung, Gyung Tak

    2003-02-01

    to complex stone surgery such as anatrophic nephrolithotomy with encouraging surgical and functional outcomes. To our knowledge this report represents the initial study of in situ creation of experimental staghorn calculi and laparoscopic anatrophic nephrolithotomy performed completely intracorporeally in a chronic porcine model.

  17. Localization and neurochemical features of the sympathetic trunk ganglia neurons projecting to the urethral muscle. An experimental study in a porcine animal model.

    PubMed

    Botti, Maddalena; Ragionieri, Luisa; Gazza, Ferdinando; Panu, Rino

    2014-07-01

    The striated perineal urethral muscle (UM) is involved in the voluntary control of the micturition requiring complex interactions between afferent and efferent (autonomic and somatic) pathways to store and periodically eliminate urine. Our aim was to define the site, cross sectional area and phenotype of sympathetic trunk ganglia (STG) neurons projecting to the porcine UM, combining retrograde neuronal tracer Fast Blue (FB) and double immunohistochemical labelling methods. The research was carried out on 3 male intact pigs, in which we counted a total number of 4992.67 ± 834.35 (mean ± S.E.M., n = 3) FB+ neurons distributed in the bilateral T12-S3 STG. These neurons were significantly larger in lumbar STG than in the sacral ones. Moreover we highlighted the presence of Dopamine β hydroxylase (DβH), Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT), neuronal Nitric Oxyde Sinthase (n-NOS), Calcitonine Gene Related Peptide (CGRP), Leu-Enkephaline (LENK), Neuropeptide Y (NPY), Substance P (SP), Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide (VIP) and Somatostatine (SOM) and their eventual co-existence with Tyrosine Hydroxylase(TH) in both lumbar and sacral FB+ neurons. In particular, lumbar and sacral STG neurons expressed similar percentages of immunoreactivity for TH, SP and CGRP, but showed significantly different levels of immunoreactivity for NPY, VIP, VAChT, LENK, nNOS, DβH and SOM. Taken together, these data indicate a different contribution of lumbar and sacral pathways in the sympathetic transmission to the boar UM.

  18. Acute neurologic disease in Porcine rubulavirus experimentally infected piglets.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Jenifer; Gómez-Núñez, Luis; Lara-Romero, Rocío; Diosdado, Fernando; Martínez-Lara, Atalo; Jasso, Miguel; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Rivera-Benítez, José Francisco

    2017-02-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical disease, humoral response and viral distribution of recent Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) isolates in experimentally infected pigs. Four, 6-piglet (5-days old) groups were employed (G1-84, G2-93, G3-147, and G4-T). Three viral strains were used for the experimental infection: the reference strain LPMV-1984 (Michoacán 1984) and two other strains isolated in 2013, one in Queretaro (Qro/93/2013) and the other in Michoacán (Mich/147/2013). Each strain was genetically characterized by amplification and sequencing of the gene encoding hemagglutinin-neuroamidase (HN). The inoculation was performed through the oronasal and ocular routes, at a dose of 1×10(6)TCID50/ml. Subsequently, the signs were evaluated daily and necropsies were performed on 3 different days post infection (dpi). We recorded all micro- and macroscopic lesions. Organs from the nervous, lymphatic, and respiratory system were analyzed by quantifying the viral RNA load and the presence of the infectious virus. The presence of the viral antigen in organs was evidenced through immunohistochemistry. Seroconversion was evaluated through the use of a hemagglutination inhibition test. In the characterization of gene HN, only three substitutions were identified in strain Mich/147/2013, two in strain LPMV/1984 (fourth passage) and one in strain Qro/93/2013, with respect to reference strain LPMV-84, these changes had not been identified as virulence factors in previously reported strains. Neurological alterations associated with the infection were found in all three experimental groups starting from 3dpi. Groups G1-84 and G3-147 presented the most exacerbated nervous signs. Group G2-93 only presented milder signs including slight motor incoordination, and an increased rectal temperature starting from day 5 post infection (PI). The main histopathological findings were the presence of a mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate (lymphocytic/monocytic) surrounding the

  19. Feasibility of endoscopic transumbilical thoracic sympathectomy in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jixue; Zhu, Lihuan; Yang, Shengsheng; Chen, Long; Li, Dazhou; Zheng, Heping; Chen, Weisheng

    2013-07-01

    Thoracoscopic sympathectomy is an effective treatment for palmar hyperhidrosis. Current methods are associated with risks of chronic neuropathic pain and a visible chest scar. We developed a novel surgical technique for the performance of sympathectomy by embryonic natural orifice transumbilical endoscopic surgery with a flexible endoscope in a porcine model. Transumbilical flexible endoscopic thoracic sympathectomies were performed in seven farm pigs (three acute and four 4-week survivals). Under general anaesthesia, animals were intubated and mechanically ventilated with a dual lumen endotracheal tube through tracheostomy. A newly developed long transabdominal trocar was placed through the umbilicus. After insertion of a gastroscope through this trocar, a small incision was created on both sides of the diaphragm by a needle-knife. Then the gastroscope was inserted into the thoracic cavity, and the sympathetic chain was identified at the desired thoracic level and ablated. Operation time, safety and feasibility were recorded in all animals. The transumbilical thoracic sympathectomies were successfully completed in all pigs with a mean operation time of 66.7 ± 9.4 min. Intraoperative bleeding occurred in one pig during the electrosurgical incision of diaphragm tissue, which was successfully controlled by hot biopsy forceps. No other acute intraoperative complications were observed in any cases. In the acute group, the length of the diaphragm incision ranged from 4 to 5 mm in three pigs. In the survival group, the animals recovered promptly from surgery. In three pigs, a small pneumothorax was found in the postoperative chest X-ray, but all of them were completely resolved with conservative treatment. Autopsy showed all bilateral T3 sympathetic chains were successfully ablated and no evidence of vital structure injury or diaphragmatic hernia. Transumbilical flexible endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is technically feasible, simple and safe in a porcine model. This

  20. Feasibility of endoscopic transumbilical thoracic sympathectomy in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jixue; Zhu, Lihuan; Yang, Shengsheng; Chen, Long; Li, Dazhou; Zheng, Heping; Chen, Weisheng

    2013-01-01

    , simple and safe in a porcine model. This technique can be used as a novel experimental platform for studies of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) for intrathoracic surgery. PMID:23579034

  1. Porous Gelatin Particles for Uterine Artery Embolization: An Experimental Study of Intra-Arterial Distribution, Uterine Necrosis, and Inflammation in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Miyuki; Osuga, Keigo; Shimazu, Kohki; Higashihara, Hiroki; Nakazawa, Tetsuro; Kato, Kenichi; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Nakamura, Hironobu; Morii, Eiichi; Aozasa, Katsuyuki

    2010-10-15

    PurposeWe evaluated the location of porous gelatin particles (GP; Gelpart; Nippon Kayaku/Astellas, Tokyo, Japan) within the arterial vasculature and their acute effects on uterine necrosis and inflammation after uterine artery embolization (UAE) in swine.Materials and MethodsAdult nonpregnant pigs (n = 6) were allocated to either 1- (n = 3) or 2-mm GP (n = 3). Superselective and bilateral embolization of the uterine arteries was performed. All animals were killed 1 week after UAE. Macroscopic and microscopic findings, including the level of arterial occlusion and their effect on uterine necrosis and inflammation, were analyzed.ResultsAll UAE procedures were completed without severe complications. The macroscopic necrosis was seen in two animals in the 2-mm group with an extent of <50%. The location of the occluded arteries did not differ significantly between groups. The median diameters of the occluded arteries were 449 {mu}m (95% confidence interval [CI] 417-538 {mu}m) in the 1-mm GP group and 484 {mu}m (95% CI 370-560 {mu}m) in the 2-mm GP group. As for microscopic necrosis, no statistically significant difference was observed. The qualitative inflammatory reaction was significantly greater in the 2-mm GP group than in the 1-mm group (p < 0.001).ConclusionsBoth 1- and 2-mm GP occluded the arteries relevant to the target diameter for UAE in porcine uterus, presumably due to the plastic deformity. Both sizes of GP were associated with limited areas of necrosis; however, evaluation of inflammatory reaction was preliminary. Further study with adequate evaluation of inflammatory reactions is suggested.

  2. What Kind of Capsule Endoscope Is Suitable for a Controllable Self-Propelling Capsule Endoscope? Experimental Study Using a Porcine Stomach Model for Clinical Application (with Videos).

    PubMed

    Ota, Kazuhiro; Nouda, Sadaharu; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Iguchi, Munetaka; Kojima, Yuichi; Kuramoto, Takanori; Inoue, Takuya; Shindo, Yasunori; Uesugi, Kenshiro; Fujito, Yoshiaki; Nishihara, Hironori; Ohtsuka, Naotake; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    We have been developing the Self-Propelling Capsule Endoscope (SPCE) that allows for controllability from outside of the body and real-time observation. What kind of capsule endoscope (CE) is suitable for a controllable SPCE is unclear and a very critical point for clinical application. We compared observing ability of three kinds of SPCEs with different viewing angles and frame rates. Eleven buttons were sewed in an excised porcine stomach. Four examiners controlled the SPCE using PillCamSB2, -ESO2, and -COLON2 (Given Imaging Ltd., Israel), for 10 minutes each with the aim of detecting as many buttons and examining them as closely as possible. The ability to find lesions was assessed based on the number of detected buttons. The SPCE-performance score (SPS) was used to evaluate the ability to examine the lesions in detail. The SPCE-ESO2, -COLON2, and -SB2 detected 11 [interquartile range (IQR): 0], 10.5 (IQR, 0.5), and 8 (IQR, 1.0) buttons, respectively. The SPCE-ESO2 and -COLON2 had a significantly better ability to detect lesions than the -SB2 (p < 0.05). The SPCE-ESO2, -COLON2, and -SB2 had significantly different SPS values of 22 (IQR, 0), 16.5 (IQR, 1.5), and 14 (IQR, 1.0), respectively (p < 0.05 for all comparisons; SPCE-SB2 vs. -ESO2, -SB2 vs. -COLON2, and -ESO2 vs. -COLON2). PillCamESO2 is most suitable in different three CEs for SPCE for examining lesions in detail of the stomach.

  3. What Kind of Capsule Endoscope Is Suitable for a Controllable Self-Propelling Capsule Endoscope? Experimental Study Using a Porcine Stomach Model for Clinical Application (with Videos)

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Kazuhiro; Nouda, Sadaharu; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Iguchi, Munetaka; Kojima, Yuichi; Kuramoto, Takanori; Inoue, Takuya; Shindo, Yasunori; Uesugi, Kenshiro; Fujito, Yoshiaki; Nishihara, Hironori; Ohtsuka, Naotake; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Background We have been developing the Self-Propelling Capsule Endoscope (SPCE) that allows for controllability from outside of the body and real-time observation. What kind of capsule endoscope (CE) is suitable for a controllable SPCE is unclear and a very critical point for clinical application. We compared observing ability of three kinds of SPCEs with different viewing angles and frame rates. Methods Eleven buttons were sewed in an excised porcine stomach. Four examiners controlled the SPCE using PillCamSB2, -ESO2, and -COLON2 (Given Imaging Ltd., Israel), for 10 minutes each with the aim of detecting as many buttons and examining them as closely as possible. The ability to find lesions was assessed based on the number of detected buttons. The SPCE-performance score (SPS) was used to evaluate the ability to examine the lesions in detail. Results The SPCE-ESO2, -COLON2, and -SB2 detected 11 [interquartile range (IQR): 0], 10.5 (IQR, 0.5), and 8 (IQR, 1.0) buttons, respectively. The SPCE-ESO2 and -COLON2 had a significantly better ability to detect lesions than the -SB2 (p < 0.05). The SPCE-ESO2, -COLON2, and -SB2 had significantly different SPS values of 22 (IQR, 0), 16.5 (IQR, 1.5), and 14 (IQR, 1.0), respectively (p < 0.05 for all comparisons; SPCE-SB2 vs. -ESO2, -SB2 vs. -COLON2, and -ESO2 vs. -COLON2). Conclusions PillCamESO2 is most suitable in different three CEs for SPCE for examining lesions in detail of the stomach. PMID:26447694

  4. Modeling the thermal response of porcine cartilage to laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Valdes, Sergio H.; Aguilar, Guillermo; Basu, Reshmi; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Wong, Brian J.

    2002-06-01

    Cartilage laser thermoforming, also known as laser reshaping, is a new surgical procedure that allows in-situ treatment of deformities in the head and neck with less morbidity than traditional approaches. During laser irradiation, cartilage becomes sufficiently subtle or deformable for stretching and shaping into new stable configurations. This study describes the experimental and theoretical characterization of the thermal response of porcine cartilage to laser irradiation (Nd:YAG). The surface temperature history of cartilage specimens was monitored during heating and thermal relaxation; using laser exposure times ranging between 1 and 15 s and laser powers of 1 to 10 W. The experimental results were then used to validate a finite element model, which accounts for heat diffusion, light propagation in tissue, and heat loss due to water evaporation. The simultaneous solution of the energy and mass diffusion equations resulted in predictions of temperature distribution in cartilage that were in good agreement with experiments. The model simulations will provide insights to the relationship between the laser treatment parameters (exposure time, laser beam diameter, and power) and the onset of new molecular arrangements and cell thermal injury in the material, thus conceiving basic guidelines of laser thermoforming.

  5. Virulence and immunogenicity of genetically defined human and porcine isolates of M. avium subsp. hominissuis in an experimental mouse infection.

    PubMed

    Bruffaerts, Nicolas; Vluggen, Christelle; Roupie, Virginie; Duytschaever, Lucille; Van den Poel, Christophe; Denoël, Joseph; Wattiez, Ruddy; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Fretin, David; Rigouts, Leen; Chapeira, Ophélie; Mathys, Vanessa; Saegerman, Claude; Huygen, Kris

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (Mah) represents a health concern for humans and to a lesser extent for pigs, but its zoonotic potential remains elusive. Using multispacer sequence typing (MST) we previously identified 49 different genotypes of Mah among Belgian clinical and porcine isolates, with 5 MSTs shared by both hosts. Using experimental intranasal infection of BALB/c mice, we compared the virulence and immunogenicity of porcine and clinical human isolates with shared genotype or with a genotype only found in humans or pigs. Bacterial replication was monitored for 20 weeks in lungs, spleen and liver and mycobacteria specific spleen cell IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 production as well as serum antibody responses were analyzed. Isolates varied in virulence, with human and porcine isolates sharing MST22 genotype showing a thousand fold higher bacterial replication in lungs and more dissemination to spleen and liver than the human and porcine MST91 isolates. Virulent MST22 type was also associated with progressive suppression of IFN-γ and IL-17 responses, and increased IL-10 production. Whole genome sequencing of the two virulent isolates with MST22 genotype and two avirulent isolates of genotype MST91 and comparison with two well-studied M. avium subsp. hominissuis reference strains i.e. Mah 104 and Mah TH135, identified in the two MST22 isolates nine specific virulence factors of the mammalian cell entry family, that were identical with Mah 104 strain. Despite the obvious limitations of the mouse model, a striking link of virulence and identity at the genome level of porcine and human isolates with the same multisequence type, for which no correlation of place of residence (humans) or farm of origin (pigs) was observed, seems to point to the existence in the environment of certain genotypes of Mah which may be more infectious both for humans and pigs than other genotypes.

  6. Virulence and immunogenicity of genetically defined human and porcine isolates of M. avium subsp. hominissuis in an experimental mouse infection

    PubMed Central

    Vluggen, Christelle; Roupie, Virginie; Duytschaever, Lucille; Van den Poel, Christophe; Denoël, Joseph; Wattiez, Ruddy; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Fretin, David; Rigouts, Leen; Chapeira, Ophélie; Mathys, Vanessa; Saegerman, Claude; Huygen, Kris

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (Mah) represents a health concern for humans and to a lesser extent for pigs, but its zoonotic potential remains elusive. Using multispacer sequence typing (MST) we previously identified 49 different genotypes of Mah among Belgian clinical and porcine isolates, with 5 MSTs shared by both hosts. Using experimental intranasal infection of BALB/c mice, we compared the virulence and immunogenicity of porcine and clinical human isolates with shared genotype or with a genotype only found in humans or pigs. Bacterial replication was monitored for 20 weeks in lungs, spleen and liver and mycobacteria specific spleen cell IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 production as well as serum antibody responses were analyzed. Isolates varied in virulence, with human and porcine isolates sharing MST22 genotype showing a thousand fold higher bacterial replication in lungs and more dissemination to spleen and liver than the human and porcine MST91 isolates. Virulent MST22 type was also associated with progressive suppression of IFN-γ and IL-17 responses, and increased IL-10 production. Whole genome sequencing of the two virulent isolates with MST22 genotype and two avirulent isolates of genotype MST91 and comparison with two well-studied M. avium subsp. hominissuis reference strains i.e. Mah 104 and Mah TH135, identified in the two MST22 isolates nine specific virulence factors of the mammalian cell entry family, that were identical with Mah 104 strain. Despite the obvious limitations of the mouse model, a striking link of virulence and identity at the genome level of porcine and human isolates with the same multisequence type, for which no correlation of place of residence (humans) or farm of origin (pigs) was observed, seems to point to the existence in the environment of certain genotypes of Mah which may be more infectious both for humans and pigs than other genotypes. PMID:28182785

  7. Salivary Stone Pneumatic Lithotripsy in a Live Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Walvekar, Rohan R; Hoffman, Henry T; Kolenda, Jack; Hernandez, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic fragmentation and removal of artificial calculi in a live porcine model employing intracorporeal pneumatic lithotripsy. In this experimental study, 7 submandibular ducts were accessed and artificial calculi placed. A salivary pneumatic lithotripter probe was inserted through an interventional sialendoscope to fragment the calculi. A salivary duct catheter was then used to flush stone fragments, followed by endoscopy to assess complete fragmentation and ductal trauma. Ultimately, 7 artificial stones (3-10 mm, 4F/5F) were successfully fragmented without causing significant endoluminal trauma. Number of pulses for adequate stone fragmentation averaged 20 (range, 5-31). In all cases, stone fragments were successfully flushed out with the salivary duct catheter. Postprocedure endoscopy confirmed ductal integrity in all 7 ducts. While more studies are needed, this preliminary animal model demonstrates efficacy of endoscopic pneumatic lithotripsy for the management of sialolithiasis. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  8. Analysis of the temporal regression of the QRS widening induced by bupivacaine after Intralipid administration. Study in an experimental porcine model.

    PubMed

    Zaballos, M; Sevilla, R; González, J; Callejo, D; de Diego, C; Almendral, J; Quintela, O; Anadón, M J

    2016-01-01

    The principal mechanism of cardiac toxicity of bupivacaine relates to the blockade of myocardial sodium channels, which leads to an increase in the QRS duration. Recently, experimental studies suggest that lipid emulsion is effective in reversing bupivacaine cardiac toxicity. We aimed to evaluate the temporal evolution of the QRS widening induced by bupivacaine with the administration of Intralipid. Twelve pigs were anesthetized with intravenous sodium thiopental 5mg kg(-1) and sevoflurane 1 MAC (2.6%). Femoral artery and vein were canalized for invasive monitoring, analysis of blood gases and determination of bupivacaine levels. After instrumentation and monitoring, a bupivacaine bolus of 4-6 mg kg(-1) was administered in order to induce a 150% increase in QRS duration (defined as the toxic point). The pigs were randomized into two groups of six individuals. Intralipid group (IL) received 1.5 mL kg(-1)of IL over one minute, followed by an infusion of 0.25 mL kg min(-1). Control group (C) received the same volume of a saline solution. The electrocardiographic parameters were recorded, and blood samples were taken after bupivacaine and 1, 5, 10 and 30 minutes after Intralipid/saline administration. Bupivacaine (4.33±0.81 mg/kg in IL group and 4.66±1.15 mg/kg in C group) induced similar electrocardiographic changes in both groups; mean maximal percent increase in QRS interval was 184±62% in IL group, and 230±56% in control group (NS). Lipid administration reversed the QRS widening previously impaired by bupivacaine. After ten minutes of the administration of IL, the mean QRS interval decreased to 132±56% vs. 15±76% relative to the maximum widening induced by bupivacaine, in IL and C group, respectively. Intralipid reversed the lengthening of QRS interval induced by the injection of bupivacaine. Time to normalization of electrocardiographic parameters can last more than 10 minutes. While the phenomena of cardiac toxicity persist, resuscitation measures and

  9. Porcine model for free-flap breast reconstruction training.

    PubMed

    Bodin, Frédéric; Diana, Michele; Koutsomanis, Alexandre; Robert, Emeric; Marescaux, Jacques; Bruant-Rodier, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    Free-flap breast reconstruction is a challenging surgical procedure with a steep learning curve. A reproducible large animal model could be relevant for free-flap harvesting and microsurgical anastomosis training. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a porcine model for free-flap breast reconstruction. Three female pigs were placed under general anesthesia in order to study feasibility and estimate relevance for training. The deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap, the transverse musculocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flap, and the superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP) flap were harvested and anastomosed to the internal thoracic vessels. Differences were noted between pig and human anatomy, and the surgical procedure was adapted to build training models. Under a more prominent anterior thoracic wall, the internal thoracic vessels were slightly deeper and larger than in human anatomy. The DIEP flap was never feasible in the porcine model. However, the superior epigastric artery perforator (SEAP) flap showed anatomical similarity with the human DIEP flap, and it proved to be suitable for an inverted training model. The porcine TMG flap harvesting was close to the human one, reproducing specific dissection and anastomotic difficulties. The SGAP flap was not a muscular perforator flap in pigs but a septocutaneous flap. Because of the thinness of the hypodermal fat, porcine flaps were not considered adequate training models for breast-mound shaping. Despite any anatomical variations, the pig has proven to be a suitable training model for free-flap harvesting and transfer in the field of breast reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental Evidence of Mechanical Isotropy in Porcine Lung Parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Benjamin; Patnaik, Sourav; Rougeau-Browning, Mary; Brazile, Bryn; Liao, Jun; Prabhu, Raj; Williams, Lakiesha N.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary injuries are a major source of morbidity and mortality associated with trauma. Trauma includes injuries associated with accidents and falls as well as blast injuries caused by explosives. The prevalence and mortality of these injuries has made research of pulmonary injury a major priority. Lungs have a complex structure, with multiple types of tissues necessary to allow successful respiration. The soft, porous parenchyma is the component of the lung which contains the alveoli responsible for gas exchange. Parenchyma is also the portion which is most susceptible to traumatic injury. Finite element simulations are an important tool for studying traumatic injury to the human body. These simulations rely on material properties to accurately recreate real world mechanical behaviors. Previous studies have explored the mechanical properties of lung tissues, specifically parenchyma. These studies have assumed material isotropy but, to our knowledge, no study has thoroughly tested and quantified this assumption. This study presents a novel methodology for assessing isotropy in a tissue, and applies these methods to porcine lung parenchyma. Briefly, lung parenchyma samples were dissected so as to be aligned with one of the three anatomical planes, sagittal, frontal, and transverse, and then subjected to compressive mechanical testing. Stress-strain curves from these tests were statistically compared by a novel method for differences in stresses and strains at percentages of the curve. Histological samples aligned with the anatomical planes were also examined by qualitative and quantitative methods to determine any differences in the microstructural morphology. Our study showed significant evidence to support the hypothesis that lung parenchyma behaves isotropically.

  11. Effective protection induced by three different versions of the porcine S3Pvac anticysticercosis vaccine against rabbit experimental Taenia pisiformis cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Miguel Angel; de Aluja, Aline S; Sciutto, Edda; Hernández, Marisela; Bobes, Raúl J; Rosas, Gabriela; Hernández, Beatriz; Fragoso, Gladis; Hallal-Calleros, Claudia; Aguilar, Liliana; Flores-Peréz, Iván

    2012-04-05

    In an effort to develop an effective and affordable oral vaccine against porcine Taenia solium cysticercosis, the S3Pvac anti-cysticercosis vaccine was expressed in papaya calli. Taenia pisiformis experimental rabbit cysticercosis was used as a model to compare the efficacy of the oral vaccine vs. the injectable S3Pvac-synthetic and S3Pvac-phage versions. Oral S3Pvac-papaya significantly reduced the expected number of hepatic lesions and peritoneal cysticerci to a similar extent than the injectable vaccines. This study reports for the first time an effective oral vaccine against T. pisiformis cysticercosis, possibly useful against porcine T. solium cysticercosis.

  12. In vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Regelsberger, Jan; Eicker, Sven; Siasios, Ioannis; Hänggi, Daniel; Kirsch, Matthias; Horn, Peter; Winkler, Peter; Signoretti, Stefano; Fountas, Kostas; Dufour, Henry; Barcia, Juan A; Sakowitz, Oliver; Westermaier, Thomas; Sabel, Michael; Heese, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Supplemental education is desirable for neurosurgical training, and the use of human cadaver specimen and virtual reality models is routine. An in vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery was introduced in 2005, and our recent experience with this unique model is outlined here. For the first time, porcine anatomy is illustrated with particular respect to neurosurgical procedures. The pros and cons of this model are described. The aim of the course was to set up a laboratory scenery imitating an almost realistic operating room in which anatomy of the brain and neurosurgical techniques in a mentored environment free from time constraints could be trained. Learning objectives of the course were to learn about the microsurgical techniques in cranial neurosurgery and the management of complications. Participants were asked to evaluate the quality and utility of the programme via standardized questionnaires by a grading scale from A (best) to E (worst). In total, 154 residents have been trained on the porcine model to date. None of the participants regarded his own residency programme as structured. The bleeding and complication management (97%), the realistic laboratory set-up (89%) and the working environment (94%) were favoured by the vast majority of trainees and confirmed our previous findings. After finishing the course, the participants graded that their skills in bone drilling, dissecting the brain and preserving cerebral vessels under microscopic magnification had improved to level A and B. In vivo hands-on courses, fully equipped with microsurgical instruments, offer an outstanding training opportunity in which bleeding management on a pulsating, vital brain represents a unique training approach. Our results have shown that education programmes still lack practical training facilities in which in vivo models may act as a complementary approach in surgical training.

  13. Acoustic hemostasis of porcine superficial femoral artery: Simulation and in-vivo experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaozheng; Mitchell, Stuart; Miller, Matthew; Barnes, Stephen; Hopple, Jerry; Kook, John; Moreau-Gobard, Romain; Hsu, Stephen; Ahiekpor-Dravi, Alexis; Crum, Lawrence A.; Eaton, John; Wong, Keith; Sekins, K. Michael

    2012-10-01

    In-vivo focused ultrasound studies were computationally simulated and conducted experimentally with the aim of occluding porcine superficial femoral arteries (SFA) via thermal coagulation. A multi-array HIFU applicator was used which electronically scanned multiple beam foci around the target point. The spatio-temporally averaged acoustic and temperature fields were simulated in a fluid dynamics and acousto-thermal finite element model with representative tissue fields, including muscle, vessel and blood. Simulations showed that with an acoustic power of 200W and a dose time of 60s, perivascular tissue reached 91°C; and yet blood reached a maximum 59°C, below the coagulation objective for this dose regime (75°C). Per simulations, acoustic-streaming induced velocity in blood reached 6.1cm/s. In in-vivo experiments, several arteries were treated. As simulated, thermal lesions were observed in muscle surrounding SFA in all cases. In dosing limited to 30 to 60 seconds, it required 257W to provide occlusion (one complete and one partial occlusion). Angiography and histology showed evidence of thrombogenesis and collagen shrinkage-based vessel constriction at these doses.

  14. Attempted Experimental Reproduction of Porcine Periweaning-Failure-to-Thrive Syndrome Using Tissue Homogenates

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanyun; Harding, John C. S.

    2014-01-01

    Porcine periweaning failure-to-thrive syndrome (PFTS) is characterized by anorexia and progressive debilitation of newly weaned pigs, of which some also demonstrate repetitive oral behaviour. Although no relevant porcine pathogens have been shown to be causally associated, inoculation of susceptible pigs using tissue homogenates is needed to rule out infectious etiologies. Eight snatched-farrowed porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs were inoculated with tissue homogenates made from PFTS-affected pigs orally, or combined orally, intraperitoneally (IP) and intramuscularly (IM) at day (D) 14 of age (INOC). On D21, IP and IM inoculation were repeated. Four sham-inoculated pigs served as control (CTRL). Three INOC pigs developed mixed bacterial septicemia between the first and second inoculation. All other pigs survived until termination on D49. Average daily gain (ADG) and the frequencies of diarrhea did not differ between INOC and CTRL pigs D14 and D29. Additionally, the progressive debilitation characteristic of PFTS was not observed in any pig, and repetitive oral behaviour was observed in both groups. In conclusion, PFTS was not experimentally reproduced by the current experimental approach providing evidence that PFTS may not have an infectious etiology. PMID:24594806

  15. Attempted experimental reproduction of porcine periweaning-failure-to-thrive syndrome using tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyun; Harding, John C S

    2014-01-01

    Porcine periweaning failure-to-thrive syndrome (PFTS) is characterized by anorexia and progressive debilitation of newly weaned pigs, of which some also demonstrate repetitive oral behaviour. Although no relevant porcine pathogens have been shown to be causally associated, inoculation of susceptible pigs using tissue homogenates is needed to rule out infectious etiologies. Eight snatched-farrowed porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs were inoculated with tissue homogenates made from PFTS-affected pigs orally, or combined orally, intraperitoneally (i.p.) and intramuscularly (i.m.) at day (D) 14 of age (INOC). On D21, i.p. and i.m. inoculation were repeated. Four sham-inoculated pigs served as control (CTRL). Three INOC pigs developed mixed bacterial septicemia between the first and second inoculation. All other pigs survived until termination on D49. Average daily gain (ADG) and the frequencies of diarrhea did not differ between INOC and CTRL pigs D14 and D29. Additionally, the progressive debilitation characteristic of PFTS was not observed in any pig, and repetitive oral behaviour was observed in both groups. In conclusion, PFTS was not experimentally reproduced by the current experimental approach providing evidence that PFTS may not have an infectious etiology.

  16. Development of a Consistent and Reproducible Porcine Scald Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Margit; Kimble, Roy; Cuttle, Leila

    2016-01-01

    There are very few porcine burn models that replicate scald injuries similar to those encountered by children. We have developed a robust porcine burn model capable of creating reproducible scald burns for a wide range of burn conditions. The study was conducted with juvenile Large White pigs, creating replicates of burn combinations; 50°C for 1, 2, 5 and 10 minutes and 60°C, 70°C, 80°C and 90°C for 5 seconds. Visual wound examination, biopsies and Laser Doppler Imaging were performed at 1, 24 hours and at 3 and 7 days post-burn. A consistent water temperature was maintained within the scald device for long durations (49.8 ± 0.1°C when set at 50°C). The macroscopic and histologic appearance was consistent between replicates of burn conditions. For 50°C water, 10 minute duration burns showed significantly deeper tissue injury than all shorter durations at 24 hours post-burn (p ≤ 0.0001), with damage seen to increase until day 3 post-burn. For 5 second duration burns, by day 7 post-burn the 80°C and 90°C scalds had damage detected significantly deeper in the tissue than the 70°C scalds (p ≤ 0.001). A reliable and safe model of porcine scald burn injury has been successfully developed. The novel apparatus with continually refreshed water improves consistency of scald creation for long exposure times. This model allows the pathophysiology of scald burn wound creation and progression to be examined. PMID:27612153

  17. Creating porcine biomedical models through recombineering.

    PubMed

    Rogatcheva, Margarita M; Rund, Laurie A; Swanson, Kelly S; Marron, Brandy M; Beever, Jonathan E; Counter, Christopher M; Schook, Lawrence B

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in genomics provide genetic information from humans and other mammals (mouse, rat, dog and primates) traditionally used as models as well as new candidates (pigs and cattle). In addition, linked enabling technologies, such as transgenesis and animal cloning, provide innovative ways to design and perform experiments to dissect complex biological systems. Exploitation of genomic information overcomes the traditional need to choose naturally occurring models. Thus, investigators can utilize emerging genomic knowledge and tools to create relevant animal models. This approach is referred to as reverse genetics. In contrast to 'forward genetics', in which gene(s) responsible for a particular phenotype are identified by positional cloning (phenotype to genotype), the 'reverse genetics' approach determines the function of a gene and predicts the phenotype of a cell, tissue, or organism (genotype to phenotype). The convergence of classical and reverse genetics, along with genomics, provides a working definition of a 'genetic model' organism (3). The recent construction of phenotypic maps defining quantitative trait loci (QTL) in various domesticated species provides insights into how allelic variations contribute to phenotypic diversity. Targeted chromosomal regions are characterized by the construction of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contigs to isolate and characterize genes contributing towards phenotypic variation. Recombineering provides a powerful methodology to harvest genetic information responsible for phenotype. Linking recombineering with gene-targeted homologous recombination, coupled with nuclear transfer (NT) technology can provide 'clones' of genetically modified animals.

  18. Evaluation of a Model-Based Hemodynamic Monitoring Method in a Porcine Study of Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Revie, James A.; Stevenson, David; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Pretty, Chris J.; Lambermont, Bernard C.; Ghuysen, Alexandre; Kolh, Philippe; Shaw, Geoffrey M.; Desaive, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The accuracy and clinical applicability of an improved model-based system for tracking hemodynamic changes is assessed in an animal study on septic shock. Methods. This study used cardiovascular measurements recorded during a porcine trial studying the efficacy of large-pore hemofiltration for treating septic shock. Four Pietrain pigs were instrumented and induced with septic shock. A subset of the measured data, representing clinically available measurements, was used to identify subject-specific cardiovascular models. These models were then validated against the remaining measurements. Results. The system accurately matched independent measures of left and right ventricle end diastolic volumes and maximum left and right ventricular pressures to percentage errors less than 20% (except for the 95th percentile error in maximum right ventricular pressure) and all R 2 > 0.76. An average decrease of 42% in systemic resistance, a main cardiovascular consequence of septic shock, was observed 120 minutes after the infusion of the endotoxin, consistent with experimentally measured trends. Moreover, modelled temporal trends in right ventricular end systolic elastance and afterload tracked changes in corresponding experimentally derived metrics. Conclusions. These results demonstrate that this model-based method can monitor disease-dependent changes in preload, afterload, and contractility in porcine study of septic shock. PMID:23585774

  19. Efficacy of various anticoccidials against experimental porcine neonatal isosporosis.

    PubMed

    Mundt, H C; Mundt-Wüstenberg, S; Daugschies, A; Joachim, A

    2007-01-01

    The efficacies of 20 mg/kg body weight (BW) of toltrazuril (Toltra) 2 days post-infection (dpi), 2 mg/kg BW of diclazuril 2 and 3 dpi and 200 mg/kg BW of sulphadimidine 2, 3 and 4 dpi were compared in a model for piglet isosporosis. Weight gain (first 4 weeks of life) and diarrhoea and oocyst excretion from 4 to 11 dpi were evaluated (10-12 piglets/group). Additionally, animals were killed and examined for pathohistological changes of the small intestines 5, 7, 11 and 14 dpi (n = 3 per group and time point) and lengths of the intestinal villi. Diarrhoea (semi-liquid or liquid faeces) was seen from 5 dpi in all groups except Toltra, and the differences in prevalence and intensity of diarrhoea were statistically significant (p < 0.05) between Toltra and the other groups, which were similar (trial 1). Oocyst excretion was greatly reduced in the Toltra group, which was also statistically significant for the mean and median excretion rates and the percentage of excreting piglets between Toltra and the other groups (p < 0.05). Weight gain was highest in Toltra (p < 0.05). Histopathology revealed mostly villous necrosis and atrophy in the small intestines except the duodenum, which peaked at 7 dpi, in all groups except Toltra. Between 5 and 11 dpi, the Toltra group had significantly longer villi than the other groups. Reduced weight gain and diarrhoea caused by Isospora suis was controlled by a single application of Toltra in the pre-patent period, while neither diclazuril nor sulphadimidine improved the clinical picture of isosporosis.

  20. Anatomy and bronchoscopy of the porcine lung. A model for translational respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Judge, Eoin P; Hughes, J M Lynne; Egan, Jim J; Maguire, Michael; Molloy, Emer L; O'Dea, Shirley

    2014-09-01

    The porcine model has contributed significantly to biomedical research over many decades. The similar size and anatomy of pig and human organs make this model particularly beneficial for translational research in areas such as medical device development, therapeutics and xenotransplantation. In recent years, a major limitation with the porcine model was overcome with the successful generation of gene-targeted pigs and the publication of the pig genome. As a result, the role of this model is likely to become even more important. For the respiratory medicine field, the similarities between pig and human lungs give the porcine model particular potential for advancing translational medicine. An increasing number of lung conditions are being studied and modeled in the pig. Genetically modified porcine models of cystic fibrosis have been generated that, unlike mouse models, develop lung disease similar to human cystic fibrosis. However, the scientific literature relating specifically to porcine lung anatomy and airway histology is limited and is largely restricted to veterinary literature and textbooks. Furthermore, methods for in vivo lung procedures in the pig are rarely described. The aims of this review are to collate the disparate literature on porcine lung anatomy, histology, and microbiology; to provide a comparison with the human lung; and to describe appropriate bronchoscopy procedures for the pig lungs to aid clinical researchers working in the area of translational respiratory medicine using the porcine model.

  1. [Comparative estimation of antilithogenic activity of porcine kidney derived biomedical substance and sodium citrate in experimental urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Pavlyashik, G V; Zharikov, A Yu; Kiselev, V I

    2017-06-01

    to compare the anti-lithogenic activity of biomedical substance derived from freeze-dried porcine kidney and sodium citrate. The experiments were conducted on Wistar rats divided into three groups of 15 animals each: control group (disease control), comparison group (sodium citrate treatment) and experimental group (treatment with biomedical substance from porcine kidneys). Experimental urolithiasis was modeled using the ethylene glycol model. On every 7th day of the 6 week experiment testing was done calcium and oxalate urine concentration and the activity of marker enzymes of renal epithelial damage: lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), -glutamyl transferase (GGT), and N-acetyl--D-glucosaminidase (NAG). At the end of the experiment, a part of the rats were decapitated and the renal tissue was tested for the oxidant status indicators of (renal thiobarbiturate reactive product content, TBRP, and total prooxidant activity, TPA) and antioxidant enzyme activities: glutathione peroxidase (GPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). To measure the number and size of calcium deposits formed in the renal papillary area, the Koss histochemical method was used. The experimental findings showed developing oxalate nephrolithiasis in the control group, as indicated by urinary supersaturation of oxalate ion, increased activity of marker enzymes, oxidative stress and the formation of numerous calcium deposits in the renal papillary area. In the comparison group, the 3-week use of sodium citrate contributed to a significant decrease in nephrolithiasis: a 3 to 4-fold decrease in the activity of marker enzymes in the urine, a 3.8-fold increase in the concentration of TBRP, normalization of GPO activity; the number and size of urinary calcium deposits decreased by 3.4 and 1.9 times, respectively. In the experimental group, using biomedical substance led to an even greater therapeutic effect. LDH activity and concentration of TPRP showed 1.9 times and by 26.2% greater decrease than

  2. Myocardial Scar Imaging by Standard Single-Energy and Dual-Energy Late Enhancement Computed Tomography: Comparison to Pathology and Electroanatomical Map in an Experimental Chronic Infarct Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Quynh A.; Thai, Wai-ee; Wai, Bryan; Cordaro, Kevin; Cheng, Teresa; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Xiong, Guanglei; Cheung, Jim W.; Altman, Robert; Min, James K.; Singh, Jagmeet P.; Barrett, Conor D.; Danik, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Background Myocardial scar is a substrate for ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death. Late enhancement computed tomography (CT) imaging can detect scar, but it remains unclear whether newer late enhancement dual-energy (LE-DECT) acquisition has benefit over standard single-energy late enhancement (LE-CT). Objective We aim to compare late enhancement CT using newer LE-DECT acquisition and single-energy LE-CT acquisitions to pathology and electroanatomical map (EAM) in an experimental chronic myocardial infarction (MI) porcine study. Methods In 8 chronic MI pigs (59±5 kg), we performed dual-source CT, EAM, and pathology. For CT imaging, we performed 3 acquisitions at 10 minutes post-contrast: LE-CT 80 kV, LE-CT 100 kV, and LE-DECT with two post-processing software settings. Results Of the sequences, LE-CT 100 kV provided the best contrast-to-noise ratio (all p≤0.03) and correlation to pathology for scar (ρ=0.88). While LE-DECT overestimated scar (both p=0.02), LE-CT images did not (both p=0.08). On a segment basis (n=136), all CT sequences had high specificity (87–93%) and modest sensitivity (50–67%), with LE-CT 100 kV having the highest specificity of 93% for scar detection compared to pathology and agreement with EAM (κ 0.69). Conclusions Standard single-energy LE-CT, particularly 100kV, matched better to pathology and EAM than dual-energy LE-DECT for scar detection. Larger human trials as well as more technical-based studies that optimize varying different energies with newer hardware and software are warranted. PMID:25977115

  3. Development and evaluation of a retroperitoneal dialysis porcine model.

    PubMed

    Okhunov, Zhamshid; Yoon, Renai; Perez Lanzac, Alberto; Sgroi, Michael; Lau, Wei Ling; Del Junco, Michael; Ordon, Michael; Drysch, Austin; Hwang, Christina; Vernez, Simone L; Fujitani, Roy; Kabutey, Nii-Kabu; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Landman, Jaime

    2016-08-01

    We attempted to create a surgical model to evaluate the retroperitoneal space for the ability to transfer solutes through the retroperitoneal membrane. Our dual objectives were to develop a technique to assess the feasibility of retroperitoneal dialysis (RPD) in a porcine model. We incorporated two 35-kg Yorkshire pigs for this pilot study. In the first animal, we clamped renal vessels laparoscopically. In the second animal, we embolized renal arteries. In both animals, we dilated the retroperitoneal space bilaterally and deployed dialysis catheters. We measured serum creatinine (Cr), urea, and electrolytes at baseline 6 hours before the dialysis and every 4 hours after. We successfully created retroperitoneal spaces bilaterally and deployed dialysis catheters in both animals. In the first animal, dialysate and plasma Cr ratio (D/P) on the left and right side were 0.43 and 0.3, respectively. Cr clearance by 40 minutes of dialysis treatment was 6.3 mL/min. The ratio of dialysate glucose at 4 hours dwell time to dialysate glucose at 0 dwell time (D/D0) for left/rights sides were 0.02 and 0.02, respectively. kt/Vurea was 0.43. In the second animal, D/P Cr for left/right sides were 0.34 and 0.33, respectively. kt/Vurea was 0.17. We euthanized the pigs due to fluid collection in the peritoneal space and rapid increase of serum Cr, urea, and electrolytes. We demonstrated the feasibility of creation of a functionally anephric porcine model with successful development of retroperitoneal spaces using balloon inflation. Notwithstanding minimal clearance and limited diffusion capacity in this experiment, additional studies are needed to examine potential use of retroperitoneal space for peritoneal dialysis.

  4. Emerging Technologies to Create Inducible and Genetically Defined Porcine Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Schook, Lawrence B.; Rund, Laurie; Begnini, Karine R.; Remião, Mariana H.; Seixas, Fabiana K.; Collares, Tiago

    2016-01-01

    There is an emerging need for new animal models that address unmet translational cancer research requirements. Transgenic porcine models provide an exceptional opportunity due to their genetic, anatomic, and physiological similarities with humans. Due to recent advances in the sequencing of domestic animal genomes and the development of new organism cloning technologies, it is now very feasible to utilize pigs as a malleable species, with similar anatomic and physiological features with humans, in which to develop cancer models. In this review, we discuss genetic modification technologies successfully used to produce porcine biomedical models, in particular the Cre-loxP System as well as major advances and perspectives the CRISPR/Cas9 System. Recent advancements in porcine tumor modeling and genome editing will bring porcine models to the forefront of translational cancer research. PMID:26973698

  5. Characterization of porcine skin as a model for human skin studies using infrared spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Kong, Rong; Bhargava, Rohit

    2011-06-07

    Porcine skin is often considered a substitute for human skin based on morphological and functional data, for example, for transdermal drug diffusion studies. A chemical, structural and temporal characterization of porcine skin in comparison to human skin is not available but will likely improve our understanding of this porcine skin model. Here, we employ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging to holistically measure chemical species as well as spatial structure as a function of time to characterize porcine skin as a model for human skin. Porcine skin was found to resemble human skin spectroscopically and differences are elucidated. Cryo-prepared fresh porcine skin samples for spectroscopic imaging were found to be stable over time and small variations are observed. Hence, we extended characterization to the use of this model for dynamic processes. In particular, the capacity and stability of this model in transdermal diffusion is examined. The results indicate that porcine skin is likely to be an attractive tool for studying diffusion dynamics of materials in human skin.

  6. [The isolated perfused porcine kidney model for investigations concerning surgical therapy procedures].

    PubMed

    Peters, Kristina; Michel, Maurice Stephan; Matis, Ulrike; Häcker, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Experiments to develop innovative surgical therapy procedures are conventionally conducted on animals, as crucial aspects like tissue removal and bleeding disposition cannot be investigated in vitro. Extracorporeal organ models however reflect these aspects and could thus reduce the use of animals for this purpose fundamentally in the future. The aim of this work was to validate the isolated perfused porcine kidney model with regard to its use for surgical purposes on the basis of histological and radiological procedures. The results show that neither storage nor artificial perfusion led to any structural or functional damage which would affect the quality of the organ. The kidney model is highly suitable for simulating the main aspects of renal physiology and allows a constant calibration of perfusion pressure and tissue temperature. Thus, with only a moderate amount of work involved, the kidney model provides a cheap and readily available alternative to conventional animal experiments; it allows standardised experimental settings and provides valid results.

  7. Experimental infection of pigs with the porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV): measure of viral excretion.

    PubMed

    Bourgueil, E; Hutet, E; Cariolet, R; Vannier, P

    1992-04-01

    Twelve pigs were experimentally infected with a porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV) by the oronasal route. Viral excretion was measured daily by two means-deep nasal swabs and air samples obtained in a cyclone sampler. Clinical signs were very slight on infected pigs. Airborne virus could be recovered from day 1 to day 6 post-infection in the cyclone sampler as well as in petri dishes placed in the same loose-box. Viral titres obtained from nasal swabs were significantly correlated with those obtained from air samples. Different collection media were compared. The most efficient media for the collection of infectious viral particles contained a protective agent such as foetal calf serum.

  8. A Simple Porcine Model of Inducible Sustained Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anson M.; Miller, Jacob R.; Voeller, Rochus K.; Zierer, Andreas; Lall, Shelly C.; Schuessler, Richard B.; Damiano, Ralph J.; Melby, Spencer J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary The surgical management of atrial fibrillation (AF) is an evolving field with a history of testing various lesion sets and ablation technologies. Prior animal models of AF require a chronic intervention to make AF reliably inducible. Our objective was to create an acute, reliable and reproducible porcine model of sustained AF. To accomplish this, twenty-one adult domestic pigs underwent median sternotomy. Methods to induce AF were then performed sequentially: manual stimulation, rapid pacing (200 beats per minute), then rapid pacing of 8 beats with a cycle length of 300 msecs, followed by an extra stimulus at decreasing cycle lengths. If AF was not induced, burst pacing was done at a cycle length of 90 msec for 30 seconds. If AF was still not induced, IV neostigmine was administered and the process was repeated. AF was considered sustained after 1 minute. Attempts at AF induction were successful in 18 of 21 (86%). AF was induced during manual stimulation in 4 (19%), during rapid pacing in 5 (24%), during burst pacing in 5 (24%) and after the administration of neostigmine in 4 (19%). Mean duration of AF was 3.6 ± 2.6 minutes. Fourteen of the 18 (78%) reverted to sinus rhythm spontaneously and 4 (22%) required an antiarrhythmic. This technique of inducing AF can easily be used to evaluate new technologies and lesion sets without the need for creating a chronic animal model. PMID:26889882

  9. Lipid organization in human and porcine stratum corneum differs widely, while lipid mixtures with porcine ceramides model human stratum corneum lipid organization very closely.

    PubMed

    Caussin, Julia; Gooris, Gert S; Janssens, Michelle; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2008-06-01

    The conformational disordering and lateral packing of lipids in porcine and human isolated stratum corneum (SC) was compared using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was shown that SC of both species differ markedly, porcine SC lipids being arranged predominantly in a hexagonal lattice while lipids in human SC are predominantly packed in the denser orthorhombic lattice. However, the lipid organization of equimolar ceramide:cholesterol:free fatty acid (CER:CHOL:FFA) mixtures prepared with isolated porcine CER or human CER is very similar, only the transition temperatures differed being slightly lower in mixtures with porcine CER. Therefore, the difference in lateral packing between human and porcine stratum corneum is not due to the difference in CER composition. Furthermore, it is possible to use more readily available porcine CER in model lipid mixtures to mimic lipid organization in human SC. As the equimolar porcine CER:CHOL:FFA mixtures closely mimic the lipid organization in human SC, both human SC and this mixture were selected to examine the effect of glycerol on the lipid phase behaviour. It was found that high concentrations of glycerol change the lamellar organization slightly, while domains with an orthorhombic lateral packing are still observed.

  10. Cardiac Dysfunction in a Porcine Model of Pediatric Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Fabiansen, Christian; Lykke, Mikkel; Hother, Anne-Louise; Koch, Jørgen; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard; Hunter, Ingrid; Goetze, Jens P.; Friis, Henrik; Thymann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Half a million children die annually of severe acute malnutrition and cardiac dysfunction may contribute to the mortality. However, cardiac function remains poorly examined in cases of severe acute malnutrition. Objective To determine malnutrition-induced echocardiographic disturbances and longitudinal changes in plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin-T in a pediatric porcine model. Methods and Results Five-week old piglets (Duroc-x-Danish Landrace-x-Yorkshire) were fed a nutritionally inadequate maize-flour diet to induce malnutrition (MAIZE, n = 12) or a reference diet (AGE-REF, n = 12) for 7 weeks. Outcomes were compared to a weight-matched reference group (WEIGHT-REF, n = 8). Pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin-T were measured weekly. Plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide decreased in both MAIZE and AGE-REF during the first 3 weeks but increased markedly in MAIZE relative to AGE-REF during week 5–7 (p≤0.001). There was overall no difference in plasma cardiac troponin-T between groups. However, further analysis revealed that release of cardiac troponin-T in plasma was more frequent in AGE-REF compared with MAIZE (OR: 4.8; 95%CI: 1.2–19.7; p = 0.03). However, when release occurred, cardiac troponin-T concentration was 6.9-fold higher (95%CI: 3.0–15.9; p<0.001) in MAIZE compared to AGE-REF. At week 7, the mean body weight in MAIZE was lower than AGE-REF (8.3 vs 32.4 kg, p<0.001), whereas heart-weight relative to body-weight was similar across the three groups. The myocardial performance index was 86% higher in MAIZE vs AGE-REF (p<0.001) and 27% higher in MAIZE vs WEIGHT-REF (p = 0.025). Conclusions Malnutrition associates with cardiac dysfunction in a pediatric porcine model by increased myocardial performance index and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and it associates with cardiac injury by elevated cardiac troponin-T. Clinical studies are needed to see if the same applies for children suffering from

  11. Transplantation of embryonic stem cells improves the regeneration of periodontal furcation defects in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jenn-Rong; Hsu, Chia-Wen; Liao, Shih-Chung; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chen, Lih-Ren; Yuan, Kuo

    2013-04-01

    Stem cell-based therapy promises to regenerate lost tissue. Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent and may provide a virtually unlimited source for transplantation. We investigated whether ES cell transplantation improved the regeneration of furcation defects in a porcine model. Experimental periodontitis was induced in the buccal furcations of the bilateral mandibular 2nd premolars of six minipigs. After 4 weeks, the lesions were surgically debrided and implanted with collagen matrix alone (control site) or collagen matrix overlaid with porcine ES cells expressing green fluorescent protein (pES/GFP(+) ) (test site). After 3 months of healing, the clinical parameters were measured again. The treated teeth with adjacent tissue, and part of the major organs, were processed for GFP immunohistochemistry. We found no obvious teratoma or rejection. The test group had significantly better clinical parameters. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed that transplanted pES/GFP(+) cells had differentiated to new periodontal ligament and cementum in the test sites. Surprisingly, GFP(+) cells were also detectable in the repaired control cementum and remote organs. We conclude that using ES cells to improve the regeneration of periodontal furcation defects is feasible. More studies are required to assess this potential treatment's efficacy and safety. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. A comprehensive computational model of sound transmission through the porcine lung.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Henry, Brian M; Mansy, Hansen A; Sandler, Richard H; Royston, Thomas J

    2014-09-01

    A comprehensive computational simulation model of sound transmission through the porcine lung is introduced and experimentally evaluated. This "subject-specific" model utilizes parenchymal and major airway geometry derived from x-ray CT images. The lung parenchyma is modeled as a poroviscoelastic material using Biot theory. A finite element (FE) mesh of the lung that includes airway detail is created and used in comsol FE software to simulate the vibroacoustic response of the lung to sound input at the trachea. The FE simulation model is validated by comparing simulation results to experimental measurements using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry on the surface of an excised, preserved lung. The FE model can also be used to calculate and visualize vibroacoustic pressure and motion inside the lung and its airways caused by the acoustic input. The effect of diffuse lung fibrosis and of a local tumor on the lung acoustic response is simulated and visualized using the FE model. In the future, this type of visualization can be compared and matched with experimentally obtained elastographic images to better quantify regional lung material properties to noninvasively diagnose and stage disease and response to treatment.

  13. A comprehensive computational model of sound transmission through the porcine lung

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Henry, Brian M.; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Royston, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive computational simulation model of sound transmission through the porcine lung is introduced and experimentally evaluated. This “subject-specific” model utilizes parenchymal and major airway geometry derived from x-ray CT images. The lung parenchyma is modeled as a poroviscoelastic material using Biot theory. A finite element (FE) mesh of the lung that includes airway detail is created and used in comsol FE software to simulate the vibroacoustic response of the lung to sound input at the trachea. The FE simulation model is validated by comparing simulation results to experimental measurements using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry on the surface of an excised, preserved lung. The FE model can also be used to calculate and visualize vibroacoustic pressure and motion inside the lung and its airways caused by the acoustic input. The effect of diffuse lung fibrosis and of a local tumor on the lung acoustic response is simulated and visualized using the FE model. In the future, this type of visualization can be compared and matched with experimentally obtained elastographic images to better quantify regional lung material properties to noninvasively diagnose and stage disease and response to treatment. PMID:25190415

  14. Identification of a Divergent Lineage Porcine Pestivirus in Nursing Piglets with Congenital Tremors and Reproduction of Disease following Experimental Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Bailey L.; Arruda, Paulo H.; Magstadt, Drew R.; Schwartz, Kent J.; Dohlman, Tyler; Schleining, Jennifer A.; Patterson, Abby R.; Visek, Callie A.; Victoria, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital tremors is a sporadic disease of neonatal pigs characterized by action-related repetitive myoclonus. A majority of outbreaks of congenital tremors have been attributed to an unidentified virus. The objectives of this project were to 1) detect potential pathogen(s) in samples from piglets with congenital tremors and 2) develop an infection model to reproduce disease. Using next-generation sequencing, a divergent lineage pestivirus was detected in piglets with congenital tremors. The virus was originally most closely related to a bat pestivirus but is now more closely related to a recently published novel porcine pestivirus provisionally named atypical porcine pestivirus. A quantitative real-time PCR detected the virus in samples from neonatal piglets with congenital tremors from two separate farms, but not in samples from unaffected piglets from the same farm. To fulfill the second objective, pregnant sows were inoculated with either serum containing the pestivirus or PBS (control) by intravenous and intranasal routes simultaneously with direct inoculation of fetal amniotic vesicles by ultrasound-guided surgical technique. Inoculations were performed at either 45 or 62 days of gestation. All sows inoculated with the novel pestivirus farrowed piglets affected with congenital tremors while PBS-inoculated control piglets were unaffected. Tremor severity for each piglet was scored from videos taken 0, 1 and 2 days post-farrowing. Tremor severity remained relatively constant from 0 to 2 days post-farrowing for a majority of piglets. The prevalence of congenital tremors in pestivirus-inoculated litters ranged from 57% (4 out of 7 affected piglets) to 100% (10 out of 10 affected piglets). The virus was consistently detected by PCR in tissues from piglets with congenital tremors but was not detected in control piglets. Samples positive by PCR in greater than 90% of piglets sampled included brainstem (37 out of 41), mesenteric lymph node (37 out of 41

  15. Identification of a Divergent Lineage Porcine Pestivirus in Nursing Piglets with Congenital Tremors and Reproduction of Disease following Experimental Inoculation.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Bailey L; Arruda, Paulo H; Magstadt, Drew R; Schwartz, Kent J; Dohlman, Tyler; Schleining, Jennifer A; Patterson, Abby R; Visek, Callie A; Victoria, Joseph G

    2016-01-01

    Congenital tremors is a sporadic disease of neonatal pigs characterized by action-related repetitive myoclonus. A majority of outbreaks of congenital tremors have been attributed to an unidentified virus. The objectives of this project were to 1) detect potential pathogen(s) in samples from piglets with congenital tremors and 2) develop an infection model to reproduce disease. Using next-generation sequencing, a divergent lineage pestivirus was detected in piglets with congenital tremors. The virus was originally most closely related to a bat pestivirus but is now more closely related to a recently published novel porcine pestivirus provisionally named atypical porcine pestivirus. A quantitative real-time PCR detected the virus in samples from neonatal piglets with congenital tremors from two separate farms, but not in samples from unaffected piglets from the same farm. To fulfill the second objective, pregnant sows were inoculated with either serum containing the pestivirus or PBS (control) by intravenous and intranasal routes simultaneously with direct inoculation of fetal amniotic vesicles by ultrasound-guided surgical technique. Inoculations were performed at either 45 or 62 days of gestation. All sows inoculated with the novel pestivirus farrowed piglets affected with congenital tremors while PBS-inoculated control piglets were unaffected. Tremor severity for each piglet was scored from videos taken 0, 1 and 2 days post-farrowing. Tremor severity remained relatively constant from 0 to 2 days post-farrowing for a majority of piglets. The prevalence of congenital tremors in pestivirus-inoculated litters ranged from 57% (4 out of 7 affected piglets) to 100% (10 out of 10 affected piglets). The virus was consistently detected by PCR in tissues from piglets with congenital tremors but was not detected in control piglets. Samples positive by PCR in greater than 90% of piglets sampled included brainstem (37 out of 41), mesenteric lymph node (37 out of 41

  16. Cardiomyocyte transplantation in a porcine myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, E; Smith, D M; Delcarpio, J B; Sun, J; Smart, F W; Van Meter, C H; Claycomb, W C

    1998-01-01

    Transplantation of cardiomyocytes into the heart is a potential treatment for replacing damaged cardiac muscle. To investigate the feasibility and efficiency of this technique, either a cardiac-derived cell line (HL-1 cells), or normal fetal or neonatal pig cardiomyocytes were grafted into a porcine model of myocardial infarction. The myocardial infarction was created by the placement of an embolization coil in the distal portion of the left anterior descending artery in Yorkshire pigs (n = 9). Four to 5 wk after creation of an infarct, the three preparations of cardiomyocytes were grafted, at 1 x 10(6) cells/20 microL into normal and into the middle of the infarcted myocardium. The hearts were harvested and processed for histologic examinations 4 to 5 wk after the cell grafts. Histologic evaluation of the graft sites demonstrated that HL-1 cells and fetal pig cardiomyocytes formed stable grafts within the normal myocardium without any detrimental effect including arrhythmia. In addition, a marked increase in angiogenesis was observed both within the grafts and adjacent host myocardium. Electron microscopy studies demonstrated that fetal pig cardiomyocytes and the host myocardial cells were coupled with adherens-type junctions and gap junctions. Histologic examination of graft sites from infarct tissue failed to show the presence of grafted HL-1 cells, fetal, or neonatal pig cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocyte transplantation may provide the potential means for cell-mediated gene therapy for introduction of therapeutic molecules into the heart.

  17. Self-expandable biodegradable biliary stents in porcine model.

    PubMed

    Grolich, Tomáš; Crha, Michal; Novotný, Ladislav; Kala, Zdeněk; Hep, Aleš; Nečas, Alois; Hlavsa, Jan; Mitáš, Ladislav; Misík, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Treatment or prevention of a benign biliary tree stricture is an unresolved problem. A novel self-expandable biodegradable polydioxanon biliary stent in a porcine model was studied. This new stent was used in 23 pigs. Feasibility and safety of surgical stenting, time of biodegradation, and histologic reaction in 2, 8, 13, and 20 wk of a follow-up were studied. All stents were inserted into a common bile duct through a duodenal papilla following small dilatation. After surgical evaluation of abdominal cavities, the pigs were sacrificed to remove common bile ducts with the stents. All bile ducts were assessed by macroscopic and histopathologic examination. Self-expansion was correct in all cases. Neither bile duct obstruction nor postsurgical complications were observed. Macroscopic evaluation indicated lightening of the stent color in 2 wk, a partial disintegration in 8 wk, and a complete absorption in 13 and 20 wk. Histologic evaluation in general substantiated a mild-to-moderate inflammatory reaction in the lamina propria during the whole follow up and had no clinical consequences. No cholangitis, necrosis, abscess, or excessive fibroplasia was found in a hepatoduodenal ligament. Our results suggest that polydioxanon biodegradable self-expanding stents seem to be useful for biliary system implantation, offer a good biocompatibility, and completely degrade within 13 wk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental investigation of commercial small diameter dental implants in porcine mandibular segments.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Istabrak; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Schwegmann, Monika; Keilig, Ludger; Stark, Helmut; Bourauel, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    Small diameter (mini) dental implants have become more popular in recent years as alternatives to classical implant treatment in clinical cases with critical bony situations. However, an in-depth scientific analysis of the mechanical and biomechanical effects of small diameter implants has not yet been published. The aim of the present study was to investigate experimentally different commercial mini implants by measuring their displacements under immediate loading. Twelve commercially available mini implants were measured. Implants were inserted into porcine mandibular segments and loaded by means of a predefined displacement of 0.5 mm of the loading system. The implants were loaded at an angle of 30° to the implant long axis using the self-developed biomechanical hexapod measurement system. Implant displacements were registered. The experimental results were compared to the numerical ones from a previous study. Measured implant displacements were within the range of 39-194 μm. A large variation in the displacements was obtained among the different implant systems due to the different designs and thread profiles. Comparing experimental and numerical results, the displacements that were obtained numerically were within the range of 79-347 μm. The different commercial mini implants showed acceptable primary stability and could be loaded immediately after their insertion.

  19. Antiviral effect of dietary germanium biotite supplementation in pigs experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A

    2013-01-01

    Germanium biotite (GB) is an aluminosilicate mineral containing 36 ppm germanium. The present study was conducted to better understand the effects of GB on immune responses in a mouse model, and to demonstrate the clearance effects of this mineral against Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in experimentally infected pigs as an initial step towards the development of a feed supplement that would promote immune activity and help prevent diseases. In the mouse model, dietary supplementation with GB enhanced concanavalin A (ConA)-induced lymphocyte proliferation and increased the percentage of CD3+CD8+ T lymphocytes. In pigs experimentally infected with PRRSV, viral titers in lungs and lymphoid tissues from the GB-fed group were significantly decreased compared to those of the control group 12 days post-infection. Corresponding histopathological analyses demonstrated that GB-fed pigs displayed less severe pathological changes associated with PRRSV infection compared to the control group, indicating that GB promotes PRRSV clearance. These antiviral effects in pigs may be related to the ability of GB to increase CD3+CD8+ T lymphocyte production observed in the mice. Hence, this mineral may be an effective feed supplement for increasing immune activity and preventing disease. PMID:23814470

  20. Antiviral effect of dietary germanium biotite supplementation in pigs experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2013-01-01

    Germanium biotite (GB) is an aluminosilicate mineral containing 36 ppm germanium. The present study was conducted to better understand the effects of GB on immune responses in a mouse model, and to demonstrate the clearance effects of this mineral against Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in experimentally infected pigs as an initial step towards the development of a feed supplement that would promote immune activity and help prevent diseases. In the mouse model, dietary supplementation with GB enhanced concanavalin A (ConA)-induced lymphocyte proliferation and increased the percentage of CD3+CD8+ T lymphocytes. In pigs experimentally infected with PRRSV, viral titers in lungs and lymphoid tissues from the GB-fed group were significantly decreased compared to those of the control group 12 days post-infection. Corresponding histopathological analyses demonstrated that GB-fed pigs displayed less severe pathological changes associated with PRRSV infection compared to the control group, indicating that GB promotes PRRSV clearance. These antiviral effects in pigs may be related to the ability of GB to increase CD3+CD8+ T lymphocyte production observed in the mice. Hence, this mineral may be an effective feed supplement for increasing immune activity and preventing disease.

  1. Endoscopic submucosal dissection using a carbon dioxide laser with submucosally injected laser absorber solution (porcine model).

    PubMed

    Obata, Daisuke; Morita, Yoshinori; Kawaguchi, Rinna; Ishii, Katsunori; Hazama, Hisanao; Awazu, Kunio; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Azuma, Takeshi

    2013-11-01

    Recently, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been performed to treat early gastric cancer. The en bloc resection rate of ESD has been reported to be higher than that of conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), and ESD can resect larger lesions than EMR. However, ESD displays a higher complication rate than conventional EMR. Therefore, the development of devices that would increase the safety of ESD is desired. Lasers have been extensively studied as a possible alternative to electrosurgical tools. However, laser by itself easily resulted in perforation upon irradiation of the gastrointestinal tract. We hypothesized that performing ESD using a CO2 laser with a submucosal laser absorber could be a safe and simple treatment for early gastric cancer. To provide proof of concept regarding the feasibility of ESD using a CO2 laser with submucosally injected laser absorber solution, an experimental study in ex vivo and in vivo porcine models was performed. Five endoscopic experimental procedures using a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser were performed in a resected porcine stomach. In addition, three endoscopic experimental procedures using a CO2 laser were performed in living pigs. In the ex vivo study, en bloc resections were all achieved without perforation and muscular damage. In addition, histological evaluations could be performed in all of the resected specimens. In the in vivo study, en bloc resections were achieved without perforation and muscular damage, and uncontrollable hemorrhage did not occur during the procedures. Endoscopic submucosal dissection using a CO2 laser with a submucosal laser absorber is a feasible and safe method for the treatment of early gastric cancer.

  2. A porcine model: surgical anatomy of the orbit for maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Kyllar, Michal; Štembírek, Jan; Danek, Zdenek; Hodan, Radek; Stránský, Jiří; Machoň, Vladimír; Foltán, René

    2016-04-01

    Due to its similarity to humans, the pig has proven to be a suitable biomodel for both research purposes and for training medical professionals, particularly in surgical specializations. For example, new implant materials have been tested on pig jaws and pigs have also been used in the development of new surgical techniques. For optimizing the effectiveness of such research or training, detailed data on the anatomy of their particular features are needed. At present, however, only limited information related to surgical and imaging anatomy of the facial and orbital areas of the pig and its comparison to human structures from the experimental surgery point of view is available in the literature. The aim of this study was to obtain such data and to compare the morphological structures of the porcine and human orbital regions and to lay down the foundation for practical use in experimental surgery. Ten pig heads were examined using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and, subsequently, a dissection of the orbit was carried out. Attention was focused on the structure of the orbit (floor, rim and nerves) frequently affected by pathological processes in humans (such as trauma, infection or tumours) and which consequently are frequently the subject of maxillofacial surgery. The porcine orbit is suitable for use in experimental medicine. However, if used in experiments, its anatomical peculiarities must be taken into consideration. Our study presents a foundation of basic knowledge for researchers who plan to use the pig as a biomedical model to investigate alternative treatments in the head region.

  3. Macrophage Phenotype Is Associated With the Regenerative Response in Experimental Replacement of the Porcine Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Linus; Dellenmark Blom, Michaela; Friberg, Lars; Gatzinsky, Vladimir; Holmquist, Olof; Jennische, Eva; Sandin, Anders; Abrahamsson, Kate

    2016-10-01

    A porcine model for bridging circumferential defects in the intrathoracic esophagus has been developed in order to improve the treatment of children born with long-gap esophageal atresia. The aim of this study was to identify factors beneficial for tissue regeneration in the bridging area in this model and to describe the histological progression 20 days after replacement with a silicone-stented Biodesign mesh. Resection of 3 cm of intrathoracic esophagus and replacement with a bridging graft was performed in six newly weaned piglets. They were fed through a gastrostomy for 10 days, and then had probe formula orally for another 10 days prior to sacrifice. Two out of six piglets had stent loss prior to sacrifice. In the four piglets with the stent in place, a tissue tube, with visible muscle in the wall, was seen at sacrifice. Histology showed that the wall of the healing area was well organized with layers of inflammatory cells, in-growing vessels, and smooth muscle cells. CD163+ macrophages was seen toward the esophageal lumen. In the animals where the stent was lost, the bridging area was narrow, and histology showed a less organized structure in the bridging area without the presence of CD163+ macrophages. This study indicates that regenerative healing was seen in the porcine esophagus 20 days after replacement of a part of the intrathoracic esophagus with a silicone-stented Biodesign mesh, if the bridging graft is retained. If the graft is lost, the inflammatory pattern changes with invasion of proinflammatory, M1 macrophages in the entire wall, which seems to redirect the healing process toward scar formation. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Characterisation of a novel porcine coronary artery CTO model.

    PubMed

    Fefer, Paul; Robert, Normand; Qiang, Beiping; Liu, Garry; Munce, Nigel; Anderson, Kevan; Osherov, Azriel B; Ladouceur-Wodzak, Michelle; Qi, Xiuling; Dick, Alexander; Weisbrod, Max; Samuel, Michelle; Butany, Jagdish; Wright, Graham; Strauss, Bradley H

    2012-04-01

    To create a large animal coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) model. Presence of microvessels within the CTO lumen facilitates guidewire crossing. The patterns and time profiles of matrix changes and microvessel formation during coronary CTO maturation are unknown. CTO were created in 15 swine by percutaneous deployment of a collagen plug. Matrix changes were assessed by histology. Intraluminal neovascularisation was assessed by histology and several imaging modalities, including conventional and 3D spin angiography, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging, and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), at six and 12 weeks following CTO creation. Matrix changes included an intense inflammatory reaction at six weeks which had partially abated by 12 weeks. A proteoglycan-rich matrix at six weeks was partially replaced with collagen by 12 weeks. Similar changes were noted in the proximal cap which was acellular. Three patterns of microvessel formation were identified and defined based on the presence and extent of a "lead" neovessel. No major differences in pattern or extent of neovascularisation were noted between six and 12 weeks. Heterogeneity in neovascularisation patterns occurs during coronary CTO development in a porcine model. Non-invasive imaging to determine the predominant type of neovascularisation prior to and during CTO revascularisation may improve guidewire crossing success rates. This model may be useful for further exploration of CTO pathophysiology, and may aid in further refinements of in vivo imaging of CTO and development of novel therapeutic approaches to revascularisation of CTO, such as manipulations of the proximal cap, matrix composition, neovessel induction, and device testing.

  5. Porcine Ischemic Wound-Healing Model for Preclinical Testing of Degradable Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Patil, Prarthana; Martin, John R; Sarett, Samantha M; Pollins, Alonda C; Cardwell, Nancy L; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Guelcher, Scott A; Nanney, Lillian B; Duvall, Craig L

    2017-09-29

    Impaired wound healing that mimics chronic human skin pathologies is difficult to achieve in current animal models, hindering testing and development of new therapeutic biomaterials that promote wound healing. In this article, we describe a refinement and simplification of the porcine ischemic wound model that increases the size and number of experimental sites per animal. By comparing three flap geometries, we adopted a superior configuration (15 × 10 cm) that enabled testing of twenty 1 cm(2) wounds in each animal: 8 total ischemic wounds within 4 bipedicle flaps and 12 nonischemic wounds. The ischemic wounds exhibited impaired skin perfusion for ∼1 week. To demonstrate the utility of the model for comparative testing of tissue regenerative biomaterials, we evaluated the healing process in wounds implanted with highly porous poly (thioketal) urethane (PTK-UR) scaffolds that were fabricated through reaction of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-cleavable PTK macrodiols with isocyanates. PTK-lysine triisocyanate (LTI) scaffolds degraded significantly in vitro under both oxidative and hydrolytic conditions whereas PTK-hexamethylene diisocyanate trimer (HDIt) scaffolds were resistant to hydrolytic breakdown and degraded exclusively through an ROS-dependent mechanism. Upon placement into porcine wounds, both types of PTK-UR materials fostered new tissue ingrowth over 10 days in both ischemic and nonischemic tissue. However, wound perfusion, tissue infiltration and the abundance of pro-regenerative, M2-polarized macrophages were markedly lower in ischemic wounds independent of scaffold type. The PTK-LTI implants significantly improved tissue infiltration and perfusion compared with analogous PTK-HDIt scaffolds in ischemic wounds. Both LTI and HDIt-based PTK-UR implants enhanced M2 macrophage activity, and these cells were selectively localized at the scaffold/tissue interface. In sum, this modified porcine wound-healing model decreased animal usage, simplified

  6. Thermal epiphysiodesis performed with radio frequency in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Shiguetomi-Medina, Juan M; Rahbek, Ole; Abood, Ahmed Abdul-Hussein; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Current techniques for epiphysiodesis involve opening of cortical windows; use of staples, screws, and tension devices; and fusion with curettes or drills. Complications may have serious consequences. There is a need for a more reliable, precise, and less traumatic procedure that overcomes the known complications from existing techniques. We analyzed a new epiphysiodesis technique using radio-frequency ablation (RFA) in a porcine model. Methods Six 35-kg and two 25-kg immature pigs were used. 1 hind leg of each animal was randomly selected and the proximal tibia growth plate was ablated laterally and medially. The contralateral leg was used as a control. MR images were obtained immediately after the ablation and 12 weeks later for 6 animals, and 24 weeks later for the other 2 animals. CT was done for the 2 animals that were followed for 24 weeks for proof of bone bridges. Results Both tibias were equal in length initially. At the 12-week follow-up, there was an average leg length discrepancy of 3.9 mm (95% CI: 3.0–4.8), and at 24 weeks the difference was 8.4 mm and 7.5 mm. No damage to the adjacent tissue was found. Bone bridges and physeal closure were found after 24 weeks. The pigs showed no discomfort after the intervention. Interpretation We found RFA to be feasible for epiphysiodesis in a pig model. The method is minimally invasive and recovery may be quick compared to conventional methods. We recommend that the method should be tested in larger-scale safety studies before clinical application. PMID:25036720

  7. Pathogenicity of three type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus strains in experimentally inoculated pregnant gilts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mechanisms of reproductive failure resulting from infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) are still poorly understood. The present study, a side-by-side evaluation of the pathogenicity of three type 2 PRRSv strains in a reproductive model, was used as a pilot study...

  8. Experimental laser interstitial thermotherapy in ex-vivo porcine tissue at 980 nm and 830 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Nelson, Jr.; Manns, Fabrice; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Milne, Peter J.; Minhaj, Ahmed M.; Denham, David B.; Robinson, David S.

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to compare the temperature increase in ex-vivo porcine mammary chain tissue as a breast tissue model during interstitial laser irradiation with diode lasers emitting at 980 nm and 830 nm. Both wavelengths were delivered at 4.0 W for 10 minutes through a diffusing fiber inserted into ex-vivo porcine tissue. The temperature was measured with a set of 15 thermocouples placed 5, 10, and 15 mm from the fiber axis. The initial rate of temperature increase 5 mm away from the fiber tip was higher at 980 nm (0.12 to 0.20 degree(s)C/s) than at 830 nm (0.10 to 0.16 degree(s)C/s). At 10 mm and 15 mm (areas with less radiation), the rate was smaller than at 5 mm (less than 0.06 degree(s)C/s at 10 mm and less than 0.02 degree(s)C/s at 15 mm) for both wavelengths with no significant difference between the 980 nm and 830 nm radiation. The temperature increase at 5, 10 and 15 mm away from the fiber tip after 10 minutes of irradiation was higher at 980 nm (36 to 45 degree(s)C at 5 mm, 14 to 30 degree(s)C at 10 mm and 9 to 17 degree(s)C at 15 mm) than at 830 nm (27 to 33 degree(s)C at 5 mm, 11 to 17 degree(s)C at 10 mm and 8 to 9 degree(s)C at 15 mm) after 10 minutes. These results were found to be highly dependent on tissue composition (muscle vs. fatty tissue).

  9. Remote effects of acute kidney injury in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Gardner, David S; De Brot, Simone; Dunford, Louise J; Grau-Roma, Llorenc; Welham, Simon J M; Fallman, Rebecca; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E; Oh, Weng; Devonald, Mark A J

    2016-02-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious condition with no specific treatment. An episode of AKI may affect organs distant from the kidney, further increasing the morbidity associated with AKI. The mechanism of organ cross talk after AKI is unclear. The renal and immune systems of pigs and humans are alike. Using a preclinical animal (porcine) model, we tested the hypothesis that early effects of AKI on distant organs is by immune cell infiltration, leading to inflammatory cytokine production, extravasation, and edema. In 29 pigs exposed to either sham surgery or renal ischemia-reperfusion (control, n = 12; AKI, n = 17), we assessed remote organ (liver, lung, brain) effects in the short (from 2- to 48-h reperfusion) and longer term (5 wk later) using immunofluorescence (for leukocyte infiltration, apoptosis), a cytokine array, tissue elemental analysis (e.g., electrolytes), blood hematology and chemistry (e.g., liver enzymes), and PCR (for inflammatory markers). AKI elicited significant, short-term (∼24 h) increments in enzymes indicative of acute liver damage (e.g. , AST: ALT ratio; P = 0.02) and influenced tissue biochemistry in some remote organs (e.g., lung tissue [Ca(2+)] increased; P = 0.04). These effects largely resolved after 48 h, and no further histopathology, edema, apoptosis, or immune cell infiltration was noted in the liver, lung, or hippocampus in the short and longer term. AKI has subtle biochemical effects on remote organs in the short term, including a transient increment in markers of acute liver damage. These effects resolved by 48 h, and no further remote organ histopathology, apoptosis, edema, or immune cell infiltration was noted.

  10. Postnatal development of lung T lymphocytes in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Balam-May, Angel J; Ramírez-Estudillo, Carmen; Lazo-Vázquez, Gloria; Vega-López, Marco A

    2014-10-01

    Despite the high prevalence of respiratory diseases in the world and the extensive information available on the mucosal immune system, research on the development of the lung immune system in humans is limited by technical and ethical considerations; therefore, we studied the postnatal development of T lymphocytes in lung lobes in a porcine model. Using less than 36-hour-old (NB), 1-week-weaned (5-week-old -AW-), 3-month-old (3M), and 4-year-old (4YR) healthy, nonvaccinated, specific pathogen free (SPF) Vietnamese miniature pigs, we studied the CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, TCR1 (gamma-delta T cells), and CD25+ (IL-2R-alpha) cell subpopulations in lung lobes parenchyma, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and cervical lymph nodes (LN) by flow cytometry. No differences among lung lobes were detected in any of the cell subpopulations tested. A low proportion of T cell subsets was detected in NB and 4YR groups in lung and BAL. Besides, the AW and 3M groups showed important changes in T cell subpopulations. These results suggest that in healthy animals the lung lobes behave as a homogeneous immune organ. T cells were detected in very low percentages at birth and in adult life, which may explain the high susceptibility to respiratory infections both early and later in life. Postweaning antigenic challenges and endocrine and sexual maturity at 3M had important effects on the development of the mucosal immune system. It was also evident that changes at mucosal sites were poorly correlated with PBMC and LN.

  11. Laparoscopic choledochojejunostomy and gastrojejunostomy in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Reed, D N; Cacchione, R N; Allen, J W; Arlauskas, V; Casey, J; Larson, G M; Vitale, G

    2003-01-01

    Surgical extirpation remains the only known curative treatment for cancer of the pancreas. Because of locally advanced or metastatic tumor, up to 80% of patients are unresectable at the time of initial diagnosis [13]. Other investigators previously have suggested that laparoscopy before laparotomy aids in the diagnosis of unresectable pancreatic cancer in a fair number of patients even after negative computed tomography scans [3, 17]. Many surgeons are reluctant to incorporate laparoscopy into the workup of patients with cancer of the pancreas because of the frequent need for surgical bypass in the management of either biliary tract obstruction or gastric outlet obstruction [9, 13]. Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of laparoscopic cholecystojejunostomy combined with gastrojejunostomy in a porcine model, as well as the individual accomplishment of laparoscopic choledochojejunostomy. The purpose of this study was to document the feasibility of performing laparoscopic choledochojejunostomy with gastrojejunostomy. Under general anesthesia, seven pigs underwent laparoscopic choledochojejunostomy and gastrojejunostomy using an intracorporeal hand-sutured technique. The mean operating time ranged from 150 to 450 min. All the animals recovered completely from the operation and had patent anastomoses at the time of necropsy. One pig died of gastric bleeding on postoperative day 13, and two animals had intraabdominal fluid collections discovered at the time of necropsy. These results suggest that synchronous laparoscopic bypass of biliary and gastric outlet obstruction is feasible, and can be performed in a manner similar to that used in open operations. We believe this lends support to the argument promoting laparoscopy in the evaluation of pancreatic cancer.

  12. Computational biomechanics and experimental validation of vessel deformation based on 4D-CT imaging of the porcine aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazer, Dilana; Finol, Ender A.; Kostrzewa, Michael; Kopaigorenko, Maria; Richter, Götz-M.; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2009-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease results from pathological biomechanical conditions and fatigue of the vessel wall. Image-based computational modeling provides a physical and realistic insight into the patient-specific biomechanics and enables accurate predictive simulations of development, growth and failure of cardiovascular disease. An experimental validation is necessary for the evaluation and the clinical implementation of such computational models. In the present study, we have implemented dynamic Computed-Tomography (4D-CT) imaging and catheter-based in vivo measured pressures to numerically simulate and experimentally evaluate the biomechanics of the porcine aorta. The computations are based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) and simulate the arterial wall response to the transient pressure-based boundary condition. They are evaluated by comparing the numerically predicted wall deformation and that calculated from the acquired 4D-CT data. The dynamic motion of the vessel is quantified by means of the hydraulic diameter, analyzing sequences at 5% increments over the cardiac cycle. Our results show that accurate biomechanical modeling is possible using FEM-based simulations. The RMS error of the computed hydraulic diameter at five cross-sections of the aorta was 0.188, 0.252, 0.280, 0.237 and 0.204 mm, which is equivalent to 1.7%, 2.3%, 2.7%, 2.3% and 2.0%, respectively, when expressed as a function of the time-averaged hydraulic diameter measured from the CT images. The present investigation is a first attempt to simulate and validate vessel deformation based on realistic morphological data and boundary conditions. An experimentally validated system would help in evaluating individual therapies and optimal treatment strategies in the field of minimally invasive endovascular surgery.

  13. Multiple models of porcine teschovirus pathogenesis in endemically infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shu-Chun; Yang, Chih-Lin; Chen, Ya-Mei; Hu, Shu-Chia; Chiu, Kuo-Chao; Lin, Yi-Chien; Chang, Chia-Yi; Wang, Fun-In

    2014-01-10

    Porcine teschoviruses (PTVs) belong to the genus Teschovirus within the family Picornaviridae. PTVs are universal contaminants in pig herds in endemic and multi-infection status. To further the understanding of PTV pathogenesis in endemically infected pigs, a set of samples was studied by real time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) to quantitate viral loads in tissues and by in situ hybridization (ISH) to locate PTV signals in target cells, both targeting the 5'-NTR. cRNA of PTV-1 and PTV-7, in vitro transcribed from cloned fragments of 5'-NTR of 2 viruses, was used to construct standard curves and to run parallel in qRT-PCR, which had detection limits of 10(1) copies/per reaction, with a linearity in between 10(1) and 10(7) copies/per reaction and correlation coefficients of 0.997-0.9988. The qRT-PCR specifically amplified RNA from PTV-1 to -11, while excluding those of Sapelovirus, PEV-9 and PEV-10. Inguinal lymph node (LN) had the highest viral load of all (assuming 100%), followed by ileac LN (89-91%), tonsil (66-68%), ileum (59-60%), spleen (38-40%), and kidney (30-31%), with the least in brain (22.9%) of the inguinal LN. The 22.9% load in brain was higher than that anticipated from a simple fecal-oral-viremia operative model. The results suggested in addition that intranasal infection and retrograding axonal infection from the tonsils were equally operative and significant. ISH revealed PTV signals in a wider variety of tissue cell types than before. PTV signals were noted most impressively in neurons of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus and in the dark zone of the germinal center and adjacent paracortex of regional LN. Multiple operative models indicated that PTVs seemed to have no difficulty invading the brain. The key to whether encephalitis would ensue resided in the animal's immune status and topographic differences of neurons' susceptibilities to PTVs. When common co-infected agents are present, as is typical in the field, PTVs may synergize in

  14. A lightweight polypropylene mesh (TiMesh) for laparoscopic intraperitoneal repair of abdominal wall hernias: comparison of biocompatibility with the DualMesh in an experimental study using the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Schug-Pass, C; Tamme, C; Tannapfel, A; Köckerling, F

    2006-03-01

    Despite numerous experimental studies, conducted most often with the open small-animal model, the ideal structure for a mesh with maximum biocompatibility in the intraabdominal region has yet to be found. To date, few experimental models have been concerned with the laparoscopic intraabdominal implantation of meshes. Numerous experimental and clinical studies appear to have identified expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE), in the form of DualMesh, as the gold standard. Since publications have reported fistula formation and marked adhesions to be associated with the use of polypropylene meshes, only few studies have investigated meshes made of this material. It is known, however, that a reduction in the amount of material and an increase in pore size results in better mesh biocompatibility. Six pigs each underwent laparoscopic intraabdominal placement of either a TiMesh or a DualMesh, both of which were prepared for implantation in standardized fashion. After 87 +/- 2 days, the pigs were killed, and postmortem laparoscopy was performed, followed by the removal of the tissue embedding the mesh for assessment of adhesions and shrinkage, and for histologic workup. The specimens were processed both histologically and immunohistochemically. In all but one case, the greater omentum adhered, usually over discrete areas, to the mesh. In every case the omentum was separable from the mesh surface only by sharp dissection. With the titanium-coated polypropylene meshes, the average total adhesion area was only 0.085, as compared with 0.25 for the GoreTex meshes (p = 0.055). The GoreTex meshes showed an average shrinkage to almost half of the original surface area (median, 0.435). The average shrinkage of the TiMesh, was to 0.18 of the original area (p = 0.006), which thus was significantly smaller. Determination of the partial volume of the inflammatory cells showed significantly lower median figures for the TiMesh (p = 0.009). Measurements of the proliferation marker Ki67

  15. Comparative Effects of Vaccination against Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2) and Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) in a PCV2-PRRSV Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Changhoon; Oh, Yeonsu; Seo, Hwi Won; Han, Kiwon

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccinations in an experimental PCV2-PRRSV challenge model, based on virological (viremia), immunological (neutralizing antibodies [NAs], gamma interferon-secreting cells [IFN-γ-SCs], and CD4+ CD8+ double-positive cells), and pathological (lesions and antigens in lymph nodes and lungs) evaluations. A total of 72 pigs were randomly divided into 9 groups (8 pigs per group): 5 vaccinated and challenged groups, 3 nonvaccinated and challenged groups, and a negative-control group. Vaccination against PCV2 induced immunological responses (NAs and PCV2-specific IFN-γ-SCs) and reduced PCV2 viremia, PCV2-induced lesions, and PCV2 antigens in the dually infected pigs. However, vaccination against PCV2 did not affect the PRRSV immunological responses (NAs and PRRSV-specific IFN-γ-SCs), PRRSV viremia, PRRSV-induced lesions, or PRRSV antigens in the dually infected pigs. Vaccination against PRRSV did not induce immunological responses (PRRSV-specific IFN-γ-SCs) or reduce PRRSV viremia, PRRSV-induced lesions, or PRRSV antigens in the dually infected pigs. In addition, vaccination against PRRSV increased PCV2 viremia, PCV2-induced lesions, and PCV2 antigens in the dually infected pigs. In summary, vaccination against PCV2 reduced PCV2 viremia, PCV2-induced lesions, and PCV2 antigens in the dually infected pigs. However, vaccination against PRRSV increased PCV2 viremia, PCV2-induced lesions, and PCV2 antigens in the dually infected pigs. Therefore, the PCV2 vaccine decreased the potentiation of PCV2-induced lesions by PRRSV in dually infected pigs. In contrast, the PRRSV vaccine alone did not decrease the potentiation of PCV2-induced lesions by PRRSV in dually infected pigs. PMID:23302743

  16. Experimental porcine rubulavirus (La Piedad-Michoacan virus) infection in pregnant gilts.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Jáuregui, P; Ramírez Mendoza, H; Mercado García, C; Moreno-López, J; Kennedy, S

    2004-01-01

    Porcine rubulavirus (La Piedad-Michoacan virus) (PoRV-LPMV) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family that causes encephalitis in young piglets and infertility in adult sows and boars. Infertility in sows naturally infected by PoRV-LPMV is characterized by an increased number of returns to oestrus, stillbirths and mummified fetuses. In this study, nine seronegative gilts were inoculated intranasally with the PAC-3 strain of PoRV-LPMV at week 6 or 10 of gestation. These animals were then killed at weeks 8 or 15 of gestation (seven gilts) or after natural parturition (two gilts). Four control gilts were mock-infected at gestation week 6 or 10 and killed between 2 and 4 weeks later. Gross lesions of focal congestion and haemorrhage were seen in the placenta and endometrium of one gilt infected at gestation week 6 and one infected at gestation week 10. PoRV-LPMV was isolated, at 2-6 weeks post-inoculation (pi), from lung, tonsils, ovary, placenta, uterus and lymph nodes of three of the gilts infected at gestation week 6 and at 2-3 weeks pi from lung, tonsil and ovary of two gilts infected at gestation week 10. Many of the fetuses of eight infected gilts were smaller than normal and had dermal ecchymoses. Dehydrated or mummified fetuses were present in six of the infected gilts but not in any control animal. PoRV-LPMV was isolated from brain, lung and liver of fetuses from two gilts infected at gestation week 6, and from two infected at gestation week 10. These results indicate that, after experimental infection, PoRV can replicate in tissues of seronegative pregnant gilts, cross the placenta, and cause fetal death and mummification.

  17. Improved Cell Line IPEC-J2, Characterized as a Model for Porcine Jejunal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Silke S.; Richter, Jan F.; Krug, Susanne M.; Jebautzke, Britta; Lee, In-Fah M.; Rieger, Juliane; Sachtleben, Monika; Bondzio, Angelika; Schulzke, Jörg D.; Fromm, Michael; Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Cell lines matching the source epithelium are indispensable for investigating porcine intestinal transport and barrier properties on a subcellular or molecular level and furthermore help to reduce animal usage. The porcine jejunal cell line IPEC-J2 is established as an in vitro model for porcine infection studies but exhibits atypically high transepithelial resistances (TER) and only low active transport rates so that the effect of nutritional factors cannot be reliably investigated. This study aimed to properly remodel IPEC-J2 and then to re-characterize these cells regarding epithelial architecture, expression of barrier-relevant tight junction (TJ) proteins, adequate TER and transport function, and reaction to secretagogues. For this, IPEC-J2 monolayers were cultured on permeable supports, either under conventional (fetal bovine serum, FBS) or species-specific (porcine serum, PS) conditions. Porcine jejunal mucosa was analyzed for comparison. Main results were that under PS conditions (IPEC-J2/PS), compared to conventional FBS culture (IPEC-J2/FBS), the cell height increased 6-fold while the cell diameter was reduced by 50%. The apical cell membrane of IPEC-J2/PS exhibited typical microvilli. Most importantly, PS caused a one order of magnitude reduction of TER and of trans- and paracellular resistance, and a 2-fold increase in secretory response to forskolin when compared to FBS condition. TJ ultrastructure and appearance of TJ proteins changed dramatically in IPEC-J2/PS. Most parameters measured under PS conditions were much closer to those of typical pig jejunocytes than ever reported since the cell line’s initial establishment in 1989. In conclusion, IPEC-J2, if cultured under defined species-specific conditions, forms a suitable model for investigating porcine paracellular intestinal barrier function. PMID:24260272

  18. Modelling and simulation of porcine liver tissue indentation using finite element method and uniaxial stress-strain data.

    PubMed

    Fu, Y B; Chui, C K

    2014-07-18

    We hypothesize that both compression and elongation stress-strain data should be considered for modeling and simulation of soft tissue indentation. Uniaxial stress-strain data were obtained from in vitro loading experiments of porcine liver tissue. An axisymmetric finite element model was used to simulate liver tissue indentation with tissue material represented by hyperelastic models. The material parameters were derived from uniaxial stress-strain data of compressions, elongations, and combined compression and elongation of porcine liver samples. in vitro indentation tests were used to validate the finite element simulation. Stress-strain data from the simulation with material parameters derived from the combined compression and elongation data match the experimental data best. This is due to its better ability in modeling 3D deformation since the behavior of biological soft tissue under indentation is affected by both its compressive and tensile characteristics. The combined logarithmic and polynomial model is somewhat better than the 5-constant Mooney-Rivlin model as the constitutive model for this indentation simulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of hands-on seminar for reduced port surgery using fresh porcine cadaver model

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Saseem; Kurashima, Yo; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Kitashiro, Shuji; Kanehira, Eiji; Hirano, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of various biological and non-biological simulators is playing an important role in training modern surgeons with laparoscopic skills. However, there have been few reports of the use of a fresh porcine cadaver model for training in laparoscopic surgical skills. The purpose of this study was to report on a surgical training seminar on reduced port surgery using a fresh cadaver porcine model and to assess its feasibility and efficacy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The hands-on seminar had 10 fresh porcine cadaver models and two dry boxes. Each table was provided with a unique access port and devices used in reduced port surgery. Each group of 2 surgeons spent 30 min at each station, performing different tasks assisted by the instructor. The questionnaire survey was done immediately after the seminar and 8 months after the seminar. RESULTS: All the tasks were completed as planned. Both instructors and participants were highly satisfied with the seminar. There was a concern about the time allocated for the seminar. In the post-seminar survey, the participants felt that the number of reduced port surgeries performed by them had increased. CONCLUSION: The fresh cadaver porcine model requires no special animal facility and can be used for training in laparoscopic procedures. PMID:27279391

  20. Comparing the reported burn conditions for different severity burns in porcine models: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Christine J; Cuttle, Leila

    2017-07-23

    There are many porcine burn models that create burns using different materials (e.g. metal, water) and different burn conditions (e.g. temperature and duration of exposure). This review aims to determine whether a pooled analysis of these studies can provide insight into the burn materials and conditions required to create burns of a specific severity. A systematic review of 42 porcine burn studies describing the depth of burn injury with histological evaluation is presented. Inclusion criteria included thermal burns, burns created with a novel method or material, histological evaluation within 7 days post-burn and method for depth of injury assessment specified. Conditions causing deep dermal scald burns compared to contact burns of equivalent severity were disparate, with lower temperatures and shorter durations reported for scald burns (83°C for 14 seconds) compared to contact burns (111°C for 23 seconds). A valuable archive of the different mechanisms and materials used for porcine burn models is presented to aid design and optimisation of future models. Significantly, this review demonstrates the effect of the mechanism of injury on burn severity and that caution is recommended when burn conditions established by porcine contact burn models are used by regulators to guide scald burn prevention strategies. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Pathogenicity of three type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strains in experimentally inoculated pregnant gilts.

    PubMed

    Ladinig, Andrea; Detmer, Susan E; Clarke, Kyle; Ashley, Carolyn; Rowland, Raymond R R; Lunney, Joan K; Harding, John C S

    2015-05-04

    Mechanisms of reproductive failure resulting from infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are still poorly understood. Presented herein are the results of a side-by-side evaluation of the pathogenicity of three type 2 PRRSV strains in a reproductive model, from a pilot study used to develop experimental conditions and laboratory methods for a larger experiment. Pregnant gilts were experimentally infected with PRRSV at gestation day 85 or served as uninfected negative controls. After 21 days, all gilts and fetuses were necropsied. Clinical signs, litter outcome, viral load, cytokine levels, and pathology were compared from samples collected among pigs exposed to the three PRRSV strains. Based on differences in histologic lesions, and fetal weights, and numeric differences in gilt serum cytokine levels, litter outcome and virus replication in fetal tissues KS06-483 appeared less virulent than NVSL 97-7895 and KS06-72109 isolates. Levels of chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), interferon alpha (IFNα), and interferon gamma (IFNγ) were increased in PPRRSV-infected compared to non-infected gilts (0.01 > P < 0.06). Inoculation with NVSL 97-7895 induced higher levels of all three cytokines. All three PRRSV isolates were able to induce high mean viral load in individual litters, which was closely related to the proportion of PRRSV positive fetuses in the litter. Viral load in fetal samples was also positively associated with viral load at the maternal-fetal interface. All but one dead fetus were positive for PRRSV RNA, and higher concentrations of PRRSV RNA in fetal thymus increased the odds of fetal death. Our results suggest that virus replication in fetal tissues and the maternal-fetal interface, but not in other gilt tissues, are important for the outcome of reproductive PRRS. Additionally, our data indicate that umbilical lesions decreased corresponding to the use of pentobarbital sedation prior to euthanasia of pregnant gilts by captive bolt

  2. Clinically compatible flexible wide-field multi-color fluorescence endoscopy with a porcine colon model

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gyugnseok; Park, Youngrong; Yoo, Su Woong; Hwang, Soonjoo; Chin-Yu, Alexey V. Dan; Ryu, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Do, Eun-Ju; Kim, Ki Hean; Kim, Sungjee; Myung, Seung-Jae; Chung, Euiheon

    2017-01-01

    Early detection of structural or molecular changes in dysplastic epithelial tissues is crucial for cancer screening and surveillance. Multi-targeting molecular endoscopic fluorescence imaging may improve noninvasive detection of precancerous lesions in the colon. Here, we report the first clinically compatible, wide-field-of-view, multi-color fluorescence endoscopy with a leached fiber bundle scope using a porcine model. A porcine colon model that resembles the human colon is used for the detection of surrogate tumors composed of multiple biocompatible fluorophores (FITC, ICG, and heavy metal-free quantum dots (hfQDs)). With an ex vivo porcine colon tumor model, molecular imaging with hfQDs conjugated with MMP14 antibody was achieved by spraying molecular probes on a mucosa layer that contains xenograft tumors. With an in vivo porcine colon embedded with surrogate tumors, target-to-background ratios of 3.36 ± 0.43, 2.70 ± 0.72, and 2.10 ± 0.13 were achieved for FITC, ICG, and hfQD probes, respectively. This promising endoscopic technology with molecular contrast shows the capacity to reveal hidden tumors and guide treatment strategy decisions. PMID:28270983

  3. Degenerative effects of cobalt-chloride treatment on neurons and microglia in a porcine retina organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, S; Hurst, J; Rensinghoff, F; Tsai, T; Grauthoff, S; Satgunarajah, Y; Dick, H B; Schnichels, S; Joachim, S C

    2017-02-01

    In order to understand the pathological processes of retinal diseases, experimental models are necessary. Cobalt, as part of the vitamin B12 complex, is important for neuronal integrity. However, it is known that high quantities of cobalt induce cytotoxic mechanisms via hypoxia mimicry. Therefore, we tested the degenerative effect of cobalt chloride (CoCl2) on neurons and microglia in a porcine retina organ culture model. Organotypic cultures of porcine retinas were cultured and treated with different concentrations of CoCl2 (0, 100, 300 and 500 μM) for 48 h. After four and eight days, CoCl2 induced a strong degeneration of the porcine retina, starting at 300 μM. A loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, Brn-3a), amacrine cells (calretinin) and bipolar cells (PKCα) was observed. Additionally, a high expression of hypoxia induced factor-1a (HIF-1a) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was noted at both points in time. Also, the Caspase 3 protein was activated and P21 expression was induced. However, only at day four, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was increased. The effect of CoCl2 was not restricted to neurons. CoCl2 concentrations reduced the microglia amount (Iba1) and activity (Iba1 + Fcγ-Receptor) at both points in time. These damaging effects on microglia were surprising, since CoCl2 causes hypoxia and a pro-inflammatory environment. However, high concentrations of CoCl2 also seem to be toxic to these cells. Similar degenerative mechanisms as in comparison to retinal ischemia animal models were observed. In summary, an effective and reproducible hypoxia-mimicking organotypic model for retinal degeneration was established, which is easy to handle and ready for drug studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. New bone formation in bone defects after melatonin and porcine bone grafts: experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Guirado, José-Luis; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Maté-Sánchez, José-Eduardo; López-Marí, Laura; Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael; Romanos, Georgios E

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the topical application of melatonin compared with collagenized porcine bone grafts to accelerate bone formation 2 months after their insertion in tibiae rabbits. Twenty New Zealand rabbits weighing 3,900-4,500 g were used. Twenty collagenized porcine bone (MP3) grafts, twenty melatonin-impregnated bone grafts, and twenty control areas were placed in the proximal metaphyseal area of both rear tibias. Four groups were formed according to the moment in which animal killing was carried out: Group I (15 days), Group II (30 days), Group III (45 days) and Group IV (60 days). Cortical width and cortical length of bone formation was measured. Following implantation, an anteroposterior and lateral radiological study was carried out. Samples were sectioned at 5 μm and stained using hematoxylin-Eeosin, Masson's trichromic, and Gordon-Switt reticulin stains. After 60 days of treatment period, melatonin increased the length of cortical bone formation 99.03 ± 0.61% like control 98.90 ± 3.82% compared with porcine bone 92.73 ± 1.08%. Related to perimeter of cortical bone of the tibiae melatonin new bone was 98.35 ± 1.14% like control 98.0 ± 1.43% more than porcine bone 92.05 ± 1.03%. Histomorphometric values related to porcine bone were connective tissue 49.16 ± 2.4%, graft material (MP3) 23.52 ± 2.3%, and new bone formation 27.32 ± 1.4% compared with test group with melatonin 24.5 ± 1.2%, connective tissue 45.1 ± 1.2%, and new bone formation of 30.4 ± 1.0%. Melatonin has proven to regenerate the width and length of cortical bone in tibiae rabbits more quickly than collagenized porcine bone. Melatonin acts as a bone stimulator compared with porcine bone and control sites. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Porcine models of digestive disease: the future of large animal translational research.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Liara M; Moeser, Adam J; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2015-07-01

    There is increasing interest in nonrodent translational models for the study of human disease. The pig, in particular, serves as a useful animal model for the study of pathophysiological conditions relevant to the human intestine. This review assesses currently used porcine models of gastrointestinal physiology and disease and provides a rationale for the use of these models for future translational studies. The pig has proven its utility for the study of fundamental disease conditions such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, stress-induced intestinal dysfunction, and short bowel syndrome. Pigs have also shown great promise for the study of intestinal barrier function, surgical tissue manipulation and intervention, as well as biomaterial implantation and tissue transplantation. Advantages of pig models highlighted by these studies include the physiological similarity to human intestine and mechanisms of human disease. Emerging future directions for porcine models of human disease include the fields of transgenics and stem cell biology, with exciting implications for regenerative medicine.

  6. Transplantation of human mesenchymal stems cells into intervertebral discs in a xenogeneic porcine model.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Helena B; Svanvik, Teresia; Jonsson, Marianne; Hagman, Margret; Horn, Michael; Lindahl, Anders; Brisby, Helena

    2009-01-15

    Experimental and descriptive study of a xenotransplantation model in minipigs. To study survival and function of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) after transplantation into injured porcine spinal discs, as a model for cell therapy. Biologic treatment options of the intervertebral disc are suggested for patients with chronic low back pain caused by disc degeneration. Three lumbar discs in each of 9 minipigs were injured by aspiration of the nucleus pulposus (NP), 2 weeks later hMSCs were injected in F12 media suspension (cell/med) or with a hydrogel carrier (Puramatrix) (cell/gel). The animals were sacrificed after 1, 3, or 6 months. Disc appearance was visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. Immunohistochemistry methods were used to detect hMSCs by antihuman nuclear antibody staining, and further performed for Collagen II, Aggrecan, and Collagen I. SOX 9, Aggrecan, Versican, Collagen IA, and Collagen IIA and Collagen IIB human mRNA expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. At magnetic resonance imaging all injured discs demonstrated degenerative signs. Cell/gel discs showed fewer changes compared with cell/med discs and only injured discs at later time points. hMSCs were detected in 9 of 10 of the cell/gel discs and in 8 of 9 of the cell/med discs. Immunostaining for Aggrecan and Collagen type II expression were observed in NP after 3 and 6 months in gel/cell discs and colocalized with the antihuman nuclear antibody. mRNA expression of Collagen IIA, Collagen IIB, Versican, Collagen 1A, Aggrecan, and SOX9 were detected in both cell/med and cell/gel discs at the time points 3 and 6 months by real-time PCR. hMSCs survive in the porcine disc for at least 6 months and express typical chondrocyte markers suggesting differentiation toward disc-like cells. As in autologous animal models the combination with a three-dimensional-hydrogel carrier seems to facilitate differentiation and survival of MSCs in the disc. Xenotransplantation seems to be valuable in evaluating

  7. Effects of Pharmacologic Intervention on Oxygenation, Lung Water and Protein Leak in the Pseudomonas ARDS Porcine Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    swine U6 i!D 19, ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) A porcine model of Pseudorronas induced acute lung injury...and the clinical picture seen in ARDS unfolds. Pseudomonas- induced ARDS in the porcine model has been used as an effective and reproducible model of...sepsis- induced ARDS in this laboratory. Because ARDS is mediated by numerous inflammatory mediators, it is likely that treatment will require several

  8. Invasive surgery reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function in a porcine model of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    van Hout, Gerardus PJ; Teuben, Michel PJ; Heeres, Marjolein; de Maat, Steven; de Jong, Renate; Maas, Coen; Kouwenberg, Lisanne HJA; Koenderman, Leo; van Solinge, Wouter W; de Jager, Saskia CA; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo E

    2015-01-01

    Reperfusion injury following myocardial infarction (MI) increases infarct size (IS) and deteriorates cardiac function. Cardioprotective strategies in large animal MI models often failed in clinical trials, suggesting translational failure. Experimentally, MI is induced artificially and the effect of the experimental procedures may influence outcome and thus clinical applicability. The aim of this study was to investigate if invasive surgery, as in the common open chest MI model affects IS and cardiac function. Twenty female landrace pigs were subjected to MI by transluminal balloon occlusion. In 10 of 20 pigs, balloon occlusion was preceded by invasive surgery (medial sternotomy). After 72 hrs, pigs were subjected to echocardiography and Evans blue/triphenyl tetrazoliumchloride double staining to determine IS and area at risk. Quantification of IS showed a significant IS reduction in the open chest group compared to the closed chest group (IS versus area at risk: 50.9 ± 5.4% versus 69.9 ± 3.4%, P = 0.007). End systolic LV volume and LV ejection fraction measured by echocardiography at follow-up differed significantly between both groups (51 ± 5 ml versus 65 ± 3 ml, P = 0.033; 47.5 ± 2.6% versus 38.8 ± 1.2%, P = 0.005). The inflammatory response in the damaged myocardium did not differ between groups. This study indicates that invasive surgery reduces IS and preserves cardiac function in a porcine MI model. Future studies need to elucidate the effect of infarct induction technique on the efficacy of pharmacological therapies in large animal cardioprotection studies. PMID:26282710

  9. Biomechanical characteristics of the porcine denticulate ligament in different vertebral levels of the cervical spine-preliminary results of an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Polak, Katarzyna; Czyż, Marcin; Ścigała, Krzysztof; Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz; Będziński, Romuald

    2014-06-01

    Few studies exist on the mechanical properties of denticulate ligaments and none report the variation in these properties at different levels of the spine. The aim of this study was to perform an experimental determination of load-extension and stress-strain characteristics of the denticulate ligament and to establish if their properties change at different vertebral levels of the cervical spine. The study was carried out on a total of 98 porcine denticulate ligament samples dissected from seven fresh porcine cervical spinal cord specimens. All of the samples were subjected to an uniaxial tensile test at a speed of 2mm/min, during which the load-extension characteristics were registered. The analysis revealed a decrease of the failure force in the caudal orientation indicated by significant differences between the C1 (1.04±0.41N) and C7 (0.55±0.12N) vertebral levels (P=0.037). The average ultimate force that broke the denticulate ligaments was 0.88N. The mean value of Young׳s modulus was 2.06MPa with a minimum of 1.31MPa for C7 and maximum of 2.46MPa for C5. The values of the denticulate ligament failure force in samples from different cervical vertebrae levels differ significantly. The presented data should be taken into consideration during numerical modelling of the human cervical spinal cord. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide on an experimental porcine enterovirus infection in piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Derbyshire, J B

    1983-01-01

    Eleven specific pathogen-free, five week old piglets were infected orally with the T80 strain of porcine enterovirus type 2. Three days after infection, five of the piglets were treated with cyclophosphamide, together with two of four uninfected control piglets. The treated, infected piglets developed severe diarrhea, and one showed signs of encephalomyelitis. These piglets showed no virological evidence of recovery from the infection, since the virus persisted throughout the intestinal tract, and they failed to mount a serological response. It was concluded that immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide impaired the normal recovery mechanisms in this infection, providing further evidence that the humoral immune response is an important defence mechanism against porcine enterovirus infection in piglets. PMID:6224548

  11. Porcine pulmonary auto-transplantation for ex vivo therapy as a model for new treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Marcus; Zinne, Norman; Biancosino, Christian; Höffler, Klaus; Rajab, Taufiek K; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Jonigk, Danny; Avsar, Murat; Haverich, Axel; Hoeltig, Doris

    2016-09-01

    Lung auto-transplantation is the surgical key step in experiments involving ex vivo therapy of severe or end-stage lung diseases. Ex vivo therapy has become a clinical reality because of systems such as the Organ Care System (OCS) Lung, which is the only commercially available portable lung perfusion system. However, survival experiments involving porcine lung auto-transplantation pose special surgical and anaesthesiological challenges. This current study was designed to describe the development of surgical techniques and aneasthesiological management strategies that facilitate lung auto-transplantation survival surgery including a follow-up period of 4 days. Left pneumonectomy was performed in 12 Mini-Lewe miniature pigs. After ex vivo treatment of the harvested lungs within the OCS Lung for 2 h, the lungs were retransplanted into the same animal (auto-transplantation). Four animals were used to develop the optimal techniques and establish an experimental protocol. According to the final protocol, eight additional animals were operated. The follow-up period was 4 days. There were four severe intraoperative surgical complications [anatomical variant of the superior vena cava (two times), a complication related to the bronchial anastomosis and a complication related to the pulmonary arterial anastomosis]. The major postoperative problems were hyperkalaemia, prolonged recovery from anaesthesia and pulmonary oedema after reperfusion. Establishment of the surgical technique showed that using a pericardial tube to facilitate the anastomosis of the thin left superior pulmonary vein should be considered to prevent thrombosis. However, routine use of the patch technique to construct venous and arterial anastomoses is not necessary. Furthermore, traction on the venous anastomoses can be avoided by performing the bronchial anastomosis first. Lung auto-transplantation is a feasible experimental model for ex vivo therapy of lung diseases and is applicable for experimental

  12. Lesions in the reproductive tract of boars experimentally infected with porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Mendoza, H; Hernandez-Jauregui, P; Reyes-Leyva, J; Zenteno, E; Moreno-Lopez, J; Kennedy, S

    1997-10-01

    "Blue eye" disease of pigs in Mexico is caused by porcine rubulavirus and characterized by infertility in sows and boars, nervous signs in young pigs, and corneal opacity in pigs of all ages. The pathogenesis of reproductive tract lesions in rubulavirus-infected boars has not previously been investigated. In a first experiment, four 9-month-old boars were inoculated with porcine rubulavirus and killed 5, 15, 30 or 45 days post-inoculation (pi). In a second experiment, four similar boars were inoculated with the same virus and two animals were killed on each of days 70 and 80 pi. Swelling of the head of the epididymis developed in all inoculated boars at approximately day 15 pi. Reduced spermatozoan motility and concentration were detected in semen samples collected from one boar from day 21 pi. At post-mortem examination, nodules were seen in the head of the epididymis of the boars killed 15, 30 or 45 days pi and the right testis of the pig killed 30 days pi was atrophic. Corresponding histopathological epididymal alterations included formation of spermatic granulomas and vacuolar degeneration of ductular epithelium. These lesions were associated with mononuclear cell infiltration and interstitial fibroplasia. Degeneration of seminiferous tubules and interstitial mononuclear cell infiltration were seen in the atrophic testis of the pig killed 30 days pi. There was fibrosis of the head of the epididymis in all boars killed 70 or 80 days pi and one of these animals also had right testicular atrophy associated with degeneration of seminiferous tubules, lymphocytic infiltration and giant cell formation. Porcine rubulavirus antigen was detected by immunofluorescence labelling in the head of the epididymis of the pigs killed 15, 30 or 45 days pi and in one animal killed on day 70 pi. These results indicate that porcine rubulavirus can cause severe epididymo-orchitis and reduced semen quality in sexually mature boars.

  13. Effect of porcine circovirus type 2a or 2b on infection kinetics and pathogenicity of two genetically divergent strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in the conventional pig model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to characterize the infection dynamics and pathogenicity of two heterologous type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates in a conventional pig model under the influence of concurrent porcine circovirus (PCV) subtype 2a or 2b infection. ...

  14. Modified robotic lightweight endoscope (ViKY) validation in vivo in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Gumbs, Andrew A; Crovari, Fernando; Vidal, Clement; Henri, Patrick; Gayet, Brice

    2007-12-01

    The added precision and steadiness of a robotically held camera enables the performance of more complex procedures laparoscopically. In contrast to typical laparoscope holders, the modified lightweight robotic endoscope, the ViKY system is particularly compact, simple to set up and use, and occupies no floor space. Ease and safety of setup was confirmed in a porcine model and several common general surgical procedures were performed. The sterilizable endoscope manipulator is sufficiently small to be placed directly on the operating room table without interfering with other handheld instruments during minimally invasive surgery. The endoscope manipulator and its user interface were tested and evaluated by several surgeons during a series of 5 minimally invasive surgical training procedures in a porcine model. The endoscope manipulator described has been shown to be a practical device with performance and functionality equivalent to those of commercially available models, yet with greatly reduced size, weight, and cost.

  15. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Thoracolumbar Fascia Injury and Movement Restriction in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Bishop, James H; Fox, James R; Maple, Rhonda; Loretan, Caitlin; Badger, Gary J; Henry, Sharon M; Vizzard, Margaret A; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of back pain following acute back "sprains" is a serious public health problem with poorly understood pathophysiology. The recent finding that human subjects with chronic low back pain (LBP) have increased thickness and decreased mobility of the thoracolumbar fascia measured with ultrasound suggest that the fasciae of the back may be involved in LBP pathophysiology. This study used a porcine model to test the hypothesis that similar ultrasound findings can be produced experimentally in a porcine model by combining a local injury of fascia with movement restriction using a "hobble" device linking one foot to a chest harness for 8 weeks. Ultrasound measurements of thoracolumbar fascia thickness and shear plane mobility (shear strain) during passive hip flexion were made at the 8 week time point on the non-intervention side (injury and/or hobble). Injury alone caused both an increase in fascia thickness (p = .007) and a decrease in fascia shear strain on the non-injured side (p = .027). Movement restriction alone did not change fascia thickness but did decrease shear strain on the non-hobble side (p = .024). The combination of injury plus movement restriction had additive effects on reducing fascia mobility with a 52% reduction in shear strain compared with controls and a 28% reduction compared to movement restriction alone. These results suggest that a back injury involving fascia, even when healed, can affect the relative mobility of fascia layers away from the injured area, especially when movement is also restricted.

  16. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Thoracolumbar Fascia Injury and Movement Restriction in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, James H.; Fox, James R.; Maple, Rhonda; Loretan, Caitlin; Badger, Gary J.; Henry, Sharon M.; Vizzard, Margaret A.; Langevin, Helene M.

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of back pain following acute back “sprains” is a serious public health problem with poorly understood pathophysiology. The recent finding that human subjects with chronic low back pain (LBP) have increased thickness and decreased mobility of the thoracolumbar fascia measured with ultrasound suggest that the fasciae of the back may be involved in LBP pathophysiology. This study used a porcine model to test the hypothesis that similar ultrasound findings can be produced experimentally in a porcine model by combining a local injury of fascia with movement restriction using a “hobble” device linking one foot to a chest harness for 8 weeks. Ultrasound measurements of thoracolumbar fascia thickness and shear plane mobility (shear strain) during passive hip flexion were made at the 8 week time point on the non-intervention side (injury and/or hobble). Injury alone caused both an increase in fascia thickness (p = .007) and a decrease in fascia shear strain on the non-injured side (p = .027). Movement restriction alone did not change fascia thickness but did decrease shear strain on the non-hobble side (p = .024). The combination of injury plus movement restriction had additive effects on reducing fascia mobility with a 52% reduction in shear strain compared with controls and a 28% reduction compared to movement restriction alone. These results suggest that a back injury involving fascia, even when healed, can affect the relative mobility of fascia layers away from the injured area, especially when movement is also restricted. PMID:26820883

  17. Percentile growth charts for biomedical studies using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Corson, A M; Laws, J; Laws, A; Litten, J C; Lean, I J; Clarke, L

    2008-12-01

    Increasing rates of obesity and heart disease are compromising quality of life for a growing number of people. There is much research linking adult disease with the growth and development both in utero and during the first year of life. The pig is an ideal model for studying the origins of developmental programming. The objective of this paper was to construct percentile growth curves for the pig for use in biomedical studies. The body weight (BW) of pigs was recorded from birth to 150 days of age and their crown-to-rump length was measured over the neonatal period to enable the ponderal index (PI; kg/m3) to be calculated. Data were normalised and percentile curves were constructed using Cole's lambda-mu-sigma (LMS) method for BW and PI. The construction of these percentile charts for use in biomedical research will allow a more detailed and precise tracking of growth and development of individual pigs under experimental conditions.

  18. A Zebrafish Larval Model to Assess Virulence of Porcine Streptococcus suis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zaccaria, Edoardo; Cao, Rui; Wells, Jerry M.; van Baarlen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an encapsulated Gram-positive bacterium, and the leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in young pigs resulting in considerable economic losses in the porcine industry. It is also considered an emerging zoonotic agent. In the environment, both avirulent and virulent strains occur in pigs, and virulent strains appear to cause disease in both humans and pigs. There is a need for a convenient, reliable and standardized animal model to assess S. suis virulence. A zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae infection model has several advantages, including transparency of larvae, low cost, ease of use and exemption from ethical legislation up to 6 days post fertilization, but has not been previously established as a model for S. suis. Microinjection of different porcine strains of S. suis in zebrafish larvae resulted in highly reproducible dose- and strain-dependent larval death, strongly correlating with presence of the S. suis capsule and to the original virulence of the strain in pigs. Additionally we compared the virulence of the two-component system mutant of ciaRH, which is attenuated for virulence in both mice and pigs in vivo. Infection of larvae with the ΔciaRH strain resulted in significantly higher survival rate compared to infection with the S10 wild-type strain. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish larvae are a rapid and reliable model to assess the virulence of clinical porcine S. suis isolates. PMID:26999052

  19. Does the additional application of a polylactide film (SurgiWrap) to a lightweight mesh (TiMesh) reduce adhesions after laparoscopic intraperitoneal implantation procedures? Experimental results obtained with the laparoscopic porcine model.

    PubMed

    Schug-Pass, Christine; Sommerer, Florian; Tannapfel, Andrea; Lippert, Hans; Köckerling, Ferdinand

    2008-11-01

    Intraperitoneal repair of incisional hernias using a mesh makes particular demands on the material used. In addition to good integration of the mesh on the parietal side, adhesions to the visceral peritoneum must be avoided. Large-pore, light-weight meshes induce fewer adhesions than heavy-weight polypropylene meshes. Although numerous adhesion-barrier substances for use in combination with a polypropylene mesh have been tested already, mostly in open small animal models, unequivocal benefits have been identified to date in only a few of the experiments. Using the laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh technique, six pigs were implanted with either a lightweight polypropylene mesh (TiMesh light) or TiMesh plus an adhesion-barrier film made of polylactide (SurgiWrap). After 3 months, the animals underwent a postmortem laparoscopy, and specimens were obtained for planimetric and histologic investigations. No adhesions to intestinal structures were found in any of the animals. Adhesions between the greater omentum and the mesh did not differ significantly between the TiMesh (32%) and SurgiWrap (33.5%) groups. The shrinkage of the mesh's surface area was comparable between the two groups (18% vs. 21%). Histology showed pronounced inflammatory reaction and bridging of scar tissue between the filaments with the use of SurgiWrap versus TiMesh light without film. However, immunohistochemical investigations examining the partial volume of the inflammatory cells, the proliferation marker Ki67, and the apoptotic index at the interface of the filaments all failed to show any significant differences. To avoid adhesions, it is essential that the acute and chronic inflammatory reaction to the implanted material be as small as possible. This requirement is met specifically by the lightweight polypropylene mesh TiMesh light. The additional application of a slowly absorbable adhesion-barrier film made of polylactide (SurgiWrap) does not appear to confer any further benefit.

  20. Effects of xenon and isoflurane on apoptosis and inflammation in a porcine myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Sopka, Sasa; Mertens, Christine; Roehl, Anna Bettina; Schiffl, Katharina; Rossaint, Rolf; Classen-Linke, Irmgard

    2013-03-01

    Volatile anaesthetics can reduce the infarction size in myocardial tissue when administered before and during experimentally induced ischaemia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether xenon is beneficial compared to isoflurane in limiting myocardial tissue apoptosis and inflammation induced by experimental ischaemia-reperfusion injury in a porcine right ventricular infarction model. Twenty-one animals used for this study randomly received isoflurane, xenon or thiopental, (n=6-8 per group). Myocardial infarction was induced for 90min, followed by reperfusion for 120min. Tissues from the left and right ventricles were removed from the sites of infarction, reperfusion and remote areas, and processed for immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis (caspase-3 staining) and neutrophilic infiltration (naphthol AS-D chloroacetate-specific esterase) were assessed and evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using an ANOVA of repeated measures. Density of apoptotic cells were higher in tissues from animals that were anesthetized with xenon. This effect was significant in comparison to isoflurane (p=0.0177). Neutrophilic infiltration was significantly higher in the right compared to the left ventricle (p<0.001), whereas no significant differences in the number of granulocytes based on the anaesthetic regime or the different tissue areas were found. We conclude that xenon, in the early phase of ischaemia and reperfusion, induces a significant increase in apoptosis compared to isoflurane. Therefore, clinical use of this anaesthetic in cardiocompromised patients should be taken with care until more long-term studies have been carried out. The increased neutrophilic infiltration in the right vs. the left ventricle indicates the right ventricle being more susceptible to ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

  1. Experimental models of stress

    PubMed Central

    Patchev, Vladimir K.; Patchev, Alexandre V.

    2006-01-01

    Illustrating the complexity of the stress response and its multifaceted manifestations is the leading idea of this overview of experimental paradigms used for stress induction in laboratory animals. The description of key features of models based on naturalistic stressors, pharmacological challenges, and genomic manipulations is complemented by comprehensive analysis of physiological, behavioral, neurochemical, and endocrine changes and their appropriatness as outcome readouts. Particular attention has been paid to the role of sex and age as determinants of the dynamics of the stress response. Possible translational applications of stress-inducing paradigms as models of disease are briefly sketched. PMID:17290800

  2. Short Duration Combined Mild Hypothermia Improves Resuscitation Outcomes in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Zhengfei; Li, Heng; Ding, Youde; Huang, Zitong; Li, Yongqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of combined hypothermia with short duration maintenance on the resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods. Fourteen porcine models were electrically induced with VF and untreated for 11 mins. All animals were successfully resuscitated manually and then randomized into two groups: combined mild hypothermia (CH group) and normothermia group (NT group). A combined hypothermia of ice cold saline infusion and surface cooling was implemented in the animals of the CH group and maintained for 4 hours. The survival outcomes and neurological function were evaluated every 24 hours until a maximum of 96 hours. Neuron apoptosis in hippocampus was analyzed. Results. There were no significant differences in baseline physiologies and primary resuscitation outcomes between both groups. Obvious improvements of cardiac output were observed in the CH group at 120, 180, and 240 mins following resuscitation. The animals demonstrated better survival at 96 hours in the CH group when compared to the NT group. In comparison with the NT group, favorable neurological functions were observed in the CH group. Conclusion. Short duration combined cooling initiated after resuscitation improves survival and neurological outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged VF. PMID:26558261

  3. A differentiated porcine bronchial epithelial cell culture model for studying human adenovirus tropism and virulence.

    PubMed

    Lam, E; Ramke, M; Groos, S; Warnecke, G; Heim, A

    2011-12-01

    The species specificity of human adenoviruses (HAdV) almost precludes studying virulence and tropism in animal models, e.g. rodent models, or derived tissue and cell culture models. However, replication of HAdV type 5 (HAdV-C5) has been shown after intravenous injection in swine. In order to study adenovirus replication in airway tissue propagation of bronchial epithelial cells from porcine lungs was established. These primary cells proved to be fully permissive for HAdV-C5 infection in submerged culture, demonstrating efficient HAdV genome replication, infectious viral particle release (1.07×10(8) TCID(50)/ml±6.63×10(7)) and development of cytopathic effect (CPE). Differentiation of porcine bronchial epithelial cells was achieved at the air-liquid interface on collagen I coated 0.4μm polyester membranes. Morphology, expression of tubulin and occludin, the development of tight-junctions and cilia were similar to human bronchial epithelial cells. Infection with HAdV-C5 from the basolateral side resulted in release of infectious virus progeny (2.05×10(7) TCID(50)/ml±2.39×10(7)) to the apical surface as described recently in human bronchial epithelial cells, although complete CPE was not observed. Differentiated porcine bronchial epithelial cells hold promise as a novel method for studying the virulence and pathophysiology of pneumonia associated HAdV types.

  4. A novel coculture model of porcine central neuroretina explants and retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Lauro, Salvatore; Rodriguez-Crespo, David; Gayoso, Manuel J.; Garcia-Gutierrez, Maria T.; Pastor, J. Carlos; Srivastava, Girish K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop and standardize a novel organ culture model using porcine central neuroretina explants and RPE cells separated by a cell culture membrane. Methods RPE cells were isolated from porcine eyes, expanded, and seeded on the bottom of cell culture inserts. Neuroretina explants were obtained from the area centralis and cultured alone (controls) on cell culture membranes or supplemented with RPE cells in the same wells but physically separated by the culture membrane. Finally, cellular and tissue specimens were processed for phase contrast, cyto-/histological, and immunochemical evaluation. Neuroretina thickness was also determined. Results Compared to the neuroretinas cultured alone, the neuroretinas cocultured with RPE cells maintained better tissue structure and cellular organization, displayed better preservation of photoreceptors containing rhodopsin, lower levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoexpression, and preservation of cellular retinaldehyde binding protein both markers of reactive gliosis. Neuroretina thickness was significantly greater in the cocultures. Conclusions A coculture model of central porcine neuroretina and RPE cells was successfully developed and standardized. This model mimics a subretinal space and will be useful in studying interactions between the RPE and the neuroretina and to preclinically test potential therapies. PMID:27081295

  5. Extrahepatic islet transplantation with microporous polymer scaffolds in syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models.

    PubMed

    Gibly, Romie F; Zhang, Xiaomin; Graham, Melanie L; Hering, Bernhard J; Kaufman, Dixon B; Lowe, William L; Shea, Lonnie D

    2011-12-01

    Intraportal transplantation of islets has successfully treated select patients with type 1 diabetes. However, intravascular infusion and the intrahepatic site contribute to significant early and late islet loss, yet a clinical alternative has remained elusive. We investigated non-encapsulating, porous, biodegradable polymer scaffolds as a vehicle for islet transplantation into extrahepatic sites, using syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models. Scaffold architecture was modified to enhance cell infiltration leading to revascularization of the islets with minimal inflammatory response. In the diabetic mouse model, 125 islets seeded on scaffolds implanted into the epididymal fat pad restored normoglycemia within an average of 1.95 days and transplantation of only 75 islets required 12.1 days. Increasing the pore size to increase islet-islet interactions did not significantly impact islet function. The porcine model was used to investigate early islet engraftment. Increasing the islet seeding density led to a greater mass of engrafted islets, though the efficiency of islet survival decreased. Transplantation into the porcine omentum provided greater islet engraftment than the gastric submucosa. These results demonstrate scaffolds support murine islet transplantation with high efficiency, and feasibility studies in large animals support continued pre-clinical studies with scaffolds as a platform to control the transplant microenvironment.

  6. Porcine gonadogenesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Five images submitted for teaching purposes related to porcine gonadogenesis (2), porcine fetal testicular development (2), and porcine fetal ovarian development. Key words include: Egg cell nests, Embryo, GATA4, Genital ridge, Gonad, Leydig cell, Mesonephros, MIS, Ovary, P450c17, Porcine, Sertoli ...

  7. Experimental infections of the porcine foetus with Bungowannah virus, a novel pestivirus.

    PubMed

    Finlaison, Deborah S; Cook, Roger W; Srivastava, Mukesh; Frost, Melinda J; King, Katherine R; Kirkland, Peter D

    2010-07-29

    In 2003 an outbreak of sudden deaths occurred in 2-3-week-old pigs on a piggery in New South Wales, Australia. There was a marked increase in the birth of stillborn pigs and preweaning losses associated with a multifocal non-suppurative myocarditis with myonecrosis. The aim of this study was to amplify any infectious agents present in field material to aid the detection and identification of the causative agent of the porcine myocarditis syndrome (PMC). Foetuses were directly inoculated in utero with tissue extracts from field cases of PMC at 56-60, 70-84 or 85-94 days of gestation and euthanased 7-28 days later. The IgG concentration in foetal sera/body fluids was measured, hearts were examined by light microscopy and selected hearts were examined by electron microscopy. An infectious agent was detected in tissues from cases of PMC and its identification as the novel pestivirus Bungowannah virus has recently been reported (Kirkland et al., 2007). Sow sera, foetal tissues and foetal sera/body fluids were tested for Bungowannah virus RNA by qRT-PCR and antibody by peroxidase-linked assay. Bungowannah virus was detected in numerous organs of the porcine foetus. Following direct foetal exposure it is probable that this virus spreads by direct intra-uterine transmission to adjacent foetuses and by trans-uterine transmission to the dam. Data were obtained for both the replication of the virus in the porcine foetus and the humoral immune response in the foetus and sow. Crown Copyright (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural investigation of porcine stomach mucin by X-ray fiber diffraction and homology modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Veluraja, K.; Vennila, K.N.; Umamakeshvari, K.; Jasmine, A.; Velmurugan, D.

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Techniques to get oriented mucin fibre. {yields} X-ray fibre diffraction pattern for mucin. {yields} Molecular modeling of mucin based on X-ray fibre diffraction pattern. -- Abstract: The basic understanding of the three dimensional structure of mucin is essential to understand its physiological function. Technology has been developed to achieve orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules. X-ray fiber diffraction of partially orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules show d-spacing signals at 2.99, 4.06, 4.22, 4.7, 5.37 and 6.5 A. The high intense d-spacing signal at 4.22 A is attributed to the antiparallel {beta}-sheet structure identified in the fraction of the homology modeled mucin molecule (amino acid residues 800-980) using Nidogen-Laminin complex structure as a template. The X-ray fiber diffraction signal at 6.5 A reveals partial organization of oligosaccharides in porcine stomach mucin. This partial structure of mucin will be helpful in establishing a three dimensional structure for the whole mucin molecule.

  9. Establishment and characterization of a differentiated epithelial cell culture model derived from the porcine cervix uteri

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical uterine epithelial cells maintain a physiological and pathogen-free milieu in the female mammalian reproductive tract and are involved in sperm-epithelium interaction. Easily accessible, differentiated model systems of the cervical epithelium are not yet available to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms within these highly specialized cells. Therefore, the aim of the study was to establish a cell culture of the porcine cervical epithelium representing in vivo-like properties of the tissue. Results We tested different isolation methods and culture conditions and validated purity of the cultured cells by immunohistochemistry against keratins. We could reproducibly culture pure epithelial cells from cervical tissue explants. Based on a morphology score and the WST-1 Proliferation Assay, we optimized the growth medium composition. Primary porcine cervical cells performed best in conditioned Ham's F-12, containing 10% FCS, EGF and insulin. After cultivation in an air-liquid interface for three weeks, the cells showed a discontinuously multilayered phenotype. Finally, differentiation was validated via immunohistochemistry against beta catenin. Mucopolysaccharide production could be shown via alcian blue staining. Conclusions We provide the first suitable protocol to establish a differentiated porcine epithelial model of the cervix uteri, based on easily accessible cells using slaughterhouse material. PMID:22429795

  10. Modelling the porcine oviduct epithelium: a polarized in vitro system suitable for long-term cultivation.

    PubMed

    Miessen, K; Sharbati, S; Einspanier, R; Schoen, J

    2011-09-15

    For exploring the processes leading to successful reproduction, differentiated long-term in vitro systems modelling the mammalian oviduct are needed. Therefore, in the present study culture conditions for primary porcine oviductal epithelial cells were optimized with regard to morphological differentiation and usability for extended cultivation periods. To evaluate different growth media for the primary cells, we used morphological criteria as well as real-time impedance measurement. After an initial media testing, the cells were grown on hanging membranes and the culture settings (conventionally cultured, serum gradient over the membrane and air-liquid interface) were assessed by histology and electron microscopy. We proved long-term expression of an oviduct specific marker (oviductal glycoprotein 1) and showed a hormone responsiveness of the culture system by means of quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Differentiated epithelial cells could reproducibly be cultured up to 6 weeks in an air-liquid interface. After 3 weeks of culturing, the cells were clearly polarized and exhibited cilia. The model maintains physiological properties such as morphological features (mixed cell population of ciliated and secretory cells, apical cell-cell contacts typical for columnar epithelial cells) and oviduct-specific markers showing hormone responsiveness. We established a polarized long-term in vitro-system of the porcine oviductal epithelium preserving detailed features of the porcine oviduct. Therefore, we provide a useful tool to elucidate unsolved scientific questions concerning reproductive physiology.

  11. Experimental in utero infection of fetal pigs with a porcine parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, P A; Sheffy, B E; Vauhan, J T

    1975-01-01

    In utero infection of fetuses of six specific-pathogen-free large white sows at 35, 48, 55, 72, 99, and 105 days was studied. The fetuses were infected by direct inoculation of porcine parvovirus into the amniotic sac. The inoculation consisted of 0.25 ml of tissue culture fluid containing 10(5.5) mean tissue culture infective doses per ml of porcine parvovirus strain G10/1. Fetuses of one uterus horn were infected, whereas fetuses in the opposite horn were given 0.25 ml of noninfected cell culture material. No clinical signs of infection were observed; however, all sows developed antibodies 7 to 9 days postinfection. A total of 24 virus-inoculated fetuses and 20 control fetuses were studied. Fetuses infected at 35, 48, and 55 days of gestation died between about 5 and 22 days after infection. Virus was isolated from their organs and fetal blood. Virus spread to control fetuses but did not cause death and mummification or stimulate antibody production. Fetuses from sows infected at 72, 99, and 105 days of gestation survived. They developed high antibody titer in utero. Control piglets remained antibody free. PMID:1165118

  12. The immunology of the porcine skin and its value as a model for human skin.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Artur; Meurens, François; Ricklin, Meret E

    2015-07-01

    The porcine skin has striking similarities to the human skin in terms of general structure, thickness, hair follicle content, pigmentation, collagen and lipid composition. This has been the basis for numerous studies using the pig as a model for wound healing, transdermal delivery, dermal toxicology, radiation and UVB effects. Considering that the skin also represents an immune organ of utmost importance for health, immune cells present in the skin of the pig will be reviewed. The focus of this review is on dendritic cells, which play a central role in the skin immune system as they serve as sentinels in the skin, which offers a large surface area exposed to the environment. Based on a literature review and original data we propose a classification of porcine dendritic cell subsets in the skin corresponding to the subsets described in the human skin. The equivalent of the human CD141(+) DC subset is CD1a(-)CD4(-)CD172a(-)CADM1(high), that of the CD1c(+) subset is CD1a(+)CD4(-)CD172a(+)CADM1(+/low), and porcine plasmacytoid dendritic cells are CD1a(-)CD4(+)CD172a(+)CADM1(-). CD209 and CD14 could represent markers of inflammatory monocyte-derived cells, either dendritic cells or macrophages. Future studies for example using transriptomic analysis of sorted populations are required to confirm the identity of these cells.

  13. Development of an in vitro porcine aorta model to study the stability of stent grafts in motor vehicle accidents.

    PubMed

    Darvish, Kurosh; Shafieian, Mehdi; Romanov, Vasily; Rotella, Vittorio; Salvatore, Michael D; Blebea, John

    2009-04-01

    Endovascular stent grafts for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms have become increasingly utilized and yet their locational stability in moderate chest trauma is unknown. A high speed impact system was developed to study the stability of aortic endovascular stent grafts in vitro. A straight segment of porcine descending aorta with stent graft was constrained in a custom-made transparent urethane casing. The specimen was tested in a novel impact system at an anterior inclination of 45 deg and an average deceleration of 55 G, which represented a frontal automobile crash. Due to the shock of the impact, which was shown to be below the threshold of aortic injury, the stent graft moved 0.6 mm longitudinally. This result was repeatable. The presented experimental model may be helpful in developing future grafts to withstand moderate shocks experienced in motor vehicle accidents or other dynamic loadings of the chest.

  14. Experimental Models of Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by interstitial edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, depending on its severity. Regardless of the extent of tissue injury, acute pancreatitis is a completely reversible process with evident normal tissue architecture after recovery. Its pathogenic mechanism has been known to be closely related to intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In contrast to acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible tissue damage such as acinar cell atrophy and pancreatic fibrosis that results in exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Recently, many studies of chronic pancreatitis have been prompted by the discovery of the pancreatic stellate cell, which has been identified and distinguished as the key effector cell of pancreatic fibrosis. However, investigations into the pathogenesis and treatment of pancreatitis face many obstacles because of its anatomical location and disparate clinical course. Due to these difficulties, most of our knowledge on pancreatitis is based on research conducted using experimental models of pancreatitis. In this review, several experimental models of pancreatitis will be discussed in terms of technique, advantages, and limitations. PMID:24944983

  15. Irreversible Electroporation of the Pancreas Using Parallel Plate Electrodes in a Porcine Model: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Steffi J. E.; Nijkamp, Maarten W.; van Dijck, Willemijn P. M.; Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.; Konings, Maurits; van Hillegersberg, R.; Borel Rinkes, Inne H. M.; Hagendoorn, Jeroen; Wittkampf, Fred H.; Molenaar, I. Quintus

    2017-01-01

    Background Irreversible electroporation (IRE) with needle electrodes is being explored as treatment option in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Several studies have shown promising results with IRE needles, positioned around the tumor to achieve tumor ablation. Disadvantages are the technical difficulties for needle placement, the time needed to achieve tumor ablation, the risk of needle track seeding and most important the possible occurrence of postoperative pancreatic fistula via the needle tracks. The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the feasibility of a new IRE-technique using two parallel plate electrodes, in a porcine model. Methods Twelve healthy pigs underwent laparotomy. The pancreas was mobilized to enable positioning of the paddles. A standard monophasic external cardiac defibrillator was used to perform an ablation in 3 separate parts of the pancreas; either a single application of 50 or 100J or a serial application of 4x50J. After 6 hours, pancreatectomy was performed for histology and pigs were terminated. Results Histology showed necrosis of pancreatic parenchyma with neutrophil influx in 5/12, 11/12 and 12/12 of the ablated areas at 50, 100, and 4x50J respectively. The electric current density threshold to achieve necrosis was 4.3, 5.1 and 3.4 A/cm2 respectively. The ablation threshold was significantly lower for the serial compared to the single applications (p = 0.003). The content of the ablated areas differed between the applications: areas treated with a single application of 50 J often contained vital areas without obvious necrosis, whereas half of the sections treated with 100 J showed small islands of normal looking cells surrounded by necrosis, while all sections receiving 4x 50 J showed a homogeneous necrotic lesion. Conclusion Pancreatic tissue can be successfully ablated using two parallel paddles around the tissue. A serial application of 4x50J was most effective in creating a homogeneous necrotic lesion. PMID:28052102

  16. Creating a model of diseased artery damage and failure from healthy porcine aorta.

    PubMed

    Noble, Christopher; Smulders, Nicole; Green, Nicola H; Lewis, Roger; Carré, Matt J; Franklin, Steve E; MacNeil, Sheila; Taylor, Zeike A

    2016-07-01

    Large quantities of diseased tissue are required in the research and development of new generations of medical devices, for example for use in physical testing. However, these are difficult to obtain. In contrast, porcine arteries are readily available as they are regarded as waste. Therefore, reliable means of creating from porcine tissue physical models of diseased human tissue that emulate well the associated mechanical changes would be valuable. To this end, we studied the effect on mechanical response of treating porcine thoracic aorta with collagenase, elastase and glutaraldehyde. The alterations in mechanical and failure properties were assessed via uniaxial tension testing. A constitutive model composed of the Gasser-Ogden-Holzapfel model, for elastic response, and a continuum damage model, for the failure, was also employed to provide a further basis for comparison (Calvo and Peña, 2006; Gasser et al., 2006). For the concentrations used here it was found that: collagenase treated samples showed decreased fracture stress in the axial direction only; elastase treated samples showed increased fracture stress in the circumferential direction only; and glutaraldehyde samples showed no change in either direction. With respect to the proposed constitutive model, both collagenase and elastase had a strong effect on the fibre-related terms. The model more closely captured the tissue response in the circumferential direction, due to the smoother and sharper transition from damage initiation to complete failure in this direction. Finally, comparison of the results with those of tensile tests on diseased tissues suggests that these treatments indeed provide a basis for creation of physical models of diseased arteries.

  17. Operator Independent Focused High Frequency ISM Band for Fat Reduction: Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Robert; Weiss, Margaret; Beasley, Karen; Vrba, Jan; Bernardy, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Selective fat reduction has been clearly shown for various methods and energy modalities including cryolipolysis and high intensity focused thermal ultrasound. Mathematical modeling of focused high frequency of the EM spectrum has indicated that selective heating of fat is possible using wavelengths not previous explored. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate in the porcine model that selective heating of fat is possible with a non-contact, operator independent device. Methods High frequencies of the Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) RF band were utilized to reduce abdominal fat in a porcine model. Practical application of mathematical modeling allowed an auto-feedback loop to be developed to allow operator independent adjustment of energy to maintain subcutaneous fat at 45–46°C while overlying skin remained at 40–41°C. Results Treatments of three Vietnamese pigs were performed under anesthesia in a certified veterinary facility. Gross and microscopic histologic results demonstrated a marked reduction in adipocytes of the treated area after 4 treatments of a total of 30 minutes each, with incremental fat diminution after each treatment. A final 70% reduction of the abdominal fat layer was seen in the treated areas. Duplex ultrasound revealed a reduction of fat layer from 7.6 to 2.9 mm. Histologic evaluation revealed that epidermis, dermis, and adnexal structures such as hair follicles were unaffected by the treatment, while adipocytes were significantly affected. Conclusion A new model of fat reduction using high frequency RF has been successfully achieved in a porcine model. This has very positive implications in the development of an operator independent, contact free device for reduction of fat in clinical practice. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23619902

  18. Porcine models for the metabolic syndrome, digestive and bone disorders: a general overview.

    PubMed

    Litten-Brown, J C; Corson, A M; Clarke, L

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this review article is to provide an overview of the role of pigs as a biomedical model for humans. The usefulness and limitations of porcine models have been discussed in terms of metabolic, cardiovascular, digestive and bone diseases in humans. Domestic pigs and minipigs are the main categories of pigs used as biomedical models. One drawback of minipigs is that they are in short supply and expensive compared with domestic pigs, which in contrast cost more to house, feed and medicate. Different porcine breeds show different responses to the induction of specific diseases. For example, ossabaw minipigs provide a better model than Yucatan for the metabolic syndrome as they exhibit obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension, all of which are absent in the Yucatan. Similar metabolic/physiological differences exist between domestic breeds (e.g. Meishan v. Pietrain). The modern commercial (e.g. Large White) domestic pig has been the preferred model for developmental programming due to the 2- to 3-fold variation in body weight among littermates providing a natural form of foetal growth retardation not observed in ancient (e.g. Meishan) domestic breeds. Pigs have been increasingly used to study chronic ischaemia, therapeutic angiogenesis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and abdominal aortic aneurysm as their coronary anatomy and physiology are similar to humans. Type 1 and II diabetes can be induced in swine using dietary regimes and/or administration of streptozotocin. Pigs are a good and extensively used model for specific nutritional studies as their protein and lipid metabolism is comparable with humans, although pigs are not as sensitive to protein restriction as rodents. Neonatal and weanling pigs have been used to examine the pathophysiology and prevention/treatment of microbial-associated diseases and immune system disorders. A porcine model mimicking various degrees of prematurity in infants receiving total parenteral nutrition has been established to

  19. A novel porcine model of ataxia telangiectasia reproduces neurological features and motor deficits of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Beraldi, Rosanna; Chan, Chun-Hung; Rogers, Christopher S.; Kovács, Attila D.; Meyerholz, David K.; Trantzas, Constantin; Lambertz, Allyn M.; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Weber, Krystal L.; White, Katherine A.M.; Rheeden, Richard V.; Kruer, Michael C.; Dacken, Brian A.; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T.; Rohret, Judy A.; Struzynski, Jason T.; Rohret, Frank A.; Weimer, Jill M.; Pearce, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a progressive multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the AT-mutated (ATM) gene. AT is a neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by cerebellar degeneration in children leading to motor impairment. The disease progresses with other clinical manifestations including oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immune disorders, increased susceptibly to cancer and respiratory infections. Although genetic investigations and physiological models have established the linkage of ATM with AT onset, the mechanisms linking ATM to neurodegeneration remain undetermined, hindering therapeutic development. Several murine models of AT have been successfully generated showing some of the clinical manifestations of the disease, however they do not fully recapitulate the hallmark neurological phenotype, thus highlighting the need for a more suitable animal model. We engineered a novel porcine model of AT to better phenocopy the disease and bridge the gap between human and current animal models. The initial characterization of AT pigs revealed early cerebellar lesions including loss of Purkinje cells (PCs) and altered cytoarchitecture suggesting a developmental etiology for AT and could advocate for early therapies for AT patients. In addition, similar to patients, AT pigs show growth retardation and develop motor deficit phenotypes. By using the porcine system to model human AT, we established the first animal model showing PC loss and motor features of the human disease. The novel AT pig provides new opportunities to unmask functions and roles of ATM in AT disease and in physiological conditions. PMID:26374845

  20. A 3-dimensional model for teaching local flaps using porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Zahid; Hogg, Fiona; Graham, Ken

    2014-10-01

    The European Working Time Directive and streamlined training has led to reduced training time. Surgery, as an experience-dependent craft specialty is affected more than other medical specialties. Trainees want to maximize all training opportunities in the clinical setting, and having predeveloped basic skills acquired on a simulated model can facilitate this.Here we describe the use of a novel model to design and raise local flaps in the face and scalp regions. The model consists of mannequin heads draped with porcine skin which is skewered with pins at strategic points to give a 3-dimensional model which closely resembles a cadaveric head.The advantages of this model are that it is life size and incorporates all the relevant anatomical features, which can be drawn on if required.This model was used on a recent course, Intermediate Skills in Plastic Surgery: Flaps Around the Face, at the Royal College of Surgeons England. The trainees found that practicing on the porcine skin gave them an opportunity to master the basics of flap design and implementation.In summary, this innovative 3-dimensional training model has received high levels of satisfaction and is currently as close as we can get to cadaveric dissection without the constraints and cost of using human tissue.

  1. A novel porcine model of ataxia telangiectasia reproduces neurological features and motor deficits of human disease.

    PubMed

    Beraldi, Rosanna; Chan, Chun-Hung; Rogers, Christopher S; Kovács, Attila D; Meyerholz, David K; Trantzas, Constantin; Lambertz, Allyn M; Darbro, Benjamin W; Weber, Krystal L; White, Katherine A M; Rheeden, Richard V; Kruer, Michael C; Dacken, Brian A; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T; Rohret, Judy A; Struzynski, Jason T; Rohret, Frank A; Weimer, Jill M; Pearce, David A

    2015-11-15

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a progressive multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the AT-mutated (ATM) gene. AT is a neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by cerebellar degeneration in children leading to motor impairment. The disease progresses with other clinical manifestations including oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immune disorders, increased susceptibly to cancer and respiratory infections. Although genetic investigations and physiological models have established the linkage of ATM with AT onset, the mechanisms linking ATM to neurodegeneration remain undetermined, hindering therapeutic development. Several murine models of AT have been successfully generated showing some of the clinical manifestations of the disease, however they do not fully recapitulate the hallmark neurological phenotype, thus highlighting the need for a more suitable animal model. We engineered a novel porcine model of AT to better phenocopy the disease and bridge the gap between human and current animal models. The initial characterization of AT pigs revealed early cerebellar lesions including loss of Purkinje cells (PCs) and altered cytoarchitecture suggesting a developmental etiology for AT and could advocate for early therapies for AT patients. In addition, similar to patients, AT pigs show growth retardation and develop motor deficit phenotypes. By using the porcine system to model human AT, we established the first animal model showing PC loss and motor features of the human disease. The novel AT pig provides new opportunities to unmask functions and roles of ATM in AT disease and in physiological conditions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Escin inhibits type I allergic dermatitis in a novel porcine model.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Wolfgang; Reutterer, Benjamin; Frank, Maria; Unger, Hermann; Grassauer, Andreas; Prieschl-Grassauer, Eva; Doerfler, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Current standard medications for the treatment of allergic inflammation consist primarily of glucocorticoids and anti-histamines, but adverse side effects or insufficient responsiveness by patient subpopulations illustrate the need for safe and novel alternatives. Thus, there is a demand to develop a porcine model that is able to mimic mast cell-mediated type I hypersensitivity. Previously, we found that escin, a pharmacologically active mix of triterpene saponins from horse chestnut extracts, exerts anti-allergic effects in murine models and merits further investigation as an anti-allergic therapeutic. We developed a new porcine model of allergic dermatitis based on a clinical prick test protocol. Histamine clearly provoked erythema and swelling at the prick site, whereas the mast cell-degranulating compound 48/80 even more pronounced caused wheal and flare reactions known from the human prick response. This model was used to test the anti-allergic efficacy of orally applied escin. Oral pretreatment of animals with escin strongly inhibited the allergic skin response induced by compound 48/80 in a dose-dependent manner. Additional in vitro data from murine mast cells indicate an engagement of the glucocorticoid receptor pathway upon treatment with escin. This model provides a valuable and easy-to-set-up tool for preclinical studies of mast cell-inhibiting compounds. The successful implementation of this model supports the development of oral escin applications as a novel anti-allergic therapy. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Porcine models of digestive disease: the future of large animal translational research

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Liara M.; Moeser, Adam J.; Blikslager, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing interest in non-rodent translational models for the study of human disease. The pig, in particular, serves as a useful animal model for the study of pathophysiological conditions relevant to the human intestine. This review assesses currently used porcine models of gastrointestinal physiology and disease and provides a rationale for the use of these models for future translational studies. The pig has proven its utility for the study of fundamental disease conditions such as ischemia/ reperfusion injury, stress-induced intestinal dysfunction, and short bowel syndrome. Pigs have also shown great promise for the study of intestinal barrier function, surgical tissue manipulation and intervention, as well as biomaterial implantation and tissue transplantation. Advantages of pig models highlighted by these studies include the physiological similarity to human intestine as well as to mechanisms of human disease. Emerging future directions for porcine models of human disease include the fields of transgenics and stem cell biology, with exciting implications for regenerative medicine. PMID:25655839

  4. A combined trauma model of chest and abdominal trauma with hemorrhagic shock--description of a new porcine model.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Frank; Weuster, Matthias; Mommsen, Philipp; Mohr, Juliane; Fröhlich, Matthias; Witte, Ingo; Keibl, Claudia; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Seekamp, Andreas; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Flohe, Sascha; van Griensven, Martijn

    2012-12-01

    Despite the high incidence and prognostic relevance of hemorrhagic shock and abdominal and blunt chest trauma in multiply injured patients, there are no animal models combining these injuries. Therefore, we established a new porcine multiple trauma model consisting of blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma (two incisions in the right upper liver lobe using a four-edged scalpel and subsequent liver packing), and pressure-controlled hemorrhagic shock with a mean arterial pressure of 30 ± 5 mmHg (a maximum of 45% of the total blood volume). The combined traumatic insult led to severe signs of hemorrhagic shock and impaired pulmonary function. In conclusion, a consistent, reproducible, and clinically relevant porcine model of multisystem injury with controlled (pressure-controlled blood withdrawal) and uncontrolled components of hemorrhage (liver laceration) with the potential for rebleeding was established.

  5. Experimental reproduction of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) in pigs in Sweden and Denmark with a Swedish isolate of porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Hasslung, F; Wallgren, P; Ladekjaer-Hansen, A-S; Bøtner, A; Nielsen, J; Wattrang, E; Allan, G M; McNeilly, F; Ellis, J; Timmusk, S; Belák, K; Segall, T; Melin, L; Berg, M; Fossum, C

    2005-03-20

    An experimental model using 3-day-old snatch-farrowed colostrum-deprived piglets co-infected with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine parvovirus (PPV) is at present one of the best methods to study factors affecting development of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). A Swedish isolate of PCV2 (S-PCV2) retrieved in 1993 from a healthy pig has been used in this model to reproduce PMWS in pigs from Northern Ireland. This virus has been present in the Swedish pig population for at least a decade without causing any known PMWS disease problems, despite its potential pathogenicity. The reasons for this are unknown, but could be related to genetics, absence of triggers for PCV2 upregulation (infectious agent and/or management forms) within Swedish pig husbandry. In order to confirm the pathogenicity of S-PCV2, Swedish and Danish pigs were experimentally infected with this isolate according to the established model. Swedish pigs were also infected with a reference isolate of PCV2 (PCV2-1010) to compare the severity of disease caused by the two isolates in Swedish pigs. Both Danish and Swedish pigs developed PMWS after the experimental infection with S-PCV2. Antibodies to PCV2 developed later and reached lower levels in serum from pigs infected with S-PCV2 than in pigs inoculated with PCV2-1010. In general, pigs infected with S-PCV2 showed more severe clinical signs of disease than pigs infected with PCV2-1010, but pigs from all PCV2-inoculated groups displayed gross and histological lesions consistent with PMWS. All pigs inoculated with PPV, alone or in combination with PCV2, displayed interleukin-10 responses in serum while only pigs infected with PPV in combination with PCV2 showed interferon-alpha in serum on repeated occasions. Thus, the pathogenicity of S-PCV2 was confirmed and a role for cytokines in the etiology of PMWS was indicated.

  6. Dietary aluminosilicate supplement enhances immune activity in mice and reinforces clearance of porcine circovirus type 2 in experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Toan, Nguyen Tat; Cho, Sun-Ju; Ko, Jae-hyung; Jung, Yeon-Kwon; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2010-07-14

    Aluminosilicate is the major component of clay minerals such as zeolite, bentonite and clinoptilolite. The minerals possess a number of beneficial activities, especially in regulating the immune system. The aims of the present study were to evaluate immune enhancing effects of dietary aluminosilicate supplement (DAS) in mice, and to demonstrate clearance effects of DAS against porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in experimentally infected pigs as an initial step towards the development of an antibiotic substitute for use in pigs. Relative messenger RNA expression levels of interferon-gamma, interleukin-4 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, phagocytic activities of polymorphonuclear leucocytes, serum antibody production level and spleen B cell ratio were significantly increased in the DAS groups of mice compared with the control group (each feeding group had three replications with 5 mice each). The results indicated that general immune activity including cellular and humoral immunity could be enhanced by DAS in mice. In experimentally PCV2-infected pigs, the load of viral genome in nasal swab, serum and lung of the DAS group of pigs was significantly decreased compared with the control group at 28 days post-infection (each group three pigs). Corresponding histopathological analyses demonstrated that pigs in the DAS group displayed mild and less severe abnormal changes compared with the control group, indicating that DAS reinforces clearance of PCV2 in experimentally infected pigs. This may relate to general immune enhancing effects of DAS in mice. Therefore DAS will help the health of animal, especially in swine.

  7. A Porcine Anterior Segment Perfusion and Transduction Model With Direct Visualization of the Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, Ralitsa T.; Roy, Pritha; Park, Daniel B.; Jensen, Adrianna; Scott, Gordon; Cohen-Karni, Devora; Fautsch, Michael P.; Schuman, Joel S.; Loewen, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To establish a consistent and affordable, high quality porcine anterior segment perfusion and transduction model that allows direct visualization of the trabecular meshwork. Methods Porcine anterior segments were cultured within 2 hours of death by removing lens and uvea and securing in a specially designed petri dish with a thin bottom to allow direct visualization of the trabecular meshwork with minimal distortion. Twenty-two control eyes (CO) with a constant flow rate were compared to eight gravity perfused eyes (COgr, 15 mm Hg). We established gene delivery to the TM using eGFP expressing feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vector GINSIN at 108 transducing units (TU) per eye (GINSIN_8, n = 8) and 107 TU (GINSIN_7, n = 8). Expression was assessed for 14 days before histology was obtained. Results Pig eyes were a reliable source for consistent and high quality anterior segment cultures with a low failure rate of 12%. Control eyes had an intraocular pressure (IOP) of 15.8 ± 1.9 mm Hg at fixed pump perfusion with 3 μL/min compared to gravity perfused COgr with imputed 3.7 ± 1.6 μL/min. Vector GINSIN_8 eyes experienced a transient posttransduction IOP increase of 44% that resolved at 48 hours; this was not observed in GINSIN_7 eyes. Expression was higher in GINSIN_8 than in GINSIN_7 eyes. Trabecular meshwork architecture was well preserved. Conclusions Compared with previously used human donor eyes, this inexpensive porcine anterior segment perfusion model is of sufficient, repeatable high quality to develop strategies of TM bioengineering. Trabecular meshwork could be observed directly. Despite significant anatomic differences, effects of transduction replicate the main aspects of previously explored human, feline and rodent models. PMID:27002293

  8. Feasibility and Technique for Transvaginal Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery Liver Resection: A Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Toshio; Horgan, Santiago; Sandler, Bryan J.; Jacobsen, Garth R.; Coker, Alisa M.; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Maeda, Tetsuya; Kaneko, Hironori

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a challenging minimally invasive procedure. Although laparoscopic techniques for liver resection are gaining acceptance worldwide, few studies have investigated NOTES liver resection. We used a porcine model to assess the feasibility and safety of transvaginal NOTES liver resection (TV NOTES LR). Materials and Methods: Nine female pigs underwent TV NOTES LR. A nonsurvival acute porcine model with general anesthesia was used in all cases. Using hybrid NOTES technique, we placed only 1 umbilical 12-mm umbilical trocar in the abdominal wall, which was used to create pneumoperitoneum. A laparoscope was then advanced to obtain intra-abdominal visualization. A 15-mm vaginal trocar was inserted under direct laparoscopic vision, and a flexible endoscope was introduced through the vaginal trocar. A long, flexible grasper and endocavity retractor were used to stably retract the liver. The liver edge was partially transected using energy devices inserted through the umbilical trocar. To transect the left lateral lobe, a flexible linear stapler was inserted alongside the vaginal trocar. A specimen extraction bag was deployed and extracted transvaginally. Blood loss, bile leakage, operative time, and specimen size were evaluated. Necropsy studies were performed after the procedures. Results: Eighteen transvaginal NOTES partial liver resections and 4 transvaginal NOTES left lateral lobectomies were successfully performed on 9 pigs. Mean operative time was 165.8 minutes, and mean estimated blood loss was 76.6 mL. All TV NOTES LRs were performed without complications or deaths. Necropsy showed no bile leakage from remnant liver. Conclusions: Our porcine model suggests that TV NOTES LR is technically feasible and safe and has the potential for clinical use as a minimally invasive alternative to conventional laparoscopic liver resection. PMID:28030435

  9. Porcine cadaver iris model for iris heating during corneal surgery with a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Fan, Zhongwei; Wang, Jiang; Yan, Ying; Juhasz, Tibor; Kurtz, Ron

    2015-03-01

    Multiple femtosecond lasers have now been cleared for use for ophthalmic surgery, including for creation of corneal flaps in LASIK surgery. Preliminary study indicated that during typical surgical use, laser energy may pass beyond the cornea with potential effects on the iris. As a model for laser exposure of the iris during femtosecond corneal surgery, we simulated the temperature rise in porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by the femtosecond laser. Additionally, ex-vivo iris heating due to femtosecond laser irradiation was measured with an infrared thermal camera (Fluke corp. Everett, WA) as a validation of the simulation.

  10. Porcine sclera as a model of human sclera for in vitro transport experiments: histology, SEM, and comparative permeability

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, G.; Quarta, M.; Macaluso, C.; Govoni, P.; Dallatana, D.; Santi, P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate porcine sclera as a model of human sclera for in vitro studies of transscleral drug delivery of both low and high molecular weight compounds. Methods Human and porcine scleras were characterized for thickness and water content. The tissue surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the histology was studied with hematoxylin-eosin staining. Comparative permeation experiments were performed using three model molecules, acetaminophen as the model compound for small molecules; a linear dextran with a molecular weight of 120 kDa as the model compound for high molecular weight drugs; and insulin, which was chosen as the model protein. Permeation parameters such as flux, lag time, and permeability coefficient were determined and compared. Results Human and porcine scleras have a similar histology and collagen bundle organization. The water content is approx 70% for both tissues while a statistically significant difference was found for the thickness, porcine sclera being approximately twofold thicker than human sclera. Differences in thickness produced differences in the permeability coefficient. In fact, human sclera was found to be two to threefold more permeable toward the three molecules studied than porcine sclera. Conclusions The results obtained in the present paper prove that porcine sclera can be considered a good model for human sclera for in vitro permeation experiments of both low and high molecular weight compounds. In fact, if the different tissue thickness is taken into account, comparable permeability was demonstrated. This suggests a possible use of this model in the evaluation of the transscleral permeation of new biotech compounds, which currently represent the most innovative and efficient therapeutic options for the treatment of ocular diseases. PMID:19190734

  11. Porcine vagina ex vivo as a model for studying permeability and pathogenesis in mucosa.

    PubMed

    Squier, Christopher A; Mantz, Mary J; Schlievert, Patrick M; Davis, Catherine C

    2008-01-01

    The vaginal mucosa is commonly exposed to a variety of topical agents, including chemical contraceptives, drugs for the treatment of specific pathological conditions, and pathogenic microorganisms. In vitro models can provide important information regarding the penetration and efficacy of topical compounds as well as the pathogenesis of various diseases such a menstrual toxic shock syndrome. Realistic and reproducible test systems are important if new agents are to fulfill their therapeutic potential in human populations. The selection of appropriate animal species and tissue and the use of valid in vitro systems can avoid many of the shortcomings of current animal and cell culture test systems. This review provides information about the factors that should be considered when selecting the best model to study the permeability of the human vagina. The characteristics of an ex vivo porcine model are explored and the validity of this model is demonstrated in terms of its histology, ultrastructure and composition and organization of the permeability barrier; data indicate excellent correlation of permeability and tissue response between human and porcine vaginal tissue. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Effects of C1 inhibitor on tissue damage in a porcine model of controlled hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Dalle Lucca, Jurandir J; Li, Yansong; Simovic, Milomir; Pusateri, Anthony E; Falabella, Michael; Dubick, Michael A; Tsokos, George C

    2012-07-01

    Activation of the complement system has been associated with tissue injury after hemorrhage and resuscitation in animals. We investigated whether administration of recombinant human C1-esterase inhibitor (rhC1-INH), a regulator of complement and contact activation systems, reduces tissue damage and cytokine release and improves metabolic acidosis in a porcine model of hemorrhagic shock. Male Yorkshire swine were assigned to experimental groups and subjected to controlled, isobaric hemorrhage to a target mean arterial pressure of 35 mmHg. Hypotension was maintained for 20 min followed by a bolus intravenous injection of rhC1-INH or vehicle; animals were then observed for 3 h. Blood chemistry and physiologic parameters were recorded. Lung and small intestine tissue samples were subjected to histopathologic evaluation and immunohistochemistry to determine the extent of injury and deposition of complement proteins. Cytokine levels and quantitative assessment of renal and hepatic function were measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and chemistry analyzer, respectively. Pharmacokinetics of rhC1-INH revealed dose proportionality for maximum concentration, half-life, and the time span in which the functional C1-INH level was greater than 1 IU/mL. Recombinant human C1-INH significantly reduced renal, intestinal, and lung tissue damage in a dose-dependent manner (100 and 250 IU/kg). In addition, rhC1-INH (250 IU/kg) markedly improved hemorrhage-induced metabolic acidosis and circulating tumor necrosis factor α. The tissue-protective effects of rhC1-INH appear to be related to its ability to reduce tissue complement activation and deposition. Recombinant human C1-INH decreased tissue complement activation and deposition in hemorrhaged animals, improved metabolic acidosis, reduced circulating tumor necrosis factor α, and attenuated tissue damage in this model. The observed beneficial effects of rhC1-INH treatment on tissue injury 20 min into severe hypotension

  13. Which part of a porcine stomach is suitable as an animal training model for gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection?

    PubMed

    Horii, Joichiro; Goto, Osamu; Shimoda, Masayuki; Sasaki, Motoki; Fujimoto, Ai; Ochiai, Yasutoshi; Yahagi, Naohisa

    2016-02-01

    Training using an animal model is generally recommended before performing endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in humans. This study aimed to clarify the suitability of an isolated porcine stomach as an animal training model for gastric ESD. Study 1: six experienced endoscopists performed ESDs of six simulated lesions located in six locations in an isolated porcine stomach (1, lower third [L]/ greater curvature [Gre]; 2, L/ anterior wall [Ant]; 3, L/ posterior wall [Post]; 4, upper third [U]/ Gre; 5, U/Ant; 6, U/Post). The procedure times (s/cm(2)) were compared among the different lesion locations. A questionnaire (scored 1 - 5) completed by the endoscopists was used to assess the difference in the difficulty compared to the human stomach of the three steps of the ESD procedure (injection, incision and dissection). Study 2: the thicknesses of the mucosal layers were histologically evaluated among the six locations in three porcine and two human stomachs. Study 1: the procedure speed was significantly slower at L/Gre and U/Gre in the porcine stomachs (P = 0.0004). The questionnaire responses revealed a tendency toward similarity between the lower regions of the human and porcine stomachs at L/Ant, L/Post, U/Ant and U/Post during the dissection step (P = 0.056). In contrast, the injection and incision steps at L/Gre in the porcine stomach were shown to differ in difficultly level (both P = 0.0006). Study 2: the mucosal layers in the porcine stomachs were significantly thicker than those in the human stomachs in the lower areas, especially L/Gre. The difficulty of ESD and the histological features of the porcine stomachs were coincident with those of the human stomachs at L/Ant, L/Post, U/Ant and U/Post. These parts of the porcine stomach may be suitable as animal training models for gastric ESD. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Experimental reproduction of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome in pigs by dual infection with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, T; Thacker, E L; Yu, S; Fenaux, M; Meng, X-J; Halbur, P G

    2004-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the interactions between Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and to establish a model for studying the pathogenesis of and testing intervention strategies for the control of PCV2-associated porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Sixty-seven pigs were randomly assigned to four groups. Group 1 (n=17) pigs served as controls, group 2 (n=17) pigs were inoculated with M. hyopneumoniae, group 3 (n=17) pigs were dual infected with M. hyopneumoniae and PCV2, and group 4 (n=16) pigs were inoculated with PCV2. Pigs were inoculated intratracheally with M. hyopneumoniae at 4 weeks of age followed by intranasal inoculation with PCV2 at 6 weeks of age. Dual-infected pigs had moderate dyspnea, lethargy, and reduced weight gain. The overall severity of macroscopic lung lesions, PCV2-associated microscopic lesions in lung and lymphoid tissues, and the amount of PCV2-antigen associated with these lesions were significantly (P <0.05) higher in dual-infected pigs compared with all other groups. Four of 17 (23.5%) dual-infected pigs had decreased growth rate and severe lymphoid depletion and granulomatous lymphadenitis associated with high amounts of PCV2-antigen consistent with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). PCV2-antigen in lung tissue was most often associated with M. hyopneumoniae-induced peribronchial lymphoid hyperplasia, suggesting that this is an important site for PCV2 replication in the lung. This study indicates that M. hyopneumoniae potentiates the severity of PCV2-associated lung and lymphoid lesions, increases the amount and prolongs the presence of PCV2-antigen, and increases the incidence of PMWS in pigs.

  15. Porcine (Sus scrofa) Chronic Myocardial Infarction Model Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-03

    Myocardial Infarction Model Development.” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (PI) / TRAINING COORDINATOR (TC): Lt Col. Daren Danielson DEPARTMENT: 60MSGS/SGCH...invasively, a myocardial infarction that was isolated to the mid-anterior, left ventricular wall. In doing so, we were able to create an infarct that...be used to investigate new methodologies for treatment of chronic myocardial infarction in individuals afflicted with chronic ischemic

  16. Water jet dissection in neurosurgery: experimental results in the porcine cadaveric brain.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Joachim; Gaab, Michael Robert; Knapp, Andreas; Essig, Harald; Warzok, Rolf; Piek, Juergen

    2003-01-01

    Water jet dissection is currently under investigation as a new tool for use in neurosurgical procedures. The safety of this instrument has already been demonstrated. However, precise data demonstrating highly accurate tissue dissection in the brain in combination with vessel preservation are still missing. In this study, 50 porcine cadaveric brains were dissected with the use of several nozzle types (80-150 in microm diameter, coherent straight or helically turned jet) and several levels of water jet pressure (1-40 bars). The dissection characteristics in various brain regions and the basilar artery were evaluated morphologically. The best results regarding reliable function, dissection accuracy, and the correlation of water jet pressure with dissection depth were obtained with the 120-microm Helix Hydro-Jet nozzle. An almost linear relationship of pressure increase with dissection depth was demonstrated. The dissection depth varied significantly up to threefold, depending on the area investigated (greatest resistance was in the brainstem, followed by hemispheres and then the cerebellum). Vessels including the basilar artery resisted pressure up to 15 bars in most cases, whereas the basilar artery was dissected significantly more often with higher pressure. The results indicate that 1) use of the water jet enables very precise and reliable brain parenchyma dissection with vessel preservation under conditions corresponding to the clinical situation, and 2) the nozzle type and water jet pressure must be selected carefully according to the brain area and tissue targeted. This study provides the morphological basis for further research with the use of the water jet technique in the brain. The water jet's characteristics may make this device a useful addition to the neurosurgical armamentarium.

  17. Experimental infection of conventional nursing pigs and their dams with Porcine deltacoronavirus.

    PubMed

    Vitosh-Sillman, Sarah; Loy, John Dustin; Brodersen, Bruce; Kelling, Clayton; Doster, Alan; Topliff, Christina; Nelson, Eric; Bai, Jianfa; Schirtzinger, Erin; Poulsen, Elizabeth; Meadors, Barbara; Anderson, Joseph; Hause, Benjamin; Anderson, Gary; Hesse, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is a newly identified virus that has been detected in swine herds of North America associated with enteric disease. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the pathogenicity, course of infection, virus kinetics, and aerosol transmission of PDCoV using 87 conventional piglets and their 9 dams, including aerosol and contact controls to emulate field conditions. Piglets 2-4 days of age and their dams were administered an oronasal PDCoV inoculum with a quantitative real-time reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR quantification cycle (Cq) value of 22 that was generated from a field sample having 100% nucleotide identity to USA/Illinois121/2014 determined by metagenomic sequencing and testing negative for other enteric disease agents using standard assays. Serial samples of blood, serum, oral fluids, nasal and fecal swabs, and tissues from sequential autopsy, conducted daily on days 1-8 and regular intervals thereafter, were collected throughout the 42-day study for qRT-PCR, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Diarrhea developed in all inoculated and contact control pigs, including dams, by 2 days post-inoculation (dpi) and in aerosol control pigs and dams by 3-4 dpi, with resolution occurring by 12 dpi. Mild to severe atrophic enteritis with PDCoV antigen staining was observed in the small intestine of affected piglets from 2 to 8 dpi. Mesenteric lymph node and small intestine were the primary sites of antigen detection by immunohistochemistry, and virus RNA was detected in these tissues to the end of the study. Virus RNA was detectable in piglet fecal swabs to 21 dpi, and dams to 14-35 dpi.

  18. C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and Pig-Major acute phase protein profiles of pigs infected experimentally by different isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Saco, Y; Martínez-Lobo, F; Cortey, M; Pato, R; Peña, R; Segalés, J; Prieto, C; Bassols, A

    2016-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (PRRSV) is the etiologic agent of PRRS, one of the most important diseases in swine worldwide. In the present work, the effects of different PRRSV strains were tested on a piglet experimental model to study the induced acute phase response. For this purpose, pigs (n=15 for each group) were intranasally inoculated with one of five PRRSV strains (isolates EU10, 12, 17, 18 from genotype 1 and isolate JA-142 from genotype 2). The acute phase response was monitored by measuring acute phase proteins (APPs). Specifically, the serum concentration of haptoglobin (Hp), C-reactive protein (CRP) and Pig-Major Acute Protein (Pig-MAP) was determined at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days p.i. Clinical signs and growth performance were also monitored during the experiment. All animals became viremic after inoculation during the study period. The APP response was heterogeneous and dependent on the strain, being strains EU10, EU 18 and JA-142 those that induced the highest response and the strongest clinical signs. In general, Hp was the most sensitive biomarker for PRRSV infection, CRP behaved as moderate and Pig-MAP was the less responsive during the course of PRRSV experimental infection. Hp and CRP were significantly discriminatory between infected and control pigs, but not Pig-MAP.

  19. Extrusion properties of porcine intestines and surrogate materials for ventral hernia modelling.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mathew; Winter, Des C; Simms, Ciaran K

    2013-02-01

    A physical model of the abdomen can be a clean and cheap surrogate environment to assess new and existing closure solutions for post-laparoscopic wound closure, but a particular challenge is finding a surrogate material to replicate intestines which may protrude through a hernia. The literature shows no focus on this topic, and this paper therefore presents an investigation of the extrusion properties of fresh porcine intestines compared to a number of potential surrogate materials: silicone, edible gelatine, dough and reconstituted powdered potatoes (RPP). An extrusion rig was developed to simulate the mechanical environment of a post-operative hernia formation. Displacement controlled extrusion tests were performed, and the force-extrusion relationships at different extrusion velocities were compared for the intestines and the surrogate materials. The intestines showed a peak extrusion force ranging from 9 N to 14.8 N when pushed through a 13 mm hole, and similar extrusion properties between cleaned and uncleaned fresh porcine intestines were observed. The tests on surrogate materials showed that the surface tension properties of silicone gel resulted in high friction, that edible gelatine extruded like a liquid and that dough is very stiff, rendering all three materials unsuitable for use as surrogates. However, the RPP mix showed very similar force-extrusion properties compared to both the cleaned and uncleaned intestines. Viscoelastic testing (7.5 mm/min, 15 mm/min and 30 mm/min) showed little rate dependency in the extrusion properties for either the porcine intestines or the RPP. Despite the complexity of intestinal tissue and the obvious physical differences between intestine and RPP, it was found that there is no statistical difference between the yield strength of intestines and RPP (P values ranged between 0.14 and 0.3) at the rates tested. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Feasibility of Transvesical Robotic VVF Repair in Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Han, Jang Hee; Kim, Hong-Wook; Rha, Koon Ho; Kim, Jang Hwan

    2017-06-01

    Extraperitoneal transvesicoscopic vesicovaginal fistula (VVF) repair has received limited use because of its narrow working space, longer operation time, and technical difficulty. The present study describes the feasibility of robotic-assisted transvesicoscopic VVF repair in an animal model. Two Yorkshire swine underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic (RAL) VVF repair. With the 4 trocars, an artificial VVF was made in the supratrigonal area and VVF repair was performed in 3 layers as in open VVF repair methods. The mean operation time was 108 minutes. The operation time was prolonged in 1 case due to weak fixation of bladder to anterior abdominal wall. Equipment interference did not occur. Tissue manipulation and suturing were easy. The results of this study suggest that extraperitoneal RAL procedures for VVF repair may be an effective minimally invasive modality with reduced morbidity. A shorter operation time and easy suturing technique were the distinct merits of the extraperitoneal RAL technique.

  1. A porcine model of full-thickness burn, excision and skin autografting

    PubMed Central

    Branski, Ludwik K.; Mittermayr, Rainer; Herndon, David N.; Norbury, William B.; Masters, Oscar E.; Hofmann, Martina; Traber, Daniel L.; Redl, Heinz; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2008-01-01

    Acute burn wounds often require early excision and adequate coverage to prevent further hypothermia, protein and fluid losses, and the risk of infection. Meshed autologous skin grafts are generally regarded as the standard treatment for extensive full-thickness burns. Graft take and rate of wound healing, however, depend on several endogenous factors. This paper describes a standardized reproducible porcine model of burn and skin grafting which can be used to study the effects of topical treatments on graft take and re-epithelialization. Procedures provide a protocol for successful porcine burn wound experiments with special focus on pre-operative care, anesthesia, burn allocation, excision and grafting, postoperative treatment, dressing application, and specimen collection. Selected outcome measurements include percent area of wound closure by planimetry, wound assessment using a clinical assessment scale, and histological scoring. The use of this standardized model provides burn researchers with a valuable tool for the comparison of different topical drug treatments and dressing materials in a setting that closely mimics clinical reality. PMID:18617332

  2. A porcine model of full-thickness burn, excision and skin autografting.

    PubMed

    Branski, Ludwik K; Mittermayr, Rainer; Herndon, David N; Norbury, William B; Masters, Oscar E; Hofmann, Martina; Traber, Daniel L; Redl, Heinz; Jeschke, Marc G

    2008-12-01

    Acute burn wounds often require early excision and adequate coverage to prevent further hypothermia, protein and fluid losses, and the risk of infection. Meshed autologous skin grafts are generally regarded as the standard treatment for extensive full-thickness burns. Graft take and rate of wound healing, however, depend on several endogenous factors. This paper describes a standardized reproducible porcine model of burn and skin grafting which can be used to study the effects of topical treatments on graft take and re-epithelialization. Procedures provide a protocol for successful porcine burn wound experiments with special focus on pre-operative care, anesthesia, burn allocation, excision and grafting, postoperative treatment, dressing application, and specimen collection. Selected outcome measurements include percent area of wound closure by planimetry, wound assessment using a clinical assessment scale, and histological scoring. The use of this standardized model provides burn researchers with a valuable tool for the comparison of different topical drug treatments and dressing materials in a setting that closely mimics clinical reality.

  3. Bovine serum albumin glutaraldehyde for completely sutureless laparoscopic heminephrectomy in a survival porcine model.

    PubMed

    Louie, Michael K; Gamboa, Aldrin Joseph R; Kaplan, Adam G; Khosravi, Amanda; Truong, Hung; Andrade, Lorena; Lin, Rachelle; Alipanah, Reza; Ortiz, Cervando; McCormick, David; Box, Geoffrey N; Lee, Hak J; Deane, Leslie A; Edwards, Robert A; McDougall, Elspeth M; Clayman, Ralph V

    2010-03-01

    Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) has not received widespread clinical application because of its technical challenge. Bovine serum albumin glutaraldehyde (BSAG) is a hemostatic agent that is independent of the clotting cascade. We evaluated the use of BSAG as the sole agent for parenchymal and collecting system closure during LPN in a survival porcine model. Eighteen pigs underwent hilar clamping and LPN by longitudinal excision of the lateral one-third of the right kidney. The opened collecting system was covered with oxidized cellulose to prevent BSAG seepage into the urinary tract. BSAG was allowed to set for 10 or 5 minutes. Twelve animals underwent survival LPN BSAG only closure; six control pigs were acutely studied using saline. Urinary extravasation was evaluated by injection of furosemide and indigo carmine, and then evaluating the renal surface and bladder catheter drainage for dye. A subjective bleeding score was assigned after hilum unclamping. At 6 weeks, BSAG kidneys were harvested for burst pressure testing and histopathological analysis. All 12 pigs survived for 6 weeks. No pigs had urinary extravasation. Mean percentage of kidney removed by weight was 19%. Mean warm ischemia time was 29 minutes. Five pigs required a second BSAG application to achieve a bleeding score of 0. Mean arterial and collecting system burst pressures were 301.8 and 322.4 mm Hg, respectively. Mean postoperative creatinine increase was 0.07 mg/dL. BSAG for completely sutureless LPN in a survival porcine model was feasible.

  4. Porcine retinal cell line VIDO R1 and Chlamydia suis to modelize ocular chlamydiosis.

    PubMed

    Käser, Tobias; Cnudde, Thomas; Hamonic, Glenn; Rieder, Meghanne; Pasternak, J Alex; Lai, Ken; Tikoo, Suresh K; Wilson, Heather L; Meurens, François

    2015-08-15

    Human ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infections can lead to trachoma, the major cause of infectious blindness worldwide. Trachoma control strategies are very helpful but logistically challenging, and a trachoma vaccine is needed but not available. Pigs are a valuable large animal model for various immunological questions and could facilitate the study of human ocular chlamydial infections. In addition, a recent study identified the zoonotic potential of Chlamydia suis, the natural pathogen of pigs. In terms of the One Health Initiative, understanding the host-pathogen-interactions and finding a vaccine for porcine chlamydia infections would also benefit human health. Thus, we infected the porcine retinal cell line VIDO R1 with C. suis and analyzed the chlamydial life cycle and the innate immune response of the infected cells. Our results indicate that C. suis completes its life cycle in VIDO R1 cells within 48 h, comparable to C. trachomatis in humans. C. suis infection of VIDO R1 cells led to increased levels of various innate immune mediators like pathogen recognition receptors, cytokines and chemokines including IL6, TNFα, and MMP9, also most relevant in human C. trachomatis infections. These results illustrate the first steps in the host-pathogen-interactions of ocular C. suis infections in pigs and show their similarity to C. trachomatis infections in humans, justifying further testing of pigs as an animal model for human trachoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Vacuum-assisted abdominal wall lift for minimal-access surgery: a porcine model study.

    PubMed

    Udwadia, T E; Kathrani, B K; Bernie, W; Gadgil, U S; Chariar, V M

    2005-08-01

    Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum, although used universally in laparoscopy, has several well-documented complications and disadvantages. The authors describe a simple method of creating vacuum between a rigid shell and the abdominal wall in a porcine model to create adequate operative space for minimal-access surgery, which does not requires carbon dioxide, does not raise intraabdominal pressure, and is safe, cost effective, and feasible. The proposed device and method could be useful wherever basic laparoscopic equipment and a vacuum pump are available, including many parts of the developing world. The study was carried out with three groups using individual porcine models for each study. Group 1 was studied for feasibility of abdominal wall lift, adequacy of intraabdominal space, optimal vacuum levels, and safety and efficacy of the procedure. Group 2 was subjected to laparoscopic cholecystectomy and salpingectomy. Group 3 was studied for 2 days and 8 days after the animals were subjected to prolonged, high-level vacuum and monitored every 24 h to establish long-term effects. In all three groups the safety and efficacy of the proposed method were established, as well as the absence of physiological or histological alterations.

  6. Irreversible electroporation of the pancreas is feasible and safe in a porcine survival model.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Stefan; Sommer, Christof M; Vollherbst, Dominik; Wachter, Miguel F; Longerich, Thomas; Sachsenmeier, Milena; Knapp, Jürgen; Radeleff, Boris A; Werner, Jens

    2015-07-01

    Use of thermal tumor ablation in the pancreatic parenchyma is limited because of the risk of pancreatitis, pancreatic fistula, or hemorrhage. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of irreversible electroporation (IRE) in a porcine model. Ten pigs were divided into 2 study groups. In the first group, animals received IRE of the pancreatic tail and were killed after 60 minutes. In the second group, animals received IRE at the head of the pancreas and were followed up for 7 days. Clinical parameters, computed tomography imaging, laboratory results, and histology were obtained. All animals survived IRE ablation, and no cardiac adverse effects were noted. Sixty minutes after IRE, a hypodense lesion on computed tomography imaging indicated the ablation zone. None of the animals developed clinical signs of acute pancreatitis. Only small amounts of ascites fluid, with a transient increase in amylase and lipase levels, were observed, indicating that no pancreatic fistula occurred. This porcine model shows that IRE is feasible and safe in the pancreatic parenchyma. Computed tomography imaging reveals significant changes at 60 minutes after IRE and therefore might serve as an early indicator of therapeutic success. Clinical studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of IRE in pancreatic cancer.

  7. A novel device to create consistent deep dermal burns in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Menon, Seema; Chan, Queenie; Bertinetti, Monique; Harvey, John G; Hei, Erik R La; Holland, Andrew Ja

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this study to evaluate a novel device to create a consistent and reproducible deep partial thickness burn in a porcine model. A thermostatically controlled, heated aluminium disc device was fashioned by the Biomedical Department of our institution. Contact burns were made on the flank of two Great White pigs by applying the device heated to 92°C at intervals of 5, 10, 15 and 20 seconds to four separate test areas area of skin. Biopsies for histological analysis of burn depth were taken on day 0 at 10 minutes post burn and on day 8. Biopsies taken at day 0 revealed superficial to mid-dermal burns, with minimal dermal edema and necrosis. Those from day 8 showed mid to deep dermal edema and necrosis in all four test areas following a 20 second contact duration burn. The new contact burn device was able to create a consistent deep dermal burn after 20 seconds of contact. We anticipate that this new device could be used to investigate the development of hypertrophic scarring in a porcine model.

  8. Induced Hypothermia Does Not Harm Hemodynamics after Polytrauma: A Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Weuster, Matthias; Mommsen, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Mohr, Juliane; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Flohé, Sascha; Fröhlich, Matthias; Keibl, Claudia; Seekamp, Andreas; van Griensven, Martijn; Witte, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Background. The deterioration of hemodynamics instantly endangers the patients' life after polytrauma. As accidental hypothermia frequently occurs in polytrauma, therapeutic hypothermia still displays an ambivalent role as the impact on the cardiopulmonary function is not yet fully understood. Methods. We have previously established a porcine polytrauma model including blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma, and hemorrhagic shock. Therapeutic hypothermia (34°C) was induced for 3 hours. We documented cardiovascular parameters and basic respiratory parameters. Pigs were euthanized after 15.5 hours. Results. Our polytrauma porcine model displayed sufficient trauma impact. Resuscitation showed adequate restoration of hemodynamics. Induced hypothermia had neither harmful nor major positive effects on the animals' hemodynamics. Though heart rate significantly decreased and mixed venous oxygen saturation significantly increased during therapeutic hypothermia. Mean arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and wedge pressure showed no significant differences comparing normothermic trauma and hypothermic trauma pigs during hypothermia. Conclusions. Induced hypothermia after polytrauma is feasible. No major harmful effects on hemodynamics were observed. Therapeutic hypothermia revealed hints for tissue protective impact. But the chosen length for therapeutic hypothermia was too short. Nevertheless, therapeutic hypothermia might be a useful tool for intensive care after polytrauma. Future studies should extend therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:26170533

  9. Ventricular Arrhythmias and Mortality Associated with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane in a Porcine Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Regueiro-Purriños, Marta; Fernández-Vázquez, Felipe; de Prado, Armando Perez; Altónaga, Jose R; Cuellas-Ramón, Carlos; Ajenjo-Silverio, Jose M; Orden, Asuncion; Gonzalo-Orden, Jose M

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia of the myocardium can lead to reversible or irreversible injury depending on the severity and duration of the preceding ischemia. Here we compared sevoflurane and isoflurane with particular reference to their hemodynamic effects and ability to modify the effects of acute severe myocardial ischemia and reperfusion on ventricular arrhythmias and mortality in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. Female Large White pigs were premedicated with ketamine, midazolam, and atropine. Propofol was given intravenously for the anesthetic induction, and anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane or sevoflurane. Endovascular, fluoroscopy-guided, coronary procedures were performed to occlude the midleft anterior descending artery by using a coronary angioplasty balloon. After 75 min, the balloon catheter system was withdrawn and the presence of adequate reperfusion flow was verified. The pigs were followed for 2 mo, and overall mortality rate was calculated. The isoflurane group showed lower arterial pressure throughout the procedure, with the difference reaching statistical significance after induction of myocardial ischemia. The ventricular fibrillation rate was higher in isoflurane group (81.3%) than the sevoflurane group (51.7%; relative risk, 1.57 [1.03 to 2.4]). Overall survival was lower in the isoflurane group (75%) than the sevoflurane group (96.4%). In conclusion, in this porcine model of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, sevoflurane was associated with higher hemodynamic stability and fewer ventricular arrhythmias and mortality than was isoflurane. PMID:21333167

  10. Enzymolysis kinetics, thermodynamics and model of porcine cerebral protein with single-frequency countercurrent and pulsed ultrasound-assisted processing.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ye; Ding, Yangyang; Feng, Weiwei; Wang, Wei; Li, Qian; Chen, Yao; Wu, Huiyu; Wang, Xintong; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    The present work investigated the enzymolysis kinetics, thermodynamics and model of porcine cerebral protein (PCP) which was pretreated by single-frequency countercurrent and pulsed ultrasound. The kinetic constants for ultrasonic pretreated and traditional enzymolysis have been determined. Results showed that the value of KM in ultrasonic PCP (UPCP) enzymolysis decreased by 9% over that in the traditional enzymolysis. The values of reaction rate constant (k) for UPCP enzymolysis increased by 207%, 121%, 62%, and 45% at 293, 303, 313 and 323 K, respectively. For the thermodynamic parameters, ultrasound decreased activation energy (Ea), change in enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) by 76%, 82% and 31% in PCP, respectively. However, ultrasound had little change in Gibbs free energy (ΔG) value in the temperature range of 293-323 K. Therefore, a general kinetic equation for the enzymolysis model of UPCP by a simple empirical equation was suggested. The experimental values fits with the enzymolysis kinetic model with a low average relative error (4%) confirmed that the kinetic model was accurate to reflect the enzymolysis process. The positive effect of single-frequency countercurrent and pulsed ultrasound in this study and application of the kinetic model may be useful for the release of bioactive peptides from meat processing by-products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Percutaneous transgastric endoscopic tube ileostomy in a porcine survival model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Chen, Su-Yu; Wang, Yong-Guang; Jiang, Sheng-Jun; Cai, He-Li; Lin, Kai; Xie, Zhao-Fei; Dong, Fen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To introduce natural orifice transgastric endoscopic surgery (NOTES) tube ileostomy using pelvis-directed submucosal tunneling endoscopic gastrostomy and endoscopic tube ileostomy. METHODS Six live pigs (three each in the non-survival and survival groups) were used. A double-channeled therapeutic endoscope was introduced perorally into the stomach. A gastrostomy was made using a 2-cm transversal mucosal incision following the creation of a 5-cm longitudinal pelvis-directed submucosal tunnel. The pneumoperitoneum was established via the endoscope. In the initial three operations of the series, a laparoscope was transumbilically inserted for guiding the tunnel direction, intraperitoneal spatial orientation and distal ileum identification. Endoscopic tube ileostomy was conducted by adopting an introducer method and using a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Catheter Kit equipped with the Loop Fixture. The distal tip of the 15 Fr catheter was placed toward the proximal limb of the ileum to optimize intestinal content drainage. Finally, the tunnel entrance of the gastrostomy was closed using nylon endoloops with the aid of a twin grasper. The gross and histopathological integrity of gastrostomy closure and the abdominal wall-ileum stoma tract formation were assessed 1 wk after the operation. RESULTS Transgastric endoscopic tube ileostomy was successful in all six pigs, without major bleeding. The mean operating time was 71 min (range: 60-110 min). There were no intraoperative complications or hemodynamic instability. The post-mortem, which was conducted 1-wk postoperatively, showed complete healing of the gastrostomy and adequate stoma tract formation of ileostomy. CONCLUSION Transgastric endoscopic tube ileostomy is technically feasible and reproducible in an animal model, and this technique is worthy of further improvement. PMID:27729743

  12. Scabies mites alter the skin microbiome and promote growth of opportunistic pathogens in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Swe, Pearl M; Zakrzewski, Martha; Kelly, Andrew; Krause, Lutz; Fischer, Katja

    2014-01-01

    The resident skin microbiota plays an important role in restricting pathogenic bacteria, thereby protecting the host. Scabies mites (Sarcoptes scabiei) are thought to promote bacterial infections by breaching the skin barrier and excreting molecules that inhibit host innate immune responses. Epidemiological studies in humans confirm increased incidence of impetigo, generally caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, secondary to the epidermal infestation with the parasitic mite. It is therefore possible that mite infestation could alter the healthy skin microbiota making way for the opportunistic pathogens. A longitudinal study to test this hypothesis in humans is near impossible due to ethical reasons. In a porcine model we generated scabies infestations closely resembling the disease manifestation in humans and investigated the scabies associated changes in the skin microbiota over the course of a mite infestation. In a 21 week trial, skin scrapings were collected from pigs infected with S. scabies var. suis and scabies-free control animals. A total of 96 skin scrapings were collected before, during infection and after acaricide treatment, and analyzed by bacterial 16S rDNA tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing. We found significant changes in the epidermal microbiota, in particular a dramatic increase in Staphylococcus correlating with the onset of mite infestation in animals challenged with scabies mites. This increase persisted beyond treatment from mite infection and healing of skin. Furthermore, the staphylococci population shifted from the commensal S. hominis on the healthy skin prior to scabies mite challenge to S. chromogenes, which is increasingly recognized as being pathogenic, coinciding with scabies infection in pigs. In contrast, all animals in the scabies-free cohort remained relatively free of Staphylococcus throughout the trial. This is the first experimental in vivo evidence supporting previous assumptions that

  13. Scabies Mites Alter the Skin Microbiome and Promote Growth of Opportunistic Pathogens in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Swe, Pearl M.; Zakrzewski, Martha; Kelly, Andrew; Krause, Lutz; Fischer, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Background The resident skin microbiota plays an important role in restricting pathogenic bacteria, thereby protecting the host. Scabies mites (Sarcoptes scabiei) are thought to promote bacterial infections by breaching the skin barrier and excreting molecules that inhibit host innate immune responses. Epidemiological studies in humans confirm increased incidence of impetigo, generally caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, secondary to the epidermal infestation with the parasitic mite. It is therefore possible that mite infestation could alter the healthy skin microbiota making way for the opportunistic pathogens. A longitudinal study to test this hypothesis in humans is near impossible due to ethical reasons. In a porcine model we generated scabies infestations closely resembling the disease manifestation in humans and investigated the scabies associated changes in the skin microbiota over the course of a mite infestation. Methodology/Principal Findings In a 21 week trial, skin scrapings were collected from pigs infected with S. scabies var. suis and scabies-free control animals. A total of 96 skin scrapings were collected before, during infection and after acaricide treatment, and analyzed by bacterial 16S rDNA tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing. We found significant changes in the epidermal microbiota, in particular a dramatic increase in Staphylococcus correlating with the onset of mite infestation in animals challenged with scabies mites. This increase persisted beyond treatment from mite infection and healing of skin. Furthermore, the staphylococci population shifted from the commensal S. hominis on the healthy skin prior to scabies mite challenge to S. chromogenes, which is increasingly recognized as being pathogenic, coinciding with scabies infection in pigs. In contrast, all animals in the scabies-free cohort remained relatively free of Staphylococcus throughout the trial. Conclusions/Significance This is the first

  14. Efficacy of a new bivalent vaccine of porcine circovirus type 2 and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Fostera™ PCV MH) under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, Changhoon; Jeong, Jiwoon; Choi, Kyuhyung; Chae, Chanhee

    2016-01-04

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new bivalent vaccine (Fostera™ PCV MH, Zoetis) of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in growing pigs under experimental conditions. A total of 80 pigs were randomly divided into 8 groups (10 pigs per group). The pigs were administered the bivalent vaccine intramuscularly as a 2.0 mL dose at 21 days of age based on the manufacturer's instructions. Three weeks after vaccination, the pigs were inoculated with either PCV2 (intranasal route) or M. hyopneumoniae (intratracheal route) or both. Regardless of the type of inoculation, vaccinated pigs after challenge exhibited effective reduction of clinical signs, PCV2 viremia levels and mycoplasma nasal shedding, and lung and lymphoid lesion when compared to unvaccinated challenged pigs. Vaccinated challenged pigs had significantly higher (P<0.05) levels of PCV2-specific neutralizing antibodies, and numbers of PCV2-and M. hyopneumoniae-specific interferon-γ secreting cells compared to unvaccinated challenged pigs. This study demonstrates that the bivalent vaccine is able to protect pigs against either PCV2 or M. hyopneumoniae infection or both based on clinical, microbiological, immunological, and pathological evaluation.

  15. Novel A20-gene-eluting stent inhibits carotid artery restenosis in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen-hua; Peng, Jing; Meng, Zhao-you; Chen, Lin; Huang, Jia-Lu; Huang, He-qing; Li, Li; Zeng, Wen; Wei, Yong; Zhu, Chu-Hong; Chen, Kang-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background Carotid artery stenosis is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. Although carotid angioplasty and stenting using an embolic protection device has been introduced as a less invasive carotid revascularization approach, in-stent restenosis limits its long-term efficacy and safety. The objective of this study was to test the anti-restenosis effects of local stent-mediated delivery of the A20 gene in a porcine carotid artery model. Materials and methods The pCDNA3.1EHA20 was firmly attached onto stents that had been collagen coated and treated with N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithiol)propionate solution and anti-DNA immunoglobulin fixation. Anti-restenosis effects of modified vs control (the bare-metal stent and pCDNA3.1 void vector) stents were assessed by Western blot and scanning electron microscopy, as well as by morphological and inflammatory reaction analyses. Results Stent-delivered A20 gene was locally expressed in porcine carotids in association with significantly greater extent of re-endothelialization at day 14 and of neointimal hyperplasia inhibition at 3 months than stenting without A20 gene expression. Conclusion The A20-gene-eluting stent inhibits neointimal hyperplasia while promoting re-endothelialization and therefore constitutes a novel potential alternative to prevent restenosis while minimizing complications. PMID:27540277

  16. Technique of right lymphatic duct cannulation for pulmonary lymph collection in an acute porcine model.

    PubMed

    Chuang, G J; Gao, C X; Mulder, D S; Chiu, R C

    1986-12-01

    The pig is an increasingly preferred model for biomedical research, including studies for pulmonary pathophysiology. However, in piglets, the technique for cannulating the right lymphatic duct, which is subject to more anatomical variations and technically more demanding than that in dogs, has not been described. Our technique evolved to enable this collection of porcine lung lymph in acute experiments. The lymphatic ampulla is cannulated via one of the cervical lymphatics. The right lymphatic duct is invariably dorsal to the cranial vena cava and classically leads to the lymphatic ampulla. Yet in 18% of our pigs, cannulation was difficult or not feasible because the lymphatic duct either drained directly into the cranial vena cava at a distance from the lymphatic ampulla, or into the axillary lymph node of the first rib or the caudal deep cervical lymph nodes. Gently squeezing back regurgitated blood in the lymphatic ampulla before tying the suture and frequently withdrawing lymph with a syringe when the flow is small enabled us to collect clear lymph, usually immediately after completing the cannulation. The rate of lymph flow varied widely (1.7 +/- 0.6 ml/hr) and increased when the left atrial pressure was raised. The lymph protein was 2.8 +/- 0.2 g% with lymph/plasma protein ratio at 0.55 +/- 0.04. The anatomical variations encountered in our 34 dissections, as well as the technical maneuvers found to be useful in the successful cannulation and collection of the porcine lung lymph, are described in detail.

  17. Myoblast transplantation in the porcine model: a potential technique for myocardial repair.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, C H; Claycomb, W C; Delcarpio, J B; Smith, D M; deGruiter, H; Smart, F; Ochsner, J L

    1995-11-01

    The use of transgenic cells transplanted in syngeneic rodents has shown modest success, but allogeneic and xenogeneic transplants have not been uniformly successful. To assess the feasibility of xenogeneic and allogeneic myoblast transplantation, we subjected seven adult swine to transplantation of murine atrial tumor cells (xenogeneic), neonatal porcine myocytes (allogeneic), and human fetal cardiomyocytes into the left ventricular wall. After general anesthesia, isolated cells were injected along the anterior and posterior walls of the porcine left ventricle. All the animals were immuno-suppressed and observed for 1 month after injection, at which time they were killed and analyzed. This report will present results primarily concerned with the success of human cell transfers. In all injected sites examined, the transplanted cells thrived within the host myocardium with no significant rejection. Transplant cells formed close associations with host myocytes that resembled nascent intercalated disks on electron microscopy. These cells also contained myofibrils and other cell architecture resembling the transplanted cell lines. Additionally, these cells appeared to produce an angiogenic influence resulting in the proliferation of the surrounding microvasculature. We believe that these findings indicate successful xenogeneic and allogeneic myoblast cell transplantation in a large animal model. These experiments set the stage for future studies to assess the ability of these cells to form a syncytium, contract, and potentially repair failed myocardium.

  18. Biomechanical Analysis of a Novel Wedge Locking Plate in a Porcine Tibial Model

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jeong-Ku; Yeom, Chul Hyun; Jang, Ho Su; Song, Han Eui; Lee, Sung Jae; Kim, Kang Hee; Chung, Kyu Sung; Bhat, Mahendar Gururaj

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to analyze biomechanical properties of a novel wedge locking plate in medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) in a porcine tibial model. Methods A uniform 8-mm OWHTO was performed in 12 porcine tibiae. Six of them were subsequently fixed with the plate without a wedge, whereas the other 6 were additionally reinforced with a metal wedge of 8 mm. Biomechanical properties (stiffness, displacement of the osteotomy gap, and failure load) were evaluated under axial load. The different modes of failure were also investigated. Results The plate showed an axial stiffness of 2,457 ± 450 N/mm with a wedge and 1,969 ± 874 N/mm without a wedge. The maximum failure load was 5,380 ± 952 N with a wedge and 4,354 ± 607 N without a wedge. The plate with a wedge had a significantly greater failure load and significantly less displacement of medial gap at failure than that without a wedge (p = 0.041 and p = 0.002, respectively). The axial stiffness was not different between the two types of fixation. Most failures were caused by lateral cortex breakage and there was no implant failure. Conclusions The novel wedge locking plate showed excellent biomechanical properties and an additional wedge provided significant improvement. This plate can be a good fixation method for OWHTO. PMID:27904718

  19. An Immunomodulatory Device Improves Insulin Resistance in Obese Porcine Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Westover, Angela J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with tissue inflammation which is a crucial etiology of insulin resistance. This inflammation centers around circulating monocytes which form proinflammatory adipose tissue macrophages (ATM). Specific approaches targeting monocytes/ATM may improve insulin resistance without the adverse side effects of generalized immunosuppression. In this regard, a biomimetic membrane leukocyte processing device, called the selective cytopheretic device (SCD), was evaluated in an Ossabaw miniature swine model of insulin resistance with metabolic syndrome. Treatment with the SCD in this porcine model demonstrated a decline in circulating neutrophil activation parameters and monocyte counts. These changes were associated with improvements in insulin resistance as determined with intravenous glucose tolerance testing. These improvements were also reflected in lowering of homeostatic model assessment- (HOMA-) insulin resistant (IR) scores for up to 2 weeks after SCD therapy. These results allow for the planning of first-in-man studies in obese type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:27819007

  20. Investigation of the thermal and tissue injury behaviour in microwave thermal therapy using a porcine kidney model.

    PubMed

    He, X; McGee, S; Coad, J E; Schmidlin, F; Iaizzo, P A; Swanlund, D J; Kluge, S; Rudie, E; Bischof, J C

    2004-09-01

    Minimally invasive microwave thermal therapies are being developed for the treatment of small renal cell carcinomas (RCC, d<3 cm). This study assessed the thermal history and corresponding tissue injury patterns resulting from microwave treatment of the porcine renal cortex. Three groups of kidneys were evaluated: (1) in vitro treated, (2) in vivo with 2-h post-treatment perfusion (acute) and (3) in vivo with 7-day post-treatment perfusion (chronic). The kidneys were treated with an interstitial water-cooled microwave probe (Urologix, Plymouth, MN) that created a lesion centered in the renal cortex (50 W for 10 min). The thermal histories were recorded at 0.5 cm radial intervals from the probe axis for correlation with the histologic cellular and vascular injury. The kidneys showed a reproducible 2 cm chronic lesion with distinct histologic injury zones identified. The thermal histories at the edge of these zones were found using Lagrangian interpolation. The threshold thermal histories for microvascular injury and stasis appeared to be lower than that for renal epithelial cell injury. The Arrhenius kinetic injury models were fit to the thermal histories and injury data to determine the kinetic parameters (i.e. activation energy and frequency factor) for the thermal injury processes. The resultant activation energies are consistent in magnitude with those for thermally induced protein denaturation. A 3-D finite element thermal model based on the Pennes bioheat equation was developed and solved using ANSYS (V7.0). The real geometry of the kidneys studied and temperature dependent thermal properties were used in this model. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of the microwave probe required for the thermal modelling was experimentally determined. The results from the thermal modelling suggest that the complicated change of local renal blood perfusion with temperature and time during microwave thermal therapy can be predicted, although a first order kinetic model may

  1. Visible Lesion Thresholds and Model Predictions for Q-Switched 1318-nm and 1540-nm Laser Exposures to Porcine Skin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    collected using the Yucatan mini-pig ( Sus scrofa domestica) as the in vivo model. The Yucatan mini-pig was selected due to the similarity of its flank...Johnson, M. A. Mitchell, B. H. Saladino, and W. P. Roach, "Median Effective Dose Determination and Histologic Characterization of Porcine ( Sus scrofa domestica

  2. Percutaneous catheter-based intracoronary infusion of insulin--a dose finding study in the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Slettom, Grete; Jonassen, Anne K; Tuseth, Vegard; Pettersen, Reidar J; Larsen, Terje H; Seifert, Reinhard; Nordrehaug, Jan E

    2011-06-01

    Insulin given at immediate reperfusion reduces myocardial infarct size in the in vitro and the ex vivo rat heart. In vivo, insulin may cause hypoglycaemia, hypokalaemia and elevation of catecholamines, potentially harmful during an acute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tolerance and safety of intracoronary insulin infusions in a porcine model applying percutaneous intervention techniques.

  3. Snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs as a model for swine infectious disease research

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanyun; Haines, Deborah M.; Harding, John C.S.

    2013-01-01

    The current study tested the benefit of commercially available spray-dried bovine colostrum (The Saskatoon Colostrum Company, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) in raising snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs. In experiment 1, 12 SF-pCD pigs received a liquid diet composed mainly of bovine colostrum from birth to day 10; 6 remained on the same liquid diet (COL), and the other 6 were fed a diet composed mainly of milk replacer (RPL) until weaning. In experiment 2, 12 SF-pCD pigs were fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning; after weaning, 6 were fed a starter diet containing 20% (w/w) bovine colostrum powder (STARTER-COL), and the other 6 were fed a starter diet without any bovine colostrum (STARTER-CTRL) until termination (day 42 or day 49). In experiment 1 the COL pigs had significantly fewer fever-days than did the RPL pigs. In experiment 2 diarrhea, typhlocolitis, and pancreatic degeneration developed in 4 of the STARTER-COL pigs after weaning. In both experiments all the pigs fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning survived until termination. All pigs tested free of swine influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Porcine parvovirus. In experiment 2 all the pigs tested free of Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), but some in both groups tested positive for Torque teno virus genogroups 1 and 2. In conclusion, with the use of snatch-farrowing and bovine colostrum, pigs can be raised in the absence of porcine maternal antibodies with 100% survival and freedom from most porcine pathogens of biologic relevance. This model is potentially suitable for animal disease research. PMID:24082397

  4. Snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs as a model for swine infectious disease research.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyun; Haines, Deborah M; Harding, John C S

    2013-04-01

    The current study tested the benefit of commercially available spray-dried bovine colostrum (The Saskatoon Colostrum Company, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) in raising snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs. In experiment 1, 12 SF-pCD pigs received a liquid diet composed mainly of bovine colostrum from birth to day 10; 6 remained on the same liquid diet (COL), and the other 6 were fed a diet composed mainly of milk replacer (RPL) until weaning. In experiment 2, 12 SF-pCD pigs were fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning; after weaning, 6 were fed a starter diet containing 20% (w/w) bovine colostrum powder (STARTER-COL), and the other 6 were fed a starter diet without any bovine colostrum (STARTER-CTRL) until termination (day 42 or day 49). In experiment 1 the COL pigs had significantly fewer fever-days than did the RPL pigs. In experiment 2 diarrhea, typhlocolitis, and pancreatic degeneration developed in 4 of the STARTER-COL pigs after weaning. In both experiments all the pigs fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning survived until termination. All pigs tested free of swine influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Porcine parvovirus. In experiment 2 all the pigs tested free of Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), but some in both groups tested positive for Torque teno virus genogroups 1 and 2. In conclusion, with the use of snatch-farrowing and bovine colostrum, pigs can be raised in the absence of porcine maternal antibodies with 100% survival and freedom from most porcine pathogens of biologic relevance. This model is potentially suitable for animal disease research.

  5. Rosiglitazone dampens pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mirakaj, Valbona; Mutz, Christian; Vagts, Dierk; Henes, Janek; Haeberle, Helene A; Husung, Susanne; König, Tony; Nöldge-Schomburg, Gabriele; Rosenberger, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The hallmarks of acute lung injury (ALI) are the compromised alveolar-capillary barrier and the extravasation of leukocytes into the alveolar space. Given the fact that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist rosiglitazone holds significant anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone could dampen these hallmarks of local pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of lung injury. For this purpose, we used a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 μg/kg)-induced ALI. One hundred twenty minutes following the infusion of LPS, we started the exposure to rosiglitazone through inhalation or infusion. We found that intravenous rosiglitazone significantly controlled local pulmonary inflammation as determined through the expression of cytokines within the alveolar compartment. Furthermore, we found a significant reduction of the protein concentration and neutrophil activity within the alveolar space. In summary, we therefore conclude that the treatment with rosiglitazone might dampen local pulmonary inflammation during the initial stages of ALI.

  6. Experimental models of uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Paula L; Caissie, Amanda L; Burnier, Miguel N

    2004-06-01

    Over the past several decades, considerable effort has been directed toward developing suitable experimental models for the study of uveal melanoma. Animal models of uveal melanoma have undergone many improvements, leading to the development of experimental systems that better represent the disease in human beings. A major advance has come from the use of human uveal melanoma cell lines capable of inducing tumour growth and metastatic disease in immunodeficient hosts. Knowledge gained from the use of experimental models will ultimately be translated into better diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with uveal melanoma. In this review the authors describe the current state-of-the-art designs of experimental models of uveal melanoma, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of the available models. Novel findings from a rabbit model of uveal melanoma are also presented.

  7. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of insulin in agar and porcine models of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiszthuber, Helga; Bhatnagar, Sunali; Gyöngy, Miklós; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-assisted transdermal insulin delivery offers a less painful and less invasive alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. However, ultrasound-based drug delivery, otherwise known as sonophoresis, is a highly variable phenomenon, in part dependent on cavitation. The aim of the current work is to investigate the role of cavitation in transdermal insulin delivery. Fluorescently stained, soluble Actrapid insulin was placed on the surface of human skin-mimicking materials subjected to 265 kHz, 10% duty cycle focused ultrasound. A confocally and coaxially aligned 5 MHz broadband ultrasound transducer was used to detect cavitation. Two different skin models were used. The first model, 3% agar hydrogel, was insonated with a range of pressures (0.25-1.40 MPa peak rarefactional focal pressure—PRFP), with and without cavitation nuclei embedded within the agar at a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The second, porcine skin was insonated at 1.00 and 1.40 MPa PRFP. In both models, fluorescence measurements were used to determine penetration depth and concentration of delivered insulin. Results show that in agar gel, both insulin penetration depth and concentration only increased significantly in the presence of inertial cavitation, with up to a 40% enhancement. In porcine skin the amount of fluorescent insulin was higher in the epidermis of those samples that were exposed to ultrasound compared to the control samples, but there was no significant increase in penetration distance. The results underline the importance of instigating and monitoring inertial cavitation during transdermal insulin delivery.

  8. Combined in vivo and ex vivo analysis of mesh mechanics in a porcine hernia model.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Lindsey G; Lake, Spencer P; McAllister, Jared M; Tan, Wen Hui; Yu, Jennifer; Thompson, Dominic; Brunt, L Michael; Blatnik, Jeffrey A

    2017-07-21

    Hernia meshes exhibit variability in mechanical properties, and their mechanical match to tissue has not been comprehensively studied. We used an innovative imaging model of in vivo strain tracking and ex vivo mechanical analysis to assess effects of mesh properties on repaired abdominal walls in a porcine model. We hypothesized that meshes with dissimilar mechanical properties compared to native tissue would alter abdominal wall mechanics more than better-matched meshes. Seven mini-pigs underwent ventral hernia creation and subsequent open repair with one of two heavyweight polypropylene meshes. Following mesh implantation with attached radio-opaque beads, fluoroscopic images were taken at insufflation pressures from 5 to 30 mmHg on postoperative days 0, 7, and 28. At 28 days, animals were euthanized and ex vivo mechanical testing performed on full-thickness samples across repaired abdominal walls. Testing was conducted on 13 mini-pig controls, and on meshes separately. Stiffness and anisotropy (the ratio of stiffness in the transverse versus craniocaudal directions) were assessed. 3D reconstructions of repaired abdominal walls showed stretch patterns. As pressure increased, both meshes expanded, with no differences between groups. Over time, meshes contracted 17.65% (Mesh A) and 0.12% (Mesh B; p = 0.06). Mesh mechanics showed that Mesh A deviated from anisotropic native tissue more than Mesh B. Compared to native tissue, Mesh A was stiffer both transversely and craniocaudally. Explanted repaired abdominal walls of both treatment groups were stiffer than native tissue. Repaired tissue became less anisotropic over time, as mesh properties prevailed over native abdominal wall properties. This technique assessed 3D stretch at the mesh level in vivo in a porcine model. While the abdominal wall expanded, mesh-ingrown areas contracted, potentially indicating stresses at mesh edges. Ex vivo mechanics demonstrate that repaired tissue adopts mesh properties, suggesting

  9. MRI Evaluation of an Elastic TPU Mesh under Pneumoperitoneum in IPOM Position in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Lambertz, A; van den Hil, L C L; Ciritsis, A; Eickhoff, R; Kraemer, N A; Bouvy, N D; Müllen, A; Klinge, U; Neumann, U P; Klink, C D

    2017-06-08

    The frequency of laparoscopic approaches increased in hernia surgery over the past years. After mesh placement in IPOM position, the real extent of the meshes configurational changes after termination of pneumoperitoneum is still largely unknown. To prevent a later mesh folding it might be useful to place the mesh while it is kept under tension. Conventionally used meshes may lose their Effective Porosity under these conditions due to poor elastic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate a newly developed elastic thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) containing mesh that retains its Effective Porosity under mechanical strain in IPOM position in a porcine model. It was visualized under pneumoperitoneum using MRI in comparison to polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) meshes with similar structure. In each of ten minipigs, a mesh (TPU containing or native PVDF, 10 × 20 cm) was randomly placed in IPOM position at the center of the abdominal wall. After 8 weeks, six pigs underwent MRI evaluation with and without pneumoperitoneum to assess the visibility and elasticity of the mesh. Finally, pigs were euthanized and abdominal walls were explanted for histological and immunohistochemical assessment. The degree of adhesion formation was documented. Laparoscopic implantation of elastic TPU meshes in IPOM position was feasible and safe in a minipig model. Mesh position could be precisely visualized and assessed with and without pneumoperitoneum using MRI after 8 weeks. Elastic TPU meshes showed a significantly higher surface increase under pneumoperitoneum in comparison to PVDF. Immunohistochemically, the amount of CD45-positive cells was significantly lower and the Collagen I/III ratio was significantly higher in TPU meshes after 8 weeks. There were no differences regarding adhesion formation between study groups. The TPU mesh preserves its elastic properties in IPOM position in a porcine model after 8 weeks. Immunohistochemistry indicates superior biocompatibility

  10. The preventive effect of garlicin on a porcine model of myocardial infarction reperfusion no-reflow.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-hui; Yang, Peng; Li, Ai-li; Wang, Yong; Shi, Zai-xiang; Ke, Yuan-nan; Li, Xian-lun

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate whether garlicin can prevent reperfusion no-reflow in a catheter-based porcine model of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Twenty-two male Chinese mini swines were randomized into 3 groups: sham-operation group (n=6), control group (n=8), and garlicin group (n=8). The distal part of left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) in swines of the latter two groups was completely occluded by dilated balloon for 2 h and a successful AMI model was confirmed by coronary angiography (CAG) and electrocardiograph (ECG), which was then reperfused for 3 h. In the sham-operation group, balloon was placed in LAD without dilatation. Garlicin at a dosage of 1.88 mg/kg was injected 10 min before LAD occlusion until reperfusion for 1 h in the garlicin group. To assess serial cardiac function, hemodynamic data were examined by catheter method before AMI, 2 h after occlusion and 1, 2, and 3 h after reperfusion. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) and double staining with Evans blue and thioflavin-S were performed to evaluate myocardial no-reflow area (NRA) and risk area (RA). Left ventricular systolic pressure and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure significantly improved in the garlicin group after reperfusion compared with the control group P<0.05) and 2 h after AMI (P<0.05). MCE showed garlicin decreased reperfusion NRA after AMI compared with the control group (P <0.05). In double staining, NRA/RA in the garlicin group was 18.78%, significantly lower than that of the control group (49.84%, P<0.01). Garlicin has a preventive effect on the porcine model of myocardial infarction reperfusion no-reflow by improving hemodynamics and decreasing NRA.

  11. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of insulin in agar and porcine models of human skin.

    PubMed

    Feiszthuber, Helga; Bhatnagar, Sunali; Gyöngy, Miklós; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2015-03-21

    Ultrasound-assisted transdermal insulin delivery offers a less painful and less invasive alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. However, ultrasound-based drug delivery, otherwise known as sonophoresis, is a highly variable phenomenon, in part dependent on cavitation. The aim of the current work is to investigate the role of cavitation in transdermal insulin delivery. Fluorescently stained, soluble Actrapid insulin was placed on the surface of human skin-mimicking materials subjected to 265 kHz, 10% duty cycle focused ultrasound. A confocally and coaxially aligned 5 MHz broadband ultrasound transducer was used to detect cavitation. Two different skin models were used. The first model, 3% agar hydrogel, was insonated with a range of pressures (0.25-1.40 MPa peak rarefactional focal pressure-PRFP), with and without cavitation nuclei embedded within the agar at a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The second, porcine skin was insonated at 1.00 and 1.40 MPa PRFP. In both models, fluorescence measurements were used to determine penetration depth and concentration of delivered insulin. Results show that in agar gel, both insulin penetration depth and concentration only increased significantly in the presence of inertial cavitation, with up to a 40% enhancement. In porcine skin the amount of fluorescent insulin was higher in the epidermis of those samples that were exposed to ultrasound compared to the control samples, but there was no significant increase in penetration distance. The results underline the importance of instigating and monitoring inertial cavitation during transdermal insulin delivery.

  12. Reconstruction of porcine critical-sized mandibular defects with free fibular flaps: the development of a craniomaxillofacial surgery model.

    PubMed

    Dorafshar, Amir H; Mohan, Raja; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Brown, Emile N; Kelamis, Alex J; Bojovic, Branko; Christy, Michael R; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2014-05-01

    Vascularized bone flaps are the well-known standards of care for reconstruction of segmental mandibular defects ≥ 6 cm. We developed a large animal critical-sized mandibular defect model in which osseous free fibula flaps were used for reconstruction.In this study a total of eight 3-month-old Yorkshire pigs underwent 6 cm full-thickness resection of the left hemimandible. An osseous free fibula flap from the left leg was harvested and contoured to the mandibular defect. Bone placement and plate position was confirmed with fluoroscopy. Animals were followed with serial radiographs and clinical evaluations.Free fibulas were transferred successfully in all eight animals. The average operative time was 346 minutes, and the average flap ischemia time was 86 minutes. The average volume ratio of reconstructed hemimandibles to nonoperated control hemimandibles was 0.72 ± 0.33. The average maximum fracture load was 689 ± 262 N, and the average ratio of biomechanical fracture load for these samples compared with contralateral control hemimandibles was 0.88 ± 0.25.It is concluded that the porcine osseous free fibula flaps can be reliably harvested and viably transferred to critical-sized posterior mandibular defects with acceptable long-term results. The described microsurgical large animal model is acceptable for use in craniomaxillofacial experimentation.

  13. Porcine skin visible lesion thresholds for near-infrared lasers including modeling at two pulse durations and spot sizes.

    PubMed

    Cain, C P; Polhamus, G D; Roach, W P; Stolarski, D J; Schuster, K J; Stockton, K L; Rockwell, B A; Chen, Bo; Welch, A J

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of such systems as the airborne laser and advanced tactical laser, high-energy lasers that use 1315-nm wavelengths in the near-infrared band will soon present a new laser safety challenge to armed forces and civilian populations. Experiments in nonhuman primates using this wavelength have demonstrated a range of ocular injuries, including corneal, lenticular, and retinal lesions as a function of pulse duration. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) laser safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental data, and there is scant data for this wavelength. We are reporting minimum visible lesion (MVL) threshold measurements using a porcine skin model for two different pulse durations and spot sizes for this wavelength. We also compare our measurements to results from our model based on the heat transfer equation and rate process equation, together with actual temperature measurements on the skin surface using a high-speed infrared camera. Our MVL-ED50 thresholds for long pulses (350 micros) at 24-h postexposure are measured to be 99 and 83 J cm(-2) for spot sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 mm diam, respectively. Q-switched laser pulses of 50 ns have a lower threshold of 11 J cm(-2) for a 5-mm-diam top-hat laser pulse.

  14. Porcine skin visible lesion thresholds for near-infrared lasers including modeling at two pulse durations and spot sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; Polhamus, Garrett D.; Roach, William P.; Stolarski, David J.; Schuster, Kurt J.; Stockton, Kevin; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Chen, Bo; Welch, Ashley J.

    2006-07-01

    With the advent of such systems as the airborne laser and advanced tactical laser, high-energy lasers that use 1315-nm wavelengths in the near-infrared band will soon present a new laser safety challenge to armed forces and civilian populations. Experiments in nonhuman primates using this wavelength have demonstrated a range of ocular injuries, including corneal, lenticular, and retinal lesions as a function of pulse duration. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) laser safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental data, and there is scant data for this wavelength. We are reporting minimum visible lesion (MVL) threshold measurements using a porcine skin model for two different pulse durations and spot sizes for this wavelength. We also compare our measurements to results from our model based on the heat transfer equation and rate process equation, together with actual temperature measurements on the skin surface using a high-speed infrared camera. Our MVL-ED50 thresholds for long pulses (350 µs) at 24-h postexposure are measured to be 99 and 83 Jcm-2 for spot sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 mm diam, respectively. Q-switched laser pulses of 50 ns have a lower threshold of 11 Jcm-2 for a 5-mm-diam top-hat laser pulse.

  15. In vivo tissue response following implantation of shape memory polyurethane foam in a porcine aneurysm model

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Clubb, Fred J.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Miller, Matthew W.; Fossum, Theresa W.; Hartman, Jonathan; Tuzun, Egemen; Singhal, Pooja; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms treated by traditional endovascular methods using platinum coils have a tendency to be unstable, either due to chronic inflammation, compaction of coils, or growth of the aneurysm. We propose to use alternate filling methods for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms using polyurethane based shape memory polymer (SMP) foams. SMP polyurethane foams were surgically implanted in a porcine aneurysm model to determine biocompatibility, localized thrombogenicity, and their ability to serve as a stable filler material within an aneurysm. The degree of healing was evaluated via gross observation, histopathology and low vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LV-SEM) imaging after zero, thirty and ninety days. Clotting was initiated within the SMP foam at time zero (less than one hour exposure to blood prior to euthanization), partial healing was observed at thirty days, and almost complete healing had occurred at ninety days in vivo, with minimal inflammatory response. PMID:23650278

  16. Laparoendoscopic single site nephrectomy with the SPIDER surgical system: engineering advancements tested in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Salas, Nelson; Gorin, Michael A; Gorbatiy, Vladislav; Castle, Scott M; Bird, Vincent G; Leveillee, Raymond J

    2011-05-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose: The Single Port Instrument Delivery Extended Reach (SPIDER) surgical system was developed for true continuous instrument triangulation during laparoendoscopic single site (LESS) surgery. We present our initial preclinical experience with the SPIDER surgical system during renal surgery. Bilateral laparoscopic nephrectomies were performed in a live adult porcine animal model using the SPIDER device. A standard surgical approach was used via direct video guidance. The procedure was successfully performed without surgical error or complication. The SPIDER system proved easy to use with only a minimal learning curve. Intracorporeal surgical knots were tied without difficulty using this single site system. Our initial experience with the SPIDER surgical system during renal surgery is promising. SPIDER allows for true single port instrument triangulation offering a superior operative experience to currently available LESS surgical systems.

  17. In vivo response to an implanted shape memory polyurethane foam in a porcine aneurysm model.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N; Clubb, Fred J; Wilson, Thomas S; Miller, Matthew W; Fossum, Theresa W; Hartman, Jonathan; Tuzun, Egemen; Singhal, Pooja; Maitland, Duncan J

    2014-05-01

    Cerebral aneurysms treated by traditional endovascular methods using platinum coils have a tendency to be unstable, either due to chronic inflammation, compaction of coils, or growth of the aneurysm. We propose to use alternate filling methods for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms using polyurethane-based shape memory polymer (SMP) foams. SMP polyurethane foams were surgically implanted in a porcine aneurysm model to determine biocompatibility, localized thrombogenicity, and their ability to serve as a stable filler material within an aneurysm. The degree of healing was evaluated via gross observation, histopathology, and low vacuum scanning electron microscopy imaging after 0, 30, and 90 days. Clotting was initiated within the SMP foam at time 0 (<1 h exposure to blood before euthanization), partial healing was observed at 30 days, and almost complete healing had occurred at 90 days in vivo, with minimal inflammatory response. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Analysis of regional compliance in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Czaplik, Michael; Biener, Ingeborg; Dembinski, Rolf; Pelosi, Paolo; Soodt, Thomas; Schroeder, Wolfgang; Leonhardt, Steffen; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf; Bickenbach, Johannes

    2012-10-15

    Lung protective ventilation in acute lung injury (ALI) focuses on using low tidal volumes and adequate levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Identifying optimal pressure is difficult because pressure-volume (PV) relations differ regionally. Precise analysis demands local measurements of pressures and related alveolar morphologies. In a porcine model of surfactant depletion (n=24), we combined measuring static pressures with endoscopic microscopy and electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to examine regional PV loops and morphologic heterogeneities between healthy (control group; CON) and ALI lungs ventilated with low (LVT) or high tidal volumes (HVT). Quantification included indices for microscopy (Volume Air Index (VAI), Heterogeneity and Circularity Index), EIT analysis and calculation of regional compliances due to generated PV loops. We found that: (1) VAI decreased in lower lobe after ALI, (2) electrical impedance decreased in dorsal regions and (3) PV loops differed regionally. Further studies should prove the potentials of these techniques on individual respiratory settings and clinical outcome.

  19. Porcine model of intracoronary pulverization of stent struts by rotablation atherectomy.

    PubMed

    Quang, Thuy Tran; Hatem, Raja; Rousseau, Guy; Dube, Bruno; Samson, Caroline; Schampaert, Erick; Charron, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and safety of rotablation atherectomy in a suboptimally expanded stent. Seven pigs underwent suboptimal stent expansion in the left anterior descending coronary. Pulverization of the stent struts was performed by rotablation atherectomy with two different burr sizes. Two types of control porcine models were used: pigs with fully expanded stents and pigs without stents. Continuous electrocardiogram readings as well as microscopic and radiologic analysis of cardiac tissue were performed. Rotablation atherectomy reduces the suboptimally expanded stent by (26.95 ± 5.03)%. Ninety-five percent of the metal microparticles, imbedded in the suboptimally expanded stent group cardiac tissue, are less than 15 μm. Transient vasospasm and ST segments elevations were observed during rotablation atherectomy, which returned to basal conditions at the end of the intervention. Our study demonstrated the feasibility and safety of using rotablation atherectomy to pulverize stent struts in a suboptimally expanded stent. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Percutaneous renal access training: content validation comparison between a live porcine and a virtual reality (VR) simulation model.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shashikant; Kurien, Abraham; Ganpule, Arvind; Muthu, Veeramani; Sabnis, Ravindra; Desai, Mahesh

    2010-12-01

    • To compare the content validity (realism and usefulness) of percutaneous renal access (PRA) obtained on a live porcine model and a high-fidelity computer-based surgical simulator (PERC Mentor, Simbionix; Lod, Israel) in our skills laboratory for trainees interested in PRA training, so as to determine which of the two is a more appropriate and effective training model. • In all, 24 'experts' performed PRA in a live porcine model and using the PERC Mentor. • The porcine model access required a live anaesthetized pig with a pre-placed ureteric catheter. The access was done with flouroscopic guidance using a 22-G 'skinny' needle (Cook Medical, Bloomington, IN, USA). • Then the specific task of PRA using a similar case scenario was done using the PERC Mentor. • The experts rated the models using a questionnaire based on a 5-point Likert scale, consisting of 10- and three-items of realism and usefulness, respectively. • Of the 10 items of realism assessed, the porcine model was rated as better than the PERC Mentor for 'overall realism', 'movement of the kidney', 'tactile feedback of perinephric space', 'fluoroscopic realism' and 'complications encountered' (All P < 0.001). • It was inferior to the PERC Mentor for 'orientation to the flank', 'aspiration', 'repetitive performance' and 'organisational feasibility' (All P < 0.001). • 'Tactile feedback of successful access' was similar in both models (mean [sd] points, 4.24 [0.7] vs 4.6 [0.5]). • Of the three items of usefulness, 'overall usefulness' (4.6 [0.6] vs 4.65 [0.5]) and 'use as a training tool' (4.32 [0.5] vs 4.75 [0.4]) was similar; however, the porcine model was a much better assessment tool (P < 0.001). • Both models have relative advantages and disadvantages. The live porcine model is a more realistic assessment tool for PRA. The specific advantage of the PERC Mentor is of repetitive tasking and easier set up feasibility. • The overall usefulness was same for both

  1. Gene expression analysis of a porcine hepatocyte/bile duct in vitro differentiaion model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A serum-free, feeder-cell-dependent, inductive differentiation culture system of porcine hepatocytes and bile ductules was analyzed for differential gene expression on a porcine genome microarray. Primary cultures of baby pig hepatocytes (BPH) were matured in culture as a monolayer of hepatocytes w...

  2. Bovine Serum Albumin Glutaraldehyde for Completely Sutureless Laparoscopic Heminephrectomy in a Survival Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Gamboa, Aldrin Joseph R.; Kaplan, Adam G.; Khosravi, Amanda; Truong, Hung; Andrade, Lorena; Lin, Rachelle; Alipanah, Reza; Ortiz, Cervando; McCormick, David; Box, Geoffrey N.; Lee, Hak J.; Deane, Leslie A.; Edwards, Robert A.; McDougall, Elspeth M.; Clayman, Ralph V.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) has not received widespread clinical application because of its technical challenge. Bovine serum albumin glutaraldehyde (BSAG) is a hemostatic agent that is independent of the clotting cascade. We evaluated the use of BSAG as the sole agent for parenchymal and collecting system closure during LPN in a survival porcine model. Methods Eighteen pigs underwent hilar clamping and LPN by longitudinal excision of the lateral one-third of the right kidney. The opened collecting system was covered with oxidized cellulose to prevent BSAG seepage into the urinary tract. BSAG was allowed to set for 10 or 5 minutes. Twelve animals underwent survival LPN BSAG only closure; six control pigs were acutely studied using saline. Urinary extravasation was evaluated by injection of furosemide and indigo carmine, and then evaluating the renal surface and bladder catheter drainage for dye. A subjective bleeding score was assigned after hilum unclamping. At 6 weeks, BSAG kidneys were harvested for burst pressure testing and histopathological analysis. Results All 12 pigs survived for 6 weeks. No pigs had urinary extravasation. Mean percentage of kidney removed by weight was 19%. Mean warm ischemia time was 29 minutes. Five pigs required a second BSAG application to achieve a bleeding score of 0. Mean arterial and collecting system burst pressures were 301.8 and 322.4 mm Hg, respectively. Mean postoperative creatinine increase was 0.07 mg/dL. Conclusion BSAG for completely sutureless LPN in a survival porcine model was feasible. PMID:20059350

  3. The effect of whole-body resonance vibration in a porcine model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H T; Chak, Jason; Dressler, Dan; Manouchehri, Neda; Okon, Elena B; Anderson, Lisa M; Melnyk, Angela D; Cripton, Peter A; Kwon, Brian K

    2015-06-15

    Whole-body vibration has been identified as a potential stressor to spinal cord injury (SCI) patients during pre-hospital transportation. However, the effect that such vibration has on the acutely injured spinal cord is largely unknown, particularly in the frequency domain of 5 Hz in which resonance of the spine occurs. The objective of the study was to investigate the consequences of resonance vibration on the injured spinal cord. Using our previously characterized porcine model of SCI, we subjected animals to resonance vibration (5.7±0.46 Hz) or no vibration for a period of 1.5 or 3.0 h. Locomotor function was assessed weekly and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected to assess different inflammatory and injury severity markers. Spinal cords were evaluated histologically to quantify preserved white and gray matter. No significant differences were found between groups for CSF levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and lL-8. Glial fibrillary acidic protein levels were lower in the resonance vibration group, compared with the non-vibrated control group. Spared white matter tissue was increased within the vibrated group at 7 d post-injury but this difference was not apparent at the 12-week time-point. No significant difference was observed in locomotor recovery following resonance vibration of the spine. Here, we demonstrate that exposure to resonance vibration for 1.5 or 3 h following SCI in our porcine model is not detrimental to the functional or histological outcomes. Our observation that a 3.0-h period of vibration at resonance frequency induces modest histological improvement at one week post-injury warrants further study.

  4. Ultrasound imagery for dental implant diagnosis and treatment planning in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mijin; Culjat, Martin O; Singh, Rahul S; White, Shane N

    2012-12-01

    Currently, there is no commercially available method to provide non-invasive, non-ionizing, real-time imaging of the gingival form and bony architecture of implant sites, before, during, and after implant placement. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of 2-dimensional (2-D) ultrasound imaging of soft and hard tissues for implant diagnosis and treatment planning. A sector scanning ultrasound system was applied. Five representative clinical features (implant in an edentulous ridge, single implant tooth replacement, implant dehiscence, tooth dehiscence, and mental foramina) were created or identified in each of the 5 porcine jaws, which were then covered with soft tissue and imaged in an acoustic water tank. All of the 5 model features, in all 5 jaws, were clearly visible with the ultrasound. Most objects were visible over a large range of positions and angles. Each of the features, as well as the soft tissue and bone surfaces, were recognized by specific acoustic signatures, with the same signature recurring for each object type among all 5 of the jaw specimens. All implants were highly reflective and clearly visualized. A 2-D sector scanning ultrasound system was demonstrated to be capable of imaging representative features for implant treatment planning in a porcine model; these included implants placed in edentulous ridges; implants placed for single tooth replacement; implants with simulated dehiscences; teeth with simulated dehiscences; and mental foramina. Specific acoustic signatures for these features were defined. Qualitative differences between ultrasound and other dental imaging techniques were described. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Microparticulate ICE slurry for renal hypothermia: laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in a porcine model.

    SciTech Connect

    Shikanov, S; Wille, M; Large, M; Razmaria, A; Lifshitz, D; Chang, A; Wu, Y; Kasza, K; Shalhav, A

    2010-10-01

    Previously, we described the feasibility of renal hypothermia using microparticulate ice slurry during laparoscopy. In the present study, we compared surface cooling with the ice slurry versus near-frozen saline or warm ischemia (WI) during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) in a porcine model. We used a single-kidney porcine model. Animals in 5 equal groups (n = 6 each) underwent right laparoscopic complete nephrectomy. In Phase I, left LPN was performed under 90 minutes of ischemia and 90-minute renal cooling with either slurry (Slurry group 1) or saline (Saline group 1). No cooling was applied in the WI group. In Phase II, to simulate more extreme condition, ischemia time was extended to 120 minutes and cooling shortened to 10 minutes (Slurry group 2 and Saline group 2). The study endpoints were renal and core temperature during the surgery and serum creatinine at baseline and days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after the procedure. The ice slurry was easily produced and delivered. Nadir renal temperature (mean {+-} SD) was 8 {+-} 4 C in Slurry group 1 vs. 22.5 {+-} 3 C in Saline group 1 (P < .0001). Renal rewarming to 30 C occurred after 61 {+-} 7 minutes in Slurry group 2 vs. 24 {+-} 6 minutes in Saline group 2 (P < .0001). Core temperature decreased on average to 35 C in the Saline groups compared with 37 C in the Slurry groups (P < .0001). Serum creatinine did not differ between the Saline and Slurry groups in Phases I and II at any time point. Ice slurry provides superior renal cooling compared with near-frozen saline during LPN without associated core hypothermia.

  6. Dynamic and volumetric variables reliably predict fluid responsiveness in a porcine model with pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Broch, Ole; Gruenewald, Matthias; Renner, Jochen; Meybohm, Patrick; Schöttler, Jan; Heß, Katharina; Steinfath, Markus; Bein, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    The ability of stroke volume variation (SVV), pulse pressure variation (PPV) and global end-diastolic volume (GEDV) for prediction of fluid responsiveness in presence of pleural effusion is unknown. The aim of the present study was to challenge the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness in a porcine model with pleural effusions. Pigs were studied at baseline and after fluid loading with 8 ml kg(-1) 6% hydroxyethyl starch. After withdrawal of 8 ml kg(-1) blood and induction of pleural effusion up to 50 ml kg(-1) on either side, measurements at baseline and after fluid loading were repeated. Cardiac output, stroke volume, central venous pressure (CVP) and pulmonary occlusion pressure (PAOP) were obtained by pulmonary thermodilution, whereas GEDV was determined by transpulmonary thermodilution. SVV and PPV were monitored continuously by pulse contour analysis. Pleural effusion was associated with significant changes in lung compliance, peak airway pressure and stroke volume in both responders and non-responders. At baseline, SVV, PPV and GEDV reliably predicted fluid responsiveness (area under the curve 0.85 (p<0.001), 0.88 (p<0.001), 0.77 (p = 0.007). After induction of pleural effusion the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness was well preserved and also PAOP was predictive. Threshold values for SVV and PPV increased in presence of pleural effusion. In this porcine model, bilateral pleural effusion did not affect the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness.

  7. Effect of Stents Coated with Artemisinin or Dihydroartemisinin in a Porcine Coronary Restenosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Suyoung; Lim, Kyung Seob; Bae, In Ho; Park, Jun-Kyu; Park, Dae Sung; Shim, Jae Won; Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Hyun Kuk; Sim, Doo Sun; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kang, Jung Chaee

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Artemisinin and dihydroartemisinin are drugs used to treat malaria. These drugs suppress inflammatory reactions. The aim of this study was to examine the anti-intima hyperplasia effect of a novel drug-eluting stent with artemisinin or dihydroartemisinin in a porcine coronary restenosis model. Materials and Methods Pigs were randomized into four groups; in the first, the coronary arteries (20 pigs, a total of 40 coronary arteries, with 10 coronary arteries in each group) was implanted with bare metal stents (BMS, n=10); the second group was given polymer-coated stents (PCS, n=10); the third group was treated with artemisinin-eluting stents (AES, n=10); and the fourth group was given dihydroartemisinin-eluting stents (DAES, n=10). Histopathologic analysis was performed 28 days after stenting. Results The injury and fibrin scores among the four groups were not significantly different. However, the internal elastic lamina, lumen area, and neointima area were significantly different. Moreover, the percent area of stenosis (46.2±18.66% in BMS vs. 89.4±10.92% in PCS vs. 83.3±17.07% in AES vs. 36.7±11.20% in DAES, p<0.0001) and inflammation score (1.0 [range: 1.0-1.0] vs. 3.0 [range: 2.25-3.0] vs. 3.0 [range: 1.0-3.0] vs. 2.0 [range: 1.75-3.0] in BMS, PCS, AES, and DAES, respectively; p<0.001) were markedly decreased in the DAES group compared to the PCS group. Conclusion DES, which uses a natural substance, dihydroartemisinin, showed a neointima and inflammatory suppressive effect in a porcine coronary restenosis model. PMID:28154599

  8. Comparison between cryopreserved and glycerol-preserved allografts in a partial-thickness porcine wound model.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Cheonjae; Lim, Kihwan; Lee, Sungjun; Choi, Yanghwan; Choi, Youngwhan; Lee, Jungsuk

    2016-03-01

    Human skin allografts are one of the best temporary biological coverings for severely burned patients. Cryopreserved (CPA) and glycerol-preserved (GPA) allografts are the most widely used types. This study compared the allograft efficiency of both preservation methods under the same conditions. To simulate actual clinical conditions, we used a porcine wound model. In addition, we evaluated the macroscopic and microscopic scoring of graft performance for each method. Porcine cadaver skin 1 mm thick was obtained from one pig. Cryopreserved skin cell viability was 20.8 %, glycerol-preserved skin was 9.08 %, and fresh skin was 58.6 %. We made ten partial-thickness wounds each in two pigs. The take rates on day 2 were 96.23 and 82.65 % in the GPA and CPA group (both n = 9), respectively. After 1 week, the take rates of both groups were nearly equal. The removal rate at week 5 was 98.87 and 94.41 % in the GPA and CPA group, respectively. On microscopic findings at week 2, inflammation was greater in the CPA group. Other findings such as fibroblast hyperplasia and neovascularization were not significantly different between both groups. At week 5, the score of collagen fiber synthesis was 2.67 ± 0.47 and 2.33 ± 0.47 in the GPA and CPA group, respectively. The epidermal-dermal junction was 2.22 ± 0.79 and 2.00 ± 0.47 in the GPA and CPA group, respectively. These findings suggest that wound healing takes longer in the CPA group. The preservation method of allografts is not a absolute factor in the wound healing process in this wound model.

  9. Dynamic and Volumetric Variables Reliably Predict Fluid Responsiveness in a Porcine Model with Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Broch, Ole; Gruenewald, Matthias; Renner, Jochen; Meybohm, Patrick; Schöttler, Jan; Heß, Katharina; Steinfath, Markus; Bein, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability of stroke volume variation (SVV), pulse pressure variation (PPV) and global end-diastolic volume (GEDV) for prediction of fluid responsiveness in presence of pleural effusion is unknown. The aim of the present study was to challenge the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness in a porcine model with pleural effusions. Methods Pigs were studied at baseline and after fluid loading with 8 ml kg−1 6% hydroxyethyl starch. After withdrawal of 8 ml kg−1 blood and induction of pleural effusion up to 50 ml kg−1 on either side, measurements at baseline and after fluid loading were repeated. Cardiac output, stroke volume, central venous pressure (CVP) and pulmonary occlusion pressure (PAOP) were obtained by pulmonary thermodilution, whereas GEDV was determined by transpulmonary thermodilution. SVV and PPV were monitored continuously by pulse contour analysis. Results Pleural effusion was associated with significant changes in lung compliance, peak airway pressure and stroke volume in both responders and non-responders. At baseline, SVV, PPV and GEDV reliably predicted fluid responsiveness (area under the curve 0.85 (p<0.001), 0.88 (p<0.001), 0.77 (p = 0.007). After induction of pleural effusion the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness was well preserved and also PAOP was predictive. Threshold values for SVV and PPV increased in presence of pleural effusion. Conclusions In this porcine model, bilateral pleural effusion did not affect the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness. PMID:23418546

  10. 17β-estradiol prevents experimentally-induced oxidative damage to membrane lipids and nuclear DNA in porcine ovary.

    PubMed

    Stepniak, Jan; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens, with their principle representative 17β-estradiol, contribute to the redox state of cells showing both pro- and antioxidative properties. In the ovary, being the main source of estrogens, maintaining balance between the production and detoxification of ROS is crucial. Whereas ovary estrogen concentration is difficult to estimate, its circulating concentration in women may reach the nanomolar level. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of 17β-estradiol on oxidative damage to membrane lipids (lipid peroxidation, LPO) and to nuclear DNA in the porcine ovary under basal conditions and in the presence of Fenton reaction (Fe(2+)+H2O2→Fe(3+)+(•)OH + OH(-)) substrates. Ovary homogenates and DNA were incubated in the presence of 17β-estradiol (1 mM-1 pM), without/with FeSO4 (30 μM) + H2O2 (0.5 mM). Malondialdehyde + 4-hydroxyalkenals (MDA + 4-HDA) concentration (LPO index) was measured spectrophotometrically. The concentration of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) (DNA damage index) was measured by HPLC. We observed that 17β-estradiol did not alter the basal level of oxidative damage, but reduced Fe(2+)+H2O2-induced oxidative damage to membrane lipids when ≥10 nM and to DNA at concentrations ≥1 nM. In the ovary at near physiological concentration, 17β-estradiol prevents experimentally induced oxidative damage. This suggests that under physiological conditions this hormone may contribute to protecting the ovary against oxidative damage.

  11. Experimental Building Information Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    link can later be removed. In some cases, it may also help to have a 2D drawing extracted from the 3D model, such as when laying out a large floor...plan. In such cases, a Revit plan view can be exported as a 2D Autocad DWG file using Revit’s export function. This 2D DWG file can then be...with government-furnished 2D Autocad DWG files. The 2D DWG files included architectural, mechanical, plumbing, and electrical layouts, and were

  12. Rise of the Pigs: Utilization of the Porcine Model to Study Musculoskeletal Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering During Skeletal Growth.

    PubMed

    Cone, Stephanie G; Warren, Paul B; Fisher, Matthew B

    2017-09-01

    Large animal models play an essential role in the study of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM), as well as biomechanics. The porcine model has been increasingly used to study the musculoskeletal system, including specific joints, such as the knee and temporomandibular joints, and tissues, such as bone, cartilage, and ligaments. In particular, pigs have been utilized to evaluate the role of skeletal growth on the biomechanics and engineered replacements of these joints and tissues. In this review, we explore the publication history of the use of pig models in biomechanics and TERM discuss interspecies comparative studies, highlight studies on the effect of skeletal growth and other biological considerations in the porcine model, and present challenges and emerging opportunities for using this model to study functional TERM.

  13. Quantification of intervertebral displacement with a novel MRI-based modeling technique: Assessing measurement bias and reliability with a porcine spine model.

    PubMed

    Mahato, Niladri K; Montuelle, Stephane; Goubeaux, Craig; Cotton, John; Williams, Susan; Thomas, James; Clark, Brian C

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based modeling technique for measuring intervertebral displacements. Here, we present the measurement bias and reliability of the developmental work using a porcine spine model. Porcine lumbar vertebral segments were fitted in a custom-built apparatus placed within an externally calibrated imaging volume of an open-MRI scanner. The apparatus allowed movement of the vertebrae through pre-assigned magnitudes of sagittal and coronal translation and rotation. The induced displacements were imaged with static (T1) and fast dynamic (2D HYCE S) pulse sequences. These images were imported into animation software, in which these images formed a background 'scene'. Three-dimensional models of vertebrae were created using static axial scans from the specimen and then transferred into the animation environment. In the animation environment, the user manually moved the models (rotoscoping) to perform model-to-'scene' matching to fit the models to their image silhouettes and assigned anatomical joint axes to the motion-segments. The animation protocol quantified the experimental translation and rotation displacements between the vertebral models. Accuracy of the technique was calculated as 'bias' using a linear mixed effects model, average percentage error and root mean square errors. Between-session reliability was examined by computing intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and the coefficient of variations (CV). For translation trials, a constant bias (β0) of 0.35 (±0.11) mm was detected for the 2D HYCE S sequence (p=0.01). The model did not demonstrate significant additional bias with each mm increase in experimental translation (β1Displacement=0.01mm; p=0.69). Using the T1 sequence for the same assessments did not significantly change the bias (p>0.05). ICC values for the T1 and 2D HYCE S pulse sequences were 0.98 and 0.97, respectively. For rotation trials, a constant bias (β0) of 0

  14. Endoscopic intestinal bypass creation by using self-assembling magnets in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Marvin; Agoston, A Tony; Thompson, Christopher C

    2016-04-01

    A purely endoluminal method of GI bypass would be desirable for the treatment of obstruction, obesity, or metabolic syndrome. We have developed a technology based on miniature self-assembling magnets that create large-caliber anastomoses (Incisionless Anastomosis System [IAS]). The aim of this study was to evaluate procedural characteristics of IAS deployment and long-term anastomotic integrity and patency. We performed a 3-month survival study of Yorkshire pigs (5 interventions, 3 controls). Intervention pigs underwent simultaneous enteroscopy/colonoscopy performed with the animals under intravenous sedation. The IAS magnets were deployed and coupled with reciprocal magnets under fluoroscopy. Every 3 to 6 days pigs underwent endoscopy until jejunocolonic anastomosis (dual-path bypass) creation and magnet expulsion. Necropsies and histological evaluation were performed. The primary endpoints were technical success; secondary endpoints of anastomosis integrity, patency, and histological characteristics were weight trends. Under intravenous sedation, endoscopic bypass creation by using IAS magnets was successfully performed in 5 of 5 pigs (100%). Given porcine anatomy, the easiest dual-path bypass to create was between the proximal jejunum and colon. The mean procedure time was 14.7 minutes. Patent, leak-free anastomoses formed by day 4. All IAS magnets were expelled by day 12. All anastomoses were fully patent at 3 months with a mean diameter of 3.5 cm. The mean 3-month weight was 45 kg in bypass pigs and 78 kg in controls (P = .01). At necropsy, adhesions were absent. Histology showed full re-epithelialization across the anastomosis without fibrosis or inflammation. Large-caliber, leak-free, foreign body-free endoscopic intestinal bypass by using IAS magnets can be safely and rapidly performed in the porcine by model using only intravenous sedation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Methotrexate loaded SAE coated coronary stents reduce neointimal hyperplasia in a porcine coronary model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Y; Salu, K; Liu, X; Li, S; Wang, L; Verbeken, E; Bosmans, J; De Scheerder, I

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of stent based methotrexate delivery on neointimal hyperplasia. Methods: Stainless steel coronary stents and biological polymer coated (SAE) stents were randomly implanted in coronary arteries of pigs with a stent to artery ratio of 1.1:1. The pigs were killed after five days (10 stents) or four weeks (20 stents). Second, stainless steel coronary stents were dip coated in a 10 mg/ml methotrexate–SAE polymer solution, resulting in a total load of 150 μg methotrexate/stent. SAE coated stents and methotrexate loaded stents were randomly implanted in porcine coronary arteries with a stent to artery ratio of 1.2:1 and followed up to four weeks. Results: SAE coated stents and bare stents elicited a similar tissue response at five days. At four weeks, neointimal hyperplasia induced by the coated stents was less pronounced than with the bare stents (1.32 (0.66) v 1.73 (0.93) mm2, p > 0.05). In vitro drug release studies showed that 50% of the methotrexate was released in 24 hours, and all drug was released within four weeks. No impact on vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation or viability was observed in in vitro cell cultures. At four weeks the arteries with methotrexate loaded stents had decreased peristrut inflammation and neointimal hyperplasia (1.22 (0.34) v 2.25 (1.28) mm2, p < 0.01). Conclusions: SAE coating had an excellent biocompatibility with vascular tissue. Stent based delivery of methotrexate in the SAE coating effectively reduced neointimal hyperplasia in a porcine coronary stent model, potentially due to reduced peristrut inflammation. PMID:14729797

  16. Complex porcine model of atherosclerosis: induction of early coronary lesions after long-term hyperlipidemia without sustained hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Artinger, Sandra; Deiner, Carolin; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Schwimmbeck, Peter L; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Pels, Klaus

    2009-04-01

    The incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) is still increasing in industrialized countries and it is even higher in diabetic patients. For experimental studies investigating the pathophysiology of CAD, the use of an animal model comparable with the pathological situation in patients is crucial. To develop a model of advanced coronary atherosclerosis with induction of hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia in domestic pigs. Six pigs were fed a standard pig chow (controls), two were fed a 2% cholesterol and 17% coconut fat diet (Chol group), and two pigs received a 4% cholesterol and 17% coconut fat diet combined with streptozotocin (STZ) injections to induce diabetes (High Chol+STZ group). Serum lipid and plasma glucose values were analyzed, and histochemical staining for morphometric analysis and immunohistochemistry were performed. Pigs on the hyperlipidemic diet had elevated mean (+/- SD) serum lipid levels (total cholesterol 5.05+/-1.45 mmol/L [Chol] and 5.03+/-2.41 mmol/L [High Chol+STZ] versus 2.09+/-0.23 mmol/L [controls]). Histopathological evaluation revealed an initial stage of coronary atherosclerosis. None of the STZ-treated pigs showed a sustained elevation of plasma glucose (mean glucose before STZ injection was 5.11+/-0.94 mmol/L and thereafter was 6.03+/-2.39 mmol/L) or a decline in pancreatic beta cells. The current data suggest that the domestic porcine model is not suitable to create severe CAD using an atherogenic diet in combination with STZ injections for experimental interventional vascular research. This may be due to different STZ sensitivities among species. However, hyperlipidemia induced early pathological lesions in coronary arteries resembling initial stages of atherosclerosis without severe luminal narrowing.

  17. Selenium toxicity and porcine focal symmetrical poliomyelomalacia: description of a field outbreak and experimental reproduction.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, T M; Scholz, R W; Drake, T R

    1983-01-01

    An acute afebrile paretic condition was diagnosed in 18 of 225 feeder pigs between eight to ten weeks of age. Nine pigs died acutely, seven pigs were euthanatized and two appeared to recover. Macroscopic lesions in the ventral horns of the cervical and lumbar/sacral spinal cord enlargements consisted of focal, bilateral, depressed areas. Histopathologically, the lesion consisted of endothelial proliferation, glial cell reaction and microcavitation. Similar lesions were observed in some brain stem motor nuclei. High selenium levels were detected in the pig feed and in pig tissues and blood. Two of five experimental pigs fed a commercial grower ration and supplemented with 52 ppm selenium as sodium selenite developed paresis and paralysis after a 29 day feeding trial. Histopathological lesions of focal symmetrical poliomyelomalacia confined to the cervical and lumbar/sacral spinal cord enlargements, and identical to those in the field cases, were produced. Select brain stem motor nuclei were also affected. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. PMID:6667430

  18. The Effect of Experimental Fusarium Mycotoxicosis on Microbiota Diversity in Porcine Ascending Colon Contents

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Śliżewska, Katarzyna; Nowak, Adriana; Zielonka, Łukasz; Żakowska, Zofia; Gajęcka, Magdalena; Gajęcki, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of exposure of pigs to the Fusarium mycotoxins zearalenone (ZEN) and deoxynivalenol (DON), administered together and separately, on the colon microbiota. An experiment was conducted for 42 days on gilts, randomly assigned to four groups and administered either ZEN, DON, ZEN+DON, or a placebo. The number of aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeasts, molds, anaerobic Clostridium perfringens, fecal streptococci, Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were determined in the contents of the ascending colon. The influence of mycotoxins on the functional diversity of the colonic microbiota was assessed using EcoPlate tests (Biolog). Analysis revealed the predominance of LAB in all groups of pigs. Zearalenone, administered separately and together with DON, was found to have an adverse effect on mesophilic aerobic bacteria, but only after long exposure to this mycotoxin. During the six weeks of the experiment, the concentration of C. perfringens, E. coli, and other bacteria in the family Enterobacteriaceae was most considerably reduced in the experimental groups exposed to zearalenone, both separately and together with DON. Mycotoxins also affected the functional biodiversity of microorganisms. Both Shannon’s diversity index and the number of catabolized substrates in Biolog plate (the R index) were much higher in the group subjected to mixed mycotoxicosis. PMID:25025709

  19. Influence of two different levels of intra-abdominal hypertension on bacterial translocation in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to quantify bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes due to different levels of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH; 15 vs. 30 mmHg) lasting for 24 h in a porcine model. Methods We examined 18 anesthetized and intubated pigs (52.3 ± 4.7 kg) which were randomly allocated to three experimental groups (each n = 6) and studied over a period of 24 h. After preparation and establishing a steady state, the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) was increased stepwise to 30 mmHg in six animals using a carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflator (IAP-30 group). In the second group, IAP was increased to 15 mmHg (IAP-15 group), while IAP remained unchanged in another six pigs (control group). Using a pulse contour cardiac output (PiCCO®) monitoring system, hemodynamic parameters as well as blood gases were recorded periodically. Moreover, peripheral and portal vein blood samples were taken for microbiological examinations. Lymph nodes from the ileocecal junction were sampled during an intra-vital laparotomy at the end of the observational period. After sacrificing the animals, bowel tissue samples and corresponding mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were extracted for histopathological and microbiological analyses. Results Cardiac output decreased in all groups. In IAP-30 animals, volumetric preload indices significantly decreased, while those of IAP-15 pigs did not differ from those of controls. Under IAH, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the IAP-30 group declined, while MAP in the IAP-15 group was significantly elevated (controls unchanged). PO2 and PCO2 remained unchanged. The grade of ischemic damage of the intestines (histopathologically quantified using the Park score) increased significantly with different IAH levels. Accordingly, the amount of translocated bacteria in intestinal wall specimens as well as in MLN significantly increased with the level of IAH. Lymph node cultures confirmed the relation between bacterial translocation

  20. Alcohol concentration determines the type of atrial arrhythmia induced in a porcine model of acute alcoholic intoxication.

    PubMed

    Anadon, M J; Almendral, J; González, P; Zaballos, M; Delcan, J L; De Guevara, J L

    1996-11-01

    Alcohol abuse has long been suspected clinically to cause paroxysmal atrial tachyarrhythmias. However, such a relationship has never been conclusively proven, partly due to the lack of experimental evidence. Although atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common atrial arrhythmia attributed to acute alcoholic ingestion, atrial flutter has occasionally been noted. We analyzed the possible role of alcohol in initiation and/or maintenance of a variety of atrial tachyarrhythmias in a closed-chest porcine model. Nine pigs underwent nine endocardial right atrial stimulation protocols (RASP) at baseline and 17 RASPs after increasing doses of ethanol (first infusion 1,230 mg/kg, second infusion 870 mg/kg) by means of one multipolar catheter advanced under heavy sedation from the femoral vein. Each RASP included 1, 2, and 3 extrastimuli, and rapid pacing at 5 times diastolic threshold. Venous ethanol concentrations were measured (HPGC method) every 10 minutes and at the time of arrhythmia induction. Atrial tachyarrhythmias were induced in 4 of 9 baseline RASPs, and lasted for a mean of 21 seconds, and in 16 of 17 RASPs after alcohol lasting for a mean of 357 seconds. Only fibrillation was observed at the baseline RASP. The atrial tachyarrhythmias induced after alcohol were AF in 11 RASPs and atrial flutter in 5 RASPs (in 5 animals). The mean venous ethanol concentration at the time of the longest arrhythmia induced for each RASP were 200 +/- 89 mg/dL for RASP inducing fibrillation and 292 +/- 40 mg/dL for RASP inducing flutter (P < 0.05). Flutter tended to be sustained (> 1 minute in duration) more often than fibrillation (4 of 5 flutter vs 2 of 11 fibrillation P < 0.05). In three experiments, atrial flutter persisted for > 10 minutes and was terminated by overdrive atrial pacing. We concluded: (1) in this closed-chest porcine model, an ethanol infusion facilitates a variety of atrial arrhythmias related to the ethanol concentration; (2) flutter tended to be sustained, and

  1. Assessment of Novel Anti-thrombotic Fusion Proteins for Inhibition of Stenosis in a Porcine Model of Arteriovenous Graft

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Christi M.; Zhuplatov, Ilya; He, Yuxia; Wun, Tze-Chein; Kim, Seong-Eun; Cheung, Alfred K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis arteriovenous synthetic grafts (AVG) provide high volumetric blood flow rates shortly after surgical placement. However, stenosis often develops at the vein-graft anastomosis contributing to thrombosis and early graft failure. Two novel fusion proteins, ANV-6L15 and TAP-ANV, inhibit the tissue factor/factor VIIa coagulation complex and the factor Xa/factor Va complex, respectively. Each inhibitor domain is fused to an annexin V domain that targets the inhibitor activity to sites of vascular injury to locally inhibit thrombosis. This study’s objective was to determine if these antithrombotic proteins are safe and effective in inhibiting AVG stenosis. Methods A bolus of either TAP-ANV or ANV-6L15 fusion protein was administered intravenously immediately prior to surgical placement of a synthetic graft between the external jugular vein and common carotid artery in a porcine model. At surgery, the vein and artery were irrigated with the anti-thrombotic fusion protein. Control animals received intravenous heparin. At 4 weeks, MRI was performed to evaluate graft patency, the pigs were then euthanized and grafts and attached vessels were explanted for histomorphometric assessment of neointimal hyperplasia at the vein-graft anastomosis. Blood was collected at surgery, immediately after surgery and at euthanasia for serum metabolic panels and coagulation chemistries. Results No acute thrombosis occurred in the control group or in either experimental group. No abnormal serum chemistries, activated clotting times or PT, PTT values were observed after treatment in experimental or control animals. However, at the vein-graft anastomosis, there was no difference between the control and experimental groups in cross-sectional lumen areas, as measured on MRI, and no difference in hyperplasia areas as determined by histomorphometry. These results suggest that local irrigation of TAP-ANV or ANV-6L15 intra-operatively was as effective in inhibiting acute graft

  2. Development and translational imaging of a TP53 porcine tumorigenesis model

    PubMed Central

    Sieren, Jessica C.; Meyerholz, David K.; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T.; Newell, John D.; Hammond, Emily; Rohret, Judy A.; Rohret, Frank A.; Struzynski, Jason T.; Goeken, J. Adam; Naumann, Paul W.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Taghiyev, Agshin; Van Rheeden, Richard; Hagen, Jussara; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Quelle, Dawn E.; Rogers, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the second deadliest disease in the United States, necessitating improvements in tumor diagnosis and treatment. Current model systems of cancer are informative, but translating promising imaging approaches and therapies to clinical practice has been challenging. In particular, the lack of a large-animal model that accurately mimics human cancer has been a major barrier to the development of effective diagnostic tools along with surgical and therapeutic interventions. Here, we developed a genetically modified porcine model of cancer in which animals express a mutation in TP53 (which encodes p53) that is orthologous to one commonly found in humans (R175H in people, R167H in pigs). TP53R167H/R167H mutant pigs primarily developed lymphomas and osteogenic tumors, recapitulating the tumor types observed in mice and humans expressing orthologous TP53 mutant alleles. CT and MRI imaging data effectively detected developing tumors, which were validated by histopathological evaluation after necropsy. Molecular genetic analyses confirmed that these animals expressed the R167H mutant p53, and evaluation of tumors revealed characteristic chromosomal instability. Together, these results demonstrated that TP53R167H/R167H pigs represent a large-animal tumor model that replicates the human condition. Our data further suggest that this model will be uniquely suited for developing clinically relevant, noninvasive imaging approaches to facilitate earlier detection, diagnosis, and treatment of human cancers. PMID:25105366

  3. Development and translational imaging of a TP53 porcine tumorigenesis model.

    PubMed

    Sieren, Jessica C; Meyerholz, David K; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T; Newell, John D; Hammond, Emily; Rohret, Judy A; Rohret, Frank A; Struzynski, Jason T; Goeken, J Adam; Naumann, Paul W; Leidinger, Mariah R; Taghiyev, Agshin; Van Rheeden, Richard; Hagen, Jussara; Darbro, Benjamin W; Quelle, Dawn E; Rogers, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is the second deadliest disease in the United States, necessitating improvements in tumor diagnosis and treatment. Current model systems of cancer are informative, but translating promising imaging approaches and therapies to clinical practice has been challenging. In particular, the lack of a large-animal model that accurately mimics human cancer has been a major barrier to the development of effective diagnostic tools along with surgical and therapeutic interventions. Here, we developed a genetically modified porcine model of cancer in which animals express a mutation in TP53 (which encodes p53) that is orthologous to one commonly found in humans (R175H in people, R167H in pigs). TP53(R167H/R167H) mutant pigs primarily developed lymphomas and osteogenic tumors, recapitulating the tumor types observed in mice and humans expressing orthologous TP53 mutant alleles. CT and MRI imaging data effectively detected developing tumors, which were validated by histopathological evaluation after necropsy. Molecular genetic analyses confirmed that these animals expressed the R167H mutant p53, and evaluation of tumors revealed characteristic chromosomal instability. Together, these results demonstrated that TP53(R167H/R167H) pigs represent a large-animal tumor model that replicates the human condition. Our data further suggest that this model will be uniquely suited for developing clinically relevant, noninvasive imaging approaches to facilitate earlier detection, diagnosis, and treatment of human cancers.

  4. Reversal of experimental Laron Syndrome by xenotransplantation of microencapsulated porcine Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Luca, Giovanni; Calvitti, Mario; Mancuso, Francesca; Falabella, Giulia; Arato, Iva; Bellucci, Catia; List, Edward O; Bellezza, Enrico; Angeli, Giovanni; Lilli, Cinzia; Bodo, Maria; Becchetti, Ennio; Kopchick, John J; Cameron, Don F; Baroni, Tiziano; Calafiore, Riccardo

    2013-01-10

    Recombinant human IGF-1 currently represents the only available treatment option for the Laron Syndrome, a rare human disorder caused by defects in the gene encoding growth hormone receptor, resulting in irreversibly retarded growth. Unfortunately, this treatment therapy, poorly impacts longitudinal growth (13% in females and 19% in males), while burdening the patients with severe side effects, including hypoglycemia, in association with the unfair chore of taking multiple daily injections that cause local intense pain. In this study, we have demonstrated that a single intraperitoneal graft of microencapsulated pig Sertoli cells, producing pig insulin-like growth factor-1, successfully promoted significant proportional growth in the Laron mouse, a unique animal model of the human Laron Syndrome. These findings indicate a novel, simply, safe and successful method for the cell therapy-based cure of the Laron Syndrome, potentially applicable to humans.

  5. Endovascular Broad-Neck Aneurysm Creation in a Porcine Model Using a Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlenbruch, Georg Nikoubashman, Omid; Steffen, Bjoern; Dadak, Mete; Palmowski, Moritz; Wiesmann, Martin

    2013-02-15

    Ruptured cerebral arterial aneurysms require prompt treatment by either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling. Training for these sophisticated endovascular procedures is essential and ideally performed in animals before their use in humans. Simulators and established animal models have shown drawbacks with respect to degree of reality, size of the animal model and aneurysm, or time and effort needed for aneurysm creation. We therefore aimed to establish a realistic and readily available aneurysm model. Five anticoagulated domestic pigs underwent endovascular intervention through right femoral access. A total of 12 broad-neck aneurysms were created in the carotid, subclavian, and renal arteries using the Amplatzer vascular plug. With dedicated vessel selection, cubic, tubular, and side-branch aneurysms could be created. Three of the 12 implanted occluders, two of them implanted over a side branch of the main vessel, did not induce complete vessel occlusion. However, all aneurysms remained free of intraluminal thrombus formation and were available for embolization training during a surveillance period of 6 h. Two aneurysms underwent successful exemplary treatment: one was stent-assisted, and one was performed with conventional endovascular coil embolization. The new porcine aneurysm model proved to be a straightforward approach that offers a wide range of training and scientific applications that might help further improve endovascular coil embolization therapy in patients with cerebral aneurysms.

  6. Closed-Loop Prevention of Hypotension in the Heartbeating Brain-Dead Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Soltesz, Kristian; Sturk, Christopher; Paskevicius, Audrius; Liao, Qiuming; Qin, Guangqi; Sjoberg, Trygve; Steen, Stig

    2017-06-01

     Objective: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate feasibility of a novel closed-loop controlled therapy for prevention of hypertension in the heartbeating brain-dead porcine model. Dynamic modeling and system identification were based on in vivo data. A robust controller design was obtained for the identified models. Disturbance attenuation properties and reliability of operation of the resulting control system were evaluated in vivo. The control system responded both predictably and consistently to external disturbances. It was possible to prevent mean arterial pressure to fall below a user-specified reference throughout 24 h of completely autonomous operation. Parameter variability in the identified models confirmed the benefit of closed-loop controlled administration of the proposed therapy. The evaluated robust controller was able to mitigate both process uncertainty and external disturbances. Prevention of hypertension is critical to the care of heartbeating brain-dead organ donors. Its automation would likely increase the fraction of organs suitable for transplantation from this patient group.

  7. Development of an ex vivo human-porcine respiratory model for preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Perinel, Sophie; Pourchez, Jérémie; Leclerc, Lara; Avet, John; Durand, Marc; Prévôt, Nathalie; Cottier, Michèle; Vergnon, Jean M

    2017-02-24

    Anatomical models to study aerosol delivery impose huge limitations and extrapolation to humans remains controversial. This study aimed to develop and validate an ex vivo human-like respiratory tract model easy to use and relevant to compare to in vivo human data. A human plastinated head is connected to an ex vivo porcine pulmonary tract ventilated artificially by passive expansion. A physiological study measures "pleural" depressions, tidal volumes, and minute ventilation for the respiratory rates chosen (10, 15, and 20 per minute) with three inspiratory/expiratory ratios (1/1, 1/2, and 1/3). Scintigraphy with (81m)Krypton assesses the homogeneity of the ventilation. Forty different experiments were set for validation, with 36 (90%) ventilating successfully. At a respiratory rate of 15/minute with inspiratory/expiratory ratio of 1/2, the tidal volume average was 824 mL (standard deviation, 207 mL). The scintigraphy performed on 16 ex vivo models (44.4%), showed homogenous ventilation with great similarity to human physiological studies. Ratio of the peripheral to central count rates were equally correlated with human data published in the literature. This new model, combining research feasibility and human physiology likeness, provides a realistic approach to human inhalation and therefore can be an interesting tool in aerosol regional deposition studies.

  8. Development of an ex vivo human-porcine respiratory model for preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Perinel, Sophie; Pourchez, Jérémie; Leclerc, Lara; Avet, John; Durand, Marc; Prévôt, Nathalie; Cottier, Michèle; Vergnon, Jean M.

    2017-01-01

    Anatomical models to study aerosol delivery impose huge limitations and extrapolation to humans remains controversial. This study aimed to develop and validate an ex vivo human-like respiratory tract model easy to use and relevant to compare to in vivo human data. A human plastinated head is connected to an ex vivo porcine pulmonary tract ventilated artificially by passive expansion. A physiological study measures “pleural” depressions, tidal volumes, and minute ventilation for the respiratory rates chosen (10, 15, and 20 per minute) with three inspiratory/expiratory ratios (1/1, 1/2, and 1/3). Scintigraphy with 81mKrypton assesses the homogeneity of the ventilation. Forty different experiments were set for validation, with 36 (90%) ventilating successfully. At a respiratory rate of 15/minute with inspiratory/expiratory ratio of 1/2, the tidal volume average was 824 mL (standard deviation, 207 mL). The scintigraphy performed on 16 ex vivo models (44.4%), showed homogenous ventilation with great similarity to human physiological studies. Ratio of the peripheral to central count rates were equally correlated with human data published in the literature. This new model, combining research feasibility and human physiology likeness, provides a realistic approach to human inhalation and therefore can be an interesting tool in aerosol regional deposition studies. PMID:28233793

  9. Healing of ileocolic nitinol compression anastomosis: a novel porcine model of subtotal colectomy.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, Doron; Kopelman, Yael; Peled, Dori; Willenz, Udi; Zmora, Oded; Wasserberg, Nir

    2013-12-01

    There are limited large animal models for the research of novel anastomotic technologies. Subtotal colectomy requires the anastomosis of relatively remote segments of the alimentary tract that are different anatomically, histologically, and pose significant physiological challenge. The quest for a foreign material-free anastomotic line reintroduced nitinol compression anastomosis into clinical use in the last decade. To evaluate the safety, histological, and physiological parameters of side-to-side ileocolic nitinol compression anastomosis in a newly developed large animal model, mimicking the human subtotal colectomy. Resection of the entire spiral colon with an ileocolic side-to-side compression anastomosis in 12 animals, compared to resection of a short ileal segment in 6 animals. All anastomoses were constructed by using a novel nitinol-based compression device. The animals were followed up to 30 days postoperatively and were reoperated and sacrificed. All 12 animals underwent successful subtotal colectomy with side-to-side nitinol compression anastomosis. No signs of abdominal infection were found. The increase in the colectomized animals' bodyweight over the postoperative course was significantly lower and the animals presented with longer periods of diarrhea. The histopathology revealed minimal inflammation and foreign body reaction with good alignment of the bowel wall layers in both groups. The anastomotic line width was shown to be reduced during the healing course of the compression anastomoses. Side-to-side nitinol compression anastomosis is safe and demonstrates favorable functional and histopathological features. The porcine model of subtotal colectomy can be used for further research of novel anastomotic technologies.

  10. The Effect of Intra-Abdominal Hypertension Incorporating Severe Acute Pancreatitis in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhi-hui; Ni, Hai-bin; Ding, Wei-wei; Sun, Jia-kui; Li, Wei-qin; Li, Ning; Li, Jie-shou

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) and intra abdominal hypertension(IAH) are common clinical findings in patients with severe acute pancreatitis(SAP). It is thought that an increased intra abdominal pressure(IAP) is associated with poor prognosis in SAP patients. But the detailed effect of IAH/ACS on different organ system is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of SAP combined with IAH on hemodynamics, systemic oxygenation, and organ damage in a 12 h lasting porcine model. Measurements and Methods Following baseline registrations, a total of 30 animals were divided into 5 groups (6 animals in each group): SAP+IAP30 group, SAP+IAP20 group, SAP group, IAP30 group(sham-operated but without SAP) and sham-operated group. We used a N2 pneumoperitoneum to induce different levels of IAH and retrograde intra-ductal infusion of sodium taurocholate to induce SAP. The investigation period was 12 h. Hemodynamic parameters (CO, HR, MAP, CVP), urine output, oxygenation parameters(e.g., SvO2, PO2, PaCO2), peak inspiratory pressure, as well as serum parameters (e.g., ALT, amylase, lactate, creatinine) were recorded. Histological examination of liver, intestine, pancreas, and lung was performed. Main Results Cardiac output significantly decreased in the SAP+IAH animals compared with other groups. Furthermore, AST, creatinine, SUN and lactate showed similar increasing tendency paralleled with profoundly decrease in SvO2. The histopathological analyses also revealed higher grade injury of liver, intestine, pancreas and lung in the SAP+IAH groups. However, few differences were found between the two SAP+IAH groups with different levels of IAP. Conclusions Our newly developed porcine SAP+IAH model demonstrated that there were remarkable effects on global hemodynamics, oxygenation and organ function in response to sustained IAH of 12 h combined with SAP. Moreover, our model should be helpful to study the mechanisms of IAH/ACS-induced exacerbation and

  11. Evaluation of the presence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in pig meat and experimental transmission following oral exposure

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract A study was performed to evaluate the presence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in pig meat collected at slaughterhouses and its potential transmission to pigs via pig meat. A total of 1039 blood samples were collected from pigs upon their arrival at the abattoir. The following day, meat samples (n = 1027) were collected from the carcasses of these same pigs. Samples originated from 2 Canadian slaughterhouses, 1 situated in the province of Quebec and the other situated in the province of Manitoba. Serum samples were tested for antibodies to PRRSV and both serum and meat samples were also tested for PRRSV nucleic acid by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Seropositivity to PRRSV for all serum samples was 74.3%. Furthermore 45 (4.3%) of the total serum samples and 19 (1.9%) of the 1027 meat samples were positive for PRRSV by PCR. Sequence analysis of open reading frame (ORF) 5 performed on 15 of the 19 PRRSV strains identified in pig meat indicated that 9 were field strains and 6 were vaccine-like (98% to 99.7% nucleotide homology with the Ingelvac RespPRRS/Repro vaccine). One of these 6 strains presented an intermediate 2-6-2 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) cut pattern and the others showed the characteristic 2-5-2 RFLP pattern of the vaccine strain. All strains sequenced were determined to be North American strains. In only 1 of the 19 PRRSV-positive meat samples could PRRSV be isolated. To test the potential infectivity of meat samples containing residual PRRSV, 11 of the PCR-positive meat samples (weighing 1.05 to 1.8 kg) were each used in feeding experiments of 2 PRRSV antibody-negative specific pathogen-free pigs of 9 wk of age. Samples were cut into several pieces and fed to each pair of pigs on 2 consecutive days. Each pig pair was housed in a separate cubicle and serum samples were collected at –7, 0, 7, 14, and 20 to 21 days post exposure. Seven pig pairs were found to be infected by PRRSV following

  12. Evaluation of the presence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in pig meat and experimental transmission following oral exposure.

    PubMed

    Magar, Ronald; Larochelle, Renée

    2004-10-01

    A study was performed to evaluate the presence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in pig meat collected at slaughterhouses and its potential transmission to pigs via pig meat. A total of 1039 blood samples were collected from pigs upon their arrival at the abattoir. The following day, meat samples (n = 1027) were collected from the carcasses of these same pigs. Samples originated from 2 Canadian slaughterhouses, 1 situated in the province of Quebec and the other situated in the province of Manitoba. Serum samples were tested for antibodies to PRRSV and both serum and meat samples were also tested for PRRSV nucleic acid by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Seropositivity to PRRSV for all serum samples was 74.3%. Furthermore 45 (4.3%) of the total serum samples and 19 (1.9%) of the 1027 meat samples were positive for PRRSV by PCR. Sequence analysis of open reading frame (ORF) 5 performed on 15 of the 19 PRRSV strains identified in pig meat indicated that 9 were field strains and 6 were vaccine-like (98% to 99.7% nucleotide homology with the Ingelvac RespPRRS/Repro vaccine). One of these 6 strains presented an intermediate 2-6-2 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) cut pattern and the others showed the characteristic 2-5-2 RFLP pattern of the vaccine strain. All strains sequenced were determined to be North American strains. In only 1 of the 19 PRRSV-positive meat samples could PRRSV be isolated. To test the potential infectivity of meat samples containing residual PRRSV, 11 of the PCR-positive meat samples (weighing 1.05 to 1.8 kg) were each used in feeding experiments of 2 PRRSV antibody-negative specific pathogen-free pigs of 9 wk of age. Samples were cut into several pieces and fed to each pair of pigs on 2 consecutive days. Each pig pair was housed in a separate cubicle and serum samples were collected at -7, 0, 7, 14, and 20 to 21 days post exposure. Seven pig pairs were found to be infected by PRRSV following ingestion of

  13. A Porcine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury via Head Rotational Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, D. Kacy; Harris, James P.; Browne, Kevin D.; Wolf, John A; Duda, John E.; Meaney, David F.; Margulies, Susan S.; Smith, Douglas H.

    2017-01-01

    Unique from other brain disorders, traumatic brain injury (TBI) generally results from a discrete biomechanical event that induces rapid head movement. The large size and high organization of the human brain makes it particularly vulnerable to traumatic injury from rotational accelerations that can cause dynamic deformation of the brain tissue. Therefore, replicating the injury biomechanics of human TBI in animal models presents a substantial challenge, particularly with regard to addressing brain size and injury parameters. Here we present the historical development and use of a porcine model of head rotational acceleration. By scaling up the rotational forces to account for difference in brain mass between swine and humans, this model has been shown to produce the same tissue deformations and identical neuropathologies found in human TBI. The parameters of scaled rapid angular accelerations applied for the model reproduce inertial forces generated when the human head suddenly accelerates or decelerates in falls, collisions, or blunt impacts. The model uses custom-built linkage assemblies and a powerful linear actuator designed to produce purely impulsive nonimpact head rotation in different angular planes at controlled rotational acceleration levels. Through a range of head rotational kinematics, this model can produce functional and neuropathological changes across the spectrum from concussion to severe TBI. Notably, however, the model is very difficult to employ, requiring a highly skilled team for medical management, biomechanics, neurological recovery, and specialized outcome measures including neuromonitoring, neurophysiology, neuroimaging, and neuropathology. Nonetheless, while challenging, this clinically relevant model has proven valuable for identifying mechanisms of acute and progressive neuropathologies as well as for the evaluation of noninvasive diagnostic techniques and potential neuroprotective treatments following TBI. PMID:27604725

  14. Validation of a realistic, simple, and inexpensive EUS-FNA training model using isolated porcine stomach

    PubMed Central

    Hoshi, Koki; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Yamabe, Akane; Fujisawa, Mariko; Igarashi, Ryo; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Abe, Yoko; Imbe, Koh

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Trainees are required to learn EUS-FNA using a model before working with a patient. The aim of the current study was to validate a new training model developed for EUS-FNA. Patients and methods: Several fresh chicken tenderloins were embedded as target lesions in the submucosal layer of an isolated porcine stomach. The stomach was fixed to a plate with nails, and was placed in a tub filled with water. The primary endpoint was feasibility of the newly developed model for EUS-FNA training, evaluated as follows: 1) visualization of the target lesion with blinding for lesion location; 2) penetrability of the needle; 3) sampling rate of macroscopic specimen; and 4) ROSE capability. Secondary endpoints were its durability and utility for multiple EUS-FNA procedures during EUS-FNA training, and the ease and cost of preparing the model. Results: Six endoscopists (1 expert, 5 trainees) attempted EUS-FNA procedures using this model. The target lesion could be identified clearly, and EUS-FNA could be performed with realistic resistance felt. In addition, rapid on-site evaluation could be easily achieved. Based on 10 needlings by each endoscopist, adequate specimens for histology could be macroscopically taken with an average 85 % success rate. Visibility and maneuverability were maintained throughout all needlings. Preparation time for this model was less than 30 minutes with a total cost of $ 22. Conclusions: An easy-to-use and inexpensive training model with a realistic feel of needling was created. This model can potentially enable beginners to practice safe and effective EUS-FNA procedures. PMID:27652292

  15. Validation of a realistic, simple, and inexpensive EUS-FNA training model using isolated porcine stomach.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Koki; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Yamabe, Akane; Fujisawa, Mariko; Igarashi, Ryo; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Abe, Yoko; Imbe, Koh

    2016-09-01

    Trainees are required to learn EUS-FNA using a model before working with a patient. The aim of the current study was to validate a new training model developed for EUS-FNA. Several fresh chicken tenderloins were embedded as target lesions in the submucosal layer of an isolated porcine stomach. The stomach was fixed to a plate with nails, and was placed in a tub filled with water. The primary endpoint was feasibility of the newly developed model for EUS-FNA training, evaluated as follows: 1) visualization of the target lesion with blinding for lesion location; 2) penetrability of the needle; 3) sampling rate of macroscopic specimen; and 4) ROSE capability. Secondary endpoints were its durability and utility for multiple EUS-FNA procedures during EUS-FNA training, and the ease and cost of preparing the model. Six endoscopists (1 expert, 5 trainees) attempted EUS-FNA procedures using this model. The target lesion could be identified clearly, and EUS-FNA could be performed with realistic resistance felt. In addition, rapid on-site evaluation could be easily achieved. Based on 10 needlings by each endoscopist, adequate specimens for histology could be macroscopically taken with an average 85 % success rate. Visibility and maneuverability were maintained throughout all needlings. Preparation time for this model was less than 30 minutes with a total cost of $ 22. An easy-to-use and inexpensive training model with a realistic feel of needling was created. This model can potentially enable beginners to practice safe and effective EUS-FNA procedures.

  16. Attenuation of virulence of Lawsonia intracellularis after in vitro passages and its effects on the experimental reproduction of porcine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Fabio A; Beckler, Dana; Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha M; Gebhart, Connie J

    2013-02-22

    Non-pathogenic Lawsonia intracellularis variants have been obtained through multiple passages in cell culture but there is no information regarding the number of passages necessary to attenuate a pathogenic isolate. The present study evaluated the susceptibility of pigs to L. intracellularis after 10, 20 and 40 passages in vitro. Three groups (six animals/group) were inoculated with pure culture of L. intracellularis on passage 10, 20 or 40 and one group with placebo. The animals were monitored for clinical signs, fecal shedding and serological IgG response during 28 days post-inoculation. Gross and histologic lesions and the level of infection based on the amount of L. intracellularis-specific antigen in the intestinal mucosa identified by immunohistochemistry were evaluated in two animals from each group on days 14, 21 and 28. Animals inoculated with passages 10 and 20 demonstrated proliferative lesions typical of porcine proliferative enteropathy associated with the presence of Lawsonia-specific antigen in the intestinal mucosa. Passage 40-inoculated pigs did not show proliferative lesions or presence of Lawsonia antigen at any time point throughout the study. Similar patterns of the fecal shedding were observed in passage 10 and 20-infected pigs but those infected with passage 40 shed for a short period. Serological IgG responses in passage 10 and 20-inoculated pigs were detected from day 14 post-infection but not at all in passage 40-inoculated animals. These results demonstrate attenuation of the virulence properties of L. intracellularis between 20 and 40 cell passages in vitro. This information will be valuable for design of future experimental models and for studying the mechanisms involved in the attenuation of L. intracellularis virulence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Feasibility and safety of endoscopic cryoablation at the duodenal papilla: Porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis; Reinhard, Mary K; Wagh, Mihir S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the feasibility and safety of liquid nitrogen spray cryoablation at the duodenal papilla in a porcine model. METHODS: This prospective study protocol was approved by the University of Florida Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Six pigs underwent liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy at the duodenal papilla. Freeze time of 20-s was applied per cycle (4 cycles/session). Survival animals (n = 4) were monitored for adverse events. Hemoglobin, white blood count, liver tests, and lipase were obtained at baseline and post-treatment. EGD was performed on day#7 to evaluate the papilla and for histology. All animals were euthanized and necropsy was performed at the end of the one-week survival period. Feasibility was defined as successful placement of the decompression tube in the duodenum, followed by delivery of spray cryotherapy to the duodenal papilla. Safety was determined by monitoring post-treatment blood tests and clinical course. Treatment effect was defined as endoscopic and histologic changes after cryotherapy. This was established by comparing endoscopic and histologic findings from mucosal biopsies prior to cryotherapy and on post-operative day (POD)#7. Full-thickness specimen was obtained post-mortem to assess depth of injury. RESULTS: Spray cryotherapy was feasible and successfully performed in all 6/6 (100%) animals. Cryospray with liquid nitrogen (four 20-s freeze-thaw cycles) at the duodenal papilla resulted in white frost formation at and around the target region. The mean procedural time was 54.5 min (range 50-58 min). All six animals studied had stable blood pressure, heart rate, and pulse oximetry measurements during the procedure. There were no significant intra-procedural adverse events. There were no significant differences in hemoglobin, white cell count, liver tests or lipase from baseline to post-cryotherapy. Survival animals were monitored daily post-operatively without any clinical ill effects from the cryotherapy. There was

  18. The use of sequential organ failure assessment parameters in an awake porcine model of severe Staphylococcus aureus sepsis.

    PubMed

    Soerensen, Karen E; Nielsen, Ole L; Birck, Malene M; Soerensen, Dorte B; Leifsson, Páll S; Jensen, Henrik E; Aalbaek, Bent; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Wiinberg, Bo; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Heegaard, Peter M H; Iburg, Tine M

    2012-11-01

    The human sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scoring system is used worldwide in intensive care units for assessing the extent of organ dysfunction/failure in patients with severe sepsis. An increasing number of septic cases are caused by Gram-positive bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus. The aim of the current study was to apply the human SOFA parameters in an awake, porcine model of severe S. aureus sepsis. Five pigs were inoculated intravenously with S. aureus and two control animals were sham-inoculated. Extensive clinical monitoring and sequential blood sampling was obtained and analysed for SOFA parameters. Dysfunction/failure was observed in the respiratory, haemostatic and hepatic system of all infected animals, together with initial cardiovascular dysfunction. The pulmonary system was the first to fail clinically, which corresponds with similar human findings, whereas the liver was affected earlier in pigs compared to humans. The use of human SOFA parameters was valuable in identifying dysfunctional/failing organs and showed consistency between this porcine model and human severe sepsis. Applying SOFA parameters in this model increased the relevance for comparison to clinical methods of evaluating human severe sepsis. Changes in SOFA parameters may in future porcine studies serve as a target for monitoring the effect of therapeutic intervention. © 2012 The Authors APMIS © 2012 APMIS.

  19. Acellular hydrogel for regenerative burn wound healing: translation from a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Arianne; Burke, Jacqueline; Volk, Susan W; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Currently available skin grafts and skin substitute for healing following third-degree burn injuries is fraught with complications, often resulting in long-term physical and psychological sequelae. Synthetic treatment that can promote wound healing in a regenerative fashion would provide an off-the-shelf, non-immunogenic strategy to improve clinical care of severe burn wounds. Here, we demonstrate vulnerary efficacy and accelerated healing mechanism of dextran-based hydrogel in third-degree porcine burn model. The model was optimized to allow examination of the hydrogel treatment for clinical translation and its regenerative response mechanisms. Hydrogel treatment accelerated third-degree burn wound healing by rapid wound closure, improved reepithelialization, enhanced extracellular matrix remodeling, and greater nerve reinnervation, compared to the dressing treated group. These effects appear to be mediated through the ability of the hydrogel to facilitate a rapid but brief initial inflammatory response that coherently stimulates neovascularization within the granulation tissue during the first week of treatment, followed by an efficient vascular regression to promote a regenerative healing process. Our results suggest that the dextran-based hydrogels may substantially improve healing quality and reduce skin grafting incidents and thus pave the way for clinical studies to improve the care of severe burn injury patients. PMID:26358387

  20. Postresuscitation treatment with argon improves early neurological recovery in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Fumagalli, Francesca; Russo, Ilaria; Tantillo, Simona; Zani, Davide Danilo; Locatelli, Valentina; De Maglie, Marcella; Novelli, Deborah; Staszewsky, Lidia; Vago, Tarcisio; Belloli, Angelo; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Fries, Michael; Masson, Serge; Scanziani, Eugenio; Latini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Effects of postresuscitation treatment with argon on neurologic recovery were investigated in a porcine model of cardiac arrest (CA) with an underlying acute myocardial infarction. The left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded in 12 pigs, and CA was induced. After 8 min of untreated CA, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed for 5 min before defibrillation. Following resuscitation, animals were subjected to 4-h ventilation with 70% argon/30% oxygen or 70% nitrogen/30% oxygen. Myocardial function was echocardiographically assessed, and serum neuron-specific enolase was measured. Animals were observed up to 72 h for assessment of survival and neurologic recovery. All the animals were resuscitated and survived for 72 h, except for a control pig. Ventilation with argon did not have any detrimental effects on hemodynamics and respiratory gas exchange. All the six argon-treated animals had a fast and complete 72-h neurologic recovery, in contrast to only two of the six controls (P < 0.05). Seventy-two-hour neurologic alertness score and neurologic deficit score were, respectively, 100 and 0 in the argon group and 79 and 29 in the control one (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05). Significantly lower increases in serum neuron-specific enolase (12% vs. 234%) and minimal histological brain injury (neuronal degeneration: 0 vs. 1) were also observed in argon-treated animals, in comparison to controls. In this model, postresuscitation treatment with argon allowed for a faster and complete neurologic recovery, without detrimental effects on hemodynamics and respiratory gas exchanges.

  1. Systemic Inflammatory Response After Natural Orifice Translumenal Surgery: Transvaginal Cholecystectomy in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Joe K. M.; Tong, Daniel K. H.; HO, David W. Y.; Luk, John; Law, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We analyzed circulating TNF-α and IL-6 to determine systemic inflammatory responses associated with transvaginal cholecystectomy in a porcine model. Methods: Six female pigs were used for a survival study after transvaginal cholecystectomy (NOTES group) using endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) instruments and a single-channel endoscope. Blood was drawn preoperatively and 24 hours and 48 hours postoperatively. Four pigs were used as controls. In addition, laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed in 2 pigs for laparoscopic control. Results: In all 6 pigs in the NOTES group, no major intraoperative complications occurred. No significant differences were found between control, laparoscopic, and NOTES groups in terms of preoperative IL-6 level (P=0.897) and at 24 hours (P=0.790), and 48 hours postoperatively (P=0.945). Similarly, there was no significant difference in mean preoperative (P=0.349) and mean day 2 postoperative TNF-α levels (P=0.11). But a significant increase in day 1 postoperative TNF-α levels in the laparoscopic group compared with that in the control and NOTES groups was observed (P=0.049). One limitation of our study is that the sample size was relatively small. Conclusion: NOTES is safe in animal models in terms of anatomical and cellular level changes with minimal systemic inflammatory host responses elicited. Further study needs to be carried out in humans before NOTES can be recommended for routine use. PMID:19366533

  2. Comparing the Effectiveness of Polymer Debriding Devices Using a Porcine Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Holly N.; McBain, Andrew J.; Stephenson, Christian; Hardman, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Debridement to remove necrotic and/or infected tissue and promote active healing remains a cornerstone of contemporary chronic wound management. While there has been a recent shift toward less invasive polymer-based debriding devices, their efficacy requires rigorous evaluation. Approach: This study was designed to directly compare monofilament debriding devices to traditional gauze using a wounded porcine skin biofilm model with standardized application parameters. Biofilm removal was determined using a surface viability assay, bacterial counts, histological assessment, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Quantitative analysis revealed that monofilament debriding devices outperformed the standard gauze, resulting in up to 100-fold greater reduction in bacterial counts. Interestingly, histological and morphological analyses suggested that debridement not only removed bacteria, but also differentially disrupted the bacterially-derived extracellular polymeric substance. Finally, SEM of post-debridement monofilaments showed structural changes in attached bacteria, implying a negative impact on viability. Innovation: This is the first study to combine controlled and defined debridement application with a biologically relevant ex vivo biofilm model to directly compare monofilament debriding devices. Conclusion: These data support the use of monofilament debriding devices for the removal of established wound biofilms and suggest variable efficacy towards biofilms composed of different species of bacteria. PMID:27867752

  3. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided placement of a transhepatic portal vein stent in a live porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Young; Seo, Dong Wan; Kang, Hyeon-Ji; Cho, Min Keun; Song, Tae Jun; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Percutaneous portal vein (PV) stent placement is used to manage PV occlusion or stenosis caused by malignancy. The use of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has expanded to include vascular interventions. The aim of this study was to examine the technical feasibility and safety of EUS-guided transhepatic PV stent placement in a live porcine model. Materials and Methods: EUS-guided transhepatic PV stent placement was performed in six male miniature pigs under general anesthesia using forward-viewing echoendoscope. Under EUS guidance, the left intrahepatic PV was punctured with a 19-gauge fine-needle aspiration (FNA) needle and a 0.025 inch guidewire inserted through the needle and into the main PV. The FNA needle was then withdrawn and a needle-knife inserted to dilate the tract. Under EUS and fluoroscopic guidance, a noncovered metal stent was inserted over the guidewire and released into the main PV. Results: A PV stent was placed successfully in all six pigs with no technical problems or complications. The patency of the stent in the main PV was confirmed using color Doppler EUS and transhepatic portal venography. Necropsy of the first three animals revealed no evidence of bleeding and damage to intra-abdominal organs or vessels. No complications occurred in the remaining three animals during the 8 weeks observation period. Conclusions: EUS-guided transhepatic PV stent placement can be both technically feasible and safe in a live animal model. PMID:27803904

  4. Comparative Efficacy of Nebivolol and Metoprolol to Prevent Tachycardia-Induced Cardiomyopathy in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Nazeri, Alireza; Elayda, MacArthur A; Segura, Ana Maria; Stainback, Raymond F; Nathan, Joanna; Lee, Vei-Vei; Bove, Christina; Sampaio, Luiz; Grace, Brian; Massumi, Ali; Razavi, Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    Chronic tachycardia is a well-known cause of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that nebivolol, a β-blocker with nitric oxide activity, would be superior to a pure β-blocker in preventing tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in a porcine model. Fifteen healthy Yucatan pigs were randomly assigned to receive nebivolol, metoprolol, or placebo once a day. All pigs underwent dual-chamber pacemaker implantation. The medication was started the day after the pacemaker implantation. On day 7 after implantation, each pacemaker was set at atrioventricular pace (rate, 170 beats/min), and the pigs were observed for another 7 weeks. Transthoracic echocardiograms, serum catecholamine levels, and blood chemistry data were obtained at baseline and at the end of the study. At the end of week 8, the pigs were euthanized, and complete histopathologic studies were performed. All the pigs developed left ventricular cardiomyopathy but remained hemodynamically stable and survived to the end of the study. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction decreased from baseline by 34%, 20%, and 20% in the nebivolol, metoprolol, and placebo groups, respectively. These changes did not differ significantly among the 3 groups (P =0.51). Histopathologic analysis revealed mild left ventricular perivascular fibrosis with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in 14 of the 15 pigs. Both nebivolol and metoprolol failed to prevent cardiomyopathy in our animal model of persistent tachycardia and a high catecholamine state.

  5. Comparative Efficacy of Nebivolol and Metoprolol to Prevent Tachycardia-Induced Cardiomyopathy in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Nazeri, Alireza; Elayda, MacArthur A.; Segura, Ana Maria; Stainback, Raymond F.; Nathan, Joanna; Lee, Vei-Vei; Bove, Christina; Sampaio, Luiz; Grace, Brian; Massumi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tachycardia is a well-known cause of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that nebivolol, a β-blocker with nitric oxide activity, would be superior to a pure β-blocker in preventing tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in a porcine model. Fifteen healthy Yucatan pigs were randomly assigned to receive nebivolol, metoprolol, or placebo once a day. All pigs underwent dual-chamber pacemaker implantation. The medication was started the day after the pacemaker implantation. On day 7 after implantation, each pacemaker was set at atrioventricular pace (rate, 170 beats/min), and the pigs were observed for another 7 weeks. Transthoracic echocardiograms, serum catecholamine levels, and blood chemistry data were obtained at baseline and at the end of the study. At the end of week 8, the pigs were euthanized, and complete histopathologic studies were performed. All the pigs developed left ventricular cardiomyopathy but remained hemodynamically stable and survived to the end of the study. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction decreased from baseline by 34%, 20%, and 20% in the nebivolol, metoprolol, and placebo groups, respectively. These changes did not differ significantly among the 3 groups (P =0.51). Histopathologic analysis revealed mild left ventricular perivascular fibrosis with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in 14 of the 15 pigs. Both nebivolol and metoprolol failed to prevent cardiomyopathy in our animal model of persistent tachycardia and a high catecholamine state. PMID:28100964

  6. Systemic inflammatory response after natural orifice translumenal surgery: transvaginal cholecystectomy in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Fan, Joe K M; Tong, Daniel K H; Ho, David W Y; Luk, John; Law, Wai Lun; Law, Simon

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed circulating TNF-alpha and IL-6 to determine systemic inflammatory responses associated with transvaginal cholecystectomy in a porcine model. Six female pigs were used for a survival study after transvaginal cholecystectomy (NOTES group) using endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) instruments and a single-channel endoscope. Blood was drawn preoperatively and 24 hours and 48 hours postoperatively. Four pigs were used as controls. In addition, laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed in 2 pigs for laparoscopic control. In all 6 pigs in the NOTES group, no major intraoperative complications occurred. No significant differences were found between control, laparoscopic, and NOTES groups in terms of preoperative IL-6 level (P=0.897) and at 24 hours (P=0.790), and 48 hours postoperatively (P=0.945). Similarly, there was no significant difference in mean preoperative (P=0.349) and mean day 2 postoperative TNF-alpha levels (P=0.11). But a significant increase in day 1 postoperative TNF-alpha levels in the laparoscopic group compared with that in the control and NOTES groups was observed (P=0.049). One limitation of our study is that the sample size was relatively small. NOTES is safe in animal models in terms of anatomical and cellular level changes with minimal systemic inflammatory host responses elicited. Further study needs to be carried out in humans before NOTES can be recommended for routine use.

  7. Photodynamic therapy for the treatment of metastatic lesions in bone: studies in rat and porcine models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, S.; Bisland, Stuart K.; Siewerdsen, Jeff; Bogaards, Arjen; Moseley, Douglas; Yee, A.; Finkelstein, J.; Wilson, Brian

    2004-06-01

    This study represents the first reported use of photodynamic therapy in bone and specifically, as a treatment for spinal metastases. A metastatic model in rat confirmed the efficacy of benzoporphyrin derivative-monoacid-mediated PDT for treating lesions within the spine and appendicular bone. Fluorimetry confirmed the selective accumulation of drug into the tumor(s) at 3 hours post-injection. 48 hrs post light delivery into the vertebral body of the rat spine loss of bioluminescent signal and histological analyses of sectioned spine confirmed MT-1 tumor cell kill in vivo as previously confirmed in vitro using an established cell viability assay. Porcine vertebrae provided a model comparable to that of human for light propagation and PDT response. Light measurements were recorded at 2.5 mm increments as the detector probe was retracted out of the vertebral body away from a diffusing fiber at 70-90° planar angle to it. At 30 minutes or 1hr post BPD-MA administration (6 mg/m2), light (648 J, 150 mW/cm, 690 nm) was delivered to vertebrae L1 and/or L2. Vertebrae were harvested and sectioned for histology 48 hrs following PDT. Light propagation was plotted as distance (μm) from the emitting source. Results support the application of PDT to the treatment of primary or metastatic lesions within bone.

  8. Evaluation of a Novel Laser-assisted Coronary Anastomotic Connector - the Trinity Clip - in a Porcine Off-pump Bypass Model

    PubMed Central

    Stecher, David; Bronkers, Glenn; Noest, Jappe O.T.; Tulleken, Cornelis A.F.; Hoefer, Imo E.; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Buijsrogge, Marc P.

    2014-01-01

    To simplify and facilitate beating heart (i.e., off-pump), minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery, a new coronary anastomotic connector, the Trinity Clip, is developed based on the excimer laser-assisted nonocclusive anastomosis technique. The Trinity Clip connector enables simplified, sutureless, and nonocclusive connection of the graft to the coronary artery, and an excimer laser catheter laser-punches the opening of the anastomosis. Consequently, owing to the complete nonocclusive anastomosis construction, coronary conditioning (i.e., occluding or shunting) is not necessary, in contrast to the conventional anastomotic technique, hence simplifying the off-pump bypass procedure. Prior to clinical application in coronary artery bypass grafting, the safety and quality of this novel connector will be evaluated in a long-term experimental porcine off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) study. In this paper, we describe how to evaluate the coronary anastomosis in the porcine OPCAB model using various techniques to assess its quality. Representative results are summarized and visually demonstrated. PMID:25490000

  9. [Experimental models of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembiński, Artur

    2015-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is a severe disease with high mortality. Clinical studies can bring some data about etiology, pathogenesis and the course of acute pancreatitis. However, studies concerning early events of this disease and the new concepts of treatment cannot be performed on humans, due to ethical reasons. Animal models of acute pancreatitis have been developed to solve this problem. This review presents currently used experimental models of acute pancreatitis, their properties and clinical relevance. Experimental models of acute pancreatitis can be divided into in vivo (non-invasive and invasive) and ex vivo models. The onset, development, severity and extent of acute pancreatitis, as well as the mortality, vary considerably between these different models. Animal models reproducibly produce mild, moderate or severe acute pancreatitis. One of the most commonly used models of acute pancreatitis is created by administration of supramaximal doses of cerulein, an analog of cholecystokinin. This model produces acute mild edematous pancreatitis in rats, whereas administration of cerulein in mice leads to the development of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis evoked by retrograde administration of sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct is the most often used model of acute severe necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. Ex vivo models allow to eliminate the influence of hormonal and nervous factors on the development of acute pancreatitis.

  10. Finite element model of the temperature increase in excised porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Kurtz, Ronald M.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2012-07-01

    In order to model the thermal effect of laser exposure of the iris during laser corneal surgery, we simulated the temperature increase in porcine cadaver iris. The simulation data for the 60 kHz FS60 Laser showed that the temperature increased up to 1.23°C and 2.45°C (at laser pulse energy 1 and 2 µJ, respectively) by the 24 second procedure time. Calculated temperature profiles show good agreement with data obtained from ex vivo experiments using porcine cadaver iris. Simulation results of different types of femtosecond lasers indicate that the Laser in situ keratomileusis procedure does not present a safety hazard to the iris.

  11. Finite element model of the temperature increase in excised porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by femtosecond laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui; Kurtz, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. In order to model the thermal effect of laser exposure of the iris during laser corneal surgery, we simulated the temperature increase in porcine cadaver iris. The simulation data for the 60 kHz FS60 Laser showed that the temperature increased up to 1.23°C and 2.45°C (at laser pulse energy 1 and 2 µJ, respectively) by the 24 second procedure time. Calculated temperature profiles show good agreement with data obtained from ex vivo experiments using porcine cadaver iris. Simulation results of different types of femtosecond lasers indicate that the Laser in situ keratomileusis procedure does not present a safety hazard to the iris. PMID:22894525

  12. Towards the Establishment of a Porcine Model to Study Human Amebiasis

    PubMed Central

    Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Cognie, Juliette; Delgado-Ortega, Mario; Berthon, Patricia; Rossignol, Christelle; Larcher, Thibaut; Melo, Sandrine; Bruel, Timothée; Guibon, Roseline; Chérel, Yan; Sarradin, Pierre; Salmon, Henri; Guillén, Nancy; Meurens, François

    2011-01-01

    Background Entamoeba histolytica is an important parasite of the human intestine. Its life cycle is monoxenous with two stages: (i) the trophozoite, growing in the intestine and (ii) the cyst corresponding to the dissemination stage. The trophozoite in the intestine can live as a commensal leading to asymptomatic infection or as a tissue invasive form producing mucosal ulcers and liver abscesses. There is no animal model mimicking the whole disease cycle. Most of the biological information on E. histolytica has been obtained from trophozoite adapted to axenic culture. The reproduction of intestinal amebiasis in an animal model is difficult while for liver amebiasis there are well-described rodent models. During this study, we worked on the assessment of pigs as a new potential model to study amebiasis. Methodology/Principal Findings We first co-cultured trophozoites of E. histolytica with porcine colonic fragments and observed a disruption of the mucosal architecture. Then, we showed that outbred pigs can be used to reproduce some lesions associated with human amebiasis. A detailed analysis was performed using a washed closed-jejunal loops model. In loops inoculated with virulent amebas a severe acute ulcerative jejunitis was observed with large hemorrhagic lesions 14 days post-inoculation associated with the presence of the trophozoites in the depth of the mucosa in two out four animals. Furthermore, typical large sized hepatic abscesses were observed in the liver of one animal 7 days post-injection in the portal vein and the liver parenchyma. Conclusions The pig model could help with simultaneously studying intestinal and extraintestinal lesion development. PMID:22205970

  13. Towards the establishment of a porcine model to study human amebiasis.

    PubMed

    Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Cognie, Juliette; Delgado-Ortega, Mario; Berthon, Patricia; Rossignol, Christelle; Larcher, Thibaut; Melo, Sandrine; Bruel, Timothée; Guibon, Roseline; Chérel, Yan; Sarradin, Pierre; Salmon, Henri; Guillén, Nancy; Meurens, François

    2011-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an important parasite of the human intestine. Its life cycle is monoxenous with two stages: (i) the trophozoite, growing in the intestine and (ii) the cyst corresponding to the dissemination stage. The trophozoite in the intestine can live as a commensal leading to asymptomatic infection or as a tissue invasive form producing mucosal ulcers and liver abscesses. There is no animal model mimicking the whole disease cycle. Most of the biological information on E. histolytica has been obtained from trophozoite adapted to axenic culture. The reproduction of intestinal amebiasis in an animal model is difficult while for liver amebiasis there are well-described rodent models. During this study, we worked on the assessment of pigs as a new potential model to study amebiasis. We first co-cultured trophozoites of E. histolytica with porcine colonic fragments and observed a disruption of the mucosal architecture. Then, we showed that outbred pigs can be used to reproduce some lesions associated with human amebiasis. A detailed analysis was performed using a washed closed-jejunal loops model. In loops inoculated with virulent amebas a severe acute ulcerative jejunitis was observed with large hemorrhagic lesions 14 days post-inoculation associated with the presence of the trophozoites in the depth of the mucosa in two out four animals. Furthermore, typical large sized hepatic abscesses were observed in the liver of one animal 7 days post-injection in the portal vein and the liver parenchyma. The pig model could help with simultaneously studying intestinal and extraintestinal lesion development.

  14. A Triple Culture Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier Using Porcine Brain Endothelial cells, Astrocytes and Pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Burkhart, Annette; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models based on primary brain endothelial cells (BECs) cultured as monoculture or in co-culture with primary astrocytes and pericytes are useful for studying many properties of the BBB. The BECs retain their expression of tight junction proteins and efflux transporters leading to high trans-endothelial electric resistance (TEER) and low passive paracellular permeability. The BECs, astrocytes and pericytes are often isolated from small rodents. Larger species as cows and pigs however, reveal a higher yield, are readily available and have a closer resemblance to humans, which make them favorable high-throughput sources for cellular isolation. The aim of the present study has been to determine if the preferable combination of purely porcine cells isolated from the 6 months old domestic pigs, i.e. porcine brain endothelial cells (PBECs) in co-culture with porcine astrocytes and pericytes, would compare with PBECs co-cultured with astrocytes and pericytes isolated from newborn rats with respect to TEER value and low passive permeability. The astrocytes and pericytes were grown both as contact and non-contact co-cultures as well as in triple culture to examine their effects on the PBECs for barrier formation as revealed by TEER, passive permeability, and expression patterns of tight junction proteins, efflux transporters and the transferrin receptor. This syngenic porcine in vitro BBB model is comparable to triple cultures using PBECs, rat astrocytes and rat pericytes with respect to TEER formation, low passive permeability, and expression of hallmark proteins signifying the brain endothelium (tight junction proteins claudin 5 and occludin, the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (PgP) and breast cancer related protein (BCRP), and the transferrin receptor). PMID:26241648

  15. A Triple Culture Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier Using Porcine Brain Endothelial cells, Astrocytes and Pericytes.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Burkhart, Annette; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models based on primary brain endothelial cells (BECs) cultured as monoculture or in co-culture with primary astrocytes and pericytes are useful for studying many properties of the BBB. The BECs retain their expression of tight junction proteins and efflux transporters leading to high trans-endothelial electric resistance (TEER) and low passive paracellular permeability. The BECs, astrocytes and pericytes are often isolated from small rodents. Larger species as cows and pigs however, reveal a higher yield, are readily available and have a closer resemblance to humans, which make them favorable high-throughput sources for cellular isolation. The aim of the present study has been to determine if the preferable combination of purely porcine cells isolated from the 6 months old domestic pigs, i.e. porcine brain endothelial cells (PBECs) in co-culture with porcine astrocytes and pericytes, would compare with PBECs co-cultured with astrocytes and pericytes isolated from newborn rats with respect to TEER value and low passive permeability. The astrocytes and pericytes were grown both as contact and non-contact co-cultures as well as in triple culture to examine their effects on the PBECs for barrier formation as revealed by TEER, passive permeability, and expression patterns of tight junction proteins, efflux transporters and the transferrin receptor. This syngenic porcine in vitro BBB model is comparable to triple cultures using PBECs, rat astrocytes and rat pericytes with respect to TEER formation, low passive permeability, and expression of hallmark proteins signifying the brain endothelium (tight junction proteins claudin 5 and occludin, the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (PgP) and breast cancer related protein (BCRP), and the transferrin receptor).

  16. Endoscopic high-intensity focused US: technical aspects and studies in an in vivo porcine model (with video).

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Maloney, Ezekiel; Wang, Yak-Nam; D'Andrea, Samantha; Starr, Frank; Farr, Navid; Morrison, Kyle; Keilman, George; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-05-01

    High-intensity focused US (HIFU) is becoming more widely used for noninvasive and minimally invasive ablation of benign and malignant tumors. Recent studies suggest that HIFU can also enhance targeted drug delivery and stimulate an antitumor immune response in many tumors. However, targeting pancreatic and liver tumors by using an extracorporeal source is challenging due to the lack of an adequate acoustic window. The development of an EUS-guided HIFU transducer has many potential benefits including improved targeting, decreased energy requirements, and decreased potential for injury to intervening structures. To design, develop, and test an EUS-guided HIFU transducer for endoscopic applications. A preclinical, pilot characterization and feasibility study. Academic research center. Studies were performed in an in vivo porcine model. Thermal ablation of in vivo porcine pancreas and liver was performed with EUS-guided focused US through the gastric tract. The transducer successfully created lesions in gel phantoms and ex vivo bovine livers. In vivo studies demonstrated that targeting and creating lesions in the porcine pancreas and liver are feasible. This was a preclinical, single-center feasibility study with a limited number of subjects. An EUS-guided HIFU transducer was successfully designed and developed with dimensions that are appropriate for endoscopic use. The feasibility of performing EUS-guided HIFU ablation in vivo was demonstrated in an in vivo porcine model. Further development of this technology will allow endoscopists to perform precise therapeutic ablation of periluminal lesions without breaching the wall of the gastric tract. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Noncontact imaging of burn depth and extent in a porcine model using spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Amaan; Saggese, Steve; Pollins, Alonda C.; Cardwell, Nancy L.; Nanney, Lillian; Cuccia, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The standard of care for clinical assessment of burn severity and extent lacks a quantitative measurement. In this work, spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) was used to measure 48 thermal burns of graded severity (superficial partial, deep partial, and full thickness) in a porcine model. Functional (total hemoglobin and tissue oxygen saturation) and structural parameters (tissue scattering) derived from the SFDI measurements were monitored over 72 h for each burn type and compared to gold standard histological measurements of burn depth. Tissue oxygen saturation (stO2) and total hemoglobin (ctHbT) differentiated superficial partial thickness burns from more severe burn types after 2 and 72 h, respectively (p<0.01), but were unable to differentiate deep partial from full thickness wounds in the first 72 h. Tissue scattering parameters separated superficial burns from all burn types immediately after injury (p<0.01), and separated all three burn types from each other after 24 h (p<0.01). Tissue scattering parameters also showed a strong negative correlation to histological burn depth as measured by vimentin immunostain (r2>0.89). These results show promise for the use of SFDI-derived tissue scattering as a correlation to burn depth and the potential to assess burn depth via a combination of SFDI functional and structural parameters. PMID:25147961

  18. The Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on the Colon in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaomei; Liang, Xianjun; Li, Jiannan; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Wenlong; Chai, Wei; Wu, Jiuping; Guo, Shuai; Fang, Gang; Zhou, Xulong; Zhang, Jianhua; Xu, Kecheng; Zeng, Jianying; Niu, Lizhi

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a method of targeted cell ablation which has been suggested as a potential cancer therapy as it leaves structures such as blood vessels and the extracellular matrix intact, thereby allowing the rapid recovery of healthy tissue. Here, we investigated the effects of IRE on the colon in vivo in a porcine model. IRE ablation was performed on the colon walls of 12 female Tibet mini-pigs, creating a total of 24 lesions. Lesions were monitored periodically by endoscopy. The pigs were euthanized 7, 14, 21 or 28 days after IRE ablation and the colons harvested for gross and histological analysis. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Masson's trichrome (MT) stain and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. All pigs tolerated the ablation procedure without serious clinical symptoms or complications. There was no evidence of perforation by endoscopy or gross postmortem examination. All lesions were characterized by necrotic cell death with mild inflammation and hyperemia, with a sharp demarcation between ablated and adjacent normal tissue. A fibrous scar was observed in the ablated colon tissue. Histological analysis revealed damage to each layer of the colon. Histopathology findings also showed the preservation of extracellular structures and the recovery of the ablated colon. The complete ablation of the target area, its rapid recovery and the lack of posttreatment symptoms suggest that IRE ablation may be a promising therapy for tumors located adjacent to or violating the colon wall.

  19. Brief report: biomarkers of aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection in a porcine model with Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Langerhuus, S N; Tønnesen, E K; Jensen, K H; Damgaard, B M; Heegaard, P M H; Halekoh, U; Lauridsen, C

    2010-11-01

    Aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection (AVPGI) with Staphylococcus aureus is a feared post-operative complication. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical signs and potential biomarkers of infection in a porcine AVPGI model. The biomarkers evaluated were: C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, white blood cells (WBC), major histocompatibility complex II (MHC II) density, lymphocyte CD4:CD8 ratio and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in vitro responsiveness. Sixteen pigs were included in the study, and randomly assigned into four groups (n = 4): "SHAM" pigs had their infra-renal aorta exposed by laparotomy; "CLEAN" pigs had an aortic graft inserted; "LOW" and "HIGH" pigs had an aortic graft inserted and, subsequently, S. aureus were inoculated on the graft material (5 × 10(4) colony-forming units [CFU] and 1 × 10(6) CFU, respectively). Biomarkers were evaluated prior to surgery and on day 2, 5, 7, and 14 post-operatively in blood samples. Of all biomarkers evaluated, CRP was superior for diagnosing S. aureus AVPGI in pigs, with a sensitivity of 0.86 and a specificity of 0.75.

  20. Adaptation of gut microbiome to different dietary nonstarch polysaccharide fractions in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Tian, Gang; Wu, Xiying; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun

    2017-10-01

    Dietary fibers, consisting of nonstarch polysaccharides (NSPs) were found to modulate the gut microbiota. However, little is known about the role of a separated fiber fraction. Here, we describe a response in gut microbiome to different fiber fractions using a porcine model. Ileal and cecal digesta were collected from pigs fed with fiber-free diet (FFD) or diet containing 5% cellulose (CEL), xylan (XYL) or β-glucan (GLU). We observed an elevated 16S rRNA gene copies in ileum and cecum digesta after NSP ingestion. Interestingly, we found that cecum digesta contained higher bacterial diversity than ileum digesta. Moreover, NSPs had no significant influence on overall diversity, but acutely altered the abundance of specific bacteria. Importantly, NSPs decreased the abundance of phylum Firmicutes, but increased the phylum Proteobacteria in ileal samples. Among the NSP-treated groups, pigs on CEL-containing diet had exclusively higher abundance of Lactobacillus spp. in the ileum. Whereas, the GLU-treated samples had more Clostridium spp. This study not only indicated how the gut microbiome adapts to the three major NSP fractions, but the results also contribute to our understanding of the role of dietary fibers in modulating gut microbiota and health. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Surgical wound debridement sequentially characterized in a porcine burn model with multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    King, Darlene R; Li, Weizhi; Squiers, John J; Mohan, Rachit; Sellke, Eric; Mo, Weirong; Zhang, Xu; Fan, Wensheng; DiMaio, J Michael; Thatcher, Jeffrey E

    2015-11-01

    Multispectral imaging (MSI) is an optical technique that measures specific wavelengths of light reflected from wound site tissue to determine the severity of burn wounds. A rapid MSI device to measure burn depth and guide debridement will improve clinical decision making and diagnoses. We used a porcine burn model to study partial thickness burns of varying severity. We made eight 4 × 4 cm burns on the dorsum of one minipig. Four burns were studied intact, and four burns underwent serial tangential excision. We imaged the burn sites with 400-1000 nm wavelengths. Histology confirmed that we achieved various partial thickness burns. Analysis of spectral images show that MSI detects significant variations in the spectral profiles of healthy tissue, superficial partial thickness burns, and deep partial thickness burns. The absorbance spectra of 515, 542, 629, and 669 nm were the most accurate in distinguishing superficial from deep partial thickness burns, while the absorbance spectra of 972 nm was the most accurate in guiding the debridement process. The ability to distinguish between partial thickness burns of varying severity to assess whether a patient requires surgery could be improved with an MSI device in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging: detection of ischemia in a porcine model with FFR verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is a high resolution, non-invasive technique for assessing myocardial blood ow (MBF), which in concert with coronary CT angiography enable CT to provide a unique, comprehensive, fast analysis of both coronary anatomy and functional ow. We assessed perfusion in a porcine model with and without coronary occlusion. To induce occlusion, each animal underwent left anterior descending (LAD) stent implantation and angioplasty balloon insertion. Normal ow condition was obtained with balloon completely de ated. Partial occlusion was induced by balloon in ation against the stent with FFR used to assess the extent of occlusion. Prospective ECG-triggered partial scan images were acquired at end systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Images were reconstructed using FBP and a hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4, Philips Healthcare). Processing included: beam hardening (BH) correction, registration of image volumes using 3D cubic B-spline normalized mutual-information, and spatio-temporal bilateral ltering to reduce partial scan artifacts and noise variation. Absolute blood ow was calculated with a deconvolutionbased approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). Arterial input function was estimated from the left ventricle (LV) cavity. Regions of interest (ROIs) were identi ed in healthy and ischemic myocardium and compared in normal and occluded conditions. Under-perfusion was detected in the correct LAD territory and ow reduction agreed well with FFR measurements. Flow was reduced, on average, in LAD territories by 54%.

  3. In vivo hyperspectral imaging of traumatic skin injuries in a porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeberg, Lise L.; Winnem, Andreas M.; Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Haaverstad, Rune; Haugen, Olav A.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2007-02-01

    Studies of immediate skin reactions are important to understand the underlying biological mechanisms involved in traumatic or chemical damage to the skin. In this study the spatial and spectral information provided by hyperspectral images was used to identify and characterize non-penetrating skin injuries in a porcine model. A hyperspectral imaging system (Hyspex, Norsk Elektro Optikk AS) was used to monitor the temporal development of minor skin injuries in an anesthetized Norwegian domestic pig. Hyperspectral data were collected in the wavelength range 400-1000 nm (VNIR), with a spectral sampling interval of 3.7 nm. The measurements were initiated immediately after inflicting the injury, and were repeated at least five times at each site with irregular frequency. The last measurement was performed 4 hours after injury. Punch biopsies (5 mm), were collected from adjacent normal skin, and at the center and the margin of each injury. The study was approved by the national animal research authority. The hyperspectral data were analyzed with respect to oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin, and erythema index. The skin biopsies were examined to determine the extent of skin damage in the bruised zones. Preliminary results show that hyperspectral imaging allows discrimination between traumatized skin and normal skin in an early phase. The extent and location of the hemorrhages can be determined from hyperspectral images. These findings might contribute to a better understanding of immediate skin reactions to minor trauma, and thereby the development of a better diagnostic modality for non-penetrating skin injuries in forensic medicine.

  4. In vivo microscopy in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Johannes; Czaplik, Michael; Dembinski, Rolf; Pelosi, Paolo; Schroeder, Wolfgang; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf

    2010-07-31

    Regional inhomogeneity and alveolar mechanics in a porcine model of acute lung injury (ALI) was evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM was performed through thoracic windows of the upper and lower lobes. Image quantification was conducted by use of a volume air index (VAI). Twelve anesthetized, mechanically ventilated pigs were randomized to non-injury (control group, n = 6) or ALI induced by surfactant depletion (ALI group, n = 6). CLSM was performed at baseline, after 1 h at 5 mbar and after 2 h at 15 mbar positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Haemodynamics, respiratory mechanics and calculation of pulmonary ventilation-perfusion distribution by MIGET were determined. At baseline, VAI was not different. In the upper lobes, VAI significantly decreased in ALI compared to control group, with no changes after PEEP application. In the lower lobes, VAI significantly decreased in ALI compared to control group. Incremental PEEP significantly increased VAI in ALI, but not in control group. Haemodynamics were significantly compromised in the ALI group. A significant deterioration in oxygenation and ventilation-perfusion distribution could be seen being restored after PEEP adjustment. The VAI may help to assess regional inhomogeneity of the acutely injured lung.

  5. In vivo perfusion assessment of an anastomosis surgery on porcine intestinal model (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Opferman, Justin; Decker, Ryan; Cheon, Gyeong W.; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Anastomosis, the connection of two structures, is a critical procedure for reconstructive surgery with over 1 million cases/year for visceral indication alone. However, complication rates such as strictures and leakage affect up to 19% of cases for colorectal anastomoses and up to 30% for visceral transplantation anastomoses. Local ischemia plays a critical role in anastomotic complications, making blood perfusion an important indicator for tissue health and predictor for healing following anastomosis. In this work, we apply a real time multispectral imaging technique to monitor impact on tissue perfusion due to varying interrupted suture spacing and suture tensions. Multispectral tissue images at 470, 540, 560, 580, 670 and 760 nm are analyzed in conjunction with an empirical model based on diffuse reflectance process to quantify the hemoglobin oxygen saturation within the suture site. The investigated tissues for anastomoses include porcine small (jejunum and ileum) and large (transverse colon) intestines. Two experiments using interrupted suturing with suture spacing of 1, 2, and 3 mm and tension levels from 0 N to 2.5 N are conducted. Tissue perfusion at 5, 10, 20 and 30 min after suturing are recorded and compared with the initial normal state. The result indicates the contrast between healthy and ischemic tissue areas and assists the determination of suturing spacing and tension. Therefore, the assessment of tissue perfusion will permit the development and intra-surgical monitoring of an optimal suture protocol during anastomosis with less complications and improved functional outcome.

  6. Antibody Responses to Sarcoptes scabiei Apolipoprotein in a Porcine Model: Relevance to Immunodiagnosis of Recent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rampton, Melanie; Walton, Shelley F.; Holt, Deborah C.; Pasay, Cielo; Kelly, Andrew; Currie, Bart J.; McCarthy, James S.; Mounsey, Kate E.

    2013-01-01

    No commercial immunodiagnostic tests for human scabies are currently available, and existing animal tests are not sufficiently sensitive. The recombinant Sarcoptes scabiei apolipoprotein antigen Sar s 14.3 is a promising immunodiagnostic, eliciting high levels of IgE and IgG in infected people. Limited data are available regarding the temporal development of antibodies to Sar s 14.3, an issue of relevance in terms of immunodiagnosis. We utilised a porcine model to prospectively compare specific antibody responses to a primary infestation by ELISA, to Sar s 14.3 and to S. scabiei whole mite antigen extract (WMA). Differences in the antibody profile between antigens were apparent, with Sar s 14.3 responses detected earlier, and declining significantly after peak infestation compared to WMA. Both antigens resulted in >90% diagnostic sensitivity from weeks 8–16 post infestation. These data provide important information on the temporal development of humoral immune responses in scabies and further supports the development of recombinant antigen based immunodiagnostic tests for recent scabies infestations. PMID:23762351

  7. Evaluation of ECHO PS Positioning System in a Porcine Model of Simulated Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Erin M.; Voeller, Guy R.; Roth, J. Scott; Scott, Jeffrey R.; Gagne, Darcy H.; Iannitti, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Operative efficiency improvements for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) have focused on reducing operative time while maintaining overall repair efficacy. Our objective was to evaluate procedure time and positioning accuracy of an inflatable mesh positioning device (Echo PS Positioning System), as compared to a standard transfascial suture technique, using a porcine model of simulated LVHR. Methods. The study population consisted of seventeen general surgeons (n = 17) that performed simulated LVHR on seventeen (n = 17) female Yorkshire pigs using two implantation techniques: (1) Ventralight ST Mesh + Echo PS Positioning System (Echo PS) and (2) Ventralight ST Mesh + transfascial sutures (TSs). Procedure time and mesh centering accuracy overtop of a simulated surgical defect were evaluated. Results. Echo PS demonstrated a 38.9% reduction in the overall procedure time, as compared to TS. During mesh preparation and positioning, Echo PS demonstrated a 60.5% reduction in procedure time (P < 0.0001). Although a trend toward improved centering accuracy was observed for Echo PS (16.2%), this was not significantly different than TS. Conclusions. Echo PS demonstrated a significant reduction in overall simulated LVHR procedure time, particularly during mesh preparation/positioning. These operative time savings may translate into reduced operating room costs and improved surgeon/operating room efficiency. PMID:23762628

  8. Noncontact imaging of burn depth and extent in a porcine model using spatial frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Mazhar, Amaan; Saggese, Steve; Pollins, Alonda C; Cardwell, Nancy L; Nanney, Lillian; Cuccia, David J

    2014-08-01

    The standard of care for clinical assessment of burn severity and extent lacks a quantitative measurement. In this work, spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) was used to measure 48 thermal burns of graded severity (superficial partial, deep partial, and full thickness) in a porcine model. Functional (total hemoglobin and tissue oxygen saturation) and structural parameters (tissue scattering) derived from the SFDI measurements were monitored over 72 h for each burn type and compared to gold standard histological measurements of burn depth. Tissue oxygen saturation (stO₂) and total hemoglobin (ctHbT) differentiated superficial partial thickness burns from more severe burn types after 2 and 72 h, respectively (p < 0.01), but were unable to differentiate deep partial from full thickness wounds in the first 72 h. Tissue scattering parameters separated superficial burns from all burn types immediately after injury (p < 0.01), and separated all three burn types from each other after 24 h (p < 0.01). Tissue scattering parameters also showed a strong negative correlation to histological burn depth as measured by vimentin immunostain (r² > 0.89). These results show promise for the use of SFDI-derived tissue scattering as a correlation to burn depth and the potential to assess burn depth via a combination of SFDI functional and structural parameters.

  9. Effects of sodium nitroprusside on splanchnic microcirculation in a resuscitated porcine model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Assadi, A; Desebbe, O; Kaminski, C; Rimmelé, T; Bénatir, F; Goudable, J; Chassard, D; Allaouchiche, B

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that sodium nitroprusside (SNP) might improve the impairment of hepatosplanchnic microcirculatory blood flow (MBF) in septic shock. Fourteen pigs were anaesthetized and their lungs mechanically ventilated. Sepsis was induced with i.v. infusion of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa [1x10(8) colony forming units (CFU) ml(-1) kg(-1)] for 1 h. Sixty minutes later, the animals received in a random succession either SNP or normal saline for 30 min. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac index (CI), mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP), carbon dioxide tension of the ileal mucosa (PCO2; by gas tonometry), ileal mucosal and hepatic MBF by laser Doppler flowmetry, blood gases, and lactates were assessed before, during administration, and 30 min after discontinuing the test drug. Bacterial infusion promoted hypodynamic shock (MAP -18%, CI -33%, ileal MBF -19%, and hepatic MBF -27%), which was converted to normodynamic shock by resuscitation. During SNP infusion, ileal mucosal MBF significantly increased (+19%) compared with control (P = 0.033). Although hepatic MBF increased (+42% from baseline), this did not differ from control. In order to maintain a constant central venous pressure and MAP, fluid loading and norepinephrine (P < 0.01) were increased. Acid-base status was not altered by SNP. In a resuscitated porcine model of the early phase of septic shock, SNP improved ileal mucosal MBF but required a concomitant increase in fluid and norepinephrine supplements to maintain constant systemic haemodynamic parameters.

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Mannanase-Hydrolyzed Copra Meal in a Porcine Model of Colitis

    PubMed Central

    IBUKI, Masahisa; FUKUI, Kensuke; KANATANI, Hiroyuki; MINE, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of mannanase-hydrolyzed copra meal (MNB), including β-1,4-mannobiose (67.8%), in a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced porcine model of intestinal inflammation. In the DSS-positive control (POS) and MNB treatment (MCM) groups, DSS was first administered to piglets via intragastric catheter for 5 days, followed by 5 days administration of saline or MCM. A negative control group (NEG) received a saline alternative to DSS and MNB. Inflammation was assessed by clinical signs, morphological and histological measurements, gut permeability and neutrophil infiltration. Local production of TNF-α and IL-6 were analyzed by ELISA, colonic and ileal inflammatory gene expressions were assessed by real time RT-PCR, and CD4+CD25+ cell populations were analyzed by flow cytometry. Crypt elongation and muscle thickness, D-mannitol gut permeation, colonic expression of the inflammatory mediators TNF-α and IL-6 and myeloperoxidase activity were significantly lower in the MCM group than in that of POS group. The mRNA levels of ileal IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α were significantly lower following MCM treatment than with POS treatment.MNB exerts anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, suggesting that MNB is a novel therapeutic that may provide relief to human and animals suffering from intestinal inflammation. PMID:24430661

  11. Pulmonary vascular clearance of harmful endogenous macromolecules in a porcine model of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Nedredal, Geir I; Elvevold, Kjetil; Chedid, Marcio F; Ytrebø, Lars M; Rose, Christopher F; Sen, Sambit; Smedsrød, Bård; Jalan, Rajiv; Revhaug, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are common in acute liver failure (ALF). The role of the lungs in the uptake of harmful soluble endogenous macromolecules was evaluated in a porcine model of ALF induced by hepatic devascularization (n = 8) vs. controls (n = 8). In additional experiments, pulmonary uptake was investigated in healthy pigs. Fluorochrome-labeled modified albumin (MA) was applied to investigate the cellular uptake. As compared to controls, the ALF group displayed a 4-fold net increased lung uptake of hyaluronan, and 5-fold net increased uptake of both tissue plasminogen activator and lysosomal enzymes. Anatomical distribution experiments in healthy animals revealed that radiolabeled MA uptake (taken up by the same receptor as hyaluronan) was 53% by the liver, and 24% by the lungs. The lung uptake of LPS was 14% whereas 60% remained in the blood. Both fluorescence and electron microscopy revealed initial uptake of MA by pulmonary endothelial cells (PECs) with later translocation to pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs). Moreover, the presence of PIMs was evident 10 min after injection. Systemic inflammatory markers such as leukopenia and increased serum TNF-α levels were evident after 20 min in the MA and LPS groups. Significant lung uptake of harmful soluble macromolecules compensated for the defect liver scavenger function in the ALF-group. Infusion of MA induced increased TNF-α serum levels and leukopenia, similar to the effect of the known inflammatory mediator LPS. These observations suggest a potential mechanism that may contribute to lung damage secondary to liver disease.

  12. [Experimental models of Huntington's disease].

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, R; del Val-Fernández, J; Catalán-Alonso, M J; Barcia-Albacar, J A; Matías-Guiu, J

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant hereditary disease caused by triplet repetition in exon 1 of the huntingtin protein located in chromosome 4. Medium spiny neurons in the striatum are selectively affected. Clinical manifestations include progressive behavioural, motor and cognitive disorders. There is no treatment available today capable of modifying the natural course of the disease. A great amount of research work is being carried out, much of which involves animal models of the disease. We reviewed the articles published in PubMed on basic research into HD and analysed the most frequently used models. Transgenic mouse models, excitotoxic models, transgenic fly models and cell cultures are all used in studies into HD. The advantages and disadvantages of each of them are highlighted. The contribution made by each model of HD must be known in order to draw up a correct design in experimental studies of the disease.

  13. Studies using a porcine model: what insights into human calcium oxalate stone formation mechanisms has this model facilitated?

    PubMed

    Penniston, Kristina L; Patel, Sutchin R; Schwahn, Denise J; Nakada, Stephen Y

    2017-02-01

    Animal models are useful in the study of many human diseases. Our current understanding of the biological, physiological, and biochemical aspects of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate urolithiasis has been greatly informed by studies using animals. Recently, limitations in the extrapolation to humans of research results derived from laboratory rodents have been identified. The use in biomedical research of a variety of organisms, including large animals, is increasingly encouraged. The purpose of this article is to review the use of pigs in biomedical and stone research, to provide a rationale for using pigs in metabolic stone research, and to describe our 8-year experience in developing a porcine platform for studying hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate urolithiasis. In this article, we share and review some of the highlights of our findings. We also report results from a recent feeding swine study that demonstrated oxalate-induced renal nephropathy. Finally, we offer ideas for future directions in urolithiasis research using swine.

  14. Radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy (RFiTT) in a porcine liver model and ex vivo great saphenous vein.

    PubMed

    Badham, George E; Dos Santos, Scott J; Whiteley, Mark S

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the thermal spread achieved in porcine liver when using an optimised radiofrequency ablation protocol and correlate findings with the effects seen in ex vivo great saphenous vein (GSV), in order to justify clinical use with the new treatment protocol. Porcine liver and GSV sections were treated with radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy (RFiTT) using the following settings: 20 W at 1 s/cm (linear endovenous energy density; LEED 20 J/cm), 18 W at 1 s/cm (LEED 18 J/cm), 18 W at 3 s/cm (LEED 54 J/cm), 6 W interrupted pull-back 6 s stationary every 0.5 cm (LEED 72 J/cm). Thermal spread in the liver was measured via digital imaging. GSV sections were sent to an independent laboratory for histological analysis. Previous work suggests a thermal spread of >0.65 mm in liver correlates with transmural thermoablation of a GSV. Parameters giving a LEED of 72 J/cm produced the best results, with a clear transmural effect in the GSV and maximal thermal spread of 1.65 mm, without excessive thermal damage or carbonisation in the ablation tract. Our porcine liver model correlated well with histological findings and was representative of the thermoablative effects observed in the GSV wall treated with RFiTT. Clinical investigations are now being carried out to investigate the efficacy of this protocol in the clinical setting.

  15. Virtual Electrophysiologic Study in a Three-dimensional Cardiac MRI Model of Porcine Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jason; Jacobson, Jason T; Ng, Justin K; Gordon, David; Lee, Daniel C; Carr, James C.; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study sought to test the hypothesis that “virtual” electrophysiologic studies (EPS) on an anatomic platform generated by 3D MRI reconstruction of the left ventricle (LV) can reproduce the reentrant circuits of induced ventricular tachycardia (VT) in a porcine model of myocardial infarction (MI). Background Delayed-enhancement MRI has been used to characterize MI and “gray zones”, which are thought to reflect heterogeneous regions of viable and non-viable myocytes. Methods MI by coronary artery occlusion was induced in eight pigs. After a recovery period, 3D cardiac MRIs were obtained from each pig in-vivo. Normal areas, gray zones, and infarct cores were classified based on voxel intensity. In the computer model, gray zones were assigned slower conduction and longer action potential durations than those for normal myocardium. Virtual EPS was performed and was compared to results of actual in vivo programmed stimulation and non-contact mapping. Results The LV volumes ranged from 97.8 to 166.2 cm3 with 4.9 to 17.5% of voxels classified as infarct zones. Six of the seven pigs that developed VT during actual EPS were also inducible with virtual EPS. Four of the six pigs that had simulated VT had reentrant circuits that approximated the circuits seen with non-contact mapping, while the remaining two had similar circuits but propagating in opposite directions. Conclusions This initial study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a mathematical model to MRI reconstructions of the LV to predict VT circuits. Virtual EPS may be helpful to plan catheter ablation strategies or to identify patients who are at risk for future episodes of VT. PMID:22633654

  16. Virtual electrophysiological study in a 3-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging model of porcine myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jason; Jacobson, Jason T; Ng, Justin K; Gordon, David; Lee, Daniel C; Carr, James C; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2012-07-31

    This study sought to test the hypothesis that "virtual" electrophysiological studies (EPS) on an anatomic platform generated by 3-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging reconstruction of the left ventricle can reproduce the reentrant circuits of induced ventricular tachycardia (VT) in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. Delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging has been used to characterize myocardial infarction and "gray zones," which are thought to reflect heterogeneous regions of viable and nonviable myocytes. Myocardial infarction by coronary artery occlusion was induced in 8 pigs. After a recovery period, 3-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance images were obtained from each pig in vivo. Normal areas, gray zones, and infarct cores were classified based on voxel intensity. In the computer model, gray zones were assigned slower conduction and longer action potential durations than those for normal myocardium. Virtual EPS was performed and compared with results of actual in vivo programmed stimulation and noncontact mapping. The left ventricular volumes ranged from 97.8 to 166.2 cm(3), with 4.9% to 17.5% of voxels classified as infarct zones. Six of the 7 pigs in which VT developed during actual EPS were also inducible with virtual EPS. Four of the 6 pigs that had simulated VT had reentrant circuits that approximated the circuits seen with noncontact mapping, whereas the remaining 2 had similar circuits but propagating in opposite directions. This initial study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a mathematical model to magnetic resonance imaging reconstructions of the left ventricle to predict VT circuits. Virtual EPS may be helpful to plan catheter ablation strategies or to identify patients who are at risk of future episodes of VT. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of burn location and investigator on burn depth in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam J; Toussaint, Jimmy; Chung, Won Taek; Thode, Henry C; McClain, Steve; Raut, Vivek

    2016-02-01

    In order to be useful, animal models should be reproducible and consistent regardless of sampling bias, investigator creating burn, and burn location. We determined the variability in burn depth based on biopsy location, burn location and investigator in a porcine model of partial thickness burns. 24 partial thickness burns (2.5 cm by 2.5 cm each) were created on the backs of 2 anesthetized pigs by 2 investigators (one experienced, one inexperienced) using a previously validated model. In one of the pigs, the necrotic epidermis covering each burn was removed. Five full thickness 4mm punch biopsies were obtained 1h after injury from the four corners and center of the burns and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin and Masson's trichrome for determination of burn depth by a board certified dermatopathologist blinded to burn location and investigator. Comparisons of burn depth by biopsy location, burn location and investigator were performed with t-tests and ANOVA as appropriate. The mean (SD) depth of injury to blood vessels (the main determinant of burn progression) in debrided and non-debrided pigs pooled together was 1.8 (0.3)mm, which included 75% of the dermal depth. Non-debrided burns were 0.24 mm deeper than debrided burns (P<0.001). Burn depth increased marginally from cephalic to caudal in non-debrided burns, but showed no statistical differences for these locations, in debrided burns. Additionally, there were also no statistical differences in burn depths from midline to lateral in either of these burn types. Burn depth was similar for both investigators and among biopsy locations. Burn depth was greater for caudal locations in non-debrided burns and overall non-debrided burns were deeper than debrided burns. However, burn depth did not differ based on investigator, biopsy site, and medial-lateral location. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic Ataxia Telangiectasia porcine model phenocopies the multisystemic features of the human disease.

    PubMed

    Beraldi, Rosanna; Meyerholz, David K; Savinov, Alexei; Kovács, Attila D; Weimer, Jill M; Dykstra, Jordan A; Geraets, Ryan D; Pearce, David A

    2017-07-23

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a progressive multisystem autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the AT-mutated (ATM) gene. Early onset AT in children is characterized by cerebellar degeneration, leading to motor impairment. Lung disease and cancer are the two most common causes of death in AT patients. Accelerated thymic involution may contribute to the cancer, and recurrent and/or chronic respiratory infections may be a contributing factor to lung disease in AT. AT patients have fertility issues, are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation and they present oculocutaneous telangiectasia. Current treatments only slightly ameliorate disease symptoms; therapy that alters or reverses the course of the disease has not yet been discovered. Previously, we have shown that ATM(-/-) pigs, a novel model of AT, present with a loss of Purkinje cells, altered cerebellar cytoarchitecture and motor coordination deficits. ATM(-/-) porcine model not only recapitulates the neurological phenotype, but also other multifaceted clinical features of the human disease. Our current study shows that ATM(-/-) female pigs are infertile, with anatomical and functional signs of an immature reproductive system. Both male and female ATM(-/-) pigs show abnormal thymus structure with decreased cell cycle and apoptosis markers in the gland. Moreover, ATM(-/-) pigs have an altered immune system with decreased CD8(+) and increased natural killer and CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive cells. Nevertheless, ATM(-/-) pigs manifest a deficient IgG response after a viral infection. Based on the neurological and peripheral phenotypes, the ATM(-/-) pig is a novel genetic model that may be used for therapeutic assessments and to identify pathomechanisms of this disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Dietary plant extracts improve immune responses and growth efficiency of pigs experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Che, T M; Song, M; Lee, J J; Almeida, J A S; Bravo, D; Van Alstine, W G; Pettigrew, J E

    2013-12-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of 3 different plant extracts on growth performance and immune responses of weaned pigs experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). A total of 64 weaned pigs (7.8 ± 0.3 kg BW), free of PRRSV, were randomly allotted to 1 of 8 treatments in a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement with a randomized complete block design. Pigs were blocked by initial BW. Sex and ancestry were equalized across treatments. The first factor was with or without PRRSV challenge (intranasal dose; 10(5) 50% tissue culture infective dose). The second factor was represented by 4 diets: a nursery basal diet (CON), 10 mg/kg capsicum oleoresin (CAP), garlic botanical (GAR), or turmeric oleoresin (TUR). Pigs were housed in disease containment chambers for 28 d [14 d before and after the inoculation (d 0)]. Blood was collected on d 0, 7, and 14 to measure the total and differential white blood cells (WBC), and serum was collected to measure viral load by quantitative PCR, PRRSV antibody titer, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-1β, C-reactive protein (CRP), and haptoglobin (Hp) by ELISA. In the unchallenged group, all piglets were PRRSV negative during the overall period postinoculation. All data were analyzed using PROC MIXED of SAS. The PRRSV challenge decreased (P < 0.01) ADG, ADFI, and G:F from d 0 to 14. Feeding TUR improved G:F of the PRRSV-infected pigs from d 0 to 14. The numbers of WBC and neutrophils were decreased (P < 0.05) by PRRSV on d 7 but increased (P < 0.05) by PRRSV on d 14, indicating the PRRSV-infected pigs undergo a stage of weak immune responses. Feeding GAR increased (P < 0.05) B cells and CD8+ T cells of PRRSV-infected pigs compared with the CON. Furthermore, the PRRSV challenge increased (P < 0.05) serum viral load, TNF-α, and IL-1β on d 7 and serum viral load, CRP, and Hp on d 14, but feeding plant extracts to PRRSV-infected pigs reversed (P < 0.05) this increase. Infection with PRRSV

  20. Reabsorption atelectasis in a porcine model of ARDS: regional and temporal effects of airway closure, oxygen, and distending pressure.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Savino; Borges, João Batista; Segelsjö, Monica; Tannoia, Angela; Pellegrini, Mariangela; Larsson, Anders; Perchiazzi, Gaetano; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2013-11-01

    Little is known about the small airways dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). By computed tomography (CT) imaging in a porcine experimental model of early ARDS, we aimed at studying the location and magnitude of peripheral airway closure and alveolar collapse under high and low distending pressures and high and low inspiratory oxygen fraction (FIO2). Six piglets were mechanically ventilated under anesthesia and muscle relaxation. Four animals underwent saline-washout lung injury, and two served as healthy controls. Beyond the site of assumed airway closure, gas was expected to be trapped in the injured lungs, promoting alveolar collapse. This was tested by ventilation with an FIO2 of 0.25 and 1 in sequence during low and high distending pressures. In the most dependent regions, the gas/tissue ratio of end-expiratory CT, after previous ventilation with FIO2 0.25 low-driving pressure, was significantly higher than after ventilation with FIO2 1; with high-driving pressure, this difference disappeared. Also, significant reduction in poorly aerated tissue and a correlated increase in nonaerated tissue in end-expiratory CT with FIO2 1 low-driving pressure were seen. When high-driving pressure was applied or after previous ventilation with FIO2 0.25 and low-driving pressure, this pattern disappeared. The findings suggest that low distending pressures produce widespread dependent airway closure and with high FIO2, subsequent absorption atelectasis. Low FIO2 prevented alveolar collapse during the study period because of slow absorption of gas behind closed airways.

  1. Garlicin post-conditioning suppresses adhesion molecules in a porcine model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Li, Jia-Hui; Li, Ai-Li; Li, Jing; Wang, Yong; Ren, Shi-Yan; Li, Xian-Lun

    2017-05-11

    To evaluate whether garlicin post-conditioning can attenuate myocardial ischemiareperfusion injury in a catheter-based porcine model of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) by affecting adhesion molecules integrin β1/CD29 and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31). Twenty-two swine were devided into 3 groups: 6 in a sham-operation group, and 8 each in the model and garlicin groups. AMI porcine model was established in the model and garlicin groups. The distal parts of the left anterior descending coronary artery in the animals of the model and garlicin groups were occluded by dilated balloon for 2 h, followed by reperfusion for 3 h. Garlicin (1.88 mg/kg) was injected over a period of 1 h, beginning just before reperfusion, in the garlicin group. Real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and Western blot were carried out to detect mRNA and protein expressions of CD29 and CD31 3 h after reperfusion. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed a better myocardial structure in the garlicin group after reperfusion. Compared to the model group, garlicin inhibited both the mRNA and protein expression of CD29 and CD31 in reperfusion area and no-reflflow area (P<0.05 respectively). Garlicin post-conditioning induced cardio-protection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in this catheter-based porcine model of AMI. The cardio-protective effect of garlicin is possibly owing to suppression of production of CD29 and CD31, by inhibition of the mRNA expression of CD29 and CD31.

  2. Topographic Findings of the Porcine Cornea

    PubMed Central

    HEICHEL, Jens; WILHELM, Frank; KUNERT, Kathleen S.; HAMMER, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The porcine eye is often used as an ex vivo animal model in ophthalmological research. It is well suited for investigations concerning refractive surgery; however, corneal topography data are scarce. This study investigated the corneal topography and pachymetry of the porcine eye to provide further reproducible data. We evaluated freshly enucleated porcine eyes (n = 16) by performing computerized corneal topographies (Orbscan® IIz, Bausch and Lomb, Rochester, NY, USA). We assessed the steepest and flattest keratometric powers (K1 and K2, units in diopters (D)), astigmatism (D), white-to-white (WTW) diameter (mm), thinnest point pachymetry (µm), anterior and posterior best-fit sphere (BFS) (D), refractive power of the anterior and posterior curvatures, and total refractive power of the cornea (D). The mean keratometric powers were 39.6 ± 0.89 D (K1) and 38.5 ± 0.92 D (K2), and the mean astigmatism was 1.1 ± 0.78 D. The mean WTW diameter was 13.81 ± 0.83 mm, and the mean corneal thickness was 832.6 ± 40.18 µm. The BFSs were 38.14 ± 0.73 D (anterior) and 42.56 ± 1.15 D (posterior), and the mean refractive powers were 43.27 ± 1.08 D (anterior) and -5.15 ± 0.20 D (posterior); therefore, the mean of the total refractive power was 38.16 ± 1.00 D. The topography and pachymetry of the porcine cornea showed a specific configuration differing from the human cornea. When using animal ex vivo models such as porcine corneas for experimental corneal surgery, findings such as these should be considered. PMID:28293660

  3. Evaluation of a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound device: preclinical studies in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Mark L; Desilets, Charles; Smoller, Bruce R

    2011-05-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been applied clinically for the noninvasive treatment of pathological conditions in various organs for over 50 years; however, there are little data describing the use of thermal HIFU to ablate fat for body contouring and treatment of collagen-rich layers. A novel device under clinical investigation (LipoSonix; Medicis Technologies Corporation, Bothell, Washington) uses HIFU to eliminate unwanted adipose tissue. The authors describe the results of HIFU treatment in a series of preclinical studies performed in a validated porcine model. Preclinical research included in vivo treatment of the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of swine with transcutaneous HIFU therapy. Endpoint analyses included thermocouple temperature data, full-body necropsy, local pathology and histology studies, clinical hematology, urinalysis, and blood chemistry parameters, including lipid panels. The application of HIFU energy levels of 166 to 372 J/cm(2) generated tissue temperature approaching 70°C, which was restricted to the focal area (n = seven). Application of 68 and 86 J/cm(2) did not produce clinically-significant changes in serum liver function tests, free fatty acids, or cholesterol (n = eight). Gross examination of tissue from various organs showed no evidence of fat emboli or accumulation (n = two). Histology demonstrated well-preserved vasculature and intact nerve fibers within the HIFU focal area (n = three). Following treatment with 85.3 to 270 J/cm(2), normal healing response included the migration of macrophages into the damaged tissue and removal of disrupted cellular debris and lipids (n = 8). In a preclinical swine model, the controlled thermal effect of HIFU appears to provide a safe and effective means for ablating subcutaneous adipose tissue.

  4. Cell Sheet Transplantation for Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Pidial, Laetitia; Camilleri, Sophie; Bellucci, Alexandre; Casanova, Amaury; Viel, Thomas; Tavitian, Bertrand; Cellier, Christophe; Clement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Extended esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is highly responsible for esophageal stricture. We conducted a comparative study in a porcine model to evaluate the effectiveness of adipose tissue-derived stromal cell (ADSC) double cell sheet transplantation. Methods Twelve female pigs were treated with 5 cm long hemi-circumferential ESD and randomized in two groups. ADSC group (n = 6) received 4 double cell sheets of allogenic ADSC on a paper support membrane and control group (n = 6) received 4 paper support membranes. ADSC were labelled with PKH-67 fluorophore to allow probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopie (pCLE) monitoring. After 28 days follow-up, animals were sacrificed. At days 3, 14 and 28, endoscopic evaluation with pCLE and esophagography were performed. Results One animal from the control group was excluded (anesthetic complication). Animals from ADSC group showed less frequent alimentary trouble (17% vs 80%; P = 0.08) and higher gain weight on day 28. pCLE demonstrated a compatible cell signal in 4 animals of the ADSC group at day 3. In ADSC group, endoscopy showed that 1 out of 6(17%) animals developed a severe esophageal stricture comparatively to 100% (5/5) in the control group; P = 0.015. Esophagography demonstrated a decreased degree of stricture in the ADSC group on day 14 (44% vs 81%; P = 0.017) and day 28 (46% vs 90%; P = 0.035). Histological analysis showed a decreased fibrosis development in the ADSC group, in terms of surface (9.7 vs 26.1 mm²; P = 0.017) and maximal depth (1.6 vs 3.2 mm; P = 0.052). Conclusion In this model, transplantation of allogenic ADSC organized in double cell sheets after extended esophegeal ESD is strongly associated with a lower esophageal stricture’s rate. PMID:26930409

  5. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning Reduces Cerebral Oxidative Stress Following Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Arvola, Oiva; Haapanen, Henri; Herajärvi, Johanna; Anttila, Tuomas; Puistola, Ulla; Karihtala, Peeter; Tuominen, Hannu; Anttila, Vesa; Juvonen, Tatu

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic precondition has become prominent as one of the most promising methods to mitigate neurological damage following ischemic insult. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the effects of remote ischemic preconditioning can be seen in the markers of oxidative stress or in redox-regulating enzymes in a porcine model. A total of 12 female piglets were randomly assigned to 2 groups. The study group underwent an intervention of 4 cycles of 5-minute ischemic preconditioning on the right hind leg. All piglets underwent 60-minute hypothermic circulatory arrest. Oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was measured from blood samples with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After 7 days of follow-up, samples from the brain, heart, kidney, and ovary were harvested for histopathologic examination. The immunohistochemical stainings of hypoxia marker hypoxia-inducible factor-1-α, oxidative stress marker 8-OHdG, DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine glycosylase, and antioxidant response regulators nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and protein deglycase were analyzed. The level of 8-OHdG referred to baseline was decreased in the sagittal sinus׳ blood samples in the study group after a prolonged deep hypothermic circulatory arrest at 360 minutes after reperfusion. Total histopathologic score was 3.8 (1.8-6.0) in the study group and was 4.4 (2.5-6.5) in the control group (P = 0.72), demonstrating no statistically significant difference in cerebral injury. Our findings demonstrate that the positive effects of remote ischemic preconditioning can be seen in cellular oxidative balance regulators in an animal model after 7 days of preconditioned ischemic insult. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prolonged application of clopidogrel reduces inflammation after percutaneous coronary intervention in the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Ayral, Yunus; Rauch, Ursula; Goldin-Lang, Petra; Stellbaum, Caroline; Deiner, Carolin; Schwimmbeck, Peter L; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Pels, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    We determined the effect of prolonged treatment with clopidogrel on C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations and blood thrombogenicity after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty followed by intracoronary brachytherapy in the porcine model. ANIMAL MODEL: All 48 pigs received antiplatelet therapy, including aspirin (325 mg, daily) and clopidogrel (300 mg, loading dose) 1 day before PCI, followed by a daily dose of clopidogrel (75 mg/day) in addition to aspirin. During PCI, one of two balloon-injured arteries was randomly assigned to receive immediate radiation treatment. Animals were sacrificed after 24 h, 1 month, and 3 months post-PCI. The pigs, which were sacrificed 3 months post-PCI, were divided into two groups. The first group received clopidogrel in addition to aspirin for 3 months, and the second group received clopidogrel in addition to aspirin for only 1 month after PCI and then aspirin alone. Blood was taken from all pigs before intervention, immediately after intervention, and before sacrifice. Serum CRP was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To analyze the procoagulant effects of PCI on blood thrombogenicity, a one-stage clotting assay was performed. Clopidogrel treatment for 3 months reduced CRP levels more than did clopidogrel therapy for 1 month only at 3 months post-PCI (27.9+/-3.9 vs. 56.6+/-11.3 microg/ml; P=.019). Baseline CRP levels were found to be 50.4+/-4.8 microg/ml. Plasma clotting was not affected by prolonged clopidogrel therapy (322.8+/-59.3 s vs. 295.2+/-52.5 s; P=ns). Prolonged treatment with clopidogrel reduced CRP levels post-PCI.

  7. Intramural coronary delivery of advanced antisense oligonucleotides reduces neointimal formation in the porcine stent restenosis model.

    PubMed

    Kipshidze, Nicholas N; Kim, Han Soo; Iversen, Patrick; Yazdi, Hamid A; Bhargava, Balram; New, Gishel; Mehran, Roxana; Tio, Fermin; Haudenschild, Christian; Dangas, George; Stone, Gregg W; Iyer, Sriram; Roubin, Gary S; Leon, Martin B; Moses, Jeffrey W

    2002-05-15

    We evaluated the long-term influence of intramural delivery of advanced c-myc neutrally charged antisense oligonucleotides (Resten-NG) on neointimal hyperplasia after stenting in a pig model. Neointimal hyperplasia after percutaneous coronary interventions is one of the key components of the restenotic process. The c-myc is a critical cell division cycle protein involved in the formation of neointima. In short-term experiments, different doses (from 500 microg to 5 mg) of Resten-NG or saline were delivered to the stent implantation site with an infiltrator delivery system (Interventional Technologies, San Diego, California). Animals were euthanized at 2, 6 and 18 h after interventions, and excised vessels were analyzed for c-myc expression by Western blot. In long-term experiments, either saline or a dose of 1, 5 or 10 mg of Resten-NG was delivered in the same fashion, and animals were euthanized at 28 days after the intervention. Western blot analysis demonstrated inhibition of c-myc expression and was dose dependent. Morphometry showed that the intimal area was 3.88 +/- 1.04 mm(2) in the control. There was statistically significant reduction of intimal areas in the 5 and 10 mg groups (2.01 +/- 0.66 and 1.95 +/- 0.91, respectively, p < 0.001) but no significant reduction in the 1 mg group (2.81 +/- 0.56, p > 0.5) in comparison with control. This study demonstrated that intramural delivery of advanced c-myc neutrally charged antisense morpholino compound completely inhibits c-myc expression and dramatically reduces neointimal formation in a dose dependent fashion in a porcine coronary stent restenosis model, while allowing for complete vascular healing.

  8. Development of a Bronchial Wall Model: Triple Culture on a Decellularized Porcine Trachea.

    PubMed

    Melo, Esther; Kasper, Jennifer Y; Unger, Ronald E; Farré, Ramon; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2015-09-01

    In vitro coculture models mimicking the bronchial barrier are a significant step forward in investigating the behavior and function of the upper respiratory tract mucosa. To date, mostly synthetic materials have been used as substrates to culture the cells. However, decellularized tissues provide a more in vivo-like environment based on the native extracellular matrix. In this study, an in vitro, bronchial wall coculture model has been established using a decellularized, porcine luminal trachea membrane and employing three relevant human cell types. The tissue was decellularized and placed in plastic transwell supports. The human bronchial epithelial cell line, 16HBE14o-, was seeded on the apical side of the membrane with the human lung fibroblast cell line, Wi-38, and/or the microvascular endothelial cell line, ISO-HAS-1, seeded on the basolateral side. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was measured over 10 days and tight/adherens junctions (ZO-1, occludin/β-catenin) were studied through immunofluorescence. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed to evaluate microvilli and cilia formation. All cultures grew successfully on the membrane. TER values of 555 Ω·cm(2) (±21, SEM) were achieved in the monoculture. Cocultures with fibroblasts reached 565 Ω·cm(2) (±41, SEM), with endothelial cells at 638 Ω·cm(2) (±37, SEM), and the triple culture achieved 552 Ω·cm(2) (±38, SEM). ZO-1, occludin, and β-catenin were expressed in 16HBE14o- under all culture conditions. Using SEM, a dense microvilli population was found. Prominent cell-cell contacts and clusters of emerging cilia could be identified. Fibroblasts and endothelial cells strengthened the formation of a tight barrier by the 16HBE14o-. Thus, the coculture of three relevant cell types in combination with native decellularized scaffolds as a substrate approaches more closely the in vivo situation and could be used to study mechanisms of upper respiratory damage and regeneration.

  9. Cell Sheet Transplantation for Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Perrod, Guillaume; Rahmi, Gabriel; Pidial, Laetitia; Camilleri, Sophie; Bellucci, Alexandre; Casanova, Amaury; Viel, Thomas; Tavitian, Bertrand; Cellier, Christophe; Clement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Extended esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is highly responsible for esophageal stricture. We conducted a comparative study in a porcine model to evaluate the effectiveness of adipose tissue-derived stromal cell (ADSC) double cell sheet transplantation. Twelve female pigs were treated with 5 cm long hemi-circumferential ESD and randomized in two groups. ADSC group (n = 6) received 4 double cell sheets of allogenic ADSC on a paper support membrane and control group (n = 6) received 4 paper support membranes. ADSC were labelled with PKH-67 fluorophore to allow probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopie (pCLE) monitoring. After 28 days follow-up, animals were sacrificed. At days 3, 14 and 28, endoscopic evaluation with pCLE and esophagography were performed. One animal from the control group was excluded (anesthetic complication). Animals from ADSC group showed less frequent alimentary trouble (17% vs 80%; P = 0.08) and higher gain weight on day 28. pCLE demonstrated a compatible cell signal in 4 animals of the ADSC group at day 3. In ADSC group, endoscopy showed that 1 out of 6 (17%) animals developed a severe esophageal stricture comparatively to 100% (5/5) in the control group; P = 0.015. Esophagography demonstrated a decreased degree of stricture in the ADSC group on day 14 (44% vs 81%; P = 0.017) and day 28 (46% vs 90%; P = 0.035). Histological analysis showed a decreased fibrosis development in the ADSC group, in terms of surface (9.7 vs 26.1 mm²; P = 0.017) and maximal depth (1.6 vs 3.2 mm; P = 0.052). In this model, transplantation of allogenic ADSC organized in double cell sheets after extended esophegeal ESD is strongly associated with a lower esophageal stricture's rate.

  10. Delayed cooling of an acute scald contact burn injury in a porcine model: is it worthwhile?

    PubMed

    Rajan, Vasant; Bartlett, Nita; Harvey, John G; Martin, Hugh C O; La Hei, Erik R; Arbuckle, Susan; Godfrey, Craig; Holland, Andrew J A

    2009-01-01

    The current Australia and New Zealand Burn Association recommended burns first aid treatment is to place the burn under cool running water for 20 minutes. Immediate cooling of a burn wound has been shown to reduce the depth of the injury. Cooling has also been recommended as beneficial for up to 3 hours after the burn. No scientific data currently exist to support this recommendation. The aim of this study was to identify the effect of delayed cooling of an acute scald contact burn wound in a porcine model. Four partial-thickness contact scald burn injuries were induced in 12 piglets each. First aid treatment consisting of cool running water for 20 minutes was instituted randomly to each wound at different time points: immediately and at time delays of 5, 20, and 60 minutes. The group receiving immediate first aid with cool running water for 20 minutes served as the control group. At day 1 and day 9, biopsies were obtained and assessed in a blinded manner. Histologic analysis of burn depth on days 1 and 9 demonstrated no significant difference in the depth of the burn in the various treatment groups in comparison to the control group receiving immediate first aid. No significant differences in the surface areas of each burn were noted between the various treatment groups on day 9. Core body temperature did not fall below 35 degrees C throughout the cooling process. This study provides scientific evidence that in an animal model delayed cooling for up to 60 minutes postacute contact scald burn is still effective compared with immediate cooling at reducing burn depth.

  11. Comparative trial assessing suture techniques and types of urinary catheters in vesicourethral anastomotic tensile strength in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Perera, Marlon; Divakaran, Pranav; Roberts, Matthew J; Chung, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Vesicourethal anastomosis (VUA) during radical prostatectomy can be achieved using various suture plication techniques. Traditionally, an indwelling urinary catheter remains in-situ to facilitate the healing process of the reconstructed VUA. Compromise or rupture of this anastomosis may lead to acute urinary leak and subsequent urinoma or stricture formation. This ex-vivo porcine model aims to evaluate VUA tensile strength using different suture techniques and catheter types. Male porcine bladders were obtained and prostatectomy was performed. The specimens were randomized and VUA were created using 3-point interrupted, 6-point interrupted or 6 point continuous 3-0 monocryl suture. 20Fr catheters were utilized, specifically varying manufacturers (A and B) and catheter balloon shapes (round versus oval). The VUA model was placed within a reproducible pulley system and graduated weights were applied until failure of the catheter balloon or the model VUA. Model failure was defined as either 'VUA rupture', 'Catheter passage through VUA' or 'catheter failure'. Twenty consecutive porcine bladders were prepared, tested and utilized for analysis. VUA reconstructed with 3-point fixation was more likely to suffer VUA rupture (p=0.025) compared to 6-point interrupted or 6-point continuous VUA. Higher tensile pressure causing catheter balloon rupture (p=0.009) was observed for Manufacturer A. Catheters with oval-balloon shape were more likely to dislodge past the VUA without disruption of the anastomosis (p=0.002). During prostatectomy, anastomotic technique and catheter selection can significantly alter the tensile properties of the VUA. Further research is required to validate our findings in clinical models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Measuring transdermal glucose levels in neonates by passive diffusion: an in vitro porcine skin model.

    PubMed

    Tiangco, Cristina; Andar, Abhay; Quarterman, Juliana; Ge, Xudong; Sevilla, Fortunato; Rao, Govind; Stinchcomb, Audra; Bunge, Annette; Tolosa, Leah

    2017-03-10

    Current glucose monitoring techniques for neonates rely heavily on blood glucose monitors which require intermittent blood collection through skin-penetrating pricks on the heel or fingers. This procedure is painful and often not clinically conducive, which presents a need for a noninvasive method for monitoring glucose in neonates. Our motivation for this study was to develop an in vitro method for measuring passive diffusion of glucose in premature neonatal skin using a porcine skin model. Such a model will allow us to initially test new devices for noninvasive glucose monitoring without having to do in vivo testing of newborns. The in vitro model is demonstrated by comparing uncompromised and tape-stripped skin in an in-line flow-through diffusion apparatus with glucose concentrations that mimic the hypo-, normo-, and hyper-glycemic conditions in the neonate (2.0, 5.0, and 20 mM, respectively). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) of the tape-stripped skin was approximately 20 g m(-2) h(-1), which closely mimics TEWL for neonatal skin at about 190 days post-conceptional age. The tape-stripped skin showed a >15-fold increase in glucose diffusion compared to the uncompromised skin. The very small concentrations of collected glucose were measured with a highly selective and highly sensitive fluorescent glucose biosensor based on the glucose binding protein (GBP). The demonstrated method of glucose determination is noninvasive and painless, which makes it especially desirable for glucose testing in neonates and children. This study is an important step towards an in vitro model for noninvasive real-time glucose monitoring that may be easily transferred to the clinic for glucose monitoring in neonates. Graphical Abstract Glucose diffusion through model skin was measured using an in-line flow-through diffusion apparatus with glucose solutions mimicking hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemia in the neonate. Phosphate buffered saline was added to the top chamber and the

  13. Experimental analysis of the mechanical behavior of the viscoelastic porcine pancreas and preliminary case study on the human pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wex, C; Fröhlich, M; Brandstädter, K; Bruns, C; Stoll, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the mechanical properties of the pancreas. Up to now, the mechanical properties of the pancreas are not sufficiently characterized. The possibility of intraoperative mechanical testing of pathological pancreata will allow the classification of pancreatic diseases in the future. The application of mechanical parameters instead of the intraoperative frozen section analysis shortens waiting times in the operating room. This study proves the general applicability of shear rheology for the determination of the mechanical properties of pancreas and the assessment of graft quality for transplantation. Porcine and human pancreas samples were examined ex vivo and a nonlinear viscoelastic behavior was observed. Pancreas was found to be more viscous than liver but both abdominal organs showed a similar flow behavior. The shear deformation dependence of healthy human pancreas was similar to porcine pancreas. An increase in the post-mortem time led to an increase in the complex modulus for a post-mortem time up to 8.5 days. Histological investigations showed that an increased amount of collagen coincides with the stiffening of the pancreatic tissue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The rolling-circle melting-pot model for porcine circovirus DNA replication

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A stem-loop structure, formed by a pair of inverted repeats during DNA replication, is a conserved feature at the origin of DNA replication (Ori) among plant and animal viruses, bacteriophages and plasmids that replicate their genomes via the rolling-circle replication (RCR) mechanism. Porcine circo...

  15. Effect and mechanism of esmolol given during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine ventricular fibrillation model.

    PubMed

    Jingjun, Lü; Yan, Zhang; Weijie; Dongdong, Zhao; Guosheng, Lin; Mingwei, Bao

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect on calcium cycling protein and electrical restitution of beta(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist esmolol administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the porcine ventricular fibrillation model. Ventricular fibrillation untreated for four minutes was induced by dynamic steady state pacing protocol in 40 healthy male pigs, in which local unipolar electrograms were recorded using one 10-electrode catheter that was sutured to the left ventricular epicardium. During CPR, animals were randomized into two groups to receive saline as placebo or esmolol after two standard doses of epinephrine. At post-resuscitation 2-h, six pigs were randomly selected from each group and the second VF induction was performed. Local activation-recovery intervals (ARI) restitutions and the VF inducibility between control group and esmolol group were compared. Western blotting was performed to determine expression of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIdelta(CaMKIIdelta) and cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) protein, and their phosphorylation status. Injection of esmolol combined with epinephrine during CPR significantly decreased recurrent rate of ventricular fibrillation during 2-h post-resuscitation, meanwhile it has no adverse affect on the restore of spontaneous circulation. Esmolol significantly flattened ARI restitution slope, lessened regional difference of ARI restitution, decreased the VF inducibility, and alleviated CaMKIIdelta hyper-activation and RyR2 hyper-phosphorylation. Esmolol given during CPR has significant effects on modulating electrical restitution property and intracellular calcium handling, which contributes the most important reasons why beta(1)-blockade significantly reduced the onset and maintenance of VF.

  16. Hydro-jet assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy: initial experience in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Shekarriz, H; Shekarriz, B; Upadhyay, J; Bürk, C; Wood, D P; Bruch, H P

    2000-03-01

    Hemostasis represents a challenge when performing laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. Hydro-Jet cutting is an advanced technology that has been used to create an ultra-coherent water force that functions like a sharp knife. In the surgical field, it has mainly been used for liver surgery and initial clinical experience with laparoscopic cholecystectomies has been favorable. This technique allowed selective parenchymal cutting with preservation of vessels and bile ducts. We describe a novel Hydro-Jet assisted dissection technique for laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in a porcine model. Ten partial nephrectomies were performed in 5 pigs using a Muritz 1000 (Euromed Medizintechnik, A. Pein, Schwerin, Germany) Hydro-Jet generator. A thin stream of ultra coherent fluid is forced at a high velocity through a small nozzle. A modified probe allows both blunt dissection concomitantly with high-pressure water application. Coagulation can be applied via a bipolar thermoapplicator as needed. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy was successful in all animals. Water-jet cutting through the parenchyma was virtually bloodless and preserved the vasculature and the collecting system. The vessels were then ligated or coagulated under direct vision. The continuous water flow established a bloodless operating field and a clear view for the surgeon. The mean dissection time and warm ischemia time were 45+/-9 and 17+/-3 minutes, respectively. This preliminary study supports the suitability of this technique for laparoscopic partial nephrectomy to improve hemostasis. The improved anatomical dissection and hemostasis may further decrease morbidity and operative time. Further studies are underway to compare this technique with laser coagulation for laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

  17. Carbon dioxide laser ablation with immediate autografting in a full-thickness porcine burn model.

    PubMed Central

    Glatter, R D; Goldberg, J S; Schomacker, K T; Compton, C C; Flotte, T J; Bua, D P; Greaves, K W; Nishioka, N S; Sheridan, R L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the long-term clinical and histologic outcome of immediate autografting of full-thickness burn wounds ablated with a high-power continuous-wave CO2 laser to sharply débrided wounds in a porcine model. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Continuous-wave CO2 lasers have performed poorly as tools for burn excision because the large amount of thermal damage to viable subeschar tissues precluded successful autografting. However, a new technique, in which a high-power laser is rapidly scanned over the eschar, results in eschar vaporization without significant damage to underlying viable tissues, allowing successful immediate autografting. METHODS: Full-thickness paravertebral burn wounds measuring 36 cm2 were created on 11 farm swine. Wounds were ablated to adipose tissue 48 hours later using either a surgical blade or a 150-Watt continuous-wave CO2 laser deflected by an x-y galvanometric scanner that translated the beam over the tissue surface, removing 200 microm of tissue per scan. Both sites were immediately autografted and serially evaluated clinically and histologically for 180 days. RESULTS: The laser-treated sites were nearly bloodless. The mean residual thermal damage was 0.18+/-0.05 mm. The mean graft take was 96+/-11% in manual sites and 93+/-8% in laser sites. On postoperative day 7, the thickness of granulation tissue at the graft-wound bed interface was greater in laser-debrided sites. By postoperative day 180, the manual and laser sites were histologically identical. Vancouver scar assessment revealed no differences in scarring at postoperative day 180. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term scarring, based on Vancouver scar assessments and histologic evaluation, was equivalent at 6 months in laser-ablated and sharply excised sites. Should this technology become practical, the potential clinical implications include a reduction in surgical blood loss without sacrifice of immediate engraftment rates or long-term outcome. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3

  18. Comparative assessment of drug-eluting balloons in an advanced porcine model of coronary restenosis.

    PubMed

    Joner, M; Byrne, R A; Lapointe, J-M; Radke, P W; Bayer, G; Steigerwald, K; Wittchow, E

    2011-05-01

    The advent of drug-eluting balloon (DEB) therapy has represented an important development in interventional cardiology. Nevertheless, preclinical data with this technology remain scant, and comparative studies have not previously been published. Bare metal stents were implanted in the coronary arteries of 15 pigs followed by balloon angioplasty. Animals were allocated to treatment with a 60-second inflation of one of four different balloon catheters: a conventional untreated plain angioplasty balloon (PBA, Biotronik AG), the Pantera Lux DEB (3.0 μg/mm2 paclitaxel; BTHC excipient, Biotronik AG), the Elutax DEB (2.0 μg/mm2 paclitaxel; no excipient; Aachen Resonance), or the SeQuent Please DEB (3.0 μg/mm2 paclitaxel; iopromide excipient: B. Braun). Twenty-eight days following balloon deployment, animals underwent repeat angiography for quantitative coronary angiography analysis and euthanasia for histopathologic assessment. By histology, the mean neointimal thickness was 0.44 ± 0.19 mm with PBA, 0.35 ± 0.13 mm with Pantera Lux , 0.61 ± 0.20 mm with Elutax , and 0.47 ± 0.21 mm with SeQuent Please DEB (p=0.02). In comparison with PBA, deployment of the Pantera Lux or the SeQuent Please DEB resulted in delayed healing characterised by significant increases in fibrin, neointimal cell vacuity and delayed re-endothelialisation. In conclusion, investigation of comparative DEB performance in a porcine model of advanced coronary restenosis reveals significant heterogeneity of neointimal suppression between the devices tested with numerically lowest values seen in the Pantera Lux group. On the other hand, evidence of delayed healing was observed in the most effective DEB groups.

  19. Human keratinocyte growth factor effects in a porcine model of epidermal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Staiano-Coico, L.; Krueger, J. G.; Rubin, J. S.; D'limi, S.; Vallat, V. P.; Valentino, L.; Fahey, T.; Hawes, A.; Kingston, G.; Madden, M. R.; Mathwich, M.; Gottlieb, A.; Aaronson, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family (hence the alternative designation FGF-7). It is produced by stromal cells, but acts as a mitogen for epithelial cells. We examined the effects of topically applied KGF on healing of wounds in a porcine model. In partial-thickness wounds, KGF stimulated the rate of reepithelialization (p < 0.0002), associated with a thickening of the epidermis (p < 0.0001). Epidermis from KGF-treated full-thickness wound sites was significantly thicker (0.31 +/- 0.22 mm) compared with mirror image control sites (0.18 +/- 0.12 mm) (p < 0.0001). Moreover, the majority (77%) of KGF-treated wounds exhibited epidermis with a deep rete ridge pattern as compared with control sites. These effects were observed as early as 14 d and persisted for at least 4 wk. KGF treatment also increased the number of serrated basal cells associated with increased deposition of collagen fibers in the superficial dermis adjacent to the acanthotic epidermis. Electron microscopy revealed better developed hemidesmosomes associated with thicker bundles of tonofilaments in the serrated cells. The pattern of epidermal thickening observed in KGF-treated wounds resembled psoriasis. Psoriasis is a disease associated with epidermal thickening, parakeratosis as well as hyperproliferation that extends beyond the basal layer. In striking contrast to psoriasis, KGF-treated wounds exhibited normal orthokeratotic maturation, and proliferation was localized to the basal cells. Our present findings have significant implications concerning the role of KGF as a paracrine modulator of epidermal proliferation and differentiation. PMID:8350059

  20. The Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on the Colon in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiannan; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Wenlong; Chai, Wei; Wu, Jiuping; Guo, Shuai; Fang, Gang; Zhou, Xulong; Zhang, Jianhua; Xu, Kecheng; Zeng, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a method of targeted cell ablation which has been suggested as a potential cancer therapy as it leaves structures such as blood vessels and the extracellular matrix intact, thereby allowing the rapid recovery of healthy tissue. Here, we investigated the effects of IRE on the colon in vivo in a porcine model. Methods IRE ablation was performed on the colon walls of 12 female Tibet mini-pigs, creating a total of 24 lesions. Lesions were monitored periodically by endoscopy. The pigs were euthanized 7, 14, 21 or 28 days after IRE ablation and the colons harvested for gross and histological analysis. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Masson’s trichrome (MT) stain and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results All pigs tolerated the ablation procedure without serious clinical symptoms or complications. There was no evidence of perforation by endoscopy or gross postmortem examination. All lesions were characterized by necrotic cell death with mild inflammation and hyperemia, with a sharp demarcation between ablated and adjacent normal tissue. A fibrous scar was observed in the ablated colon tissue. Histological analysis revealed damage to each layer of the colon. Histopathology findings also showed the preservation of extracellular structures and the recovery of the ablated colon. Conclusions The complete ablation of the target area, its rapid recovery and the lack of posttreatment symptoms suggest that IRE ablation may be a promising therapy for tumors located adjacent to or violating the colon wall. PMID:27907057

  1. Laparoendoscopic single-site simple nephrectomy using a magnetic anchoring system in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Hyo; Lee, Hye Won; Lee, Seo Yeon; Han, Deok Hyun; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic anchoring devices may reduce the number of port sites needed in laparoscopic surgery. In this study, we prospectively assessed the feasibility of using a magnetic anchoring and guidance system (MAGS) in laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery performed by novices. Materials and Methods A total of 10 LESS simple nephrectomies were performed with or without MAGS in a nonsurvival porcine model by 6 operators with no previous LESS surgery experience. After installation of the homemade single port, an intra-abdominal magnet was fixed to the renal parenchyma with suturing and stabilized by an external magnet placed on the flank so that the position of the kidney could be easily changed by moving the external handheld magnet. The length of the procedure and any intraoperative complications were evaluated. Results Operative time (mean±standard deviation) was shorter in the group using the magnetic anchoring device (M-LESS-N) than in the group with conventional LESS nephrectomy (C-LESS-N) (63±20.8 minutes vs. 82±40.7 minutes, respectively). Although all nephrectomies were completed uneventfully in the M-LESS-N group, renal vein injury occurred during dissection of the renal hilum in two cases of C-LESS-N and was resolved by simultaneous transection of the renal artery and vein with an Endo-GIA stapler. Conclusions LESS-N using MAGS is a feasible technique for surgeons with no LESS surgery experience. Taking into account the 2 cases of renal vein injury in the C-LESS-N group, the application of MAGS may be beneficial for overcoming the learning curve of LESS surgery. PMID:27195320

  2. Assessment of Chronological Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on Hilar Bile Ducts in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae Woong Lu, David S. K. Osuagwu, Ferdnand Raman, Steven; Lassman, Charles

    2013-11-07

    PurposeTo evaluate the chronological effects of irreversible electroporation (IRE) on large hilar bile ducts in an in vivo porcine model correlated with computed tomography (CT) cholangiography and histopathology.Materials and MethodsTwelve IRE zones were made along hilar bile ducts intraoperatively under ultrasound (US)-guidance in 11 pigs. Paired electrodes were placed either on opposing sides of the bile duct (straddle [STR]) or both on one side of the bile duct (one-sided [OSD]). The shortest electrode-to-duct distance was classified as periductal (≤2 mm) or nonperiductal (>2 mm). CT cholangiography and laboratory tests were performed before IRE and again at 2 days, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks after IRE. Degree of bile duct injury were graded as follows: grade 0 = no narrowing; grade 1 = ≤50 % duct narrowing; grade 2 = >50 % narrowing without proximal duct dilatation; grade 3 = grade 2 with proximal duct dilatation; and grade 4 = grade 3 with enzyme elevation. Pigs were selected for killing and histopathology at 2 days, 4, and 8 weeks.ResultsNonperiductal electrode placement produced no long-term strictures in 5 of 5 ducts. Periductal electrode placement produced mild narrowing in 6 of 7 ducts: 5 grade 1 and 1 grade 2. None showed increased enzymes. There was no significant difference between STR versus OSD electrode placement. Histopathology showed minor but relatively greater ductal mural changes in narrowed ducts.ConclusionIn the larger hilar ducts, long-term patency and mural integrity appear resistant to IRE damage with the energy deposition used, especially if the electrode is not immediately periductal in position.

  3. Impaired contractile recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Janice V; Lu, Li; Ye, Shuyu; Bergman, Bryan C; Sparagna, Genevieve C; Sarraf, Mohammad; Reusch, Jane E B; Greyson, Clifford R; Schwartz, Gregory G

    2013-03-15

    Clinical metabolic syndrome conveys a poor prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome, not fully accounted for by the extent of coronary atherosclerosis. To explain this observation, we determined whether postischemic myocardial contractile and metabolic function are impaired in a porcine dietary model of metabolic syndrome without atherosclerosis. Micropigs (n = 28) were assigned to a control diet (low fat, no added sugars) or an intervention diet (high saturated fat and simple sugars, no added cholesterol) for 7 mo. The intervention diet produced obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance, but not atherosclerosis. Under open-chest, anesthetized conditions, pigs underwent 45 min of low-flow myocardial ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion. In both diet groups, contractile function was similar at baseline and declined similarly during ischemia. However, after 120 min of reperfusion, regional work recovered to 21 ± 12% of baseline in metabolic syndrome pigs compared with 61 ± 13% in control pigs (P = 0.01). Ischemia-reperfusion caused a progressive decline in mechanical/metabolic efficiency (regional work/O2 consumption) in metabolic syndrome hearts, but not in control hearts. Metabolic syndrome hearts demonstrated altered fatty acyl composition of cardiolipin and increased Akt phosphorylation in both ischemic and nonischemic regions, suggesting tonic activation. Metabolic syndrome hearts used more fatty acid than control hearts (P = 0.03). When fatty acid availability was restricted by prior insulin exposure, differences between groups in postischemic contractile recovery and mechanical/metabolic efficiency were eliminated. In conclusion, pigs with characteristics of metabolic syndrome demonstrate impaired contractile and metabolic recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia. Contributory mechanisms may include remodeling of cardiolipin, abnormal activation of Akt, and excessive utilization of fatty acid substrates.

  4. Adipose-derived stem cell sheet transplantation therapy in a porcine model of chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Osamu; Hagino, Ikuo; Nagaya, Noritoshi; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo; Sawa, Yoshiki; Mori, Hidezo; Yagihara, Toshikatsu

    2015-05-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a promising resource for cell transplantation therapy for damaged heart tissue. Cell death in the graft early after transplantation represents the main cause of unsatisfactory therapeutic efficacy, but tissue-engineered cell sheets grown in temperature-responsive cell culture dishes may enable improved engraftment of transplanted cells. We investigated the therapeutic potential of this method in chronic myocardial ischemia in swine. We created a porcine model of chronic heart failure by implanting an ameroid constrictor around the main trunk of the left anterior descending artery, just distal to the circumflex branch. Simultaneously, ASCs were obtained from a piece of subcutaneous adipose tissue and expanded to form ASC sheets using temperature-responsive dishes. Four weeks after ameroid constrictor placement, triple-layered ASC sheets were transplanted onto the area of the ischemic myocardium (sheet group, n = 7). Controls (n = 7) received no sheet. Just before and 4 weeks after transplantation, left ventriculography (LVG) and coronary angiography (CAG) were performed. LVG revealed a significant improvement in the left ventricular ejection fraction of the sheet group compared with controls (47.6 ± 2.9% vs 41.4 ± 2.8%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, development of collateral vessels was only detected in the sheet group with right CAG. Histologic analysis demonstrated that engrafted ASC sheets grew to form a thickened layer that included newly formed vessels. ASC sheet transplantation therapy is an intriguing therapeutic method for ischemic heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impaired contractile recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Janice V.; Lu, Li; Ye, Shuyu; Bergman, Bryan C.; Sparagna, Genevieve C.; Sarraf, Mohammad; Reusch, Jane E. B.; Greyson, Clifford R.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical metabolic syndrome conveys a poor prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome, not fully accounted for by the extent of coronary atherosclerosis. To explain this observation, we determined whether postischemic myocardial contractile and metabolic function are impaired in a porcine dietary model of metabolic syndrome without atherosclerosis. Micropigs (n = 28) were assigned to a control diet (low fat, no added sugars) or an intervention diet (high saturated fat and simple sugars, no added cholesterol) for 7 mo. The intervention diet produced obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance, but not atherosclerosis. Under open-chest, anesthetized conditions, pigs underwent 45 min of low-flow myocardial ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion. In both diet groups, contractile function was similar at baseline and declined similarly during ischemia. However, after 120 min of reperfusion, regional work recovered to 21 ± 12% of baseline in metabolic syndrome pigs compared with 61 ± 13% in control pigs (P = 0.01). Ischemia-reperfusion caused a progressive decline in mechanical/metabolic efficiency (regional work/O2 consumption) in metabolic syndrome hearts, but not in control hearts. Metabolic syndrome hearts demonstrated altered fatty acyl composition of cardiolipin and increased Akt phosphorylation in both ischemic and nonischemic regions, suggesting tonic activation. Metabolic syndrome hearts used more fatty acid than control hearts (P = 0.03). When fatty acid availability was restricted by prior insulin exposure, differences between groups in postischemic contractile recovery and mechanical/metabolic efficiency were eliminated. In conclusion, pigs with characteristics of metabolic syndrome demonstrate impaired contractile and metabolic recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia. Contributory mechanisms may include remodeling of cardiolipin, abnormal activation of Akt, and excessive utilization of fatty acid substrates. PMID:23335793

  6. Serum-stabilized naked caspase-3 siRNA protects autotransplant kidneys in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Zhao, Tian; Zhao, Zitong; Jia, Yichen; Li, Long; Zhang, Yufang; Song, Mangen; Rong, Ruiming; Xu, Ming; Nicholson, Michael L; Zhu, Tongyu; Yang, Bin

    2014-10-01

    The naked small interfering RNA (siRNA) of caspase-3, a key player in ischemia reperfusion injury, was effective in cold preserved and hemoreperfused kidneys, but not autotransplanted kidneys in our porcine models. Here, chemically modified serum stabilized caspase-3 siRNAs were further evaluated. The left kidney was retrieved and infused by University of Wisconsin solution with/without 0.3 mg caspase-3 or negative siRNA into the renal artery for 24-hour cold storage (CS). After an intravenous injection of 0.9 mg siRNA and right-uninephrectomy, the left kidney was autotransplanted for 2 weeks. The effectiveness of caspase-3 siRNA was confirmed by caspase-3 knockdown in the post-CS and/or post-transplant kidneys with reduced apoptosis and inflammation, while the functional caspase-3 siRNA in vivo was proved by detected caspase-3 mRNA degradation intermediates. HMGB1 protein was also decreased in the post-transplanted kidneys; correlated positively with renal IL-1β mRNA, but negatively with serum IL-10 or IL-4. The minimal off-target effects of caspase-3 siRNA were seen with favorable systemic responses. More importantly, renal function, associated with active caspase-3, HMGB1, apoptosis, inflammation, and tubulointerstitial damage, was improved by caspase-3 siRNA. Taken together, the 2-week autotransplanted kidneys were protected when caspase-3 siRNA administrated locally and systemically, which provides important evidence for future clinical trials.

  7. Comparison of solvents for removing pesticides from skin using an in vitro porcine model.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J L; Smith, M A; Eiteman, M A; Williams, P L; Boeniger, M F

    2000-01-01

    This study compared four solvents (1-propanol, polyethylene glycol [avg. MW 400], 10% Ivory Liquid and water, and D-TAM) for their ability to remove selected pesticides from an in vitro porcine skin model using a solvent-moistened wipe. Wipes were performed 90 min after pesticide was applied to the skin. The four pesticides selected (glyphosate, alachlor, methyl parathion, and trifluralin) were chosen because of their differences in water solubility. This study also determined whether pretreatment of skin with a solvent prior to pesticide application would either increase or decrease recovery of the pesticide. Recovery efficiencies for all solvents and pesticides were affected by the amount of contaminant on the skin. Although pesticide recoveries from all four solvents were similar (range: 45-57%), on average 1-propanol had significantly higher recoveries, followed by soap and water. There was no significant difference between polyethylene glycol, and D-TAM. When skin was pretreated with any of the four solvents before pesticide application, the recoveries of the more water soluble compounds, glyphosate and alachlor, decreased. When pretreatment with solvent preceded application of trifluralin, the pesticide with the lowest water solubility, recoveries increased. 1-Propanol or soap and water were more effective in removing pesticides from skin than polyethylene glycol or D-TAM, but the amount of pesticide recovered from skin was affected by the chemical characteristics of the pesticide (such as water solubility) and the amount of pesticide originally on the skin. This study provides information useful to the interpretation of skin wipe sample results collected in field studies.

  8. Small-Incision Laparoscopy-Assisted Surgery Under Abdominal Cavity Irrigation in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Takuro; Aoe, Tomohiko; Yu, Wen-Wei; Ebihara, Yuma; Kawahira, Hiroshi; Isono, Shiro; Naya, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgeries are performed under carbon dioxide insufflation. Switching from gas to an isotonic irrigant introduces several benefits and avoids some adverse effects of gas insufflation. We developed an irrigating device and apparatus designed for single-incision laparoscopic surgery and tested its advantages and drawbacks during surgery in a porcine model. Materials and Methods: Six pigs underwent surgical procedures under general anesthesia. A 30-cm extracorporeal cistern was placed over a 5–6-cm abdominal incision. The abdomen was irrigated with warm saline that was drained via a suction tube placed near the surgical field and continuously recirculated through a closed circuit equipped with a hemodialyzer as a filter. Irrigant samples from two pigs were cultured to check for bacterial and fungal contamination. Body weight was measured before and after surgery in four pigs that had not received treatments affecting hemodynamics or causing diuresis. Results: One-way flow of irrigant ensured laparoscopic vision by rinsing blood from the surgical field. Through a retroperitoneal approach, cystoprostatectomy was successfully performed in three pigs, nephrectomy in two, renal excision in two, and partial nephrectomy in one, under simultaneous ultrasonographic monitoring. Through a transperitoneal approach, liver excision and hemostasis with a bipolar sealing device were performed in three pigs, and bladder pedicle excision was performed in one pig. Bacterial and fungal contamination of the irrigant was observed on the draining side of the circuit, but the filter captured the contaminants. Body weight increased by a median of 2.1% (range, 1.2–4.4%) of initial weight after 3–5 hours of irrigation. Conclusions: Surgery under irrigation is feasible and practical when performed via a cistern through a small abdominal incision. This method is advantageous, especially in the enabling of continuous and free

  9. Protective ventilation reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth in lung tissue in a porcine pneumonia model.

    PubMed

    Sperber, Jesper; Nyberg, Axel; Lipcsey, Miklos; Melhus, Åsa; Larsson, Anders; Sjölin, Jan; Castegren, Markus

    2017-08-31

    Mechanical ventilation with positive end expiratory pressure and low tidal volume, i.e. protective ventilation, is recommended in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the effect of protective ventilation on bacterial growth during early pneumonia in non-injured lungs is not extensively studied. The main objectives were to compare two different ventilator settings on Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth in lung tissue and the development of lung injury. A porcine model of severe pneumonia was used. The protective group (n = 10) had an end expiratory pressure of 10 cm H2O and a tidal volume of 6 ml x kg(-1). The control group (n = 10) had an end expiratory pressure of 5 cm H2O and a tidal volume of 10 ml x kg(-1). 10(11) colony forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were inoculated intra-tracheally at baseline, after which the experiment continued for 6 h. Two animals from each group received only saline, and served as sham animals. Lung tissue samples from each animal were used for bacterial cultures and wet-to-dry weight ratio measurements. The protective group displayed lower numbers of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (p < 0.05) in the lung tissue, and a lower wet-to-dry ratio (p < 0.01) than the control group. The control group deteriorated in arterial oxygen tension/inspired oxygen fraction, whereas the protective group was unchanged (p < 0.01). In early phase pneumonia, protective ventilation with lower tidal volume and higher end expiratory pressure has the potential to reduce the pulmonary bacterial burden and the development of lung injury.

  10. Ultrasound-based Relative Elastic Modulus Imaging for Visualizing Thermal Ablation Zones in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jingfeng; Brace, Chris; Andreano, Anita; DeWall, Ryan J.; Rubert, Nick; Fisher, Ted G.; Varghese, Tomy; Lee, Fred; Hall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasound-based elastic modulus imaging to visualize thermal ablation zones in an in vivo porcine model is reported in this article. Elastic modulus images of soft tissues are estimated as an inverse optimization problem. Ultrasonically-measured displacement data are utilized as inputs to determine an elastic modulus distribution that provides the best match to this displacement field. A total of 14 in vivo thermal ablation zones were investigated in this study. To determine the accuracy of delineation of each thermal ablation zone using elastic modulus imaging, the dimensions (lengths of long and short axes) and the are of each thermal ablation zone obtained from an elastic modulus image was compared to the corresponding gross pathology photograph of the same ablation zone. Comparison of elastic modulus imaging measurements and gross pathology measurements showed high correlation with respect to the area of thermal ablation zones (Pearson coefficient = 0.950 and p<0.0001). The radiological-pathological correlation was slightly lower (correlation = 0.853, p<0.0001) for strain imaging among these 14 in vivo ablation zones. We also found that, on average, elastic modulus imaging can more accurately depict thermal ablation zones, when compared to strain imaging (14.7% versus 22.3% absolute percent error in area measurements, respectively). Furthermore, elastic modulus imaging also provide higher (more than a factor of two) contrast-to-noise ratios for evaluating these thermal ablation zones than those on corresponding strain images, thereby reducing inter-observer variability. Our preliminary results suggest that elastic modulus imaging might potentially enhance the ability to visualize thermal ablation zones, thereby improving assessment of ablative therapies. PMID:20354279

  11. Porcine model characterizing various parameters assessing the outcome after acetaminophen intoxication induced acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Karolin; Klingert, Wilfried; Klingert, Kathrin; Morgalla, Matthias H; Schuhmann, Martin U; Leckie, Pamela; Sharifi, Yalda; Davies, Nathan A; Jalan, Rajiv; Peter, Andreas; Grasshoff, Christian; Königsrainer, Alfred; Schenk, Martin; Thiel, Christian

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the changes of hemodynamic and laboratory parameters during the course of acute liver failure following acetaminophen overdose. METHODS Eight pigs underwent a midline laparotomy following jejunal catheter placement for further acetaminophen intoxication and positioning of a portal vein Doppler flow-probe. Acute liver failure was realized by intrajejunal acetaminophen administration in six animals, two animals were sham operated. All animals were invasively monitored and received standardized intensive care support throughout the study. Portal blood flow, hemodynamic and ventilation parameters were continuously recorded. Laboratory parameters were analysed every eight hours. Liver biopsies were sampled every 24 h following intoxication and upon autopsy. RESULTS Acute liver failure (ALF) occurred after 28 ± 5 h resulted in multiple organ failure and death despite maximal support after further 21 ± 1 h (study end). Portal blood flow (baseline 1100 ± 156 mL/min) increased to a maximum flow of 1873 ± 175 mL/min at manifestation of ALF, which was significantly elevated (P < 0.01). Immediately after peaking, portal flow declined rapidly to 283 ± 135 mL/min at study end. Thrombocyte values (baseline 307 × 103/µL ± 34 × 103/µL) of intoxicated animals declined slowly to values of 145 × 103/µL ± 46 × 103/µL when liver failure occurred. Subsequent appearance of severe thrombocytopenia in liver failure resulted in values of 11 × 103/µL ± 3 × 103/µL preceding fatality within few hours which was significant (P > 0.01). CONCLUSION Declining portal blood flow and subsequent severe thrombocytopenia after acetaminophen intoxication precede fatality in a porcine acute liver failure model. PMID:28321158

  12. Inhibition of vascular remodelling in a porcine coronary injury model by herbal extract XS0601

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao; Shi, Dazhuo; Chen, Keji

    2006-01-01

    Background Arterial remodelling is a major pathologic change of restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Our previous studies showed that XS0601 (consisting of Chuangxingol and paeoniflorin) had some effects on the prevention of restenosis after PCI. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine whether and how its mechanism was related to the regulation of the arterial remodelling after endothelial injury by balloon dilation. Methods Twenty Chinese mini-pigs were randomized into four groups: control, probucol, low-dose XS0601 and high-dose XS0601 group before oversized balloon injury of the left anterior descending coronary arteries. Starting from two days before balloon injury, the mini-pigs in the treated group were administered with probucol (2 g/day) and XS0601 (0.02 g/kg/day for low dose; 0.04 g/kg/day for high dose) for four weeks after balloon injury. The animals receiving balloon injury alone were used as control. Morphometric and angiographic analysis of the injured arteries were performed. Results The contribution of intimal hyperplasia and arterial remodelling to angiographic late lumen loss was 41% and 59% respectively. XS0601 markedly inhibited proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and transformation of SMCs from contractile to synthetic phenotype in neointima, inhibited hyperplasia-related indices of morphometric analysis and reduce late angiographic lumen loss. The reduction of the late angiographic lumen loss resulting from vascular remodelling was greater after XS0601 treatment. Conclusion Both intimal hyperplasia and vascular remodelling are attributed to late lumen loss in this porcine coronary injury model. XS0601 markedly reduced angiographic late lumen loss resulting from intimal hyperplasia, vascular remodelling and XS0601 may be a potential agent to prevent restenosis after PCI. PMID:17302965

  13. Experimental models of hepatocellular carcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Philippa; Villanueva, Augusto; Friedman, Scott L.; Koike, Kazuhiko; Llovet, Josep M.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common and deadly cancer whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Comparative genomic studies from human HCC samples have classified HCCs into different molecular subgroups; yet, the unifying feature of this tumor is its propensity to arise upon a background of inflammation and fibrosis. This review seeks to analyze the available experimental models in HCC research and to correlate data from human populations with them in order to consolidate our efforts to date, as it is increasingly clear that different models will be required to mimic different subclasses of the neoplasm. These models will be instrumental in the evaluation of compounds targeting specific molecular pathways in future preclinical studies. PMID:18314222

  14. Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Lengyel, E; Burdette, JE; Kenny, HA; Matei, D; Pilrose, J; Haluska, P.; Nephew, KP; Hales, DB; Stack, MS

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) is associated with high mortality and, as the majority (>75%) of women with OvCa have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, rates of survival have not changed appreciably over 30 years. A mechanistic understanding of OvCa initiation and progression is hindered by the complexity of genetic and/or environmental initiating events and lack of clarity regarding the cell(s) or tissue(s) of origin. Metastasis of OvCa involves direct extension or exfoliation of cells and cellular aggregates into the peritoneal cavity, survival of matrix-detached cells in a complex ascites fluid phase, and subsequent adhesion to the mesothelium lining covering abdominal organs to establish secondary lesions containing host stromal and inflammatory components. Development of experimental models to recapitulate this unique mechanism of metastasis presents a remarkable scientific challenge and many approaches used to study other solid tumors (lung, colon, and breast, for example) are not transferable to OvCa research given the distinct metastasis pattern and unique tumor microenvironment. This review will discuss recent progress in the development and refinement of experimental models to study OvCa. Novel cellular, three-dimensional organotypic, and ex vivo models are considered and the current in vivo models summarized. The review critically evaluates currently available genetic mouse models of OvCa, the emergence of xenopatients, and the utility of the hen model to study OvCa prevention, tumorigenesis, metastasis, and chemoresistance. As these new approaches more accurately recapitulate the complex tumor microenvironment, it is predicted that new opportunities for enhanced understanding of disease progression, metastasis and therapeutic response will emerge. PMID:23934194

  15. Porcine arteriogenesis based on vasa vasorum in a novel semi-acute occlusion model using high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Harnoss, Jonathan M; Krackhardt, Florian; Ritter, Zully; Granzow, Susanne; Felsenberg, Dieter; Neumann, Konrad; Lerman, Lilach O; Riediger, Fabian; Hillmeister, Philipp; Bramlage, Peter; Buschmann, Ivo R

    2017-08-03

    Bridging collaterals (BC) develop in several chronic total artery occlusion diseases, and can prevent extensive myocardial necrosis. Yet, their origin, growth process, and histo-morphology are still unclear. Since vasa vasorum (VV) may take part in collateralization, we hypothesized that VV are the basis for BCs. To comprehensively investigate this arteriogenesis process, we used high-resolution imaging, including corrosion casts, post-mortem angiography with stereoscopy, micro-CT, and immunohistology, in combination with a novel semi-acute vessel occlusion model. This porcine model was produced by implanting a copper stent minimally invasively into the left anterior descending coronary artery. To define the kinetics of arteriogenesis, pigs (n = 11) were assigned to one of the five euthanasia timepoints: day 0.5 (D0.5, n = 2), D3 (n = 2), D5 (n = 1), D7 (n = 3), or D12 (n = 3) after stent implantation. We found that (1) BCs originate from longitudinally running type 1 VV, mainly VV interna, partially also from VV externa; (2) the growth of VV to BC is rapid, occurring within 7 days; and (3) porcine BCs are likely functionally relevant, considering an observed 102% increase in the number of smooth muscle cell layers in their vascular wall. High-resolution imaging in a minimally invasive non-acute vessel occlusion model is an innovative technique that allowed us to provide direct evidence that porcine BCs develop from the VV. These data may be crucial for further studies on the treatment of angina pectoris and thromboangiitis obliterans through therapeutic stimulation of BC development.

  16. An innovative ex-vivo porcine upper gastrointestinal model for submucosal tunnelling endoscopic resection (STER)

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Baldwin; Chiu, Philip; Teoh, Anthony; Zheng, Linfu; Chan, Shannon; Lam, Kelvin; Tang, Raymond; Ng, Enders K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Submucosal tunnelling endoscopic resection (STER) is a novel endoscopic technique to remove submucosal tumour (SMT). We propose a novel, low cost simulator for training of techniques for STER. Patients and methods: The model consisted of an ex-planted porcine oesophagus, stomach and duodenum with marbles embedded surgically in the submucosal plane. Two expert endoscopists with experience in submucosal tunnelling and 5 board-certified endoscopists with no experience in submucosal tunnelling were recruited. Participants were asked to perform a diagnostic endoscopy and 2 STER procedures, 1 in the oesophagus and 1 in the stomach. They also answered a structured questionnaire. Factors including operative time, mucosal and muscular injury rate, injection volume and accuracy of endoscopic closure were assessed. Results: The median time for localization of all SMTs was 40.1 seconds for experts and 38.5 seconds for novices (P = 1.000). For esophageal STER, the length of mucosal incisions and tunnelling distances were comparable between the 2 groups. The median volume injected by the novice group was significantly lower than the experts (15 mL vs 42.5 mL (P = 0.05). The median tunnelling time per length was 25.9 seconds/mm for the experts and 40.8 seconds/mm for the novice group (P = 0.38). There was a higher rate of mucosal injury and muscular perforation in the novice group (8 vs 0; P = 0.05). For gastric STER, the length of mucosal incisions and tunnel distances were comparable between the 2 groups. The median tunnelling time per length for the experts was 23.3 seconds/mm and 34.6 seconds/mm for the novice group (P = 0.38). One mucosal injury was incurred by a novice. The rate of dissection in the stomach and the oesophagus was not statistically different (P = 0.620). All participants voted that the model provides a realistic simulation and recommended it for training. Conclusions: STER is an advanced endoscopic

  17. A surfactant-based wound dressing can reduce bacterial biofilms in a porcine skin explant model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingping; Larose, Christelle; Della Porta, Alessandra C; Schultz, Gregory S; Gibson, Daniel J

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial biofilms have been found in many, if not all, chronic wounds. Their excessive extracellular matrix secretion and the metabolic changes that they undergo render them highly tolerant of many antibiotic and antimicrobial treatments. Physical removal and/or disruption are a common approach to treating wounds suspected of having bacterial biofilms. While many of these techniques use mechanical energy as the primary means of removal, we have begun to investigate if surfactants could facilitate the removal of bacterial biofilms, or if they might sensitise the biofilms to antimicrobial interventions. We tested a new surfactant-based wound gel on an ex vivo porcine skin explant model infected with a functionally tolerant 3-day biofilm. The wounds were dressed with a surfactant-based gel directly on the wound or with moistened gauze. The wounds were then wiped daily with moistened gauze, and the gel or gauze was re-applied. Each day, an explant from each group was harvested and tested for total viable bacteria counts and viable biofilm-protected bacteria counts. The results show that daily wiping with moistened gauze led to an initial decrease of bacteria, but by day 3, the biofilm had been fully re-established to the same level prior to the beginning of treatment. For the surfactant-based treatment, there was no detectable functional biofilm after the first treatment. The gauze control, which was also subjected to daily wiping, still contained functional biofilms, indicating that this result was not due to wiping alone. The total bacteria in the surfactant-treated explants steadily decreased through day 3, when there were no detectable bacteria, while the wiping-only control bacteria counts remained steady. The use of a moist gauze to wipe the visually apparent slime off of a wound appears to be insufficient to reduce biofilm over a 3-day period. Daily application of the surfactant gel dressing and wiping reduced the biofilm to undetectable levels within 3 days in

  18. Microwave ablation with triaxial antennas tuned for lung: results in an in vivo porcine model.

    PubMed

    Durick, Nathan A; Laeseke, Paul F; Broderick, Lynn S; Lee, Fred T; Sampson, Lisa A; Frey, Tina M; Warner, Thomas F; Fine, Jason P; van der Weide, Daniel W; Brace, Christopher L

    2008-04-01

    To prospectively determine in swine the size and shape of coagulation zones created in normal lung tissue by using small-diameter triaxial microwave antennas and to prospectively quantify the effects of bronchial occlusion and multiple antennas on the coagulation zone. The study was approved by the research animal care and use committee, and all husbandry and experimental studies were compliant with the National Research Council's Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. Twenty-four coagulation zones (three per animal) were created at thoracotomy in eight female domestic swine (mean weight, 55 kg) by using a microwave ablation system with 17-gauge lung-tuned triaxial antennas. Ablations were performed for 10 minutes each by using (a) a single antenna, (b) a single antenna with bronchial occlusion, and (c) an array of three antennas powered simultaneously. The animals were sacrificed immediately after ablation. The coagulation zones were excised en bloc and sectioned into approximately 4-mm slices for measurement of size, shape, and circularity. Analysis of variance and two-sample t tests were used to identify differences between the three ablation groups. The overall mean diameters of coagulation achieved with a single antenna and bronchial occlusion (4.11 cm +/- 1.09 [standard deviation]) and with multiple-antenna arrays (4.05 cm +/- 0.69) were significantly greater than the overall mean diameter achieved with a single antenna alone (3.09 cm +/- 0.83) (P = .016 for comparison with multiple antennas, P = .032 for comparison with bronchial occlusion). No significant differences in size were seen between the coagulation zones created with bronchial occlusion and those created with multiple antennas (P = .68). The coagulation zones in all groups were very circular (isoperimetric ratio > 0.80) at cross-sectional analysis. A 17-gauge triaxial microwave ablation system tuned for lung tissue yielded large circular zones of coagulation in vivo in porcine lungs

  19. Scaffold-Based Delivery of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis: Preliminary Studies in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zongyang; Tee, Boon Ching; Kennedy, Kelly S.; Kennedy, Patrick M.; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Mallery, Susan R.; Fields, Henry W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bone regeneration through distraction osteogenesis (DO) is promising but remarkably slow. To accelerate it, autologous mesenchymal stem cells have been directly injected to the distraction site in a few recent studies. Compared to direct injection, a scaffold-based method can provide earlier cell delivery with potentially better controlled cell distribution and retention. This pilot project investigated a scaffold-based cell-delivery approach in a porcine mandibular DO model. Materials and Methods Eleven adolescent domestic pigs were used for two major sets of studies. The in-vitro set established methodologies to: aspirate bone marrow from the tibia; isolate, characterize and expand bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs); enhance BM-MSC osteogenic differentiation using FGF-2; and confirm cell integration with a gelatin-based Gelfoam scaffold. The in-vivo set transplanted autologous stem cells into the mandibular distraction sites using Gelfoam scaffolds; completed a standard DO-course and assessed bone regeneration by macroscopic, radiographic and histological methods. Repeated-measure ANOVAs and t-tests were used for statistical analyses. Results From aspirated bone marrow, multi-potent, heterogeneous BM-MSCs purified from hematopoietic stem cell contamination were obtained. FGF-2 significantly enhanced pig BM-MSC osteogenic differentiation and proliferation, with 5 ng/ml determined as the optimal dosage. Pig BM-MSCs integrated readily with Gelfoam and maintained viability and proliferative ability. After integration with Gelfoam scaffolds, 2.4–5.8×107 autologous BM-MSCs (undifferentiated or differentiated) were transplanted to each experimental DO site. Among 8 evaluable DO sites included in the final analyses, the experimental DO sites demonstrated less interfragmentary mobility, more advanced gap obliteration, higher mineral content and faster mineral apposition than the control sites, and all transplanted scaffolds were completely

  20. Experimental models of developmental hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Argumedo, G S; Sanz, C R; Olguín, H J

    2012-02-01

    Hypothyroidism is a systemic disease resulting from either thyroid gland's anatomical and functional absence or lack of hypophyseal stimulation, both of which can lead to deficiency in thyroid hormone (TH) production. TH is essential for human and animal development, growth, and function of multiple organs. Children with deficient TH can develop alterations in central nervous system (CNS), striated muscle, bone tissue, liver, bone marrow, and cardiorespiratory system. Among the clinical outlook are signs like breathing difficulty, cardiac insufficiency, dysphagia, and repeated bronchial aspiration, constipation, muscle weakness, cognitive alterations, cochlear dysfunction, reduced height, defects in temperature regulation, anaemia, jaundice, susceptibility to infection, and others. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that TH is very essential for normal brain development. Other research work based on mice pointed out that a reduced level of TH in pregnant mother leads to congenital hypothyroidism in animal models and it is associated with mental retardation, deep neurologic deficiency that impacts on cognitive, learning, and memory functions. The principal experimental model studies that have focused on hypothyroidism are reviewed in this study. This is important on considering the fact that almost all animal species require thyroid hormones for their metabolism.

  1. Protective effect of active perfusion in porcine models of acute myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zanxiang; Mao, Zhifu; Dong, Shengjun; Liu, Baohui

    2016-10-01

    Mortality rates associated with off‑pump coronary artery bypass (CAB) are relatively high, as the majority of patients requiring CAB are at a high risk for cardiac events. The present study aimed to establish porcine models of acute myocardial ischemia, and evaluate the protective role of shunt and active perfusion. A total of 30 pigs were randomly assigned to five groups, as follows: i) Sham (control); ii) A1 (shunt; stenosis rate, 55%); iii) A2 (shunt; stenosis rate, 75%); iv) B1 (active perfusion; stenosis rate, 55%); and v) B2 (active perfusion; stenosis rate, 75%) groups. Aortic pressure (P0), left anterior descending coronary pressure (P1), and coronary effective perfusion pressure (P1/P0) were measured. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α), cardiac troponin (cTnI), creatine kinase‑myocardial band (CK‑MB), interleukin (IL)‑6, IL‑10, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2), and caspase‑3 were detected using enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay or western blotting. The myocardial apoptosis rate was determined using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Ischemia models with stenosis rates of 55 and 75% were successfully constructed following suturing of the descending artery. Compared with the control, the 55 and 75% stenosis groups demonstrated significantly decreased P1/P0, increased expression levels of TNF‑α, cTnI, CK‑MB, IL‑6, IL‑10 and caspase‑3, an increased rate of myocardial apoptosis, and a decreased expression level of anti‑apoptotic protein, Bcl‑2. At 30 min following successful establishment of the model (ST segment elevation to 1 mm), group B demonstrated significantly increased P1/P0, decreased expression levels of TNF‑α, cTnI, CK‑MB, IL‑6, IL‑10 and caspase‑3, a decreased rate of myocardial apoptosis, and an increased expression level of anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl‑2. Furthermore, the current study indicated that active perfusion was more efficacious

  2. A comparative study on the antibacterial photodynamic efficiency of a curcumin derivative and a formulation on a porcine skin model.

    PubMed

    Tortik, Nicole; Steinbacher, Peter; Maisch, Tim; Spaeth, Andreas; Plaetzer, Kristjan

    2016-02-01

    The propagation of pathogens resistant to antibiotics around the globe has induced an urgent call for action: alternatives to conventional antibiotic therapy have to be developed to prevent a post-antibiotic catastrophe. This study focuses on the enhancement of Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) of Gram(+) versus Gram(-) bacteria comparing a cationic derivative of curcumin (SACUR-3) to curcumin bound to polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-CUR) using an ex vivo porcine skin model to simulate an application on the human skin and foodstuff. Porcine skin samples were inoculated with either Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli and treated with either SACUR-3 or PVP-CUR at concentrations of 50 or 100 μM, respectively. Subsequent to blue light illumination (435 nm, 33.8 J cm(-2)) quantitative analyses were performed by counting the colony forming units. Furthermore, the localization of both photoactive compounds in the porcine skin was determined by fluorescence microscopy. PDI of S. aureus resulted in a reduction of 2.2 log10 steps if employing 50 μM of SACUR-3 and of 1.7 log10 steps with 50 μM of PVP-CUR. Phototoxicity towards E. coli was 3.3 log10 steps using 100 μM of SACUR-3 and 0.3 log10 steps for 100 μM of PVP-CUR. Both compounds do not exceed the stratum corneum of the skin. A direct comparison of both approaches yields that the cationic curcumin derivative SACUR-3 is effective against Gram(+) and Gram(-) pathogens, whereas the formulation of PVP-CUR has a photokilling effect on the Gram(+) model strain only, but leaves the approval of curcumin as a food additive E100 unaffected. Our results suggest the applicability of SACUR-3-based PDI in dermatology, hand hygiene and food production.

  3. Quantification of Trapped Gas with CT and 3He MR Imaging in a Porcine Model of Isolated Airway Obstruction1

    PubMed Central

    Salito, Caterina; Aliverti, Andrea; Gierada, David S.; Deslée, Gaetan; Pierce, Richard A.; Macklem, Peter T.; Woods, Jason C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify regional gas trapping in the lung by using computed tomographic (CT)–determined specific gas volume and hyperpolarized helium 3 (3He) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in a porcine model of airway obstruction. Materials and Methods: Four porcine lungs were removed after sacrifice for unrelated cardiac experiments, for which animal studies approval was obtained. Dynamic expiratory thin-section CT and 3He MR imaging were performed during passive deflation from total lung capacity after obstructions were created with inverted one-way endobronchial exit valves in segmental or lobar bronchi to produce identifiable regions of trapped gas. Changes in specific gas volume were assessed from CT data for defined regions of interest within and outside of obstructed segments and for entire lobes. Helium 3 data were analyzed according to the corresponding regional signal reduction during expiration, compared with the total magnetic moment at each time point. Results: In 4.5 seconds of free collapse, volume decreased by 6% ± 2 (standard error) and 53% ± 3, respectively, in trapped-gas lobes and in unobstructed regions (P < .0001). Specific gas volume changed by 6% ± 2 in areas of trapped gas and decreased by 56% ± 3 in unobstructed regions, from 3.4 mL/g ± 0.2 to 1.5 mL/g ± 0.1 (P < .0001). The 3He signal intensity decreased by 25% ± 6 and 71% ± 3, respectively, in trapped-gas and normal regions (P = .0008). In unobstructed regions, the percentage decreases in specific gas volume and 3He signal intensity were not statistically different from one another (P = .89). Conclusion: The results obtained from the model of gas trapping demonstrate that CT-determined specific gas volume and 3He MR imaging can help identify and quantify the extent of regional trapped gas in explanted porcine lungs. © RSNA, 2009 PMID:19703847

  4. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of quinolones in porcine blood: Optimization of extraction procedure and CE separation using experimental design.

    PubMed

    Vera-Candioti, Luciana; Teglia, Carla M; Cámara, María S

    2016-10-01

    A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction procedure was developed to extract nine fluoroquinolones in porcine blood, six of which were quantified using a univariate calibration method. Extraction parameters including type and volume of extraction and dispersive solvent and pH, were optimized using a full factorial and a central composite designs. The optimum extraction parameters were a mixture of 250 μL dichloromethane (extract solvent) and 1250 μL ACN (dispersive solvent) in 500 μL of porcine blood reached to pH 6.80. After shaking and centrifugation, the upper phase was transferred in a glass tube and evaporated under N2 steam. The residue was resuspended into 50 μL of water-ACN (70:30, v/v) and determined by CE method with DAD, under optimum separation conditions. Consequently, a tenfold enrichment factor can potentially be reached with the pretreatment, taking into account the relationship between initial sample volume and final extract volume. Optimum separation conditions were as follows: BGE solution containing equal amounts of sodium borate (Na2 B4 O7 ) and di-sodium hydrogen phosphate (Na2 HPO4 ) with a final concentration of 23 mmol/L containing 0.2% of poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) and adjusted to pH 7.80. Separation was performed applying a negative potential of 25 kV, the cartridge was maintained at 25.0°C and the electropherograms were recorded at 275 nm during 4 min. The hydrodynamic injection was performed in the cathode by applying a pressure of 50 mbar for 10 s.

  5. Experimental animal models of osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Meng; Peng, Jiang; Qin, Ling; Lu, Shibi

    2011-08-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) or avascular necrosis (AVN) is a common bone metabolic disorder, mostly affecting femoral head. Although many biological, biophysical, and surgical methods have been tested to preserve the femoral head with ON, none has been proven fully satisfactory. It lacks consensus on an optimal approach for treatment. This is due, at least in part, to the lack of ability to systematically compare treatment efficacy using an ideal animal model that mimics full-range osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) in humans with high incidence of joint collapse accompanied by reparative reaction adjacent to the necrotic bone in a reproducible and accessible way. A number of preclinical animal ON models have been established for testing potential efficacy of various modalities developed for prevention and treatment of ON before introduction into clinics for potential applications. This paper describes a number of different methods for creating animal experimental ON models. Advantages and disadvantages of such models are also discussed as reference for future research in battle against this important medical condition.

  6. ADAPT-treated porcine valve tissue (cusp and wall) versus Medtronic Freestyle and Prima Plus: crosslink stability and calcification behavior in the subcutaneous rat model.

    PubMed

    Neethling, William M L; Glancy, Ross; Hodge, Andrew J

    2004-07-01

    The study aim was to compare the crosslink stability and calcification behavior of porcine tissue (cusp and wall), treated with a new antimineralization process (ADAPT) with that of commercially prepared Freestyle and Prima Plus bioprosthetic tissues. Porcine aortic roots were divided into two groups: (i) tissue zero pressure-fixed with 0.625% glutaraldehyde (GA) for seven days and stored in 0.25% GA (as control); and (ii) tissue exposed to the ADAPT process for four days and stored in 0.25% buffered GA. These groups were compared with Freestyle and Prima Plus tissues (cusp and wall). Crosslink stability was assessed by shrinkage temperature and resistance to pronase degradation. Calcification behavior was assessed histologically (Von Kossa staining) and by atomic absorption spectrophotometry of explanted tissue after eight weeks. in a subcutaneous rat model. Crosslink stability and calcification potential of ADAPT-treated porcine valve cusps were comparable to those of Freestyle and Prima Plus cusps (p = NS). ADAPT-treated porcine wall tissue showed improved crosslink stability (p <0.05) and significantly (p <0.001) reduced calcification (-95.95%) compared to control (-0.00%), Freestyle (-47.87%) and Prima Plus (-51.95%) tissues. The ADAPT process is effective in reducing calcification in both porcine cusp and wall tissues in a subcutaneous rat model, and further suggest that enhanced crosslinking plays an important role in minimizing aortic wall calcification.

  7. Evaluation of two absorbent silver dressings in a porcine partial-thickness excisional wound model.

    PubMed

    Bell, A; Hart, J

    2007-11-01

    To investigate and compare the performance of two widely used silver-containing, fibre-based dressings (Silvercel and Aquacel Ag) in terms of exudate management, wound-site adherence, dressing integrity, retention of dressing debris within wounds, frequency of debris-associated foreign body reactions and the impact of both debris and tissue reactions on wound-tissue integrity. The dressings were evaluated in a porcine partial-thickness exudating wound model (an in vivo model of moderate to high exudation up to post-wounding day 4, and low exudation from days 4 to 7). Dressing performance was assessed using a panel of semi-quantitative scales.Wound-exudate retention, dressing structure following exposure to exudate, and adherence to wound tissues were compared macroscopically; the extent of trapped dressing debris, any ensuing tissue reactions and the level of resulting tissue disruption were compared histologically. Silvercel was found to be significantly more effective in terms of wound exudate management than Aquacel Ag. On exposure to high levels of wound exudate, Silvercel retained its shape and mechanical strength, and remained at the site of application. In contrast, Aquacel Ag formed a fluid (semi-fibrous) gel, with minimal mechanical integrity and variable retention at the wound site. Silvercel was significantly more adherent to wound tissues than Aquacel Ag, but the level of trapped dressing debris, the frequency of ensuing foreign body reactions and the level of consequent wound-tissue disruption was lower, although not statistically, in the Silvercel-treated wounds. These results suggest that the potential adverse clinical consequences of unmanaged wound exudate may be less likely in Silvercel than Aquacel Ag-treated wounds. In addition, the adverse effects of dressing adherence may be less likely in Aquacel Ag-treated wounds, although such benefits may be negated by the potentially deleterious effects of elevated dressing debris deposition. In view of

  8. Experimental models of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Cogliati, Bruno; Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research.

  9. Porcine Head Response to Blast

    PubMed Central

    Shridharani, Jay K.; Wood, Garrett W.; Panzer, Matthew B.; Capehart, Bruce P.; Nyein, Michelle K.; Radovitzky, Raul A.; Bass, Cameron R. ‘Dale’

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposes porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110 to 740 kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3 to 6.9 ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. Instrumentation was placed on the porcine head to measure bulk acceleration, pressure at the surface of the head, and pressure inside the cranial cavity. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within 30 s and the remaining two recovered within 8 min following respiratory assistance and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80 to 390 kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300–2830 kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385 to 3845 G’s and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R2 = 0.90). One SD corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure (ICP), and head acceleration are

  10. Recombinant human prothrombin reduced blood loss in a porcine model of dilutional coagulopathy with uncontrolled bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Kenny M; Johansson, Karin J; Wingren, Cecilia; Fries, Dietmar; Nelander, Karin; Lövgren, Ann

    2017-04-01

    : Uncontrolled bleeding remains one of the leading causes of trauma-induced death. Treatment recommendations focus on fresh frozen plasma and blood cell transfusions, whereas plasma concentrates or single coagulation factors have been studied in recent years. The effect of recombinant human prothrombin factor II (rhFII, 8 mg/kg), activated recombinant human factor VII (rhFVIIa, 300 μg/kg), plasma-derived human fibrinogen (pdhFib) (200 mg/kg), activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC, 40 IU/kg), a three-factor combination intended as a minimal PCC (8 mg/kg rhFII, 640 μg/kg recombinant human factor X (rhFX), and 12 μg/kg rhFVIIa), and vehicle were investigated in a porcine model of dilutional coagulopathy with uncontrolled bleeding. Survival time and blood loss were determined up to 120 min after induction of liver injury. Rotational thromboelastometry EXTEM coagulation time and maximum clot firmness, prothrombin time, thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), thrombin generation (endogenous thrombin potential, ETP) were measured at baseline, after dilution, drug administration, and end of experiment. rhFII, the three-factor combination, and aPCC significantly (P < 0.01) decreased blood loss vs. vehicle and rhFII also vs. fibrinogen (P < 0.05). Survival times increased significantly for rhFII, aPCC, rhFVIIa, and pdhFib vs. vehicle (P < 0.05), and, coagulation time, maximum clot firmness, and prothrombin time improved in all groups. TAT and ETP increased transiently for rhFII and three-factor combination, whereas persistently increased for aPCC. PdhFib and rhFVIIa did not increase TAT and ETP. rhFII decreased blood loss and improved hemostatic markers and survival. In vivo, thrombin generation (TAT) and potential to form thrombin (ETP) were transiently elevated by rhFII. Addition of rhFVIIa and rhFX to rhFII did not further improve hemostatic efficacy.

  11. Histologic effects of laser-assisted topical anesthesia in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Singer, Daniel D; Singer, Adam J; McClain, Steve A; Tortora, George

    2005-12-01

    A handheld laser device that removes the stratum corneum, the major barrier to transdermal absorption, has recently been approved to assist with topical anesthesia before painful procedures such as intravenous cannulation. The authors assessed the cutaneous histomorphologic effects of the laser device and the ability of the laser-treated skin to resist infection in a porcine model. This was a blinded, randomized animal experiment using isoflurane-anesthetized young domestic pigs. The ventral surface of the animals was irradiated multiple times with a lightweight, portable erbium yttrium-aluminum-garnet unit or a sham laser. One third of the wounds were inoculated with a Staphylococcus aureus suspension. The treated areas were then covered with a dry dressing, and full-thickness biopsy specimens of the treated areas were obtained immediately after treatment and at three, seven, ten, and 14 days for blinded histopathologic evaluation using hematoxylin and eosin staining and electron microscopy. Quantitative bacterial counts were obtained at three days in wounds exposed to bacteria. Main outcomes were quantitative bacterial counts, presence of cellular necrosis, epidermal integrity, and dermal scarring. Data analysis was conducted with descriptive statistics. Laser irradiation resulted in immediate disruption of the cornified layer of the skin and necrosis of the stratum spinosum in all treated areas. There were also focal areas of vacuolar alteration of the basal one third of the epidermis. There was no evidence of any damage to the basement membrane or the underlying dermis. At three days, the epidermis had healed and there was evidence of epidermal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis that was completely resolved by 14 days. There were no infections and no scarring. Sham laser had no histomorphologic effects on the skin. There was no bacterial growth from all sham laser-treated wounds challenged with bacteria. Three of 20 (15%; 95% confidence interval = 0% to 31%) laser

  12. Prolonged clopidogrel application reduces tissue factor expression after percutaneous coronary intervention in the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Ayral, Yunus; Rauch, Ursula; Goldin-Lang, Petra; Eisenreich, Andreas; Pepke, Wojciech; Deiner, Carolin; Schwimmbeck, Peter L; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Pels, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Late thrombotic events are important complications associated with intracoronary brachytherapy (ICBT) using ionizing radiation (IR) or with antiproliferative treatment modalities such as drug-eluting stents (DES). The mechanism mediating these thrombotic events is not well understood. This study assessed the effect of prolonged clopidogrel treatment on tissue factor (TF) expression in coronary arteries and on the circulating TF level after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty /ICBT in a porcine coronary model. Pigs were treated with aspirin plus a 300 mg loading dose of clopidogrel one day before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), followed by a daily dose of clopidogrel and aspirin. During PCI one of the two balloon-injured arteries was treated by brachytherapy. Animals were sacrificed at different time points. The pigs, which were sacrificed 3 months post-PCI, were divided into two groups (Group I: clopidogrel for 3 months; Group II: clopidogrel for 1 month). Plasma TF was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in blood samples taken from all pigs before and immediately after intervention and before sacrifice. Morphometric analysis was performed on digitalized images employing the software LUCIA G for TF staining. Vascular TF expression levels were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Prolonged clopidogrel application significantly reduced coronary TF at the protein (Group I vs. II, 8.975 ± 3.947% vs. 26.44 ± 5.375%, P = .007) and mRNA level [Group I vs. II, (0.3501 ± 0.0519) × 10(-3) vs. (0.7073 ± 0.0436) × 10(-3), P<.0005]. Circulating TF protein tended to be lower after 3 months than after 1 month clopidogrel treatment post-PCI (Group I vs. Group II, 488.3 ± 35.37 pg/ml vs. 572.3 ± 39.9 pg/ml, P = .130). Prolonged clopidogrel treatment reduced coronary TF expression and tended to reduce the blood TF level post-PCI, thus possibly modulating the risk of late thrombosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All

  13. Comparison of Two Gelatin and Thrombin Combination Hemostats in a Porcine Liver Abrasion Model

    PubMed Central

    Atlee, Holly D.; Mannone, Angela J.; Dwyer, Joseph; Lin, Lawrence; Goppelt, Andreas; Redl, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Background: Surgical hemostasis is achieved using adjunctive hemostats when conventional methods fail. Objective: This study compares the effectiveness of two adjunctive gelatin-thrombin hemostats. Hypothesis: To determine effectiveness, hemostats were compared in vivo, in vitro, and using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods: In vivo, a heparinized porcine liver abrasion model was used to compare hemostatic success, degree of bleeding, and blood loss at 2, 5, and 10 minutes post-treatment. In vitro, thrombin in the supernatant of each hemostat and Red Blood Cells (RBC'S) in the supernatant of clots formed by each was compared. Results: Ultrastructure of one gelatin was smooth and the other stellate. In vivo, smooth gelatin provided superior hemostatic success at 5 (85% vs. 60%; OR: 5.3; 95% CI: 1.66 to 17.9) and 10 mins (72.5% vs. 47.5%; OR: 5.0; 95% CI: 1.55 to 16.1). Smooth gelatin had a statistically different degree of bleeding at 5 (0.58 ± 0.87 [Mean ± SD] vs. 1.03 ± 1.12; OR: 3.36; 95% CI: 1.34 to 8.41) and 10 mins (1.13 ± 1.14 vs. 1.65 ± 1.05; OR: 3.87; 95% CI: 1.62 to 9.21). Mean blood loss was less with smooth gelatin at 2 (0.07 ± 0.19 vs. 0.13 ± 0.63 ml/min), 5 (0.04 ± 0.13 vs. 0.23 ± 0.45 ml/min), and 10 mins (0.09 ± 0.24 vs. 0.21 ± 0.32 ml/min). In vitro, supernatant of smooth gelatin had significantly less thrombin (6.81 vs. 10.9 IU/ml, p = .001), and significantly less RBC's than stellate gelatin (0.07 vs. 0.09 × 106/ul, p = .0085). Conclusion: Smooth gelatin has an increased ability to retain thrombin and RBC's in vitro which may explain why it provides superior hemostatic effectiveness, superior control of bleeding, and greater reduced blood loss in vivo. PMID:23514063

  14. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (SecPBMC), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-SecPBMC), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-SecPBMC had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-SecPBMC had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-SecPBMC significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  15. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-04-29

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (Sec(PBMC)), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-Sec(PBMC)), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-Sec(PBMC) significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting.

  16. Even Four Minutes of Poor Quality of CPR Compromises Outcome in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Zhengfei; Huang, Zitong; Chen, Bihua; Li, Yongqin; Yu, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Untrained bystanders usually delivered suboptimal chest compression to victims who suffered from cardiac arrest in out-of-hospital settings. We therefore investigated the hemodynamics and resuscitation outcome of initial suboptimal quality of chest compressions compared to the optimal ones in a porcine model of cardiac arrest. Methods. Fourteen Yorkshire pigs weighted 30 ± 2 kg were randomized into good and poor cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) groups. Ventricular fibrillation was electrically induced and untreated for 6 mins. In good CPR group, animals received high quality manual chest compressions according to the Guidelines (25% of animal's anterior-posterior thoracic diameter) during first two minutes of CPR compared with poor (70% of the optimal depth) compressions. After that, a 120-J biphasic shock was delivered. If the animal did not acquire return of spontaneous circulation, another 2 mins of CPR and shock followed. Four minutes later, both groups received optimal CPR until total 10 mins of CPR has been finished. Results. All seven animals in good CPR group were resuscitated compared with only two in poor CPR group (P < 0.05). The delayed optimal compressions which followed 4 mins of suboptimal compressions failed to increase the lower coronary perfusion pressure of five non-survival animals in poor CPR group. Conclusions. In a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest, even four minutes of initial poor quality of CPR compromises the hemodynamics and survival outcome. PMID:24364028

  17. Poisson׳s ratio of arterial wall - Inconsistency of constitutive models with experimental data.

    PubMed

    Skacel, Pavel; Bursa, Jiri

    2016-02-01

    Poisson׳s ratio of fibrous soft tissues is analyzed in this paper on the basis of constitutive models and experimental data. Three different up-to-date constitutive models accounting for the dispersion of fibre orientations are analyzed. Their predictions of the anisotropic Poisson׳s ratios are investigated under finite strain conditions together with the effects of specific orientation distribution functions and of other parameters. The applied constitutive models predict the tendency to lower (or even negative) out-of-plane Poisson׳s ratio. New experimental data of porcine arterial layer under uniaxial tension in orthogonal directions are also presented and compared with the theoretical predictions and other literature data. The results point out the typical features of recent constitutive models with fibres concentrated in circumferential-axial plane of arterial layers and their potential inconsistence with some experimental data. The volumetric (in)compressibility of arterial tissues is also discussed as an eventual and significant factor influencing this inconsistency.

  18. A mouse model to study infection against porcine circovirus type 2: viral distribution and lesions in mouse

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Little information is known about viral distribution and transmission of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in species other than swine. It is still a debated topic whether the PCV2 could be infected and caused clinical lesions. Our study is aimed to estimate the susceptibility of Kunming mouse to PCV2. Forty-eight, 6-week-old Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups. Group A (C1-C12) was inoculated with PK-15 cell culture as a control group. Group B (sPCV1-12) was inoculated orally and intramuscularly with PCV2 (106.2TCID50/ml). Group C (mPCV1-12) was inoculated orally and intramuscularly with PCV2 (106.2TCID50/ml) and a booster inoculation at days 14 and 28 after the first inoculation. Group D (MixPCV1-12) was unvaccinated but released into Group C. Each group was sacrificed at 7, 14, 28, and 42 days post-inoculation, respectively. Necropsy was checked on every mouse. Sera samples were collected for the test of PCV2 specific antibody. Tissues were collected for histopathology study and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results The results showed that viral replication, seroconversion, and microscopic lesions were found in inoculated mice. Continuous existence of PCV2 viruses in lymph nodes have been confirmed by PCR, which took at least seven days for the virus to be transferred into other organs from the primary interface, and the diffusion to thymus had been retarded for seven days. Special PCV2 antibody could be found in PCV2 inoculation mice and was significantly higher than that in the control. Further more, microscopic lesions and the main target of PCV2 focused in the lymph nodes with a characteristic depletion and occasional necrosis of lymphocytes in the cortex and paracortex were found in inoculated mice. Conclusions The Kunming mouse could be infected by PCV2 virus and used as a PCV2 infected experimental model. PMID:20630105

  19. Immunity Elicited by an Experimental Vaccine Based on Recombinant Flagellin-Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Cap Fusion Protein in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Wei, Li; Quan, Rong; Yang, Jiayu; Yan, Xu; Li, Zixuan; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    In a recent study, we reported that a recombinant protein from fusion expression of flagellin to porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) Cap induced robust humoral and cell-mediated immunity that afforded full protection for PCV2 infection using BALB/c mice. Here, we further evaluated the immunogenicity and protection of the recombinant protein using specific pathogen free (SPF) pigs. Twenty-five 3-week-old piglets without passively acquired immunity were divided into 5 groups. All piglets except negative controls were challenged with a virulent PCV2 at 21 days after booster vaccination and necropsied at 21 days post-challenge. Vaccination of piglets with the recombinant protein without adjuvant induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses as observed by high levels of PCV2-specific IgG antibodies and neutralizing antibodies, as well as frequencies of PCV2-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells that conferred good protection against PCV2 challenge, with significant reduced PCV2 viremia, mild lesions, low PCV2 antigen-positive cells, as well as improved body weight gain, comparable to piglets vaccinated with a commercial PCV2 subunit vaccine. These results further demonstrated that the recombinant flagellin-Cap fusion protein is capable of inducing solid protective humoral and cellular immunity when administered to pigs, thereby becoming an effective PCV2 vaccine candidate for control of PCV2 infection. PMID:26848967

  20. A New Porcine Sponge Material for Temporary Embolization: An Experimental Short-Term Pilot Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Louail, B.; Sapoval, M. Bonneau, M.; Wasseff, M.; Senechal, Q.; Gaux, J-C.

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a porcine-derived gelfoam, Curaspon, for the temporary occlusion of the visceral arteries. Methods. Curaspon was used for the selective embolization of segmentary hepatic, unilateral polar renal, and single lumbar arteries of 10 pigs under general anesthesia. Sequential angiographic checks were carried out and the pigs killed between 3 days and 2 weeks later. Macroscopic and microscopic studies using standard techniques were used to evaluate the immediate efficacy of embolization, duration of and completeness of recanalization on angiography, macroscopic appearance of target-organ ischemia, and microscopic analysis of inflammatory reaction. Results. Immediate arterial occlusion was obtained in all cases. Renal arteries showed a total recanalization in 63% of cases on day 7 and 100% on day 14. Total hepatic recanalization was obtained in 100% of animals on day 7. All lumbar arteries were recanalized on day 14. Microscopic analysis in the kidney revealed a mild inflammatory reaction and a progressive lysis of the Curaspon (87% of samples at day 3 showed a persistence of Curaspon and 5% at day 14). In some cases, localized and partial destruction of the arterial wall was visualized. In the liver the same patterns were observed but resolved more completely and more rapidly. Conclusions. Curaspon is an efficient material for the temporary occlusion of visceral and parietal arteries in pigs. However, arterial aneurysms were observed and a relationship of these with the material cannot be excluded.

  1. 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound volume measurement validation in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model of lung tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornblower, V. D. M.; Yu, E.; Fenster, A.; Battista, J. J.; Malthaner, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy and reliability of volume measurements obtained using three-dimensional (3D) thoracoscopic ultrasound (US) imaging. Artificial 'tumours' were created by injecting a liquid agar mixture into spherical moulds of known volume. Once solidified, the 'tumours' were implanted into the lung tissue in both a porcine lung sample ex vivo and a surgical porcine model in vivo. 3D US images were created by mechanically rotating the thoracoscopic ultrasound probe about its long axis while the transducer was maintained in close contact with the tissue. Volume measurements were made by one observer using the ultrasound images and a manual-radial segmentation technique and these were compared with the known volumes of the agar. In vitro measurements had average accuracy and precision of 4.76% and 1.77%, respectively; in vivo measurements had average accuracy and precision of 8.18% and 1.75%, respectively. The 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound can be used to accurately and reproducibly measure 'tumour' volumes both in vivo and ex vivo.

  2. Evaluation of lincomycin in drinking water for treatment of induced porcine proliferative enteropathy using a Swine challenge model.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Winkelman, Nathan L; Moreira, Frederico P; Elfring, Gregory D

    2004-01-01

    A single-location, challenge-model study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of lincomycin against porcine proliferative enteropathy when administered through the drinking water at 125 and 250 mg/gallon. The primary variables of interest were pig removal rate, diarrhea scores, demeanor scores, and abdominal appearance scores. Ancillary performance variables examined included average daily feed intake, average daily gain, and feed per gain. After a 3-day acclimation period, pigs were challenged on 2 consecutive days with a mucosal homogenate containing a total dose of 1.4 x 10(9) cells of Lawsonia intracellularis. Five days later, when porcine proliferative enteropathy was well established, drinking water medicated with 125 mg (L125) or 250 mg (L250) lincomycin/gallon was provided to two groups of pigs for 10 days. Pigs were observed for 13 days following the treatment period. A third group of pigs served as controls and received unmedicated drinking water throughout the study. The L250 group experienced a significantly lower (P < .05) pig removal rate than the control group over the 23-day observation period. Additionally, for every primary variable, the L250 group experienced a significantly decreased (P < .01) number of abnormal days compared with the control group. The L125 group showed a significant reduction (P < .05) in abnormal demeanor and abnormal abdominal appearance scores compared with controls.

  3. Considerations for ex vivo thermal tissue testing exemplified using the fresh porcine longissimus muscle model for endometrial ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugett, James H.; Bennett, Haydon E.; Shrout, Joshua L.; Coad, James E.

    2017-02-01

    Expansions in minimally invasive medical devices and technologies with thermal mechanisms of action are continuing to advance the practice of medicine. These expansions have led to an increasing need for appropriate animal models to validate and quantify device performance. The planning of these studies should take into consideration a variety of parameters, including the appropriate animal model (test system - ex vivo or in vivo; species; tissue type), treatment conditions (test conditions), predicate device selection (as appropriate, control article), study timing (Day 0 acute to more than Day 90 chronic survival studies), and methods of tissue analysis (tissue dissection - staining methods). These considerations are discussed and illustrated using the fresh extirpated porcine longissimus muscle model for endometrial ablation.

  4. A novel single-stapling technique for colorectal anastomosis: a pre-ligation single-stapling technique (L-SST) in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Hata, Taishi; Takahashi, Yusuke; Ohtsuka, Masahisa; Nonaka, Ryoji; Inoue, Akira; Naito, Atsushi; Matsumura, Tae; Uemura, Mamoru; Nishimura, Junichi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2015-08-01

    In low anterior resections, anastomosis continues to present major problems. Although the single-stapling technique (SST) is considered to be superior to the double-staple technique (DST) in terms of leakage and stenosis, SST requires suturing, which is particularly difficult during laparoscopic surgery. A simpler and safer method of anastomosis is needed. In this study, we developed a pre-ligation SST (L-SST) that does not require suturing and evaluated the usefulness of L-SST in an ex vivo and an in vivo porcine model. Porcine rectums were ligated using SurgiTie™ and sharply resected instead of using a linear stapler. The burst pressures of the closed rectums after using a linear stapler and SurgiTie™ (each group; n = 5) and the burst pressures of the anastomoses performed with L-SST and DST (each group; n = 4) were measured. During in vivo porcine laparoscopic surgery, we performed and evaluated the feasibility of L-SST. After completing the anastomosis with L-SST, the ligated portion using SurgiTie™ was completely removed. The stump closed using SurgiTie™ was much stronger than that closed using a stapler (131.2 and 25.6 mmHg, respectively; P = 0.01). The average burst pressure of the anastomoses performed with L-SST was 33.8 mmHg, whereas that performed with DST was 30.5 mmHg. We did not find significant difference between these two groups (P = 0.88). We also confirmed the feasibility of L-SST in an in vivo porcine laparoscopic surgery model. We developed a novel SST, the L-SST. We were able to perform L-SST successfully using an ex vivo porcine rectum and during in vivo porcine laparoscopic surgery.

  5. Experimental Model of Proximal Junctional Fracture after Multilevel Posterior Spinal Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Levasseur, Annie; Parent, Stefan; Petit, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    There is a high risk of proximal junctional fractures (PJF) with multilevel spinal instrumentation, especially in the osteoporotic spine. This problem is associated with significant morbidity and possibly the need for reoperation. Various techniques have been proposed in an attempt to decrease the risk of PJF but there is no experimental model described for in vitro production of PJF after multilevel instrumentation. The objective of this study is to develop an experimental model of PJF after multilevel posterior instrumentation. Initially, four porcine specimens including 4 vertebrae and instrumented at the 3 caudal vertebrae using a pedicle screw construct were subjected to different loading conditions. Loading conditions on porcine specimens involving cyclic loading along the axis of the center vertebral body line, with constrained flexion between 0° and 15° proximally, and fully constraining the specimen distally resulted in a fracture pattern most representative of a PJF seen clinically in humans, so to undergo human cadaveric testing with similar loading conditions was decided. Clinically relevant PJF were produced in all 3 human specimens. The experimental model described in this study will allow the evaluation of different parameters influencing the incidence and prevention of PJF after multilevel posterior spinal instrumentation. PMID:27610381

  6. Evaluation of a novel laparoscopic camera for characterization of renal ischemia in a porcine model using digital light processing (DLP) hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olweny, Ephrem O.; Tan, Yung K.; Faddegon, Stephen; Jackson, Neil; Wehner, Eleanor F.; Best, Sara L.; Park, Samuel K.; Thapa, Abhas; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2012-03-01

    Digital light processing hyperspectral imaging (DLP® HSI) was adapted for use during laparoscopic surgery by coupling a conventional laparoscopic light guide with a DLP-based Agile Light source (OL 490, Optronic Laboratories, Orlando, FL), incorporating a 0° laparoscope, and a customized digital CCD camera (DVC, Austin, TX). The system was used to characterize renal ischemia in a porcine model.

  7. Expression of Cocaine and Amphetamine Regulated Transcript (CART) in the Porcine Intramural Neurons of Stomach in the Course of Experimentally Induced Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bulc, Michał; Gonkowski, Sławomir; Całka, Jarosław

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, the effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-like immunoreactive (CART-LI) enteric nervous structures was investigated within the porcine stomach. To induce diabetes, the pigs were administered intravenously streptozotocin at a dose of 150 mg/kg of body weight. A significant decrease of the number of CART-LI perikarya was observed in the myenteric plexus of the gastric antrum, corpus, and pylorus in the experimental group. In contrast, submucous plexus was devoid of CART-positive neuronal cells both in control and experimental animals. In the control group, the highest densities of CART-LI nerve fibers were observed in the circular muscle layer of antrum and slightly less nerve fibers were present in the muscle layer of corpus and pylorus. In turn, submucous layer of all studied stomach regions revealed relatively smaller number of CART-positive nerve fibers. Diabetes caused statistically significant decrease in the expression of CART-LI nerve fibers only in the antrum circular muscle layer. Also, no changes in the CART-like immunoreactivity in the intraganglionic nerve fibers were observed. The obtained results suggest that acute hyperglycemia produced significant reduction of the CART expression in enteric perikarya throughout entire stomach as well as decrease of density the CART-LI fibers in circular muscle layer of the antrum. Additionally, we suggest that CART might be involved in the regulation of stomach function especially in the gastric motility.

  8. Effects of an Inactivated Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2) Vaccine on PCV2 Virus Shedding in Semen from Experimentally Infected Boars ▿

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hwi Won; Han, Kiwon; Kim, Duyeol; Oh, Yeonsu; Kang, Ikjae; Park, Changhoon; Jang, Hyun; Chae, Chanhee

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of an inactivated porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccine on PCV2b virus shedding in the semen of experimentally infected boars by measuring the immunological response and the PCV2b DNA load in blood and semen. Twelve boars were randomly divided into three groups. The boars in group 1 (n = 4) were immunized with an inactivated PCV2 vaccine and were challenged with PCV2b. The boars in group 2 (n = 4) were only challenged with PCV2b. The boars in group 3 (n = 4) served as negative controls. The number of PCV2 genome copies of PCV2 in the serum and semen were significantly lower in vaccinated challenged boars than in nonvaccinated challenged boars at 7, 10, 14, 21, 32, 35, 42, 49, and 60 days postinoculation. The number of PCV2b genomes in the semen correlated with the number of PCV2b genomes in the blood in both vaccinated challenged (R = 0.714) and nonvaccinated challenged (R = 0.861) boars. The results of the present study demonstrate that the inactivated PCV2 vaccine significantly decreases the amount of PCV2b DNA shedding in semen from vaccinated boars after experimental infection with PCV2b. PMID:21613465

  9. Cell Lineage Identification and Stem Cell Culture in a Porcine Model for the Study of Intestinal Epithelial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Liara M.; Williamson, Ian; Piedrahita, Jorge A.; Blikslager, Anthony T.; Magness, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Significant advances in intestinal stem cell biology have been made in murine models; however, anatomical and physiological differences between mice and humans limit mice as a translational model for stem cell based research. The pig has been an effective translational model, and represents a candidate species to study intestinal epithelial stem cell (IESC) driven regeneration. The lack of validated reagents and epithelial culture methods is an obstacle to investigating IESC driven regeneration in a pig model. In this study, antibodies against Epithelial Adhesion Molecule 1 (EpCAM) and Villin marked cells of epithelial origin. Antibodies against Proliferative Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), Minichromosome Maintenance Complex 2 (MCM2), Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and phosphorylated Histone H3 (pH3) distinguished proliferating cells at various stages of the cell cycle. SOX9, localized to the stem/progenitor cells zone, while HOPX was restricted to the +4/‘reserve’ stem cell zone. Immunostaining also identified major differentiated lineages. Goblet cells were identified by Mucin 2 (MUC2); enteroendocrine cells by Chromogranin A (CGA), Gastrin and Somatostatin; and absorptive enterocytes by carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and sucrase isomaltase (SIM). Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated morphologic and sub-cellular characteristics of stem cell and differentiated intestinal epithelial cell types. Quantitative PCR gene expression analysis enabled identification of stem/progenitor cells, post mitotic cell lineages, and important growth and differentiation pathways. Additionally, a method for long-term culture of porcine crypts was developed. Biomarker characterization and development of IESC culture in the porcine model represents a foundation for translational studies of IESC-driven regeneration of the intestinal epithelium in physiology and disease. PMID:23840480

  10. Sodium nitroprusside enhanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves short term survival in a porcine model of ischemic refractory ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Yannopoulos, Demetris; Bartos, Jason A; George, Stephen A; Sideris, George; Voicu, Sebastian; Oestreich, Brett; Matsuura, Timothy; Shekar, Kadambari; Rees, Jennifer; Aufderheide, Tom P

    2017-01-01

    Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) enhanced CPR (SNPeCPR) demonstrates increased vital organ blood flow and survival in multiple porcine models. We developed a new, coronary occlusion/ischemia model of prolonged resuscitation, mimicking the majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests presenting with shockable rhythms. SNPeCPR will increase short term (4-h) survival compared to standard 2015 Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) guidelines in an ischemic refractory ventricular fibrillation (VF), prolonged CPR model. Sixteen anesthetized pigs had the ostial left anterior descending artery occluded leading to ischemic VF arrest. VF was untreated for 5min. Basic life support was performed for 10min. At minute 10 (EMS arrival), animals received either SNPeCPR (n=8) or standard ACLS (n=8). Defibrillation (200J) occurred every 3min. CPR continued for a total of 45min, then the balloon was deflated simulating revascularization. CPR continued until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or a total of 60min, if unsuccessful. SNPeCPR animals received 2mg of SNP at minute 10 followed by 1mg every 5min until ROSC. Standard ACLS animals received 0.5mg epinephrine every 5min until ROSC. Primary endpoints were ROSC and 4-h survival. All SNPeCPR animals (8/8) achieved sustained ROSC versus 2/8 standard ACLS animals within one hour of resuscitation (p=0.04). The 4-h survival was significantly improved with SNPeCPR compared to standard ACLS, 7/8 versus 1/8 respectively, p=0.0019. SNPeCPR significantly improved ROSC and 4-h survival compared with standard ACLS CPR in a porcine model of prolonged ischemic, refractory VF cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Forward-looking infrared imaging predicts ultimate burn depth in a porcine vertical injury progression model.

    PubMed

    Miccio, Joseph; Parikh, Shruti; Marinaro, Xavier; Prasad, Atulya; McClain, Steven; Singer, Adam J; Clark, Richard A F

    2016-03-01

    relevant criterion standard, temperature minima at 2 days after burn was found to be the most sensitive and specific test. FLIR imaging is a fast and simple tool that has been shown to predict burn wound outcome in a porcine vertical injury progression model. Data showed that more severe burn wounds get cooler between 1 and 2 days after burn. We found four analytic methods of FLIR images that were predictive of burn progression at 1 and 2 days after burn; however, temperature minima 2 days after burn appeared to be the best predictive test for injury progression to a full-thickness burn. Although these results must be validated in clinical studies, FLIR imaging has the potential to aid clinicians in assessing burn severity and thereby assisting in burn wound management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of an interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) mutant of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) on PCV2-induced pathological lesions in a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) co-infection model.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, S; Opriessnig, T; Pal, N; Huang, F F; Meng, X J

    2011-01-10

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary causative agent of porcine circovirus-associated diseases (PCVAD) in swine. Coinfections of PCV2 with other swine pathogens increase the severity of PCVAD. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines by coinfecting pathogens may attribute to the exacerbation of PCVAD during coinfections. An interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) sequence was identified in the origin of replication of PCV2 genome. To assess the role of ISRE in PCV2 pathogenesis during coinfection, an ISRE-mutant PCV2 was constructed and used to experimentally infect pigs with either ISRE mutant or wildtype PCV2 singly or in combination with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The results showed that, during early stage of infection at 14 days post-inoculation (dpi), the ISRE mutation reduced viral replication and elicited low antibody responses. However, at 28 dpi viremia in pigs infected with the ISRE-mutant was on an upward trend, and microscopic lesion scores in pigs inoculated with the ISRE-mutant were significantly more severe than in wildtype PCV2-infected pigs. Coinfection with PRRSV caused an opposite shift in the in vivo dynamics of the ISRE-mutant at 14 dpi with the lymph node histopathological lesions being significantly more severe in pigs coinfected with the ISRE-mutant PCV2 and PRRSV than in pigs coinfected with wildtype PCV2 and PRRSV. PCV2 genomic copy numbers in pigs coinfected with ISRE-mutant and PRRSV were also higher than those coinfected with wildtype PCV2 and PRRSV. The results suggested that the ISRE element in PCV2 genome may play a potential role in viral pathogenesis.

  13. Safety of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Modified Live Virus (MLV) vaccine strains in a young pig infection model.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lobo, Francisco Javier; de Lome, Laura Carrascosa; Díez-Fuertes, Francisco; Segalés, Joaquim; García-Artiga, Carlos; Simarro, Isabel; Castro, José María; Prieto, Cinta

    2013-12-05

    The objective of this study was to compare the safety of all modified live virus vaccines commercially available in Europe against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) under the same experimental conditions. For this purpose, one hundred and twenty three-week-old piglets, divided into five groups, were used. On day 0 of the experiment, nine pigs per group were removed and the remaining fifteen were vaccinated with the commercial vaccines Ingelvac PRRS MLV, Amervac PRRS, Pyrsvac-183 and Porcilis PRRS by the IM route or were mock vaccinated and used as controls. On day 3, the nine unvaccinated pigs were re-introduced into their respective groups and served as sentinel pigs. Clinical signs were recorded daily and lung lesions were determined on days 7, 14 and 21, when 5 vaccinated pigs per group were euthanized. Blood samples and swabs were taken every three days and different organs were collected at necropsy to determine the presence of PRRSV. None of the vaccines studied caused detectable clinical signs in vaccinated pigs although lung lesions were found. Altogether, these results indicate that all vaccines can be considered clinically safe. However, some differences were found in virological parameters. Thus, neither Pyrsvac-183 nor Porcilis PRRS could be detected in porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM) cultures or in lung sections used to determine PRRSV by immunohistochemistry, indicating that these viruses might have lost their ability to replicate in PAM. This inability to replicate in PAM might be related to the lower transmission rate and the delay in the onset of viremia observed in these groups.

  14. A bio-artificial renal epithelial cell system conveys survival advantage in a porcine model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Westover, Angela J; Buffington, Deborah A; Johnston, Kimberly A; Smith, Peter L; Pino, Christopher J; Humes, H David

    2017-03-01

    Renal cell therapy using the hollow fiber based renal assist device (RAD) improved survival time in an animal model of septic shock (SS) through the amelioration of cardiac and vascular dysfunction. Safety and ability of the RAD to improve clinical outcomes was demonstrated in a Phase II clinical trial, in which patients had high prevalence of sepsis. Even with these promising results, clinical delivery of cell therapy is hampered by manufacturing hurdles, including cell sourcing, large-scale device manufacture, storage and delivery. To address these limitations, the bioartificial renal epithelial cell system (BRECS) was developed. The BRECS contains human renal tubule epithelial cells derived from adult progenitor cells using enhanced propagation techniques. Cells were seeded onto trabeculated disks of niobium-coated carbon, held within cryopreservable, perfusable, injection-moulded polycarbonate housing. The study objective was to evaluate the BRECS in a porcine model of SS to establish conservation of efficacy after necessary cell sourcing and design modifications; a pre-clinical requirement to move back into clinical trials. SS was incited by peritoneal injection of E. coli simultaneous to insertion of BRECS (n=10) or control (n=15), into the ultrafiltrate biofeedback component of an extracorporeal circuit. Comparable to RAD, prolonged survival of the BRECS cohort was conveyed through stabilization of cardiac output and vascular leak. In conclusion, the demonstration of conserved efficacy with BRECS therapy in a porcine SS model represents a crucial step toward returning renal cell therapy to the clinical setting, initially targeting ICU patients with acute kidney injury requiring continuous renal replacement therapy. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Testing Danegaptide Effects on Kidney Function after Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in a New Porcine Two Week Model

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Anna K.; Hansen, Rie Schultz; Nørregaard, Rikke; Krag, Søren Palmelund; Møldrup, Ulla; Pedersen, Michael; Jespersen, Bente; Birn, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R-I) is a leading cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) and is associated with increased mortality. Danegaptide is a selective modifier of the gap junction protein connexion 43. It has cytoprotective as well as anti-arrhythmic properties and has been shown to reduce the size of myocardial infarct in pigs. The aim of this study was to investigate the ischemia-protective effect of Danegaptide in a porcine renal I/R-I model with two weeks follow up. Methods Unilateral renal I/R-I was induced in pigs by clamping the left renal artery over a two hour period. The model allowed examination of renal blood flow by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the measurement of single kidney GFR two weeks after injury. Eleven animals were randomized to Danegaptide-infusion while nine animals received placebo. Kidney histology and urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) excretion were included as markers of AKI. Results Unilateral kidney I/R-I resulted in an immediate ~50% GFR reduction, associated with a four-fold increase in urinary NGAL-excretion. Fourteen days after I/R-I, the total GFR was ~75% of baseline with a significantly lower GFR in the injured left kidney compared to the right kidney. No differences in GFR were observed between the treated and non-treated animals immediately after I/R-I or at Day 14. Furthermore, no differences were observed in the urinary excretion of NGAL, renal blood flow or other markers of renal function. Conclusions As expected this porcine renal I/R-I model was associated with reduced GFR two weeks after injury. Danegaptide did not improve renal function after I/R-I. PMID:27760220

  16. A bio-artificial renal epithelial cell system conveys survival advantage in a porcine model of septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Westover, Angela J.; Buffington, Deborah A.; Johnston, Kimberly A.; Smith, Peter L.; Pino, Christopher J.; Humes, H. David

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell therapy using the hollow fiber based renal assist device (RAD) improved survival time in an animal model of septic shock (SS) through the amelioration of cardiac and vascular dysfunction. Safety and ability of the RAD to improve clinical outcomes was demonstrated in a Phase II clinical trial, in which patients had high prevalence of sepsis. Even with these promising results, clinical delivery of cell therapy is hampered by manufacturing hurdles, including cell sourcing, large-scale device manufacture, storage and delivery. To address these limitations, the bioartificial renal epithelial cell system (BRECS) was developed. The BRECS contains human renal tubule epithelial cells derived from adult progenitor cells using enhanced propagation techniques. Cells were seeded onto trabeculated disks of niobium-coated carbon, held within cryopreservable, perfusable, injection-molded polycarbonate housing. The study objective was to evaluate the BRECS in a porcine model of SS to establish conservation of efficacy after necessary cell sourcing and design modifications; a pre-clinical requirement to move back into clinical trials. SS was incited by peritoneal injection of E. coli simultaneous to insertion of BRECS (n=10) or control (n=15), into the ultrafiltrate biofeedback component of an extracorporeal circuit. Comparable to RAD, prolonged survival of the BRECS cohort was conveyed through stabilization of cardiac output and vascular leak. In conclusion, the demonstration of conserved efficacy with BRECS therapy in a porcine SS model represents a crucial step toward returning renal cell therapy to the clinical setting, initially targeting ICU patients with acute kidney injury requiring continuous renal replacement therapy. PMID:25424193

  17. Blocking porcine sialoadhesin improves extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion with human blood

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Joshua P.; Vogel, Thomas; Burlak, Christopher; Coussios, Constantin; Dominguez, Javier; Friend, Peter; Rees, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Patients in fulminant hepatic failure currently do not have a temporary means of support while awaiting liver transplantation. A potential therapeutic approach for such patients is the use of extracorporeal perfusion with porcine livers as a form of “liver dialysis”. During a 72-hour extracorporeal perfusion of porcine livers with human blood, porcine Kupffer cells bind to and phagocytose human red blood cells (hRBC) causing the hematocrit to decrease to 2.5% of the original value. Our laboratory has identified porcine sialoadhesin expressed on Kupffer cells as the lectin responsible for binding N-acetylneuraminic acid on the surface of the hRBC. We evaluated whether blocking porcine sialoadhesin prevents the recognition and subsequent destruction of hRBCs seen during extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion. Ex vivo studies were performed using wild type pig livers perfused with isolated hRBCs for 72-hours in the presence of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody or isotype control. The addition of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody to an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model reduces the loss of hRBC over a 72 hour period. Sustained liver function was demonstrated throughout the perfusion. This study illustrates the role of sialoadhesin in mediating the destruction of hRBCs in an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model. PMID:23822217

  18. Evaluation of fenestrated and non-fenestrated biologic grafts in a porcine model of mature ventral incisional hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, E. D.; Melman, L.; Deeken, C. R.; Greco, S. C.; Frisella, M. M.; Matthews, B. D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to compare the tissue incorporation of a novel fenestrated and non-fenestrated crosslinked porcine dermal matrix (CPDM) (CollaMend™, Davol Inc., Warwick, RI) in a porcine model of ventral hernia repair. Methods Bilateral abdominal wall defects were created in 12 Yucatan minipigs and repaired with a preperitoneal or intraperitoneal technique 21 days after hernia creation. Animals were randomized to fenestrated or non-fenestrated CPDM for n = 6 pieces of each graft in the preperitoneal or intraperitoneal location. All animals were sacrificed at 1 month. Adhesion characteristics and graft contraction/growth were measured by the Garrard adhesion grading scale and transparent grid overlay. Histological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained slides was performed to assess graft incorporation. Tissue incorporation strength was measured by a T-peel tensile test. The strength of explanted CPDM alone and de novo CPDM was measured by a uniaxial tensile test using a tensiometer (Instron, Norwood, MA) at a displacement rate of 0.42 mm/s. Statistical significance (P < 0.05) was determined for histological analysis using a Kruskal–Wallis non-parametric test with a Bonferroni correction, and for all other analyses using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a Bonferroni post-test or a Kruskal–Wallis non-parametric test with a Dunn’s post-test. Results Intraperitoneal placement of fenestrated CPDM resulted in a significantly higher area of adhesions and adhesion score compared to the preperitoneal placement of fenestrated CPDM (P < 0.05). For both preperitoneal and intraperitoneal placement, histological findings demonstrated greater incorporation of the graft due to the fenestrations. No significant differences were detected in the uniaxial tensile strengths of the graft materials alone, either due to the graft type (non-fenestrated vs. fenestrated) or due to the placement location (preperitoneal vs. intraperitoneal

  19. New model systems for experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sinéad

    2013-07-01

    Microbial experimental evolution uses a few well-characterized model systems to answer fundamental questions about how evolution works. This special section highlights novel model systems for experimental evolution, with a focus on marine model systems that can be used to understand evolutionary responses to global change in the oceans.

  20. Contrast-enhanced sonothrombolysis in a porcine model of acute peripheral arterial thrombosis and prevention of anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    Nederhoed, Johanna H; Slikkerveer, Jeroen; Meyer, Klaas W; Wisselink, Willem; Musters, René J P; Yeung, Kak K

    2014-03-01

    Acute peripheral arterial thrombosis can be threatening to life and limb. Dissolution of the thrombus local catheter-directed intra-arterial infusion of fibrinolytic agents such as urokinase is the standard therapy for thrombosis; however, this method is time-intensive, and amputation of the affected limb is still needed in 10-30% of cases. Furthermore, thrombolytic therapy carries the risk of bleeding complications. The use of small gas-filled bubbles, or ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), in combination with ultrasound has been investigated as an improved thrombolytic therapy in acute coronary and cerebral arterial thrombosis. The authors describe a porcine model of acute peripheral arterial occlusion to test contrast-enhanced sonothrombolysis approaches that combine ultrasound, UCAs and fibrinolytic agents and recommend a strategy for preventing severe allergic reactions to UCAs in the pigs.

  1. Novel diffuse optics system for continuous tissue viability monitoring: extended recovery in vivo testing in a porcine flap model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Yup; Pakela, Julia M.; Hedrick, Taylor L.; Vishwanath, Karthik; Helton, Michael C.; Chung, Yooree; Kolodziejski, Noah J.; Stapels, Christopher J.; McAdams, Daniel R.; Fernandez, Daniel E.; Christian, James F.; O'Reilly, Jameson; Farkas, Dana; Ward, Brent B.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2017-02-01

    In reconstructive surgery, tissue perfusion/vessel patency is critical to the success of microvascular free tissue flaps. Early detection of flap failure secondary to compromise of vascular perfusion would significantly increase the chances of flap salvage. We have developed a compact, clinically-compatible monitoring system to enable automated, minimally-invasive, continuous, and quantitative assessment of flap viability/perfusion. We tested the system's continuous monitoring capability during extended non-recovery surgery using an in vivo porcine free flap model. Initial results indicated that the system could assess flap viability/perfusion in a quantitative and continuous manner. With proven performance, the compact form constructed with cost-effective components would make this system suitable for clinical translation.

  2. Short-term effects of double-layer autologous vein graft on restraint of excessive distension and alleviation of neointimal hyperplasia in a porcine saphenous vein graft model.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qiang; Mei, Yunqing; Wang, Xisheng; Feng, Jing; Cai, Jianzhi; Sun, Yifeng; Dewei, Wusha; Wang, Chunping; Chi, Liangjie

    2011-03-01

    Although the use of external vein graft support seems a promising approach to prevent neointimal hyperplasia and wall thickening in vein grafts, its extensive clinical application still has a long way to go. The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term effects of self-designed double-layer autologous saphenous vein graft on restraining excessive distension of vein graft and alleviating neointimal hyperplasia in a porcine model. Left and right hind femoral arteries of 24 white pigs were randomly divided into an experimental group (double-layer vein graft) and a control group (single-layer vein graft). After 1 h of implantation, then 1, 2, and 4 weeks later, the mean inner diameter of the vein grafts in the experimental group measured by Doppler-ultrasound was 2.7 ± 0.1, 2.8 ± 0.1, 2.9 ± 0.1, and 3.1 ± 0.1 mm, respectively; mean peak blood flow velocity measured by Doppler-ultrasound was 96.7 ± 12.8, 93.7 ± 11.5, 89.4 ± 9.6 and 84.6 ± 10.1 cm/s, respectively, while the mean neointimal thicknesses were 47.1 ± 7.7, 93.7 ± 15.1, and 177.4 ± 25.5 μm at 1, 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. As compared to the control group, inner diameter and neointimal thickness of vein grafts in the experimental group were significantly lower, while mean peak blood flow velocity was significantly higher at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after implantation. The proliferation index in the experimental group was also significantly lower within 4 weeks after implantation. The self-designed double-layer autologous saphenous vein graft restrains early excessive distension of vein graft and alleviates early neointimal hyperplasia.

  3. Experimental evidence for the influence of cumulus-oocyte-complexes on sperm release from the porcine oviductal sperm reservoir.

    PubMed

    Brüssow, Klaus-Peter; Torner, Helmut; Rátky, Jozsef; Manabe, Noboru; Tuchscherer, Armin

    2006-04-01

    In the pig, a temporal relationship is suggested between sperm release from the sperm reservoir (SR) and ovulation, but the mechanism(s) is still under discussion. In two experiments, the influence of transferred ova on the release of SR-spermatozoa at ovulation and the effect of supplementation with non-sulfated glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) on embryo development and the number of accessory spermatozoa, respectively, were examined. PMSG/hCG primed ovectomized gilts that had previously received endoscopic low-dose insemination into the cranial uterine horn were used as an experimental model. After salpingectomy, tubal segments (ampulla, cranial, and caudal isthmus) were flushed and sperm numbers or respective accessory spermatozoa were counted. In Experiment 1, the distribution of the sperm population was altered in the presence of cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COCs). A higher proportion of spermatozoa was found after transfer of COCs into one oviduct in the ampulla and cranial isthmus segments compared with the controls (17.5 vs. 4.9%, p<0.05). In Experiment 2, the quality of the transferred ova and treatment influenced the presence of accessory spermatozoa. Transfer of COCs together with HA increased (p<0.05) the number of accessory spermatozoa compared with the other treatment groups and was similar to those in the "undisturbed" controls. No modifications were obtained regarding mean blastomere numbers (2.6 +/- 0.2 to 3.1 +/- 0.2). In summary, this study was demonstrated that cumulus-oocyte-complexes may be involved in triggering sperm release from the pig oviductal SR and that HA might be related to sperm release.

  4. Decolonisation of MRSA, S. aureus and E. coli by Cold-Atmospheric Plasma Using a Porcine Skin Model In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Maisch, Tim; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Heinlin, Julia; Karrer, Sigrid; Morfill, Gregor; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2012-01-01

    In the last twenty years new antibacterial agents approved by the U.S. FDA decreased whereas in parallel the resistance situation of multi-resistant bacteria increased. Thus, community and nosocomial acquired infections of resistant bacteria led to a decrease in the efficacy of standard therapy, prolonging treatment time and increasing healthcare costs. Therefore, the aim of this work was to demonstrate the applicability of cold atmospheric plasma for decolonisation of Gram-positive (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) using an ex vivo pig skin model. Freshly excised skin samples were taken from six month old female pigs (breed: Pietrain). After application of pure bacteria on the surface of the explants these were treated with cold atmospheric plasma for up to 15 min. Two different plasma devices were evaluated. A decolonisation efficacy of 3 log10 steps was achieved already after 6 min of plasma treatment. Longer plasma treatment times achieved a killing rate of 5 log10 steps independently from the applied bacteria strains. Histological evaluations of untreated and treated skin areas upon cold atmospheric plasma treatment within 24 h showed no morphological changes as well as no significant degree of necrosis or apoptosis determined by the TUNEL-assay indicating that the porcine skin is still vital. This study demonstrates for the first time that cold atmospheric plasma is able to very efficiently kill bacteria applied to an intact skin surface using an ex vivo porcine skin model. The results emphasize the potential of cold atmospheric plasma as a new possible treatment option for decolonisation of human skin from bacteria in patients in the future without harming the surrounding tissue. PMID:22558091

  5. Early versus Delayed Excision and Grafting of Full-Thickness Burns in a Porcine Model: A Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam J; Toussaint, Jimmy; Chung, Won Taek; McClain, Steve A; Raut, Vivek; Rosenberg, Lior

    2016-06-01

    The standard of care for full-thickness burns is tangential excision followed by skin autografting; however, the timing of excision and grafting is subject to debate. The authors compared early (2 days) versus delayed (14 days) excision and grafting in a porcine full-thickness burn model. Full-thickness burns (n = 12) were created on the backs of two anesthetized pigs and assigned randomly to no excision, tangential excision followed by skin autografting 2 days after injury, or tangential excision followed by skin autografting 14 days after injury. Digital images and full-thickness biopsy specimens were taken at 16, 21, 28, and 42 days after injury to determine percentage reepithelialization and scar depth. At day 16, all burns that were excised early were completely reepithelialized, whereas only eight of 11 nonexcised burns (72.7 percent) were reepithelialized (p = 0.02). By day 21, all burns were completely reepithelialized. Scar thickness was greatest at 42 days in nonexcised burns (7.5 ± 2.1 mm); scars were thinner after early excision than after late excision (2.2 ± 1.8 mm versus 4.0 ± 1.1 mm; p < 0.001, analysis of variance). Wounds treated with early or late tangential excision followed by skin autografting were flat and minimally contracted, whereas all nonexcised burns were red, contracted, and slightly raised. Scar contraction at 28 and 42 days was greatest in nonexcised control wounds compared with early and late excised wounds. Both early and late excision followed by autografting reduce scarring in a full-thickness porcine burn model. However, early excision (2 days after injury) reduces scar thickness to a greater extent than later (after 14 days) excision.

  6. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma as a shielding technique after endoscopic mucosal resection in rat and porcine models

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente; Boix, Jaume; Moreno de Vega, Vicente; Bon, Ignacio; Marín, Ingrid; Bartolí, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The aims were to assess the efficacy of endoscopic application of Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to prevent delayed perforation and to induce mucosal healing after endoscopic resections. Patients and methods: Colonic induced lesions were performed in rats (n = 16) and pigs (n = 4). Animals were randomized to receive onto the lesions saline (control) or PRP. Animals underwent endoscopic follow-up. Thermal injury was assessed with a 1 – 4 scale: (1) mucosal necrosis; (2) submucosal necrosis; (3) muscularis propria necrosis; and (4) serosal necrosis Results: Saline treatment showed 50 % of mortality in rats (P = 0.02). Mean ulcerated area after 48 hours and 7 days was significantly smaller with PRP than with saline (0.27 ± 0.02 cm2 and 0.08 ± 0.01 cm2 vs. 0.56 ± 0.1 cm2 and 0.40 ± 0.06 cm2; P < 0.001). The incidence of thermal injury was significantly lower with PRP (1.25 ± 0.46) than in controls (2.25 ± 0.50); P = 0.006. The porcine model showed a trend toward higher mucosal restoration in animals treated with PRP than with saline at weeks 1 and 2 (Median area in cm2: 0.55 and 0.40 vs. 1.32 and 0.79) Conclusions: Application of PRP to colonic mucosal lesions showed strong healing properties in rat and porcine models. PMID:27540573

  7. Effects of Intracoronary Administration of Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells on Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Park, Jong Ha; Kim, Bo Won; Ahn, Jinhee; Kim, Jin Hee; Park, Jin Sup; Oh, Jun-Hyok; Choi, Jung Hyun; Cha, Kwang Soo; Hong, Taek Jong; Park, Tae Sik; Kim, Sang-Pil; Song, Seunghwan; Kim, Ji Yeon; Park, Mi Hwa; Jung, Jin Sup

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are known to be potentially effective in regeneration of damaged tissue. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of intracoronary administration of ADSCs in reducing the infarction area and improving function after acute transmural myocardial infarction (MI) in a porcine model. Materials and Methods ADSCs were obtained from each pig's abdominal subcutaneous fat tissue by simple liposuction. After 3 passages of 14-days culture, 2 million ADSCs were injected into the coronary artery 30 min after acute transmural MI. At baseline and 4 weeks after the ADSC injection, 99mTc methoxyisobutylisonitrile-single photon emission computed tomography (MIBI-SPECT) was performed to evaluate the left ventricular volume, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF; %), and perfusion defects as well as the myocardial salvage (%) and salvage index. At 4 weeks, each pig was sacrificed, and the heart was extracted and dissected. Gross and microscopic analyses with specific immunohistochemistry staining were then performed. Results Analysis showed improvement in the perfusion defect, but not in the LVEF in the ADSC group (n=14), compared with the control group (n=14) (perfusion defect, -13.0±10.0 vs. -2.6±12.0, p=0.019; LVEF, -8.0±15.4 vs. -15.9±14.8, p=0.181). There was a tendency of reducing left ventricular volume in ADSC group. The ADSCs identified by stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) staining were well co-localized by von Willebrand factor and Troponin T staining. Conclusion Intracoronary injection of cultured ADSCs improved myocardial perfusion in this porcine acute transmural MI model. PMID:26446632

  8. A New Sliding-Loop Technique in Renorrhaphy for Partial Nephrectomy: A Feasibility Study in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Keun; Oh, Jong Jin; Lee, Sangchul; Lee, Seung Bae; Byun, Seok-Soo; Lee, Sang Eun; Jeong, Chang Wook

    2016-04-01

    We developed a sliding-loop technique that narrowed both sides of the parenchyma in a porcine model and compared it with the conventional sliding-clip technique. Three pigs (30-40 kg) were reused following another experiment conducted by the same researchers. Bilateral kidneys were harvested within 30 minutes after euthanasia. Two partial nephrectomies per kidney were performed on opposite surfaces. All kidney defects were of the same size (diameter of 2.5-3 cm with a depth of 1.0-1.5 cm). The sliding-clip technique and sliding-loop technique were performed separately. In the sliding-loop technique, we created a 1-cm loop at the end of a Vicryl and placed a tetrafluoroethylene polymer pledget in front of the knots passing through the needle. The needle then crossed the loop after passing through the renal parenchyma. A Weck clip was placed and slid on one side to tighten the suture. Tightening was controlled with an equivalent force using a digital push-pull gauge. Three stitches were placed at each renorrhaphy site. The distance between repaired renal surfaces was measured at 5 different points (3 suture sites and 2 middle sites between sutures). The results of the 2 techniques were compared by using the independent t test. The mean distance between renal surfaces was significantly narrower in the sliding-loop technique than in the conventional technique (1.80 ± 1.08 mm vs 5.28 ± 2.46 mm, P < .001). In the porcine model, the sliding-loop technique more effectively closed the partial nephrectomy defects compared with the conventional sliding-clip technique. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Comparison of three magnetic nanoparticle tracers for sentinel lymph node biopsy in an in vivo porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Pouw, Joost J; Ahmed, Muneer; Anninga, Bauke; Schuurman, Kimberley; Pinder, Sarah E; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Pankhurst, Quentin A; Douek, Michael; ten Haken, Bennie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer staging with sentinel lymph node biopsy relies on the use of radioisotopes, which limits the availability of the procedure worldwide. The use of a magnetic nanoparticle tracer and a handheld magnetometer provides a radiation-free alternative, which was recently evaluated in two clinical trials. The hydrodynamic particle size of the used magnetic tracer differs substantially from the radioisotope tracer and could therefore benefit from optimization. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of three different-sized magnetic nanoparticle tracers for sentinel lymph node biopsy within an in vivo porcine model. Materials and methods Sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed within a validated porcine model using three magnetic nanoparticle tracers, approved for use in humans (ferumoxytol, with hydrodynamic diameter dH =32 nm; Sienna+®, dH =59 nm; and ferumoxide, dH =111 nm), and a handheld magnetometer. Magnetometer counts (transcutaneous and ex vivo), iron quantification (vibrating sample magnetometry), and histopathological assessments were performed on all ex vivo nodes. Results Transcutaneous “hotspots” were present in 12/12 cases within 30 minutes of injection for the 59 nm tracer, compared to 7/12 for the 32 nm tracer and 8/12 for the 111 nm tracer, at the same time point. Ex vivo magnetometer counts were significantly greater for the 59 nm tracer than for the other tracers. Significantly more nodes per basin were excised for the 32 nm tracer compared to other tracers, indicating poor retention of the 32 nm tracer. Using the 59 nm tracer resulted in a significantly higher iron accumulation compared to the 32 nm tracer. Conclusion The 59 nm tracer demonstrated rapid lymphatic uptake, retention in the first nodes reached, and accumulation in high concentration, making it the most suitable tracer for intraoperative sentinel lymph node localization. PMID:25709445

  10. Effects of zinc on epithelial barrier properties and viability in a human and a porcine intestinal cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Lodemann, U; Einspanier, R; Scharfen, F; Martens, H; Bondzio, A

    2013-03-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element with a variety of physiological and biochemical functions. Piglets are commonly supplemented, during the weaning period, with doses of zinc above dietary requirements with positive effects on health and performance that might be attributed to anti-secretory and barrier-enhancing effects in the intestine. For a better understanding of these observations increasing zinc sulfate (ZnSO4; 0-200μM) concentrations were used in an in vitro culture model of porcine (IPEC-J2) and human (Caco-2) intestinal epithelial cells and effects on barrier function, viability, and the mRNA expression of one selected heat shock protein (Hsp) were assessed. When treated apically with zinc sulfate, the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) did not change significantly. In contrast, cell viability measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, by ATP and by WST-1 conversion in postconfluent IPEC-J2 monolayers was affected after a 24-h treatment with 200μM ZnSO4. Caco-2 cells were more resistant to Zn. ZnSO4 did not induce any effect on viability, except when it was used at the highest concentration (200μM), and only in preconfluent cells. Furthermore, ZnSO4 induced Hsp70 mRNA expression at 200μM and was more pronounced in preconfluent cells. The observed dose-related effects of zinc are cell-line specific and depended on the differentiation status of the cells. The IPEC-J2 cell line appears to be a suitable in vitro model to characterize specific effects on porcine intestinal cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pericytes support neutrophil transmigration via interleukin-8 across a porcine co-culture model of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Christian; Pieloch, Paulina; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2013-08-02

    Transmigration of neutrophils across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to an inflamed brain tissue is an important process during neuronal inflammation. The process of neutrophil activation as well as their way of rolling along the endothelium and their transmigration is quite well understood. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the fate of neutrophils after they have transmigrated through the endothelium. The role of the other cells of the neurovascular unit in this process is also poorly understood. Here we studied the potential of pericytes to chemo-attract neutrophils under inflammatory conditions. Quantitative real time PCR, western blot analysis, and a chemotaxis assay showed that pericytes are able to chemo-attract neutrophils by interleukin-8 (IL-8) after stimulation with lipopolysaccharides (LPS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), or interleukin-1beta (IL-1β). Then, a co-culture model consisting of primary porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (PBCECs) and primary porcine brain capillary pericytes (PBCPs) was used to analyze neutrophil transmigration across the BBB. As a model for inflammation, LPS was used and the effects of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) were analyzed. In general, all stimulants apart from IFN-γ were able to increase transendothelial neutrophil migration. This effect was significantly reduced by a specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9. MMP-2/-9 secretion is expected to decrease adhesion to pericytes and thus support the transmigration of neutrophils. Additionally, in an adhesion experiment, we showed that MMP-2/-9 inhibition significantly enhances the adhesion of neutrophils to pericytes.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Determination of the Local Temperature Distribution during Phacoemulsification and Comparison of Different Surgery Situations within Enucleated Porcine Eyes.

    PubMed

    Buschschlüter, Steffen; von Eicken, Jörn; Koch, Christian; Höh, Helmut

    2015-08-01

    Phacoemulsification, a common treatment for cataract, is accompanied by cell damage at the corneal endothelium. Thermal exposure during treatment has been considered a reason for this damage, but a thorough experimental and theoretical assessment of the local temperature distribution inside the eye had not yet been conducted. Measurements in porcine eyes and a finite-element simulation enabled such an assessment and localized the highest temperature rise very close to the probe. The results described in this study indicate that a distance of 1 mm between the probe and the endothelium should be maintained during treatment as a safety margin, especially when fluid flow is blocked. The highest measured temperature rise with surgically reasonable system settings and unblocked fluid flow was 1.11°C. The finite-element simulation described here is able to calculate the temperature rise at the endothelium and could serve as a tool for comparing arbitrary surgical situations with respect to thermal exposure of the endothelium.

  13. Preliminary evidence of age-dependent clinical signs associated with porcine circovirus 2b in experimentally infected CH3/Rockefeller mice.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Alessandra M M G; Cruz, Taís F; Yamada, Katarina B; Gerber, Priscilla F; Gabardo, Michelle P; Araújo, João P; Guedes, Roberto M C; Mori, Cinthia K; Oliveira, Camila P; Santos, Sueli S; Richtzenhain, Leonardo J

    2015-12-01

    Mice and rats are susceptible to porcine circovirus 2b (PCV2) infection under field and experimental conditions. However, whether PCV2 induces disease in rodents remains a matter of debate. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether PCV2-induced disease in mice is age-dependent and whether intranasally inoculated animals are able to infect animals they come into contact with. Twenty-five CH3/Rockefeller mice were divided into six groups and intranasally inoculated with 25μL of either PCV2b or PBS on days 0, 3 and 6. One group remained untreated. Two age groups were tested: 3-week-old mice and 6-week-old mice. The administration of three PCV2 intranasal inoculations at intervals of three days was able to induce infection and support virus transmission in susceptible mice, regardless of the age at inoculation. The clinical signs associated with PCV2 infection were more severe in younger mice, and PCV2-DNA load was higher in their faeces. In conclusion, PCV2 induced disease in mice. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Cytokine profiles in pregnant gilts experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and relationships with viral load and fetal outcome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In spite of extensive research, immunologic control mechanisms against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv) remain poorly understood. Cytokine responses have been exhaustively studied in nursery pigs and show contradictory results. Since no detailed reports on cytokine respons...

  15. Correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient and viscoelasticity of articular cartilage in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T; Watanabe, A; Nitta, N; Numano, T; Fukushi, M; Niitsu, M

    2012-09-01

    Quantitative MR imaging techniques of degenerative cartilage have been reported as useful indicators of degenerative changes in cartilage extracellular matrix, which consists of proteoglycans, collagen, non-collagenous proteins, and water. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping of cartilage has been shown to correlate mainly with the water content of the cartilage. As the water content of the cartilage in turn correlates with its viscoelasticity, which directly affects the mechanical strength of articular cartilage, ADC can serve as a potentially useful indicator of the mechanical strength of cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between ADC and viscoelasticity as measured by indentation testing. Fresh porcine knee joints (n = 20, age 6 months) were obtained from a local abattoir. ADC of porcine knee cartilage was measured using a 3-Tesla MRI. Indentation testing was performed on an electromechanical precision-controlled system, and viscosity coefficient and relaxation time were measured as additional indicators of the viscoelasticity of cartilage. The relationship between ADC and viscosity coefficient as well as that between ADC and relaxation time were assessed. ADC was correlated with relaxation time and viscosity coefficient (R(2) = 0.75 and 0.69, respectively, p < 0.01). The mean relaxation time values in the weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing regions were 0.61 ± 0.17 ms and 0.14 ± 0.08 ms, respectively. This study found a moderate correlation between ADC and viscoelasticity in the superficial articular cartilage. Both molecular diffusion and viscoelasticity were higher in weight bearing than non-weight-bearing articular cartilage areas.

  16. Experimental Models of Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, J. Ashley; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2011-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is one of the commonest glomerular diseases, typically presenting in older males with nephrotic syndrome. The development and characterization of animal models of MN, in particular, the passive Heymann nephritis model (PHN), has greatly advanced our understanding of this disease. In this review we discuss the different animal models of human MN that are available, with an emphasis on the PHN model, including technical issues, the typical disease course and its application to human disease. PMID:21359154

  17. Electrosurgical vessel sealing tissue temperature: experimental measurement and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Roland K; Chastagner, Matthew W; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J

    2013-02-01

    The temporal and spatial tissue temperature profile in electrosurgical vessel sealing was experimentally measured and modeled using finite element modeling (FEM). Vessel sealing procedures are often performed near the neurovascular bundle and may cause collateral neural thermal damage. Therefore, the heat generated during electrosurgical vessel sealing is of concern among surgeons. Tissue temperature in an in vivo porcine femoral artery sealed using a bipolar electrosurgical device was studied. Three FEM techniques were incorporated to model the tissue evaporation, water loss, and fusion by manipulating the specific heat, electrical conductivity, and electrical contact resistance, respectively. These three techniques enable the FEM to accurately predict the vessel sealing tissue temperature profile. The averaged discrepancy between the experimentally measured temperature and the FEM predicted temperature at three thermistor locations is less than 7%. The maximum error is 23.9%. Effects of the three FEM techniques are also quantified.

  18. A custom tailored model to investigate skin penetration in porcine skin and its comparison with human skin.

    PubMed

    Herbig, Michael E; Houdek, Pia; Gorissen, Sascha; Zorn-Kruppa, Michaela; Wladykowski, Ewa; Volksdorf, Thomas; Grzybowski, Stephan; Kolios, Georgios; Willers, Christoph; Mallwitz, Henning; Moll, Ingrid; Brandner, Johanna M

    2015-09-01

    Reliable models for the determination of skin penetration and permeation are important for the development of new drugs and formulations. The intention of our study was to develop a skin penetration model which (1) is viable and well supplied with nutrients during the period of the experiment (2) is mimicking human skin as far as possible, but still is independent from the problems of supply and heterogeneity, (3) can give information about the penetration into different compartments of the skin and (4) considers specific inter-individual differences in skin thickness. In addition, it should be quick and inexpensive (5) and without ethical implications (6). Using a chemically divers set of four topically approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), namely diclofenac, metronidazole, tazarotene, and terbinafine, we demonstrated that the model allows reliable determination of drug concentrations in different layers of the viable epidermis and dermis. For APIs susceptible for skin metabolism, the extent of metabolic transformation in epidermis and dermis can be monitored. Furthermore, a high degree of accordance in the ability for discrimination of skin concentrations of the substances in different layers was found in models derived from porcine and human skin. Viability, proliferation, differentiation and markers for skin barrier function were surveyed in the model. This model, which we call 'Hamburg model of skin penetration' is particularly suited to support a rational ranking and selection of dermatological formulations within drug development projects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Postmortem pump-driven reperfusion of the vascular system of porcine lungs: towards a new model for surgical training.

    PubMed

    Willaert, W; Van Hoof, T; De Somer, F; Grabherr, S; D'Herde, K; Ceelen, W; Pattyn, P

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to establish a continuous postmortem circulation in the vascular system of porcine lungs and to evaluate the pulmonary distribution of the perfusate. This research is performed in the bigger scope of a revascularization project of Thiel embalmed specimens. This technique enables teaching anatomy, practicing surgical procedures and doing research under lifelike circumstances. After cannulation of the pulmonary trunk and the left atrium, the vascular system was flushed with paraffinum perliquidum (PP) through a heart-lung machine. A continuous circulation was then established using red PP, during which perfusion parameters were measured. The distribution of contrast-containing PP in the pulmonary circulation was visualized on computed tomography. Finally, the amount of leak from the vascular system was calculated. A reperfusion of the vascular system was initiated for 37 min. The flow rate ranged between 80 and 130 ml/min throughout the experiment with acceptable perfusion pressures (range: 37-78 mm Hg). Computed tomography imaging and 3D reconstruction revealed a diffuse vascular distribution of PP and a decreasing vascularization ratio in cranial direction. A self-limiting leak (i.e. 66.8% of the circulating volume) towards the tracheobronchial tree due to vessel rupture was also measured. PP enables circulation in an isolated porcine lung model with an acceptable pressure-flow relationship resulting in an excellent recruitment of the vascular system. Despite these promising results, rupture of vessel walls may cause leaks. Further exploration of the perfusion capacities of PP in other organs is necessary. Eventually, this could lead to the development of reperfused Thiel embalmed human bodies, which have several applications. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Electrogastrography in experimental pigs: the influence of gastrointestinal injury induced by dextran sodium sulphate on porcine gastric erythromycin-stimulated myoelectric activity.

    PubMed

    Tachecí, Ilja; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Kunes, Martin; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Ali, Shahzad Marghoob; Pavlik, Michal; Kopacova, Marcela; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Bures, Jan; Pleskot, Miloslav

    2011-01-01

    Electrogastrography (EGG) is a non-invasive investigation of gastric myoelectrical activity. The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of erythromycin on EGG in gastrointestinal toxic injury induced by dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in experimental pigs. The experiments were carried out on 12 adult pigs (weighing 30-35 kg). EGG was recorded using Digitrapper equipment (Synectics Medical AB, Stockholm). Running spectrum activity was used for EGG evaluation. There were two groups of animals: Group I: 6 controls with erythromycin administration (1,600 mg intragastrically); Group II: 6 animals treated with DSS (for 5 days, 0.25 g/kg per day in a dietary bolus) followed by erythromycin administration. Baseline and subsequent six separate 30-minute EGG-recordings (from time 0 to 360 min) were accomplished in each animal. A total of 84 records were analysed. Baseline dominant frequency of slow waves was fully comparable in both groups. In Group I, there was a significant increase in dominant frequency after erythromycin administration (maximum between 240-360 min). There was a flat non-significant and delayed increase in dominant frequency after erythromycin administration in Group II. The difference between Group I and II at particular time intervals was not significant but a diverse trend was evident. EGG recording enables us to register a gastric myoelectrical effect of prokinetic drugs. Erythromycin induced a significant increase in the dominant frequency of slow waves. DSS caused toxic injury to the porcine gastrointestinal tract responsible for the delayed and weaker myoelectrical effect of erythromycin in experimental animals.

  1. Gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection assisted by a new traction method: the clip-band technique. A feasibility study in a porcine model (with video).

    PubMed

    Parra-Blanco, Adolfo; Nicolas, David; Arnau, Maria R; Gimeno-Garcia, Antonio Z; Rodrigo, Luis; Quintero, Enrique

    2011-11-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is the standard of care for treating gastric intramucosal neoplasias in Japan. However, it is seldom performed in Western countries, mainly because it is technically very challenging. Several traction methods have been proposed to facilitate submucosal dissection, but they are usually not widely available or are difficult to apply. Our main aim was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method, the clip-band technique, for improving the visualization of the submucosal layer during ESD. Observational, experimental, feasibility study conducted in a porcine model. University Hospital of the Canary Islands, Research Animal Laboratory. Animal study. After completion of the circumferential cutting, a clip-band traction system was applied. Efficacy and safety of the clip-band technique. Eighteen ESDs performed in live domestic pigs were completed without any serious complications. The mean specimen size was 35.38 ± 12.17 mm, the mean cutting time was 13.06 ± 10.52 minutes, and the mean dissection time was 16.67 ± 9.01 minutes. The clip-band technique was not compared with the standard ESD technique. This initial study shows that the clip-band traction technique is feasible and that it permits safe, effective, and relatively inexpensive gastric ESD. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental mammary carcinogenesis - Rat models.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Antonieta; Faustino-Rocha, Ana I; Colaço, Bruno; Oliveira, Paula A

    2017-03-15

    Mammary cancer is one of the most common cancers, victimizing more than half a million of women worldwide every year. Despite all the studies in this field, the current therapeutic approaches are not effective and have several devastating effects for patients. In this way, the need to better understand the mammary cancer biopathology and find effective therapies led to the development of several rodent models over years. With this review, the authors intended to provide the readers with an overview of the rat models used to study mammary carcinogenesis, with a special emphasis on chemically-induced models.

  3. Formation of reactive aldehydes (MDA, HHE, HNE) during the digestion of cod liver oil: comparison of human and porcine in vitro digestion models.

    PubMed

    Tullberg, Cecilia; Larsson, Karin; Carlsson, Nils-Gunnar; Comi, Irene; Scheers, Nathalie; Vegarud, Gerd; Undeland, Ingrid

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we investigated lipid oxidation of cod liver oil during gastrointestinal (GI) digestion using two types of in vitro digestion models. In the first type of model, we used human GI juices, while we used digestive enzymes and bile from porcine origin in the second type of model. Human and porcine models were matched with respect to factors important for lipolysis, using a standardized digestion protocol. The digests were analysed for reactive oxidation products: malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE), and 4-hydroxy-trans-2-hexenal (HHE) by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS), and for free fatty acids (FFA) obtained during the digestion by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The formation of the oxidation products MDA, HHE, and HNE was low during the gastric digestion, however, it increased during the duodenal digestion. The formation of the oxidation products reached higher levels when digestive juices of human origin were used (60 μM of MDA, 0.96 μM of HHE, and 1.6 μM of HNE) compared to when using enzymes and bile of porcine origin (9.8, and 0.36 μM of MDA; 0.16, and 0.026 μM of HHE; 0.23, and 0.005 μM of HNE, respectively, in porcine models I and II). In all models, FFA release was only detected during the intestinal step, and reached up to 31% of total fatty acids (FA). The findings in this work may be of importance when designing oxidation oriented lipid digestion studies.

  4. Comparative efficacy of commercial Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) vaccines in pigs experimentally infected with M. hyopneumoniae and PCV2.

    PubMed

    Kim, D; Kim, C H; Han, K; Seo, H W; Oh, Y; Park, C; Kang, I; Chae, C

    2011-04-12

    The efficacies of two commercial Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterins and porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) vaccines were compared in conventional pigs immunized at different ages based on humoral response, pathological observation, and growth performance from birth to finishing (175 days of age) using a M. hyopneumoniae and PCV2 co-infection challenge model. One-week-old pigs (n=110) were randomly assigned to five groups: three vaccinated and challenged (VC), and one each of non-vaccinated and challenged (NVC) and negative control. A significant difference was found in the number of genomic copies of M. hyopneumoniae in nasal swabs and PCV2 in serum samples, the average daily weight gain (gram/pig/day) between 63 and 133 dpi, gross and histopathological lung lesion scores, histopathological lymph node lesion scores, and the immunohistochemical analysis of PCV2 among the three VC groups. The single dose schedule for M. hyopneumoniae bacterins and PCV2 vaccines have the advantages of (i) improving daily weight gain (122.4%) and slaughter weight (120.5%), and (ii) reducing the incidence of clinical signs and lung and lymph node lesions.

  5. Administration of intrapulmonary sodium polyacrylate to induce lung injury for the development of a porcine model of early acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Henderson, William R; Barnbrook, Julian; Dominelli, Paolo B; Griesdale, Donald Eg; Arndt, Tara; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Foster, Glen; Ackland, Gareth L; Xu, James; Ayas, Najib T; Sheel, Andrew W

    2014-12-01

    The loss of alveolar epithelial and endothelial integrity is a central component in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); however, experimental models investigating the mechanisms of epithelial injury are lacking. The purpose of the present study was to design and develop an experimental porcine model of ARDS by inducing lung injury with intrapulmonary administration of sodium polyacrylate (SPA). The present study was performed at the Centre for Comparative Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia. Human alveolar epithelial cells were cultured with several different concentrations of SPA; a bioluminescence technique was used to assess cell death associated with each concentration. In the anesthetized pig model (female Yorkshire X pigs (n = 14)), lung injury was caused in 11 animals (SPA group) by injecting sequential aliquots (5 mL) of 1% SPA gel in aqueous solution into the distal airway via a rubber catheter through an endotracheal tube. The SPA was dispersed throughout the lungs by manual bag ventilation. Three control animals (CON group) underwent all experimental procedures and measurements with the exception of SPA administration. The mean (± SD) ATP concentration after incubation of human alveolar epithelial cells with 0.1% SPA (0.92 ± 0.27 μM/well) was approximately 15% of the value found for the background control (6.30 ± 0.37 μM/well; p < 0.001). Elastance of the respiratory system (E RS) and the lung (E L) increased in SPA-treated animals after injury (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001, respectively). Chest wall elastance (E CW) did not change in SPA-treated animals. There were no differences in E RS, E L, or E CW in the CON group when pre- and post-injury values were compared. Analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed a significant shift toward neutrophil predominance from before to after injury in SPA-treated animals (p < 0.001) but not in the CON group (p = 0.38). Necropsy revealed

  6. Experimental models of anxiety. Problems and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Griez, E

    1984-01-01

    In a brief review of the field of experimental psychopathology, the author observes that few adequate laboratory models of anxiety have been produced. Criteria to set up valid anxiety models are discussed. The carbon dioxide inhalation technique, an anxiomimetic intervention, is then proposed as a new human panic attack model and compared to the existing lactate infusion method. Both appear as promising agents in the experimental study of panic anxiety.

  7. [An experimental model of suppurative osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Privalov, V A; Svetlakov, A L; Kushakovskiĭ, O S; Ebert, L Ia; Giniatullin, R U; Svetlakova, I A; Iarovoĭ, N N

    2000-01-01

    A new experimental rabbit model of acute purulent osteomyelitis is proposed. The model is reproduced by percutaneous introduction of 4 million St. aureus microorganisms into the medullary channel of the femoral bone after aseptic destruction of the bone marrow by ethyl alcohol and hot saline. The model satisfies the demands of good reproduction, reduces probability of contamination of periosteal tissues during intraosteal inoculation and provides reproduction of local inflammation without its generalization which results in reduced number of fatal outcomes among experimental animals.

  8. Characterization of blunt chest trauma in a long-term porcine model of severe multiple trauma

    PubMed Central

    Horst, K.; Simon, T. P.; Pfeifer, R.; Teuben, M.; Almahmoud, K.; Zhi, Q.; Santos, S. Aguiar; Wembers, C. Castelar; Leonhardt, S.; Heussen, N.; Störmann, P.; Auner, B.; Relja, B.; Marzi, I.; Haug, A. T.; van Griensven, M.; Kalbitz, M.; Huber-Lang, M.; Tolba, R.; Reiss, L. K.; Uhlig, S.; Marx, G.; Pape, H. C.; Hildebrand, F.

    2016-01-01

    Chest trauma has a significant relevance on outcome after severe trauma. Clinically, impaired lung function typically occurs within 72 hours after trauma. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are still not fully elucidated. Therefore, we aimed to establish an experimental long-term model to investigate physiological, morphologic and inflammatory changes, after severe trauma. Male pigs (sus scrofa) sustained severe trauma (including unilateral chest trauma, femur fracture, liver laceration and hemorrhagic shock). Additionally, non-injured animals served as sham controls. Chest trauma resulted in severe lung damage on both CT and histological analyses. Furthermore, severe inflammation with a systemic increase of IL-6 (p = 0.0305) and a local increase of IL-8 in BAL (p = 0.0009) was observed. The pO2/FiO2 ratio in trauma animals decreased over the observation period (p < 0.0001) but not in the sham group (p = 0.2967). Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) revealed differences between the traumatized and healthy lung (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, a clinically relevant, long-term model of blunt chest trauma with concomitant injuries has been developed. This reproducible model allows to examine local and systemic consequences of trauma and is valid for investigation of potential diagnostic or therapeutic options. In this context, EIT might represent a radiation-free method for bedside diagnostics. PMID:28000769

  9. In-vivo tissue repair using light-activated surgical adhesive in a porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Riley, Jill N.; Dickson, Tonya J.; Hou, Dong Ming; Rogers, Pamela; March, Keith L.

    2001-05-01

    An in vivo study was conducted to investigate the feasibility, mechanical function, and chronic biocompatibility of a new light-activated surgical adhesive for achieving rapid hemostasis of the puncture site following diagnostic catheterization and interventional cardiac procedures. Porcine carotid arteries (nequals6) and femoral arteries (nequals6) were exposed, and an incision was made in the arterial walls using a 16G needle. The surgical adhesive, composed of a poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold doped with the traditional protein solder mix of serum albumin and indocyanine green dye, was used to close the incisions in conjunction with an 805-nm diode laser. Blood flow was restored to the vessels immediately after the procedure and the incision sites were checked for patency. The strength and hemostatic abilities of the new surgical adhesive were evaluated in the context of arterial pressure, persistence of hemostatis and presence of any inflammatory reaction after 3 days. After this evaluation period, the surgical procedure was repeated on the carotid arteries (nequals6) and femoral arteries (nequals6) of three additional animals that had been heparinized prior to surgery to closer approximate the conditions seen in a typical vascular surgical setting.

  10. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation Lung Ablation: Preliminary Results in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Deodhar, Ajita; Monette, Sebastien; Single, Gordon W.; Hamilton, William C.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Maybody, Majid; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2011-12-15

    Objective: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) uses direct electrical pulses to create permanent 'pores' in cell membranes to cause cell death. In contrast to conventional modalities, IRE has a nonthermal mechanism of action. Our objective was to study the histopathological and imaging features of IRE in normal swine lung. Materials and Methods: Eleven female swine were studied for hyperacute (8 h), acute (24 h), subacute (96 h), and chronic (3 week) effects of IRE ablation in lung. Paired unipolar IRE applicators were placed under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Some applicators were deliberately positioned near bronchovascular structures. IRE pulse delivery was synchronized with the cardiac rhythm only when ablation was performed within 2 cm of the heart. Contrast-enhanced CT scan was performed immediately before and after IRE and at 1 and 3 weeks after IRE ablation. Representative tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Results: Twenty-five ablations were created: ten hyperacute, four acute, and three subacute ablations showed alveolar edema and necrosis with necrosis of bronchial, bronchiolar, and vascular epithelium. Bronchovascular architecture was maintained. Chronic ablations showed bronchiolitis obliterans and alveolar interstitial fibrosis. Immediate post-procedure CT images showed linear or patchy density along the applicator tract. At 1 week, there was consolidation that resolved partially or completely by 3 weeks. Pneumothorax requiring chest tube developed in two animals; no significant cardiac arrhythmias were noted. Conclusion: Our preliminary porcine study demonstrates the nonthermal and extracellular matrix sparing mechanism of action of IRE. IRE is a potential alternative to thermal ablative modalities.

  11. Histologic response of porcine collagen-coated and uncoated polypropylene grafts in a rabbit vagina model.

    PubMed

    Huffaker, R Keith; Muir, Tristi W; Rao, Arundhati; Baumann, Shannon S; Kuehl, Thomas J; Pierce, Lisa M

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the host tissue response in the rabbit vagina differs for 2 synthetic graft materials that are used in pelvic reconstructive surgery. One strip of porcine collagen-coated or uncoated polypropylene mesh was implanted adjacent to a sham operative site into the posterior vagina of 10 New Zealand white rabbits and harvested 12 weeks later. Rabbits were assigned randomly to group 1 (coated; n = 5), group 2 (uncoated; n = 5), or group 3 (unoperated; n = 4). Full-thickness sagittal sections of posterior vaginal wall and rectum were scored for inflammation, neovascularization, and fibroblastic proliferation. Erosion of grafts did not occur in any animal. Coated and uncoated meshes induced a mild inflammatory response with minimal fibrosis and good host tissue incorporation within the grafts. Few apoptotic and proliferating cells were seen for both graft types. Both coated and uncoated polypropylene meshes elicit a mild foreign body reaction and minimal fibrotic response without evidence of vaginal epithelial erosion.

  12. Effect of high-dose vocal fold injection of cidofovir and bevacizumab in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mostafa M; Connor, Matthew P; Palazzolo, Mitzi; Thompson, Michelle E; Lospinoso, Josh; O'Connor, Peter; Howard, N Scott; Maturo, Stephen C

    2017-03-01

    Perform a follow-up study to investigate the histologic impact of high-dose intralaryngeal cidofovir injections in porcine vocal cords, either alone or in combination with bevacizumab, and compared to saline controls. This was an in vivo study involving 24 pigs with blinded pathologist review of specimens. Six groups were created, with four subjects in each group. Each subject received 10 or 20 mg of either cidofovir or bevacizumab alone, or in combination, injected into the right vocal cord. The left vocal fold was used as a saline control. Three separate injections were made at 2-week intervals. Larynges were harvested at 8 and 12 weeks, stained with hematoxylin and eosin and trichrome stain, and reviewed for histologic changes by two blinded pathologists. Minimal inflammation, edema, and atypia were noted with all treatments. Increased glandular inflammation was noted with 10 mg bevacizumab (P < 0.05), which decreased when combined with 10 mg cidofovir (P < 0.05). No lamina propria or muscle fibrosis was observed. Drug duration had no statistically significant histologic impact. High-dose cidofovir and bevacizumab do not induce detrimental vocal fold changes. Combination cidofovir and bevacizumab do not cause vocal fold scarring. Further work is needed to assess systemic concentration with this high-dose combination in humans. N/A. Laryngoscope, 127:671-675, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. An environmentally relevant organochlorine mixture impairs sperm function and embryo development in the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Campagna, Céline; Guillemette, Christine; Paradis, René; Sirard, Marc-André; Ayotte, Pierre; Bailey, Janice L

    2002-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of an environmentally relevant mixture of more than 15 organochlorines on the development of pig oocytes and sperm during in vitro fertilization (IVF). Oocytes were cocultured with sperm in IVF medium containing increasing concentrations of an organochlorine mixture, similar to that found in women of highly exposed populations. Exposure to the organochlorine mixture diminished oocyte penetration rates and polyspermy in a linear manner. The mixture did not affect rates of cleavage nor development to multicell embryos. However, rates of development to the blastocyst stage were lower at the highest concentration at which oocyte penetration was observed. The same experiment was performed using oocytes that were preexposed during in vitro maturation. This greater exposure to the mixture also reduced penetration in a dose-response manner and affected polyspermy. Frozen-thawed pig sperm were also cultured in IVF medium containing the same organochlorine concentrations. Sperm motility parameters were immediately reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the organochlorines, followed by diminished viability 2 h later. From these results, it appears that reduced sperm quality would account for decreases in fertilization, polyspermy, and blastocyst formation. These results suggest that exposing porcine oocytes and sperm to an environmentally pertinent organochlorine mixture in vitro disrupts the oocyte block to polyspermy, sperm fertility, and further embryonic development, and supports recent concerns that such pollutants harm reproductive health in humans and other species.

  14. Comparison of sow and/or piglet vaccination of 3 commercial porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) single-dose vaccines on pigs under experimental PCV2 challenge.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yeonsu; Seo, Hwi Won; Park, Changhoon; Chae, Chanhee

    2014-08-27

    The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of sow and/or piglet vaccination regimen by three commercial porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccines on pigs experimentally challenged with PCV2 at 84 days of age based on immunological, virological, and pathological evaluation. One hundred and nineteen piglets born to vaccinated or non-vaccinated sows were divided into 17 groups. A portion of the pigs with or without passively acquired immunity was vaccinated at 21 or 49 days of age. Regardless of the PCV2 vaccine, the combination of sow and pig (49 days of age) vaccinations significantly (P<0.05) reduced PCV2 viremia, induced higher log2 transformed neutralizing antibody titers, and resulted in higher proportion of CD4(+)CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) lymphocyte subsets than the sow vaccination alone, the pig (21 or 49 days of age) vaccination alone, and the combination of sow and pig (21 days of age) vaccinations at various days post challenge. The results showed a significant negative correlation between maternally derived antibodies at the day of vaccination and the increment of antibody titers to PCV2 at 28 days post vaccination in the combination of sow and pig (21 days of age) vaccinations but not the combination of sow and pig (49 days of age) vaccinations. The combination of sow and pig (49 days of age) vaccinations could be more effective for controlling PCV2 infection if PCV2 the infection occurs during the growing-finishing period in herds. Optimal vaccination strategies must balance the advantage of delayed vaccination with the need to induce immunity prior to exposure to pathogens under field conditions.

  15. Evaluation of renal nerve morphological changes and norepinephrine levels following treatment with novel bipolar radiofrequency delivery systems in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Mazor, Meital; Mathur, Prabodh; Stanley, James R.L.; Mendelsohn, Farrell O.; Lee, Henry; Baird, Rose; Zani, Brett G.; Markham, Peter M.; Rocha-Singh, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of different bipolar radiofrequency system algorithms in interrupting the renal sympathetic nerves and reducing renal norepinephrine in a healthy porcine model. Methods: A porcine model (N = 46) was used to investigate renal norepinephrine levels and changes to renal artery tissues and nerves following percutaneous renal denervation with radiofrequency bipolar electrodes mounted on a balloon catheter. Parameters of the radiofrequency system (i.e. electrode length and energy delivery algorithm), and the effects of single and longitudinal treatments along the artery were studied with a 7-day model in which swine received unilateral radiofrequency treatments. Additional sets of animals were used to examine norepinephrine and histological changes 28 days following bilateral percutaneous radiofrequency treatment or surgical denervation; untreated swine were used for comparison of renal norepinephrine levels. Results: Seven days postprocedure, norepinephrine concentrations decreased proportionally to electrode length, with 81, 60 and 38% reductions (vs. contralateral control) using 16, 4 and 2-mm electrodes, respectively. Applying a temperature-control algorithm with the 4-mm electrodes increased efficacy, with a mean 89.5% norepinephrine reduction following a 30-s treatment at 68°C. Applying this treatment along the entire artery length affected more nerves vs. a single treatment, resulting in superior norepinephrine reduction 28 days following bilateral treatment. Conclusion: Percutaneous renal artery application of bipolar radiofrequency energy demonstrated safety and resulted in a significant renal norepinephrine content reduction and renal nerve injury compared with untreated controls in porcine models. PMID:24875181

  16. Fed state prior to hemorrhagic shock and polytrauma in a porcine model results in altered liver transcriptomic response.

    PubMed

    Determan, Charles; Anderson, Rebecca; Becker, Aaron; Witowski, Nancy; Lusczek, Elizabeth; Mulier, Kristine; Beilman, Greg J

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a leading cause of trauma-related mortality in both civilian and military settings. Resuscitation often results in reperfusion injury and survivors are susceptible to developing multiple organ failure (MOF). The impact of fed state on the overall response to shock and resuscitation has been explored in some murine models but few clinically relevant large animal models. We have previously used metabolomics to establish that the fed state results in a different metabolic response in the porcine liver following hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. In this study, we used our clinically relevant model of hemorrhagic shock and polytrauma and the Illumina HiSeq platform to determine if the liver transcriptomic response is also altered with respect to fed state. Functional analysis of the response to shock and resuscitation confirmed several typical responses including carbohydrate metabolism, cytokine inflammation, decreased cholesterol synthesis, and apoptosis. Our findings also suggest that the fasting state, relative to a carbohydrate prefed state, displays decreased carbohydrate metabolism, increased cytoskeleton reorganization and decreased inflammation in response to hemorrhagic shock and reperfusion. Evidence suggests that this is a consequence of a shrunken, catabolic state of the liver cells which provides an anti-inflammatory condition that partially mitigates hepatocellar damage.

  17. Using heterogeneity in the population structure of U.S. swine farms to compare transmission models for porcine epidemic diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, Eamon B; Snelson, Harry; Bansal, Shweta

    2016-03-07

    In 2013, U.S. swine producers were confronted with the disruptive emergence of porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED). Movement of animals among farms is hypothesised to have played a role in the spread of PED among farms. Via this or other mechanisms, the rate of spread may also depend on the geographic density of farms and climate. To evaluate such effects on a large scale, we analyse state-level counts of outbreaks with variables describing the distribution of farm sizes and types, aggregate flows of animals among farms, and an index of climate. Our first main finding is that it is possible for a correlation analysis to be sensitive to transmission model parameters. This finding is based on a global sensitivity analysis of correlations on simulated data that included a biased and noisy observation model based on the available PED data. Our second main finding is that flows are significantly associated with the reports of PED outbreaks. This finding is based on correlations of pairwise relationships and regression modeling of total and weekly outbreak counts. These findings illustrate how variation in population structure may be employed along with observational data to improve understanding of disease spread.

  18. Development of a novel ex vivo porcine skin explant model for the assessment of mature bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingping; Phillips, Priscilla L; Sampson, Edith M; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Jin, Shouguang; Antonelli, Patrick; Schultz, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms have been proposed to be a major factor contributing to the failure of chronic wounds to heal because of their increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents and the prolonged inflammation they cause. Phenotypic characteristics of bacterial biofilms vary depending on the substratum to which they attach, the nutritional environment, and the microorganisms within the biofilm community. To develop an ex vivo biofilm model that more closely mimics biofilms in chronic skin wounds, we developed an optimal procedure to grow mature biofilms on a central partial-thickness wound in 12-mm porcine skin explants. Chlorine gas produced optimal sterilization of explants while preserving histological properties of the epidermis and dermis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus developed mature biofilms after 3 days that had dramatically increased tolerance to gentamicin and oxacillin (∼100× and 8,000× minimal inhibitory concentration, respectively) and to sodium hypochlorite (0.6% active chlorine). Scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy verified extensive exopolymeric biofilm structures on the explants. Despite a significant delay, a ΔlasI quorum-sensing mutant of P. aeruginosa developed biofilm as antibiotic-tolerant as wild-type after 3 days. This ex vivo model simulates growth of biofilms on skin wounds and provides an accurate model to assess effects of antimicrobial agents on mature biofilms. © 2013 by the Wound Healing Society.

  19. Using heterogeneity in the population structure of U.S. swine farms to compare transmission models for porcine epidemic diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    O’Dea, Eamon B.; Snelson, Harry; Bansal, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, U.S. swine producers were confronted with the disruptive emergence of porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED). Movement of animals among farms is hypothesised to have played a role in the spread of PED among farms. Via this or other mechanisms, the rate of spread may also depend on the geographic density of farms and climate. To evaluate such effects on a large scale, we analyse state-level counts of outbreaks with variables describing the distribution of farm sizes and types, aggregate flows of animals among farms, and an index of climate. Our first main finding is that it is possible for a correlation analysis to be sensitive to transmission model parameters. This finding is based on a global sensitivity analysis of correlations on simulated data that included a biased and noisy observation model based on the available PED data. Our second main finding is that flows are significantly associated with the reports of PED outbreaks. This finding is based on correlations of pairwise relationships and regression modeling of total and weekly outbreak counts. These findings illustrate how variation in population structure may be employed along with observational data to improve understanding of disease spread. PMID:26947420

  20. Cardiac repair in a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction with human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiovascular cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Chang, Ying-Hua; Xiong, Qiang; Zhang, Pengyuan; Zhang, Liying; Somasundaram, Porur; Lepley, Mike; Swingen, Cory; Su, Liping; Wendel, Jacqueline S; Guo, Jing; Jang, Albert; Rosenbush, Daniel; Greder, Lucas; Dutton, James R; Zhang, Jianhua; Kamp, Timothy J; Kaufman, Dan S; Ge, Ying; Zhang, Jianyi

    2014-12-04

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) hold promise for myocardial repair following injury, but preclinical studies in large animal models are required to determine optimal cell preparation and delivery strategies to maximize functional benefits and to evaluate safety. Here, we utilized a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction (MI) to investigate the functional impact of intramyocardial transplantation of hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells, in combination with a 3D fibrin patch loaded with insulin growth factor (IGF)-encapsulated microspheres. hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes integrated into host myocardium and generated organized sarcomeric structures, and endothelial and smooth muscle cells contributed to host vasculature. Trilineage cell transplantation significantly improved left ventricular function, myocardial metabolism, and arteriole density, while reducing infarct size, ventricular wall stress, and apoptosis without inducing ventricular arrhythmias. These findings in a large animal MI model highlight the potential of utilizing hiPSC-derived cells for cardiac repair. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Model refinement for offshore platforms: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Chen, Zongli; Wu, Yanjian

    2017-08-01

    Offshore jacket platforms are widely used in offshore oil and gas exploitation. Finite element models of such structures need to have many degrees of freedom (DOFs) to represent the geometrical detail of complex structures, thereby leading to incompatibility in the number of DOFs of experimental models. To bring them both to the same order while ensuring that the essential eigen- properties of the refined model match those of experimental models, an extended model refinement procedure is presented in this paper. Vibration testing of an offshore jacket platform model is performed to validate the applicability of the proposed approach. A full-order finite element model of the platform is established and then tuned to meet the measured modal properties identified from the acceleration signals. Both model reduction and modal expansion methods are investigated, as well as various scenarios of sensor arrangements. Upon completion of the refinement, the updated jacket platform model matches the natural frequencies of the measured model well.

  2. Experimental models of demyelination and remyelination.

    PubMed

    Torre-Fuentes, L; Moreno-Jiménez, L; Pytel, V; Matías-Guiu, J A; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Matías-Guiu, J

    2017-08-29

    Experimental animal models constitute a useful tool to deepen our knowledge of central nervous system disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis, however, there is no such specific model able to provide an overview of the disease; multiple models covering the different pathophysiological features of the disease are therefore necessary. We reviewed the different in vitro and in vivo experimental models used in multiple sclerosis research. Concerning in vitro models, we analysed cell cultures and slice models. As for in vivo models, we examined such models of autoimmunity and inflammation as experimental allergic encephalitis in different animals and virus-induced demyelinating diseases. Furthermore, we analysed models of demyelination and remyelination, including chemical lesions caused by cuprizone, lysolecithin, and ethidium bromide; zebrafish; and transgenic models. Experimental models provide a deeper understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis. Choosing one model or another depends on the specific aims of the study. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. IMPROVED EXPERIMENTAL MODEL TO EVALUATE SUBMUCOSAL INJECTION SOLUTIONS FOR ENDOSCOPIC SUBMUCOSAL DISSECTION

    PubMed Central

    YAMAZAKI, Kendi; MALUF-FILHO, Fauze; da COSTA, Vitor Alves Pessoa; PESSORRUSSO, Fernanda Cristina Simões; HONDO, Fabio Yuji; SAKAI, Paulo; de FIGUEIREDO, Luis Francisco Poli

    2015-01-01

    Background : Endoscopic submucosal dissection carries an increased risk of bleeding and perforation. The creation of a long lasting submucosal cushion is essential for the safe and complete removal of the lesion. There is not a suitable experimental model for evaluation of the durability of the cushioning effect of different solutions. Aim : To describe an improved experimental model to evaluate submucosal injection solutions. Methods : A total of four domestic pigs were employed to evaluate two different submucosal fluid solutions in the gastric submucosa. After midline laparotomy, the anterior gastric wall was incised from the gastric body to the antrum and its mucosal surface was exposed by flipping inside out the incised gastric wall. Two different solutions (10% mannitol and normal saline) were injected in the submucosa of the anterior wall of the distal gastric body. All submucosal cushions were injected until they reach the same size, standardized as 1.0 cm in height and 2.0 cm in diameter. A caliper and a ruler were employed to guarantee accuracy of the measurements. Results : All four animal experiments were completed. All submucosal cushions had the exact same size measured with caliper and a ruler. By using the mannitol solution, the mean duration of the submucosal cushion was longer than the saline solution: 20 and 22 min (mean, 21 min) vs 5 and 6 min (mean, 5.5 min) Conclusions : This experimental model is simple and evaluate the duration, size, and effect of the submucosal cushion, making it more reliable than other models that employ resected porcine stomachs or endoscopic images in live porcine models. PMID:26734797

  4. IMPROVED EXPERIMENTAL MODEL TO EVALUATE SUBMUCOSAL INJECTION SOLUTIONS FOR ENDOSCOPIC SUBMUCOSAL DISSECTION.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kendi; Maluf-Filho, Fauze; da Costa, Vitor Alves Pessoa; Pessorrusso, Fernanda Cristina Simões; Hondo, Fabio Yuji; Sakai, Paulo; de Figueiredo, Luis Francisco Poli

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection carries an increased risk of bleeding and perforation. The creation of a long lasting submucosal cushion is essential for the safe and complete removal of the lesion. There is not a suitable experimental model for evaluation of the durability of the cushioning effect of different solutions. To describe an improved experimental model to evaluate submucosal injection solutions. A total of four domestic pigs were employed to evaluate two different submucosal fluid solutions in the gastric submucosa. After midline laparotomy, the anterior gastric wall was incised from the gastric body to the antrum and its mucosal surface was exposed by flipping inside out the incised gastric wall. Two different solutions (10% mannitol and normal saline) were injected in the submucosa of the anterior wall of the distal gastric body. All submucosal cushions were injected until they reach the same size, standardized as 1.0 cm in height and 2.0 cm in diameter. A caliper and a ruler were employed to guarantee accuracy of the measurements. All four animal experiments were completed. All submucosal cushions had the exact same size measured with caliper and a ruler. By using the mannitol solution, the mean duration of the submucosal cushion was longer than the saline solution: 20 and 22 min (mean, 21 min) vs 5 and 6 min (mean, 5.5 min) This experimental model is simple and evaluate the duration, size, and effect of the submucosal cushion, making it more reliable than other models that employ resected porcine stomachs or endoscopic images in live porcine models.

  5. Xenotransplantation of Human Cardiomyocyte Progenitor Cells Does Not Improve Cardiac Function in a Porcine Model of Chronic Ischemic Heart Failure. Results from a Randomized, Blinded, Placebo Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jansen of Lorkeers, Sanne J.; Gho, Johannes M. I. H.; Koudstaal, Stefan; van Hout, Gerardus P. J.; Zwetsloot, Peter Paul M.; van Oorschot, Joep W. M.; van Eeuwijk, Esther C. M.; Leiner, Tim; Hoefer, Imo E.; Goumans, Marie-José; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (CMPCs) were successfully isolated from fetal and adult human hearts. Direct intramyocardial injection of human CMPCs (hCMPCs) in experimental mouse models of acute myocardial infarction significantly improved cardiac function compared to controls. Aim Here, our aim was to investigate whether xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of fetal hCMPCs in a pig model of chronic myocardial infarction is safe and efficacious, in view of translation purposes. Methods & Results We performed a randomized, blinded, placebo controlled trial. Four weeks after ischemia/reperfusion injury by 90 minutes of percutaneous left anterior descending artery occlusion, pigs (n = 16, 68.5 ± 5.4 kg) received intracoronary infusion of 10 million fetal hCMPCs or placebo. All animals were immunosuppressed by cyclosporin (CsA). Four weeks after infusion, endpoint analysis by MRI displayed no difference in left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular end diastolic and left ventricular end systolic volumes between both groups. Serial pressure volume (PV-)loop and echocardiography showed no differences in functional parameters between groups at any timepoint. Infarct size at follow-up, measured by late gadolinium enhancement MRI showed no difference between groups. Intracoronary pressure and flow measurements showed no signs of coronary obstruction 30 minutes after cell infusion. No premature death occurred in cell treated animals. Conclusion Xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of hCMPCs is feasible and safe, but not associated with improved left ventricular performance and infarct size compared to placebo in a porcine model of chronic myocardial infarction. PMID:26678993

  6. Quantitative Assessment of Inflammation in a Porcine Acute Terminal Ileitis Model: US with a Molecularly Targeted Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaijun; Felt, Stephen A.; Machtaler, Steven; Guracar, Ismayil; Luong, Richard; Bettinger, Thierry; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of ultrasonography (US) performed with dual-selectin–targeted contrast agent microbubbles (MBs) for assessment of inflammation in a porcine acute terminal ileitis model, with histologic findings as a reference standard. Materials and Methods The study had institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approval. Acute terminal ileitis was established in 19 pigs; four pigs served as control pigs. The ileum was imaged with clinical-grade dual P- and E-selectin–targeted MBs (MBSelectin) at increasing doses (0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, and 20 × 108 MB per kilogram of body weight) and with control nontargeted MBs (MBControl). For reproducibility testing, examinations were repeated twice after the MBSelectin and MBControl injections. After imaging, scanned ileal segments were analyzed ex vivo both for inflammation grade (by using hematoxylin-eosin staining) and for expression of selectins (by using quantitative immunofluorescence analysis). Statistical analysis was performed by using the t test, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and Spearman correlation analysis. Results Imaging signal increased linearly (P < .001) between a dose of 0.5 and a dose of 5.0 × 108 MB/kg and plateaued between a dose of 10 and a dose of 20 × 108 MB/kg. Imaging signals were reproducible (ICC = 0.70), and administration of MBSelectin in acute ileitis resulted in a significantly higher (P < .001) imaging signal compared with that in control ileum and MBControl. Ex vivo histologic grades of inflammation correlated well with in vivo US signal (ρ = 0.79), and expression levels of both P-selectin (37.4% ± 14.7 [standard deviation] of vessels positive; P < .001) and E-selectin (31.2% ± 25.7) in vessels in the bowel wall of segments with ileitis were higher than in control ileum (5.1% ± 3.7 for P-selectin and 4.8% ± 2.3 for E-selectin). Conclusion Quantitative measurements of inflammation obtained by using dual-selectin–targeted US

  7. In-vivo regional myocardial perfusion measurements in a porcine model by ECG-gated multislice computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun; Meyer, Cristopher A.; Teague, Shawn; Stecker, Michael; Hutchins, Gary; McLennan, Gordon; Persohn, Scott

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether functional multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) can identify regional areas of normally perfused and ischemic myocardium in a porcine model. Material and Methods: Three out bred pigs, two of which had ameroids surgically implanted to constrict flow within the LAD and LCx coronary arteries, were injected with 25 mL of iopromide (Isovue) at a rate of 5 mL/second via the femoral or jugular vein. Sixty axial scans along the short axis of the heart was acquired on a 16-slice CT scanner (Philips MX8000-IDT) triggered at end-diastole of the cardiac cycle and acquiring an image within 270 msec. A second series of scans were taken after an intravenous injection of a vasodilator, 150 μg/kg/min of adenosine. ROIs were drawn around the myocardial tissue and the resulting time-density curves were used to extract perfusion values. Results: Determination of the myocardial perfusion and fractional blood volume implementing three different perfusion models. A 5-point averaging or 'smoothing' algorithm was employed to effectively filter the data due to its noisy nature. The (preliminary) average perfusion and fractional blood volume values over selected axial slices for the pig without an artificially induced stenosis were measured to be 84 +/- 22 mL/min/100g-tissue and 0.17 +/- 0.04 mL/g-tissue, the former is consistent with PET scan and EBCT results. The pig with a stenosis in the left LAD coronary artery showed a reduced global perfusion value -- 45 mL/min/100g-tissue. Correlations in regional perfusion values relative to the stenosis were weak. During the infusion of adenosine, averaged perfusion values for the three subjects increased by 46 (+/-45) percent, comparable to increases measured with PET. Conclusion: Quantifying global perfusion values using MDCT appear encouraging. Future work will focus resolving the systematic effects from noise due to signal fluctuation from the porcine tachyardia (80-93 BPM) and provide a more robust measurement

  8. Mechanisms of late lumen loss after antiproliferative percutaneous coronary intervention using beta-irradiation in a porcine model of restenosis.

    PubMed

    Deiner, Carolin; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Rauch, Ursula; Rosenthal, Peter; Pauschinger, Matthias; Schwimmbeck, Peter L; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Pels, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    The short-term results for the prevention of coronary restenosis after intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) and use of drug-eluting stents (DESs) are excellent. The long-term results either lack or present with late complications (e.g., late thrombosis and late catch-up phenomenon leading to late restenosis even years after the initial procedure). Both IVBT and DESs mediate their potent antirestenotic effects via a cytostatic mechanism, but the cardiovascular pathology at late time points after the use of these antiproliferative therapies is incompletely understood. This study investigated the long-term effects of antiproliferative beta-irradiation in a clinically relevant porcine coronary model to address the pathophysiology of late coronary restenosis after antiproliferative vascular interventions. We performed percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) in two major coronary arteries in 12 domestic crossbred pigs. One of the two balloon-injured segments was randomly assigned to receive immediate beta-irradiation (PTCA+IVBT group) using a noncentered delivery catheter (20 Gy; Novoste Beta-Cath System, Novoste, Norcross, GA, USA). The animals were sacrificed after 14 days (n=6) or 3 months (n=6). The luminal area in the PTCA+IVBT group decreased significantly 3 months after the intervention as compared with that in the PTCA group (PTCA 3.45+/-0.46 mm2 vs. PTCA+IVBT 1.22+/-0.26 mm2; P=.0017). This lumen loss was primarily due to shrinkage of the external elastic lamina area (negative arterial remodeling; PTCA 5.22+/-0.27 mm2 vs. PTCA+IVBT 3.42+/-0.45 mm2; P=.0064), which was accompanied by an increase in the adventitial area (PTCA 3.07+/-0.2 mm2 vs. PTCA+IVBT 5.41+/-0.5 mm2; P=.0049). The application of antiproliferative radiation in a porcine coronary model caused an early beneficial effect (reduction of intimal-medial lesion and luminal gain) that was followed by a late lumen loss primarily due to negative arterial remodeling. This mechanism may in part

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of a novel software technology for detecting pneumothorax in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Summers, Shane M; Chin, Eric J; April, Michael D; Grisell, Ronald D; Lospinoso, Joshua A; Kheirabadi, Bijan S; Salinas, Jose; Blackbourne, Lorne H

    2017-09-01

    Our objective was to measure the diagnostic accuracy of a novel software technology to detect pneumothorax on Brightness (B) mode and Motion (M) mode ultrasonography. Ultrasonography fellowship-trained emergency physicians performed thoracic ultrasonography at baseline and after surgically creating a pneumothorax in eight intubated, spontaneously breathing porcine subjects. Prior to pneumothorax induction, we captured sagittal M-mode still images and B-mode videos of each intercostal space with a linear array transducer at 4cm of depth. After collection of baseline images, we placed a chest tube, injected air into the pleural space in 250mL increments, and repeated the ultrasonography for pneumothorax volumes of 250mL, 500mL, 750mL, and 1000mL. We confirmed pneumothorax with intrapleural digital manometry and ultrasound by expert sonographers. We exported collected images for interpretation by the software. We treated each individual scan as a single test for interpretation by the software. Excluding indeterminate results, we collected 338M-mode images for which the software demonstrated a sensitivity of 98% (95% confidence interval [CI] 92-99%), specificity of 95% (95% CI 86-99), positive likelihood ratio (LR+) of 21.6 (95% CI 7.1-65), and negative likelihood ratio (LR-) of 0.02 (95% CI 0.008-0.046). Among 364 B-mode videos, the software demonstrated a sensitivity of 86% (95% CI 81-90%), specificity of 85% (81-91%), LR+ of 5.7 (95% CI 3.2-10.2), and LR- of 0.17 (95% CI 0.12-0.22). This novel technology has potential as a useful adjunct to diagnose pneumothorax on thoracic ultrasonography. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Gingiva laser welding: preliminary study on an ex vivo porcine model.

    PubMed

    Rasca, Emilia; Nyssen-Behets, Catherine; Tielemans, Marc; Peremans, André; Hendaoui, Nordine; Heysselaer, Daniel; Romeo, Umberto; Nammour, Samir

    2014-08-01

    The use of lasers to fuse different tissues has been studied for 50 years. As none of these experiments concerned the oral soft tissues, our objective was to assess the feasibility of laser gingiva welding. Porcine full-thickness gingival flaps served to prepare calibrated samples in the middle of which a 2 cm long incision was closed, either by conventional suture or by laser tissue welding (LTW). To determine the irradiation conditions yielding the best tensile strength, 13 output power values, from 0.5 to 5 W, delivered either at 10 Hz or in continuous wave mode, were tested on six indocyanine green (ICG) concentrations, from 8% to 13% (588 samples). Then, some samples served to compare the tensile strength between the laser welded and the sutured gingiva; the other samples were histologically processed in order to evaluate the thermal damage extent. The temperature rise during the LTW was measured by thermocouples. Another group of 12 samples was used to measure the temperature elevation by thermal camera. In the laser welding groups, the best tensile strength (p<0.05) was yielded by the 9% ICG saline solution (117 mM) at 4.5 W, 10 Hz, and a fluence of 31.3 kJ/cm(2). The apposition strength revealed no statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between the sutured and the laser welded gingiva at 4.5 W, 10 Hz, and 9% ICG solution. The mean temperature was 74±5.4°C at the upper surface and 42±8.9°C at the lower surface. The damaged zone averaged 333 μm at the upper surface. The 808 nm diode laser associated with ICG can achieve oral mucosa LTW, which is conceivable as a promising technique of gingival repair.

  11. Penile enhancement using a porcine small intestinal submucosa graft in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Leungwattanakij, S; Pummangura, N; Ratana-Olarn, K

    2006-01-01

    Several biodegradable materials have been experimented for penile enhancement, but none show the potential for clinical use. This study was designed to use porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) augmenting the normal tunica albuginea to increase the functional girth of the rat penis. In all, 20 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats constituted the study population. The animals were divided into two groups: group 1 consisted of the control (n=10) and group 2 (n=10) consisted of rats that underwent penile enhancement by a longitudinal I-shaped incision of the tunica albuginea on both sides, and the dissection of the plane between tunica albuginea and cavernosal tissue was carried out (n=10). The incision was then patched with a 3 x 10 mm2 piece of SIS, using a 6/0 nylon suture material. The penile length and mid-circumference were then measured using a Vernier Caliper before and 2 months after surgery. All rat penises underwent histological examination using Masson's trichome and Verhoff's van Giesen's stain for collagen and elastic fibers. The penile length, mid-circumference and degree of fibrosis score were expressed as mean+/-s.e. (standard error) and analyzed using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test. A statistical significance was accepted at P-value < or =0.05. Our results showed similar preoperative penile length and circumference in both groups. However, 2 months after the surgery, the mean penile circumference of the SIS group has grown significantly larger than the control group, while the mean penile length remained unchanged. The histological study of the rat penises revealed minimal amounts of fibrosis under the graft, and the elastic fibers of the graft showed orientation in a circular manner. In conclusion, SIS appears promising for material use in a penile enhancement.

  12. Delivery of gelfoam-enabled cells and vectors into the pericardial space using a percutaneous approach in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Ladage, D; Turnbull, IC; Ishikawa, K; Takewa, Y; Rapti, K; Morel, C; Karakikes, I; Müller-Ehmsen, J; Costa, KD; Hajjar, RJ; Kawase, Y

    2013-01-01

    Intrapericardial drug delivery is a promising procedure, with the ability to localize therapeutics with the heart. Gelfoam particles are nontoxic, inexpensive, nonimmunogenic and biodegradable compounds that can be used to deliver therapeutic agents. We developed a new percutaneous approach method for intrapericardial injection, puncturing the pericardial sac safely under fluoroscopy and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance. In a porcine model of myocardial infarction (MI), we deployed gelfoam particles carrying either (a) autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or (b) an adenovirus encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) 48 h post-MI. The presence of MSCs and viral infection at the infarct zone was confirmed by immunoflourescence and PCR. Puncture was performed successfully in 16 animals. Using IVUS, we successfully determined the size of the pericardial space before the puncture, and safely accessed that space in setting of pericardial effusion and also adhesions induced by the MI. Intrapericardial injection of gelfoam was safe and reliable. Presence of the MSCs and eGFP expression from adenovirus in the myocardium were confirmed after delivery. Our novel percutaneous approach to deliver (stem-) cells or adenovirus was safe and efficient in this pre-clinical model. IVUS-guided delivery is a minimally invasive procedure that seems to be a promising new strategy to deliver therapeutic agents locally to the heart. PMID:21512506

  13. Evaluation of surveillance protocols for detecting porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection in boar studs by simulation modeling.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Albert; Reicks, Darwin; Muñoz-Zanzi, Claudia

    2007-09-01

    Because porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) can be transmitted through semen, PRRSV-free boar studs need to be routinely monitored to rapidly detect any potential PRRSV introduction. However, current protocols for monitoring PRRSV in boar studs are diverse, sometimes very costly, and their effectiveness has not been quantified. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of different monitoring protocols to detect PRRSV introduction into a negative boar stud by using a simulation modeling approach. A stochastic transmission model was constructed to simulate the spread of PRRSV in a typical negative boar stud in the USA (herd size of 200 boars, 60% annual replacement) and the performance of monitoring protocols by using different sample sizes (10, 30, and 60 samples), sampling frequency (3 times a week, weekly, and biweekly), and diagnostic procedures (PCR on semen, PCR on serum, ELISA on serum, and both PCR and ELISA on serum). The monitoring protocols were evaluated in terms of the time from PRRSV introduction into the boar stud to PRRSV detection. Protocols that used PCR on serum detected the PRRSV introduction earlier than protocols that used PCR on semen, and these were earlier than those that used ELISA on serum. The most intensive protocol evaluated (testing 60 boars 3 times a week by PCR on serum) would need 13 days to detect 95% of the PRRSV introductions. These results support field observations, suggesting that an intensive monitoring protocol needs to be in place in a boar stud to quickly detect a PRRSV introduction.

  14. Impact of Mixed Xenogeneic Porcine Hematopoietic Chimerism on Human NK Cell Recognition in a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Li, H W; Vishwasrao, P; Hölzl, M A; Chen, S; Choi, G; Zhao, G; Sykes, M

    2017-02-01

    Mixed chimerism is a promising approach to inducing allograft and xenograft tolerance. Mixed allogeneic and xenogeneic chimerism in mouse models induced specific tolerance and global hyporesponsiveness, respectively, of host mouse natural killer (NK) cells. In this study, we investigated whether pig/human mixed chimerism could tolerize human NK cells in a humanized mouse model. Our results showed no impact of induced human NK cell reconstitution on porcine chimerism. NK cells from most pig/human mixed chimeric mice showed either specifically decreased cytotoxicity to pig cells or global hyporesponsiveness in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Mixed xenogeneic chimerism did not hamper the maturation of human NK cells but was associated with an alteration in NK cell subset distribution and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in the bone marrow. In summary, we demonstrate that mixed xenogeneic chimerism induces human NK cell hyporesponsiveness to pig cells. Our results support the use of this approach to inducing xenogeneic tolerance in the clinical setting. However, additional approaches are required to improve the efficacy of tolerance induction while ensuring adequate NK cell functions.

  15. Garlicin attenuates reperfusion no-reflow in a catheter-based porcine model of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yang; Jiahui, Li; Aili, Li; Yong, Wang; Zaixiang, Shi; Yuannan, Ke; Xianlun, Li

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate whether garlicin can attenuate reperfusion no-reflow in a catheter-based porcine model of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Twenty-two swine were used: six in a sham-operation group, and eight each in the control and garlicin groups. The distal part of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) in the latter two groups was occluded by a dilated balloon for 2 hr, then reperfused for 3 hr. Garlicin (1.88mg/kg) was injected just before reperfusion until reperfusion for 1 hr in the garlicin group. Hemodynamic data were examined before AMI, 2 hr after occlusion, and 3 hr after reperfusion. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) and pathological staining were performed to evaluate the myocardial no-reflow area (NRA). Serum proinflammatory cytokines and endothelin (ET)-1 were examined by radioimmunoassay. Left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) significantly improved in the garlicin group after reperfusion compared with the control group and also 2hr after AMI (p<0.05 for both). MCE and pathological staining both showed garlicin attenuated reperfusion NRA after AMI (p<0.05, p<0.01). Garlicin not only decreased serum interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α after reperfusion (p<0.05 for both), but also ET-1 level (p<0.01). Garlicin attenuated reperfusion no-reflow in our catheter-based porcrine model of AMI, possibly through decreasing serum proinflammatory cytokines and ET-1.

  16. Constitutive modeling of stress softening and permanent set in a porcine skin tissue: Impact of the storage preservation.

    PubMed

    Caro-Bretelle, A S; Ienny, P; Leger, R; Corn, S; Bazin, I; Bretelle, F

    2016-09-06

    Prior to testing, soft tissues are usually maintained in different media and additives (solution, air, cryopreservant…) under various environment conditions (temperature, storage duration….). In many cases, results from mechanical tests performed on these stored tissues are supposed to be as closed as possible to the fresh ones. In the present work, cyclic tensile tests were performed with increasing values of strain on porcine skin tissues (excised following the Langer's lines) to enhance tissues mechanical nonlinearity such as softening behavior and permanent set. Optical methods were used to follow the in-plane strains evolution. These latest values were used as data to simulate the structural behavior of these heterogeneous materials. The numerical simulation is based on the constitutive pseudo-elastic model accounting for the softening behavior as well as the permanent set. As a result, reliable material parameters were extracted from the experiments/model comparison for each storage solution. The result of this study reveals that preservation conditions must be carefully chosen: at low strain the tissues store in fridge in a saline solution during a short time, or in freezer (-80°C) in water with cryopreservant and the fresh one lead to a similar mechanical response. For larger strain, the freezing (-80°C) in water with cryopreservant is the only procedure for which the tissue recovers its initial behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Porcine prion protein amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions. PMID:26218890

  18. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  19. Fluid-structure interaction model of aortic valve with porcine-specific collagen fiber alignment in the cusps.

    PubMed

    Marom, Gil; Peleg, Mor; Halevi, Rotem; Rosenfeld, Moshe; Raanani, Ehud; Hamdan, Ashraf; Haj-Ali, Rami

    2013-10-01

    Native aortic valve cusps are composed of collagen fibers embedded in their layers. Each valve cusp has its own distinctive fiber alignment with varying orientations and sizes of its fiber bundles. However, prior mechanical behavior models have not been able to account for the valve-specific collagen fiber networks (CFN) or for their differences between the cusps. This study investigates the influence of this asymmetry on the hemodynamics by employing two fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) models, one with asymmetric-mapped CFN from measurements of porcine valve and the other with simplified-symmetric CFN. The FSI models are based on coupled structural and fluid dynamic solvers. The partitioned solver has nonconformal meshes and the flow is modeled by employing the Eulerian approach. The collagen in the CFNs, the surrounding elastin matrix, and the aortic sinus tissues have hyperelastic mechanical behavior. The coaptation is modeled with a master-slave contact algorithm. A full cardiac cycle is simulated by imposing the same physiological blood pressure at the upstream and downstream boundaries for both models. The mapped case showed highly asymmetric valve kinematics and hemodynamics even though there were only small differences between the opening areas and cardiac outputs of the two cases. The regions with a less dense fiber network are more prone to damage since they are subjected to higher principal stress in the tissues and a higher level of flow shear stress. This asymmetric flow leeward of the valve might damage not only the valve itself but also the ascending aorta.