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Sample records for porcine intestinal microrna

  1. Expression of interleukin-18 by porcine airway and intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Muneta, Yoshihiro; Goji, Noriko; Tsuji, Noriko M; Mikami, Osamu; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yasuyuki; Yokomizo, Yuichi; Mori, Yasuyuki

    2002-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the expression of interleukin-18 (IL-18) in porcine airway and intestinal epithelium. We found constitutive protein expression of precursor IL-18 in primary culture of porcine airway epithelium. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that porcine IL-18 was localized in the porcine airway epithelium and that it was significantly upregulated with experimental endotoxemia induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inoculation. We also confirmed by immunohistochemical staining that IL-18 was expressed in porcine intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, the concentration of IL-18 in intestinal cell lysates of 1-day-old piglets was about 3-fold and 6-fold less than that in those of 1-month-old and 6-month-old piglets, respectively. Exogenous IL-18 was able to induce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the peripheral blood of 1-day-old piglets, whereas concanavalin A (ConA) was not able to induce IFN-gamma in the same condition. These results suggest that mucosal epithelial cells are among the major sources of IL-18 in pig and that IL-18 may be useful as a therapeutic agent for the enhancement of immune responses and as a vaccine adjuvant, especially in neonatal piglets.

  2. Location and pathogenic potential of Blastocystis in the porcine intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenqi; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Traub, Rebecca J; Cuttell, Leigh; Owen, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Blastocystis is an ubiquitous, enteric protozoan of humans and many other species. Human infection has been associated with gastrointestinal disease such as irritable bowel syndrome, however, this remains unproven. A relevant animal model is needed to investigate the pathogenesis/pathogenicity of Blastocystis. We concluded previously that pigs are likely natural hosts of Blastocystis with a potentially zoonotic, host-adapted subtype (ST), ST5, and may make suitable animal models. In this study, we aimed to characterise the host-agent interaction of Blastocystis and the pig, including localising Blastocystis in porcine intestine using microscopy, PCR and histopathological examination of tissues. Intestines from pigs in three different management systems, i.e., a commercial piggery, a small family farm and a research herd (where the animals were immunosuppressed) were examined. This design was used to determine if environment or immune status influences intestinal colonisation of Blastocystis as immunocompromised individuals may potentially be more susceptible to blastocystosis and development of associated clinical signs. Intestines from all 28 pigs were positive for Blastocystis with all pigs harbouring ST5. In addition, the farm pigs had mixed infections with STs 1 and/or 3. Blastocystis organisms/DNA were predominantly found in the large intestine but were also detected in the small intestine of the immunosuppressed and some of the farm pigs, suggesting that immunosuppression and/or husbandry factors may influence Blastocystis colonisation of the small intestine. No obvious pathology was observed in the histological sections. Blastocystis was present as vacuolar/granular forms and these were found within luminal material or in close proximity to epithelial cells, with no evidence of attachment or invasion. These results concur with most human studies, in which Blastocystis is predominantly found in the large intestine in the absence of significant organic

  3. Laparoscopic Herniorrhaphy with Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Using mesh or a synthetic prosthesis during the laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias has been demonstrated to be safe and effective. A new material, porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS mesh), has been successfully used in canine and rodent animal models with excellent results. This mesh is degradable and resorbable with a marked decrease in the possibility of becoming infected. However, the amount of fibroblast ingrowth is equal to that with polypropylene mesh. Methods: A comparison was made between this new SIS mesh to repair 15 inguinal hernias in 12 patients and polypropylene mesh used in 12 similar patients. A preperitoneal approach with balloon dissection was used in all patients. Results: Demographics were similar in both groups. The results were excellent and compared equally. Complications (seroma, discomfort) were minimal in both groups and were similar. Conclusions: Porcine small intestinal submucosa, SIS mesh, can be used for laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias. Long-term follow-up will be necessary to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:12166756

  4. Binding Studies on Isolated Porcine Small Intestinal Mucosa and in vitro Toxicity Studies Reveal Lack of Effect of C. perfringens Beta-Toxin on the Porcine Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Simone; Wyder, Marianne; Candi, Ahmet; Regenscheit, Nadine; Nathues, Christina; van Immerseel, Filip; Posthaus, Horst

    2015-01-01

    Beta-toxin (CPB) is the essential virulence factor of C. perfringens type C causing necrotizing enteritis (NE) in different hosts. Using a pig infection model, we showed that CPB targets small intestinal endothelial cells. Its effect on the porcine intestinal epithelium, however, could not be adequately investigated by this approach. Using porcine neonatal jejunal explants and cryosections, we performed in situ binding studies with CPB. We confirmed binding of CPB to endothelial but could not detect binding to epithelial cells. In contrast, the intact epithelial layer inhibited CPB penetration into deeper intestinal layers. CPB failed to induce cytopathic effects in cultured polarized porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and primary jejunal epithelial cells. C. perfringens type C culture supernatants were toxic for cell cultures. This, however, was not inhibited by CPB neutralization. Our results show that, in the porcine small intestine, CPB primarily targets endothelial cells and does not bind to epithelial cells. An intact intestinal epithelial layer prevents CPB diffusion into underlying tissue and CPB alone does not cause direct damage to intestinal epithelial cells. Additional factors might be involved in the early epithelial damage which is needed for CPB diffusion towards its endothelial targets in the small intestine. PMID:25860161

  5. Mucosal projections of enteric neurons in the porcine small intestine.

    PubMed

    Hens, J; Schrödl, F; Brehmer, A; Adriaensen, D; Neuhuber, W; Scheuermann, D W; Schemann, M; Timmermans, J P

    2000-06-05

    In the present study, a combination of immunohistochemistry and retrograde 1,1;-didodecyl-3,3,3;,3;-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) tracing was used to unravel the morphology, distribution, and neurochemical coding of submucous and myenteric neurons with axonal projections to the mucosa of the porcine small intestine. The majority of traced neurons was located in the inner submucous plexus (ISP; 78%), whereas the remaining part was distributed between the outer submucous plexus (OSP; 10%) and myenteric plexus (MP; 12%). Among these traced neurons, some distinct neuronal populations could be distinguished according to their morphologic and neurochemical properties. In the ISP, several types of traced neurons were detected: 1) morphologic type II neurons expressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunoreactivity, and substance P (SP) immunoreactivity; 2) ChAT/SP-immunoreactive (-IR) small neurons; 3) vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) -IR small neurons; and 4) multidendritic ChAT/somatostatin (SOM) -IR neurons. The traced neuronal populations of the OSP and MP were similar to each other. In both plexuses, the following DiI-labelled neurons were found: 1) ChAT/CGRP/(SP)-IR type II neurons; 2) multidendritic ChAT/SP-IR neurons; and 3) multidendritic ChAT/SOM-IR neurons. Comparison of the present findings with previously obtained data concerning the mucosal innervation pattern of the intestine of small mammals, revealed significant species differences with respect to the morphologic and neurochemical features of the involved enteric neuronal classes. Although not identical, a closer resemblance between pig and human enteric nervous system seems to be at hand, as far as the anatomic organization and the presence of neurochemically identified neuronal subtypes within the enteric nervous system are concerned.

  6. Development of lntraepithelial Cells in the Porcine Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Contreras, G.; Bailey, M.; González-Pozos, S.; Stokes, C. R.; Ortega, M. G.; Mondragón-Flores, R.

    2001-01-01

    The number, phenotype, localisation and development of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) from duodenum (Du) and ileum (Il) were studied by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and light and electron microscopy in unweaned (0–7 weeks old) and six months-old pigs. Developmental changes at birth showed that 38% of the total lymphocytes in the villi were IEL, mainly of the CD2+CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) phenotype. That proportion rose to over 50% at week 5 after birth, resembling adult proportion, although still with fewer cells than in adult pigs. CD4+ cells appeared relatively early in life although they were confined to the lamina propria (LP) and CD8+ cells were found only in low numbers. In the villi of adult animals, almost half of the total number of lymphocytes were IEL (49% Du, 52% Il). Over half of these IEL (52% Du, 53% Il) showed the CD2+CD4-CD8+ phenotype and were localized at the epithelium's basement membrane. Numerous (43% Du, 42% Il) DN IEL were found grouped at the enterocyte nucleus level and relatively few (5% in Du and Il) granular IEL were found apically in the epithelium. These proportions were homogeneously maintained along the villi's tip, middle and bottom, suggesting that the IEL may have their origin in the LP. Therefore, the IEL compartment in the porcine intestine develops slowly with age and is actually composed by a heterogeneous population of cells (null, DN and CD8+). These results may explain the increased susceptibility of young animals to disease during the lactation period and should be taken into account when functional studies are carried out with IEL. The quantitative results of this paper established a model for studies on the effect of age, diet, normal flora, infection and oral immunization on the IEL of the gut. PMID:11589310

  7. Deciphering the microRNA transcriptome of skeletal muscle during porcine development.

    PubMed

    Mai, Miaomiao; Jin, Long; Tian, Shilin; Liu, Rui; Huang, Wenyao; Tang, Qianzi; Ma, Jideng; Jiang, An'an; Wang, Xun; Hu, Yaodong; Wang, Dawei; Jiang, Zhi; Li, Mingzhou; Zhou, Chaowei; Li, Xuewei

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play critical roles in many important biological processes, such as growth and development in mammals. Various studies of porcine muscle development have mainly focused on identifying miRNAs that are important for fetal and adult muscle development; however, little is known about the role of miRNAs in middle-aged muscle development. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of miRNA transcriptomes across five porcine muscle development stages, including one prenatal and four postnatal stages. We identified 404 known porcine miRNAs, 118 novel miRNAs, and 101 miRNAs that are conserved in other mammals. A set of universally abundant miRNAs was found across the distinct muscle development stages. This set of miRNAs may play important housekeeping roles that are involved in myogenesis. A short time-series expression miner analysis indicated significant variations in miRNA expression across distinct muscle development stages. We also found enhanced differentiation- and morphogenesis-related miRNA levels in the embryonic stage; conversely, apoptosis-related miRNA levels increased relatively later in muscle development. These results provide integral insight into miRNA function throughout pig muscle development stages. Our findings will promote further development of the pig as a model organism for human age-related muscle disease research.

  8. Extrusion properties of porcine intestines and surrogate materials for ventral hernia modelling.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mathew; Winter, Des C; Simms, Ciaran K

    2013-02-01

    A physical model of the abdomen can be a clean and cheap surrogate environment to assess new and existing closure solutions for post-laparoscopic wound closure, but a particular challenge is finding a surrogate material to replicate intestines which may protrude through a hernia. The literature shows no focus on this topic, and this paper therefore presents an investigation of the extrusion properties of fresh porcine intestines compared to a number of potential surrogate materials: silicone, edible gelatine, dough and reconstituted powdered potatoes (RPP). An extrusion rig was developed to simulate the mechanical environment of a post-operative hernia formation. Displacement controlled extrusion tests were performed, and the force-extrusion relationships at different extrusion velocities were compared for the intestines and the surrogate materials. The intestines showed a peak extrusion force ranging from 9 N to 14.8 N when pushed through a 13 mm hole, and similar extrusion properties between cleaned and uncleaned fresh porcine intestines were observed. The tests on surrogate materials showed that the surface tension properties of silicone gel resulted in high friction, that edible gelatine extruded like a liquid and that dough is very stiff, rendering all three materials unsuitable for use as surrogates. However, the RPP mix showed very similar force-extrusion properties compared to both the cleaned and uncleaned intestines. Viscoelastic testing (7.5 mm/min, 15 mm/min and 30 mm/min) showed little rate dependency in the extrusion properties for either the porcine intestines or the RPP. Despite the complexity of intestinal tissue and the obvious physical differences between intestine and RPP, it was found that there is no statistical difference between the yield strength of intestines and RPP (P values ranged between 0.14 and 0.3) at the rates tested.

  9. Porcine Intestinal Mast Cells. Evaluation of Different Fixatives for Histochemical Staining Techniques Considering Tissue Shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, J.; Twardziok, S.; Huenigen, H.; Hirschberg, R.M.; Plendl, J.

    2013-01-01

    Staining of mast cells (MCs), including porcine ones, is critically dependent upon the fixation and staining technique. In the pig, mucosal and submucosal MCs do not stain or stain only faintly after formalin fixation. Some fixation methods are particularly recommended for MC staining, for example the fixation with Carnoy or lead salts. Zinc salt fixation (ZSF) has been reported to work excellently for the preservation of fixation-sensitive antigens. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable histological method for counting of MCs in the porcine intestinum. For this purpose, different tissue fixation and staining methods that also allow potential subsequent immunohistochemical investigations were evaluated in the porcine mucosa, as well as submucosa of small and large intestine. Tissues were fixed in Carnoy, lead acetate, lead nitrate, Zamboni and ZSF and stained subsequently with either polychromatic methylene blue, alcian blue or toluidine blue. For the first time our study reveals that ZSF, a heavy metal fixative, preserves metachromatic staining of porcine MCs. Zamboni fixation was not suitable for histochemical visualization of MCs in the pig intestine. All other tested fixatives were suitable. Alcian blue and toluidine blue co-stained intestinal goblet cells which made a prima facie identification of MCs difficult. The polychromatic methylene blue proved to be the optimal staining. In order to compare MC counting results of the different fixation methods, tissue shrinkage was taken into account. As even the same fixation caused shrinkagedifferences between tissue from small and large intestine, different factors for each single fixation and intestinal localization had to be calculated. Tissue shrinkage varied between 19% and 57%, the highest tissue shrinkage was found after fixation with ZSF in the large intestine, the lowest one in the small intestine after lead acetate fixation. Our study emphasizes that MC counting results from data using different

  10. Effects of inactivated porcine epidemic diarrhea virus on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells and intestinal dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qi; Zhao, Shanshan; Qin, Tao; Yin, Yinyan; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2016-06-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) is a serious infection in neonatal piglets. As the causative agent of PED, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) results in acute diarrhea and dehydration with high mortality rates in swine. Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly effective antigen-presenting cells to uptake and present viral antigens to T cells, which then initiate a distinct immune response. In this study, our results show that the expression of Mo-DCs surface markers such as SWC3a(+)CD1a(+), SWC3a(+)CD80/86(+) and SWC3a(+)SLA-II-DR(+) is increased after incubation with UV-PEDV for 24h. Mo-DCs incubated with UV-PEDV produce higher levels of IL-12 and INF-γ compared to mock-infected Mo-DCs. Interactions between Mo-DCs and UV-PEDV significantly stimulate T-cell proliferation in vitro. Consistent with these results, there is an enhancement in the ability of porcine intestinal DCs to activate T-cell proliferation in vivo. We conclude that UV-PEDV may be a useful and safe vaccine to trigger adaptive immunity.

  11. Novel Approach for Isolation and Identification of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDV) Strain NJ Using Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wen; Jia, Shuo; Zhao, Haiyuan; Yin, Jiyuan; Wang, Xiaona; Yu, Meiling; Ma, Sunting; Wu, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Wenlu; Xu, Yigang; Li, Yijing

    2017-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), which is the causative agent of porcine epidemic diarrhea in China and other countries, is responsible for serious economic losses in the pork industry. Inactivated PEDV vaccine plays a key role in controlling the prevalence of PEDV. However, consistently low viral titers are obtained during the propagation of PEDV in vitro; this represents a challenge to molecular analyses of the virus and vaccine development. In this study, we successfully isolated a PEDV isolate (strain NJ) from clinical samples collected during a recent outbreak of diarrhea in piglets in China, using porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). We found that the isolate was better adapted to growth in IECs than in Vero cells, and the titer of the IEC cultures was 104.5 TCID50/0.1 mL at passage 45. Mutations in the S protein increased with the viral passage and the mutations tended towards attenuation. Viral challenge showed that the survival of IEC-adapted cultures was higher at the 45th passage than at the 5th passage. The use of IECs to isolate and propagate PEDV provides an effective approach for laboratory-based diagnosis of PEDV, as well as studies of the epidemiological characteristics and molecular biology of this virus. PMID:28117718

  12. In vitro adhesion of Escherichia coli to porcine small intestinal epithelial cells: pili as adhesive factors.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, R E; Fusco, P C; Brinton, C C; Moon, H W

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains with pili (K99 or 987P) known to facilitate intestinal colonization adhered in vitro to porcine intestinal epithelial cells. These strains adhered equally to both ileal and jejunal epithelial cells. A laboratory E. coli strain that has type 1 pili also adhered to porcine intestinal epithelial cells. When nonpiliated cells derived from 987P+, K99+, or type 1 pilus+ strains were used for in vitro adhesion assays, they failed to adhere. The attachment of piliated bacteria to epithelial cells was a saturable process that plateaued at 30 to 40 bacterial cells attached per epithelial cell. Competitive inhibition of bacterial cell attachment to epithelial cells with purified pili showed that only purified 987P competed against the 987P+ strain and only purified type 1 pili competed against the type 1 pilus+ strain. Competition between a K99+ strain and K99 was not consistently achieved. K99+, 987P+, and type 1 pilus+ bacteria could be prevented from adhering to epithelial cells by Fab fragments specific for K99, 987P, or type 1 pili, respectively. Fab fragments specific for non-K99 bacterial surface antigens did not inhibit adhesion of the K99+ strain. It is concluded that adhesion of E. coli to porcine intestinal epithelial cells in vitro is mediated by pili and that the epithelial cells used apparently had different receptors for different pili. PMID:357285

  13. In vitro adhesion of Escherichia coli to porcine small intestinal epithelial cells: pili as adhesive factors.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, R E; Fusco, P C; Brinton, C C; Moon, H W

    1978-08-01

    Escherichia coli strains with pili (K99 or 987P) known to facilitate intestinal colonization adhered in vitro to porcine intestinal epithelial cells. These strains adhered equally to both ileal and jejunal epithelial cells. A laboratory E. coli strain that has type 1 pili also adhered to porcine intestinal epithelial cells. When nonpiliated cells derived from 987P+, K99+, or type 1 pilus+ strains were used for in vitro adhesion assays, they failed to adhere. The attachment of piliated bacteria to epithelial cells was a saturable process that plateaued at 30 to 40 bacterial cells attached per epithelial cell. Competitive inhibition of bacterial cell attachment to epithelial cells with purified pili showed that only purified 987P competed against the 987P+ strain and only purified type 1 pili competed against the type 1 pilus+ strain. Competition between a K99+ strain and K99 was not consistently achieved. K99+, 987P+, and type 1 pilus+ bacteria could be prevented from adhering to epithelial cells by Fab fragments specific for K99, 987P, or type 1 pili, respectively. Fab fragments specific for non-K99 bacterial surface antigens did not inhibit adhesion of the K99+ strain. It is concluded that adhesion of E. coli to porcine intestinal epithelial cells in vitro is mediated by pili and that the epithelial cells used apparently had different receptors for different pili.

  14. Identification of side- and shear-dependent microRNAs regulating porcine aortic valve pathogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathan, Swetha; Ankeny, Casey J.; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Ferdous, Zannatul; Kumar, Sandeep; Fernandez Esmerats, Joan; Heath, Jack M.; Nerem, Robert M.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.; Jo, Hanjoong

    2016-05-01

    Aortic valve (AV) calcification is an inflammation driven process that occurs preferentially in the fibrosa. To explore the underlying mechanisms, we investigated if key microRNAs (miRNA) in the AV are differentially expressed due to disturbed blood flow (oscillatory shear (OS)) experienced by the fibrosa compared to the ventricularis. To identify the miRNAs involved, endothelial-enriched RNA was isolated from either side of healthy porcine AVs for microarray analysis. Validation using qPCR confirmed significantly higher expression of 7 miRNAs (miR-100, -130a, -181a/b, -199a-3p, -199a-5p, and -214) in the fibrosa versus the ventricularis. Upon bioinformatics analysis, miR-214 was selected for further investigation using porcine AV leaflets in an ex vivo shear system. Fibrosa and ventricularis sides were exposed to either oscillatory or unidirectional pulsatile shear for 2 days and 3 & 7 days in regular and osteogenic media, respectively. Higher expression of miR-214, increased thickness of the fibrosa, and calcification was observed when the fibrosa was exposed to OS compared to the ventricularis. Silencing of miR-214 by anti-miR-214 in whole AV leaflets with the fibrosa exposed to OS significantly increased the protein expression of TGFβ1 and moderately increased collagen content but did not affect AV calcification. Thus, miR-214 is identified as a side- and shear-dependent miRNA that regulates key mechanosensitive gene in AV such as TGFβ1.

  15. Identification of side- and shear-dependent microRNAs regulating porcine aortic valve pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rathan, Swetha; Ankeny, Casey J.; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Ferdous, Zannatul; Kumar, Sandeep; Fernandez Esmerats, Joan; Heath, Jack M.; Nerem, Robert M.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.; Jo, Hanjoong

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve (AV) calcification is an inflammation driven process that occurs preferentially in the fibrosa. To explore the underlying mechanisms, we investigated if key microRNAs (miRNA) in the AV are differentially expressed due to disturbed blood flow (oscillatory shear (OS)) experienced by the fibrosa compared to the ventricularis. To identify the miRNAs involved, endothelial-enriched RNA was isolated from either side of healthy porcine AVs for microarray analysis. Validation using qPCR confirmed significantly higher expression of 7 miRNAs (miR-100, -130a, -181a/b, -199a-3p, -199a-5p, and -214) in the fibrosa versus the ventricularis. Upon bioinformatics analysis, miR-214 was selected for further investigation using porcine AV leaflets in an ex vivo shear system. Fibrosa and ventricularis sides were exposed to either oscillatory or unidirectional pulsatile shear for 2 days and 3 & 7 days in regular and osteogenic media, respectively. Higher expression of miR-214, increased thickness of the fibrosa, and calcification was observed when the fibrosa was exposed to OS compared to the ventricularis. Silencing of miR-214 by anti-miR-214 in whole AV leaflets with the fibrosa exposed to OS significantly increased the protein expression of TGFβ1 and moderately increased collagen content but did not affect AV calcification. Thus, miR-214 is identified as a side- and shear-dependent miRNA that regulates key mechanosensitive gene in AV such as TGFβ1. PMID:27151744

  16. Effect of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide on porcine gastrointestinal electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Wechsung, E; Houvenaghel, A

    1994-01-01

    The influence of intravenous infusion of VIP, 150 and 300 pmol/kg/min, on gastrointestinal electrical activity was studied in conscious piglets with electrodes implanted in the wall of the antrum pylori, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. Both doses resulted in a decrease in antral electrical activity. In the small intestine, only the lower dose caused a shortening of the irregular spiking activity phase in the jejunum and ileum. In the jejunum this resulted in a reduction of the MMC interval. It may be concluded that the prevailing effect of VIP is an inhibition of gastrointestinal electrical activity in the piglet.

  17. Modulation of porcine intestinal epitheliocytes immunetranscriptome response by Lactobacillus jensenii TL2937.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Albarracin, L; Sato, N; Kanmani, P; Kober, A K M H; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, W; Suda, Y; Nochi, T; Aso, H; Makino, S; Kano, H; Ohkawara, S; Saito, T; Villena, J; Kitazawa, H

    2016-11-30

    In order to evaluate probiotic strains applicable for the beneficial immunomodulation of the porcine gut (immunobiotics), we previously developed a porcine intestinal epitheliocyte cell line (PIE cells). Here, transcriptomic studies using PIE cells were performed considering that this information would be valuable for understanding the mechanisms involved in the protective activity of the immunobiotic strain Lactobacillus jensenii TL2937 against intestinal inflammatory damage in pigs. In addition, those studies would provide criteria for selecting biomarkers for the screening of new immunobiotic strains. We performed microarray analysis to investigate the transcriptomic response of PIE cells to the challenge with heat-stable enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and, the changes induced by L. jensenii TL2937 in that response. The approach allowed us to obtain a global overview of the immune genes involved in the response of PIE cells to heat-stable ETEC PAMPs. We observed that L. jensenii TL2937 differently modulated gene expression in ETEC PAMPs-challenged PIE cells. Microarray and RT-PCR analysis indicated that the most remarkable changes in PIE cells transcriptomic profile after heat-stable ETEC PAMPs challenge were observed in chemokines, adhesion molecules, complement and coagulation cascades factors. In addition, an anti-inflammatory effect triggered by TL2937 strain in PIE cells was clearly demonstrated. The decrease in the expression of chemokines (CCL8, CXCL5, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11), complement (C1R, C1S, C3, and CFB), and coagulation factors (F3) by L. jensenii TL2937 supports our previous reports on the immunoregulatory effect of this strain. These results provided clues for the better understanding of the mechanism underlying host-immunobiotic interaction in the porcine host. The comprehensive transcriptomic profiles of PIE cells provided by our analyses successfully identified a group of genes, which

  18. The effect of porcine calcitonin on intestinal calcium and phosphate fluxes in the young piglet.

    PubMed

    McKercher, H G; Radde, I C

    1981-01-01

    The effects of a physiological (3.8 ng.mL-1) and a pharmacological (120 ng.mL-1) concentration of porcine calcitonin (CT) on transmucosal calcium and phosphate flux rates were determined in intestinal mucosa from young piglets (4--40 days) mounted in Ussing flux chambers. The physiological concentration of the hormone inhibited net absorptive calcium flux rates in the proximal jejunum and distal ileum but not in the duodenum. No effect of either concentration of CT on phosphate flux rates was observed. The inhibitory effect of the physiological concentration may indicate a role for CT in the maintenance of calcium homeostasis in the young suckling mammal.

  19. An intestinal microRNA modulates the homeostatic adaptation to chronic oxidative stress in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Masaomi; Kashem, Mohammed Abul; Cheng, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to an environmental or metabolic perturbation is a feature of the evolutionary process. Recent insights into microRNA function suggest that microRNAs serve as key players in a robust adaptive response against stress in animals through their capacity to fine-tune gene expression. However, it remains largely unclear how a microRNA-modulated downstream mechanism contributes to the process of homeostatic adaptation. Here we show that loss of an intestinally expressed microRNA gene, mir-60, in the nematode C. elegans promotes an adaptive response to chronic – a mild and long-term – oxidative stress exposure. The pathway involved appears to be unique since the canonical stress-responsive factors, such as DAF-16/FOXO, are dispensable for mir-60 loss to enhance oxidative stress resistance. Gene expression profiles revealed that genes encoding lysosomal proteases and those involved in xenobiotic metabolism and pathogen defense responses are up-regulated by the loss of mir-60. Detailed genetic studies and computational microRNA target prediction suggest that endocytosis components and a bZip transcription factor gene zip-10, which functions in innate immune response, are directly modulated by miR-60 in the intestine. Our findings suggest that the mir-60 loss facilitates adaptive response against chronic oxidative stress by ensuring the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. PMID:27623524

  20. Phytic acid protects porcine intestinal epithelial cells from deoxynivalenol (DON) cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Graziela Drociunas; Silva, Caio Abércio da; Pinton, Philippe; Oswald, Isabelle P; Bracarense, Ana Paula Frederico Rodrigues Loureiro

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of phytic acid (IP(6)) as a possible inhibitor of cellular damage induced by toxic substances such as mycotoxins on a porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-1). We first observed that a dose of 5 mM phytic acid decreases cell viability and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of cell monolayer. We next investigate the effect of non-cytotoxic dose of phytic acid on the deoxinivalenol (DON) induced decreased TEER. We showed that treatment with 0.5 mM or 1.0 mM phytic acid restores the decrease in TEER caused by 25 μM DON. In conclusion this study demonstrates that phytic acid decreased the negative effects of deoxynivalenol on the membrane integrity of the IPEC-1 intestinal epithelial cell line.

  1. Myocardial regeneration after implantation of porcine small intestinal submucosa in the left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Cassiana Maria Garcez; Francisco, Julio César; Olandoski, Marcia; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Cunha, Ricardo; Erbano, Bruna Olandoski; Jorge, Lianna Ferrari; Baena, Cristina Pellegrino; do Amaral, Vivian Ferreira; Noronha, Lucia; de Macedo, Rafael Michel; Faria-Neto, José Rocha; Guarita-Souza, Luiz César

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Most cardiomyocytes do not regenerate after myocardial infarction. Porcine small intestinal submucosa has been shown to be effective in tissue repair. Objective To evaluate myocardial tissue regeneration and functional effects of SIS implantation in pigs after left ventriculotomy. Methods Fifteen pigs were assigned to two groups: porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) (N=10) and control (N=5). The SIS group underwent a mini sternotomy, left ventriculotomy and placement of a SIS patch. The control group underwent a sham procedure. Echocardiography was performed before and 60 days after the surgical procedure. Histological analysis was performed with hematoxylin-eosin stain and markers for actin 1A4, anti sarcomeric actin, connexin43 and factor VIII. Results Weight gain was similar in both groups. Echocardiography analysis revealed no difference between groups regarding end diastolic and systolic diameters and left ventricular ejection fraction, both pre (P=0.118, P=0.313, P=0.944) and post procedure (P=0.333, P=0.522, P=0.628). Both groups showed an increase in end diastolic (P<0,001 for both) and systolic diameter 60 days after surgery (P=0.005, SIS group and P=0.004, control group). New cardiomyocytes, blood vessels and inflammatory reactions were histologically identified in the SIS group. Conclusion SIS implantation in pigs after left ventriculotomy was associated with angiomuscular regeneration and no damage in cardiac function. PMID:25140470

  2. Porcine milk-derived exosomes promote proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Xie, Mei-Ying; Sun, Jia-Jie; Ye, Rui-Song; Cheng, Xiao; Sun, Rui-Ping; Wei, Li-Min; Li, Meng; Lin, De-Lin; Jiang, Qing-Yan; Xi, Qian-Yun; Zhang, Yong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Milk-derived exosomes were identified as a novel mechanism of mother-to-child transmission of regulatory molecules, but their functions in intestinal tissues of neonates are not well-studied. Here, we characterized potential roles of porcine milk-derived exosomes in the intestinal tract. In vitro, treatment with milk-derived exosomes (27 ± 3 ng and 55 ± 5 ng total RNA) significantly promoted IPEC-J2 cell proliferation by MTT, CCK8, EdU fluorescence and EdU flow cytometry assays. The qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses indicated milk-derived exosomes (0.27 ± 0.03 μg total RNA) significantly promoted expression of CDX2, IGF-1R and PCNA, and inhibited p53 gene expression involved in intestinal proliferation. Additionally, six detected miRNAs were significantly increased in IPEC-J2 cell, while FAS and SERPINE were significantly down-regulated relative to that in control. In vivo, treated groups (0.125 μg and 0.25 μg total RNA) significantly raised mice’ villus height, crypt depth and ratio of villus length to crypt depth of intestinal tissues, significantly increased CDX2, PCNA and IGF-1R’ expression and significantly inhibited p53′ expression. Our study demonstrated that milk-derived exosomes can facilitate intestinal cell proliferation and intestinal tract development, thus giving a new insight for milk nutrition and newborn development and health. PMID:27646050

  3. Comparing Two Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cell Lines (IPECs): Morphological Differentiation, Function and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nossol, Constanze; Barta-Böszörményi, Anicò; Kahlert, Stefan; Zuschratter, Werner; Faber-Zuschratter, Heidi; Reinhardt, Nicole; Ponsuksili, Siriluk; Wimmers, Klaus; Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef

    2015-01-01

    The pig shows genetical and physiological resemblance to human, which predestines it as an experimental animal model especially for mucosal physiology. Therefore, the intestinal epithelial cell lines 1 and J2 (IPEC-1, IPEC-J2) - spontaneously immortalised cell lines from the porcine intestine - are important tools for studying intestinal function. A microarray (GeneChip Porcine Genome Array) was performed to compare the genome wide gene expression of IPECs. Different significantly up-regulated pathways were identified, like “lysosome”, “pathways in cancer”, “regulation of actin cytoskeleton” and “oxidative phosphorylation” in IPEC-J2 in comparison to IPEC-1. On the other hand, “spliceosome”, “ribosome”, “RNA-degradation” and “tight junction” are significantly down-regulated pathways in IPEC-J2 in comparison to IPEC-1. Examined pathways were followed up by functional analyses. ATP-, oxygen, glucose and lactate-measurement provide evidence for up-regulation of oxidative phosphorylation in IPEC-J2. These cells seem to be more active in their metabolism than IPEC-1 cells due to a significant higher ATP-content as well as a higher O2- and glucose-consumption. The down-regulated pathway “ribosome” was followed up by measurement of RNA- and protein content. In summary, IPEC-J2 is a morphologically and functionally more differentiated cell line in comparison to IPEC-1. In addition, IPEC-J2 cells are a preferential tool for in vitro studies with the focus on metabolism. PMID:26147118

  4. Identification and Evaluation of Novel MicroRNA Biomarkers in Plasma and Feces Associated with Drug-induced Intestinal Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kalabat, Dalia Y; Vitsky, Allison; Scott, Wesley; Kindt, Erick; Hayes, Kyle; John-Baptiste, Annette; Huang, Wenhu; Yang, Amy H

    2017-02-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity is dose limiting with many therapeutic and anticancer agents. Real-time, noninvasive detection of markers of toxicity in biofluids is advantageous. Ongoing research has revealed microRNAs as potential diagnostic and predictive biomarkers for the detection of select organ toxicities. To study the potential utility of microRNA biomarkers of intestinal injury in a preclinical toxicology species, we evaluated 3 rodent models of drug-induced intestinal toxicity, each with a distinct mechanism of toxicity. MiR-215 and miR-194 were identified as putative intestinal toxicity biomarkers. Both were evaluated in plasma and feces and compared to plasma citrulline, an established intestinal injury biomarker. Following intestinal toxicant dosing, microRNA changes in feces and plasma were detected noninvasively and correlated with histologic evidence of intestinal injury. Fecal miR-215 and miR-194 levels increased, and plasma miR-215 decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Dose-dependent decreases in plasma miR-215 levels also preceded and correlated positively with plasma citrulline modulation, suggesting miR-215 is a more sensitive biomarker. Moreover, during the drug-free recovery phase, plasma miR-215 returned to predose levels, supporting a corresponding recovery of histologic lesions. Despite limitations, this study provides preliminary evidence that select microRNAs have the potential to act as noninvasive, sensitive, and quantitative biomarkers of intestinal injury.

  5. Postnatal regulation of MAMDC4 in the porcine intestinal epithelium is influenced by bacterial colonization.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Alex J; Hamonic, Glenn M; Van Kessel, Andrew; Wilson, Heather L

    2016-11-01

    The MAM domain-containing 4 (MAMDC4) protein is associated with the unique endocytotic mechanism observed in the intestine of mammals during the immediate postnatal period. Transcriptional expression of MAMDC4 was substantially upregulated at birth in both the piglet jejunum and ileum and its expression decreases after birth. The protein was found localized specifically to the apical region of the luminal epithelium, however, MAMDC4 protein expression was lost at day 10 and 15 in the jejunum and ileum, respectively, and was not associated with "fetal" enterocyte replacement. Although spatial variation in the subcellular localization of Claudin 1 (CLDN1) was noted at day 3, the loss of MAMDC4 at later stages of development did not appear to have any effect on the tight junction structure. Germ-free (GF) piglets and piglets whose gastrointestinal flora consists exclusively of Escherichia coli (EC) or Lactobacillus fermentum (LF) maintained MAMDC4 protein expression to 14 days of age in distal regions of the small intestine whereas those with conventionalized intestinal flora (CV) showed no MAMDC4 protein at this age. MAMDC4 protein expression was most pronounced in the LF and GF colonized piglets which showed staining in the epithelial cells at 75% and 95% of the length of the small intestine, respectively, which matched that of the newborn. In contrast, EC animals showed only a low abundance at these regions as well as a discontinuous staining pattern. Collectively these results suggest that maturation of MAMDC4 expression in the porcine epithelium occurs more rapidly than what is reported in previously studied rodent species. Furthermore, intestinal bacterial colonization is a major regulator of MAMDC4 in a manner specific to bacterial species and independent of enterocyte turnover.

  6. Bacillus subtilis Protects Porcine Intestinal Barrier from Deoxynivalenol via Improved Zonula Occludens-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Min Jeong; Song, Sun Kwang; Park, Sung Moo; Lee, In Kyu; Yun, Cheol-Heui

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) forming the barrier for the first-line of protection are interconnected by tight junction (TJ) proteins. TJ alteration results in impaired barrier function, which causes potentially excessive inflammation leading to intestinal disorders. It has been suggested that toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 ligands and some bacteria enhance epithelial barrier function in humans and mice. However, no such study has yet to be claimed in swine. The aim of the present study was to examine whether Bacillus subtilis could improve barrier integrity and protection against deoxynivalenol (DON)-induced barrier disruption in porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2). We found that B. subtilis decreased permeability of TJ and improved the expression of zonula occludens (ZO)-1 and occludin during the process of forming TJ. In addition, ZO-1 expression of IPEC-J2 cells treated with B. subtilis was up-regulated against DON-induced damage. In conclusion, B. subtilis may have potential to enhance epithelial barrier function and to prevent the cells from DON-induced barrier dysfunction. PMID:25049991

  7. Hydrodynamic Assessment of Aortic Valves Prepared from Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Sharan; Lordeus, Makensley; Mankame, Omkar V; Valdes-Cruz, Lilliam; Bibevski, Steven; Bell, Sarah M; Baez, Ivan; Scholl, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Infants and children born with severe cardiac valve lesions have no effective long term treatment options since currently available tissue or mechanical prosthetic valves have sizing limitations and no avenue to accommodate the growth of the pediatric patient. Tissue engineered heart valves (TEHVs) which could provide for growth, self-repair, infection resistance, and long-term replacement could be an ideal solution. Porcine small intestinal submucosa (PSIS) has recently emerged as a potentially attractive bioscaffold for TEHVs. PSIS may possess the ability to recruit endogenous cardiovascular cells, leading to phenotypically-matched replacement tissue when the scaffold has completely degraded. Our group has successfully implanted custom-made PSIS valves in 4 infants with critical valve defects in whom standard bioprosthetic or mechanical valves were not an option. Short term clinical follow-up has been promising. However, no hydrodynamic data has been reported to date on these valves. The purpose of this study was to assess the functional effectiveness of tri-leaflet PSIS bioscaffolds in the aortic position compared to standard tri-leaflet porcine bioprosthetic valves. Hydrodynamic evaluation of acute PSIS function was conducted using a left heart simulator in our laboratory. Our results demonstrated similar flow and pressure profiles (p > 0.05) between the PSIS valves and the control valves. However, forward flow energy losses were found to be significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the PSIS valves compared to the controls possibly as a result of stiffer material properties of PSIS relative to glutaraldehyde-fixed porcine valve tissue. Our findings suggest that optimization of valve dimensions and shape may be important in accelerating de novo valve tissue growth and avoidance of long-term complications associated with higher energy losses (e.g. left ventricular hypertrophy). Furthermore, long term animal and clinical studies will be needed in order to

  8. In vitro effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on Trichomonas foetus-induced cytopathic changes in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, M Katherine; Brand, Mabre D; Gould, Emily N

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of specific cysteine protease (CP) inhibitors on cytopathic changes to porcine intestinal epithelial cells induced by Tritrichomonas foetus isolated from naturally infected cats. SAMPLE T foetus isolates from 4 naturally infected cats and nontransformed porcine intestinal epithelial cells. PROCEDURES T foetus isolates were treated with or without 0.1 to 1.0mM of the CP inhibitors antipain, cystatin, leupeptin, and chymostatin and the vinyl sulfone inhibitors WRR-483 and K11777. In-gel gelatin zymography was performed to evaluate the effects of these inhibitors on CP activity of T foetus isolates. Each treated or untreated isolate was also cocultured with monolayers of porcine intestinal epithelial cells for 24 hours, and cytopathic effects of T foetus were evaluated by light microscopy and crystal violet spectrophotometry. RESULTS Results of in-gel gelatin zymography suggested an ability of WRR-483, K11777, and cystatin to target specific zones of CP activity of the T foetus isolates. These inhibitors had no effect on T foetus growth, and the cytopathic changes to the intestinal epithelium induced by all 4 T foetus isolates were significantly inhibited. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE This study revealed that certain protease inhibitors were capable of inhibiting regions of CP activity (which has been suggested to cause intestinal cell damage in cats) in T foetus organisms and of ameliorating T foetus-induced cytopathic changes to porcine intestinal epithelium in vitro. Although additional research is needed, these inhibitors might be useful in the treatment of cats with trichomonosis.

  9. Immunobiotic Bifidobacteria Strains Modulate Rotavirus Immune Response in Porcine Intestinal Epitheliocytes via Pattern Recognition Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Ayako; Soma, Junichi; Suda, Yoshihito; Aso, Hisashi; Nochi, Tomonori; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-zhong; Saito, Tadao; Villena, Julio; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aimed to characterize the antiviral response of an originally established porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (PIE cells) by evaluating the molecular innate immune response to rotavirus (RVs). In addition, we aimed to select immunomodulatory bacteria with antiviral capabilities. PIE cells were inoculated with RVs isolated from different host species and the infective titers and the molecular innate immune response were evaluated. In addition, the protection against RVs infection and the modulation of immune response by different lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains was studied. The RVs strains OSU (porcine) and UK (bovine) effectively infected PIE cells. Our results also showed that RVs infection in PIE cells triggered TLR3-, RIG-I- and MDA-5-mediated immune responses with activation of IRF3 and NF-κB, induction of IFN-β and up-regulation of the interferon stimulated genes MxA and RNase L. Among the LAB strains tested, Bifidobacterium infantis MCC12 and B. breve MCC1274 significantly reduced RVs titers in infected PIE cells. The beneficial effects of both bifidobacteria were associated with reduction of A20 expression, and improvements of IRF-3 activation, IFN-β production, and MxA and RNase L expressions. These results indicate the value of PIE cells for studying RVs molecular innate immune response in pigs and for the selection of beneficial bacteria with antiviral capabilities. PMID:27023883

  10. Immunobiotic Bifidobacteria Strains Modulate Rotavirus Immune Response in Porcine Intestinal Epitheliocytes via Pattern Recognition Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Takamasa; Kanmani, Paulraj; Kobayashi, Hisakazu; Miyazaki, Ayako; Soma, Junichi; Suda, Yoshihito; Aso, Hisashi; Nochi, Tomonori; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-zhong; Saito, Tadao; Villena, Julio; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aimed to characterize the antiviral response of an originally established porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (PIE cells) by evaluating the molecular innate immune response to rotavirus (RVs). In addition, we aimed to select immunomodulatory bacteria with antiviral capabilities. PIE cells were inoculated with RVs isolated from different host species and the infective titers and the molecular innate immune response were evaluated. In addition, the protection against RVs infection and the modulation of immune response by different lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains was studied. The RVs strains OSU (porcine) and UK (bovine) effectively infected PIE cells. Our results also showed that RVs infection in PIE cells triggered TLR3-, RIG-I- and MDA-5-mediated immune responses with activation of IRF3 and NF-κB, induction of IFN-β and up-regulation of the interferon stimulated genes MxA and RNase L. Among the LAB strains tested, Bifidobacterium infantis MCC12 and B. breve MCC1274 significantly reduced RVs titers in infected PIE cells. The beneficial effects of both bifidobacteria were associated with reduction of A20 expression, and improvements of IRF-3 activation, IFN-β production, and MxA and RNase L expressions. These results indicate the value of PIE cells for studying RVs molecular innate immune response in pigs and for the selection of beneficial bacteria with antiviral capabilities.

  11. Biochemical and biomechanical characterization of porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS): a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Ronfard, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS [Oasis®]) is an acellular, biological extracellular matrix (ECM) that has been found to significantly improve the healing of difficult-to-heal or chronic wounds in humans. Like dermal ECM, SIS contains collagen, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans, and growth factors that play important roles in healing. Preclinical studies have shown that numerous cell types attach to SIS, proliferate and migrate into the matrix, and differentiate. In addition, SIS can reduce the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)—endogenous proteolytic enzymes whose levels and activities are increased in chronic wounds. Compared to the original single-layer SIS, multi-layer SIS has stronger mechanical properties and is more slowly degraded in wounds. Together, these SIS products provide flexibility in the selection of biologically-active ECMs that may be useful for the repair of diverse wound types. PMID:24273692

  12. Colonization of porcine intestine by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: selection of piliated forms in vivo, adhesion of piliated forms to epithelial cells in vitro, and incidence of a pilus antigen among porcine enteropathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, B; Moon, H W; Isaacson, R E

    1977-01-01

    In contrast to K88-positive porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), K88-negative porcine ETEC strains did not adhere to isolated intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. However, they did adhere to intestinal epithelium in vivo. Growth of one such ETEC (strain 987) in pig small intestine consistently yielded a greater percentage of piliated cells than did growth in vitro. This increase was demonstrable by electron microscopy, by change in colonial morphology, and by agglutination in specific antisera against the pili of strain 987. In contrast to the stored stock culture (which contained very few piliated cells), richly piliated forms of strain 987 did adhere to isolated intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. A series of porcine E. coli strains was tested for agglutinability in antiserum against the pili of strain 987, and several K88-negative ETEC strains were agglutinated. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that pili facilitate intestinal adhesion and colonization by K88-negative ETEC strains. Images PMID:326676

  13. Colonization of porcine intestine by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: selection of piliated forms in vivo, adhesion of piliated forms to epithelial cells in vitro, and incidence of a pilus antigen among porcine enteropathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Moon, H W; Isaacson, R E

    1977-04-01

    In contrast to K88-positive porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), K88-negative porcine ETEC strains did not adhere to isolated intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. However, they did adhere to intestinal epithelium in vivo. Growth of one such ETEC (strain 987) in pig small intestine consistently yielded a greater percentage of piliated cells than did growth in vitro. This increase was demonstrable by electron microscopy, by change in colonial morphology, and by agglutination in specific antisera against the pili of strain 987. In contrast to the stored stock culture (which contained very few piliated cells), richly piliated forms of strain 987 did adhere to isolated intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. A series of porcine E. coli strains was tested for agglutinability in antiserum against the pili of strain 987, and several K88-negative ETEC strains were agglutinated. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that pili facilitate intestinal adhesion and colonization by K88-negative ETEC strains.

  14. MicroRNA let-7f-5p Inhibits Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus by Targeting MYH9

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Du, Taofeng; Yan, Yunhuan; Zhang, Angke; Gao, Jiming; Hou, Gaopeng; Xiao, Shuqi; Zhou, En-Min

    2016-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most important viral pathogens in the swine industry. Current antiviral strategies do not effectively prevent and control PRRSV. Recent reports show that microRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in viral infections by post transcriptionally regulating the expression of viral or host genes. Our previous research showed that non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 (MYH9) is an essential factor for PRRSV infection. Using bioinformatic prediction and experimental verification, we demonstrate that MYH9 expression is regulated by the miRNA let-7f-5p, which binds to the MYH9 mRNA 3′UTR and may play an important role during PRRSV infection. To understand how let-7f-5p regulates PRRSV infection, we analyzed the expression pattern of both let-7f-5p and MYH9 in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) after infection with either highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) or classical type PRRSV (N-PRRSV) using a deep sequencing approach with quantitative real-time PCR validation. Our results showed that both HP-PRRSV and N-PRRSV infection reduced let-7f-5p expression while also inducing MYH9 expression. Furthermore, let-7f-5p significantly inhibited PRRSV replication through suppression of MYH9 expression. These findings not only provide new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV, but also suggest potential new antiviral strategies against PRRSV infection. PMID:27686528

  15. Comparative in vitro cytotoxicity of modified deoxynivalenol on porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Broekaert, Nathan; Devreese, Mathias; Demeyere, Kristel; Berthiller, Franz; Michlmayr, Herbert; Varga, Elisabeth; Adam, Gerhard; Meyer, Evelyne; Croubels, Siska

    2016-09-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the first target after ingestion of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) via feed and food. Deoxynivalenol is known to affect the proliferation and viability of animal and human intestinal epithelial cells. In addition to DON, feed and food is often co-contaminated with modified forms of DON, such as 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3ADON), 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (15ADON) and deoxynivalenol-3-β-D-glucoside (DON3G). The goal of this study was to determine the in vitro intrinsic cytotoxicity of these modified forms towards differentiated and proliferative porcine intestinal epithelial cells by means of flow cytometry. Cell death was assessed by dual staining with Annexin-V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and propidium iodide (PI), which allows the discrimination of viable (FITC-/PI-), apoptotic (FITC+/PI-) and necrotic cells (FITC+/PI+). Based on the data from the presented pilot in vitro study, it is concluded that cytotoxicity for proliferative cells can be ranked as follows: DON3G ≪ 3ADON < DON≈15ADON.

  16. Alpha-ketoglutarate inhibits glutamine degradation and enhances protein synthesis in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kang; Yin, Yulong; Li, Xilong; Xi, Pengbin; Wang, Junjun; Lei, Jian; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao

    2012-06-01

    α-Ketoglutarate (AKG) is a key intermediate in glutamine metabolism. Emerging evidence shows beneficial effects of AKG on clinical and experimental nutrition, particularly with respect to intestinal growth and integrity. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1) were used to test the hypothesis that AKG inhibits glutamine degradation and enhances protein synthesis. IPEC-1 cells were cultured for 3 days in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's-F12 Ham medium (DMEM-F12) containing 0, 0.2, 0.5 or 2 mM of AKG. At the end of the 3-day culture, cells were used to determine L-[U-14C]glutamine utilization, protein concentration, protein synthesis, and the total and phosphorylated levels of the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1). Compared with 0 mM of AKG (control), 0.2 and 0.5 mM of AKG dose-dependently reduced (P<0.05) glutamine degradation and the production of glutamate, alanine and aspartate in IPEC-1 cells. Addition of 0.5 and 2 mM of AKG to culture medium enhanced protein synthesis (P<0.05) by 78 and 101% without affecting protein degradation, compared to the control group. Rapamycin (50 nM; a potent inhibitor of mTOR) attenuated the stimulatory effect of AKG on protein synthesis. Consistent with these metabolic data, the addition of 0.5 or 2 mM of AKG to culture medium increased (P<0.05) the phosphorylated levels of mTOR, S6k1 and 4E-BP1 proteins. Collectively, these results indicate that AKG can spare glutamine and activate the mTOR signaling pathway to stimulate protein synthesis in intestinal epithelial cells.

  17. Soybean impairs Na(+)-dependent glucose absorption and Cl- secretion in porcine small intestine.

    PubMed

    Boudry, Gaëlle; Lallès, Jean-Paul; Malbert, Charles Henri; Grøndahl, Marie Louise; Unmack, Martin Andreas; Skadhauge, Erik

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that soybean, which is widely used in animal nutrition, could directly alter intestinal ion and nutrient transport. However, the mechanisms involved are still unknown. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of three differently treated soybean products on the glucose and Cl- transport capacity in porcine small intestine by the Ussing chamber technique. Jejunal and ileal piglet epithelial tissues were pre-incubated with extracts of raw soybean flour (RSF), heated soybean flour (HSF), or ethanol heat-treated soybean protein concentrate (SPC). The Na(+)-dependent glucose co-absorption capacity was then measured as an increase in the short-circuit current (ISC) after luminal addition of D-glucose. The effect of the soybean products on cAMP-dependent Cl- secretion was measured as the increase in ISC after the addition of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, theophylline, while nervous regulation of Cl- secretion was investigated by the addition of the enteric neurotransmitters; 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), substance P and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Incubation with RSF and HSF induced a 30% decrease of the Na(+)-dependent glucose absorption capacity in the jejunum. The effect was similar for RSF in the ileum. Theophylline-induced secretion was decreased by 30% after incubation with RSF, HSF and SPC but only in the jejunum. 5-HT-, substance P- and VIP-induced secretion were not altered by incubation with soybean extracts except in the HSF-incubated where the substance P-induced secretion was significantly reduced. In conclusion, soybean contains ethanol-sensitive heat-insensitive compounds impairing Na(+)-dependent glucose absorption in the jejunum and ileum, and ethanol- and heat-insensitive compounds causing an acute impairment of cAMP-dependent jejunal secretion.

  18. Femtosecond laser ablation of porcine intestinal mucosa: potential autologous transplant for segmental cystectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higbee, Russell G.; Irwin, Bryan S.; Nguyen, Michael N.; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Warren, William L.

    2005-04-01

    Nearly 80% of patients with newly diagnosed bladder cancer present with superficial bladder tumors (confined to the bladder lining such as transitional cell carcinoma [90%], squamous cell carcinoma [6-8%], and adenocarcinoma[2%]) in stages Ta, Tis, or T1. Segmental cystectomy is one surgical treatment for patients who have a low-grade invasive tumor. Transposition of small intestine is a viable surgical treatment option. Success of the transplantation is also dependent upon removal of the entire SI mucosal layer. A Clark Spitfire Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 775 nm and 1 kHz repetition rate, was used to investigate the damage induced to fresh cadaveric porcine small intestinal mucosal epithelium. The laser was held constant at a focal spot diameter of 100 μm using a 200 mm focal point lens, with a power output maximum of 257 mW. A high resolution motorized X-Y-Z stage translated the SI tissue through the beam at 500 μm/sec with a line spacing of 50 μm. This produced a 50% overlap in the laser etching for each pass over a 1 cm x 1.5 cm grid. To determine if the mucosal lining of the SI was adequately removed, the targeted area was covered with 1% fluorescein solution for 30 seconds and then rinsed with phosphate buffered saline. Fluorescein staining was examined under UV illumination, to determine the initial degree of mucosal removal. Tissues were fixed and processed for light and scanning electron microscopy by standard protocols. Brightfield light microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin stained 4 μm thick cross sections, scanning electron microscopy were examined to determine the degree of mucosal tissue removal. Clear delineation of the submucosal layer by fluorescein staining was also observed. The Ti:Sapphire laser demonstrated precise, efficient removal of the mucosal epithelium with minimal submucosal damage.

  19. Permeation studies through porcine small intestine of furosemide solutions for personalised paediatric administration.

    PubMed

    Provenza, N; Calpena, A C; Mallandrich, M; Sánchez, A; Egea, M A; Clares, B

    2014-11-20

    Personalized medicine is a challenging research area in paediatric drug design since no suitable pharmaceutical forms are currently available. Furosemide is an anthranilic acid derivative used in paediatric practice to treat cardiac and pulmonary disorders in premature infants and neonates. However, it is not commercialized in suitable dosage forms for paediatrics. Elaborating new paediatric formulations when no commercial forms are available is a common practice in pharmacy laboratories; amongst these, oral liquid formulations are the most common. We developed two extemporaneous paediatric oral solutions of furosemide (pure powder). The characterization and stability study were also performed. Parameters such as organoleptic characteristics, rheology, pH, content of active substance, and microbial stability were evaluated at three temperatures for two months. Evaluation of all these parameters showed that both solutions were stable for 60 days at 4 and 25 °C. Moreover, ex vivo studies were performed to evaluate the permeation behaviour of developed solutions through porcine small intestine to evaluate the potential paediatric biological parameters influencing the bioavailability and efficacy. A validated spectrofluorometric method was also used for this purpose. Our results guarantee a correct dosification, administration and potential efficacy of furosemide when is formulated in liquid oral forms for the treatment of cardiac and pulmonary disorders in children.

  20. EAAT3 promotes amino acid transport and proliferation of porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jin-Ling; Gao, Chun-Qi; Li, Xiang-Guang; Jin, Cheng-Long; Wang, Dan; Shu, Gang; Wang, Wen-Ce; Kong, Xiang-Feng; Yao, Kang; Yan, Hui-Chao; Wang, Xiu-Qi

    2016-06-21

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3, encoded by SLC1A1) is an epithelial type high-affinity anionic amino acid transporter, and glutamate is the major oxidative fuel for intestinal epithelial cells. This study investigated the effects of EAAT3 on amino acid transport and cell proliferation through activation of the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in porcine jejunal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2). Anionic amino acid and cystine (Cys) transport were increased (P<0.05) by EAAT3 overexpression and decreased (P<0.05) by EAAT3 knockdown rather than other amino acids. MTT and cell counting assays suggested that IPEC-J2 cell proliferation increased (P<0.05) with EAAT3 overexpression. Phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448), ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (S6K1, Thr389) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1 (4EBP1, Thr70) was increased by EAAT3 overexpression and decreased by EAAT3 knockdown (P<0.05), as were levels of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) (P<0.05). Our results demonstrate for the first time that EAAT3 facilitates anionic amino acid transport and activates the mTOR pathway, promoting Cys transport and IPEC-J2 cell proliferation.

  1. EAAT3 promotes amino acid transport and proliferation of porcine intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Cheng-long; Wang, Dan; Shu, Gang; Wang, Wen-ce; Kong, Xiang-feng; Yao, Kang; Yan, Hui-chao; Wang, Xiu-qi

    2016-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3, encoded by SLC1A1) is an epithelial type high-affinity anionic amino acid transporter, and glutamate is the major oxidative fuel for intestinal epithelial cells. This study investigated the effects of EAAT3 on amino acid transport and cell proliferation through activation of the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in porcine jejunal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2). Anionic amino acid and cystine (Cys) transport were increased (P<0.05) by EAAT3 overexpression and decreased (P<0.05) by EAAT3 knockdown rather than other amino acids. MTT and cell counting assays suggested that IPEC-J2 cell proliferation increased (P<0.05) with EAAT3 overexpression. Phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448), ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (S6K1, Thr389) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1 (4EBP1, Thr70) was increased by EAAT3 overexpression and decreased by EAAT3 knockdown (P<0.05), as were levels of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) (P<0.05). Our results demonstrate for the first time that EAAT3 facilitates anionic amino acid transport and activates the mTOR pathway, promoting Cys transport and IPEC-J2 cell proliferation. PMID:27231847

  2. In vivo perfusion assessment of an anastomosis surgery on porcine intestinal model (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Opferman, Justin; Decker, Ryan; Cheon, Gyeong W.; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Anastomosis, the connection of two structures, is a critical procedure for reconstructive surgery with over 1 million cases/year for visceral indication alone. However, complication rates such as strictures and leakage affect up to 19% of cases for colorectal anastomoses and up to 30% for visceral transplantation anastomoses. Local ischemia plays a critical role in anastomotic complications, making blood perfusion an important indicator for tissue health and predictor for healing following anastomosis. In this work, we apply a real time multispectral imaging technique to monitor impact on tissue perfusion due to varying interrupted suture spacing and suture tensions. Multispectral tissue images at 470, 540, 560, 580, 670 and 760 nm are analyzed in conjunction with an empirical model based on diffuse reflectance process to quantify the hemoglobin oxygen saturation within the suture site. The investigated tissues for anastomoses include porcine small (jejunum and ileum) and large (transverse colon) intestines. Two experiments using interrupted suturing with suture spacing of 1, 2, and 3 mm and tension levels from 0 N to 2.5 N are conducted. Tissue perfusion at 5, 10, 20 and 30 min after suturing are recorded and compared with the initial normal state. The result indicates the contrast between healthy and ischemic tissue areas and assists the determination of suturing spacing and tension. Therefore, the assessment of tissue perfusion will permit the development and intra-surgical monitoring of an optimal suture protocol during anastomosis with less complications and improved functional outcome.

  3. Transcriptional analysis of porcine intestinal mucosa infected with Salmonella Typhimurium revealed a massive inflammatory response and disruption of bile acid absorption in ileum.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Juber Herrera; Collado-Romero, Melania; Zaldívar-López, Sara; Arce, Cristina; Bautista, Rocío; Carvajal, Ana; Cirera, Susanna; Claros, M Gonzalo; Garrido, Juan J

    2016-01-07

    Infected pork meat is an important source of non-typhoidal human salmonellosis. Understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in disease pathogenesis is important for the development of therapeutic and preventive strategies. Thus, hereby we study the transcriptional profiles along the porcine intestine during infection with Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as post-transcriptional gene modulation by microRNAs (miRNA). Sixteen piglets were orally challenged with S. Typhimurium. Samples from jejunum, ileum and colon, collected 1, 2 and 6 days post infection (dpi) were hybridized to mRNA and miRNA expression microarrays and analyzed. Jejunum showed a reduced transcriptional response indicating mild inflammation only at 2 dpi. In ileum inflammatory genes were overexpressed (e.g., IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL1RAP, TNFα), indicating a strong immune response at all times of infection. Infection also down-regulated genes of the FXR pathway (e.g., NR1H4, FABP6, APOA1, SLC10A2), indicating disruption of the bile acid absorption in ileum. This result was confirmed by decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in serum of infected pigs. Ileal inflammatory gene expression changes peaked at 2 dpi and tended to resolve at 6 dpi. Furthermore, miRNA analysis of ileum at 2 dpi revealed 62 miRNAs potentially regulating target genes involved in this inflammatory process (e.g., miR-374 and miR-451). In colon, genes involved in epithelial adherence, proliferation and cellular reorganization were down-regulated at 2 and 6 dpi. In summary, here we show the transcriptional changes occurring at the intestine at different time points of the infection, which are mainly related to inflammation and disruption of the bile acid metabolism.

  4. Global microRNA profiling of well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su-Chen; Essaghir, Ahmed; Martijn, Cécile; Lloyd, Ricardo V; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Öberg, Kjell; Giandomenico, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors are rare malignancies. They arise from enterochromaffin cells and very little is known about differential microRNA (miRNA) expression. The aim of this study was to identify the miRNA profile of well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors, which may have a critical role in tumor development, progression and potentially develop miRNAs as novel clinical biomarkers. Specimens from two test groups, 24 small intestinal neuroendocrine tumor specimens at different stages of malignancy, are included in this study. Total RNA from the first test group, five primary tumors, five mesentery metastases and five liver metastases was hybridized onto the Affymetrix Genechip miRNA arrays to perform a genome-wide profile. The results were validated by using quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) and northern blot analyses. We then expanded the investigation to laser capture microdissected small intestinal neuroendocrine tumor cells and immuno-laser capture microdissected normal enterochromaffin cells of the first test group. Furthermore, a second test group, three primary tumors, three mesentery metastases and three liver metastases, was included in the study. Thus, two independent test groups validated the data by QRT-PCR. Moreover, we characterized nine miRNAs, five (miR-96, -182, -183, -196a and -200a), which are upregulated during tumor progression, whereas four (miR-31, -129-5p, -133a and -215) are downregulated. Several online software programs were used to predict potential miRNA target genes to map a number of putative target genes for the aberrantly regulated miRNAs, through an advanced and novel bioinformatics analysis. Our findings provide information about pivotal miRNAs, which may lead to further insights into tumorigenesis, progression mechanisms and novel therapeutic targets recognition. PMID:23328977

  5. Profiles of microRNA networks in intestinal epithelial cells in a mouse model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juneyoung; Park, Eun Jeong; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Ahmad, Shandar; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Ishii, Ken J.; Shimaoka, Motomu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) accompany a critical loss of the frontline barrier function that is achieved primarily by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). Although the gene-regulation pathways underlying these host-defense roles of IECs presumably are deranged during IBD pathogenesis, the quantitative and qualitative alterations of posttranscriptional regulators such as microRNAs (miRNAs) within the cells largely remain to be defined. We aimed to uncover the regulatory miRNA–target gene relationships that arise differentially in inflamed small- compared with large-IECs. Whereas IBD significantly increased the expression of only a few miRNA candidates in small-IECs, numerous miRNAs were upregulated in inflamed large-IECs. These marked alterations might explain why the large, as compared with small, intestine is more sensitive to colitis and shows more severe pathology in this experimental model of IBD. Our in-depth assessment of the miRNA–mRNA expression profiles and the resulting networks prompts us to suggest that miRNAs such as miR-1224, miR-3473a, and miR-5128 represent biomarkers that appear in large-IECs upon IBD development and co-operatively repress the expression of key anti-inflammatory factors. The current study provides insight into gene-regulatory networks in IECs through which dynamic rearrangement of the involved miRNAs modulates the gene expression–regulation machinery between maintaining and disrupting gastrointestinal homeostasis. PMID:26647826

  6. Permeation of iodide from iodine-enriched yeast through porcine intestine.

    PubMed

    Ryszka, Florian; Dolińska, Barbara; Zieliński, Michał; Chyra, Dagmara; Dobrzański, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is a common phenomenon, threatening the whole global human population. Recommended daily intake of iodine is 150 μg for adults and 250 μg for pregnant and breastfeeding women. About 50% of human population can be at risk of moderate iodine deficiency. Due to this fact, increased iodine supplementation is recommended, through intake of iodized mineral water and salt iodization. The aim of this study was to investigate permeation and absorption of iodide from iodine bioplex (experimental group) in comparison with potassium iodide (controls). Permeation and absorption processes were investigated in vitro using a porcine intestine. The experimental model was based on a standard Franz diffusion cell (FD-Cell). The iodine bioplex was produced using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and whey powder: iodine content - 388 μg/g, total protein - 28.5%, total fat - 0.9%., glutamic acid - 41.2%, asparaginic acid - 29.4%, lysine - 24.8%; purchased from: F.Z.N.P. Biochefa, Sosnowiec, Poland. Potassium iodide was used as controls, at 388 μg iodine concentration, which was the same as in iodine-enriched yeast bioplex. A statistically significant increase in iodide permeation was observed for iodine-enriched yeast bioplex in comparison with controls - potassium iodide. After 5h the total amount of permeated iodide from iodine-enriched yeast bioplex was 85%, which is ~ 2-fold higher than controls - 37%. Iodide absorption was by contrast statistically significantly higher in controls - 7.3%, in comparison with 4.5% in experimental group with iodine-enriched yeast bioplex. Presented results show that iodide permeation process dominates over absorption in case of iodine-enriched yeast bioplex.

  7. Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa Mesh for Treatment of Pelvic Organ Prolapsed

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ting-Ting; Sun, Xiu-Li; Wang, Shi-Yan; Yang, Xin; Wang, Jian-Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major health concern that affects women. Surgeons have increasingly used prosthetic meshes to correct POP. However, the most common used is synthetic mesh, and absorbable mesh is less reported. This research aimed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). Methods: Consecutive forty POP patients who met the inclusion criteria underwent pelvic reconstruction surgery with SIS between March 2012 and December 2013. The patients’ clinical characteristics were recorded preoperatively. Surgical outcomes, measured by objective and subjective success rates, were investigated. We evaluated the quality of life (QOL) using the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI-20) and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire-7 (PFIQ-7). Sexual QOL was assessed by the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12). Results: At postoperative 12 months, the subjective recurrence rate (7.5%) was much lower than the objective recurrence rate (40.0%). Postoperatively, no erosion was identified. One underwent a graft release procedure because of urinary retention, and one had anus sphincter reconstruction surgery due to defecation urgency. Another experienced posterior vaginal wall infection where the mesh was implanted, accompanied by severe vaginal pain. Estrogen cream relieved the pain. One patient with recurrence underwent a secondary surgery with Bard Mesh because of stage 3 anterior vaginal wall prolapse. Scoring system of PFDI-20 was from 59.150 ± 13.143 preoperatively to 8.400 ± 4.749 postoperatively and PFIQ-7 was from 73.350 ± 32.281 to 7.150 ± 3.110, while PISQ-12 was from 15.825 ± 4.050 to 12.725 ± 3.471. Conclusions: QOL and the degree of subjective satisfaction were significantly improved postoperatively. Anterior repair deserves more attention because of the higher recurrence rate. The long-term follow-up of the patient is warranted to draw firm

  8. Prevalence of extra-intestinal porcine helminth infections and assessment of sanitary conditions of pig slaughter slabs in Dar es Salaam city, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mkupasi, Ernatus M; Ngowi, Helena A; Nonga, Hezron Emmanuel

    2011-02-01

    A study was carried out to establish the prevalence of extra-intestinal porcine helminth infections and to assess the pig slaughter slab sanitary conditions in Dar es Salaam city, Tanzania. A total of 24 privately owned pig slaughter slabs were assessed. All slaughter slabs were sub-standard; wrongly located, poorly designed and constructed and lacked most basic requirements for a slaughter house. Because of inadequate slaughtering, disposal and cleaning facilities, the slaughter slabs were under unhygienic condition with questionable safety, soundness and wholesomeness of the pork produced. Routine meat inspection procedures were used to detect extra-intestinal porcine helminth infections. Of the 731 examined pigs; 8.1%, 5.9% and 0.4% were infected with ascariosis, porcine cysticercosis and hydatidosis, respectively. It was noted that almost all slaughter pigs in Dar es Salaam originated from different regions. Based on the region of origin, the status of porcine cysticercosis was 8.2% for Dodoma (n = 98), 8.2% for Manyara (n = 260) and 6.9% for Mbeya (n = 116). This study disclosed the unhygienic sanitary condition prevailing in Dar es Salaam pig slaughter slabs and recommends that strategies should be devised to improve the situation. Porcine ascariosis and cysticercosis were widely prevalent and caused economic losses due to condemnations. Because of their zoonotic nature, the observed extra-intestinal porcine helminth infections in pig pose a public health risk among consumers. Thus, there is a need to introduce appropriate control measures of parasitic infections in pigs.

  9. MicroRNA mir-16 is anti-proliferative in enterocytes and exhibits diurnal rhythmicity in intestinal crypts

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, Anita; Stearns, Adam T.; Park, Peter J.; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Ashley, Stanley W.; Rhoads, David B.; Tavakkolizadeh, Ali

    2010-12-10

    Background and aims: The intestine exhibits profound diurnal rhythms in function and morphology, in part due to changes in enterocyte proliferation. The regulatory mechanisms behind these rhythms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs are involved in mediating these rhythms, and studied the role of microRNAs specifically in modulating intestinal proliferation. Methods: Diurnal rhythmicity of microRNAs in rat jejunum was analyzed by microarrays and validated by qPCR. Temporal expression of diurnally rhythmic mir-16 was further quantified in intestinal crypts, villi, and smooth muscle using laser capture microdissection and qPCR. Morphological changes in rat jejunum were assessed by histology and proliferation by immunostaining for bromodeoxyuridine. In IEC-6 cells stably overexpressing mir-16, proliferation was assessed by cell counting and MTS assay, cell cycle progression and apoptosis by flow cytometry, and cell cycle gene expression by qPCR and immunoblotting. Results: mir-16 peaked 6 hours after light onset (HALO 6) with diurnal changes restricted to crypts. Crypt depth and villus height peaked at HALO 13-14 in antiphase to mir-16. Overexpression of mir-16 in IEC-6 cells suppressed specific G1/S regulators (cyclins D1-3, cyclin E1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6) and produced G1 arrest. Protein expression of these genes exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in rat jejunum, peaking between HALO 11 and 17 in antiphase to mir-16. Conclusions: This is the first report of circadian rhythmicity of specific microRNAs in rat jejunum. Our data provide a link between anti-proliferative mir-16 and the intestinal proliferation rhythm and point to mir-16 as an important regulator of proliferation in jejunal crypts. This function may be essential to match proliferation and absorptive capacity with nutrient availability.

  10. Association of Escherichia coli with the Small Intestinal Epithelium I. Comparison of Enteropathogenic and Nonenteropathogenic Porcine Strains in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bertschinger, Hans U.; Moon, Harley W.; Whipp, Shannon C.

    1972-01-01

    Two enteropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli (EEC) differed from a nonenteropathogenic strain of E. coli (NEEC) in their association with porcine small intestinal epithelium. The EEC characteristically were found along villi from tip to base and contiguous to the brush border. They were not in crypts. In contrast, the NEEC characteristically remained in the central lumen near the tips of villi and was only occasionally contiguous to the brush border. No organisms were detected within epithelial cells. The difference in distribution between EEC and NEEC was apparent in ligated jejunal loops 45 min postexposure. The association between host and bacterial cells was most consistently demonstrated on frozen sections of intestine, as other histological techniques removed many bacteria. However, cellular details of the association were best demonstrated in chemically fixed tissues. Images PMID:4564680

  11. Circulating microRNAs Reveal Time Course of Organ Injury in a Porcine Model of Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Luisa A.; Lee, Karla C. L.; Palacios Jimenez, Carolina; Alibhai, Hatim; Chang, Yu-Mei; Leckie, Pamela J.; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Davies, Nathan A.; Andreola, Fausto; Jalan, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare but catastrophic condition which can progress rapidly to multi-organ failure. Studies investigating the onset of individual organ injury such as the liver, kidneys and brain during the evolution of acute liver failure, are lacking. MicroRNAs are short, non-coding strands of RNA that are released into the circulation following tissue injury. In this study, we have characterised the release of both global microRNA and specific microRNA species into the plasma using a porcine model of acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure. Pigs were induced to acute liver failure with oral acetaminophen over 19h±2h and death occurred 13h±3h thereafter. Global microRNA concentrations increased 4h prior to acute liver failure in plasma (P<0.0001) but not in isolated exosomes, and were associated with increasing plasma levels of the damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, genomic DNA (P<0.0001). MiR122 increased around the time of onset of acute liver failure (P<0.0001) and was associated with increasing international normalised ratio (P<0.0001). MiR192 increased 8h after acute liver failure (P<0.0001) and was associated with increasing creatinine (P<0.0001). The increase in miR124-1 occurred concurrent with the pre-terminal increase in intracranial pressure (P<0.0001) and was associated with decreasing cerebral perfusion pressure (P<0.002). Conclusions MicroRNAs were released passively into the circulation in response to acetaminophen-induced cellular damage. A significant increase in global microRNA was detectable prior to significant increases in miR122, miR192 and miR124-1, which were associated with clinical evidence of liver, kidney and brain injury respectively. PMID:26018205

  12. Effects of continuous renal replacement therapy on intestinal mucosal barrier function during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been recommended for treatment of acute, potentially reversible, life-threatening respiratory failure unresponsive to conventional therapy. Intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction is one of the most critical pathophysiological disorders during ECMO. This study aimed to determine whether combination with CRRT could alleviate damage of intestinal mucosal barrier function during VV ECMO in a porcine model. Methods Twenty-four piglets were randomly divided into control(C), sham(S), ECMO(E) and ECMO + CRRT(EC) group. The animals were treated with ECMO or ECMO + CRRT for 24 hours. After the experiments, piglets were sacrificed. Jejunum, ileum and colon were harvested for morphologic examination of mucosal injury and ultrastructural distortion. Histological scoring was assessed according to Chiu’s scoring standard. Blood samples were taken from the animals at -1, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h during experiment. Blood, liver, spleen, kidney and mesenteric lymphnode were collected for bacterial culture. Serum concentrations of diamine oxidase (DAO) and intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) were tested as markers to assess intestinal epithelial function and permeability. DAO levels were determined by spectrophotometry and I-FABP levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results Microscopy findings showed that ECMO-induced intestinal microvillus shedding and edema, morphological distortion of tight junction between intestinal mucous epithelium and loose cell-cell junctions were significantly improved with combination of CRRT. No significance was detected on positive rate of serum bacterial culture. The elevated colonies of bacterial culture in liver and mesenteric lymphnode in E group reduced significantly in EC group (p < 0.05). Compared with E group, EC group showed significantly decreased level of serum DAO and I-FABP (p < 0.05). Conclusions CRRT can alleviate the intestinal mucosal dysfunction

  13. Susceptibility of porcine intestine to pilus-mediated adhesion by some isolates of piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli increases with age.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, B; Casey, T A; Whipp, S C; Moon, H W

    1992-01-01

    Two porcine isolates of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) (serogroup O157 and O141) derived from fatal cases of postweaning diarrhea and lacking K88, K99, F41, and 987P pili (4P- ETEC) were tested for adhesiveness to small-intestinal epithelia of pigs of different ages. Neither strain adhered to isolated intestinal brush borders of newborn (1-day-old) pigs in the presence of mannose. However, mannose-resistant adhesion occurred when brush borders from 10-day- and 3- and 6-week-old pigs were used. Electron microscopy revealed that both strains produced fine (3.5-nm) and type 1 pili at 37 degrees C but only type 1 pili at 18 degrees C. Mannose-resistant in vitro adhesion to brush borders of older pigs correlated with the presence of fine pili. These strains produced predominantly fine pili in ligated intestinal loops of both older and newborn pigs, but adherence was greater in loops in older pigs. Immunoelectron microscopic studies, using antiserum raised against piliated bacteria and absorbed with nonpiliated bacteria, of samples from brush border adherence studies revealed labelled appendages between adherent bacteria and intestinal microvilli. Orogastric inoculation of pigs weaned at 10 and 21 days of age indicated significantly (P less than 0.001) higher levels of adhesion by the ETEC to the ileal epithelia of older pigs than to that of younger ones. We suggest that small-intestinal adhesion and colonization by these ETEC isolates is dependent on receptors that develop progressively with age during the first 3 weeks after birth. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the fine pili described mediate intestinal adhesion by the 4P- ETEC strains studied. Images PMID:1347758

  14. Susceptibility of porcine intestine to pilus-mediated adhesion by some isolates of piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli increases with age.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Casey, T A; Whipp, S C; Moon, H W

    1992-04-01

    Two porcine isolates of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) (serogroup O157 and O141) derived from fatal cases of postweaning diarrhea and lacking K88, K99, F41, and 987P pili (4P- ETEC) were tested for adhesiveness to small-intestinal epithelia of pigs of different ages. Neither strain adhered to isolated intestinal brush borders of newborn (1-day-old) pigs in the presence of mannose. However, mannose-resistant adhesion occurred when brush borders from 10-day- and 3- and 6-week-old pigs were used. Electron microscopy revealed that both strains produced fine (3.5-nm) and type 1 pili at 37 degrees C but only type 1 pili at 18 degrees C. Mannose-resistant in vitro adhesion to brush borders of older pigs correlated with the presence of fine pili. These strains produced predominantly fine pili in ligated intestinal loops of both older and newborn pigs, but adherence was greater in loops in older pigs. Immunoelectron microscopic studies, using antiserum raised against piliated bacteria and absorbed with nonpiliated bacteria, of samples from brush border adherence studies revealed labelled appendages between adherent bacteria and intestinal microvilli. Orogastric inoculation of pigs weaned at 10 and 21 days of age indicated significantly (P less than 0.001) higher levels of adhesion by the ETEC to the ileal epithelia of older pigs than to that of younger ones. We suggest that small-intestinal adhesion and colonization by these ETEC isolates is dependent on receptors that develop progressively with age during the first 3 weeks after birth. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the fine pili described mediate intestinal adhesion by the 4P- ETEC strains studied.

  15. Effects of Lactobacillus johnsonii and Lactobacillus reuteri on gut barrier function and heat shock proteins in intestinal porcine epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao-Yu; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Ahl, David; Dicksved, Johan; Lindberg, Jan Erik; Lundh, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a set of highly conserved proteins that can serve as intestinal gate keepers in gut homeostasis. Here, effects of a probiotic, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), and two novel porcine isolates, Lactobacillus johnsonii strain P47-HY and Lactobacillus reuteri strain P43-HUV, on cytoprotective HSP expression and gut barrier function, were investigated in a porcine IPEC-J2 intestinal epithelial cell line model. The IPEC-J2 cells polarized on a permeable filter exhibited villus-like cell phenotype with development of apical microvilli. Western blot analysis detected HSP expression in IPEC-J2 and revealed that L. johnsonii and L. reuteri strains were able to significantly induce HSP27, despite high basal expression in IPEC-J2, whereas LGG did not. For HSP72, only the supernatant of L. reuteri induced the expression, which was comparable to the heat shock treatment, which indicated that HSP72 expression was more stimulus specific. The protective effect of lactobacilli was further studied in IPEC-J2 under an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) challenge. ETEC caused intestinal barrier destruction, as reflected by loss of cell–cell contact, reduced IPEC-J2 cell viability and transepithelial electrical resistance, and disruption of tight junction protein zonula occludens-1. In contrast, the L. reuteri treatment substantially counteracted these detrimental effects and preserved the barrier function. L. johnsonii and LGG also achieved barrier protection, partly by directly inhibiting ETEC attachment. Together, the results indicate that specific strains of Lactobacillus can enhance gut barrier function through cytoprotective HSP induction and fortify the cell protection against ETEC challenge through tight junction protein modulation and direct interaction with pathogens. PMID:25847917

  16. Effect of Fusarium-Derived Metabolites on the Barrier Integrity of Differentiated Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells (IPEC-J2)

    PubMed Central

    Springler, Alexandra; Vrubel, Galina-Jacqueline; Mayer, Elisabeth; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Novak, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The human, animal and plant pathogen Fusarium, which contaminates agricultural commodities worldwide, produces numerous secondary metabolites. An example is the thoroughly-investigated deoxynivalenol (DON), which severely impairs gastrointestinal barrier integrity. However, to date, the toxicological profile of other Fusarium-derived metabolites, such as enniatins, beauvericin, moniliformin, apicidin, aurofusarin, rubrofusarin, equisetin and bikaverin, are poorly characterized. Thus we examined their effects—as metabolites alone and as metabolites in combination with DON—on the intestinal barrier function of differentiated intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) over 72 h. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was measured at 24-h intervals, followed by evaluation of cell viability using neutral red (NR) assay. Enniatins A, A1, B and B1, apicidin, aurofusarin and beauvericin significantly reduced TEER. Moniliformin, equisetin, bikaverin and rubrofusarin had no effect on TEER. In the case of apicidin, aurofusarin and beauvericin, TEER reductions were further substantiated by the addition of otherwise no-effect DON concentrations. In all cases, viability was unaffected, confirming that TEER reductions were not due to compromised viability. Considering the prevalence of mycotoxin contamination and the diseases associated with intestinal barrier disruption, consumption of contaminated food or feed may have substantial health implications. PMID:27869761

  17. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Two Lawsonia intracellularis Isolates Associated with Proliferative Hemorrhagic Enteropathy and Porcine Intestinal Adenomatosis in South Korea▿

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jung-Yong; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Aeran; Lee, Ji Youn; Hwang, Jeong-Min; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Man; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2011-01-01

    This study represents the first published data on antimicrobial susceptibility of Asian isolates of Lawsonia intracellularis. We assessed MICs of 16 antimicrobials for two isolates of L. intracellularis recovered from diseased pigs in South Korea, one from a finisher pig with acute proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy in 2002 and the other from a grower pig with porcine intestinal adenomatosis in 2010. Tylosin and tilmicosin were found to be the most active against L. intracellularis both intracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 0.125 μg/ml, respectively) and extracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 1 μg/ml, respectively). PMID:21690283

  18. Different macro- and micro-rheological properties of native porcine respiratory and intestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Bokkasam, Harish; Ernst, Matthias; Guenther, Marco; Wagner, Christian; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-08-20

    Aim of this study was to investigate the similarities and differences at macro- and microscale in the viscoelastic properties of mucus that covers the epithelia of the intestinal and respiratory tract. Natural mucus was collected from pulmonary and intestinal regions of healthy pigs. Macro-rheological investigations were carried out through conventional plate-plate rheometry. Microrheology was investigated using optical tweezers. Our data revealed significant differences both in macro- and micro-rheological properties between respiratory and intestinal mucus.

  19. Abnormally High Content of Free Glucosamine Residues Identified in a Preparation of Commercially Available Porcine Intestinal Heparan Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) polysaccharides are ubiquitous in animal tissues as components of proteoglycans, and they participate in many important biological processes. HS carbohydrate chains are complex and can contain rare structural components such as N-unsubstituted glucosamine (GlcN). Commercially available HS preparations have been invaluable in many types of research activities. In the course of preparing microarrays to include probes derived from HS oligosaccharides, we found an unusually high content of GlcN residue in a recently purchased batch of porcine intestinal mucosal HS. Composition and sequence analysis by mass spectrometry of the oligosaccharides obtained after heparin lyase III digestion of the polysaccharide indicated two and three GlcN in the tetrasaccharide and hexasaccharide fractions, respectively. 1H NMR of the intact polysaccharide showed that this unusual batch differed strikingly from other HS preparations obtained from bovine kidney and porcine intestine. The very high content of GlcN (30%) and low content of GlcNAc (4.2%) determined by disaccharide composition analysis indicated that N-deacetylation and/or N-desulfation may have taken place. HS is widely used by the scientific community to investigate HS structures and activities. Great care has to be taken in drawing conclusions from investigations of structural features of HS and specificities of HS interaction with proteins when commercial HS is used without further analysis. Pending the availability of a validated commercial HS reference preparation, our data may be useful to members of the scientific community who have used the present preparation in their studies. PMID:27295282

  20. Gene Regulation of Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells IPEC-J2 Is Dependent on the Site of Deoxynivalenol Toxicological Action

    PubMed Central

    Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Nossol, Constanze; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Wimmers, Klaus; Kluess, Jeannette; Walk, Nicole; Post, Andreas; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Kahlert, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial cell layer represents the border between the luminal and systemic side of the gut. The decision between absorption and exclusion of substances is the quintessential function of the gut and varies along the gut axis. Consequently, potentially toxic substances may reach the basolateral domain of the epithelial cell layer via blood stream. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a Fusarium derived secondary metabolite known to enter the blood stream and displaying a striking toxicity on the basolateral side of polarised epithelial cell layers in vitro. Here we analysed potential mechanisms of apical and basolateral DON toxicity reflected in the gene expression. We used the jejunum-derived, polarised intestinal porcine epithelial cell line IPEC-J2 as an in vitro cell culture model. Luminal and systemic DON challenge of the epithelial cell layer was mimicked by a DON application from the apical or basolateral compartment of membrane inserts for 72 h. We compared the genome-wide gene expression of untreated and DON-treated IPEC-J2 cells with the GeneChip® Porcine Genome Array of Affymetrix. Low basolateral DON (200 ng/mL) application triggered 10 times more gene transcripts in comparison to the corresponding apical application (2539 versus 267) despite the intactness of the challenged cell layer as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. Analysis of the regulated genes by bioinformatic resource DAVID identified several groups of biochemical pathways modulated by concentration and orientation of DON application. Selected genes representing pathways of the cellular metabolism, information processing and structural design were analysed in detail by quantitative PCR. Our findings clearly show that apical and basolateral challenge of epithelial cell layers trigger different gene response profiles paralleled with a higher susceptibility towards basolateral challenge. The evaluation of toxicological potentials of mycotoxins should take this

  1. MicroRNA 29 Targets Nuclear Factor-κB–Repressing Factor and Claudin 1 to Increase Intestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, QiQi; Costinean, Stefan; Croce, Carlo M.; Brasier, Alan R.; Merwat, Shehzad; Larson, Scott A.; Basra, Sarpreet; Verne, G. Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Some patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) have intestinal hyperpermeability, which contributes to their diarrhea and abdominal pain. MicroRNA 29 (MIR29) regulates intestinal permeability in patients with IBS-D. We investigated and searched for targets of MIR29 and investigated the effects of disrupting Mir29 in mice. METHODS We investigated expression MIR29A and B in intestinal biopsies collected during endoscopy from patients with IBS (n = 183) and without IBS (controls) (n = 36). Levels were correlated with disease phenotype. We also generated and studied Mir29−/− mice, in which expression of Mir29a and b, but not c, is lost. Colitis was induced by administration of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid; intestinal tissues were collected and permeability was assessed. Microarray analysis was performed using tissues from Mir29−/− mice. Changes in levels of target genes were measured in human colonic epithelial cells and small intestinal epithelial cells after knockdown of MIR29 with anti-MIRs. RESULTS Intestinal tissues from patients with IBS-D (but not IBS with constipation or controls) had increased levels of MIR29A and B, but reduced levels of Claudin-1 (CLDN1) and nuclear factor-κB–repressing factor (NKRF). Induction of colitis and water avoidance stress increased levels of Mir29a and Mir29b and intestinal permeability in wild-type mice; these increased intestinal permeability in colons of far fewer Mir29−/− mice. In microarray and knockdown experiments, MIR29A and B were found to reduce levels of NKRF and CLDN1 messenger RNA, and alter levels of other messenger RNAs that regulate intestinal permeability. CONCLUSIONS Based on experiments in knockout mice and analyses of intestinal tissue samples from patients with IBS-D, MIR29 targets and reduces expression of CLDN1 and NKRF to increase intestinal permeability. Strategies to block MIR29 might be developed to restore intestinal permeability in patients with

  2. Computed Tomography Perfusion Imaging Detection of Microcirculatory Dysfunction in Small Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haifeng; Li, Ruokun; Qiang, Jinwei; Li, Ying; Wang, Li; Sun, Rongxun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate multi-slice computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging (CTPI) for identifying microcirculatory dysfunction in small intestinal ischemia−reperfusion (IR) injury in a porcine model. Materials and Methods Fifty-two pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups: (1) the IR group (n = 24), where intestinal ischemia was induced by separating and clamping the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) for 2 h, followed by reperfusion for 1, 2, 3, and 4 h (IR-1h, IR-2h, IR-3h, and IR-4h; n = 6, respectively); (2) the sham-operated (SO) group (n = 20), where the SMA was separated without clamping and controlled at postoperative 3, 4, 5, and 6 h (SO-3h, SO-4h, SO-5h, and SO-6h; n = 5, respectively); (3) the ischemia group (n = 4), where the SMA was separated and clamped for 2 h, without reperfusion, and (4) baseline group (n = 4), an additional group that was not manipulated. Small intestinal CTPI was performed at corresponding time points and perfusion parameters were obtained. The distal ileum was resected to measure the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and for histopathological examination. Results The perfusion parameters of the IR groups showed significant differences compared with the corresponding SO groups and the baseline group (before ischemia). The blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and permeability surface (PS) among the 4 IR groups were significantly different. BF and BV were significantly negatively correlated with MDA, and significantly positively correlated with SOD in the IR groups. Histopathologically, the effects of the 2-h ischemic loops were not significantly exacerbated by reperfusion. Conclusion CTPI can be a valuable tool for detecting microcirculatory dysfunction and for dynamic monitoring of small intestinal IR injury. PMID:27458696

  3. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains differentially modulate antiviral immune response in porcine intestinal epithelial and antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous findings suggested that Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 is able to increase resistance of children to intestinal viral infections. However, the intestinal cells, cytokines and receptors involved in the immunoregulatory effect of this probiotic strain have not been fully characterized. Results We aimed to gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory effect of the CRL1505 strain and therefore evaluated in vitro the crosstalk between L. rhamnosus CRL1505, porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and antigen presenting cells (APCs) from swine Peyer’s patches in order to deepen our knowledge about the mechanisms, through which this strain may help preventing viral diarrhoea episodes. L. rhamnosus CRL1505 was able to induce IFN–α and –β in IECs and improve the production of type I IFNs in response to poly(I:C) challenge independently of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 or TLR9 signalling. In addition, the CRL1505 strain induced mRNA expression of IL-6 and TNF-α via TLR2 in IECs. Furthermore, the strain significantly increased surface molecules expression and cytokine production in intestinal APCs. The improved Th1 response induced by L. rhamnosus CRL1505 was triggered by TLR2 signalling and included augmented expression of MHC-II and co-stimulatory molecules and expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ in APCs. IL-10 was also significantly up-regulated by CRL1505 in APCs. Conclusions It was recently reviewed the emergence of TLR agonists as new ways to transform antiviral treatments by introducing panviral therapeutics with less adverse effects than IFN therapies. The use of L. rhamnosus CRL1505 as modulator of innate immunity and inductor of antiviral type I IFNs, IFN-γ, and regulatory IL-10 clearly offers the potential to overcome this challenge. PMID:24886142

  4. Regulation of CCN1 (Cyr61) in a porcine model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Shegarfi, Hamid; Krohn, Claus Danckert; Gundersen, Yngvar; Kjeldsen, Signe Flood; Hviid, Claus V B; Ruud, Tom Erik; Aasen, Ansgar O

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal ischemia is a serious condition that may lead to both local and systemic inflammatory responses. Restoration of blood supply (reperfusion) to ischemic tissues often increases the extent of the tissue injury. Cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (Cyr61)/CCN1 is an extracellular matrix-associated signaling protein that has diverse functions. CCN1 is highly expressed at sites of inflammation and wound repair, and may modify cell responses. This study aimed to investigate regulation and cellular distribution of CCN1 in intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in pigs. After intestinal I/R, increased expression of CCN1 was detected by quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry compared with non-ischemic intestine. Immunoflorescence staining revealed that CCN1 was mainly up-regulated in intestinal mucosa after intestinal I/R. Microvillus epithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells were strongly positive for CCN1 in intestinal I/R, while natural killer cells and/or subsets of neutrophils were only modestly positive for CCN1. Furthermore, blood samples taken from the portal and caval veins during ischemia and after reperfusion showed no change of the CCN1 levels, indicating that CCN1 was locally regulated. In conclusion, these observations show, for the first time, that the CCN1 molecule is up-regulated in response to intestinal I/R in a local manner.

  5. Mechanical Intestinal Obstruction in a Porcine Model: Effects of Intra-Abdominal Hypertension. A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Margallo, F. M.; Latorre, R.; López-Albors, O.; Wise, R.; Malbrain, M. L. N. G.; Castellanos, G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical intestinal obstruction is a disorder associated with intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. As the large intestine intraluminal and intra-abdominal pressures are increased, so the patient’s risk for intestinal ischaemia. Previous studies have focused on hypoperfusion and bacterial translocation without considering the concomitant effect of intra-abdominal hypertension. The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a mechanical intestinal obstruction model in pigs similar to the human pathophysiology. Materials and Methods Fifteen pigs were divided into three groups: a control group (n = 5) and two groups of 5 pigs with intra-abdominal hypertension induced by mechanical intestinal obstruction. The intra-abdominal pressures of 20 mmHg were maintained for 2 and 5 hours respectively. Hemodynamic, respiratory and gastric intramucosal pH values, as well as blood tests were recorded every 30 min. Results Significant differences between the control and mechanical intestinal obstruction groups were noted. The mean arterial pressure, cardiac index, dynamic pulmonary compliance and abdominal perfusion pressure decreased. The systemic vascular resistance index, central venous pressure, pulse pressure variation, airway resistance and lactate increased within 2 hours from starting intra-abdominal hypertension (p<0.05). In addition, we observed increased values for the peak and plateau airway pressures, and low values of gastric intramucosal pH in the mechanical intestinal obstruction groups that were significant after 3 hours. Conclusion The mechanical intestinal obstruction model appears to adequately simulate the pathophysiology of intestinal obstruction that occurs in humans. Monitoring abdominal perfusion pressure, dynamic pulmonary compliance, gastric intramucosal pH and lactate values may provide insight in predicting the effects on endorgan function in patients with mechanical intestinal obstruction. PMID

  6. Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Disruption through Altered Mucosal MicroRNA Expression in Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gaulke, Christopher A.; Porter, Matthew; Han, Yan-Hong; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Grishina, Irina; George, Michael D.; Dang, Angeline T.; Ding, Shou-Wei; Jiang, Guochun; Korf, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial barrier dysfunction during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has largely been attributed to the rapid and severe depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although it is known that changes in mucosal gene expression contribute to intestinal enteropathy, the role of small noncoding RNAs, specifically microRNA (miRNA), has not been investigated. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected nonhuman primate model of HIV pathogenesis, we investigated the effect of viral infection on miRNA expression in intestinal mucosa. SIV infection led to a striking decrease in the expression of mucosal miRNA compared to that in uninfected controls. This decrease coincided with an increase in 5′-3′-exoribonuclease 2 protein and alterations in DICER1 and Argonaute 2 expression. Targets of depleted miRNA belonged to molecular pathways involved in epithelial proliferation, differentiation, and immune response. Decreased expression of several miRNA involved in maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the gut was localized to the proliferative crypt region of the intestinal epithelium. Our findings suggest that SIV-induced decreased expression of miRNA involved in epithelial homeostasis, disrupted expression of miRNA biogenesis machinery, and increased expression of XRN2 are involved in the development of epithelial barrier dysfunction and gastroenteropathy. IMPORTANCE MicroRNA (miRNA) regulate the development and function of intestinal epithelial cells, and many viruses disrupt normal host miRNA expression. In this study, we demonstrate that SIV and HIV disrupt expression of miRNA in the small intestine during infection. The depletion of several key miRNA is localized to the proliferative crypt region of the gut epithelium. These miRNA are known to control expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell death, and epithelial maturation. Our data indicate that this disruption might be caused by altered expression of mi

  7. Characterization of porcine intestinal receptors for the K88ac fimbrial adhesin of Escherichia coli as mucin-type sialoglycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, A K; Baker, D R; Bosworth, B T; Casey, T A; Benfield, D A; Francis, D H

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified two K88ac adhesion receptors (210 and 240 kDa) which are present in membrane preparations from adhesive but not nonadhesive porcine intestinal brush border cells; these adhesin receptors are postulated to be important determinants of the susceptibility of pigs to K88ac+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections (A.K. Erickson, J.A. Willgohs, S.Y. McFarland, D.A. Benfield, and D.F. Francis, Infect. Immun. 60:983-988, 1992). We now describe a procedure for the purification of these two receptors. Receptors were solubilized from adhesive intestinal brush border vesicles using deoxycholate and were purified by gel filtration chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B and then by hydroxyapatite chromatography. Amino acid compositional analyses indicated that the two receptors have similar amino acid compositions. The most distinguishing characteristic of both receptors is a high percentage of threonine and proline residues. Neuraminidase treatment caused the K88ac adhesin receptors to migrate with a slower mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels, indicating that these receptors are sialoglycoproteins. Results from lectin-binding studies indicated that the receptors contain O-linked oligosaccharides composed of galactosyl (beta-1,3)N-acetylgalactosamine, alpha-linked fucose, galactosyl(beta-1,4)N-acetylglucosamine, sialic acid, galactose, and N-acetylgalactosamine. Collectively, these characteristics indicate that the K88ac adhesin receptors are mucin-type sialoglycoproteins. Images PMID:7960120

  8. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria bound to the porcine intestinal mucosa and an analysis of their moonlighting adhesins

    PubMed Central

    KINOSHITA, Hideki; OHUCHI, Satoko; ARAKAWA, Kensuke; WATANABE, Masamichi; KITAZAWA, Haruki; SAITO, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to the intestinal mucosa is one of the criteria in selecting for probiotics. Eighteen LAB were isolated from porcine intestinal mucin (PIM): ten strains of Lactobacillus, six strains of Weissella, and two strains of Streptococcus. Using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) for phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) extracts from the LAB, many bands were detected in half of the samples, while a few and/or no clear bands were detected in the other half. All six of the selected LAB showed adhesion to PIM. L. johnsonii MYU 214 and MYU 221 showed adhesion at more than 10%. W. viridescens MYU 208, L. reuteri MYU 213, L. mucosae MYU 225, and L. agilis MYU 227 showed medium levels of adhesion at 5.9–8.3%. In a comprehensive analysis for the adhesins in the PBS extracts using a receptor overlay analysis, many moonlighting proteins were detected and identified as candidates for adhesins: GroEL, enolase, and elongation factor Tu in MYU 208; peptidase C1, enolase, formyl-CoA transferase, phosphoglyceromutase, triosephosphate isomerase, and phosphofructokinase in MYU 221; and DnaK, enolase, and phosphoglycerate kinase in MYU 227. These proteins in the PBS extracts, which included such things as molecular chaperones and glycolytic enzymes, may play important roles as adhesins. PMID:27867805

  9. Immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria beneficially regulate immune response triggered by poly(I:C) in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Shoichi; Villena, Julio; Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Tohno, Masanori; Fujie, Hitomi; Chiba, Eriko; Shimosato, Takeshi; Aso, Hisashi; Suda, Yoshihito; Kawai, Yasushi; Saito, Tadao; Alvarez, Susana; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2011-11-03

    This study analyzed the functional expression of TLR3 in various gastrointestinal tissues from adult swine and shows that TLR3 is expressed preferentially in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), CD172a(+)CD11R1(high) and CD4(+) cells from ileal Peyer's patches. We characterized the inflammatory immune response triggered by TLR3 activation in a clonal porcine intestinal epitheliocyte cell line (PIE cells) and in PIE-immune cell co-cultures, and demonstrated that these systems are valuable tools to study in vitro the immune response triggered by TLR3 on IEC and the interaction between IEC and immune cells. In addition, we selected an immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria strain, Lactobacillus casei MEP221106, able to beneficially regulate the anti-viral immune response triggered by poly(I:C) stimulation in PIE cells. Moreover, we deepened our understanding of the possible mechanisms of immunobiotic action by demonstrating that L. casei MEP221106 modulates the interaction between IEC and immune cells during the generation of a TLR3-mediated immune response.

  10. High-Throughput Sequencing Identifies MicroRNAs from Posterior Intestine of Loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) and Their Response to Intestinal Air-Breathing Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Songqian; Cao, Xiaojuan; Tian, Xianchang; Wang, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) exert important roles in animal growth, immunity, and development, and regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Knowledges about the diversities of miRNAs and their roles in accessory air-breathing organs (ABOs) of fish remain unknown. In this work, we used high-throughput sequencing to identify known and novel miRNAs from the posterior intestine, an important ABO, in loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) under normal and intestinal air-breathing inhibited conditions. A total of 204 known and 84 novel miRNAs were identified, while 47 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the two small RNA libraries (i.e. between the normal and intestinal air-breathing inhibited group). Potential miRNA target genes were predicted by combining our transcriptome data of the posterior intestine of the loach under the same conditions, and then annotated using COG, GO, KEGG, Swissprot and Nr databases. The regulatory networks of miRNAs and their target genes were analyzed. The abundances of nine known miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. The relative expression profiles of six known miRNAs and their eight corresponding target genes, and two novel potential miRNAs were also detected. Histological characteristics of the posterior intestines in both normal and air-breathing inhibited group were further analyzed. This study contributes to our understanding on the functions and molecular regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs in accessory air-breathing organs of fish. PMID:26872032

  11. Hyaluronan mediates the adhesion of porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells to poly (I:C)-treated intestinal cells and modulates their cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Docampo, María José; Cabrera, Jennifer; Bassols, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), has been increasingly recognized as a regulator of inflammation. Its role is complex since it has pro- and anti-inflammatory actions by modulating the expression of inflammatory genes, the recruitment of inflammatory cells and the production of inflammatory cytokines, but also by attenuating the course of inflammation and providing protection against tissue damage. Certain viruses and other inflammatory stimuli induce organization of HA into cable-like structures, which may be responsible for leukocyte recruitment and, on the other hand, low molecular weight fragments of HA have been shown to activate various inflammatory responses. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of a simulated infection with the viral mimetic Poly (I:C) on HA deposition on different porcine intestinal cells (primary colonic muscular smooth muscle cells (SMC), and epithelial IPEC-J2 and IPI-2I cell lines) and on the recruitment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to intestinal cell layers. We show that Poly (I:C) treatment induces the formation of an HA-based pericellular matrix coat in muscular SMC and in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and that, on differentiated IPEC-J2 cells, HA accumulates in the basolateral membrane. Porcine PBMCs bind to Poly (I:C)-treated cells and this binding is dependent on HA, since the increase in adhesion is abolished by hyaluronidase treatment of the cell layers. A second goal was to study the effect of different molecular weight HA forms on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-8) by porcine PBMCs. Low molecular weight HA fragments (100-150kDa), in contrast to high molecular weight HA (2500kDa), stimulate the release of these pro-inflammatory mediators by porcine PBMCs. Our results suggest that HA is involved in the inflammatory response against pathogenic insults to the porcine gut.

  12. Proteomic changes of the porcine small intestine in response to chronic heat stress.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanjun; Gu, Xianhong

    2015-12-01

    Acute heat stress (HS) negatively affects intestinal integrity and barrier function. In contrast, chronic mild HS poses a distinct challenge to animals. Therefore, this study integrates biochemical, histological and proteomic approaches to investigate the effects of chronic HS on the intestine in finishing pigs. Castrated male crossbreeds (79.00 ± 1.50 kg BW) were subjected to either thermal neutral (TN, 21 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (30 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) for 3 weeks. The pigs were sacrificed after 3 weeks of high environmental exposure and the plasma hormones, the intestinal morphology, integrity, and protein profiles of the jejunum mucosa were determined. Chronic HS reduced the free triiodothyronine (FT3) and GH levels. HS damaged intestinal morphology, increased plasma d-lactate concentrations and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity of intestinal mucosa. Proteome analysis of the jejunum mucosa was conducted by 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Fifty-three intestinal proteins were found to be differentially abundant, 18 of which were related to cell structure and motility, and their changes in abundance could comprise intestinal integrity and function. The down-regulation of proteins involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), electron transport chain (ETC), and oxidative phosphorylation suggested that chronic HS impaired energy metabolism and thus induced oxidative stress. Moreover, the changes of ten proteins in abundance related to stress response and defense indicated pigs mediated long-term heat exposure and counteracted its negative effects of heat exposure. These findings have important implications for understanding the effect of chronic HS on intestines.

  13. Inhibition of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication with exosome-transferred artificial microRNA targeting the 3' untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Bao, Liping; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli; Sun, Huaichang

    2015-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an economically important swine disease. As part of the development of RNA interference (RNAi) strategy against the disease, in this study a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) expressing the artificial microRNA (amiRNA) targeting the 3' untranslated region (UTR) was used to investigate the exosome-mediated amiRNA transfer from different pig cell types to porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the sequence-specific amiRNA was expressed in and secreted via exosomes from the rAd-transduced pig kidney cell line PK-15, PAM cell line 3D4/163, kidney fibroblast cells (PFCs) and endometrial endothelial cells (PEECs) with different secretion efficiencies. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that the dye-labeled amiRNA-containing exosomes of different cell origins were efficiently taken up by all of the five types of pig cells tested, including primary PAMs. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the amiRNA-containing exosomes of different cell origins were taken up by primary PAMs in both time- and dose-dependent manners. Both quantitative RT-PCR and viral titration assays showed that the exosome-delivered amiRNA had potent anti-viral effects against three different PRRSV strains. These data suggest that the exosomes derived from pig cells could serve as an efficient miRNA transfer vehicle, and that the exosome-delivered amiRNA had potent anti-viral effects against different PRRSV strains.

  14. Age-specific colonization of porcine intestinal epithelium by 987P-piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, E A; Whipp, S C; Moon, H W

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal (less than 1-day-old), 3- and 7-day old, and older (3-week-old postweaning) pigs were challenged by intragastric inoculation with 987P-piliated (987P+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) 987. Neonatal pigs were colonized (i.e., there were greater than or equal to 10(8) CFU of test strain per 10-cm ileal segment) and developed diarrhea. Intestinal colonization and the incidence and severity of diarrhea were lower in 3- and 7-day old pigs than in neonates. Older pigs were not colonized and did not develop diarrhea following oral inoculation with five strains of 987P+ ETEC. Strain 987 (987P+) adhered in vitro to intestinal epithelial cell brush borders isolated from both neonatal (sensitive) and older (resistant) pigs. The in vivo growth and expression of 987P pilus by strain 987 in ligated ileal loops created in neonatal and older pigs were similar. The in vivo adherence of 987P+ ETEC to intestinal epithelium in ligated ileal loops in neonatal and older pigs was compared. In neonatal pigs, most of the bacteria were in layers associated with the villous epithelium. In older pigs, most of the bacteria were associated with mucus-like material in the intestinal lumen. We concluded that swine develop an innate resistance to 987P+ ETEC by 3 weeks of age. This resistance does not appear to be due to an absence of 987P-specific receptors in the intestines of the older pig or to an inability of 987P+ bacteria to grow and express pili in the older pig. We hypothesized that the resistance of older pigs to 987P-mediated disease is due to release of 987P-specific receptors into the intestinal lumen, where these receptors facilitate bacterial clearance rather than bacterial adherence to intestinal epithelium and colonization. Images PMID:2562837

  15. Age-specific colonization of porcine intestinal epithelium by 987P-piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dean, E A; Whipp, S C; Moon, H W

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal (less than 1-day-old), 3- and 7-day old, and older (3-week-old postweaning) pigs were challenged by intragastric inoculation with 987P-piliated (987P+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) 987. Neonatal pigs were colonized (i.e., there were greater than or equal to 10(8) CFU of test strain per 10-cm ileal segment) and developed diarrhea. Intestinal colonization and the incidence and severity of diarrhea were lower in 3- and 7-day old pigs than in neonates. Older pigs were not colonized and did not develop diarrhea following oral inoculation with five strains of 987P+ ETEC. Strain 987 (987P+) adhered in vitro to intestinal epithelial cell brush borders isolated from both neonatal (sensitive) and older (resistant) pigs. The in vivo growth and expression of 987P pilus by strain 987 in ligated ileal loops created in neonatal and older pigs were similar. The in vivo adherence of 987P+ ETEC to intestinal epithelium in ligated ileal loops in neonatal and older pigs was compared. In neonatal pigs, most of the bacteria were in layers associated with the villous epithelium. In older pigs, most of the bacteria were associated with mucus-like material in the intestinal lumen. We concluded that swine develop an innate resistance to 987P+ ETEC by 3 weeks of age. This resistance does not appear to be due to an absence of 987P-specific receptors in the intestines of the older pig or to an inability of 987P+ bacteria to grow and express pili in the older pig. We hypothesized that the resistance of older pigs to 987P-mediated disease is due to release of 987P-specific receptors into the intestinal lumen, where these receptors facilitate bacterial clearance rather than bacterial adherence to intestinal epithelium and colonization.

  16. Analysis of Serum microRNA Expression Profiles and Comparison with Small Intestinal microRNA Expression Profiles in Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xin; Xu, Ziwei; Men, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Weaning stress induces tissue injuries and impairs health and growth in piglets, especially during the first week post-weaning. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in regulating stresses and diseases. Our previous study found multiple differentially expressed miRNAs in small intestine of piglets at four days post-weaning. To better understand the roles of miRNAs during weaning stress, we analyzed the serum miRNA expressional profile in weaned piglets (at four days post-weaning) and in suckling piglets (control) of the same age using miRNA microarray technology. We detected a total of 300 expressed miRNAs, 179 miRNAs of which were differentially expressed between the two groups. The miRNA microarray results were validated by RT-qPCR. The biological functions of these differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted by GO terms and KEGG pathway annotations. We identified 10 highly expressed miRNAs in weaned piglets including miR-31, miR-205, and miR-21 (upregulated) and miR-144, miR-30c-5p, miR-363, miR-194a, miR-186, miR-150, and miR-194b-5p (downregulated). Additionally, miR-194b-5p expression was significantly downregulated in serum and small intestine of weaned piglets. Our results suggest that weaning stress affects serum miRNA profiles in piglets. And serum miR-194b-5p levels can reflect its expressional changes in small intestine of piglets by weaning stress. PMID:27632531

  17. Identification of (E,E)-2,4-undecadienal from coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) as a highly effective deodorant compound against the offensive odor of porcine large intestine.

    PubMed

    Ikeura, Hiromi; Kohara, Kaori; Li, Xin-Xian; Kobayashi, Fumiyuki; Hayata, Yasuyoshi

    2010-10-27

    The leaves of coriander ( Coriandrum sativum L.) exhibited a strong deodorizing effect against porcine internal organs (large intestine). The effective deodorizing compounds of coriander were identified by separating the volatile component of coriander, testing the effectiveness of each fraction against the offensive odor of porcine large intestine, and then identifying the compounds by GC-MS. The volatile component of coriander was first separated into six fractions (A-F) by preparative gas chromatography, and the deodorizing activity of each of these fractions against the offensive odor was measured. Fraction D, which showed the strongest deodorizing effect, was then separated into 12 subfractions by preparative GC. The deodorant activity of each subfraction was evaluated, and the deodorant compounds were identified by GC-MS. It was discovered that (E,E)-2,4-undecadienal was the most effective deodorizing compound. The deodorizing activity of (E,E)-2,4-undecadienal on the porcine large intestine increased as with concentration, reaching almost complete deodorizing ability at 10 ppb.

  18. Extensive Expression Differences along Porcine Small Intestine Evidenced by Transcriptome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Núria; Berri, Mustapha; Esquerré, Diane; Chevaleyre, Claire; Lemonnier, Gaëtan; Billon, Yvon; Lepage, Patricia; Oswald, Isabelle P.; Doré, Joël; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Estellé, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse gene expression along the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum) and in the ileal Peyer's patches in four young pigs with no clinical signs of disease by transcriptome sequencing. Multidimensional scaling evidenced that samples clustered by tissue type rather than by individual, thus prefiguring a relevant scenario to draw tissue-specific gene expression profiles. Accordingly, 1,349 genes were found differentially expressed between duodenum and jejunum, and up to 3,455 genes between duodenum and ileum. Additionally, a considerable number of differentially expressed genes were found by comparing duodenum (7,027 genes), jejunum (6,122 genes), and ileum (6,991 genes) with ileal Peyer's patches tissue. Functional analyses revealed that most of the significant differentially expressed genes along small intestinal tissues were involved in the regulation of general biological processes such as cell development, signalling, growth and proliferation, death and survival or cell function and maintenance. These results suggest that the intrinsic large turnover of intestinal tissues would have local specificities at duodenum, ileum and jejunum. In addition, in concordance with their biological function, enteric innate immune pathways were overrepresented in ileal Peyer's patches. The reported data provide an expression map of the cell pathway variation in the different small intestinal tissues. Furthermore, expression levels measured in healthy individuals could help to understand changes in gene expression that occur in dysbiosis or pathological states. PMID:24533095

  19. Protective effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on epithelial barrier disruption caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunpeng; Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Weina; Ma, Xianyong; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuefen; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-04-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) play an important role in maintaining the mucosal barrier function and gastrointestinal health of animals. Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) was reported to protect the intestinal barrier function of early-weaned piglets against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 challenge; however, the underlying cellular mechanism of this protection was unclear. Here, an established intestinal porcine epithelia cell (IPEC-J2) model was used to investigate the protective effects and related mechanisms of L. plantarum on epithelial barrier damages induced by ETEC K88. Epithelial permeability, expression of inflammatory cytokines, and abundance of TJ proteins, were determined. Pre-treatment with L. plantarum for 6h prevented the reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) (P<0.05), inhibited the increased transcript abundances of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) (P<0.05), decreased expression of claudin-1, occludin and zonula occludens (ZO-1) (P<0.05) and protein expression of occludin (P<0.05) of IPEC-J2 cells caused by ETEC K88. Moreover, the mRNA expression of negative regulators of toll-like receptors (TLRs) [single Ig Il-1-related receptor (SIGIRR), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (Bcl3), and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1)] in IPEC-J2 cells pre-treated with L. plantarum were higher (P<0.05) compared with those in cells just exposed to K88. Furthermore, L. plantarum was shown to regulate proteins of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. These results indicated that L. plantarum may improve epithelial barrier function by maintenance of TEER, inhibiting the reduction of TJ proteins, and reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines induced by ETEC K88, possibly through modulation of TLRs, NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

  20. The Management of Diabetic Foot Ulcers with Porcine Small Intestine Submucosa Tri-Layer Matrix: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cazzell, Shawn M.; Lange, Darrell L.; Dickerson, Jaime E.; Slade, Herbert B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study demonstrates that superior outcomes are possible when diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) are managed with tri-layer porcine small intestine submucosa (SIS). Approach: Patients with DFU from 11 centers participated in this prospective randomized controlled trial. Qualified subjects were randomized (1:1) to either SIS or standard care (SC) selected at the discretion of the Investigator and followed for 12 weeks or complete ulcer closure. Results: Eighty-two subjects (41 in each group) were evaluable in the intent-to-treat analysis. Ulcers managed with SIS had a significantly greater proportion closed by 12 weeks than for the Control group (54% vs. 32%, p=0.021) and this proportion was numerically higher at all visits. Time to closure for ulcers achieving closure was 2 weeks earlier for the SIS group than for SC. Median reduction in ulcer area was significantly greater for SIS at each weekly visit (all p values<0.05). Review of reported adverse events found no safety concerns. Innovation: These data support the use of tri-layer SIS for the effective management of DFU. Conclusion: In this randomized controlled trial, SIS was found to be associated with more rapid improvement, and a higher likelihood of achieving complete ulcer closure than those ulcers treated with SC. PMID:26634183

  1. Carbon nanotubes as VEGF carriers to improve the early vascularization of porcine small intestinal submucosa in abdominal wall defect repair

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhengni; Feng, Xueyi; Wang, Huichun; Ma, Jun; Liu, Wei; Cui, Daxiang; Gu, Yan; Tang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Insufficient early vascularization in biological meshes, resulting in limited host tissue incorporation, is thought to be the primary cause for the failure of abdominal wall defect repair after implantation. The sustained release of exogenous angiogenic factors from a biocompatible nanomaterial might be a way to overcome this limitation. In the study reported here, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were functionalized by plasma polymerization to deliver vascular endothelial growth factor165 (VEGF165). The novel VEGF165-controlled released system was incorporated into porcine small intestinal submucosa (PSIS) to construct a composite scaffold. Scaffolds incorporating varying amounts of VEGF165-loaded functionalized MWNT were characterized in vitro. At 5 weight percent MWNT, the scaffolds exhibited optimal properties and were implanted in rats to repair abdominal wall defects. PSIS scaffolds incorporating VEGF165-loaded MWNT (VEGF–MWNT–PSIS) contributed to early vascularization from 2–12 weeks postimplantation and obtained more effective collagen deposition and exhibited improved tensile strength at 24 weeks postimplantation compared to PSIS or PSIS scaffolds, incorporating MWNT without VEGF165 loading (MWNT–PSIS). PMID:24648727

  2. Determination Trial of Nondigestible Oligosaccharide in Processed Foods by Improved AOAC Method 2009.01 Using Porcine Small Intestinal Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kenichi; Nakamura, Sadako; Omagari, Katsuhisa; Oku, Tsuneyuki

    2015-06-24

    We have previously shown that the Association of Official Analytical Chemists' (AOAC) methods 2001.03 and 2009.01 were not able to measure accurately nondigestible oligosaccharide because they are incapable of hydrolyzing digestible oligosaccharide, leading to overestimation of nondigestible oligosaccharide. Subsequently, we have proposed improved AOAC methods 2001.03 and 2009.01 using porcine small intestinal disaccharidases instead of amyloglucosidase. In the present study, we tried to determine nondigestible oligosaccharide in marketed processed foods using the improved AOAC method (improved method), and the results were compared with those by AOAC method 2009.01. In the improved method, the percentages of recovery of fructooligosaccharide, galactooligosaccharide, and raffinose to the label of processed food were 103.0, 89.9, and 102.1%, respectively. However, the AOAC method 2009.01 overestimated >30% of the quantity of nondigestible oligosaccharide in processed foods, because the margin of error was accepted ±20% on the contents of nondigestible oligosaccharides in processed foods for Japanese nutrition labeling, the improved method thus provided accurate quantification of nondigestible oligosaccharides in processed food and allows a comprehensive determination of nondigestible oligosaccharides.

  3. Understanding regulation of microRNAs on intestine regeneration in the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Sun, Jingchun; Li, Xiaoni; Zhang, Libin; Yang, Hongsheng; Wang, Qing

    2017-01-25

    The sea cucumber, as a member of the Echinodermata, has the capacity to restore damaged organs and body parts, which has always been a key scientific issue. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of short noncoding RNAs, play important roles in regulating gene expression. In the present study, we applied high-throughput sequencing to investigate alterations of miRNA expression in regenerative intestine compared to normal intestine. A total of 73 differentially expressed miRNAs were obtained, including 59 up-regulated miRNAs and 14 down-regulated miRNAs. Among these molecules, Aja-miR-1715-5p, Aja-miR-153, Aja-miR-252a, Aja-miR-153-5p, Aja-miR-252b, Aja-miR-2001, Aja-miR-64d-3p, and Aja-miR-252-5p were differentially expressed over 10-fold at 3days post-evisceration (dpe). Notably, real-time PCR revealed that Aja-miR-1715-5p was up-regulated 1390-fold at 3dpe. Moreover, putative target gene co-expression analyses, gene ontology, and pathway analyses suggest that these miRNAs play important roles in specific cellular events (cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis), metabolic regulation, and energy redistribution. These results will provide a basis for future studies of miRNA regulation in sea cucumber regeneration.

  4. MicroRNA Transcriptome Profile Analysis in Porcine Muscle and the Effect of miR-143 on the MYH7 Gene and Protein.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jianjun; Wu, Fan; Liu, Yihua; Xiao, Juan; Xu, Mei; Yu, Qinping; Xia, Minhao; He, Xiaojun; Zou, Shigeng; Tan, Huize; Feng, Dingyuan

    2015-01-01

    Porcine skeletal muscle fibres are classified based on their different physiological and biochemical properties. Muscle fibre phenotype is regulated by several independent signalling pathways, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signalling pathways. MicroRNAs are non-coding small RNAs that regulate many biological processes. However, their function in muscle fibre type regulation remains unclear. The aim of our study was to identify miRNAs that regulate muscle fibre type during porcine growth to help understand the miRNA regulation mechanism of fibre differentiation. We performed Solexa/Illumina deep sequencing for the microRNAome during 3 muscle growth stages (63, 98 and 161 d). In this study, 271 mature miRNAs and 243 pre-miRNAs were identified. We detected 472 novel miRNAs in the muscle samples. Among the mature miRNAs, there are 23 highest expression miRNAs (over 10,000 RPM), account for 85.3% of the total counts of mature miRNAs., including 10 (43.5%) muscle-related miRNAs (ssc-miR-133a-3p, ssc-miR-486, ssc-miR-1, ssc-miR-143-3p, ssc-miR-30a-5p, ssc-miR-181a, ssc-miR-148a-3p, ssc-miR-92a, ssc-miR-21, ssc-miR-126-5p). Particularly, both ssc-miR-1 and ssc-miR-133 belong to the MyomiRs, which control muscle myosin content, myofibre identity and muscle performance. The involvement of these miRNAs in muscle fibre phenotype provides new insight into the mechanism of muscle fibre regulation underlying muscle development. Furthermore, we performed cell transfection experiment. Overexpression/inhibition of ssc-miR-143-3p in porcine skeletal muscle satellite cell induced an/a increase/reduction of the slow muscle fibre gene and protein (MYH7), indicating that miR-143 activity regulated muscle fibre differentiate in skeletal muscle. And it regulate MYH7 through the HDAC4-MEF2 pathway.

  5. Toll-like receptor-2-activating bifidobacteria strains differentially regulate inflammatory cytokines in the porcine intestinal epithelial cell culture system: finding new anti-inflammatory immunobiotics.

    PubMed

    Fujie, Hitomi; Villena, Julio; Tohno, Masanori; Morie, Kyoko; Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Aso, Hisashi; Suda, Yoshihito; Shimosato, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Saito, Tadao; Numasaki, Muneo; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2011-10-01

    A total of 23 strains of bifidobacteria taxonomically belonging to five species were tested for their potent immunomodulatory effect using a combination of two methods: the NF-κB-reporter assay using a toll-like receptor 2-expressing transfectant (HEK(pTLR2) system) and the mitogenic assay using porcine Peyer's patches immunocompetent cells. Among the four preselected strains from different immunomodulatory groups, Bifidobacterium breve MCC-117 was able to efficiently modulate the inflammatory response triggered by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in a porcine intestinal epithelial (PIE) cell line. Moreover, using PIE cells and swine Peyer's patches immunocompetent cell co-culture system, we demonstrated that the immunoregulatory effect of B. breve MCC-117 was related to the capacity of the strain to influence PIE and immune cell interactions, leading to the stimulation of regulatory T cells. The results suggested that bifidobacteria that express high activity in both the HEK(pTLR2) and the mitogenic assays may behave like potential anti-inflammatory strains. The combination of the HEK(pTLR2) system, the evaluation of mitogenic activity and PIE cells will be of value for the development of new immunologically functional foods and feeds that could prevent inflammatory intestinal disorders. Although our findings should be proven in appropriate experiments in vivo, the results of the present work provide a scientific rationale for the use of B. breve MCC-117 to prevent ETEC-induced intestinal inflammation.

  6. Nutritional value of dried fermentation biomass, hydrolyzed porcine intestinal mucosa products, and fish meal fed to weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Sulabo, R C; Mathai, J K; Usry, J L; Ratliff, B W; McKilligan, D M; Moline, J D; Xu, G; Stein, H H

    2013-06-01

    Dried fermentation biomass (DFB) and hydrolyzed porcine intestinal mucosa are co-products of L-Lys • HCl production and heparin extraction, respectively. Three experiments were conducted to determine standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of AA (Exp. 1), concentration of DE and ME (Exp. 2), and standardized total tract digestibility (STTD) of P (Exp. 3) in DFB and 2 hydrolyzed porcine intestinal mucosa products (PEP50 and PEP2+), and compare these values with values for fish meal. In Exp. 1, 12 ileal cannulated barrows (BW = 11.5 ± 1.1 kg) were allotted to a replicated 6 × 6 Latin square design with 6 diets and 6 periods. A N-free diet, diet based on soybean meal (SBM), and 4 diets based on a combination of SBM and DFB, PEP50, PEP2+, or fish meal were formulated. With the exception of Lys, there were no differences in SID of indispensable AA between DFB and fish meal. Except for Thr, no differences in SID of indispensable AA between PEP50 and fish meal were observed, but SID of all indispensable AA, except Lys and Trp, was less (P < 0.05) in PEP2+ than in the other ingredients. In Exp. 2, 40 barrows (BW = 12.8 ± 1.4 kg) were allotted to 5 diets with 8 pigs/diet. A basal diet containing 96.4% corn and 4 diets containing corn and DFB, PEP50, PEP2+, or fish meal were formulated. The DE (5,445 kcal/kg DM) and ME (5,236 kcal/kg DM) in DFB were greater (P < 0.01) than in PEP50 (4,758 and 4,512 kcal/kg DM for DE and ME, respectively) and fish meal (4,227 and 3,960 kcal/kg DM for DE and ME, respectively). Also, DE in DFB was greater (P < 0.01) than in PEP2+ (4,935 kcal/kg DM), but ME in DFB was not different from that in PEP2+ (4,617 kcal/kg DM). Furthermore, DE in PEP50 and PEP2+ were greater (P < 0.01) than in fish meal, but ME did not differ from that in fish meal. In Exp. 3, 40 barrows (BW = 12.4 ± 1.3 kg) were randomly allotted to 5 diets with 8 pigs/diet. A P-free diet and 4 diets in which the sole source of P was from DFB, PEP50, PEP2+, or fish meal were

  7. Bifidobacterium breve MCC-117 Induces Tolerance in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Study of the Mechanisms Involved in the Immunoregulatory Effect.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kozue; Tomosada, Yohsuke; Villena, Julio; Chiba, Eriko; Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Aso, Hisashi; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Saito, Tadao; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacterium breve MCC-117 is able to significantly reduce the expression of inflammatory cytokines in porcine intestinal epithelial (PIE) cells and to improve IL-10 levels in CD4(+)CD25(high) Foxp3(+) lymphocytes in response to heat-stable enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), while the immunoregulatory effect of B. adolescentis ATCC15705 was significantly lower than that observed for the MCC-117 strain. Considering the different capacities of the two bifidobacterium strains to activate toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and their differential immunoregulatory activities in PIE and immune cells, we hypothesized that comparative studies with both strains could provide important information regarding the molecular mechanism(s) involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of bifidobacteria. In this work, we demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of B. breve MCC-117 was achieved by a complex interaction of multiple negative regulators of TLRs as well as inhibition of multiple signaling pathways. We showed that B. breve MCC-117 reduced heat-stable ETEC PAMP-induced NF-κB, p38 MAPK and PI3 K activation and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in PIE cells. In addition, we demonstrated that B. breve MCC-117 may activate TLR2 synergistically and cooperatively with one or more other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), and that interactions may result in a coordinated sum of signals that induce the upregulation of A20, Bcl-3, Tollip and SIGIRR. Upregulation of these negative regulators could have an important physiological impact on maintaining or reestablishing homeostatic TLR signals in PIE cells. Therefore, in the present study, we gained insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunoregulatory effect of B. breve MCC-117.

  8. Bifidobacterium breve MCC-117 Induces Tolerance in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Study of the Mechanisms Involved in the Immunoregulatory Effect

    PubMed Central

    MURATA, Kozue; TOMOSADA, Yohsuke; VILLENA, Julio; CHIBA, Eriko; SHIMAZU, Tomoyuki; ASO, Hisashi; IWABUCHI, Noriyuki; XIAO, Jin-zhong; SAITO, Tadao; KITAZAWA, Haruki

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacterium breve MCC-117 is able to significantly reduce the expression of inflammatory cytokines in porcine intestinal epithelial (PIE) cells and to improve IL-10 levels in CD4+CD25high Foxp3+ lymphocytes in response to heat-stable enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), while the immunoregulatory effect of B. adolescentis ATCC15705 was significantly lower than that observed for the MCC-117 strain. Considering the different capacities of the two bifidobacterium strains to activate toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and their differential immunoregulatory activities in PIE and immune cells, we hypothesized that comparative studies with both strains could provide important information regarding the molecular mechanism(s) involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of bifidobacteria. In this work, we demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of B. breve MCC-117 was achieved by a complex interaction of multiple negative regulators of TLRs as well as inhibition of multiple signaling pathways. We showed that B. breve MCC-117 reduced heat-stable ETEC PAMP-induced NF-κB, p38 MAPK and PI3 K activation and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in PIE cells. In addition, we demonstrated that B. breve MCC-117 may activate TLR2 synergistically and cooperatively with one or more other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), and that interactions may result in a coordinated sum of signals that induce the upregulation of A20, Bcl-3, Tollip and SIGIRR. Upregulation of these negative regulators could have an important physiological impact on maintaining or reestablishing homeostatic TLR signals in PIE cells. Therefore, in the present study, we gained insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunoregulatory effect of B. breve MCC-117. PMID:24936377

  9. Effect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. Boulardii and β-galactomannan oligosaccharide on porcine intestinal epithelial and dendritic cells challenged in vitro with Escherichia coli F4 (K88).

    PubMed

    Badia, Roger; Zanello, Galliano; Chevaleyre, Claire; Lizardo, Rosil; Meurens, François; Martínez, Paz; Brufau, Joaquim; Salmon, Henri

    2012-01-25

    Probiotic and prebiotics, often called "immune-enhancing" feed additives, are believed to deal with pathogens, preventing the need of an immune response and reducing tissue damage. In this study, we investigated if a recently developed β-galactomannan (βGM) had a similar protective role compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. Boulardii (Scb), a proven probiotic, in the context of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection. ETEC causes inflammation, diarrhea and intestinal damage in piglets, resulting in large economic loses worldwide. We observed that Scb and βGM products inhibited in vitro adhesion of ETEC on cell surface of porcine intestinal IPI-2I cells. Our data showed that Scb and βGM decreased the mRNA ETEC-induced gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, GM-CSF and chemokines CCL2, CCL20 and CXCL8 on intestinal IPI-2I. Furthermore, we investigated the putative immunomodulatory role of Scb and βGM on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) per se and under infection conditions. We observed a slight up-regulation of mRNA for TNF-α and CCR7 receptor after co-incubation of DC with Scb and βGM. However, no differences were found in DC activation upon ETEC infection and Scb or βGM co-culture. Therefore, our results indicate that, similar to probiotic Scb, prebiotic βGM may protect intestinal epithelial cells against intestinal pathogens. Finally, although these products may modulate DC activation, their effect under ETEC challenge conditions remains to be elucidated.

  10. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Innate Antiviral Immune Response in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Influence of Immunobiotic Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Albarracin, Leonardo; Kobayashi, Hisakazu; Iida, Hikaru; Sato, Nana; Nochi, Tomonori; Aso, Hisashi; Salva, Susana; Alvarez, Susana; Kitazawa, Haruki; Villena, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 and Lactobacillus plantarum CRL1506 are immunobiotic strains able to increase protection against viral intestinal infections as demonstrated in animal models and humans. To gain insight into the host-immunobiotic interaction, the transcriptomic response of porcine intestinal epithelial (PIE) cells to the challenge with viral molecular associated pattern poly(I:C) and the changes in the transcriptomic profile induced by the immunobiotics strains CRL1505 and CRL1506 were investigated in this work. By using microarray technology and reverse transcription PCR, we obtained a global overview of the immune genes involved in the innate antiviral immune response in PIE cells. Stimulation of PIE cells with poly(I:C) significantly increased the expression of IFN-α and IFN-β, several interferon-stimulated genes, cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and genes involved in prostaglandin biosynthesis. It was also determined that lactobacilli differently modulated immune gene expression in poly(I:C)-challenged PIE cells. Most notable changes were found in antiviral factors (IFN-α, IFN-β, NPLR3, OAS1, OASL, MX2, and RNASEL) and cytokines/chemokines (IL-1β, IL-6, CCL4, CCL5, and CXCL10) that were significantly increased in lactobacilli-treated PIE cells. Immunobiotics reduced the expression of IL-15 and RAE1 genes that mediate poly(I:C) inflammatory damage. In addition, lactobacilli treatments increased the expression PLA2G4A, PTGES, and PTGS2 that are involved in prostaglandin E2 biosynthesis. L. rhamnosus CRL1505 and L. plantarum CRL1506 showed quantitative and qualitative differences in their capacities to modulate the innate antiviral immune response in PIE cells, which would explain the higher capacity of the CRL1505 strain when compared to CRL1506 to protect against viral infection and inflammatory damage in vivo. These results provided valuable information for the deeper understanding of the host-immunobiotic interaction and their

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Innate Antiviral Immune Response in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Influence of Immunobiotic Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Albarracin, Leonardo; Kobayashi, Hisakazu; Iida, Hikaru; Sato, Nana; Nochi, Tomonori; Aso, Hisashi; Salva, Susana; Alvarez, Susana; Kitazawa, Haruki; Villena, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 and Lactobacillus plantarum CRL1506 are immunobiotic strains able to increase protection against viral intestinal infections as demonstrated in animal models and humans. To gain insight into the host–immunobiotic interaction, the transcriptomic response of porcine intestinal epithelial (PIE) cells to the challenge with viral molecular associated pattern poly(I:C) and the changes in the transcriptomic profile induced by the immunobiotics strains CRL1505 and CRL1506 were investigated in this work. By using microarray technology and reverse transcription PCR, we obtained a global overview of the immune genes involved in the innate antiviral immune response in PIE cells. Stimulation of PIE cells with poly(I:C) significantly increased the expression of IFN-α and IFN-β, several interferon-stimulated genes, cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and genes involved in prostaglandin biosynthesis. It was also determined that lactobacilli differently modulated immune gene expression in poly(I:C)-challenged PIE cells. Most notable changes were found in antiviral factors (IFN-α, IFN-β, NPLR3, OAS1, OASL, MX2, and RNASEL) and cytokines/chemokines (IL-1β, IL-6, CCL4, CCL5, and CXCL10) that were significantly increased in lactobacilli-treated PIE cells. Immunobiotics reduced the expression of IL-15 and RAE1 genes that mediate poly(I:C) inflammatory damage. In addition, lactobacilli treatments increased the expression PLA2G4A, PTGES, and PTGS2 that are involved in prostaglandin E2 biosynthesis. L. rhamnosus CRL1505 and L. plantarum CRL1506 showed quantitative and qualitative differences in their capacities to modulate the innate antiviral immune response in PIE cells, which would explain the higher capacity of the CRL1505 strain when compared to CRL1506 to protect against viral infection and inflammatory damage in vivo. These results provided valuable information for the deeper understanding of the host–immunobiotic interaction and their

  12. The cluster microRNAs miR-194 and miR-215 suppress the tumorigenicity of intestinal tumor organoids.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Toshiaki; Saito, Yoshimasa; Shimamoto, Yuriko; Muramatsu, Toshihide; Kimura, Masaki; Kanai, Yae; Saito, Hidetsugu

    2017-01-16

    Tumor stem cells with self-renewal and multipotent capacity play critical roles in the initiation and progression of cancer. Recently, a new 3D culture system known as organoid culture has been developed, allowing Lgr5-positive stem cells to form organoids that resemble the properties of original tissues. Here we established organoids derived from intestinal tumors of Apc(min/+) mice and normal intestinal epithelia of C57BL/6J mice and investigated the roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in intestinal tumor organoids. The results of microarray analyses revealed that expression of the cluster miRNAs, miR-194 and miR-215, was markedly suppressed in intestinal tumor organoids in comparison with organoids derived from normal intestinal epithelia. Enforced expression of miR-194 resulted in inhibition of E2f3, a positive regulator of the cell cycle and growth suppression of intestinal tumor organoids. In addition, enforced expression of miR-215 suppressed the cancer stem cell signature through down-regulation of intestinal stem cell markers including Lgr5. These findings indicate that the miRNA cluster including miR-194 and miR-215 plays important roles in suppressing the growth and attenuating the stemness of intestinal tumor organoids. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Air-liquid interface cultures enhance the oxygen supply and trigger the structural and functional differentiation of intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC).

    PubMed

    Nossol, Constanze; Diesing, A-K; Walk, N; Faber-Zuschratter, H; Hartig, R; Post, A; Kluess, J; Rothkötter, H-J; Kahlert, S

    2011-07-01

    The specific function of the epithelium as critical barrier between the intestinal lumen and the organism's internal microenvironment is reflected by permanent maintenance of intercellular junctions and cellular polarity. The intestinal epithelial cells are responsible for absorption of nutritional components, facing mechanical stress and a changing oxygen supplementation via blood stream. Oxygen itself can regulate the barrier and the absorptive function of the epithelium. Therefore, we compared the dish cell culture, the transwell-like membrane culture and the oxygen enriched air-liquid interface (ALI) culture. We demonstrated strong influence of the different culture conditions on morphology and function of intestinal porcine epithelial cell lines in vitro. ALI culture resulted in a significant increase in cell number, epithelial cell layer thickness and expression as well as apical localisation of the microvilli-associated protein villin. Remarkable similarities regarding the morphological parameters were observed between ALI cultures and intestinal epithelial cells in vivo. Furthermore, the functional analysis of protein uptake and degradation by the epithelial cells demonstrated the necessity of sufficient oxygen supply as achieved in ALI cultures. Our study is the first report providing marked evidence that optimised oxygen supply using ALI cultures directly affects the morphological differentiation and functional properties of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

  14. Bond strength of fibrin glue between layers of porcine small intestine submucosa (SIS).

    PubMed

    Nicoson, Zach R; Buckley, Christine A

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the strength of the bond between layers of small intestine submucosa (SIS, Cook Biotech, Inc., West Lafayette, IN) glued with commercially available fibrin glue (Haemacure Corporation). To determine the conditions leading to the highest bond strength, three parameters were varied: the concentration of the fibrin component, the concentration of the thrombin component, and the type of applicator used to apply the two components. Five glue concentrations and two applicator types, a Paasch Airbrush and one provided with the Haemacure glue kit, were studied. To make the test specimens, two pieces of SIS were each sprayed separately with 1 mL of one of the glue components. The two pieces were then adhered and allowed to cure for two minutes. After the panels were glued, frozen, and lyophilized, they were cut to size according to ASTM Standard D 1876: Peel Resistance of Adhesives (T-Peel Test). The panels were then rehydrated, and tests were performed in an MTS tensile testing machine set to pull at a constant rate of 1 mm/sec over a 100 mm span. The mean force over the duration of the test was computed as specified in the ASTM standard. The airbrush was found to produce a stronger bond than the applicator supplied by Haemacure. Judged qualitatively, the airbrush also produced a much more uniform spray and consistent flow rate than the glue manufacturer's applicator. The data suggest that a decrease in concentration of both glue components yields increased bond strength, although variability in the results also increased with decreased glue component concentration.

  15. Changes in the Porcine Intestinal Microbiome in Response to Infection with Salmonella enterica and Lawsonia intracellularis

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Randall S.; Gebhart, Connie J.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Johnson, Timothy; Isaacson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of food borne illness. Recent studies have shown that S. enterica is a pathogen capable of causing alterations to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. A recent prospective study of French pork production farms found a statistically significant association between Lawsonia intracellularis and carriage of S. enterica. In the current study the composition of the gut microbiome was determined in pigs challenged with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and or L. intracellularis and compared to non-challenged control pigs. Principal coordinate analysis demonstrated that there was a disruption in the composition of the gut microbiome in the colon and cecum of pigs challenged with either pathogen. The compositions of the microbiomes of challenged pigs were similar to each other but differed from the non-challenged controls. There also were statistically significant increases in Anaerobacter, Barnesiella, Pediococcus, Sporacetigenium, Turicibacter, Catenibacterium, Prevotella, Pseudobutyrivibrio, and Xylanibacter in the challenged pigs. To determine if these changes were specific to experimentally challenged pigs, we determined the compositions of the fecal microbiomes of naturally infected pigs that were carriers of S. enterica. Pigs that were frequent shedders of S. enterica were shown to have similar fecal microbiomes compared to non-shedders or pigs that shed S. enterica infrequently. In a comparison of the differentially abundant bacteria in the naturally infected pigs compared to experimentally challenged pigs, 9 genera were differentially abundant and each exhibited the same increase or decrease in abundance between the two groups. Thus, there were similar changes in the GI microbiome associated with carriage of S. enterica regardless of whether the pigs were experimentally challenged with S. enterica or acquired it naturally. PMID:26461107

  16. Downregulated expression of microRNA-124 in pediatric intestinal failure patients modulates macrophages activation by inhibiting STAT3 and AChE

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yong-Tao; Wang, Jun; Lu, Wei; Cao, Yi; Cai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of intestinal failure (IF). The macrophages are essential to maintain the intestinal homeostasis. However, the underlying mechanisms of intestinal macrophages activation remain poorly understood. Since microRNAs (miRNAs) have pivotal roles in regulation of immune responses, here we aimed to investigate the role of miR-124 in the activation of intestinal macrophages. In this study, we showed that the intestinal macrophages increased in pediatric IF patients and resulted in the induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that the expression of miR-124 significantly reduced in intestinal macrophages in IF patients. Overexpression of miR-124 was sufficient to inhibit intestinal macrophages activation by attenuating production of IL-6 and TNF-α. Further studies showed that miR-124 could directly target the 3′-untranslated region of both signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) mRNAs, and suppress their protein expressions. The AChE potentially negates the cholinergic anti-inflammatory signal by hydrolyzing the acetylcholine. We here showed that intestinal macrophages increasingly expressed the AChE and STAT3 in IF patients when compared with controls. The inhibitors against to STAT3 and AChE significantly suppressed the lipopolysaccharides-induced IL-6 and TNF-α production in macrophages. Taken together, these findings highlight an important role for miR-124 in the regulation of intestinal macrophages activation, and suggest a potential application of miR-124 in pediatric IF treatment regarding as suppressing intestinal inflammation. PMID:27977009

  17. Development of a chromogenic in situ hybridization for Giardia duodenalis and its application in canine, feline, and porcine intestinal tissues samples

    PubMed Central

    Weissenböck, Herbert; Ondrovics, Martina; Gurtner, Susanne; Schiessl, Peter; Mostegl, Meike M.; Richter, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, a chromogenic in situ hybridization for the identification of Giardia duodenalis in paraffin-embedded tissue samples was developed. The sensitivity and specificity of the probe was validated by testing it on cultured reference samples of different assemblages of G. duodenalis as well as culture and tissue samples containing other protozoa and infectious agents. The probe gave a positive reaction with the Giardia samples and a negative reaction with all other samples. Further, the probe was used for screening of histological slides of intestine from different animal species (99 canine samples, 85 feline samples, and 202 porcine samples) for the presence of G. duodenalis trophozoites. With this assay, the parasites were detected in samples from 8 dogs (8.08%), 6 cats (7.06%), and zero pigs. The results clearly indicate that the described method is useful for detection of Giardia trophozoites in routinely processed intestinal tissue of different animal species. PMID:21908276

  18. Colonization of porcine small intestine by Escherichia coli: ileal colonization and adhesion by pig enteropathogens that lack K88 antigen and by some acapsular mutants.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Moon, H W; Isaacson, R E

    1976-04-01

    Seven K88-negative porcine enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, representing three different serogroups, caused severe diarrhea and characteristically colonized the ileum, but not the jejunum, of intragastrically exposed newborn pigs. Bacterial counts of intestinal contents and wall, fluorescence, and scanning electron microscopy all suggested that these strains colonized the ileum by adhesion to the villous epithelium. However, in ligated intestinal loops, these enteropathogenic E. coli strains adhered to jejunal epithelium as well as to ileal epithelium. Acapsular (K-) mutants, derived from one of the principal strains, retained their colonizing and adhesive abilities, whereas K- mutants from three other enteropathogenic E. coli strains did not. It is suggested that: (i) these K88-negative enteropathogenic E. coli colonize the ileum by adhesion, and (ii) the adhesion of some K-88-negative strains is mediated by surface factors other than, or in addition to, the polysaccharide K antigen.

  19. MicroRNAs up-regulated by CagA of Helicobacter pylori induce intestinal metaplasia of gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongliang; Jiang, Qiaoli; Lou, Xiaojun; Ji, Xiaowei; Wen, Zhenzhen; Wu, Jia; Tao, Haiying; Jiang, Tingting; He, Wei; Wang, Caihua; Du, Qin; Zheng, Shu; Mao, Jianshan; Huang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    CagA of Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium-derived oncogenic protein closely associated with the development of gastric cancers. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of widespread non-coding RNAs, many of which are involved in cell growth, cell differentiation and tumorigenesis. The relationship between CagA protein and miRNAs is unclear. Using mammalian miRNA profile microarrays, we found that miRNA-584 and miRNA-1290 expression was up-regulated in CagA-transformed cells, miRNA-1290 was up-regulated in an Erk1/2-dependent manner, and miRNA-584 was activated by NF-κB. miRNA-584 sustained Erk1/2 activities through inhibition of PPP2a activities, and miRNA-1290 activated NF-κB by knockdown of NKRF. Foxa1 was revealed to be an important target of miRNA-584 and miRNA-1290. Knockdown of Foxa1 promoted the epithelial-mesenchymal transition significantly. Overexpression of miRNA-584 and miRNA-1290 induced intestinal metaplasia of gastric epithelial cells in knock-in mice. These results indicate that miRNA-584 and miRNA-1290 interfere with cell differentiation and remodel the tissues. Thus, the miRNA pathway is a new pathogenic mechanism of CagA.

  20. Different Zinc Sources Have Diverse Impacts on Gene Expression of Zinc Absorption Related Transporters in Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danping; Zhuo, Zhao; Fang, Shenglin; Yue, Min; Feng, Jie

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of zinc sources on gene expression of zinc-related transporters in intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1). IPEC-1 cells were treated with zinc glycine chelate (Zn-Gly), zinc methionine (Zn-Met), and zinc sulfate (ZnSO4), respectively, for measurement of cell viability. Then, the relative expression of zinc-related transporters in IPEC-1 in response to different zinc sources (50 μmol/L zinc) was measured. Zinc transporter SLC39A4 (ZIP4) expression was selectively silenced to assess the function of ZIP4 in inorganic and organic zinc absorption. The result showed that Zn-Gly and Zn-Met had lower cell damage compared with ZnSO4 on the same zinc levels. Different zinc sources improved the expression of metallothionein1 (MT1) and zinc transporter SLC30A1 (ZnT1) messenger RNA (mRNA) compared with the control (P < 0.05), while ZIP4 decreased (P < 0.05) in response to zinc addition. MT1 and ZnT1 mRNA expressions in Zn-Gly and Zn-Met were higher than those in ZnSO4, and ZIP4 mRNA expression in Zn-Met was the lowest among three kinds of zinc sources (P < 0.05). Expression of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) mRNA in control was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than added different zinc sources groups. Silencing of ZIP4 significantly decreased MT1 mRNA expression in ZnSO4 and Zn-Gly treatments, reduced zinc absorption rate, and increased DMT1 mRNA expression in ZnSO4 compared with negative control. In summary, different zinc sources could improve zinc status on IPEC-1 cells and organic zinc had lower cell damage compared with ZnSO4. Moreover, Zn-Gly and Zn-Met are more efficient on zinc absorption according to the expression of various zinc-related transporters MT1, ZIP4, ZnT1, and DMT1. ZIP4 played a direct role in inorganic zinc uptake, and the absorption of zinc in Zn-Gly depends on ZIP4 partly, while absorption of Zn-Met is less dependent on ZIP4.

  1. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus jensenii elicits anti-inflammatory activity in porcine intestinal epithelial cells by modulating negative regulators of the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Villena, Julio; Tohno, Masanori; Fujie, Hitomi; Hosoya, Shoichi; Shimosato, Takeshi; Aso, Hisashi; Suda, Yoshihito; Kawai, Yasushi; Saito, Tadao; Makino, Seiya; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    The effect of Lactobacillus jensenii TL2937 on the inflammatory immune response triggered by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a porcine intestinal epitheliocyte cell line (PIE cells) was evaluated. Challenges with ETEC or LPS elicited Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated inflammatory responses in cultured PIE cells, indicating that our cell line may be useful for studying inflammation in the guts of weaning piglets. In addition, we demonstrated that L. jensenii TL2937 attenuated the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines caused by ETEC or LPS challenge by downregulating TLR4-dependent nuclear factorκB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that L. jensenii TL2937 stimulation of PIE cells upregulated three negative regulators of TLRs: A20, Bcl-3, and MKP-1, deepening the understanding of an immunobiotic mechanism of action. L. jensenii TL2937-mediated induction of negative regulators of TLRs would have a substantial physiological impact on homeostasis in PIE cells, because excessive TLR inflammatory signaling would be downregulated. These results indicated that PIE cells can be used to study the mechanisms involved in the protective activity of immunobiotics against intestinal inflammatory damage and may provide useful information for the development of new immunologically functional feeds that help to prevent inflammatory intestinal disorders, including weaning-associated intestinal inflammation.

  2. A microRNA program in the C. elegans hypodermis couples to intestinal mTORC2/PQM-1 signaling to modulate fat transport

    PubMed Central

    Dowen, Robert H.; Breen, Peter C.; Tullius, Thomas; Conery, Annie L.; Ruvkun, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Animals integrate metabolic, developmental, and environmental information before committing key resources to reproduction. In Caenorhabditis elegans, adult animals transport fat from intestinal cells to the germline to promote reproduction. We identified a microRNA (miRNA)-regulated developmental timing pathway that functions in the hypodermis to nonautonomously coordinate the mobilization of intestinal fat stores to the germline upon initiation of adulthood. This developmental timing pathway, which is controlled by the lin-4 and let-7 miRNAs, engages mTOR signaling in the intestine. The intestinal signaling component is specific to mTORC2 and functions in parallel to the insulin pathway to modulate the activity of the serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK-1). Surprisingly, SGK-1 functions independently of DAF-16/FoxO; instead, SGK-1 promotes the cytoplasmic localization of the PQM-1 transcription factor, which antagonizes intestinal fat mobilization at the transcriptional level when localized to the nucleus. These results revealed that a non-cell-autonomous developmental input regulates intestinal fat metabolism by engaging mTORC2 signaling to promote the intertissue transport of fat reserves from the soma to the germline. PMID:27401555

  3. Excessive L-cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yun; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Sun, Kaiji; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    High intake of dietary cysteine is extremely toxic to animals and the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that excessive L-cysteine induces cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells. Jejunal enterocytes were cultured in the presence of 0-10 mmol/L L-cysteine. Cell viability, morphologic alterations, mRNA levels for genes involved in ER stress, protein abundances for glucose-regulated protein 78, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2α), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK1/2) were determined. The results showed that L-cysteine (5-10 mmol/L) reduced cell viability (P < 0.05) and led to vacuole-like cell death in intestinal porcine epithelial cells. These adverse effects of L-cysteine were not affected by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. The protein abundances for CHOP, phosphorylated (p)-eIF2α, p-JNK1/2, p-p38 MAPK, and the spliced form of XBP-1 mRNA were enhanced (P < 0.05), whereas those for p-ERK1/2 were reduced (P < 0.05). Collectively, excessive L-cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death via the activation of ER stress and MAPK signaling in small intestinal epithelial cells. These signaling pathways may be potential targets for developing effective strategies to prevent the toxicity of dietary cysteine.

  4. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  5. Interaction between Campylobacter and intestinal epithelial cells leads to a different proinflammatory response in human and porcine host.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Carmen; Jiménez-Marín, Ángeles; Martins, Rodrigo Prado; Garrido, Juan J

    2014-11-15

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the leading causes of human diarrheal disease throughout the development world. Unlike human beings, gastrointestinal tract of pigs are frequently colonized by Campylobacter to a high level in a commensal manner. The aim of this study was to identify the differences underlying the divergent outcome following Campylobacter challenge in porcine versus human host. In order to address this, a comparative in vitro infection model was combined with microscopy, gentamicin protection assay, ELISA and quantitative PCR techniques. Invasion assays revealed that Campylobacter invaded human cells up to 10-fold more than porcine cells (p<0.05). In addition, gene expression of proinflammatory genes encoding for IL1α, IL6, IL8, CXCL2 and CCL20 were strongly up-regulated by Campylobacter in human epithelial cell at early times of infection, whereas a very reduced cytokine gene expression was detected in porcine epithelial cells. These data indicate that Campylobacter fails to invade porcine cells compared to human cells, and this leads to a lack of proinflammatory response induction, probably due to its pathogenic or commensal behavior in human and porcine host, respectively.

  6. Distribution of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-like immunoreactive (CART-LI) nerve structures in the porcine large intestine.

    PubMed

    Gonkowski, Slawomir; Burliński, Piotr; Skobowiat, Cezary; Majewski, Mariusz; Arciszewski, Marcin Bartlomiej; Radziszewski, Piotr; Całka, Jarosław

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the number of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-like immunoreactive (CART-LI) nerve structures in the large intestine of juvenile pigs. The distribution pattern of CART-LI structures was studied by immunohistochemistry in the circular muscle layer, myenteric (MP), outer submucous (OSP) and inner submucous plexus (ISP) as well as in the mucosal layer of six regions of the large bowel: caecum, centripetal and centrifugal turns of the proximal colon, transverse colon, descending colon and rectum. CART-LI neural structures were observed in all gut fragments studied. CART-LI nerve fibres were numerous within the circular muscle layer and in the MP of all the regions studied, while they were moderate or few in number in other layers of the intestinal wall. The numbers of CART-LI neurons within the MP amounted to 2.02% in the caecum to 7.92% in the rectum, within the OSP from 2.73% in the centrifugal turns of the proximal colon to 5.70% in the rectum, and within the ISP from 2.23% in the transverse colon to 5.32% in the centrifugal turns of the proximal colon. The present study reports for the first time a detailed description of the CART distribution pattern within the enteric nervous system (ENS) of the porcine large intestine.

  7. In Vitro Evaluation of Swine-Derived Lactobacillus reuteri: Probiotic Properties and Effects on Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells Challenged with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhilin; Wang, Li; Chen, Zhuang; Ma, Xianyong; Yang, Xuefen; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-06-28

    Probiotics are considered as the best effective alternatives to antibiotics. The aim of this study was to characterize the probiotic potential of lactobacilli for use in swine farming by using in vitro evaluation methods. A total of 106 lactic acid bacterial isolates, originating from porcine feces, were first screened for the capacity to survive stresses considered important for putative probiotic strains. Sixteen isolates showed notable acid and bile resistance, antibacterial activity, and adherence to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1). One isolate, LR1, identified as Lactobacillus reuteri, was selected for extensive study of its probiotic and functional properties in IPEC-1 cell models. L. reuteri LR1 exhibited good adhesion to IPEC-1 cells and could inhibit the adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to IPEC-1 cells. L. reuteri LR1 could also modulate transcript and protein expression of cytokines involved in inflammation in IPEC-1 cells; the Lactobacillus strain inhibited the ETEC-induced expression of proinflammatory transcripts (IL-6 and TNF-α) and protein (IL-6), and increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). Measurement of the permeation of FD-4 showed that L. reuteri LR1 could maintain barrier integrity in monolayer IPEC-1 cells exposed to ETEC. Immunolocalization experiments showed L. reuteri LR1 could also prevent ETEC-induced tight junction ZO-1 disruption. Together, these results indicate that L. reuteri LR1 exhibits desirable probiotic properties and could be a potential probiotic for use in swine production.

  8. Deoxynivalenol, but not E. coli lipopolysaccharide, changes the response pattern of intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) according to its route of application.

    PubMed

    Kluess, J W; Kahlert, S; Kröber, A; Diesing, A-K; Rothkötter, H-J; Wimmers, Klaus; Dänicke, S

    2015-12-15

    The porcine intestinal epithelium is a primary target for mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) and lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Although epithelial cells are exposed to these toxins mainly from the luminal-chyme compartment an exposure from the blood side resulting from systemic absorption cannot be excluded. Thus, we investigated the effect of DON and LPS, alone or combined, on porcine intestinal epithelial cells IPEC-J2 on a transcriptional, translational and functional level when administered either from apical or basolateral. IPEC-J2 cells were cultured on 12-well inserts in complete medium at 5% CO2 and 39°C and subjected to following treatments: control (CON), 2000 ng/mL DON, 1 μg/mL LPS or DON+LPS for 72 h, either from apical or basolateral. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), protein and IL-8 content were measured and microarray analysis, qRT-PCR (IL-8, zonula occludens-1 ZO-1, β-actin), Western Blot (ZO-1, β-actin) and immunofluorescence (ZO-1) were performed. Data of at least three independent experiments were analysed with ANOVA and Dunnett's post hoc test. Basolateral DON resulted in significantly lower cell counts (p<0.05) with larger cells (p<0.01), whereas apical DON reduced total (p<0.001) and specific protein content (IL-8 content CON vs. DON: 2378 pg/3 mL vs. 991 pg/3 mL; p<0.001). Transcripts of ß-actin and ZO-1 were significantly upregulated in response to DON, irrespective of direction, whereas IL-8 mRNA remained unaffected. However, ZO-1 spatial distribution in the tight junction and its function (TEER) were detrimentally affected by basolateral DON only. In conclusion, direction of DON exposure affected IPEC-J2 differently on a translational and functional level, but was mainly inconsequential on a transcriptional level.

  9. β-Galactomannan and Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii modulate the immune response against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in porcine intestinal epithelial and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Badia, Roger; Brufau, M Teresa; Guerrero-Zamora, Ana Maria; Lizardo, Rosil; Dobrescu, Irina; Martin-Venegas, Raquel; Ferrer, Ruth; Salmon, Henri; Martínez, Paz; Brufau, Joaquim

    2012-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes inflammation, necrosis, and diarrhea in pigs, as well as being an important source of food-borne diseases in humans. Probiotics and prebiotics are promising alternatives to antibiotics to control and prevent intestinal infections. The present work investigated a recently developed β-galactomannan (βGM) prebiotic compared to the proven probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii on porcine ileum intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) of the IPI-2I line and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) cocultured in vitro with Salmonella. We observed that both S. cerevisiae var. boulardii and βGM inhibited the association of Salmonella with IECs in vitro. Our data indicated that βGM has a higher ability than S. cerevisiae var. boulardii to inhibit Salmonella-induced proinflammatory mRNA (cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1α [IL-1α], IL-6, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF] and chemokines CCL2, CCL20, and CXCL8) and at protein levels (IL-6 and CXCL8). Additionally, βGM and S. cerevisiae var. boulardii induced some effects on DCs that were not observed on IECs: βGM and S. cerevisiae var. boulardii showed slight upregulation of mRNA for TNF-α, GM-CSF, and CCR7 receptor on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Indeed, the addition of βGM or S. cerevisiae var. boulardii on DCs cocultured with Salmonella showed higher gene expression (mRNA) for TNF-α, GM-CSF, and CXCL8 compared to that of the control with Salmonella. In conclusion, the addition of βGM inhibits Salmonella-induced proinflammatory profiles in IECs but may promote DC activation, although associated molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated.

  10. H19 Long Noncoding RNA Regulates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function via MicroRNA 675 by Interacting with RNA-Binding Protein HuR

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Tongtong; Jaladanki, Suraj K.; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Wang, Jun-Yao; Xu, Yan; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    The disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier function occurs commonly in various pathologies, but the exact mechanisms responsible are unclear. The H19 long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) regulates the expression of different genes and has been implicated in human genetic disorders and cancer. Here, we report that H19 plays an important role in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier function by serving as a precursor for microRNA 675 (miR-675). H19 overexpression increased the cellular abundance of miR-675, which in turn destabilized and repressed the translation of mRNAs encoding tight junction protein ZO-1 and adherens junction E-cadherin, resulting in the dysfunction of the epithelial barrier. Increasing the level of the RNA-binding protein HuR in cells overexpressing H19 prevented the stimulation of miR-675 processing from H19, promoted ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression, and restored the epithelial barrier function to a nearly normal level. In contrast, the targeted deletion of HuR in intestinal epithelial cells enhanced miR-675 production in the mucosa and delayed the recovery of the gut barrier function after exposure to mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion. These results indicate that H19 interacts with HuR and regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function via the H19-encoded miR-675 by altering ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression posttranscriptionally. PMID:26884465

  11. Lack of microRNA-101 causes E-cadherin functional deregulation through EZH2 up-regulation in intestinal gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Joana; van Grieken, Nicole C; Pereira, Patricia M; Sousa, Sónia; Tijssen, Marianne; Buffart, Tineke E; Diosdado, Begoña; Grabsch, Heike; Santos, Manuel A S; Meijer, Gerrit; Seruca, Raquel; Carvalho, Beatriz; Oliveira, Carla

    2012-09-01

    E-cadherin expression disruption is commonly observed in metastatic epithelial cancers and is a crucial step in gastric cancer (GC) initiation and progression. As aberrant expression of microRNAs often perturb the normal expression/function of pivotal cancer-related genes, we characterized and dissected a pathway that causes E-cadherin dysfunction via loss of microRNA-101 and up-regulation of EZH2 expression in GC. MicroRNA microarray expression profiling and array-CGH were used to reinforce miR-101 involvement in GC. By using quantitative real-time PCR and quantitative SNaPshot genomic PCR, we confirmed that miR-101 was significantly down-regulated in GC (p < 0.0089) in comparison with normal gastric mucosas and, at least in 65% of the GC cases analysed, this down-regulation was caused by deletions and/or microdeletions at miR-101 genomic loci. Moreover, around 40% of cases showing miR-101 down-regulation displayed concomitant EZH2 over-expression (at the RNA and protein levels), which, in turn, was associated with loss/aberrant expression of E-cadherin. Interestingly, this occurred preferentially in intestinal-type GCs, retaining allele(s) untargeted by classical CDH1-inactivating mechanisms. We also demonstrated that miR-101 gain of function or direct inhibition of EZH2 in Kato III GC cells led to a strong depletion of endogenous EZH2 and consequent rescue of E-cadherin membranous localization, mimicking results obtained in clinical GC samples. In conclusion, we show that deletions and/or microdeletions at both miR-101 genomic loci cause mature miR-101 down-regulation, subsequent EZH2 over-expression and E-cadherin dysfunction, specifically in intestinal-type GC.

  12. In situ hybridization for the detection and localization of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in the intestinal tissues from naturally infected piglets.

    PubMed

    Kim, O; Chae, C

    2000-01-01

    Detection and localization of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was studied by in situ hybridization with a nonradioactive digoxigenin-labeled probe in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 10 naturally infected piglets. A 377-base pair cDNA probe for viral RNA encoding the membrane proteins of PEDV cell-culture-adapted strain V215/78 was generated by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In the retrospective study of pigs from herds with diarrhea, the 10 piglets naturally infected with PEDV had positive signals for PEDV by in situ hybridization. When intestinal tissues were hybridized with the PEDV probe, a strong signal was seen in the villus enterocytes of jejunum and ileum but not in the cecum and colon. Positive cells typically had dark brown reaction products in the cytoplasm. Scattered epithelial cells along the ileal Peyer's patches dome areas contained viral RNA. In one piglet, hybridization signal was also found in the duodenum. PEDV was not demonstrated in tissues outside of the intestinal tract. These findings indicate that jejunal and ileal villus enterocytes are the main target of PEDV replication during epizootic outbreaks of the disease.

  13. Medicinal herb extracts ameliorate impaired growth performance and intestinal lesion of newborn piglets challenged with the virulent porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeun Bum; Lee, Chul Young; Kim, Sung Jae; Han, Jeong Hee; Choi, Keum Hwa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of a combined use of extracts of medicinal herbs Taraxaumi mongolicum, Viola yedoensis Makino, Rhizoma coptidis, and Radix isatidis (MYCI) on porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED). Twenty-two 3-day-old piglets received an oral challenge with 3 × 10(3.5) TCID50 of the virulent PED virus (PEDV) in PBS or PBS only and daily oral administration of 60 mg of the MYCI mixture suspended in milk replacer or the vehicle for 7 days in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Average daily gain (ADG) increased (p < 0.05) in response to the MYCI treatment in the PEDV-challenged piglets (-18 vs. 7 g for the vehicle- vs. MYCI-administered group), but not in unchallenged animals (27 vs. 28 g). Diarrhea score and fecal PEDV shedding, however, were not influenced by the MYCI treatment. The PEDV challenge caused severe intestinal villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, both of which were alleviated by administration of the MYCI mixture as indicated by an increase in the villus height and a decrease in the crypt depth due to the treatment. Overall, medicinal herb extracts used in this study ameliorated impaired growth performance and intestinal lesion of newborn piglets challenged with the virulent PEDV. Therefore, our results suggest that the MYCI mixture could be used as a prophylactic or therapeutic agent against PED.

  14. Spherical nucleic acid targeting microRNA-99b enhances intestinal MFG-E8 gene expression and restores enterocyte migration in lipopolysaccharide-induced septic mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Hao, Liangliang; Bu, Heng-Fu; Scott, Alexander W.; Tian, Ke; Liu, Fangyi; De Plaen, Isabelle G.; Liu, Yulan; Mirkin, Chad A.; Tan, Xiao-Di

    2016-01-01

    Milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) maintains the intestinal homeostasis by enhancing enterocyte migration and attenuating inflammation. We previously reported that sepsis is associated with down-regulation of intestinal MFG-E8 and impairment of enterocyte migration. Here, we showed that impairment of intestinal epithelial cell migration occurred in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic mice. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells (a murine macrophage-like cell line) with LPS increased expression of miR-99b, a microRNA that is predicted to target mouse MFG-E8 3′UTR. Using a luciferase assay, we showed that miR-99b mimic suppressed the activity of a reporter containing MFG-E8 3′UTR. This suggests the role of miR-99b in inhibition of MFG-E8 gene expression. In addition, we developed an anti-miR99b spherical nucleic acid nanoparticle conjugate (SNA-NCanti-miR99b). Treatment of both naïve and LPS-challenged cells with SNA-NCanti-miR99b enhanced MFG-E8 expression in the cells. Administration of SNA-NCanti-miR99b rescued intestinal MFG-E8 expression in LPS-induced septic mice and attenuated LPS inhibitory effects on intestinal epithelial cell migration along the crypt-villus axis. Collectively, our study suggests that LPS represses MFG-E8 expression and disrupts enterocyte migration via a miR-99b dependent mechanism. Furthermore, this work shows that SNA-NCanti-miR99b is a novel nanoparticle-conjugate capable of rescuing MFG-E8 gene expression and maintaining intestinal epithelial homeostasis in sepsis. PMID:27538453

  15. Chronic Administration of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Intestinal Anti-Inflammatory MicroRNA Expression during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Lawrance C.; Kumar, Vinay; Torben, Workineh; Stouwe, Curtis Vande; Winsauer, Peter; Amedee, Angela; Molina, Patricia E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recreational and medical use of cannabis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals has increased in recent years. In simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques, chronic administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) inhibited viral replication and intestinal inflammation and slowed disease progression. Persistent gastrointestinal disease/inflammation has been proposed to facilitate microbial translocation and systemic immune activation and promote disease progression. Cannabinoids including Δ9-THC attenuated intestinal inflammation in mouse colitis models and SIV-infected rhesus macaques. To determine if the anti-inflammatory effects of Δ9-THC involved differential microRNA (miRNA) modulation, we profiled miRNA expression at 14, 30, and 60 days postinfection (days p.i.) in the intestine of uninfected macaques receiving Δ9-THC (n = 3) and SIV-infected macaques administered either vehicle (VEH/SIV; n = 4) or THC (THC/SIV; n = 4). Chronic Δ9-THC administration to uninfected macaques significantly and positively modulated intestinal miRNA expression by increasing the total number of differentially expressed miRNAs from 14 to 60 days p.i. At 60 days p.i., ∼28% of miRNAs showed decreased expression in the VEH/SIV group compared to none showing decrease in the THC/SIV group. Furthermore, compared to the VEH/SIV group, THC selectively upregulated the expression of miR-10a, miR-24, miR-99b, miR-145, miR-149, and miR-187, previously been shown to target proinflammatory molecules. NOX4, a potent reactive oxygen species generator, was confirmed as a direct miR-99b target. A significant increase in NOX4+ crypt epithelial cells was detected in VEH/SIV macaques compared to the THC/SIV group. We speculate that miR-99b-mediated NOX4 downregulation may protect the intestinal epithelium from oxidative stress-induced damage. These results support a role for differential miRNA induction in THC-mediated suppression of intestinal

  16. Probiotic Treatment Decreases the Number of CD14-Expressing Cells in Porcine Milk Which Correlates with Several Intestinal Immune Parameters in the Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Scharek-Tedin, Lydia; Kreuzer-Redmer, Susanne; Twardziok, Sven Olaf; Siepert, Bianca; Klopfleisch, Robert; Tedin, Karsten; Zentek, Jürgen; Pieper, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Modulating the mucosal immune system of neonates by probiotic treatment of their mothers is a promising approach which can only be investigated through the use of animal models. Here, we used sows and their piglets to investigate the impact of a bacterial treatment on the sow’s milk and on the neonate piglet intestinal immune system. In previous experiments, feed supplementation of sows with the probiotic Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 during pregnancy and lactation had been shown to affect intestinal microbiota and cytokine expression of the offspring during the suckling and weaning periods. We therefore investigated the composition of the milk from treated sows in comparison to samples from a control group. In treated sows, the amount of lactose increased, and the somatic cell numbers were reduced. In all milk samples, the percentage of cells expressing membranous CD14 (mCD14) was greater than the fractions of immune cells, indicating expression of mCD14 on mammary epithelial cells. However, in the milk of E. faecium-treated sows, mCD14+ cells were reduced. Furthermore, the number of CD14+ milk cells was positively correlated with the percentages of B cells and activated T cells in the ileal MLN of the piglets. This study provides evidence for the expression of mCD14 by the porcine mammary epithelium, and suggests an immunological effect of mCD14+ milk cells on the piglets’ intestinal immune system. Our study further suggests that mCD14+ mammary epithelial cell populations can be modulated by probiotic feed supplementation of the sow. PMID:25806034

  17. Structural alteration of tight and adherens junctions in villous and crypt epithelium of the small and large intestine of conventional nursing piglets infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Eyerly, Bryan; Annamalai, Thavamathi; Lu, Zhongyan; Saif, Linda J

    2015-06-12

    Integrity of the intestinal epithelium is critical for proper functioning of the barrier that regulates absorption of water and restricts uptake of luminal bacteria. It is maintained mainly by tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). We conducted immunofluorescence (IF) staining for in situ identification of zonula occludin (ZO)-1 proteins for TJ and E-Cadherin proteins for AJ in the small and large intestinal villous and crypt epithelium of nursing pigs infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). Twenty 9-day-old piglets [PEDV-infected (n=9) and Mock (n=11)] from PEDV seronegative sows, were orally inoculated [8.9 log₁₀ genomic equivalents/pig] with PEDV PC21A strain or mock. At post-inoculation days (PIDs) 1-5, infected pigs showed severe watery diarrhea and/or vomiting and severe atrophic enteritis. By immunohistochemistry, PEDV antigens were evident in enterocytes lining the villous epithelium. At PIDs 1-5, PEDV-infected pigs exhibited mildly to extensively disorganized, irregular distribution and reduced expression of ZO-1 or E-Cadherin in villous, but not crypt epithelial cells of the jejunum and ileum, but not in the large intestine, when compared to the negative controls. The structural destruction and disorganization of TJ and AJ were extensive in PEDV-infected pigs at PIDs 1-3, but then appeared to reversibly recover at PID 5, as evident by increased numbers of ZO-1-positive epithelial cells and markedly improved appearance of E-Cadherin-positive villous epithelium. Our results suggest a possible involvement of structurally impaired TJ and AJ in the pathogenesis of PEDV, potentially leading to secondary bacterial infections.

  18. Characterisation of CART-containing neurons and cells in the porcine pancreas, gastro-intestinal tract, adrenal and thyroid glands

    PubMed Central

    Wierup, Nils; Gunnarsdóttir, Anna; Ekblad, Eva; Sundler, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Background The peptide CART is widely expressed in central and peripheral neurons, as well as in endocrine cells. Known peripheral sites of expression include the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the pancreas, and the adrenal glands. In rodent pancreas CART is expressed both in islet endocrine cells and in nerve fibers, some of which innervate the islets. Recent data show that CART is a regulator of islet hormone secretion, and that CART null mutant mice have islet dysfunction. CART also effects GI motility, mainly via central routes. In addition, CART participates in the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-axis. We investigated CART expression in porcine pancreas, GI-tract, adrenal glands, and thyroid gland using immunocytochemistry. Results CART immunoreactive (IR) nerve cell bodies and fibers were numerous in pancreatic and enteric ganglia. The majority of these were also VIP IR. The finding of intrinsic CART containing neurons indicates that pancreatic and GI CART IR nerve fibers have an intrinsic origin. No CART IR endocrine cells were detected in the pancreas or in the GI tract. The adrenal medulla harboured numerous CART IR endocrine cells, most of which were adrenaline producing. In addition CART IR fibers were frequently seen in the adrenal cortex and capsule. The capsule also contained CART IR nerve cell bodies. The majority of the adrenal CART IR neuronal elements were also VIP IR. CART IR was also seen in a substantial proportion of the C-cells in the thyroid gland. The majority of these cells were also somatostatin IR, and/or 5-HT IR, and/or VIP IR. Conclusion CART is a major neuropeptide in intrinsic neurons of the porcine GI-tract and pancreas, a major constituent of adrenaline producing adrenomedullary cells, and a novel peptide of the thyroid C-cells. CART is suggested to be a regulatory peptide in the porcine pancreas, GI-tract, adrenal gland and thyroid. PMID:17625001

  19. Quantitative proteomics and bioinformatic analysis provide new insight into the dynamic response of porcine intestine to Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Collado-Romero, Melania; Aguilar, Carmen; Arce, Cristina; Lucena, Concepción; Codrea, Marius C.; Morera, Luis; Bendixen, Emoke; Moreno, Ángela; Garrido, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    The enteropathogen Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is the most commonly non-typhoideal serotype isolated in pig worldwide. Currently, one of the main sources of human infection is by consumption of pork meat. Therefore, prevention and control of salmonellosis in pigs is crucial for minimizing risks to public health. The aim of the present study was to use isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) to explore differences in the response to Salmonella in two segment of the porcine gut (ileum and colon) along a time course of 1, 2, and 6 days post infection (dpi) with S. Typhimurium. A total of 298 proteins were identified in the infected ileum samples of which, 112 displayed significant expression differences due to Salmonella infection. In colon, 184 proteins were detected in the infected samples of which 46 resulted differentially expressed with respect to the controls. The higher number of changes in protein expression was quantified in ileum at 2 dpi. Further biological interpretation of proteomics data using bioinformatics tools demonstrated that the expression changes in colon were found in proteins involved in cell death and survival, tissue morphology or molecular transport at the early stages and tissue regeneration at 6 dpi. In ileum, however, changes in protein expression were mainly related to immunological and infection diseases, inflammatory response or connective tissue disorders at 1 and 2 dpi. iTRAQ has proved to be a proteomic robust approach allowing us to identify ileum as the earliest response focus upon S. Typhimurium in the porcine gut. In addition, new functions involved in the response to bacteria such as eIF2 signaling, free radical scavengers or antimicrobial peptides (AMP) expression have been identified. Finally, the impairment at of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids and lipid metabolism by means the under regulation of FABP6 protein and FXR/RXR and LXR/RXR signaling pathway in ileum has been

  20. Purification and Characterization of a Surface Protein from Lactobacillus fermentum 104R That Binds to Porcine Small Intestinal Mucus and Gastric Mucin

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Maurilia; Ascencio, Felipe; Conway, Patricia L.

    2002-01-01

    An adhesion-promoting protein involved in the binding of Lactobacillus fermentum strain 104R to small intestinal mucus from piglets and to partially purified gastric mucin was isolated and characterized. Spent culture supernatant fluid and bacterial cell wall extracts were fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration. The active fraction was purified by affinity chromatography. The adhesion-promoting protein was detected in the fractions by adhesion inhibition and dot blot assays and visualized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE, and Western blotting with horseradish peroxidase-labeled mucus and mucin. The active fraction was characterized by estimating the relative molecular weight and by assessing the presence of carbohydrates in, and heat sensitivity of, the active region of the adhesion-promoting protein. The purified protein was digested with porcine trypsin, and the peptides were purified in a SMART system. The peptides were tested for adhesion to horseradish peroxidase-labeled mucin by using the dot blot adhesion assay. Peptides which bound mucin were sequenced. It was shown that the purified adhesion-promoting protein on the cell surface of L. fermentum 104R is extractable with 1 M LiCl and low concentrations of lysozyme but not with 0.2 M glycine. The protein could be released to the culture supernatant fluid after 24 h of growth and had affinity for both small intestinal mucus and gastric mucin. In the native state this protein was variable in size, and it had a molecular mass of 29 kDa when denatured. The denatured protein did not contain carbohydrate moieties and was not heat sensitive. Alignment of amino acids of the adhering peptides with sequences deposited in the EMBL data library showed poor homology with previously published sequences. The protein represents an important molecule for development of probiotics. PMID:11976105

  1. Healing rate and autoimmune safety of full-thickness wounds treated with fish skin acellular dermal matrix versus porcine small-intestine submucosa: a noninferiority study.

    PubMed

    Baldursson, Baldur Tumi; Kjartansson, Hilmar; Konrádsdóttir, Fífa; Gudnason, Palmar; Sigurjonsson, Gudmundur F; Lund, Sigrún Helga

    2015-03-01

    A novel product, the fish skin acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has recently been introduced into the family of biological materials for the treatment of wounds. Hitherto, these products have been produced from the organs of livestock. A noninferiority test was used to compare the effect of fish skin ADM against porcine small-intestine submucosa extracellular matrix in the healing of 162 full-thickness 4-mm wounds on the forearm of 81 volunteers. The fish skin product was noninferior at the primary end point, healing at 28 days. Furthermore, the wounds treated with fish skin acellular matrix healed significantly faster. These results might give the fish skin ADM an advantage because of its environmental neutrality when compared with livestock-derived products. The study results on these acute full-thickness wounds might apply for diabetic foot ulcers and other chronic full-thickness wounds, and the shorter healing time for the fish skin-treated group could influence treatment decisions. To test the autoimmune reactivity of the fish skin, the participants were tested with the following ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) tests: RF, ANA, ENA, anti ds-DNA, ANCA, anti-CCP, and anticollagen I and II. These showed no reactivity. The results demonstrate the claims of safety and efficacy of fish skin ADM for wound care.

  2. Porcine gonadogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five images submitted for teaching purposes related to porcine gonadogenesis (2), porcine fetal testicular development (2), and porcine fetal ovarian development. Key words include: Egg cell nests, Embryo, GATA4, Genital ridge, Gonad, Leydig cell, Mesonephros, MIS, Ovary, P450c17, Porcine, Sertoli ...

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae decreases inflammatory responses induced by F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zanello, Galliano; Meurens, François; Berri, Mustapha; Chevaleyre, Claire; Melo, Sandrine; Auclair, Eric; Salmon, Henri

    2011-05-15

    Probiotic yeasts may provide protection against intestinal inflammation induced by enteric pathogens. In piglets, infection with F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) leads to inflammation, diarrhea and intestinal damage. In this study, we investigated whether the yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc, strain CNCM I-3856) and S. cerevisiae variety boulardii (Sb, strain CNCM I-3799) decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in intestinal epithelial IPI-2I cells cultured with F4+ ETEC. Results showed that viable Sc inhibited the ETEC-induced TNF-α gene expression whereas Sb did not. In contrast, killed Sc failed to inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. This inhibition was dependent on secreted soluble factors. Sc culture supernatant decreased the TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, CXCL2 and CCL20 ETEC-induced mRNA. Furthermore, Sc culture supernatant filtrated fraction < 10 kDa displayed the same effects excepted for TNF-α. Thus, our results extended to Sc (strain CNCM I-3856) the inhibitory effects of some probiotic yeast strains onto inflammation.

  4. PEGylated porcine glucagon-like peptide-2 improved the intestinal digestive function and prevented inflammation of weaning piglets challenged with LPS.

    PubMed

    Qi, K K; Wu, J; Deng, B; Li, Y M; Xu, Z W

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects on intestinal function, anti-inflammatory role and possible mechanism of polyethylene glycosylated (PEGylated) porcine glucagon-like peptide-2 (pGLP-2), a long-acting form of pGLP-2, in weaning piglets challenged with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We divided 18 weaned piglets on day 21 into three groups (control, LPS and LPS+PEG-pGLP-2; n=6). The piglets from the LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 group were injected with PEG-pGLP-2 at 10 nmol/kg BW from 5 to 7 days of the trials daily. On 8th day, the piglets in the LPS and LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 groups were intraperitoneally administered with 100 µg LPS/kg. The control group was administered with the same volume of saline solution. The piglets were then sacrificed on day 28. Afterwards, serum, duodenum, jejunum and ileum samples were collected for analysis of structural and functional endpoints. LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment increased (P<0.05) lactase activities in the duodenum and the jejunum compared with LPS treatment. LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment also significantly increased sucrase activity in the jejunum compared with LPS treatment. Furthermore, LPS treatment increased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-8, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-10 in the ileum compared with the control treatment. By contrast, LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment decreased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α in the ileum compared with the LPS treatment. LPS treatment also increased (P<0.05) the mRNA expression level of GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) and the percentage of GLP-2R-positive cells in the ileum; by comparison, these results were (P<0.05) reduced by LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment. Moreover, LPS+PEG-pGLP-2 treatment increased (P<0.05) the content of serum keratinocyte growth factor compared with the control group and the LPS group. The protective effects of PEG-pGLP-2 on intestinal digestive function were associated with the release of GLP-2R mediator (keratinocyte

  5. The dynamics of Chinese variant porcine epidemic diarrhea virus production in Vero cells and intestines of 2-day old piglets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhui; Gao, Xiaojing; Yao, Yali; Zhang, Yunjing; Lv, Chaochao; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Yuzhou; Jia, Xiangrui; Zhuang, Jinshan; Xiao, Yan; Li, Xiangdong; Tian, Kegong

    2015-10-02

    A severe porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) epizootic has been affecting pigs of all ages that are characterized by high mortality among suckling piglets in China since late 2010, causing significant economic losses. Obtaining a current-circulating PEDV variant isolate that can grow efficiently in cell culture is prerequisite for the development of efficient vaccines. In this study, PEDV strain HN1303 was isolated successfully on Vero cells with supplemental trypsin, and the isolate has been serially propagated in cell culture for over 95 passages. The infectious titers of the virus during the first 10 passages ranged from 10(2.6) to 10(5.8) 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50)/ml, and the titers of 20-95 passages ranged from 10(6.2) to 10(8.0)TCID50/ml. The growth curve of Vero cell-adapted HN1303 in cell culture was determined, and dynamics of virus production was confirmed by immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA). Sequence and phylogenetic analysis based on spike gene indicate that the HN1303 strain belongs to genotype IIa. In addition, the fourth passage cell-culture HN1303 was subjected to 2-day old piglets. All piglets orally inoculated developed severe watery diarrhea and vomiting within 24 hours post-inoculation (hpi) and died within 72 hpi. The results of animal experiments reveal that this strain is highly pathogenic to 2-day old piglets.

  6. Polymethoxyflavone Apigenin-Trimethylether Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Response in Nontransformed Porcine Intestinal Cell Line IPEC-J2.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Orsolya; Palócz, Orsolya; Pászti-Gere, Erzsébet; Gálfi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin and its trimethylated analogue (apigenin-trimethylether) has been investigated in order to evaluate whether these flavonoids could attenuate LPS-induced inflammation in IPEC-J2 non-transformed intestinal epithelial cells. Levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and COX-2 mRNA were measured as a marker of inflammatory response. The extracellular H2O2 level in IPEC-J2 cells was also monitored by Amplex Red assay. Our data revealed that both compounds had significant lowering effect on the inflammatory response. Apigenin (at 25 μM) significantly decreased gene expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated cells, while apigenin-trimethylether in the same concentration did not influence IL-6 mRNA level. Both apigenin and apigenin-trimethylether reduced IL-8 gene expression significantly. TNF-α mRNA level was decreased by apigenin-trimethylether, which was not influenced by apigenin. Treatment with both flavonoids caused significant reduction in the mRNA level of COX-2, but the anti-inflammatory effect of the methylated analogue was more effective than the unmethylated one. Furthermore, both flavonoids reduced significantly the level of extracellular H2O2 compared to the control cells. In conclusion, the methylated apigenin analogue could avoid LPS-induced intestinal inflammation and it could be applied in the future as an effective anti-inflammatory compound.

  7. Polymethoxyflavone Apigenin-Trimethylether Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Response in Nontransformed Porcine Intestinal Cell Line IPEC-J2

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Orsolya; Palócz, Orsolya; Pászti-Gere, Erzsébet; Gálfi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin and its trimethylated analogue (apigenin-trimethylether) has been investigated in order to evaluate whether these flavonoids could attenuate LPS-induced inflammation in IPEC-J2 non-transformed intestinal epithelial cells. Levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and COX-2 mRNA were measured as a marker of inflammatory response. The extracellular H2O2 level in IPEC-J2 cells was also monitored by Amplex Red assay. Our data revealed that both compounds had significant lowering effect on the inflammatory response. Apigenin (at 25 μM) significantly decreased gene expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated cells, while apigenin-trimethylether in the same concentration did not influence IL-6 mRNA level. Both apigenin and apigenin-trimethylether reduced IL-8 gene expression significantly. TNF-α mRNA level was decreased by apigenin-trimethylether, which was not influenced by apigenin. Treatment with both flavonoids caused significant reduction in the mRNA level of COX-2, but the anti-inflammatory effect of the methylated analogue was more effective than the unmethylated one. Furthermore, both flavonoids reduced significantly the level of extracellular H2O2 compared to the control cells. In conclusion, the methylated apigenin analogue could avoid LPS-induced intestinal inflammation and it could be applied in the future as an effective anti-inflammatory compound. PMID:26180592

  8. Kinetic study of the replacement of porcine small intestinal submucosa grafts and the regeneration of meniscal-like tissue in large avascular meniscal defects in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cook, J L; Tomlinson, J L; Arnoczky, S P; Fox, D B; Reeves Cook, C; Kreeger, J M

    2001-06-01

    Porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) was used to replace large, avascular defects in the medial menisci of dogs. Twelve dogs received SIS grafts and 3 dogs were left untreated as controls. Dogs were evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks by means of lameness scoring and ultrasonography. Dogs were sacrificed at 1, 6, or 12 weeks after implantation, and the tissue at the site of meniscal resection was evaluated for gross and histologic appearance, cross-sectional and surface area, and collagen types I and II. The femoral and tibial condyles were assessed for articular cartilage damage. Control dogs were significantly more lame than grafted dogs 8 and 12 weeks after instrumentation. Grafted dogs' replacement tissue appeared meniscal-like when evaluated grossly and ultrasonographically 12 weeks after instrumentation. The amount of replacement tissue was significantly greater in both cross-sectional and surface area for grafted dogs than for controls at all time points. Histologically, the SIS biomaterial could be identified in all grafted dogs at 1 week post-implantation, but in none at 6 weeks post-implantation. Subjectively, grafted dogs' replacement tissue was histologically superior to that of controls with respect to tissue type, organization, and architecture. Collagen types I and II immunoreactivity in grafted menisci were similar to that of normal menisci. Control dogs had significantly more articular cartilage damage than grafted dogs. SIS appears to induce regeneration of meniscal-like tissue in large, avascular meniscal defects in dogs, resulting in superior clinical function and articular cartilage protection compared to ungrafted controls.

  9. Dietary Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Supplementation Improves the Mucosal Barrier Function in the Intestine of Weaned Piglets Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangbing; Gu, Changsong; Hu, Haiyan; Tang, Jun; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Luo, Junqiu; Tian, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been regarded as a safe probiotic strain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dietary LGG supplementation could alleviate diarrhea via improving jejunal mucosal barrier function in the weaned piglets challenged by RV, and further analyze the potential roles for apoptosis of jejunal mucosal cells and intestinal microbiota. A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets: the basal diet and LGG supplementing diet. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused RV or the sterile essential medium. RV infusion increased the diarrhea rate, increased the RV-Ab, NSP4 and IL-2 concentrations and the Bax mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), decreased the villus height, villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4 and mucin 1 concentrations and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and affected the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs. Dietary LGG supplementation increased the villus height and villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations, and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) reduced the Bax mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) in weaned pigs. Furthermore, dietary LGG supplementation alleviated the increase of diarrhea rate in the weaned pigs challenged by RV (P<0.05), and relieve the effect of RV infection on the villus height, crypt depth and the villus height: crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the NSP4, sIgA, IL-2, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the ZO-1, occludin, Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs challenged by RV. These results suggest that supplementing LGG in diets alleviated the diarrhea of weaned piglets challenged by RV via inhibiting the virus multiplication and improving the jejunal mucosal barrier function

  10. Dietary Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Supplementation Improves the Mucosal Barrier Function in the Intestine of Weaned Piglets Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiangbing; Gu, Changsong; Hu, Haiyan; Tang, Jun; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Luo, Junqiu; Tian, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been regarded as a safe probiotic strain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dietary LGG supplementation could alleviate diarrhea via improving jejunal mucosal barrier function in the weaned piglets challenged by RV, and further analyze the potential roles for apoptosis of jejunal mucosal cells and intestinal microbiota. A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets: the basal diet and LGG supplementing diet. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused RV or the sterile essential medium. RV infusion increased the diarrhea rate, increased the RV-Ab, NSP4 and IL-2 concentrations and the Bax mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), decreased the villus height, villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4 and mucin 1 concentrations and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and affected the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs. Dietary LGG supplementation increased the villus height and villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations, and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) reduced the Bax mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) in weaned pigs. Furthermore, dietary LGG supplementation alleviated the increase of diarrhea rate in the weaned pigs challenged by RV (P<0.05), and relieve the effect of RV infection on the villus height, crypt depth and the villus height: crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the NSP4, sIgA, IL-2, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the ZO-1, occludin, Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs challenged by RV. These results suggest that supplementing LGG in diets alleviated the diarrhea of weaned piglets challenged by RV via inhibiting the virus multiplication and improving the jejunal mucosal barrier function

  11. Influence of porcine intestinal pH and gastric digestion on antigenicity of F4 fimbriae for oral immunisation.

    PubMed

    Snoeck, Veerle; Cox, Eric; Verdonck, Frank; Joensuu, Jussi J; Goddeeris, Bruno M

    2004-01-14

    Newly weaned piglets can be orally immunised against F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection with F4 fimbriae. However, to efficiently develop a vaccine against ETEC induced postweaning diarrhoea, knowledge of the stability of the F4 fimbriae to different pH and gastric digestion is needed. The gastrointestinal pH in suckling and recently weaned piglets was measured and the stability of F4 fimbriae to different pH and to pepsin was assessed in vitro. In the stomach the lowest pH was found in the fundus gland region. Gastric pH values below 2.5 were not found in suckling piglets or at the day of weaning, in contrast to piglets 1 and 2 weeks postweaning. Along the first half of the small intestine and in the caecum, a negative correlation was found between pH and age. The F4 fimbriae were stable to pH 1.5 and 2 for 2 h, whereas longer incubation periods resulted in conversion of the multimeric forms into monomers. The F4 fimbriae were partially degraded by incubation for 15-30 min in simulated gastric fluid at pH 1.5 and 2, and completely digested from 3 h onwards. At pH 3, the fimbriae maintained their antigenicity for at least 4h. The results demonstrate that gastric digestion will only have a limited impact on oral immunisation since liquid passes through the stomach relatively quickly (50% within 2 h). However, we previously demonstrated that the transit times are prolonged shortly after weaning. Shortly after weaning it could be necessary to protect the F4 fimbriae against gastric digestion to obtain efficient oral immunisation of the piglets.

  12. Wet-lab tested microRNA assays for qPCR studies with SYBR® Green and DNA primers in pig tissues.

    PubMed

    Mentzel, Caroline M J; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Córdoba, Sarai; Herrera Uribe, Juber; Busk, Peter K; Cirera, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that are involved in several biological processes including those that mediate disease pathophysiology. Hence, quantifying microRNA expression levels can provide important and novel insights into disease biology. In recent years, the pig has emerged as an excellent large animal model for studying human diseases and conditions (e.g. obesity) due to similarities in organ size, gastro-intestinal tract, metabolism, immune response, genetics and the availability of relevant tissues that are not normally easily available in humans. We have previously developed two useful tools in the field of microRNA quantitative real time PCR (qPCR): 1) a very specific, sensitive and simple qPCR method based on DNA primers, MiR-specific qPCR; and 2) the free primer-design software miRprimer. The present study integrates in a publicly accessible database all available information on validated porcine microRNA qPCR assays that have utilized these tools. Due to the high phylogenetic conservation in microRNA sequence between pig, humans and other domestic species this database is a very valuable resource for the broader scientist community who are working on microRNAs and want to use readily tested qPCR assays in a simple and cost-effective manner.

  13. Intestinal Colonization by Enterotoxigenic ’Escherichia Coli’

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    Growth of enterotoxigenic E . coli in porcine small intestine selects for piliated forms which adhere to the intestinal epithelium. Surface antigen...K99 on enterotoxigenic E . coli is a pilus. Antigen K99 occurs on porcine enterotoxigenic E . coli strains and is produced in pig small intestine.

  14. Oral administration of synthetic porcine beta-defensin-2 improves growth performance and cecal microbial flora and down-regulates the expression of intestinal toll-like receptor-4 and inflammatory cytokines in weaned piglets challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhiru; Xu, Ling; Shi, Baoshi; Deng, Huang; Lai, Xin; Liu, Jingyan; Sun, Zhihong

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic porcine beta-defensin-2 (pBD-2) was tested as an alternative to antimicrobial growth-promoters in pig production. Thirty 21-day weaned piglets were challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, and orally dosed with either sterile water (CON), pBD-2 (BD) or neomycin sulphate (NS) twice daily for 21 days. pBD-2 and NS led to higher growth performance, jejunum villus height and increased expression of insulin-like growth factor-I compared with the CON group (P < 0.05). Hemolytic E. coli scores from rectal swabs, and copy numbers of E. coli, Bacteroides fragilis and Streptococcus in the cecal digesta of the BD- or NS-treated piglets were lower than those in the CON group (P < 0.05). Messenger RNA levels of toll-like receptor 4, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-8 in the jejunum mucosa of the BD and NS groups were lower than those in the CON group (P < 0.05). Copy numbers of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria in the cecal digesta of the BD group were higher than those of the CON and NS groups (P < 0.05). Therefore, pBD-2 has antimicrobial activity in piglets, and it can improve growth performance, reduce inflammatory cytokine expression and affect intestinal morphological indices in the same way as probiotics. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  15. MicroRNA-449a Overexpression, Reduced NOTCH1 Signals and Scarce Goblet Cells Characterize the Small Intestine of Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tinto, Nadia; Montanaro, Donatella; Capobianco, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Tucci, Francesca; Troncone, Giancarlo; Greco, Luigi; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    MiRNAs play a relevant role in regulating gene expression in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions including autoimmune disorders. MiRNAs are also important in the differentiation and function of the mouse intestinal epithelium. Our study was aimed to look for miRNA-based modulation of gene expression in celiac small intestine, and particularly for genes involved in cell intestinal differentiation/proliferation mechanisms. A cohort of 40 children (20 with active CD, 9 on a gluten-free diet (GFD), and 11 controls), were recruited at the Paediatrics Department (University of Naples Federico II). The expression of 365 human miRNAs was quantified by TaqMan low-density arrays. We used bioinformatics to predict putative target genes of miRNAs and to select biological pathways. The presence of NOTCH1, HES1, KLF4, MUC-2, Ki67 and beta-catenin proteins in the small intestine of CD and control children was tested by immunohistochemistry. The expression of about 20% of the miRNAs tested differed between CD and control children. We found that high miR-449a levels targeted and reduced both NOTCH1 and KLF4 in HEK-293 cells. NOTCH1, KLF4 signals and the number of goblet cells were lower in small intestine of children with active CD and in those on a GFD than in controls, whereas more nuclear beta-catenin staining, as a sign of the WNT pathway activation, and more Ki67 staining, as sign of proliferation, were present in crypts from CD patients than in controls. In conclusion we first demonstrate a miRNA mediated gene regulation in small intestine of CD patients. We also highlighted a reduced NOTCH1 pathway in our patients, irrespective of whether the disease was active or not. We suggest that NOTCH pathway could be constitutively altered in the celiac small intestine and could drive the increased proliferation and the decreased differentiation of intestinal cells towards the secretory goblet cell lineage. PMID:22194996

  16. MicroRNA-449a overexpression, reduced NOTCH1 signals and scarce goblet cells characterize the small intestine of celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Marina; Iaffaldano, Laura; Tinto, Nadia; Montanaro, Donatella; Capobianco, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Tucci, Francesca; Troncone, Giancarlo; Greco, Luigi; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    MiRNAs play a relevant role in regulating gene expression in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions including autoimmune disorders. MiRNAs are also important in the differentiation and function of the mouse intestinal epithelium. Our study was aimed to look for miRNA-based modulation of gene expression in celiac small intestine, and particularly for genes involved in cell intestinal differentiation/proliferation mechanisms. A cohort of 40 children (20 with active CD, 9 on a gluten-free diet (GFD), and 11 controls), were recruited at the Paediatrics Department (University of Naples Federico II). The expression of 365 human miRNAs was quantified by TaqMan low-density arrays. We used bioinformatics to predict putative target genes of miRNAs and to select biological pathways. The presence of NOTCH1, HES1, KLF4, MUC-2, Ki67 and beta-catenin proteins in the small intestine of CD and control children was tested by immunohistochemistry. The expression of about 20% of the miRNAs tested differed between CD and control children. We found that high miR-449a levels targeted and reduced both NOTCH1 and KLF4 in HEK-293 cells. NOTCH1, KLF4 signals and the number of goblet cells were lower in small intestine of children with active CD and in those on a GFD than in controls, whereas more nuclear beta-catenin staining, as a sign of the WNT pathway activation, and more Ki67 staining, as sign of proliferation, were present in crypts from CD patients than in controls. In conclusion we first demonstrate a miRNA mediated gene regulation in small intestine of CD patients. We also highlighted a reduced NOTCH1 pathway in our patients, irrespective of whether the disease was active or not. We suggest that NOTCH pathway could be constitutively altered in the celiac small intestine and could drive the increased proliferation and the decreased differentiation of intestinal cells towards the secretory goblet cell lineage.

  17. Adding mucins to an in vitro batch fermentation model of the large intestine induces changes in microbial population isolated from porcine feces depending on the substrate.

    PubMed

    Tran, T H T; Boudry, C; Everaert, N; Théwis, A; Portetelle, D; Daube, G; Nezer, C; Taminiau, B; Bindelle, J

    2016-02-01

    Adding mucus to in vitro fermentation models of the large intestine shows that some genera, namely lactobacilli, are dependent on host-microbiota interactions and that they rely on mucosal layers to increase their activity. This study investigated whether this dependence on mucus is substrate dependent and to what extent other genera are impacted by the presence of mucus. Inulin and cellulose were fermented in vitro by a fecal inoculum from pig in the presence or not of mucin beads in order to compare fermentation patterns and bacterial communities. Mucins increased final gas production with inulin and shifted short-chain fatty acid molar ratios (P < 0.001). Quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. decreased with mucins, but Bacteroides spp. increased when inulin was fermented. A more in-depth community analysis indicated that the mucins increased Proteobacteria (0.55 vs 0.25%, P = 0.013), Verrucomicrobia (5.25 vs 0.03%, P = 0.032), Ruminococcaceae, Bacteroidaceae and Akkermansia spp. Proteobacteria (5.67 vs 0.55%, P < 0.001) and Lachnospiraceae (33 vs 10.4%) were promoted in the mucus compared with the broth, while Ruminococcaceae decreased. The introduction of mucins affected many microbial genera and fermentation patterns, but from PCA results, the impact of mucus was independent of the fermentation substrate.

  18. Slowly digestible starch influences mRNA abundance of glucose and short-chain fatty acid transporters in the porcine distal intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Woodward, A D; Regmi, P R; Gänzle, M G; van Kempen, T A T G; Zijlstra, R T

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between starch chemistry and intestinal nutrient transporters is not well characterized. We hypothesized that inclusion of slowly instead of rapidly digestible starch in pig diets will decrease glucose and increase short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) transporter expression in the distal gut. Weaned barrows (n = 32) were fed 4 diets containing 70% starch [ranging from 0 to 63% amylose and from 1.06 (rapidly) to 0.22%/min (slowly) rate of in vitro digestion] at 3 × maintenance energy requirement in a complete randomized block design. Ileal and colon mucosa was collected on day 21 to quantify mRNA abundance of Na(+)-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), monocarboxylic acid transporter 1 (MCT1), and Na(+)-coupled monocarboxylate transporter (SMCT). Messenger RNA was extracted and cDNA manufactured prior to relative quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Data were analyzed using the 2(-Δ ΔC)(T) method, with β-actin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as reference genes, and regression analysis was performed. As in vitro rate of digestion decreased, SGLT1 linearly increased (P < 0.05) in the ileum. Contrary to SGLT1, MCT1 tended to linearly decrease (P = 0.08) in the ileum and increased quadratically (P < 0.001) in the colon with decreasing rate of digestion. Starch digestion rate did not affect SMCT in the ileum; however, colonic SMCT quadratically decreased (P < 0.01) with decreasing rate of digestion. In conclusion, in contrast to our hypothesis, slowly digestible starch increased ileal glucose and decreased ileal SCFA transporter mRNA abundance, possibly due to an increased glucose in the luminal ileum. Effects of starch on colonic SCFA transporter mRNA abundance were inconsistent.

  19. Longitudinal Examination of the Intestinal Lamina Propria Cellular Compartment of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques Provides Broader and Deeper Insights into the Link between Aberrant MicroRNA Expression and Persistent Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinay; Torben, Workineh; Kenway, Carys S.; Schiro, Faith R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic immune activation/inflammation driven by factors like microbial translocation is a key determinant of human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV) disease progression. Although extensive research on inflammation has focused on studying protein regulators, increasing evidence suggests a critical role for microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating several aspects of the immune/inflammatory response and immune cell proliferation, differentiation, and activation. To understand their immunoregulatory role, we profiled miRNA expression sequentially in intestinal lamina propria leukocytes (LPLs) of eight macaques before and at 21, 90, and 180 days postinfection (dpi). At 21 dpi, ∼20 and 9 miRNAs were up- and downregulated, respectively. However, at 90 dpi (n = 60) and 180 dpi (n = 44), ≥75% of miRNAs showed decreased expression. Notably, the T-cell activation-associated miR-15b, miR-142-3p, miR-142-5p, and miR-150 expression was significantly downregulated at 90 and 180 dpi. Out of ∼10 downregulated miRNAs predicted to regulate CD69, we confirmed miR-92a to directly target CD69. Interestingly, the SIV-induced miR-190b expression was elevated at all time points. Additionally, elevated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive miR-146b-5p expression at 180 dpi was confirmed in primary intestinal macrophages following LPS treatment in vitro. Further, reporter and overexpression assays validated IRAK1 (interleukin-1 receptor 1 kinase) as a direct miR-150 target. Furthermore, IRAK1 protein levels were markedly elevated in intestinal LPLs and epithelium. Finally, blockade of CD8+ T-cell activation/proliferation with delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) significantly prevented miR-150 downregulation and IRAK1 upregulation. Our findings suggest that miR-150 downregulation during T-cell activation disrupts the translational control of IRAK1, facilitating persistent gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation. Finally, the ability of Δ9-THC to block the mi

  20. Porcine aminopeptidase N mediated polarized infection by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cong, Yingying; Li, Xiaoxue; Bai, Yunyun; Lv, Xiaonan; Herrler, Georg; Enjuanes, Luis; Zhou, Xingdong; Qu, Bo; Meng, Fandan; Cong, Chengcheng; Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxing

    2015-04-15

    Infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was characterized. Indirect immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed PEDV can be successfully propagated in immortalized swine small intestine epithelial cells (IECs). Infection involved porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN), a reported cellular receptor for PEDV, transient expression of pAPN and siRNA targeted pAPN increased and decreased the infectivity of PEDV in IECs, respectively. Subsequently, polarized entry into and release from both Vero E6 and IECs was analyzed. PEDV entry into polarized cells and pAPN grown on membrane inserts occurs via apical membrane. The progeny virus released into the medium was also quantified which demonstrated that PEDV is preferentially released from the apical membrane. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pAPN, the cellular receptor for PEDV, mediates polarized PEDV infection. These results imply the possibility that PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in intestinal epithelial cells. - Highlights: • PEDV infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was characterized. • Porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN) facilitated PEDV infection in IECs. • PEDV entry into and release from polarized cell via its apical membrane. • PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in IECs.

  1. Molecular characterization and expression of porcine Siglec-5.

    PubMed

    Escalona, Z; Álvarez, B; Uenishi, H; Toki, D; Yuste, M; Revilla, C; Gómez del Moral, M; Alonso, F; Ezquerra, A; Domínguez, J

    2014-05-01

    In this study we describe the characterization of the porcine orthologue of Siglec-5. A cDNa clone was obtained from a porcine cDNa library derived from swine small intestine which encodes a 555 a-a type 1 transmembrane protein with sequence homology to human Siglec-5. This protein consists of four Ig-like domains, a transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic tail with two tyrosine-based signalling motifs. When expressed as a recombinant protein fused to the Fc region of human IgG1, porcine Siglec-5 was able to bind porcine red blood cells in a sialic acid-dependent manner. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were developed against porcine Siglec-5 and used to analyse its expression in bone marrow and blood cells, and lymphoid tissues. Porcine Siglec-5 expression was mainly restricted to myelomonocytic cells and their precursors, being detected also, although at low levels, on plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B lymphocytes. In lymphoid tissues, ellipsoids of the spleen and subcapsular and medullar sinuses of lymph nodes were positive for Siglec-5. These mAbs were able to precipitate, from granulocyte lysates, a protein of approximately 85 kDa under non-reducing conditions, indicating that porcine Siglec-5 is expressed as a monomer in the plasma membrane.

  2. Dietary Gluten-Induced Gut Dysbiosis Is Accompanied by Selective Upregulation of microRNAs with Intestinal Tight Junction and Bacteria-Binding Motifs in Rhesus Macaque Model of Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Mahesh; Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T; Ryan, Caitlin N; Chan, Luisa S; Dufour, Jason; Aye, Pyone P; Blanchard, James; Moehs, Charles P; Sestak, Karol

    2016-10-28

    The composition of the gut microbiome reflects the overall health status of the host. In this study, stool samples representing the gut microbiomes from 6 gluten-sensitive (GS) captive juvenile rhesus macaques were compared with those from 6 healthy, age- and diet-matched peers. A total of 48 samples representing both groups were studied using V4 16S rRNA gene DNA analysis. Samples from GS macaques were further characterized based on type of diet administered: conventional monkey chow, i.e., wheat gluten-containing diet (GD), gluten-free diet (GFD), barley gluten-derived diet (BOMI) and reduced gluten barley-derived diet (RGB). It was hypothesized that the GD diet would lower the gut microbial diversity in GS macaques. This is the first report illustrating the reduction of gut microbial alpha-diversity (p < 0.05) following the consumption of dietary gluten in GS macaques. Selected bacterial families (e.g., Streptococcaceae and Lactobacillaceae) were enriched in GS macaques while Coriobacteriaceae was enriched in healthy animals. Within several weeks after the replacement of the GD by the GFD diet, the composition (beta-diversity) of gut microbiome in GS macaques started to change (p = 0.011) towards that of a normal macaque. Significance for alpha-diversity however, was not reached by the day 70 when the feeding experiment ended. Several inflammation-associated microRNAs (miR-203, -204, -23a, -23b and -29b) were upregulated (p < 0.05) in jejunum of 4 biopsied GS macaques fed GD with predicted binding sites on 16S ribosomal RNA of Lactobacillus reuteri (accession number: NR_025911), Prevotella stercorea (NR_041364) and Streptococcus luteciae (AJ297218) that were overrepresented in feces. Additionally, claudin-1, a validated tight junction protein target of miR-29b was significantly downregulated in jejunal epithelium of GS macaques. Taken together, we predict that with the introduction of effective treatments in future studies the diversity of gut microbiomes in GS

  3. Dietary Gluten-Induced Gut Dysbiosis Is Accompanied by Selective Upregulation of microRNAs with Intestinal Tight Junction and Bacteria-Binding Motifs in Rhesus Macaque Model of Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Mahesh; Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T.; Ryan, Caitlin N.; Chan, Luisa S.; Dufour, Jason; Aye, Pyone P.; Blanchard, James; Moehs, Charles P.; Sestak, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the gut microbiome reflects the overall health status of the host. In this study, stool samples representing the gut microbiomes from 6 gluten-sensitive (GS) captive juvenile rhesus macaques were compared with those from 6 healthy, age- and diet-matched peers. A total of 48 samples representing both groups were studied using V4 16S rRNA gene DNA analysis. Samples from GS macaques were further characterized based on type of diet administered: conventional monkey chow, i.e., wheat gluten-containing diet (GD), gluten-free diet (GFD), barley gluten-derived diet (BOMI) and reduced gluten barley-derived diet (RGB). It was hypothesized that the GD diet would lower the gut microbial diversity in GS macaques. This is the first report illustrating the reduction of gut microbial alpha-diversity (p < 0.05) following the consumption of dietary gluten in GS macaques. Selected bacterial families (e.g., Streptococcaceae and Lactobacillaceae) were enriched in GS macaques while Coriobacteriaceae was enriched in healthy animals. Within several weeks after the replacement of the GD by the GFD diet, the composition (beta-diversity) of gut microbiome in GS macaques started to change (p = 0.011) towards that of a normal macaque. Significance for alpha-diversity however, was not reached by the day 70 when the feeding experiment ended. Several inflammation-associated microRNAs (miR-203, -204, -23a, -23b and -29b) were upregulated (p < 0.05) in jejunum of 4 biopsied GS macaques fed GD with predicted binding sites on 16S ribosomal RNA of Lactobacillus reuteri (accession number: NR_025911), Prevotella stercorea (NR_041364) and Streptococcus luteciae (AJ297218) that were overrepresented in feces. Additionally, claudin-1, a validated tight junction protein target of miR-29b was significantly downregulated in jejunal epithelium of GS macaques. Taken together, we predict that with the introduction of effective treatments in future studies the diversity of gut microbiomes in GS

  4. Bovine and porcine heparins: different drugs with similar effects on human haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heparins from porcine and bovine intestinal mucosa differ in their structure and also in their effects on coagulation, thrombosis and bleeding. However, they are used as undistinguishable drugs. Methods We compared bovine and porcine intestinal heparin administered to patients undergoing a particular protocol of haemodialysis. We compared plasma concentrations of these two drugs and also evaluated how they affect patients and the dialyzer used. Results Compared with porcine heparin, bovine heparin achieved only 76% of the maximum plasma concentration as IU mL-1. This observation is consistent with the activities observed in the respective pharmaceutical preparations. When the plasma concentrations were expressed on weight basis, bovine heparin achieved a maximum concentration 1.5 fold higher than porcine heparin. The reduced anticoagulant activity and higher concentration, on weight basis, achieved in the plasma of patients under dialysis using bovine instead of porcine heparin did not affect significantly the patients or the dialyzer used. The heparin dose is still in a range, which confers security and safety to the patients. Discussion Despite no apparent difference between bovine and porcine intestinal heparins in the haemodialysis practice, these two types of heparins should be used as distinct drugs due to their differences in structure and biological effects. Conclusions The reduced anticoagulant activity achieved in the plasma of patients under dialysis using bovine instead of porcine heparin did not affect significantly the patients or the dialyzer. PMID:23763719

  5. Replication of porcine circoviruses.

    PubMed

    Faurez, Florence; Dory, Daniel; Grasland, Béatrice; Jestin, André

    2009-05-18

    Porcine circoviruses are circular single-stranded DNA viruses that infect swine and wild boars. Two species of porcine circoviruses exist. Porcine circovirus type 1 is non pathogenic contrary to porcine circovirus type 2 which is associated with the disease known as Post-weaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome. Porcine circovirus DNA has been shown to replicate by a rolling circle mechanism. Other studies have revealed similar mechanisms of rolling-circle replication in plasmids and single-stranded viruses such as Geminivirus. Three elements are important in rolling-circle replication: i) a gene encoding initiator protein, ii) a double strand origin, and iii) a single strand origin. However, differences exist between viruses and plasmids and between viruses. Porcine circovirus replication probably involves a "melting pot" rather than "cruciform" rolling-circle mechanism.This review provides a summary of current knowledge of replication in porcine circoviruses as models of the Circovirus genus. Based on various studies, the factors affecting replication are defined and the mechanisms involved in the different phases of replication are described or proposed.

  6. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  7. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  8. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Paralytic ileus; Intestinal volvulus; Bowel obstruction; Ileus; Pseudo-obstruction - intestinal; Colonic ileus ... objects that are swallowed and block the intestines) Gallstones (rare) Hernias Impacted stool Intussusception (telescoping of 1 ...

  9. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    An intestinal obstruction occurs when food or stool cannot move through the intestines. The obstruction can be complete or partial. ... abdomen Inability to pass gas Constipation A complete intestinal obstruction is a medical emergency. It often requires surgery. ...

  10. Different virulence of porcine and porcine-like bovine rotavirus strains with genetically nearly identical genomes in piglets and calves.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Gyu; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Alfajaro, Mia Madel; Kim, Deok-Song; Son, Kyu-Yeol; Kwon, Hyoung-Jun; Hosmillo, Myra; Ryu, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ji-Yun; Cena, Rohani B; Lee, Ju-Hwan; Kang, Mun-Il; Park, Sang-Ik; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2013-10-01

    Direct interspecies transmissions of group A rotaviruses (RVA) have been reported under natural conditions. However, the pathogenicity of RVA has never been directly compared in homologous and heterologous hosts. The bovine RVA/Cow-tc/KOR/K5/2004/G5P[7] strain, which was shown to possess a typical porcine-like genotype constellation similar to that of the G5P[7] prototype RVA/Pig-tc/USA/OSU/1977/G5P9[7] strain, was examined for its pathogenicity and compared with the porcine G5P[7] RVA/Pig-tc/KOR/K71/2006/G5P[7] strain possessing the same genotype constellation. The bovine K5 strain induced diarrhea and histopathological changes in the small intestine of piglets and calves, whereas the porcine K71 strain caused diarrhea and histopathological changes in the small intestine of piglets, but not in calves. Furthermore, the bovine K5 strain showed extra-intestinal tropisms in both piglets and calves, whereas the porcine K71 strain had extra-intestinal tropisms in piglets, but not in calves. Therefore, we performed comparative genomic analysis of the K71 and K5 RVA strains to determine whether specific mutations could be associated with these distinct clinical and pathological phenotypes. Full-length sequencing analyses for the 11 genomic segments for K71 and K5 revealed that these strains were genetically nearly identical to each other. Two nucleotide mutations were found in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of NSP5 and the 3' UTR of NSP3, and eight amino acid mutations in VP1-VP4 and NSP2. Some of these mutations may be critical molecular determinants for RVA virulence and/or pathogenicity.

  11. Multispectral tissue characterization for intestinal anastomosis optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Shademan, Azad; Le, Hanh N. D.; Decker, Ryan; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is a surgical procedure that restores bowel continuity after surgical resection to treat intestinal malignancy, inflammation, or obstruction. Despite the routine nature of intestinal anastomosis procedures, the rate of complications is high. Standard visual inspection cannot distinguish the tissue subsurface and small changes in spectral characteristics of the tissue, so existing tissue anastomosis techniques that rely on human vision to guide suturing could lead to problems such as bleeding and leakage from suturing sites. We present a proof-of-concept study using a portable multispectral imaging (MSI) platform for tissue characterization and preoperative surgical planning in intestinal anastomosis. The platform is composed of a fiber ring light-guided MSI system coupled with polarizers and image analysis software. The system is tested on ex vivo porcine intestine tissue, and we demonstrate the feasibility of identifying optimal regions for suture placement.

  12. Porcine models of digestive disease: the future of large animal translational research.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Liara M; Moeser, Adam J; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2015-07-01

    There is increasing interest in nonrodent translational models for the study of human disease. The pig, in particular, serves as a useful animal model for the study of pathophysiological conditions relevant to the human intestine. This review assesses currently used porcine models of gastrointestinal physiology and disease and provides a rationale for the use of these models for future translational studies. The pig has proven its utility for the study of fundamental disease conditions such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, stress-induced intestinal dysfunction, and short bowel syndrome. Pigs have also shown great promise for the study of intestinal barrier function, surgical tissue manipulation and intervention, as well as biomaterial implantation and tissue transplantation. Advantages of pig models highlighted by these studies include the physiological similarity to human intestine and mechanisms of human disease. Emerging future directions for porcine models of human disease include the fields of transgenics and stem cell biology, with exciting implications for regenerative medicine.

  13. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ...

  14. MicroRNA expression profiles associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and ampullary adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Nicolai A; Werner, Jens; Willenbrock, Hanni; Roslind, Anne; Giese, Nathalia; Horn, Thomas; Wøjdemann, Morten; Johansen, Julia S

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs have potential as diagnostic cancer biomarkers. The aim of this study was (1) to define microRNA expression patterns in formalin-fixed parafin-embedded tissue from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, ampullary adenocarcinoma, normal pancreas and chronic pancreatitis without using micro-dissection and (2) to discover new diagnostic microRNAs and combinations of microRNAs in cancer tissue. The expression of 664 microRNAs in tissue from 170 pancreatic adenocarcinomas and 107 ampullary adenocarcinomas were analyzed using a commercial microRNA assay. Results were compared with chronic pancreatitis, normal pancreas and duodenal adenocarcinoma. In all, 43 microRNAs had higher and 41 microRNAs reduced expression in pancreatic cancer compared with normal pancreas. In all, 32 microRNAs were differently expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared with chronic pancreatitis (17 higher; 15 reduced). Several of these microRNAs have not before been related to diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (eg, miR-492, miR-614, miR-622). MiR-614, miR-492, miR-622, miR-135b and miR-196 were most differently expressed. MicroRNA profiles of pancreatic and ampullary adenocarcinomas were correlated (0.990). MicroRNA expression profiles for pancreatic cancer described in the literature were consistent with our findings, and the microRNA profile for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (miR-196b-miR-217) was validated. We identified a more significant expression profile, the difference between miR-411 and miR-198 (P=2.06 × 10(-54)) and a diagnostic LASSO classifier using 19 microRNAs (sensitivity 98.5%; positive predictive value 97.8%; accuracy 97.0%). We also identified microRNA profiles to subclassify ampullary adenocarcinomas into pancreatobiliary or intestinal type. In conclusion, we found that combinations of two microRNAs could roughly separate neoplastic from non-neoplastic samples. A diagnostic 19 microRNA classifier was constructed which without micro-dissection could discriminate pancreatic

  15. Xenotransplantation and porcine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Porcine microorganisms may be transmitted to the human recipient when xenotransplantation with pig cells, tissues, and organs will be performed. Most of such microorganisms can be eliminated from the donor pig by specified or designated pathogen-free production of the animals. As human cytomegalovirus causes severe transplant rejection in allotransplantation, considerable concern is warranted on the potential pathogenicity of porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) in the setting of xenotransplantation. On the other hand, despite having a similar name, PCMV is different from HCMV. The impact of PCMV infection on pigs is known; however, the influence of PCMV on the human transplant recipient is unclear. However, first transplantations of pig organs infected with PCMV into non-human primates were associated with a significant reduction of the survival time of the transplants. Sensitive detection methods and strategies for elimination of PCMV from donor herds are required.

  16. Carbohydrate-binding specificities of potential probiotic Lactobacillus strains in porcine jejunal (IPEC-J2) cells and porcine mucin.

    PubMed

    Valeriano, Valerie Diane; Bagon, Bernadette B; Balolong, Marilen P; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial lectins are carbohydrate-binding adhesins that recognize glycoreceptors in the gut mucus and epithelium of hosts. In this study, the contribution of lectin-like activities to adhesion of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1 and Lactobacillus johnsonii PF01, which were isolated from swine intestine, were compared to those of the commercial probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Both LM1 and PF01 strains have been reported to have good adhesion ability to crude intestinal mucus of pigs. To confirm this, we quantified their adhesion to porcine gastric mucin and intestinal porcine enterocytes isolated from the jejunum of piglets (IPEC-J2). In addition, we examined their carbohydrate-binding specificities by suspending bacterial cells in carbohydrate solutions prior to adhesion assays. We found that the selected carbohydrates affected the adherences of LM1 to IPEC-J2 cells and of LGG to mucin. In addition, compared to adhesion to IPEC-J2 cells, adhesion to mucin by both LM1 and LGG was characterized by enhanced specific recognition of glycoreceptor components such as galactose, mannose, and N-acetylglucosamine. Hydrophobic interactions might make a greater contribution to adhesion of PF01. A similar adhesin profile between a probiotic and a pathogen, suggest a correlation between shared pathogen-probiotic glycoreceptor recognition and the ability to exclude enteropathogens such as Escherichia coli K88 and Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253. These findings extend our understanding of the mechanisms of the intestinal adhesion and pathogen-inhibition abilities of probiotic Lactobacillus strains.

  17. Flavonol-rich fractions of yaupon holly leaves (Ilex vomitoria, Aquifoliaceae) induce microRNA-146a and have anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive effects in intestinal myofibroblast CCD-18Co cells.

    PubMed

    Noratto, Giuliana D; Kim, Youngmok; Talcott, Stephen T; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2011-06-01

    Polyphenolics extracted from yaupon holly (Ilex vomitoria, Aquifoliaceae) (YH) leaves were investigated in human colon cells for their chemopreventive and anti-inflammatory activities. An activity-guided fractionation allowed the selection of YH flavonol-rich fraction due to its preferential inhibition of HT-29 colon cancer viability over the normal CCD-18Co colon cells. Quercetin and kaempferol 3-rutinosides, main components identified in this fraction, protected CCD-18Co cells against reactive oxidative species (ROS) in part due to increased activity of antioxidant enzymes. In addition, up-regulation of microRNA-146a (miR-146a) known as a negative regulator of pro-inflammatory NF-κB activation was the underlying molecular mechanism that protected CCD-18Co from inflammation.

  18. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Freeman, Jennifer J.; Wieck, Minna M.; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S.; Grikscheit, Tracy C.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.; Spence, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue. PMID:26459240

  19. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Freeman, Jennifer J; Wieck, Minna M; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spence, Jason R

    2015-10-12

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  20. Porcine circovirus diseases.

    PubMed

    Segalés, Joaquim; Allan, Gordon M; Domingo, Mariano

    2005-12-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is a member of the family Circoviridae, a recently established virus family composed of small, non-enveloped viruses, with a circular, single-stranded DNA genome. PCV2, which is found all over the world in the domestic pig and probably the wild boar, has been recently associated with a number of disease syndromes, which have been collectively named porcine circovirus diseases (PCVD). Postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), porcine dermatitis and nephropathy syndrome (PDNS) and reproductive disorders are the most relevant ones. Among them, only PMWS is considered to have a severe impact on domestic swine production. PMWS mainly affects nursery and/or fattening pigs; wasting is considered the most representative clinical sign in this disease. Diagnosis of this disease is confirmed by histopathological examination of lymphoid tissues and detection of a moderate to high amount of PCV2 in damaged tissues. Since PMWS is considered a multifactorial disease in which other factors in addition to PCV2 are needed in most cases to trigger the clinical disease, effective control measures have focused on the understanding of the co-factors involved in individual farms and the control or elimination of these triggers. PDNS, an immuno-complex disease characterized by fibrino-necrotizing glomerulonephritis and systemic necrotizing vasculitis, has been linked to PCV2, but a definitive proof of this association is still lacking. PCV2-associated reproductive disease seems to occur very sporadically under field conditions, but it has been characterized by late-term abortions and stillbirths, extensive fibrosing and/or necrotizing myocarditis in fetuses and the presence of moderate to high amounts of PCV2 in these lesions. Taking into account that scientific information on PCV2 and its associated diseases has been markedly expanded in the last 8 years, the objective of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge of the most

  1. Rectal microRNAs are perturbed in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Zahm, Adam M.; Hand, Nicholas J.; Tsoucas, Daphne M.; Le Guen, Claire L.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Friedman, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Changes in intestinal microRNAs have been reported in adult patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. The goal of this study was to identify changes in microRNA expression associated with colitis in children with inflammatory bowel disease. Methods Rectal mucosal biopsies (n=50) and blood samples (n=47) were collected from patients with known or suspected inflammatory bowel disease undergoing endoscopy. Rectal and serum microRNA levels were profiled using the human nCounter® platform and the TaqMan® low-density array platform, respectively. Significantly altered microRNAs were then validated in independent sample sets via quantitative RT-PCR. In vitro luciferase reporter assays were performed in the human colorectal Caco-2 cell line to determine the effect of miR-192 on NOD2 expression. Results Profiling of rectal RNA identified 21 microRNAs significantly altered between control, UC, and colonic CD sample groups. Nine of the ten microRNAs selected for validation were confirmed as significantly changed. Rectal miR-24 was increased 1.47-fold in UC compared to CD samples (p=0.0052) and was the only microRNA altered between IBD subtypes. Three colitis-associated microRNAs were significantly altered in the sera of disease patients and displayed diagnostic utility. However, no serum microRNAs were found to distinguish ulcerative colitis from Crohn’s colitis. Finally, miR-192 inhibition did not affect luciferase reporter activity, suggesting miR-192 does not regulate human NOD2. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that rectal and serum microRNAs are perturbed in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. Future studies identifying the targets of inflammatory bowel disease-associated microRNAs may lead to novel therapies. PMID:24613022

  2. Intestinal Parasitoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagardere, Bernard; Dumburgier, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal parasites have become a serious public health problem in tropical countries because of the climate and the difficulty of achieving efficient hygiene. The objectives of this journal issue are to increase awareness of the individual and collective repercussions of intestinal parasites, describe the current conditions of contamination and…

  3. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  4. Porcine prion protein amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions. PMID:26218890

  5. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  6. Cloning, chromosome mapping and expression pattern of porcine PLIN and M6PRBP1 genes.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xia; Jihong, Yuan; Li, Gan; Bin, Feng; Yi, Zhu; Xiaodong, Chen; Peichao, Zhang; Yang, Zaiqing

    2008-01-01

    The PAT proteins, named after the three PLIN/ADRP/TIP47 (PAT) proteins, PLIN for perilipin, ADRP for adipose differentiation-related protein and TIP47 for tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa, now officially named M6PRBP1 for mannose-6-phosphate receptor binding protein 1, is a set of intracellular lipid droplet binding proteins. They are localized in the outer membrane monolayer enveloping lipid droplets and are involved in the metabolism of intracellular lipid. This work describes the cloning and sequencing of porcine PLIN and M6PRBP1 cDNAs, the chromosome mapping of these two genes, as well as the expression pattern of porcine PAT genes. Sequence analysis shows that the porcine PLIN cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1551 bp encoding 516 amino acids and that the porcine M6PRBP1 cDNA contains a coding region of 1320 bp encoding 439 amino acids. Comparison of PLIN and M6PRBP1 amino-acid sequences among various species reveals that porcine and bovine proteins are the most conserved. Porcine PLIN and M6PRBP1 genes have been mapped to pig chromosomes 7 and 2, respectively, by radiation hybrid analysis using the IMpRH panel. Expression analyses in pig showed a high expression of PLIN mRNA in adipose tissue, M6PRBP1 mRNA in small intestine, kidney and spleen and ADRP mRNA in adipose tissue, lung and spleen.

  7. Cloning, chromosome mapping and expression pattern of porcine PLIN and M6PRBP1 genes

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xia; Jihong, Yuan; Li, Gan; Bin, Feng; Yi, Zhu; Xiaodong, Chen; Peichao, Zhang; Yang, Zaiqing

    2008-01-01

    The PAT proteins, named after the three PLIN/ADRP/TIP47 (PAT) proteins, PLIN for perilipin, ADRP for adipose differentiation-related protein and TIP47 for tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa, now officially named M6PRBP1 for mannose-6-phosphate receptor binding protein 1, is a set of intracellular lipid droplet binding proteins. They are localized in the outer membrane monolayer enveloping lipid droplets and are involved in the metabolism of intracellular lipid. This work describes the cloning and sequencing of porcine PLIN and M6PRBP1 cDNAs, the chromosome mapping of these two genes, as well as the expression pattern of porcine PAT genes. Sequence analysis shows that the porcine PLIN cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1551 bp encoding 516 amino acids and that the porcine M6PRBP1 cDNA contains a coding region of 1320 bp encoding 439 amino acids. Comparison of PLIN and M6PRBP1 amino-acid sequences among various species reveals that porcine and bovine proteins are the most conserved. Porcine PLIN and M6PRBP1 genes have been mapped to pig chromosomes 7 and 2, respectively, by radiation hybrid analysis using the IMpRH panel. Expression analyses in pig showed a high expression of PLIN mRNA in adipose tissue, M6PRBP1 mRNA in small intestine, kidney and spleen and ADRP mRNA in adipose tissue, lung and spleen. PMID:18298936

  8. The action of porcine glucagon on the motility of the canine duodenum and jejunum.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D. F.; Foster, G. E.; Hardcastle, J. D.; Jonhson, F.; Wright, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    1 Intravenous bolus doses of porcine glucagon of 0.001-0.05 mg kg-1 caused intense stimulation of the duodenum and jejunum of the dog. 2 Intravenous infusion of porcine glucagon at 0.025-0.05 mg kg-1 h-1 caused similar stimulation. In both cases the stimulation was phasic in nature. 3 Stimulation of the duodenum and jejunum following glucagon was accompanied by a decrease in frequency of the intestinal basic electrical rhythm (BER). No change was seen in the intervals between successive periods of phase III motor activity. PMID:7093585

  9. The action of porcine glucagon on the motility of the canine duodenum and jejunum.

    PubMed

    Evans, D F; Foster, G E; Hardcastle, J D; Jonhson, F; Wright, J W

    1982-06-01

    1 Intravenous bolus doses of porcine glucagon of 0.001-0.05 mg kg-1 caused intense stimulation of the duodenum and jejunum of the dog. 2 Intravenous infusion of porcine glucagon at 0.025-0.05 mg kg-1 h-1 caused similar stimulation. In both cases the stimulation was phasic in nature. 3 Stimulation of the duodenum and jejunum following glucagon was accompanied by a decrease in frequency of the intestinal basic electrical rhythm (BER). No change was seen in the intervals between successive periods of phase III motor activity.

  10. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus strains augment NLRP3 expression in newborn and adult porcine gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Tohno, Masanori; Shimosato, Takeshi; Aso, Hisashi; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2011-12-15

    We isolated cDNA encoding porcine nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor family, pryin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) from Peyer's patches. The complete nucleotide open reading frame of porcine NLRP3 contains 3108-bp encoding a deduced polypeptide of 1036-amino acid residues. The porcine NLRP3 amino acid sequence is more similar to the longest isoform of human than the mouse counterpart. The predicted amino acid sequence of porcine NLRP3 presented nine C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domains. In newborn swine, the expression of NLRP3 was detected at higher levels in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, while lower levels were observed in intestinal tissues. In adult swine, NLRP3 was strongly expressed in Peyer's patches and the mesenteric lymph nodes, and the expression level in the lower intestinal tissues was comparable to that in spleen. Toll-like receptor and nucleotide-binding domain ligands, as well as Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Lactobacillus gasseri, enhanced NLRP3 expression in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) of newborn and adult swine. Our results should aid in understanding the intestinal immunoregulatory mechanisms underlying NLRP3 activation and the priming ability of immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria in porcine GALT.

  11. The rate of co-infection for piglet diarrhea viruses in China and the genetic characterization of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and porcine kobuvirus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z-P; Yang, Z; Lin, W-D; Wang, W-Y; Yang, J; Jin, W-J; Qin, A-J

    2016-03-01

    Piglet diarrhea epidemics result in major economic losses for the swine industry. Four viruses are closely linked to porcine diarrhea: porcine kobuvirus (PKV), porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), and porcine rotavirus (PRoV). We have conducted an epidemiology study to determine the frequency of infection and co-infection with these viruses in China, and characterized the genetic variation of the isolated PEDV and PKV strains. Stool and intestinal samples (n = 314) were collected from piglets with diarrhea in China from years 2012 to 2014. RT-PCR was used to detect PKV, PEDV, TGEV, and PRoV. Phylogenetic relationships between reference strains and the isolated PEDV and PKV strains were determined based on the M and 3D gene sequence. The rates of infection with PKV, PEDV, TGEV and PRoV were 29.9%, 24.2%, 1.91%, and 0.31%, respectively. Co-infections with PKV and the other three viruses were very common. Co-infection of PKV and PEDV was detected in 15.0% (47/314) of the samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the PKV 3D gene indicated that there were some phylogenetic differences in the PKV strains across regions within China. However, according to the PEDV M gene, strains clustered into three groups and the primary group was distinct from the vaccine strain CV777. This study provides insights in to the prevalence of diarrhea viruses and their prevention and control in China.

  12. Intestinal Capillariasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    bhIll inenais, the tiny nematode causing Intestinal capillariasis In humans, Is a Iunique parasite. It is one of the newest parasites that has been...Capillariaphilippinensis, the tiny nematode causing intestinal capillariasis in humans, is a unique parasite. It is one of the newest parasites that has been shown to...stichocytes surrounding the oesophagus. The posterior half of the nematode is wider than the anterior half and contains the digestive tract and the

  13. Isolation, sequence identification and tissue expression profiles of 3 novel porcine genes: ASPA, NAGA, and HEXA.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xianghua; Liu, Yonggang; Yang, Liangyu; Song, Chunlian; Hou, Jiafa

    2008-01-01

    The complete coding sequences of 3 porcine genes - ASPA, NAGA, and HEXA - were amplified by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) based on the conserved sequence information of the mouse or other mammals and referenced pig ESTs. These 3 novel porcine genes were then deposited in the NCBI database and assigned GeneIDs: 100142661, 100142664 and 100142667. The phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that the porcine ASPA, NAGA, and HEXA all have closer genetic relationships with the ASPA, NAGA, and HEXA of cattle. Tissue expression profile analysis was also carried out and results revealed that swine ASPA, NAGA, and HEXA genes were differentially expressed in various organs, including skeletal muscle, the heart, liver, fat, kidney, lung, and small and large intestines. Our experiment is the first one to establish the foundation for further research on these 3 swine genes.

  14. Improved Cell Line IPEC-J2, Characterized as a Model for Porcine Jejunal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Silke S.; Richter, Jan F.; Krug, Susanne M.; Jebautzke, Britta; Lee, In-Fah M.; Rieger, Juliane; Sachtleben, Monika; Bondzio, Angelika; Schulzke, Jörg D.; Fromm, Michael; Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Cell lines matching the source epithelium are indispensable for investigating porcine intestinal transport and barrier properties on a subcellular or molecular level and furthermore help to reduce animal usage. The porcine jejunal cell line IPEC-J2 is established as an in vitro model for porcine infection studies but exhibits atypically high transepithelial resistances (TER) and only low active transport rates so that the effect of nutritional factors cannot be reliably investigated. This study aimed to properly remodel IPEC-J2 and then to re-characterize these cells regarding epithelial architecture, expression of barrier-relevant tight junction (TJ) proteins, adequate TER and transport function, and reaction to secretagogues. For this, IPEC-J2 monolayers were cultured on permeable supports, either under conventional (fetal bovine serum, FBS) or species-specific (porcine serum, PS) conditions. Porcine jejunal mucosa was analyzed for comparison. Main results were that under PS conditions (IPEC-J2/PS), compared to conventional FBS culture (IPEC-J2/FBS), the cell height increased 6-fold while the cell diameter was reduced by 50%. The apical cell membrane of IPEC-J2/PS exhibited typical microvilli. Most importantly, PS caused a one order of magnitude reduction of TER and of trans- and paracellular resistance, and a 2-fold increase in secretory response to forskolin when compared to FBS condition. TJ ultrastructure and appearance of TJ proteins changed dramatically in IPEC-J2/PS. Most parameters measured under PS conditions were much closer to those of typical pig jejunocytes than ever reported since the cell line’s initial establishment in 1989. In conclusion, IPEC-J2, if cultured under defined species-specific conditions, forms a suitable model for investigating porcine paracellular intestinal barrier function. PMID:24260272

  15. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  16. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  17. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  18. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  19. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  20. Profiling the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern of porcine ovaries using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Long; Gao, Ning; Xing, Yan; Zhang, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Ai-Ling; Liu, Jing; He, Jin-Long; Xu, Yuan; Lin, Wen-Mian; Chen, Zan-Mou; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Jia-Qi

    2016-02-25

    Substantial evidence has shown that DNA methylation regulates the initiation of ovarian and sexual maturation. Here, we investigated the genome-wide profile of DNA methylation in porcine ovaries at single-base resolution using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing. The biological variation was minimal among the three ovarian replicates. We found hypermethylation frequently occurred in regions with low gene abundance, while hypomethylation in regions with high gene abundance. The DNA methylation around transcriptional start sites was negatively correlated with their own CpG content. Additionally, the methylation level in the bodies of genes was higher than that in their 5' and 3' flanking regions. The DNA methylation pattern of the low CpG content promoter genes differed obviously from that of the high CpG content promoter genes. The DNA methylation level of the porcine ovary was higher than that of the porcine intestine. Analyses of the genome-wide DNA methylation in porcine ovaries would advance the knowledge and understanding of the porcine ovarian methylome.

  1. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R; Middleton, Dorothy M; Loewen, Matthew E; Kidney, Beverly A; Simko, Elemir

    2015-04-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization.

  2. Gene expression profiles in the intestine of lipopolysaccharide-challenged piglets.

    PubMed

    Yi, Dan; Hou, Yongqing; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Di; Ding, Binying; Wu, Tao; Chen, Hongbo; Liu, Yulan; Kang, Ping; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    Bowel diseases are common in human and animals and are characterized by intestinal dysfunction and injury. A well-established porcine model of intestinal injury can be induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an endotoxin released from the cell wall of pathogenic bacteria. LPS affects the expression of genes associated with intestinal immune response, mucosal growth, energy metabolism, absorption, mucosal barrier function, and antiviral function. Transcriptional analysis of intestinal genes reveals that the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon respond to LPS challenge in a similar pattern. Moreover, the jejunum and ileum exhibit greater responses to LPS challenge than the duodenum and colon with regard to gene expression. Additionally, over 85% of genes are co-expressed along the small and large intestines and there is a clear distinction in gene expression patterns amongst the different intestinal segments in pigs. These findings have important implications for underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for endotoxin-induced intestinal injury and dysfunction.

  3. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is the number one disease affecting US swine. It is caused by the PRRS virus (PRRSV) and is recognized as reproductive failure of sows and respiratory problems of piglets and growing pigs. This book chapter is part of the Office of International E...

  4. Engineered microRNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gibson, N W

    2014-01-01

    Targeting of microRNAs that are overexpressed or replacement of microRNAs whose expression is lost are two distinct and novel approaches to treat disease(s) driven by microRNA dysregulation. This can be achieved by chemical modification of either a single stranded oligonucleotide called an antimiR or a double stranded nucleic acid molecule termed a microRNA mimic.With hundreds of microRNAs identified and knowledge of their role in disease becoming clearer there is the prospect, over the coming years, to harness engineered microRNA therapeutics to revolutionise the way diseases are treated.Both types of engineered microRNA therapeutics have advanced into clinical development with human proof of concept achieved with an anti-miR targeting miR-122 (one of the most abundant microRNAs in human hepatocytes that is utilised by the hepatitis C virus to enable its function and replication). Rather than targeting individual proteins or enzymes involved in human disease, an opportunity now exists to modulate multiple different proteins/enzymes which act in concert in the progression of disease.

  5. MicroRNAs in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Arriaga, Mayra-Cecilia; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa-María; Ruiz-Tachiquín, Martha-Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, gastric cancer (GC) was the third cause of mortality due to cancer in men and women. In Central and South America, high mortality rates have been reported. A total of 95% of tumors developed in the stomach are of epithelial origin; thus, these are denominated adenocarcinomas of the stomach. Diverse classification systems have been established, among which two types of GC based on histological type and growth pattern have been described as follows: Intestinal (IGC) and diffuse (DGC). Approximately 1–3% of GC cases are associated with heredity. Hereditary-DGC (HDGC), with 80% penetrance, is an autosomal-type, dominant syndrome in which 40% of cases are carriers of diverse mutations of the CDH1 gene, which encodes for the cadherin protein. By contrast, microRNA are non-encoded, single-chain RNA molecules. These molecules regulate the majority of cellular functions at the post-transcriptional level. However, analysis of these interactions by means of Systems Biology has allowed the understanding of complex and heterogeneous diseases, such as cancer. These molecules are ubiquitous; however, their expression can be specific in different tissues either temporarily or permanently, depending on the stage of the cell. Due to the participation of microRNA in the processes of cellular proliferation, cell cycle control, apoptosis, differentiation and metabolism, these have been indicated to have a role in the development of cancerous processes, finding specific patterns of expression in different neoplasms, including GC, in which the microRNA expression profile is different in samples of non-cancerous versus cancerous tissues. A difference has been observed in the expression patterns of DGC and IGC. However, the role of microRNA in HDGC has not yet been established. The present study reviews the investigations that describe the participation of microRNA in the regulation of genes CDH1, RHOA, CTNNA1, INSR and TGF-β in different neoplasms, such as HDGC. PMID:27446532

  6. [Intestinal microbiota].

    PubMed

    Debré, Patrice; Le Gall, Jean-Yves

    2014-12-01

    The human body normally lives in symbiosis with a considerable microscopic environment present on all interfaces with the external environment; it hosts ten times more microbes (microbiota) that it has somatic or germ cells, representing a gene diversity (microbiome) 100-150 times higher than the human genome. These germs are located mainly in the gut, where they represent a mass of about one kilogram. The primary colonization of the gastrointestinal tract depends on the delivery route, the bacterial flora rewarding then depending on the environment, food hygiene, medical treatments. The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in the maturation of the immune system and in different physiological functions: digestion of polysaccharides, glycosaminoglycans and glycoproteins, vitamins biosynthesis, bile salt metabolism of some amino acids and xenobiotics. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the microbiota are observed in a wide range of diseases: obesity, colorectal cancer, liver cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune diseases, allergies... pharmacobiotics aim to modify the intestinal microbiota in a therapeutic goal and this by various means: prebiotics, probiotics, antibiotics or fecal transplants. Intestinal flora also plays a direct role in the metabolism of certain drugs and the microbiota should be considered as a predictive parameter of response to some chemotherapies.

  7. [MicroRNAs in neurobiology].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Yukio

    2008-12-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as a new regulatory factor of gene expression. They mediate translational repression or degradation of their target mRNAs by RNA interference (RNAi). The expression of each microRNA is tightly regulated in a development- and cell-specific manner by various mechanisms such as blockade of let-7 family expression by Lin-28 or RNA editing. They also act as regulatory switches for development, organogenesis, and cellular differentiation or for controlling distinct functions that are required for the maintenance of each tissue and cell subtypes. The abundant expression of microRNAs as well as the exclusive expression of certain microRNAs in the central nervous system highlights their biological importance at all stages of neural development and in postmitotic and differentiated neurons. Further, some microRNAs, such as miRNA-134, and miRNA-132 are localized and are synthesized in part at synaptic sites in dendrites to regulate synaptic formation and plasticity. In addition to the imparting of basic knowledge about the biogenesis and mechanism of action of microRNAs, this review focuses on the recent advances in microRNA studies in neurobiology, including the expression pattern of microRNAs in the mammalian brain, the role of microRNAs in neural differentiation and maturation, formation and plasticity of synaptic connections, and maintenance of neural function such as the synthesis of the neurotransmitters in selected neurons. Finally, the possible connection between microRNA dysfunction and neurological diseases, and future implications for diagnosis, and treatment of defects in human brain development and neurodegenerative diseases are discussed.

  8. Difference in microRNA expression and editing profile of lung tissues from different pig breeds related to immune responses to HP-PRRSV

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Chen, Zhisheng; Zhao, Junlong; Fang, Liurong; Fang, Rui; Xiao, Jiang; Chen, Xing; Zhou, Ao; Zhang, Yingyin; Ren, Liming; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Zhang, Shujun; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the most devastating diseases for the pig industry. Our goal was to identify microRNAs involved in the host immune response to PRRS. We generated microRNA expression profiles of lung tissues from Tongcheng or Landrace pigs infected with a highly pathogenic PRRS virus (PRRSV) at 3, 5, 7 dpi (day post infection) and control individuals from these two breeds. Our data showed that 278 known and 294 novel microRNAs were expressed in these combined microRNA transcriptomes. Compared with control individuals, almost half of the known microRNAs (116 in Tongcheng and 153 in Landrace) showed significantly differential expression (DEmiRNAs) at least once. The numbers of down-regulated DEmiRNAs were larger than the corresponding number of up-regulated DEmiRNAs in both breeds. Interestingly, miR-2320-5p, which was predicted to bind to conserved sequences of the PRRSV genome, was down-regulated significantly at 3 dpi after PRRSV infection in both breeds. In addition, PRRSV infection induced a significant increase of microRNA editing level in both breeds. Our results provide novel insight into the role of microRNA in response to PRRSV infection in vivo, which will aid the research for developing novel therapies against PRRSV. PMID:25856272

  9. Porcine models of digestive disease: the future of large animal translational research

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Liara M.; Moeser, Adam J.; Blikslager, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing interest in non-rodent translational models for the study of human disease. The pig, in particular, serves as a useful animal model for the study of pathophysiological conditions relevant to the human intestine. This review assesses currently used porcine models of gastrointestinal physiology and disease and provides a rationale for the use of these models for future translational studies. The pig has proven its utility for the study of fundamental disease conditions such as ischemia/ reperfusion injury, stress-induced intestinal dysfunction, and short bowel syndrome. Pigs have also shown great promise for the study of intestinal barrier function, surgical tissue manipulation and intervention, as well as biomaterial implantation and tissue transplantation. Advantages of pig models highlighted by these studies include the physiological similarity to human intestine as well as to mechanisms of human disease. Emerging future directions for porcine models of human disease include the fields of transgenics and stem cell biology, with exciting implications for regenerative medicine. PMID:25655839

  10. MicroRNAome of Porcine Pre- and Postnatal Development

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yiren; Zhang, Kai; Lang, Qiulei; Chen, Lei; Guan, Jiuqiang; Luo, Zonggang; Chen, Haosi; Li, Yang; Li, Qinghai; Li, Xiang; Jiang, An-an; Shuai, Surong; Wang, Jinyong; Zhu, Qi; Zhou, Xiaochuan; Gao, Xiaolian; Li, Xuewei

    2010-01-01

    The domestic pig is of enormous agricultural significance and valuable models for many human diseases. Information concerning the pig microRNAome (miRNAome) has been long overdue and elucidation of this information will permit an atlas of microRNA (miRNA) regulation functions and networks to be constructed. Here we performed a comprehensive search for porcine miRNAs on ten small RNA sequencing libraries prepared from a mixture of tissues obtained during the entire pig lifetime, from the fetal period through adulthood. The sequencing results were analyzed using mammalian miRNAs, the precursor hairpins (pre-miRNAs) and the first release of the high-coverage porcine genome assembly (Sscrofa9, April 2009) and the available expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences. Our results extend the repertoire of pig miRNAome to 867 pre-miRNAs (623 with genomic coordinates) encoding for 1,004 miRNAs, of which 777 are unique. We preformed real-time quantitative PCR (q-PCR) experiments for selected 30 miRNAs in 47 tissue-specific samples and found agreement between the sequencing and q-PCR data. This broad survey provides detailed information about multiple variants of mature sequences, precursors, chromosomal organization, development-specific expression, and conservation patterns. Our data mining produced a broad view of the pig miRNAome, consisting of miRNAs and isomiRs and a wealth of information of pig miRNA characteristics. These results are prelude to the advancement in pig biology as well the use of pigs as model organism for human biological and biomedical studies. PMID:20634961

  11. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J H

    1992-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops. Images PMID:1576584

  12. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed

    Cross, J H

    1992-04-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops.

  13. Role of microRNAs in Alcohol-Induced Multi-Organ Injury

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Pachunka, Joseph M.; Mott, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption and its abuse is a major health problem resulting in significant healthcare cost in the United States. Chronic alcoholism results in damage to most of the vital organs in the human body. Among the alcohol-induced injuries, alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent in the United States. Remarkably, ethanol alters expression of a wide variety of microRNAs that can regulate alcohol-induced complications or dysfunctions. In this review, we will discuss the role of microRNAs in alcoholic pancreatitis, alcohol-induced liver damage, intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, and brain damage including altered hippocampus structure and function, and neuronal loss, alcoholic cardiomyopathy, and muscle damage. Further, we have reviewed the role of altered microRNAs in the circulation, teratogenic effects of alcohol, and during maternal or paternal alcohol consumption. PMID:26610589

  14. miR-762 promotes porcine immature Sertoli cell growth via the ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) gene

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Changping; Song, Huibin; Yu, Lei; Guan, Kaifeng; Hu, Pandi; Li, Yang; Xia, Xuanyan; Li, Jialian; Jiang, Siwen; Li, Fenge

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of reports have revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) play critical roles in spermatogenesis. Our previous study showed that miR-762 is differentially expressed in immature and mature testes of Large White boars. Our present data shows that miR-762 directly binds the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) and down-regulates RNF4 expression. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the RNF4 3′UTR that is significantly associated with porcine sperm quality traits leads to a change in the miR-762 binding ability. Moreover, miR-762 promotes the proliferation of and inhibits apoptosis in porcine immature Sertoli cells, partly by accelerating DNA damage repair and by reducing androgen receptor (AR) expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-762 may play a role in pig spermatogenesis by regulating immature Sertoli cell growth. PMID:27596571

  15. Molecular cloning, tissue expression, and subcellular localization of porcine peptidoglycan recognition proteins 3 and 4.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Wataru; Tohno, Masanori; Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Fujie, Hitomi; Aso, Hisashi; Kawai, Yasushi; Numasaki, Muneo; Saito, Tadao; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2011-09-15

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are innate immune molecules that are present in most invertebrates and vertebrates. Mammals have four PGRPs, PGLYRP1-4. In the present study, we cloned the cDNAs encoding porcine PGLYRP3 and 4 from the esophagus of adult swine. The length of the complete open reading frames of porcine PGLYRP3 and 4 are identical and contain 1125bp encoding 374 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequences of these two proteins were more similar to their human orthologs (78.9% [PGLYRP3] and 73.9% [PGLYRP4]) than to their mouse orthologs (71.3% [PGLYRP3] and 67.9% [PGLYRP4]). Expression analysis revealed that both PGLYRP3 and 4 were more strongly expressed in digestive tract, especially the esophagus, than in immune organs such as spleen or mesenteric lymph nodes in both newborn and adult swine. To analyze the subcellular distribution of porcine PGLYRP1-4, we constructed transfectant cell lines. Western blot and flow cytometric analyses revealed that porcine PGLYRP3 and 4 are not only secreted, but also expressed on the cell surface, unlike PGLYRP1 and 2. These results should help contribute to the understanding of PGLYRP3- and 4-mediated immune responses via their recognition of intestinal microorganisms in newborn and adult swine.

  16. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  17. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  18. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  19. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  20. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  1. Intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    Juckett, G

    1996-06-01

    Giardia is the best known cause of protozoal gastrointestinal disease in North America, producing significant but not life-threatening gastrointestinal distress and diarrhea. Although diagnosis of giardiasis may be challenging, treatment is usually successful. Entamoeba histolytica poses a rarer but far more difficult clinical challenge. Dysentery caused by E. histolytica may be the most feared intestinal protozoal infection, although Cryptosporidium parvum, Balantidium coli, Isospora belli, Sarcocystis species and other newly described protozoa also may cause diarrhea in healthy individuals and may result in intractable, life-threatening illness in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or other immunosuppressive diseases. Certain protozoa once considered relatively unimportant, such as Cryptosporidium, are now recognized as significant causes of morbidity even in the United States, since transmission readily occurs through contaminated water.

  2. miR-429 Inhibits Differentiation and Promotes Proliferation in Porcine Preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Chen, Fen-Fen; Ge, Jing; Zhu, Jia-Yu; Shi, Xin-E; Li, Xiao; Yu, Tai-Yong; Chu, Gui-Yan; Yang, Gong-She

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial regulatory molecules for adipogenesis. They contribute to the controlling of proliferation and differentiation of preadipocytes. Previous studies revealed an important role of miR-429 in cell invasion, migration, and apoptosis. Our previous work has shown that the expression of miR-429 in subcutaneous fat can be observed in newly born (3-day-old) Rongchang piglets rather than their adult counterparts (180-day-old). This expression pattern suggests that miR-429 might be functionally related to postnatal adipogenesis. However, we currently lack a mechanistic understanding of miR-429 within the context of preadipocyte differentiation. In this study, we investigated the function of miR-429 in porcine subcutaneous and intramuscular preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. In our porcine preadipocyte differentiation model, miR-429 expression decreased remarkably upon adipogenic induction. Overexpression of miR-429 notably down-regulated the expression of adipogenic marker genes: PPARγ, aP2, FAS and impaired the triglyceride accumulation, while the expression of lipolytic gene ATGL was not affected. In addition, we observed that miR-429 significantly promoted the proliferation of porcine preadipocytes. We also found that miR-429 could directly bind to the 3′-UTRs of KLF9 and p27, which have been well documented to promote preadipocyte differentiation and repress cell cycle progression. Taken together, our data support a novel role of miR-429 in regulating porcine preadipocyte differentiation and proliferation, and KLF9 and p27 are potent targets of miR-429 during these processes. PMID:27941616

  3. Blocking porcine sialoadhesin improves extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion with human blood

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Joshua P.; Vogel, Thomas; Burlak, Christopher; Coussios, Constantin; Dominguez, Javier; Friend, Peter; Rees, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Patients in fulminant hepatic failure currently do not have a temporary means of support while awaiting liver transplantation. A potential therapeutic approach for such patients is the use of extracorporeal perfusion with porcine livers as a form of “liver dialysis”. During a 72-hour extracorporeal perfusion of porcine livers with human blood, porcine Kupffer cells bind to and phagocytose human red blood cells (hRBC) causing the hematocrit to decrease to 2.5% of the original value. Our laboratory has identified porcine sialoadhesin expressed on Kupffer cells as the lectin responsible for binding N-acetylneuraminic acid on the surface of the hRBC. We evaluated whether blocking porcine sialoadhesin prevents the recognition and subsequent destruction of hRBCs seen during extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion. Ex vivo studies were performed using wild type pig livers perfused with isolated hRBCs for 72-hours in the presence of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody or isotype control. The addition of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody to an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model reduces the loss of hRBC over a 72 hour period. Sustained liver function was demonstrated throughout the perfusion. This study illustrates the role of sialoadhesin in mediating the destruction of hRBCs in an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model. PMID:23822217

  4. The effect of immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide on an experimental porcine enterovirus infection in piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Derbyshire, J B

    1983-01-01

    Eleven specific pathogen-free, five week old piglets were infected orally with the T80 strain of porcine enterovirus type 2. Three days after infection, five of the piglets were treated with cyclophosphamide, together with two of four uninfected control piglets. The treated, infected piglets developed severe diarrhea, and one showed signs of encephalomyelitis. These piglets showed no virological evidence of recovery from the infection, since the virus persisted throughout the intestinal tract, and they failed to mount a serological response. It was concluded that immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide impaired the normal recovery mechanisms in this infection, providing further evidence that the humoral immune response is an important defence mechanism against porcine enterovirus infection in piglets. PMID:6224548

  5. [Research advances in porcine bocavirus].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Shao-Lun; Chen, Sheng-Nan; Wei, Wen-Kang

    2012-03-01

    Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) was considered as a new member of the genus Bocavirus of the subfamily Parvovirinae of the family Parvoviridae, which was discovered in Swedish swine herds with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) in 2009. At present, as an emerging pathogen, it was paid great attention by researchers at home and abroad. This paper referred to some published literatures and reviewed several aspects of PBoV including its finding, classification, genome structure and replication, epidemiology, associativity with diseases, cultural and diagnostic methods.

  6. [Intestinal microbiota].

    PubMed

    Perez, Horacio Joaquín; Menezes, Maria Elisabeth; d'Acâmpora, Armando José

    2014-01-01

    There is accumulative evidence on the multiple functions of the intestinal microflora in relation to the homeostasis of the host. At first considered as a simple mutualism, today this relationship proves to be essential to the health and to pathologic processes, particularly metabolic (eg, obesity) and gastrointestinal (eg, inflammatory bowel disease and functional disorders). The first studies were conducted on the microbiota from fecal material cultured anaerobically. With the advent of molecular biology, it has become possible to determine qualitative and quantitatively the dominant, subdominant and transients species. In recent years, there were advances in the understanding of the relationship betwen the microbiota and the host, as well as among the microorganisms in their respective niches. These advances result from translational integration of microbiology with specialities such as molecular biology, cell phisiology, immunology and ecology. There are few studies on the spatial distribution of the microflora in the gut. Unravelling the topography of the microflora in mammals is a way to validate new animal models for the study of microflora.

  7. Ribavirin efficiently suppresses porcine nidovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngnam; Lee, Changhee

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) are porcine nidoviruses that represent emerging viral pathogens causing heavy economic impacts on the swine industry. Although ribavirin is a well-known antiviral drug against a broad range of both DNA and RNA viruses in vitro, its inhibitory effect and mechanism of action on porcine nidovirus replication remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine whether ribavirin suppresses porcine nidovirus infection. Our results demonstrated that ribavirin treatment dose-dependently inhibited the replication of both nidoviruses. The antiviral activity of ribavirin on porcine nidovirus replication was found to be primarily exerted at early times post-infection. Treatment with ribavirin resulted in marked reduction of viral genomic and subgenomic RNA synthesis, viral protein expression, and progeny virus production in a dose-dependent manner. Investigations into the mechanism of action of ribavirin against PRRSV and PEDV revealed that the addition of guanosine to the ribavirin treatment significantly reversed the antiviral effects, suggesting that depletion of the intracellular GTP pool by inhibiting IMP dehydrogenase may be essential for ribavirin activity. Further sequencing analysis showed that the mutation frequency in ribavirin-treated cells was similar to that in untreated cells, indicating that ribavirin did not induce error-prone replication. Taken together, our data indicate that ribavirin might not only be a good therapeutic agent against porcine nidovirus, but also a potential candidate to be evaluated against other human and animal coronaviruses.

  8. A porcine model of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Saalfrank, A; Janssen, K-P; Ravon, M; Flisikowski, K; Eser, S; Steiger, K; Flisikowska, T; Müller-Fliedner, P; Schulze, É; Brönner, C; Gnann, A; Kappe, E; Böhm, B; Schade, B; Certa, U; Saur, D; Esposito, I; Kind, A; Schnieke, A

    2016-01-01

    We previously produced pigs with a latent oncogenic TP53 mutation. Humans with TP53 germline mutations are predisposed to a wide spectrum of early-onset cancers, predominantly breast, brain, adrenal gland cancer, soft tissue sarcomas and osteosarcomas. Loss of p53 function has been observed in >50% of human cancers. Here we demonstrate that porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) convert to a transformed phenotype after activation of latent oncogenic TP53R167H and KRASG12D, and overexpression of MYC promotes tumorigenesis. The process mimics key molecular aspects of human sarcomagenesis. Transformed porcine MSCs exhibit genomic instability, with complex karyotypes, and develop into sarcomas on transplantation into immune-deficient mice. In pigs, heterozygous knockout of TP53 was sufficient for spontaneous osteosarcoma development in older animals, whereas homozygous TP53 knockout resulted in multiple large osteosarcomas in 7–8-month-old animals. This is the first report that engineered mutation of an endogenous tumour-suppressor gene leads to invasive cancer in pigs. Unlike in Trp53 mutant mice, osteosarcoma developed in the long bones and skull, closely recapitulating the human disease. These animals thus promise a model for juvenile osteosarcoma, a relatively uncommon but devastating disease. PMID:26974205

  9. [MicroRNAs and kidneys].

    PubMed

    Stříteská, Jana; Nekvindová, Jana; Cerný, Vladimír; Palička, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short non-coding ribonucleic acid molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level thus affecting important physiological as well as pathophysiological processes in the organism, for example cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and metabolism. They are involved in pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. Many microRNAs are tissue or organ-specific which implies their possible potential as biomarkers or maybe even therapeutical agents as documented by microRNA research interest rising exponentially during last years. Among all, microRNAs are important also for physiological function of the kidney and they are involved in various renal disorders. Today research is focused mainly on renal and urinary tract carcinogenesis, acute kidney injury, chronic renal diseases (polycystic kidney disease) or renal complications of systemic diseases such as diabetic or hypertension nephropathy and autoimmune kidney injury including acute allograft rejection after kidney transplantation. The review summarizes current information about microRNA effect on kidney development and function and also on the most common kidney diseases.

  10. The copper microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Pilon, Marinus

    2017-02-01

    1030 I. 1030 II. 1030 III. 1031 IV. 1031 V. 1032 VI. 1033 VII. 1034 VIII. 1034 1034 References 1034 SUMMARY: Copper (Cu) microRNAs are upregulated by Cu deficiency and mediate the post-transcriptional downregulation of transcripts that encode Cu proteins, suggesting a role directly related to Cu. However, expression and phenotypic analyses of copper microRNA mutants and over-expressors have suggested roles mainly in tolerance to abiotic stresses. To reconcile available data, a model is proposed which emphasizes the mobile nature of copper microRNA molecules in the regulation of Cu homeostasis. It is proposed that the Cu-microRNA regulatory circuits are further co-opted by plants to regulate both beneficial and pathogenic interactions with microbes. Further exploration of Cu-microRNA functions that account for the cell-to-cell mobility should give novel insight into plant microbe interactions and the integration of micronutrition and development.

  11. MicroRNA-9

    PubMed Central

    Yuva-Aydemir, Yeliz; Simkin, Alfred; Gascon, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The functional significance of microRNA-9 (miR-9) during evolution is evidenced by its conservation at the nucleotide level from flies to humans but not its diverse expression patterns. Recent studies in several model systems reveal that miR-9 can regulate neurogenesis through its actions in neural or non-neural cell lineages. In vertebrates, miR-9 exerts diverse cell-autonomous effects on the proliferation, migration and differentiation of neural progenitor cells by modulating different mRNA targets. In some developmental contexts, miR-9 suppresses apoptosis and is misregulated in several types of cancer cells, influencing proliferation or metastasis formation. Moreover, downregulation of miR-9 in postmitotic neurons is also implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, miR-9 is emerging as an important regulator in development and disease through its ability to modulate different targets in a manner dependent on the developmental stage and the cellular context. PMID:21697652

  12. Different Lineage of Porcine Deltacoronavirus in Thailand, Vietnam and Lao PDR in 2015.

    PubMed

    Saeng-Chuto, K; Lorsirigool, A; Temeeyasen, G; Vui, D T; Stott, C J; Madapong, A; Tripipat, T; Wegner, M; Intrakamhaeng, M; Chongcharoen, W; Tantituvanont, A; Kaewprommal, P; Piriyapongsa, J; Nilubol, D

    2017-02-01

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) was detected by RT-PCR in 12 of 97 (12.4%) intestinal samples collected during 2015 from piglets with diarrhoea in Thailand, Vietnam and Lao PDR. Spike, membrane and nucleocapsid genes were characterized, and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that PDCoV isolates from Thai and Lao PDR form a novel cluster, separated from US and China isolates, but relatively were more closely related to China PDCoV than US isolates. Vietnam PDCoVs, however, were grouped together with US PDCoV. The analyses of amino acid changes suggested that they were from different lineage.

  13. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Porcine Elastase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Porcine Elastase. This enzyme is associated with the degradation of lung tissue in people suffering from emphysema. It is useful in studying causes of this disease. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  14. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your small intestine is the longest part of your digestive system - about twenty feet long! It connects your stomach to ... many times to fit inside your abdomen. Your small intestine does most of the digesting of the foods ...

  15. Small intestine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the ... the duodenum. This short first portion of the small intestine is followed by the jejunum and the ileum. ...

  16. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T; Ross, Jason W; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease.

  17. Hyperendemic human and porcine Taenia solium infection in Perú.

    PubMed

    García, Héctor H; Gilman, Robert H; Gonzalez, Armando E; Verastegui, Manuela; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gavidia, Cesar; Tsang, Victor C W; Falcon, Nestor; Lescano, Andres G; Moulton, Lawrence H; Bernal, Teresa; Tovar, Marco

    2003-03-01

    The prevalence and characteristics of human taeniasis/cysticercosis and porcine cysticercosis were assessed in an endemic area of the Peruvian highlands. Individuals from 10 communities had stool examinations (N = 2,951) and serologic testing for Taenia solium antibodies (N = 2,583). The total porcine population present (N = 703) was also examined by serology. Cysticercosis is hyperendemic in this area and is associated with an important number of seizure cases. Human seroprevalence by village ranged from 7.1-26.9% (mean, 13.9%). Seroprevalence was higher among individuals with a history of seizures but not in those reporting a history of headache or intestinal taeniasis. Prevalence of taeniasis ranged from 0-6.7% (median, 2.5%). Coproantigen detection found 2.4 times more taeniasis cases than did microscopy (direct and after concentration). Age distribution for taeniasis showed a peak at younger ages than for seroprevalence. Porcine seroprevalence ranged from 42-75%. Random effects logistic regression models for human seropositivity demonstrated both in-house clustering of cases and a large increase in risk associated with a tapeworm carrier in the house. Besides confirming the close relationship between taeniasis and cysticercosis cases, this large-scale field study demonstrated early age of tapeworm and cysticercosis infections in humans, and short duration of taeniasis infections.

  18. Cysteine protease activity of feline Tritrichomonas foetus promotes adhesion-dependent cytotoxicity to intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, M K; Stauffer, S H; Brand, M D; Gookin, J L

    2014-07-01

    Trichomonads are obligate protozoan parasites most renowned as venereal pathogens of the reproductive tract of humans and cattle. Recently, a trichomonad highly similar to bovine venereal Tritrichomonas foetus but having a unique tropism for the intestinal tract was recognized as a significant cause of colitis in domestic cats. Despite a high prevalence, worldwide distribution, and lack of consistently effective drugs for treatment of the infection, the cellular mechanisms of T. foetus pathogenicity in the intestinal tract have not been examined. The aims of this study were to determine the pathogenic effect of feline T. foetus on porcine intestinal epithelial cells, the dependence of T. foetus pathogenicity on adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium, and the identity of mediators responsible for these effects. Using an in vitro coculture approach to model feline T. foetus infection of the intestinal epithelium, these studies demonstrate that T. foetus promotes a direct contact-dependent activation of intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis signaling and progressive monolayer destruction. Moreover, these pathological effects were demonstrated to be largely dependent on T. foetus cell-associated cysteine protease activity. Finally, T. foetus cysteine proteases were identified as enabling cytopathic effects by promoting adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium. The present studies are the first to examine the cellular mechanisms of pathogenicity of T. foetus toward the intestinal epithelium and support further investigation of the cysteine proteases as virulence factors in vivo and as potential therapeutic targets for ameliorating the pathological effects of intestinal trichomonosis.

  19. Polarization-sensitive multispectral tissue characterization for optimizing intestinal anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Triana, Brian; Shademan, Azad; Krieger, Axel; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-03-01

    A novel imaging system that recommends potential suture placement for anastomosis to surgeons is developed. This is achieved by a multispectral imaging system coupled with polarizers and image analysis software. We performed preliminary imaging of ex vivo porcine intestine to evaluate the system. Vulnerable tissue regions including blood vessels were successfully identified and segmented. Thickness of different tissue areas is visualized. Strategies towards optimal points for suture placements have been discussed. Preliminary data suggest our imaging platform and analysis algorithm may be useful in avoiding blood vessels, identifying optimal regions for suture placements to perform safer operations in possibly reduced time.

  20. Establishment of Intestinal Bacteriology

    PubMed Central

    MITSUOKA, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Research on intestinal bacteria began around the end of the 19th century. During the last 5 decades of the 20th century, research on the intestinal microbiota made rapid progress. At first, in my work, I first developed a method of comprehensive analysis of the intestinal microbiota, and then I established classification and identification methods for intestinal anaerobes. Using these methods I discovered a number of ecological rules governing the intestinal microbiota and the role of the intestinl microbiota in health and disease. Moreover, using germfree animals, it was proven that the intestinal microbiota has a role in carcinogenesis and aging in the host. Thus, a new interdisciplinary field, “intestinal bacteriology” was established. PMID:25032084

  1. Mucoadhesive intestinal devices for oral delivery of salmon calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vivek; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Lee, Joohee; Anselmo, Aaron C; Doshi, Nishit; Mitragotri, Samir

    2013-12-28

    One of the major challenges faced by therapeutic polypeptides remains their invasive route of delivery. Oral administration offers a potential alternative to injections; however, this route cannot be currently used for peptides due to their limited stability in the stomach and poor permeation across the intestine. Here, we report mucoadhesive devices for oral delivery that are inspired by the design of transdermal patches and demonstrate their capabilities in vivo for salmon calcitonin (sCT). The mucoadhesive devices were prepared by compressing a polymeric matrix containing carbopol, pectin and sodium carboxymethylcellulose (1:1:2), and were coated on all sides but one with an impermeable and flexible ethyl cellulose (EC) backing layer. Devices were tested for in vitro dissolution, mucoadhesion to intestinal mucosa, enhancement of drug absorption in vitro (Caco-2 monolayer transport) and in vivo in rats. Devices showed steady drug release with ≈75% cumulative drug released in 5h. Devices also demonstrated strong mucoadhesion to porcine small intestine to withstand forces up to 100 times their own weight. sCT-loaded mucoadhesive devices exhibited delivery of sCT across Caco-2 monolayers and across the intestinal epithelium in vivo in rats. A ≈52-fold (pharmacokinetic) and ≈44-fold (pharmacological) enhancement of oral bioavailability was observed with mucoadhesive devices when compared to direct intestinal injections. Oral delivery of devices in enteric coated capsules resulted in significant bioavailability enhancement.

  2. Roles of MicroRNA across Prenatal and Postnatal Periods

    PubMed Central

    Floris, Ilaria; Kraft, Jamie D.; Altosaar, Illimar

    2016-01-01

    Communication between mother and offspring in mammals starts at implantation via the maternal–placental–fetal axis, and continues postpartum via milk targeted to the intestinal mucosa. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), short, noncoding single-stranded RNAs, of about 22 nucleotides in length, are actively involved in many developmental and physiological processes. Here we highlight the role of miRNA in the dynamic signaling that guides infant development, starting from implantation of conceptus and persisting through the prenatal and postnatal periods. miRNAs in body fluids, particularly in amniotic fluid, umbilical cord blood, and breast milk may offer new opportunities to investigate physiological and/or pathological molecular mechanisms that portend to open novel research avenues for the identification of noninvasive biomarkers. PMID:27916805

  3. Modeling Equilibrium of microRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lawrence W. C.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of non-coding RNAs and the dysregulated expression of these short RNA molecules was frequently observed in cancer cells. The steady state level of microRNA concentration may differentiate the biological function of the cells between normal and impaired. To understand the steady state or equilibrium of microRNAs, their interactions with transcription factors and target genes need to be explored and visualized through prediction and network analysis algorithms. This article discusses the application of mathematical model for simulating the dynamics of network feedback loop so as to decipher the mechanism of microRNA regulation. PMID:22303331

  4. Construction of porcine CCK pDNA and its expression in COS-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jigang; Lü, Yi; Bai, Qiaoling

    2007-06-01

    CCK correlates with the generation and progression of pancreatic cancer. The research aims to construct eukaryotic expression plasmid pIRES2-EGFP/CCK (CCK pDNA) and transiently express it in COS-7 cells. Total RNA was extracted from porcine intestinal mucosa. RT-PCR was used to amplify the aimed segments CCKcDNA which was then digested with EcoR1 and BamH1 and inserted into a eukaryotic expression plasmid pIRES2-EGFP to construct CCK pDNA. The constructed plasmid was transfected into COS-7 cells by lepofectamin 2000-mediated transfer method. The expression of CCK in transfected COS-7 cells was detected 24, 48 and 72 h post-transfection with fluorescence microscopy and the expression level of CCK mRNA in transfected COS-7 cells was assayed by using RT-PCR. The results showed CCK pDNA was successfully constructed and expressed transiently in COS-7 cells. Green fluorescent protein could be detected in the COS-7 cells transfected with porcine CCK pDNA 24 h post-transfection. At 48th h post-transfection, the number of positive cells was increased significantly and much brighter green fluorescence could be detected. And 72 h post-transfection, the green fluorescence of positive cells became even stronger, while no green fluorescence was detected in the control group. The expression of CCK mRNA in the cells was detectable by using RT-PCR. In COS-7 cells transfected with CCK pDNA a high level of porcine CCK mRNA was detected while no expression of porcine CCKmRNA was found in the cells transfected with null plasmid. It was concluded CCK pDNA was expressed successfully in COS-7 cells, which lays a foundation for further research on the relationship between CCK and tumor.

  5. Other Novel Therapies: Biomarkers, microRNAs and microRNA Inhibitors, DNA Methylation, Epigenetics, Immunotherapy and Virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Giandomenico, Valeria; Thirlwell, Chrissie; Essand, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) consist of heterogeneous neoplasms. The neuroendocrine cells of the human body are confined to certain organs, such as the thyroid, pancreas and adrenals, or they are dispersed throughout the body in the respiratory tract and in the intestinal mucosa. The cells belong to the diffuse endocrine cell system, share a neuroendocrine phenotype, and accumulate precursor molecules which are then processed into hormones, peptides or amines. The tightly controlled release on stimulation is either to the blood stream or adjacent cells or neurons. Neuroendocrine cells regulate various processes in the human body, such as gastrointestinal secretion, blood pressure and response to stress. NETs present a wide spectrum of malignant diseases from rather benign to very malignant and lethal variants. NETs may occur in any organ, but are mainly detected in the gastroenteropancreatic system and in the lungs. The understanding of NET biology and treatments has changed dramatically during the last decade. Today, the main problems that clinicians and translational scientists face in overcoming these malignancies relate to various aspects within the molecular pathogenesis of NETs. This chapter focuses on the importance of novel biomarkers: microRNA and microRNA inhibitors; DNA methylation and epigenetics, and immunotherapy and virotherapy to develop novel treatments for NETs.

  6. Restriction of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus by Porcine APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dörrschuck, Eva; Fischer, Nicole; Bravo, Ignacio G.; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Kuiper, Heidi; Spötter, Andreas; Möller, Ronny; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten; Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2011-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine cells, tissues, and organs shows promise to surmount the shortage of human donor materials. Among the barriers to pig-to-human xenotransplantation are porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) since functional representatives of the two polytropic classes, PERV-A and PERV-B, are able to infect human embryonic kidney cells in vitro, suggesting that a xenozoonosis in vivo could occur. To assess the capacity of human and porcine cells to counteract PERV infections, we analyzed human and porcine APOBEC3 (A3) proteins. This multigene family of cytidine deaminases contributes to the cellular intrinsic immunity and act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. Our data show that the porcine A3 gene locus on chromosome 5 consists of the two single-domain genes A3Z2 and A3Z3. The evolutionary relationships of the A3Z3 genes reflect the evolutionary history of mammals. The two A3 genes encode at least four different mRNAs: A3Z2, A3Z3, A3Z2-Z3, and A3Z2-Z3 splice variant A (SVA). Porcine and human A3s have been tested toward their antiretroviral activity against PERV and murine leukemia virus (MuLV) using novel single-round reporter viruses. The porcine A3Z2, A3Z3 and A3Z2-Z3 were packaged into PERV particles and inhibited PERV replication in a dose-dependent manner. The antiretroviral effect correlated with editing by the porcine A3s with a trinucleotide preference for 5′ TGC for A3Z2 and A3Z2-Z3 and 5′ CAC for A3Z3. These results strongly imply that human and porcine A3s could inhibit PERV replication in vivo, thereby reducing the risk of infection of human cells by PERV in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:21307203

  7. Porcine model of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Kashiwakura, Yuji; Mimuro, Jun; Onishi, Akira; Iwamoto, Masaki; Madoiwa, Seiji; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Suzuki, Misae; Sembon, Shoichiro; Ishiwata, Akira; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Sakata, Asuka; Ohmori, Tsukasa; Hashimoto, Michiko; Yazaki, Satoko; Sakata, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X chromosome-linked genetic bleeding disorder caused by abnormalities in the coagulation factor VIII gene (F8). Hemophilia A patients suffer from a bleeding diathesis, such as life-threatening bleeding in the brain and harmful bleeding in joints and muscles. Because it could potentially be cured by gene therapy, subhuman animal models have been sought. Current mouse hemophilia A models generated by gene targeting of the F8 have difficulties to extrapolate human disease due to differences in the coagulation and immune systems between mice and humans. Here, we generated a porcine model of hemophilia A by nuclear transfer cloning from F8-targeted fibroblasts. The hemophilia A pigs showed a severe bleeding tendency upon birth, similar to human severe hemophiliacs, but in contrast to hemophilia A mice which rarely bleed under standard breed conditions. Infusion of human factor VIII was effective in stopping bleeding and reducing the bleeding frequency of a hemophilia A piglet but was blocked by the inhibitor against human factor VIII. These data suggest that the hemophilia A pig is a severe hemophilia A animal model for studying not only hemophilia A gene therapy but also the next generation recombinant coagulation factors, such as recombinant factor VIII variants with a slower clearance rate.

  8. MicroRNAs in Cholangiopathies

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Steven P.; Gradilone, Sergio A.; Masyuk, Tetyana V.; Tabibian, James H.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocytes, the cells lining bile ducts, comprise a small fraction of the total cellular component of the liver, yet perform the essential role of bile modification and transport of biliary and blood constituents. Cholangiopathies are a diverse group of biliary disorders with the cholangiocyte as the target cell; the etiopathogenesis of most cholangiopathies remains obscure. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. These small RNAs may not only be involved in the etiopathogenesis of disease, but are showing promise as diagnostic and prognostic tools. In this brief review, we summarize recent work regarding the role of microRNAs in the etiopathogenesis of several cholangiopathies, and discuss their utility as prognostic and diagnostic tools. PMID:25097819

  9. Toward the promise of microRNAs - Enhancing reproducibility and rigor in microRNA research.

    PubMed

    Witwer, Kenneth W; Halushka, Marc K

    2016-11-01

    The fields of applied and translational microRNA research have exploded in recent years as microRNAs have been implicated across a spectrum of diseases. MicroRNA biomarkers, microRNA therapeutics, microRNA regulation of cellular physiology and even xenomiRs have stimulated great interest, which have brought many researchers into the field. Despite many successes in determining general mechanisms of microRNA generation and function, the application of microRNAs in translational areas has not had as much success. It has been a challenge to localize microRNAs to a given cell type within tissues and assay them reliably. At supraphysiologic levels, microRNAs may regulate hosts of genes that are not the physiologic biochemical targets. Thus the applied and translational microRNA literature is filled with pitfalls and claims that are neither scientifically rigorous nor reproducible. This review is focused on increasing awareness of the challenges of working with microRNAs in translational research and recommends better practices in this area of discovery.

  10. Characterization of miRNAs involved in response to poly(I:C) in porcine airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Wang, J K; Han, L X; Zhuo, J S; Du, X; Liu, D; Yang, X Q

    2017-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) have been implicated in a variety of pathological conditions including infectious diseases. Knowledge of the miRNAs affected by poly(I:C), a synthetic analog of viral double-stranded RNA, in porcine airway epithelial cells (PAECs) contributes to understanding the mechanisms of swine viral respiratory diseases, which bring enormous economic loss worldwide every year. In this study, we used high throughput sequencing to profile miRNA expression in PAECs treated with poly(I:C) as compared to the untreated control. This approach revealed 23 differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs), five of which have not been implicated in viral infection before. Nineteen of the 23 miRNAs were down-regulated including members of the miR-17-92 cluster, a well-known polycistronic oncomir and extensively involved in viral infection in humans. Target genes of DEMs, predicted using bioinformatic methods and validated by luciferase reporter analysis on two representative DEMs, were significantly enriched in several pathways including transforming growth factor-β signaling. A large quantity of sequence variations (isomiRs) were found including a substitution at position 5, which was verified to redirect miRNAs to a new spectrum of targets by luciferase reporter assay together with bioinformatics analysis. Twelve novel porcine miRNAs conserved in other species were identified by homology analysis together with cloning verification. Furthermore, the expression analysis revealed the potential importance of three novel miRNAs in porcine immune response to viruses. Overall, our data contribute to clarifying the mechanisms underlying the host immune response against respiratory viruses in pigs, and enriches the repertoire of porcine miRNAs.

  11. The characteristics of the porcine (Sus scrofa) liver miRNAome with the use of next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pawlina, Klaudia; Gurgul, Artur; Oczkowicz, Maria; Bugno-Poniewierska, Monika

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, noncoding RNAs, which play a vital role in the regulation of gene expression by binding to the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of a target mRNA. Despite a significant improvement in the identification of miRNAs in a variety of species, the coverage of the porcine miRNAome is still scarce. To identify porcine miRNAs potentially regulating processes taking place in the liver, we applied next generation sequencing. As a result, we detected 206 distinct miRNAs, of which 68 represented potential novel miRNAs. Among these new miRNAs, there were miRNAs deriving from the opposite arm of a hairpin precursor of already known miRNAs. Moreover, we observed 3' and 5' length and sequence variants, probably constituting so called isomiRs, as well as differentially mapped precursor loci, alternative precursor sequences and clustering of miRNA encoding genes. On the basis of expression levels, reflected by the number of sequence reads, we identified the most abundant miRNAs followed by gene target prediction and pathway analysis. The enriched pathways were connected with cellular and metabolic processes, growth factors as well as enzymatic activity. The obtained results are the first ones to concern the porcine liver miRNAome. Consequently, they will increase the number of known porcine miRNAs and facilitate further research on gene regulation mechanisms as well as biological processes associated with the liver functioning in pigs.

  12. Intestinal M cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We have an enormous number of commensal bacteria in our intestine, moreover, the foods that we ingest and the water we drink is sometimes contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms. The intestinal epithelium is always exposed to such microbes, friend or foe, so to contain them our gut is equipped with specialized gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), literally the largest peripheral lymphoid tissue in the body. GALT is the intestinal immune inductive site composed of lymphoid follicles such as Peyer’s patches. M cells are a subset of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) residing in the region of the epithelium covering GALT lymphoid follicles. Although the vast majority of IEC function to absorb nutrients from the intestine, M cells are highly specialized to take up intestinal microbial antigens and deliver them to GALT for efficient mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. I will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of M-cell differentiation and functions. PMID:26634447

  13. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in children

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Hasan M.; Al-Arayedh, Ghadeer G.; Mohamed, Afaf M.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) is a rare disease characterized by dilatation of intestinal lymphatics. It can be classified as primary or secondary according to the underlying etiology. The clinical presentations of IL are pitting edema, chylous ascites, pleural effusion, acute appendicitis, diarrhea, lymphocytopenia, malabsorption, and intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis is made by intestinal endoscopy and biopsies. Dietary modification is the mainstay in the management of IL with a variable response. Here we report 2 patients with IL in Bahrain who showed positive response to dietary modification. PMID:26837404

  14. Intestinal transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag Sureshchandra; Khan, Khalid Mahmood; Girlanda, Raffaele; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2012-09-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving therapy for patients with intestinal failure. Intestinal transplantation is now recognized as a treatment for patients who develop complications of parenteral nutrition and in whom attempts at intestinal rehabilitation have failed. Patients with parenteral nutrition related liver disease will require a liver graft typically part of a multivisceral transplant. Isolated intestinal transplants are more commonly performed in adults while multivisceral transplants are most commonly performed in infants. Isolated intestinal transplants have the best short-term outcome, with over 80 % survival at 1 year. Patients requiring multivisceral transplants have a high rate of attrition with a 1 year survival less than 70 %. Prognostic factors for a poor outcome include patient hospitalization at the time of transplant and donor age greater than 40 years while systemic sepsis and acute rejection are the major determinant of early postoperative outcome. For patients surviving the first year the outcome of transplantation of the liver in addition to intestine affords some survival advantage though long-term outcome does not yet match other abdominal organs. Outcomes for intestinal retransplantation are poor as a result of immunology and patient debility. Overall intestinal transplantation continues to develop and is a clear indication with cost and quality of life advantages in patients with intestinal failure that do not remain stable on parenteral nutrition.

  15. Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infection: Etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and immunoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Saif, Linda J

    2015-05-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), a member of the genera Alphacoronavirus in the family Coronaviridae, causes acute diarrhea/vomiting, dehydration and high mortality in seronegative neonatal piglets. For the last three decades, PEDV infection has resulted in significant economic losses in the European and Asian pig industries, but in 2013-2014 the disease was also reported in the US, Canada and Mexico. The PED epidemic in the US, from April 2013 to the present, has led to the loss of more than 10% of the US pig population. The disappearance and re-emergence of epidemic PED indicates that the virus is able to escape from current vaccination protocols, biosecurity and control systems. Endemic PED is a significant problem, which is exacerbated by the emergence (or potential importation) of multiple PEDV variants. Epidemic PEDV strains spread rapidly and cause a high number of pig deaths. These strains are highly enteropathogenic and acutely infect villous epithelial cells of the entire small and large intestines although the jejunum and ileum are the primary sites. PEDV infections cause acute, severe atrophic enteritis accompanied by viremia that leads to profound diarrhea and vomiting, followed by extensive dehydration, which is the major cause of death in nursing piglets. A comprehensive understanding of the pathogenic characteristics of epidemic or endemic PEDV strains is needed to prevent and control the disease in affected regions and to develop an effective vaccine. This review focuses on the etiology, epidemiology, disease mechanisms and pathogenesis as well as immunoprophylaxis against PEDV infection.

  16. Porcine Neonatal Coccidiosis: Evaluation of Monensin as Preventive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Doré, Monique; Morin, Michel

    1987-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of monensin as a preventive therapy for porcine neonatal coccidiosis. Fifteen three-day-old piglets were given 50,000 sporulated oocysts of Isospora suis and eight of them received 15 mg/kg of monensin orally every other day. Seven piglets served as normal controls. Fecal samples were collected and checked for oocyst shedding. At 18 days of age, piglets were euthanized and necropsied. The onset of clinical signs was delayed in the treated group, but all inoculated piglets displayed anorexia, soft stool, or diarrheic feces. Treated piglets shed large numbers of oocysts in their feces (up to 201,200 oocysts per gram of feces). All infected piglets had lesions of villous atrophy in the jejunum and most of them were in the late atrophic or villous regrowth stages. The results of this study suggest that monensin does not prevent clinical signs, oocyst shedding, and intestinal lesions caused by I. suis in neonatal piglets. PMID:17422909

  17. MicroRNA therapeutics in neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David S; Soreq, Hermona

    2014-01-01

    Developing microRNA therapeutics for neurological diseases is both a promising opportunity and an extremely challenging topic for several reasons. The promise stems from the very small size of microRNAs, which makes them amenable for manipulation via short synthetic oligonucleotides or engineered viruses. Also, the fact that each microRNA may regulate numerous target transcripts of the same pathway predicts that such manipulations may affect an entire pathway rather than a single gene and gives reason to hope that low dose therapeutic targeting of the top microRNA in such a hierarchic pyramid would suffice to induce a focused change in the entire pyramid. However, these same features, which make microRNAs such promising targets for therapeutic manipulations also present great challenges. Thus the plethora of functional targets for each microRNA in specific cell types is yet far from being elucidated, which implies that the targets to be affected may not be those planned to be manipulated (a risk of 'off-target' effects). Also, the hierarchic order of microRNA regulation is yet unknown, which predicts a risk of complex, multi-leveled consequences following the manipulation of a single microRNA; and the delivery of oligonucleotide therapeutics into the brain is a challenge due to the blood-brain barrier. In this chapter, we briefly outline the current state of knowledge regarding microRNA regulation in different neuropathologies and sketch the emerging principles for the development of microRNA therapeutics for these diseases.We address issues such as modes of delivery and consideration of the inherited and acquired variability between individuals in the susceptibility to such treatments. We further refer in a somewhat more in-depth manner to the issue of manipulating microRNA functioning in the parasympathetic system and the pathway of cholinergic signaling. Beyond the brain and within it, cholinergic signaling controls inflammatory reactions, and microRNA changes

  18. The Intestinal Transport of Bovine Milk Exosomes Is Mediated by Endocytosis in Human Colon Carcinoma Caco-2 Cells and Rat Small Intestinal IEC-6 Cells123

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Tovah; Baier, Scott R; Zempleni, Janos

    2015-01-01

    Background: MicroRNAs play essential roles in gene regulation. A substantial fraction of microRNAs in tissues and body fluids is encapsulated in exosomes, thereby conferring protection against degradation and a pathway for intestinal transport. MicroRNAs in cow milk are bioavailable in humans. Objective: This research assessed the transport mechanism of bovine milk exosomes, and therefore microRNAs, in human and rodent intestinal cells. Methods: The intestinal transport of bovine milk exosomes and microRNAs was assessed using fluorophore-labeled bovine milk exosomes in human colon carcinoma Caco-2 cells and rat small intestinal IEC-6 cells. Transport kinetics and mechanisms were characterized using dose-response studies, inhibitors of vesicle transport, carbohydrate competitors, proteolysis of surface proteins on cells and exosomes, and transepithelial transport in transwell plates. Results: Exosome transport exhibited saturation kinetics at 37°C [Michaelis constant (Km) = 55.5 ± 48.6 μg exosomal protein/200 μL of media; maximal transport rate = 0.083 ± 0.057 ng of exosomal protein · 81,750 cells−1 · h−1] and decreased by 64% when transport was measured at 4°C, consistent with carrier-mediated transport in Caco-2 cells. Exosome uptake decreased by 61–85% under the following conditions compared with controls in Caco-2 cells: removal of exosome and cell surface proteins by proteinase K, inhibition of endocytosis and vesicle trafficking by synthetic inhibitors, and inhibition of glycoprotein binding by carbohydrate competitors. When milk exosomes, at a concentration of 5 times the Km, were added to the upper chamber in transwell plates, Caco-2 cells accumulated miR-29b and miR-200c in the lower chamber, and reverse transport was minor. Transport characteristics were similar in IEC-6 cells and Caco-2 cells, except that substrate affinity and transporter capacity were lower and higher, respectively. Conclusion: The uptake of bovine milk exosomes is

  19. MicroRNA involvement in glioblastoma pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Novakova, Jana; Slaby, Ondrej; Vyzula, Rostislav; Michalek, Jaroslav

    2009-08-14

    MicroRNAs are endogenously expressed regulatory noncoding RNAs. Altered expression levels of several microRNAs have been observed in glioblastomas. Functions and direct mRNA targets for these microRNAs have been relatively well studied over the last years. According to these data, it is now evident, that impairment of microRNA regulatory network is one of the key mechanisms in glioblastoma pathogenesis. MicroRNA deregulation is involved in processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, invasion, glioma stem cell behavior, and angiogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in glioblastoma with an emphasis on its significance in glioblastoma oncogenic signaling and its potential to serve as a disease biomarker and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  20. Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000150.htm Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... your bowel (intestine). This condition is called an intestinal obstruction . The blockage may be partial or total (complete). ...

  1. MicroRNAs dynamically remodel gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanjae; Yan, Wei; Ward, Sean M; Hwang, Sung Jin; Wu, Qiuxia; Hatton, William J; Park, Jong Kun; Sanders, Kenton M; Ro, Seungil

    2011-04-14

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) express a unique set of microRNAs (miRNAs) which regulate and maintain the differentiation state of SMCs. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of miRNAs during the development of gastrointestinal (GI) SMCs in a transgenic animal model. We generated SMC-specific Dicer null animals that express the reporter, green fluorescence protein, in a SMC-specific manner. SMC-specific knockout of Dicer prevented SMC miRNA biogenesis, causing dramatic changes in phenotype, function, and global gene expression in SMCs: the mutant mice developed severe dilation of the intestinal tract associated with the thinning and destruction of the smooth muscle (SM) layers; contractile motility in the mutant intestine was dramatically decreased; and SM contractile genes and transcriptional regulators were extensively down-regulated in the mutant SMCs. Profiling and bioinformatic analyses showed that SMC phenotype is regulated by a complex network of positive and negative feedback by SMC miRNAs, serum response factor (SRF), and other transcriptional factors. Taken together, our data suggest that SMC miRNAs are required for the development and survival of SMCs in the GI tract.

  2. Serotypic differentiation of rotaviruses in field samples from diarrheic pigs by using nucleic acid probes specific for porcine VP4 and human and porcine VP7 genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, B I; Parwani, A V; Lopez, S; Flores, J; Saif, L J

    1994-01-01

    Of 216 fecal and intestinal samples collected from nursing or weaned diarrheic pigs in the United States and Canada, 57 were identified as group A rotavirus positive by RNA electrophoresis and silver staining. Fifty-seven and 52 rotavirus-positive samples were analyzed by hybridization with Gottfried and OSU PCR-derived gene 9 and 4 probes, respectively. Only 17 samples were identified with either homologous VP4 (P)- or VP7 (G)-coding genes or both. One rotavirus identified as G4 and P7 was similar to the previously characterized interserotype rotavirus, SB-1A. Additional hybridization analyses were performed with PCR-derived probes prepared from gene 9 cDNA of the human rotaviruses Wa (G1), DS-1 (G2), and P (G3) and of the porcine rotavirus YM (G11). Eleven of 52 samples collected and analyzed from swine in Ohio, California, and Nebraska were identified as G11. No samples with G1-, G2-, or G3-type specificities were detected among the 25 of 57 rotavirus-positive samples analyzed with human rotavirus-derived probes. Further investigations with a PCR-derived gene 4 probe prepared from porcine rotavirus YM revealed hybridization specificities similar to those of the OSU gene 4 probe. Images PMID:8150940

  3. MicroRNA-378 regulates oocyte maturation via the suppression of aromatase in porcine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bo; Toms, Derek; Shen, Wei; Li, Julang

    2015-03-15

    We sought to investigate whether miR-378 plays a role in cumulus cells and whether the manipulation of miRNA levels in cumulus cells influences oocyte maturation in vitro. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from ovarian follicles had significantly lower levels of precursor and mature miR-378 in cumulus cells surrounding metaphase II (MII) oocytes than cumulus cells surrounding germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes, suggesting a possible role of miR-378 during COC maturation. Overexpression of miR-378 in cumulus cells impaired expansion and decreased expression of genes associated with expansion (HAS2, PTGS2) and oocyte maturation (CX43, ADAMTS1, PGR). Cumulus cell expression of miR-378 also suppressed oocyte progression from the GV to MII stage (from 54 ± 2.7 to 31 ± 5.1%), accompanied by a decrease of growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9), bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15), zona pellucida 3 (ZP3), and CX37 in the oocytes. Subsequent in vitro fertilization resulted in fewer oocytes from COCs overexpressing miR-378 reaching the blastocyst stage (7.3 ± 0.7 vs. 16.6 ± 0.5%). miR-378 knockdown led to increased cumulus expansion and oocyte progression to MII, confirming a specific effect of miR-378 in suppressing COC maturation. Aromatase (CYP19A1) expression in cumulus cells was also inhibited by miR-378, leading to a significant decrease in estradiol production. The addition of estradiol to IVM culture medium reversed the effect of miR-378 on cumulus expansion and oocyte meiotic progression, suggesting that decreased estradiol production via suppression of aromatase may be one of the mechanisms by which miR-378 regulates the maturation of COCs. Our data suggest that miR-378 alters gene expression and function in cumulus cells and influences oocyte maturation, possibly via oocyte-cumulus interaction and paracrine regulation.

  4. microRNA Decay: Refining microRNA Regulatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Genevieve; Gantier, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short 19-25 nucleotide RNA molecules that impact on most biological processes by regulating the efficiency of messenger RNA (mRNA) translation. To date, most research activities have been focused on the control of miRNA expression and its functional consequences. Nonetheless, much remains unknown about the mechanisms affecting the level of specific miRNAs in the cell, a critical feature impacting their regulatory activity. This review focuses on the factors that regulate the abundance of miRNAs, including synthesis, post-transcriptional modifications, nucleases, target binding, and secretion.

  5. Biological role of microRNA-103 based on expression profile and target genes analysis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoxi; Wu, Zongsong; Li, Xinjian; Ning, Xiaomin; Li, Yanjie; Yang, Gongshe

    2011-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously expressed RNAs consisting of 20-24 nucleotides. These molecules are thought to repress protein translation by binding to target mRNAs. However, biological functions have not been assigned to most of the 175 porcine miRNAs registered in miRBase (release 15.0). In an effort to uncover miR-103 important in pigs, we examined the integrative tissue expression profile and gene ontology (GO) term enrichment of predicted target genes to determine the global biological functions of miR-103. Our results demonstrated that miR-103 is involved in various biological processes including brain development, lipid metabolism, adipocyte differentiation, hematopoiesis, and immunity. Moreover, we also experimentally verified effects of miR-103 in porcine preadipocytes. miR-103 levels increased in differentiating adipocytes, and inhibition of miR-103 effectively inhibited preadipocyte differentiation. In addition, mRNA levels of the putative miR-103 target RAI14 were higher in miR-103 inhibitor-treated adipocytes. These results demonstrate that miR-103 is involved in porcine preadipocyte differentiation and may act through the putative target gene RAI14. In a word, our data provide new insights into the global biological role of miR-103.

  6. Intestinal obstruction repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100116.htm Intestinal obstruction repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Adhesions Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  7. Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100165.htm Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  8. Intestinal CFTR expression alleviates meconium ileus in cystic fibrosis pigs

    PubMed Central

    Stoltz, David A.; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Ernst, Sarah E.; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Karp, Philip H.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Rector, Michael V.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Alaiwa, Mahmoud H. Abou; Hoegger, Mark J.; Ludwig, Paula S.; Taft, Peter J.; Wallen, Tanner J.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; McMenimen, James D.; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Bogan, Katrina L.; Adam, Ryan J.; Hornick, Emma E.; Nelson, George A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Chang, Eugene H.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Prather, Randall S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) pigs develop disease with features remarkably similar to those in people with CF, including exocrine pancreatic destruction, focal biliary cirrhosis, micro-gallbladder, vas deferens loss, airway disease, and meconium ileus. Whereas meconium ileus occurs in 15% of babies with CF, the penetrance is 100% in newborn CF pigs. We hypothesized that transgenic expression of porcine CF transmembrane conductance regulator (pCFTR) cDNA under control of the intestinal fatty acid–binding protein (iFABP) promoter would alleviate the meconium ileus. We produced 5 CFTR–/–;TgFABP>pCFTR lines. In 3 lines, intestinal expression of CFTR at least partially restored CFTR-mediated anion transport and improved the intestinal phenotype. In contrast, these pigs still had pancreatic destruction, liver disease, and reduced weight gain, and within weeks of birth, they developed sinus and lung disease, the severity of which varied over time. These data indicate that expressing CFTR in intestine without pancreatic or hepatic correction is sufficient to rescue meconium ileus. Comparing CFTR expression in different lines revealed that approximately 20% of wild-type CFTR mRNA largely prevented meconium ileus. This model may be of value for understanding CF pathophysiology and testing new preventions and therapies. PMID:23676501

  9. Intestinal CFTR expression alleviates meconium ileus in cystic fibrosis pigs.

    PubMed

    Stoltz, David A; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Ernst, Sarah E; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Karp, Philip H; Samuel, Melissa S; Reznikov, Leah R; Rector, Michael V; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Bouzek, Drake C; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H; Hoegger, Mark J; Ludwig, Paula S; Taft, Peter J; Wallen, Tanner J; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; McMenimen, James D; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Bogan, Katrina L; Adam, Ryan J; Hornick, Emma E; Nelson, George A; Hoffman, Eric A; Chang, Eugene H; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B; Prather, Randall S; Meyerholz, David K; Welsh, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) pigs develop disease with features remarkably similar to those in people with CF, including exocrine pancreatic destruction, focal biliary cirrhosis, micro-gallbladder, vas deferens loss, airway disease, and meconium ileus. Whereas meconium ileus occurs in 15% of babies with CF, the penetrance is 100% in newborn CF pigs. We hypothesized that transgenic expression of porcine CF transmembrane conductance regulator (pCFTR) cDNA under control of the intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (iFABP) promoter would alleviate the meconium ileus. We produced 5 CFTR-/-;TgFABP>pCFTR lines. In 3 lines, intestinal expression of CFTR at least partially restored CFTR-mediated anion transport and improved the intestinal phenotype. In contrast, these pigs still had pancreatic destruction, liver disease, and reduced weight gain, and within weeks of birth, they developed sinus and lung disease, the severity of which varied over time. These data indicate that expressing CFTR in intestine without pancreatic or hepatic correction is sufficient to rescue meconium ileus. Comparing CFTR expression in different lines revealed that approximately 20% of wild-type CFTR mRNA largely prevented meconium ileus. This model may be of value for understanding CF pathophysiology and testing new preventions and therapies.

  10. Intestinal Barrier and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Julio-Pieper, M; Bravo, J A

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function contributes to gut homeostasis by modulating absorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the lumen into the circulation while restricting the passage of noxious luminal substances and microorganisms. Chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease are associated to intestinal barrier dysfunction. Here, the hypothesis is that a leaky intestinal wall allowing for indiscriminate passage of intraluminal compounds to the vascular compartment could in turn lead to systemic inflammation. An increasing number of studies are now investigating the association between gut permeability and CNS disorders, under the premise that translocation of intestinal luminal contents could affect CNS function, either directly or indirectly. Still, it is unknown whether disruption of intestinal barrier is a causative agent or a consequence in these situations. Here, we discuss the latest evidence pointing to an association between increased gut permeability and disrupted behavioral responses.

  11. Topographic Findings of the Porcine Cornea

    PubMed Central

    HEICHEL, Jens; WILHELM, Frank; KUNERT, Kathleen S.; HAMMER, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The porcine eye is often used as an ex vivo animal model in ophthalmological research. It is well suited for investigations concerning refractive surgery; however, corneal topography data are scarce. This study investigated the corneal topography and pachymetry of the porcine eye to provide further reproducible data. We evaluated freshly enucleated porcine eyes (n = 16) by performing computerized corneal topographies (Orbscan® IIz, Bausch and Lomb, Rochester, NY, USA). We assessed the steepest and flattest keratometric powers (K1 and K2, units in diopters (D)), astigmatism (D), white-to-white (WTW) diameter (mm), thinnest point pachymetry (µm), anterior and posterior best-fit sphere (BFS) (D), refractive power of the anterior and posterior curvatures, and total refractive power of the cornea (D). The mean keratometric powers were 39.6 ± 0.89 D (K1) and 38.5 ± 0.92 D (K2), and the mean astigmatism was 1.1 ± 0.78 D. The mean WTW diameter was 13.81 ± 0.83 mm, and the mean corneal thickness was 832.6 ± 40.18 µm. The BFSs were 38.14 ± 0.73 D (anterior) and 42.56 ± 1.15 D (posterior), and the mean refractive powers were 43.27 ± 1.08 D (anterior) and -5.15 ± 0.20 D (posterior); therefore, the mean of the total refractive power was 38.16 ± 1.00 D. The topography and pachymetry of the porcine cornea showed a specific configuration differing from the human cornea. When using animal ex vivo models such as porcine corneas for experimental corneal surgery, findings such as these should be considered. PMID:28293660

  12. Intestinal permeability, leaky gut, and intestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Hollander, D

    1999-10-01

    A major task of the intestine is to form a defensive barrier to prevent absorption of damaging substances from the external environment. This protective function of the intestinal mucosa is called permeability. Clinicians can use inert, nonmetabolized sugars such as mannitol, rhamnose, or lactulose to measure the permeability barrier or the degree of leakiness of the intestinal mucosa. Ample evidence indicates that permeability is increased in most patients with Crohn's disease and in 10% to 20% of their clinically healthy relatives. The abnormal leakiness of the mucosa in Crohn's patients and their relatives can be greatly amplified by aspirin preadministration. Permeability measurements in Crohn's patients reflect the activity, extent, and distribution of the disease and may allow us to predict the likelihood of recurrence after surgery or medically induced remission. Permeability is also increased in celiac disease and by trauma, burns, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The major determinant of the rate of intestinal permeability is the opening or closure of the tight junctions between enterocytes in the paracellular space. As we broaden our understanding of the mechanisms and agents that control the degree of leakiness of the tight junctions, we will be increasingly able to use permeability measurements to study the etiology and pathogenesis of various disorders and to design or monitor therapies for their management.

  13. Oral administration of protease inhibits enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli receptor activity in piglet small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Mynott, T L; Luke, R K; Chandler, D S

    1996-01-01

    The virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is attributed to their ability to adhere via fimbrial adhesins to specific receptors located on the intestinal mucosa. A novel approach to preventing ETEC induced diarrhoea would be to prevent attachment of ETEC to intestine by proteolytically modifying the receptor attachment sites. This study aimed to examine the effect of bromelain, a proteolytic extract obtained from pineapple stems, on ETEC receptor activity in porcine small intestine. Bromelain was administered orally to piglets and K88+ ETEC attachment to small intestine was measured at 50 cm intervals using an enzyme immunoassay. K88+ ETEC attachment to intestinal sections that were not treated with bromelain varied appreciably between sampling sites. Variability in receptor activity along the intestinal surface is though to be caused by the localised effects of endogenous proteases. Oral administration of exogenous protease inhibited K88+ ETEC attachment to pig small intestine in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.05). Attachment of K88+ ETEC was negligible after treatment, resembling the levels of attachment of K88 to piglets of the genetically determined non-adhesive phenotype, which are resistant to K88+ ETEC infection. Serum biochemical analysis and histopathological examination of treated piglets showed no adverse effects of the bromelain treatment. It is concluded that administration of bromelain can inhibit ETEC receptor activity in vivo and may therefore be useful for prevention of K88+ ETEC induced diarrhoea. PMID:8566855

  14. Towards the Establishment of a Porcine Model to Study Human Amebiasis

    PubMed Central

    Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Cognie, Juliette; Delgado-Ortega, Mario; Berthon, Patricia; Rossignol, Christelle; Larcher, Thibaut; Melo, Sandrine; Bruel, Timothée; Guibon, Roseline; Chérel, Yan; Sarradin, Pierre; Salmon, Henri; Guillén, Nancy; Meurens, François

    2011-01-01

    Background Entamoeba histolytica is an important parasite of the human intestine. Its life cycle is monoxenous with two stages: (i) the trophozoite, growing in the intestine and (ii) the cyst corresponding to the dissemination stage. The trophozoite in the intestine can live as a commensal leading to asymptomatic infection or as a tissue invasive form producing mucosal ulcers and liver abscesses. There is no animal model mimicking the whole disease cycle. Most of the biological information on E. histolytica has been obtained from trophozoite adapted to axenic culture. The reproduction of intestinal amebiasis in an animal model is difficult while for liver amebiasis there are well-described rodent models. During this study, we worked on the assessment of pigs as a new potential model to study amebiasis. Methodology/Principal Findings We first co-cultured trophozoites of E. histolytica with porcine colonic fragments and observed a disruption of the mucosal architecture. Then, we showed that outbred pigs can be used to reproduce some lesions associated with human amebiasis. A detailed analysis was performed using a washed closed-jejunal loops model. In loops inoculated with virulent amebas a severe acute ulcerative jejunitis was observed with large hemorrhagic lesions 14 days post-inoculation associated with the presence of the trophozoites in the depth of the mucosa in two out four animals. Furthermore, typical large sized hepatic abscesses were observed in the liver of one animal 7 days post-injection in the portal vein and the liver parenchyma. Conclusions The pig model could help with simultaneously studying intestinal and extraintestinal lesion development. PMID:22205970

  15. Micro-RNA378 (miR-378) regulates ovarian estradiol production by targeting aromatase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengyu; Linher-Melville, Katja; Yang, Burton B; Wu, De; Li, Julang

    2011-10-01

    Estradiol is a steroid hormone that not only plays an important role in ovarian follicular development but also is associated with many reproductive disorders. Owing to the importance of aromatase in the production of estradiol, the regulation of aromatase gene expression at the transcriptional level has been an extensive area of study for over two decades. However, its regulation at the posttranscriptional level has remained unclear. Here, we show that micro-RNA378 (miR-378) is spatiotemporally expressed in porcine granulosa cells, the cells that generate estradiol in the ovary during follicular development, in an inverse manner compared with the expression of aromatase. In vitro overexpression and inhibition experiments revealed that aromatase expression, and therefore estradiol production, by granulosa cells, is posttranscriptionally down-regulated by miR-378. Furthermore, site-directed mutation studies identified two binding sites in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the aromatase coding sequence that are critical for the action of miR-378. Interestingly, overexpression of the aromatase 3'-UTR enhanced aromatase expression at the protein level in granulosa cells, possibly mediated by the binding of miR-378 within this region, thereby reducing the binding of this micro-RNA to the endogenous aromatase 3'-UTR.

  16. MicroRNA Inhibitors as Anticancer Therapies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-17

    therapeutic approach. We are currently testing these approaches. 15. SUBJECT TERMS microRNA , miRNA , oncomir, E2F, cancer 16. SECURITY...of the microRNAs within this cluster is a therapeutic approach for the treatment of breast cancer . We undertook several strategies to test this...8 Appendices……………………………………………………………………………11 4 Introduction MicroRNAs ( miRNAs ) are short, noncoding RNAs

  17. Biochemistry of intestinal development.

    PubMed Central

    Henning, S J

    1979-01-01

    In biochemical terms, the rat small intestine is relatively immature at birth and for the first two postnatal weeks. Then during the third week a dramatic array of enzymic changes begins, and by the end of the fourth week the intestine has the digestive and absorptive properties of the adult. Selective examples of these changes are discussed with emphasis on their implications for toxicological studies. The review also includes a detailed consideration of the roles of the dietary change of weaning and of glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones in the regulation of intestinal development. PMID:575507

  18. Mycotoxin detoxifiers attenuate deoxynivalenol-induced pro-inflammatory barrier insult in porcine enterocytes as an in vitro evaluation model of feed mycotoxin reduction.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Kim, Dongwook; Moon, Yuseok

    2017-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), the most prevalent mycotoxin worldwide, leads to economic losses for animal food production. Swine is a most sensitive domestic animal to DON due to rapid absorption and low detoxification by gut microbiota. Specifically, DON can severely damage pig intestinal tissue by disrupting the intestinal barrier and inducing inflammatory responses. We evaluated the effects of several mycotoxin detoxifiers including bentonites, yeast cell wall components, and mixture-typed detoxifier composed of mineral, microorganisms, and phytogenic substances on DON-insulted intestinal barrier and pro-inflammatory responses using in vitro porcine enterocyte culture model. DON-induced disruption of the in vitro gut barrier was attenuated by all three mycotoxin detoxifiers in dose-dependent manners. These mycotoxin detoxifiers also suppressed DON-induced pro-inflammatory chemokine expression to different degrees, which was mediated by downregulation of mitogen-activated kinases and early growth response-1. Of note, the mixture-typed detoxifier was the most prominent mitigating agent at the cellular levels whereas the high dose of bentonite clay also had suppressive action against DON-induced pro-inflammatory insult. The in vitro porcine enterocyte-based assessment of intestinal barrier integrity and inflammatory signals provides sensitive and simplified alternative bioassay of feed additives such as detoxifiers against enteropathogenic mycotoxins with comprehensive mechanistic confirmation.

  19. Nutrition, microRNAs, and Human Health.

    PubMed

    Cui, Juan; Zhou, Beiyan; Ross, Sharon A; Zempleni, Janos

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) hybridize with complementary sequences in mRNA and silence genes by destabilizing mRNA or preventing translation of mRNA. Over 60% of human protein-coding genes are regulated by miRs, and 1881 high-confidence miRs are encoded in the human genome. Evidence suggests that miRs not only are synthesized endogenously, but also might be obtained from dietary sources, and that food compounds alter the expression of endogenous miR genes. The main food matrices for studies of biological activity of dietary miRs include plant foods and cow milk. Encapsulation of miRs in exosomes and exosome-like particles confers protection against RNA degradation and creates a pathway for intestinal and vascular endothelial transport by endocytosis, as well as delivery to peripheral tissues. Evidence suggests that the amount of miRs absorbed from nutritionally relevant quantities of foods is sufficient to elicit biological effects, and that endogenous synthesis of miRs is insufficient to compensate for dietary miR depletion and rescue wild-type phenotypes. In addition, nutrition alters the expression of endogenous miR genes, thereby compounding the effects of nutrition-miR interactions in gene regulation and disease diagnosis in liquid biopsies. For example, food components and dietary preferences may modulate serum miR profiles that may influence biological processes. The complex crosstalk between nutrition, miRs, and gene targets poses a challenge to gene network analysis and studies of human disease. Novel pipelines and databases have been developed recently, including a dietary miR database for archiving reported miRs in 15 dietary resources. miRs derived from diet and endogenous synthesis have been implicated in physiologic and pathologic conditions, including those linked with nutrition and metabolism. In fact, several miRs are actively regulated in response to overnutrition and tissue inflammation, and are involved in facilitating the development of chronic

  20. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... that only affects the colon). LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OF CROHN’S DISEASE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION The most common complication of Crohn’s disease, obstruction may arise from swelling and the formation ...

  1. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Taking drugs that slow intestinal movements. These include narcotic (pain) medicines and drugs used when you are ... that may have caused the problem (such as narcotic drugs) may help. In severe cases, surgery may ...

  2. Intestinal parasitic infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Suk; Kim, Ki Whang; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Dong Ho

    2008-01-01

    In general, gastrointestinal tract is the primary involvement site of parasites during their life cycle. In this article, we will describe amebiasis, ascariasis, and anisakiasis among the many common intestinal parasitic diseases. We will review the epidemiology, life cycles, clinical manifestations and complications, and illustrate detailed imaging findings of intestinal parasites. Recognizing features of parasitic infection is important to establish an early diagnosis that leads to prompt treatment and helps avoid unnecessary surgery.

  3. Effect of Vitamin D3 on Biosynthesis of Estrogen in Porcine Granulosa Cells via Modulation of Steroidogenic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, So-Hye; Lee, Jae-Eon; An, Sung-Min; Shin, Ye Young; Hwang, Dae Youn; Yang, Seung Yun; Cho, Seong-Keun; An, Beum-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D3 is a fat-soluble secosteroid responsible for enhancing intestinal absorption of calcium, iron, and other materials. Vitamin D3 deficiency, therefore, can cause health problems such as metabolic diseases, and bone disorder. Female sex hormones including estrogen and progesterone are biosynthesized mainly in the granulosa cells of ovary. In this study, we isolated granulosa cells from porcine ovary and cultured for the experiments. In order to examine the effect of vitamin D3 on the ovarian granulosa cells, the mRNA and protein levels of genes were analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blot assay. The production of estrogen from the granulosa cells was also measured by the ELISA assay. Genes associated with follicle growth were not significantly altered by vitamin D3. However, it increases expression of genes involved in the estrogen-biosynthesis. Further, estrogen concentrations in porcine granulosa cell-cultured media increased in response to vitamin D3. These results showed that vitamin D3 is a powerful regulator of sex steroid hormone production in porcine granulosa cells, suggesting that vitamin D deficiency may result in inappropriate sexual development of industrial animals and eventually economic loss. PMID:28133513

  4. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of porcine DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors (DAI).

    PubMed

    Xie, Lilan; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Cai, Kaimei; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2010-03-01

    The DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors (DAI) is a recently identified DNA sensor for intracellular DNA that triggers a signal for the production of type I IFN. Here we report the cloning and characterization of porcine DAI (poDAI). The full-length of poDAI encodes 439 amino acids, contains two N-terminal DNA-binding domains and shows similarity to mouse, rat, dog, monkey, human, horse and cattle counterparts ranging from 44% to 67%. poDAI mRNA expression was mainly detected in spleen, lung, kidney and small intestine. Over-expression of poDAI activated transcription factors IRF3 and NF-kappaB and induced IFN-beta in different porcine cell lines, but to varying degrees. Deletion mutant analysis revealed that both the DNA-binding domains and the C-terminus are required for full activation of IFN-beta. siRNA targeting poDAI significantly decreased poly(dAT:dAT)- or Pseudorabies virus (PRV)-induced IFN-beta activation. These results indicate that DAI is an important immuno-regulator of the porcine innate immune system.

  5. Intestinal adaptation following resection.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, Kelly A

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a natural compensatory process that occurs following extensive intestinal resection, whereby structural and functional changes in the intestine improve nutrient and fluid absorption in the remnant bowel. In animal studies, postresection structural adaptations include bowel lengthening and thickening and increases in villus height and crypt depth. Functional changes include increased nutrient transporter expression, accelerated crypt cell differentiation, and slowed transit time. In adult humans, data regarding adaptive changes are sparse, and the mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain to be fully elucidated. Several factors influence the degree of intestinal adaptation that occurs post resection, including site and extent of resection, luminal stimulation with enteral nutrients, and intestinotrophic factors. Two intestinotrophic growth factors, the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide and recombinant growth hormone (somatropin), are now approved for clinical use in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Both agents enhance fluid absorption and decrease requirements for parenteral nutrition (PN) and/or intravenous fluid. Intestinal adaptation has been thought to be limited to the first 1-2 years following resection in humans. However, recent data suggest that a significant proportion of adult patients with SBS can achieve enteral autonomy, even after many years of PN dependence, particularly with trophic stimulation.

  6. Claudins in intestines

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhe; Ding, Lei; Lu, Qun; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Intestines are organs that not only digest food and absorb nutrients, but also provide a defense barrier against pathogens and noxious agents ingested. Tight junctions (TJs) are the most apical component of the junctional complex, providing one form of cell-cell adhesion in enterocytes and playing a critical role in regulating paracellular barrier permeability. Alteration of TJs leads to a number of pathophysiological diseases causing malabsorption of nutrition and intestinal structure disruption, which may even contribute to systemic organ failure. Claudins are the major structural and functional components of TJs with at least 24 members in mammals. Claudins have distinct charge-selectivity, either by tightening the paracellular pathway or functioning as paracellular channels, regulating ions and small molecules passing through the paracellular pathway. In this review, we have discussed the functions of claudin family members, their distribution and localization in the intestinal tract of mammals, their alterations in intestine-related diseases and chemicals/agents that regulate the expression and localization of claudins as well as the intestinal permeability, which provide a therapeutic view for treating intestinal diseases. PMID:24478939

  7. MicroRNA and Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0428 TITLE: MicroRNA and Breast Cancer Progression...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 JUL 2005 - 14 JUL 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER MicroRNA and Breast Cancer Progression 5b...We hypothesized that certain miRNA species are differentially expressed in the normal breast epithelium and breast cancer cells. Our concept was that

  8. Tissue Sampling Guides for Porcine Biomedical Models.

    PubMed

    Albl, Barbara; Haesner, Serena; Braun-Reichhart, Christina; Streckel, Elisabeth; Renner, Simone; Seeliger, Frank; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    This article provides guidelines for organ and tissue sampling adapted to porcine animal models in translational medical research. Detailed protocols for the determination of sampling locations and numbers as well as recommendations on the orientation, size, and trimming direction of samples from ∼50 different porcine organs and tissues are provided in the Supplementary Material. The proposed sampling protocols include the generation of samples suitable for subsequent qualitative and quantitative analyses, including cryohistology, paraffin, and plastic histology; immunohistochemistry;in situhybridization; electron microscopy; and quantitative stereology as well as molecular analyses of DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and electrolytes. With regard to the planned extent of sampling efforts, time, and personnel expenses, and dependent upon the scheduled analyses, different protocols are provided. These protocols are adjusted for (I) routine screenings, as used in general toxicity studies or in analyses of gene expression patterns or histopathological organ alterations, (II) advanced analyses of single organs/tissues, and (III) large-scale sampling procedures to be applied in biobank projects. Providing a robust reference for studies of porcine models, the described protocols will ensure the efficiency of sampling, the systematic recovery of high-quality samples representing the entire organ or tissue as well as the intra-/interstudy comparability and reproducibility of results.

  9. Porcine sperm vitrification I: cryoloops method.

    PubMed

    Arraztoa, C C; Miragaya, M H; Chaves, M G; Trasorras, V L; Gambarotta, M C; Péndola, C H; Neild, D M

    2016-09-29

    The aims of this study were to evaluate porcine sperm vitrification in cryoloops, with and without two different cryoprotectants and assess two warming procedures. Extended (n = 3; r = 4) and raw (n = 5; r = 2) semen was diluted in media without and with cryoprotectants (4% dimethylformamide and 4% glycerol) to a final concentration of 20 × 10(6) spermatozoa ml(-1) and vitrified using the cryoloops method. Two warming procedures were evaluated: rapid method (30 s at 37°C) and an ultra-rapid method (7 s at 75°C, followed by 30 s at 37°C). Total motility (phase contrast), sperm viability (6-carboxifluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide stain), membrane function (hypo-osmotic swelling test), acrosome integrity (phase contrast), chromatin condensation (toluidine blue stain) and chromatin susceptibility to acid denaturation (acridine orange stain) were evaluated before and after vitrification and analysed using Friedman's test. In all media, the only seminal parameters that were maintained after vitrification were chromatin condensation and integrity. Vitrification of porcine spermatozoon using cryoloops, both in the presence or absence of cryoprotectants and independent of the warming procedure used, permits conservation of sperm chromatin condensation and integrity. It would be interesting to further verify this by producing porcine embryos using vitrified spermatozoon with intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  10. Porcine sperm vitrification II: Spheres method.

    PubMed

    Arraztoa, C C; Miragaya, M H; Chaves, M G; Trasorras, V L; Gambarotta, M C; Neild, D M

    2016-11-10

    Owing to current problems in boar sperm cryopreservation, this study proposes to evaluate vitrification in spheres as an alternative cryopreservation procedure, comparing the use or not of permeable cryoprotectants and two warming methods. Extended (n = 3; r = 4) and raw (n = 5; r = 2) porcine spermatozoa were diluted in media, in the absence or presence of either 4% dimethylformamide or 4% glycerol, to a final concentration of 5 × 10(6)  spermatozoa/ml and vitrified using the spheres method. Two warming procedures were evaluated: a rapid method (30 s at 37°C) and an ultrarapid method (7 s at 75°C, followed by 30 s at 37°C). Percentages of total motility (phase contrast), membrane function (hypo-osmotic swelling test), acrosome integrity (phase contrast), sperm viability (6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide stain), chromatin condensation (toluidine blue stain) and chromatin susceptibility to acid denaturation (acridine orange stain) were evaluated in the samples before and after vitrification. Results, analysed using Friedman's test, suggest that rapid warming of raw porcine spermatozoa vitrified without permeable cryoprotectants may preserve DNA condensation and integrity better than the other processing methods studied in this work. Hence, porcine sperm vitrification using spheres could be used to produce embryos with ICSI to further validate this method.

  11. Cloning of Porcine Pituitary Tumor Transforming Gene 1 and Its Expression in Porcine Oocytes and Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Nong, Suqun; Ma, Qingyan; Chen, Baojian; Liu, Mingjun; Pan, Tianbiao; Liao, D. Joshua

    2016-01-01

    The maternal-to-embryonic transition (MET) is a complex process that occurs during early mammalian embryogenesis and is characterized by activation of the zygotic genome, initiation of embryonic transcription, and replacement of maternal mRNA with embryonic mRNA. The objective of this study was to reveal the temporal expression and localization patterns of PTTG1 during early porcine embryonic development and to establish a relationship between PTTG1 and the MET. To achieve this goal, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to clone porcine PTTG1. Subsequently, germinal vesicle (GV)- and metaphase II (MII)-stage oocytes, zygotes, 2-, 4-, and 8-cell-stage embryos, morulas, and blastocysts were produced in vitro and their gene expression was analyzed. The results revealed that the coding sequence of porcine PTTG1 is 609-bp in length and that it encodes a 202-aa polypeptide. Using qRT-PCR, PTTG1 mRNA expression was observed to be maintained at high levels in GV- and MII-stage oocytes. The transcript levels in oocytes were also significantly higher than those in embryos from the zygote to blastocyst stages. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that porcine PTTG1 was primarily localized to the cytoplasm and partially localized to the nucleus. Furthermore, the PTTG1 protein levels in MII-stage oocytes and zygotes were significantly higher than those in embryos from the 2-cell to blastocyst stage. After fertilization, the level of this protein began to decrease gradually until the blastocyst stage. The results of our study suggest that porcine PTTG1 is a new candidate maternal effect gene (MEG) that may participate in the processes of oocyte maturation and zygotic genome activation during porcine embryogenesis. PMID:27058238

  12. Analyses of intestinal commensal Escherichia coli strains from wild boars suggest adaptation to conventional pig production conditions.

    PubMed

    Römer, Antje; Wieler, Lothar H; Schierack, Peter

    2012-12-28

    To test the hypothesis that Escherichia coli populations have adapted to conventional pig production practices, we comparatively tested intestinal commensal E. coli from wild boars versus isolates from domestic pigs by analyzing virulence-associated factors, adhesion, and metabolic activities. Virulence-associated genes typical for intestinal pathogenic E. coli (inVAGs) were sporadically detected among E. coli from wild boars except the adhesion-related gene paa and the enterotoxin-encoding gene astA. In contrast, several VAGs typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (exVAGs) were common in E. coli from wild boars. The exVAG chuA occurred more often in E. coli from wild boars compared to E. coli from domestic pigs. 23.5% of E. coli from wild boars belonged to EcoR group B2 which is higher than observed for E. coli from clinically healthy domestic pigs. Furthermore, E. coli from wild boars were more efficient in fermentation of carbohydrate sources (dulcitol, inositol, d-sucrose, d-tagatose), and adhered better to the intestinal porcine epithelial cell line IPEC-J2. In conclusion, our findings point towards an adaptation of porcine intestinal E. coli to a specific intestinal milieu caused by different animal living conditions.

  13. MicroRNA fingerprints during human megakaryocytopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Garzon, Ramiro; Pichiorri, Flavia; Palumbo, Tiziana; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Cimmino, Amelia; Aqeilan, Rami; Volinia, Stefano; Bhatt, Darshna; Alder, Hansjuerg; Marcucci, Guido; Calin, George A; Liu, Chang-Gong; Bloomfield, Clara D; Andreeff, Michael; Croce, Carlo M

    2006-03-28

    microRNAs are a highly conserved class of noncoding RNAs with important regulatory functions in proliferation, apoptosis, development, and differentiation. To discover novel regulatory pathways during megakaryocytic differentiation, we performed microRNA expression profiling of in vitro-differentiated megakaryocytes derived from CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors. The main finding was down-regulation of miR-10a, miR-126, miR-106, miR-10b, miR-17 and miR-20. Hypothetically, the down-regulation of microRNAs unblocks target genes involved in differentiation. We confirmed in vitro and in vivo that miR-130a targets the transcription factor MAFB, which is involved in the activation of the GPIIB promoter, a key protein for platelet physiology. In addition, we found that miR-10a expression in differentiated megakaryocytes is inverse to that of HOXA1, and we showed that HOXA1 is a direct target of miR-10a. Finally, we compared the microRNA expression of megakaryoblastic leukemic cell lines with that of in vitro differentiated megakaryocytes and CD34(+) progenitors. This analysis revealed up-regulation of miR-101, miR-126, miR-99a, miR-135, and miR-20. Our data delineate the expression of microRNAs during megakaryocytopoiesis and suggest a regulatory role of microRNAs in this process by targeting megakaryocytic transcription factors.

  14. A new material for tissue engineered vagina reconstruction: Acellular porcine vagina matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Kun; Du, Run-Xuan; Zhang, Lin; Li, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Ming-le; Zhao, Shuo; Huang, Xiang-Hua; Xu, Yan-Fang

    2017-03-10

    Acellular matrix materials have been widely used to repair various tissues and organs. According to the plastic principle, when a part of the body is lost, it should be replaced with a similar material. Therefore, the use of a homologous organ-specific acellular vaginal tissue in vagina reconstruction repair surgery may show good results. However, the acellular vagina matrix (AVM) form large vertebrates is difficult to isolate. In this study, we described a multi-step method to prepare porcine AVM and evaluated the efficacy of acellularization. We also investigated the biomechanical properties, biological activity elements and biocompatibility of the porcine AVM. We then used this material to reconstruct a rat vagina and performed further morphologic and functional analyses. Small intestinal submucosa (SIS), which is a commonly used acellular matrix material, was used in a control group. Histological examination, DNA content analysis and agarose gel electrophoresis revealed that the decellularization procedure was effective. The AVM had acceptable biomechanical properties and sufficient growth factor production (VEGF, FGF, TGF-β1 and PDGF-BB) compared with that of the SIS. Subcutaneous transplantation in rats showed that the AVM had good biocompatibility. The tissue-engineered vagina using the AVM more resembled normal-appearing tissue than did that using SIS following morphologic and functional analyses. The AVM has great potential for application in vaginal reconstructive surgery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes in the cholinergic innervation pattern of porcine ovaries with cysts induced by dexamethasone administration.

    PubMed

    Kozłowska, A; Majewski, M; Jana, B

    2014-09-01

    We revealed earlier that induction of ovarian cysts in gilts by dexamethasone phosphate disodium salt (DXM) administration from the follicular phase of the estrous cycle (EC) changed the cholinergic innervation of the gonad. In the present study, the innervation of porcine ovaries by vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)-, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)- and somatostatin (SOM)-immunoreactive (IR) fibres, after induction of cystic changes from the middle luteal phase of the EC, was determined. The cystic changes were induced by DXM injections from days 7 to 21 of the EC, and 11 days later, the ovaries were collected. In the cystic ovaries, VAChT-, nNOS- and SOM-IR fibres were found around cysts and small tertiary follicles; nNOS-IR and also VAChT-IR fibres were observed near secondary follicles and veins; and VAChT- and nNOS-IR fibres were not found around cortical arteries. The number of VIP-IR fibres increased near the cysts and within the ground plexus, while the number of VAChT-IR fibres decreased within the medullar part of this structure. Thus, our study showed changes in the cholinergic innervation pattern of the porcine cystic ovaries induced from the middle phase of the cycle and confirmed that cystic ovary innervation depends partly on the phase of the EC in which the induction of cysts was started.

  16. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in adults.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James; Nimmo, Michael

    2011-02-15

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia in the adult may be characterized as a disorder with dilated intestinal lacteals causing loss of lymph into the lumen of the small intestine and resultant hypoproteinemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia and reduced number of circulating lymphocytes or lymphopenia. Most often, intestinal lymphangiectasia has been recorded in children, often in neonates, usually with other congenital abnormalities but initial definition in adults including the elderly has become increasingly more common. Shared clinical features with the pediatric population such as bilateral lower limb edema, sometimes with lymphedema, pleural effusion and chylous ascites may occur but these reflect the severe end of the clinical spectrum. In some, diarrhea occurs with steatorrhea along with increased fecal loss of protein, reflected in increased fecal alpha-1-antitrypsin levels, while others may present with iron deficiency anemia, sometimes associated with occult small intestinal bleeding. Most lymphangiectasia in adults detected in recent years, however, appears to have few or no clinical features of malabsorption. Diagnosis remains dependent on endoscopic changes confirmed by small bowel biopsy showing histological evidence of intestinal lymphangiectasia. In some, video capsule endoscopy and enteroscopy have revealed more extensive changes along the length of the small intestine. A critical diagnostic element in adults with lymphangiectasia is the exclusion of entities (e.g. malignancies including lymphoma) that might lead to obstruction of the lymphatic system and "secondary" changes in the small bowel biopsy. In addition, occult infectious (e.g. Whipple's disease from Tropheryma whipplei) or inflammatory disorders (e.g. Crohn's disease) may also present with profound changes in intestinal permeability and protein-losing enteropathy that also require exclusion. Conversely, rare B-cell type lymphomas have also been described even decades following initial

  17. Relationship between Ileal symbiont intracellularis and porcine proliferative enteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, G F; Ward, G E; Murtaugh, M P; Rose, R; Gebhart, C J

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between Ileal symbiont (IS) intracellularis, formerly known as a Campylobacter-like organism, and porcine proliferative enteritis (PE) was studied by use of pigs with experimentally transmitted PE. Twenty one pigs were experimentally inoculated with homogenized ileal mucosa from a pig that died with PE, and 7 were maintained as uninoculated controls. Fecal samples were collected, and pigs were necropsied weekly postinoculation. Light microscopy and electron microscopy were used to examine tissues for lesions of PE and infectious agents. DNA was extracted from the fecal samples and assayed for the presence of sequences specific for IS intracellularis by dot blot hybridization and polymerase chain reaction amplification. IS intracellularis was detected by the polymerase chain reaction in the feces of 20 of 21 inoculated pigs but not in the feces of uninoculated pigs. Seven inoculated pigs but no uninoculated pigs were detected shedding IS intracellularis by dot blot hybridization. Shedding was detected 1 to 5 weeks after inoculation, and clinical signs were seen in the second to fifth weeks after inoculation. Few pigs without lesions of PE were found to shed IS intracellularis. There was a highly significant association between the presence of IS intracellularis in feces or tissue and the presence of microscopic proliferative lesions and between the severity of the lesions of PE and the percentage of IS intracellularis-infected intestinal crypts. Pigs that ceased shedding IS intracellularis were significantly less likely to have proliferative lesions. These and previous reports are consistent with the hypothesis that IS intracellularis is a necessary causative agent of PE. Images PMID:8225599

  18. Transcriptional regulation of the human, porcine and bovine OCTN2 gene by PPARα via a conserved PPRE located in intron 1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The novel organic cation transporter 2 (OCTN2) is the physiologically most important carnitine transporter in tissues and is responsible for carnitine absorption in the intestine, carnitine reabsorption in the kidney and distribution of carnitine between tissues. Genetic studies clearly demonstrated that the mouse OCTN2 gene is directly regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Despite its well conserved role as an important regulator of lipid catabolism in general, the specific genes under control of PPARα within each lipid metabolic pathway were shown to differ between species and it is currently unknown whether the OCTN2 gene is also a PPARα target gene in pig, cattle, and human. In the present study we examined the hypothesis that the porcine, bovine, and human OCTN2 gene are also PPARα target genes. Results Using positional cloning and reporter gene assays we identified a functional PPRE, each in the intron 1 of the porcine, bovine, and human OCTN2 gene. Gel shift assay confirmed binding of PPARα to this PPRE in the porcine, bovine, and the human OCTN2 gene. Conclusions The results of the present study show that the porcine, bovine, and human OCTN2 gene, like the mouse OCTN2 gene, is directly regulated by PPARα. This suggests that regulation of genes involved in carnitine uptake by PPARα is highly conserved across species. PMID:25299939

  19. MicroRNAs and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Rotllan, Noemi; Aranda, Juan F.; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (~22nucleotide) sequences of RNA that regulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level. MiRNA/mRNA base pairing complementarity provokes mRNA decay and consequent gene silencing. These endogenous gene expression inhibitors were primarily described in cancer but recent exciting findings have also demonstrated a key role in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including atherosclerosis. MiRNAs controls endothelial cell (EC), vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) and macrophage functions, and thereby regulate the progression of atherosclerosis. MiRNAs expression is modulated by different stimuli involved in every stage of atherosclerosis and conversely miRNAs modulates several pathways implicated in plaque development such as cholesterol metabolism. In the present review, we focus on the importance of miRNAs in atherosclerosis and we further discuss their potential use as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in CVDs. PMID:23512606

  20. High-level expression, purification and characterisation of porcine β-defensin 2 in Pichia pastoris and its potential as a cost-efficient growth promoter in porcine feed.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zixin; Wang, Anru; Feng, Qiuyue; Wang, Zhaoyue; Ivanova, Iskra Vitanova; He, Xiuping; Zhang, Borun; Song, Weiping

    2014-06-01

    Porcine β-defensin 2 (pBD2), a recently discovered porcine defensin that is produced by the intestine, exerts antimicrobial activities and innate immune effects that are linked to intestinal diseases in pigs. Here, we report a codon-optimised protein corresponding to mature pBD2 cDNA that was expressed and purified in Pichia pastoris yeast. The highest amount of secreted protein (3,694.0 mg/L) was reached 144 h into a 150-h induction during high-density cultivation. Precipitation followed by gel exclusion chromatography yielded 383.7 mg/L purified recombinant pBD2 (rpBD2) with a purity of ~93.7 %. Two recombinant proteins of 5,458.5 and 5,258.4 Da were detected in the mass spectrum due to variation in the amino-terminus. The rpBD2 exhibited high antimicrobial activity against a broad range of pig pathogenic bacteria (minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC] 32-128 μg/mL); the highest activity was observed against Salmonella choleraesuis, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus suis (MIC 32-64 μg/mL). However, rpBD2 also inhibited the growth of probiotics such as Lactobacillus plantarum, Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but at lower efficacies than the pathogens. Purified or unpurified rpBD2 also maintained high activity over a wide range of pH values (2.0-10.0), a high thermal stability at 100 °C for 40 min and significant resistance to papain, pepsin and trypsin. In addition, the activity of rpBD2 towards S. aureus was unaffected by 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) and 20 % dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO). Our results suggest that pBD2 could be produced efficiently in large quantities in P. pastoris and be a substitute for traditional antibiotics for growth promotion in the porcine industry.

  1. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Kravets, Victoria; Hu, David

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines Contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  2. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  3. MicroRNAs as regulatory elements in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Psoriasis is a chronic, autoimmune, and complex genetic disorder that affects 23% of the European population. The symptoms of Psoriatic skin are inflammation, raised and scaly lesions. microRNA, which is short, nonprotein-coding, regulatory RNAs, plays critical roles in psoriasis. microRNA participates in nearly all biological processes, such as cell differentiation, development and metabolism. Recent researches reveal that multitudinous novel microRNAs have been identified in skin. Some of these substantial novel microRNAs play as a class of posttranscriptional gene regulator in skin disease, such as psoriasis. In order to insight into microRNAs biological functions and verify microRNAs biomarker, we review diverse references about characterization, profiling and subtype of microRNAs. Here we will share our opinions about how and which microRNAs are as regulatory in psoriasis.

  4. The food contaminant deoxynivalenol, decreases intestinal barrier permeability and reduces claudin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Pinton, Philippe; Nougayrede, Jean-Philippe; Del Rio, Juan-Carlos; Moreno, Carolina; Marin, Daniela E.; Ferrier, Laurent; Bracarense, Ana-Paula; Kolf-Clauw, Martine; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2009-05-15

    'The gastrointestinal tract represents the first barrier against food contaminants as well as the first target for these toxicants. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereals and causes various toxicological effects. Through consumption of contaminated cereals and cereal products, human and pigs are exposed to this mycotoxin. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we investigated the effects of DON on the intestinal epithelium. We demonstrated that, in intestinal epithelial cell lines from porcine (IPEC-1) or human (Caco-2) origin, DON decreases trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increases in a time and dose-dependent manner the paracellular permeability to 4 kDa dextran and to pathogenic Escherichia coli across intestinal cell monolayers. In pig explants treated with DON, we also observed an increased permeability of intestinal tissue. These alterations of barrier function were associated with a specific reduction in the expression of claudins, which was also seen in vivo in the jejunum of piglets exposed to DON-contaminated feed. In conclusion, DON alters claudin expression and decreases the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium. Considering that high levels of DON may be present in food or feed, consumption of DON-contaminated food/feed may induce intestinal damage and has consequences for human and animal health.

  5. Sodium alginate decreases the permeability of intestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Alan R; Macierzanka, Adam; Aarak, Kristi; Rigby, Neil M; Parker, Roger; Channell, Guy A; Harding, Stephen E; Bajka, Balazs H

    2016-01-01

    In the small intestine the nature of the environment leads to a highly heterogeneous mucus layer primarily composed of the MUC2 mucin. We set out to investigate whether the soluble dietary fibre sodium alginate could alter the permeability of the mucus layer. The alginate was shown to freely diffuse into the mucus and to have minimal effect on the bulk rheology when added at concentrations below 0.1%. Despite this lack of interaction between the mucin and alginate, the addition of alginate had a marked effect on the diffusion of 500 nm probe particles, which decreased as a function of increasing alginate concentration. Finally, we passed a protein stabilised emulsion through a simulation of oral, gastric and small intestinal digestion. We subsequently showed that the addition of 0.1% alginate to porcine intestinal mucus decreased the diffusion of fluorescently labelled lipid present in the emulsion digesta. This reduction may be sufficient to reduce problems associated with high rates of lipid absorption such as hyperlipidaemia.

  6. Sodium alginate decreases the permeability of intestinal mucus

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Alan R.; Macierzanka, Adam; Aarak, Kristi; Rigby, Neil M.; Parker, Roger; Channell, Guy A.; Harding, Stephen E.; Bajka, Balazs H.

    2016-01-01

    In the small intestine the nature of the environment leads to a highly heterogeneous mucus layer primarily composed of the MUC2 mucin. We set out to investigate whether the soluble dietary fibre sodium alginate could alter the permeability of the mucus layer. The alginate was shown to freely diffuse into the mucus and to have minimal effect on the bulk rheology when added at concentrations below 0.1%. Despite this lack of interaction between the mucin and alginate, the addition of alginate had a marked effect on the diffusion of 500 nm probe particles, which decreased as a function of increasing alginate concentration. Finally, we passed a protein stabilised emulsion through a simulation of oral, gastric and small intestinal digestion. We subsequently showed that the addition of 0.1% alginate to porcine intestinal mucus decreased the diffusion of fluorescently labelled lipid present in the emulsion digesta. This reduction may be sufficient to reduce problems associated with high rates of lipid absorption such as hyperlipidaemia. PMID:26726279

  7. Outbreak investigation of porcine epidemic diarrhea in swine in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Pasma, Tim; Furness, Mary Catherine; Alves, David; Aubry, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus was first diagnosed in Ontario in January of 2014. An outbreak investigation was conducted and it was hypothesized that feed containing spray-dried porcine plasma contaminated with the virus was a risk factor in the introduction and spread of the disease in Ontario.

  8. Production of a subunit vaccine candidate against porcine post-weaning diarrhea in high-biomass transplastomic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Kolotilin, Igor; Kaldis, Angelo; Devriendt, Bert; Joensuu, Jussi; Cox, Eric; Menassa, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) in piglets is a major problem in piggeries worldwide and results in severe economic losses. Infection with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the key culprit for the PWD disease. F4 fimbriae of ETEC are highly stable proteinaceous polymers, mainly composed of the major structural subunit FaeG, with a capacity to evoke mucosal immune responses, thus demonstrating a potential to act as an oral vaccine against ETEC-induced porcine PWD. In this study we used a transplastomic approach in tobacco to produce a recombinant variant of the FaeG protein, rFaeG(ntd/dsc), engineered for expression as a stable monomer by N-terminal deletion and donor strand-complementation (ntd/dsc). The generated transplastomic tobacco plants accumulated up to 2.0 g rFaeG(ntd/dsc) per 1 kg fresh leaf tissue (more than 1% of dry leaf tissue) and showed normal phenotype indistinguishable from wild type untransformed plants. We determined that chloroplast-produced rFaeG(ntd/dsc) protein retained the key properties of an oral vaccine, i.e. binding to porcine intestinal F4 receptors (F4R), and inhibition of the F4-possessing (F4+) ETEC attachment to F4R. Additionally, the plant biomass matrix was shown to delay degradation of the chloroplast-produced rFaeG(ntd/dsc) in gastrointestinal conditions, demonstrating a potential to function as a shelter-vehicle for vaccine delivery. These results suggest that transplastomic plants expressing the rFaeG(ntd/dsc) protein could be used for production and, possibly, delivery of an oral vaccine against porcine F4+ ETEC infections. Our findings therefore present a feasible approach for developing an oral vaccination strategy against porcine PWD.

  9. Role of MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0491 TITLE: Role of MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate... MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0491 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jer...action is not fully characterized. Using microRNA microarray screening, we found microRNA -363 (miR363) is significantly down regulated in several

  10. Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Sérgio Paiva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; de Almeida, Samira Scalso; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation has shown exceptional growth over the past 10 years. At the end of the 1990’s, intestinal transplantation moved out of the experimental realm to become a routine practice in treating patients with severe complications related to total parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure. In the last years, several centers reported an increasing improvement in survival outcomes (about 80%), during the first 12 months after surgery, but long-term survival is still a challenge. Several advances led to clinical application of transplants. Immunosuppression involved in intestinal and multivisceral transplantation was the biggest gain for this procedure in the past decade due to tacrolimus, and new inducing drugs, mono- and polyclonal anti-lymphocyte antibodies. Despite the advancement of rigid immunosuppression protocols, rejection is still very frequent in the first 12 months, and can result in long-term graft loss. The future of intestinal transplantation and multivisceral transplantation appears promising. The major challenge is early recognition of acute rejection in order to prevent graft loss, opportunistic infections associated to complications, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and graft versus host disease; and consequently, improve results in the long run. PMID:25993080

  11. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo-Jiang; Li, Ping-Hua; Huang, Rui-Hua; Sun, Wen-Xing; Wang, Han; Li, Qi-Fa; Chen, Jie; Wu, Wang-Jun; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse) have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells.

  12. Reactomes of porcine alveolar macrophages infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has devastated pig industries worldwide for many years. It is caused by a small RNA virus (PRRSV), which targets almost exclusively pig monocytes or macrophages. In the present study, five SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) libraries derive...

  13. Actions of melatonin mixed with collagenized porcine bone versus porcine bone only on osteointegration of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; López-Marí, Laura; Guardia, Javier; Marínez-González, José María; Barone, Antonio; Tresguerres, Isabel F; Paredes, Sergio D; Fuentes-Breto, Lorena

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the topical application of melatonin mixed with collagenized porcine bone on the osteointegration on the rough discrete calcium deposit (DCD) surface implants in Beagle dogs 3 months after their insertion. In preparation for subsequent insertion of dental implants, lower molars were extracted from 12 Beagle dogs. Each mandible received two parallel wall expanded platform implants with a DCD surface of 4 mm in diameter and 10 mm in length. The implants were randomly assigned to the distal sites on each mandible in the molar area and the gaps were filled with 5 mg lyophilized powdered melatonin and porcine bone and collagenized porcine bone alone. Ten histological sections per implant were obtained for histomorphometric studies. After a 4-wk treatment period, melatonin plus porcine bone significantly increased the perimeter of bone that was in direct contact with the treated implants (P < 0.0001), bone density (P < 0.0001), and new bone formation (P < 0.0001) in comparison with porcine bone alone around the implants. Melatonin plus collagenized porcine bone on DCD surface may act as a biomimetic agent in the placement of endo-osseous dental implants and enhance the osteointegration. Melatonin combined with porcine bone on DCD implants reveals more bone in implant contact at 12 wk (84.5 +/- 1.5%) compared with porcine bone alone treated area (67.17 +/- 1.2%).

  14. Species-specificity of equine and porcine Lawsonia intracellularis isolates in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Francesca; Vannucci, Fabio A; Allen, Andrew L; Pusterla, Nicola; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J; Ball, Katherine R; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M; Hamilton, Don L; Gebhart, Connie J

    2013-10-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis infection causes proliferative enteropathy (PE) in many mammalian species, with porcine and equine proliferative enteropathy (PPE and EPE) known worldwide. Hamsters are a well-published animal model for PPE infection studies in pigs. There is no laboratory animal model for EPE infection studies and it is not known whether there is species-specificity for equine or porcine isolates of L. intracellularis in animal models. The objective of this study was to determine whether it is possible to generate typical EPE lesions in hamsters after inoculation with an equine strain of L. intracellularis (EPE strain) and whether it is comparatively possible to generate PPE lesions in rabbits after inoculation with a porcine strain of L. intracellularis (PPE strain). In 2 separate trials, 4-week-old and 3-week-old weanling golden Syrian hamsters were challenged with EPE strains and compared to uninfected (both trials) and PPE-infected controls (Trial 2 only). Concurrently, 6 female New Zealand white juvenile rabbits were infected with PPE strain and observed concomitantly to 8 similar rabbits infected with EPE strain for a different experiment. Hamsters and rabbits were observed for 21 to 24 days post-infection (DPI), depending on the experiment. Neither infected species developed clinical signs. The presence of disease was assessed with diagnostic techniques classically used for pigs and horses: immune-peroxidase monolayer assay on sera; quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection of molecular DNA in feces; and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain and immunohistochemistry (IHC) on intestinal tissues. Our results showed that EPE-challenged hamsters do not develop infection when compared with PPE controls (IHC, P = 0.009; qPCR, P = 0.0003). Conversely, PPE-challenged rabbits do not develop typical intestinal lesions in comparison to EPE-challenged rabbits, with serological response at 14 DPI being significantly lower (P = 0.0023). In conclusion

  15. Species-specificity of equine and porcine Lawsonia intracellularis isolates in laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Francesca; Vannucci, Fabio A.; Allen, Andrew L.; Pusterla, Nicola; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J.; Ball, Katherine R.; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M.; Hamilton, Don L.; Gebhart, Connie J.

    2013-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis infection causes proliferative enteropathy (PE) in many mammalian species, with porcine and equine proliferative enteropathy (PPE and EPE) known worldwide. Hamsters are a well-published animal model for PPE infection studies in pigs. There is no laboratory animal model for EPE infection studies and it is not known whether there is species-specificity for equine or porcine isolates of L. intracellularis in animal models. The objective of this study was to determine whether it is possible to generate typical EPE lesions in hamsters after inoculation with an equine strain of L. intracellularis (EPE strain) and whether it is comparatively possible to generate PPE lesions in rabbits after inoculation with a porcine strain of L. intracellularis (PPE strain). In 2 separate trials, 4-week-old and 3-week-old weanling golden Syrian hamsters were challenged with EPE strains and compared to uninfected (both trials) and PPE-infected controls (Trial 2 only). Concurrently, 6 female New Zealand white juvenile rabbits were infected with PPE strain and observed concomitantly to 8 similar rabbits infected with EPE strain for a different experiment. Hamsters and rabbits were observed for 21 to 24 days post-infection (DPI), depending on the experiment. Neither infected species developed clinical signs. The presence of disease was assessed with diagnostic techniques classically used for pigs and horses: immune-peroxidase monolayer assay on sera; quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection of molecular DNA in feces; and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain and immunohistochemistry (IHC) on intestinal tissues. Our results showed that EPE-challenged hamsters do not develop infection when compared with PPE controls (IHC, P = 0.009; qPCR, P = 0.0003). Conversely, PPE-challenged rabbits do not develop typical intestinal lesions in comparison to EPE-challenged rabbits, with serological response at 14 DPI being significantly lower (P = 0.0023). In conclusion

  16. Intestinal anisakidosis (anisakiosis).

    PubMed

    Takei, Hidehiro; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2007-10-01

    A case of intestinal anisakidosis in a 42-year-old man in Japan is presented. His chief complaint was an acute onset of severe abdominal pain. Approximately 12 hours before the onset of this symptom, he had eaten sliced raw mackerel ("sashimi"). Upper endoscopy was unremarkable. At exploratory laparotomy, an edematous, diffusely thickened segment of jejunum was observed, which was resected. The postoperative course was uneventful. The segment of small intestine showed a granular indurated area on the mucosal surface, and microscopically, a helminthic larva penetrating the intestinal wall, which was surrounded by a cuff of numerous neutrophils and eosinophils, as well as diffuse acute serositis. A cross section of the larva revealed the internal structures, pathognomonic of Anisakis simplex. Although anisakidosis is rare in the United States, with the increasing popularity of Japanese cuisine, the incidence is expected to increase, and pathologists should be familiar with this disease.

  17. Growth factor TGF-β induces intestinal epithelial cell (IEC-6) differentiation: miR-146b as a regulatory component in the negative feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yalin; Zhang, Man; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2013-01-01

    TGF-β is a potent pleiotropic factor that promotes small intestinal cell differentiation. The role of microRNAs in the TGF-β induction of intestinal epithelial phenotype is largely unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs are functionally involved in TGF-β-induced intestinal cell growth. In this study, TGF-β caused a morphological change of IEC-6 cells and stimulated expression of the epithelial cell markers alkaline phosphatase, villin, and aminopeptidase N. By global microRNA profiling during TGF-β-induced intestinal crypt cell (IEC-6) differentiation, we identified 19 differentially expressed microRNAs. We showed by real-time Q-PCR that miR-146b expression increased rapidly after TGF-β treatment; sequence analysis and in vitro assays revealed that miR-146b targets SIAH2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, with decreased protein expression upon IEC-6 cell differentiation. Transfection of miR-146b inhibitor before TGF-β treatment blocked the down-regulation of SIAH2 in response to TGF-β. Moreover, SIAH2 over-expression during TGF-β treatment caused a significant decrease in Smad7 protein expression in IEC-6 cells. Furthermore, activation of the ERK1/2 pathway is active in the up-regulation of miR-146b by TGF-β. These findings suggest a novel mechanism whereby TGF-β signaling during IEC-6 cell differentiation may be modulated in part by microRNAs, and we propose a key role for miR-146b in the homeostasis of growth factor TGF-β signaling through a negative feedback regulation involving down-regulation of SIAH2 repressed Smad7 activities.

  18. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota.

  19. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  20. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... N Vitamin deficiencies as a result of poor absorption in the intestine N Electrolyte and mineral deficiencies ... N Kidney stones or gallstones due to poor absorption of calcium or bile How is intestinal failure ...

  1. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to check for infection ...

  2. [Intestinal microbiocenosis in children with intestinal enzymopathy].

    PubMed

    Kamilova, A T; Akhmedov, N N; Pulatova, D B; Nurmatov, B A

    2001-01-01

    141 children with different kinds of intestinal enzymopathy were examined; of these, 33 had celiac disease, 39--the syndrome of celiac disease, 12--congenital lactase deficiency and 57--the syndrome of disaccharidase insufficiency. In these patients a significant decrease in the average characteristics of the main protective flora and the growth of hemolytic and lactose-negative enterobacteria were established. In all groups of patients increased amounts of Proteus were detected, which was indicative of profound dysbiosis. The content of bifidobacteria was found to be decreased in 89.5-97% of the patients and the content of lactic acid bacteria, in 15.8-33.3%. The decreased content of Escherichia coli with normal enzymatic activity (less than 10(7) colony-forming units) was noted in one-third of the patients with the syndrome of celiac disease and congenital lactase deficiency, in about a half of the patients with the syndrome of disaccharidase insufficiency and least of all in patients with celiac disease (9.1%). The association of opportunistic microbes was detected in 15.6% of the patients, more often in those with celiac disease, the syndrome of celiac disease and congenital lactase deficiency. The severity of disturbances in intestinal eubiosis was found to depend on the gravity of the patients' state.

  3. Phenotypic map of porcine retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-Crespo, Patricia; del Río, Patricia; Blindert, Marcel; Ueffing, Marius; Hauck, Stefanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Porcine retina is an excellent model for studying diverse retinal processes and diseases. The morphologies of porcine retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) have, however, not yet been described comprehensively. The aim of the present study was to créate a classification of the RGCs using the 1, 1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) tracing method. Methods About 170 RGCs were retrogradely labeled by injecting DiI into the optic nerve of postmortem eyes and statistically analyzed by two different clustering methods: Ward’s algorithm and the K-means clustering. Major axis length of the soma, soma area size, and dendritic field area size were selected as main parameters for cluster classification. Results RGC distribution in clusters was achieved according to their morphological parameters. It was feasible to combine both statistical methods, thereby obtaining a robust clustering distribution. Morphological analysis resulted in a classification of RGCs in three groups according to the soma size and dendritic field: A (large somas and large dendritic fields), B (medium to large somas and medium to large dendritic fields), C (medium to small somas and medium to small dendritic fields). Within groups, fine clustering defined several subgroups according to dendritic arborization and level of stratification. Additionally, cells stratifying in two different levels of the inner plexiform layer were observed within the clusters. Conclusions This comprehensive study of RGC morphologies in the porcine retina provides fundamental knowledge about RGC cell types and provides a basis for functional studies toward selective RGC cell degeneration in retinal disorders. PMID:23687427

  4. MicroRNAs in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pooja; Middleton, Justin; Jeon, Young-Jun; Garofalo, Michela

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs have become recognized as key players in the development of cancer. They are a family of small non-coding RNAs that can negatively regulate the expression of cancer-related genes by sequence-selective targeting of mRNAs, leading to either mRNA degradation or translational repression. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide with a substantially low survival rate. MicroRNAs have been confirmed to play roles in lung cancer development, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and response to therapy. They are also being studied for their future use as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and as potential therapeutic targets. In this review we focus on the role of dysregulated microRNA expression in lung tumorigenesis. We also discuss the role of microRNAs in therapeutic resistance and as biomarkers. We further look into the progress made and challenges remaining in using microRNAs for therapy in lung cancer. PMID:25332906

  5. microRNAs and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Josson, Sajni; Chung, Leland W. K.

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs are noncoding RNAs that are important for embryonic stem cell development and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Tumor cells hijack EMT and stemness to grow and metastasize to distant organs including bone. In the tumor microenvironment, tumor cells interact with the stromal fibroblasts at the primary and metastatic sites and this interaction leads to tumor growth, EMT, and bone metastasis. Tumor-stromal interactions are a dynamic process that involves both cell–cell communications and extracellular vesicles and soluble factors. Growing body of evidence suggests that microRNAs are part of the payload that comprises the extracellular vesicles. microRNAs induce reactive stroma and thus convert normal stroma into tumor-associated stroma to promote aggressive tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. Landmark published studies demonstrate that expression of specific microRNAs of DLK1-DIO3 stem cell cluster correlates with patient survival in metastatic prostate cancer. Thus, microRNAs mediate tumor growth, EMT, and metastasis through cell intrinsic mechanisms and extracellular communications and could be novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets in bone metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26658999

  6. microRNAs and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Josson, Sajni; Chung, Leland W K; Gururajan, Murali

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs are noncoding RNAs that are important for embryonic stem cell development and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Tumor cells hijack EMT and stemness to grow and metastasize to distant organs including bone. In the tumor microenvironment, tumor cells interact with the stromal fibroblasts at the primary and metastatic sites and this interaction leads to tumor growth, EMT, and bone metastasis. Tumor-stromal interactions are a dynamic process that involves both cell-cell communications and extracellular vesicles and soluble factors. Growing body of evidence suggests that microRNAs are part of the payload that comprises the extracellular vesicles. microRNAs induce reactive stroma and thus convert normal stroma into tumor-associated stroma to promote aggressive tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. Landmark published studies demonstrate that expression of specific microRNAs of DLK1-DIO3 stem cell cluster correlates with patient survival in metastatic prostate cancer. Thus, microRNAs mediate tumor growth, EMT, and metastasis through cell intrinsic mechanisms and extracellular communications and could be novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets in bone metastatic prostate cancer.

  7. microRNAs in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Chung, Arthur C K

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and diabetic kidney diseases have continually exerted a great burden on our society. Although the recent advances in medical research have led to a much better understanding of diabetic kidney diseases, there is still no successful strategy for effective treatments for diabetic kidney diseases. Recently, treatment of diabetic kidney diseases relies either on drugs that reduce the progression of renal injury or on renal replacement therapies, such as dialysis and kidney transplantation. On the other hand, searching for biomarkers for early diagnosis and effective therapy is also urgent. Discovery of microRNAs has opened to a novel field for posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Results from cell culture experiments, experimental animal models, and patients under diabetic conditions reveal the critical role of microRNAs during the progression of diabetic kidney diseases. Functional studies demonstrate not only the capability of microRNAs to regulate expression of target genes, but also their therapeutic potential to diabetic kidney diseases. The existence of microRNAs in plasma, serum, and urine suggests their possibility to be biomarkers in diabetic kidney diseases. Thus, identification of the functional role of microRNAs provides an essentially clinical impact in terms of prevention and treatment of progression in diabetic kidney diseases as it enables us to develop novel, specific therapies and diagnostic tools for diabetic kidney diseases.

  8. microRNAs: key triggers of neuronal cell fate.

    PubMed

    Meza-Sosa, Karla F; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    Development of the central nervous system (CNS) requires a precisely coordinated series of events. During embryonic development, different intra- and extracellular signals stimulate neural stem cells to become neural progenitors, which eventually irreversibly exit from the cell cycle to begin the first stage of neurogenesis. However, before this event occurs, the self-renewal and proliferative capacities of neural stem cells and neural progenitors must be tightly regulated. Accordingly, the participation of various evolutionary conserved microRNAs is key in distinct central nervous system (CNS) developmental processes of many organisms including human, mouse, chicken, frog, and zebrafish. microRNAs specifically recognize and regulate the expression of target mRNAs by sequence complementarity within the mRNAs 3' untranslated region and importantly, a single microRNA can have several target mRNAs to regulate a process; likewise, a unique mRNA can be targeted by more than one microRNA. Thus, by regulating different target genes, microRNAs let-7, microRNA-124, and microRNA-9 have been shown to promote the differentiation of neural stem cells and neural progenitors into specific neural cell types while microRNA-134, microRNA-25 and microRNA-137 have been characterized as microRNAs that induce the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitors. Here we review the mechanisms of action of these two sets of microRNAs and their functional implications during the transition from neural stem cells and neural progenitors to fully differentiated neurons. The genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the expression of these microRNAs as well as the role of the recently described natural RNA circles which act as natural microRNA sponges regulating post-transcriptional microRNA expression and function during the early stages of neurogenesis is also discussed.

  9. microRNAs: key triggers of neuronal cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Meza-Sosa, Karla F.; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    Development of the central nervous system (CNS) requires a precisely coordinated series of events. During embryonic development, different intra- and extracellular signals stimulate neural stem cells to become neural progenitors, which eventually irreversibly exit from the cell cycle to begin the first stage of neurogenesis. However, before this event occurs, the self-renewal and proliferative capacities of neural stem cells and neural progenitors must be tightly regulated. Accordingly, the participation of various evolutionary conserved microRNAs is key in distinct central nervous system (CNS) developmental processes of many organisms including human, mouse, chicken, frog, and zebrafish. microRNAs specifically recognize and regulate the expression of target mRNAs by sequence complementarity within the mRNAs 3′ untranslated region and importantly, a single microRNA can have several target mRNAs to regulate a process; likewise, a unique mRNA can be targeted by more than one microRNA. Thus, by regulating different target genes, microRNAs let-7, microRNA-124, and microRNA-9 have been shown to promote the differentiation of neural stem cells and neural progenitors into specific neural cell types while microRNA-134, microRNA-25 and microRNA-137 have been characterized as microRNAs that induce the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitors. Here we review the mechanisms of action of these two sets of microRNAs and their functional implications during the transition from neural stem cells and neural progenitors to fully differentiated neurons. The genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the expression of these microRNAs as well as the role of the recently described natural RNA circles which act as natural microRNA sponges regulating post-transcriptional microRNA expression and function during the early stages of neurogenesis is also discussed. PMID:25009466

  10. Integrative Analysis of Porcine microRNAome during Skeletal Muscle Development

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lijun; Chen, Yaosheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Ye, Sanxing; Yu, Kaifan; Huang, Zheng; Yu, Jingwei; Zhou, Xingyu; Chen, Hu; Mo, Delin

    2013-01-01

    Pig is an important agricultural animal for meat production and provides a valuable model for many human diseases. Functional studies have demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) play critical roles in almost all aspects of skeletal muscle development and disease pathogenesis. To investigate the miRNAs involved in regulating different periods of skeletal muscle development, we herein performed a comprehensive research for porcine microRNAome (miRNAome) during 10 skeletal muscle developmental stages including 35, 49, 63, 77, 91 dpc (days post coitum) and 2, 28, 90, 120, 180 dpn (days postnatal) using Solexa sequencing technology. Our results extend the repertoire of pig miRNAome to 247 known miRNAs processed from 210 pre-miRNAs and 297 candidate novel miRNAs through comparison with known miRNAs in the miRBase. Expression analysis of the 15 most abundant miRNAs in every library indicated that functional miRNAome may be smaller and tend to be highly expressed. A series of muscle-related miRNAs summarized in our study present different patterns between myofibers formation phase and muscle maturation phase, providing valuable reference for investigation of functional miRNAs during skeletal muscle development. Analysis of temporal profiles of miRNA expression identifies 18 novel candidate myogenic miRNAs in pig, which might provide new insight into regulation mechanism mediated by miRNAs underlying muscle development. PMID:24039761

  11. Control of the gut microbiome by fecal microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shirong; Weiner, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery in the early 90s, microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs, have mainly been associated with posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression on a cell-autonomous level. Recent evidence has extended this role by adding inter-species communication to the manifold functional range. In our latest study [Liu S, et al., 2016, Cell Host & Microbe], we identified miRNAs in gut lumen and feces of both mice and humans. We found that intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and Hopx+ cells were the two main sources of fecal miRNA. Deficiency of IEC-miRNA resulted in gut dysbiosis and WT fecal miRNA transplantation restored the gut microbiota. We investigated potential mechanisms for this effect and found that miRNAs were able to regulate the gut microbiome. By culturing bacteria with miRNAs, we found that host miRNAs were able to enter bacteria, specifically regulate bacterial gene transcripts and affect bacterial growth. Oral administration of synthetic miRNA mimics affected specific bacteria in the gut. Our findings describe a previously unknown pathway by which the gut microbiome is regulated by the host and raises the possibility that miRNAs may be used therapeutically to manipulate the microbiome for the treatment of disease. PMID:28357349

  12. Identification and differential expression of microRNAs in the ovaries of pigs (Sus scrofa) with high and low litter sizes.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Yin, Z J; Feng, Y F; Zhang, X D; Wu, T; Ding, Y Y; Ye, P F; Fu, K; Zhang, M Q

    2016-10-01

    Litter size affects profitability in the swine industry. Mammalian ovaries play important roles during reproduction, including ovulation and hormone secretion, which are tightly regulated by specific microRNAs (miRNAs). In this study, we investigated the effects of specific miRNAs on porcine litter size. We compared the ovarian miRNAs of Yorkshire pigs with high (YH) and low (YL) litter sizes using Solexa sequencing technology. We identified 327 and 320 miRNAs in the ovaries of YH and YL pigs respectively. A total of 297 miRNAs were co-expressed; 30 and 23 miRNAs respectively were specifically expressed in the two libraries. A total of 83 novel miRNAs were predicted; 37 specific miRNAs were obtained, of which 21 miRNAs were upregulated and 16 miRNAs were downregulated in YH compared with YL. Additionally, 19 628 and 19 250 target genes were predicted in the two libraries respectively. The results revealed that specific miRNAs (i.e., miR-224, miR-99a, let-7c, miR-181c, miR-214 and miR-21) may affect porcine litter size. The results of this study will help in gaining understanding of the role of miRNAs in porcine litter size regulation.

  13. microRNAs in lupus

    PubMed Central

    ZAN, HONG; TAT, CONNIE; CASALI, PAOLO

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of an array of pathogenic autoantibodies, including high-affinity anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies, which plays an important role in disease development and progression. Lupus preferentially affects women during their reproductive years. The pathogenesis of lupus is contributed by both genetic factors and epigenetic modifications that arise from exposure to the environment. Epigenetic marks, including DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications and microRNAs (miRNAs), interact with genetic programs to regulate immune responses. Epigenetic modifications influence gene expression and modulate B cell functions, such as class switch DNA recombination (CSR), somatic hypermutation (SHM) and plasma cell differentiation, thereby informing the antibody response. Epigenetic dysregulation can result in aberrant antibody responses to exogenous antigens or self-antigens, such as chromatin, histones and dsDNA in lupus. miRNAs play key roles in the post-transcriptional regulation of most gene-regulatory pathways and regulate both the innate and the adaptive immune responses. In mice, dysregulation of miRNAs leads to aberrant immune responses and development of systemic autoimmunity. Altered miRNA expression has been reported in human autoimmune diseases, including lupus. The dysregulation of miRNAs in lupus could be the result of multiple environmental factors, such as sex hormones and viral or bacterial infection. Modulation of miRNA is a potential therapeutic strategy for lupus. PMID:24826805

  14. MicroRNAs and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kotaja, Noora

    2014-06-01

    In mammals, male gametes are produced inside the testis by spermatogenesis, which has three phases: mitotic proliferation of spermatogonia, meiosis of spermatocytes, and haploid differentiation of spermatids. The genome of male germ cells is actively transcribed to produce phase-specific gene expression patterns. Male germ cells have a complex transcriptome. In addition to protein-coding messenger RNAs, many noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), are produced. The miRNAs are important regulators of gene expression. They function mainly post-transcriptionally to control the stability or translation of their target messenger RNAs. The miRNAs are expressed in a cell-specific manner during spermatogenesis to participate in the control of each step of male germ cell differentiation. Genetically modified mouse models have demonstrated the importance of miRNA pathways for normal spermatogenesis, and functional studies have been designed to dissect the roles of specific miRNAs in distinct cell types. Clinical studies have exploited the well-defined expression profiles of miRNAs, and human spermatozoal or seminal plasma miRNAs have been explored as potential biomarkers for male factor infertility. This review article discusses the current findings that support the central role of miRNAs in the regulation of spermatogenesis and male fertility.

  15. Insight into temperature-dependent microRNA function in mammalian hibernators

    PubMed Central

    Biggar, Kyle K; Storey, Kenneth B

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian hibernation involves re-programming of metabolic functions, in part, facilitated by microRNA. Although much is known about microRNA function, we lack knowledge on low temperature microRNA target selection. It is possible that the thermodynamics of microRNA target selection could dictate unique temperature-dependent sets of microRNA targets for hibernators. PMID:27582076

  16. Developing microRNA therapeutics: approaching the unique complexities.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Aimee L; Levin, Arthur A

    2012-08-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by interfering with translation or stability of target transcripts. The importance of microRNAs for maintaining biological functions is illustrated by the fact that microRNAs are exploited in nature to regulate phenotypes, and by the diverse disease phenotypes that result when microRNAs are mutated or improperly expressed. Disease-associated microRNAs might therefore represent a new class of therapeutic targets. With the recent demonstration that inhibition of miR-122 reduces viral load in hepatitis C patients, microRNA modulators are no longer merely theoretical, but rather, have become strong candidate therapeutics. The complexity of microRNA biology offers a novel mechanism of action for therapeutic intervention but also poses unique challenges for the development of therapeutic modulators as drugs.

  17. Use of recombinant porcine β-defensin 2 as a medicated feed additive for weaned piglets

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zixin; Wang, Anru; Xie, Linqi; Song, Weiping; Wang, Jie; Yin, Zhe; Zhou, Dongsheng; Li, Fengqin

    2016-01-01

    Post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD) in piglets is associated with colonization of the intestine with bacterial pathogens. In this study, we evaluated the use of recombinant porcine β-defensin 2 (rpBD2) as a medicated feed additive for weaned piglets. The crude extract from the culture supernatant of rpBD2-expressing Pichia pastoris was used as a medicated feed additive for weaned piglets. Dietary treatments included a positive control (basal diet + antibiotics, designated PC) and three different rpBD2 treatments without antibiotics (basal diet supplemented with 1, 5, or 15 g of crude rpBD2/kg basal diet, designated 1PD, 5PD, and 15PD, respectively). Of all the treatments, 5PD had the greatest impact on the weaned piglets. It increased their body weight, average daily weight gain, average daily feed intake, and intestinal villus height in the duodenum and jejunum, and reduced the incidence of PWD. The diversity of the cecal digesta and mucosa microflora was compared between the weaned piglets in the PC and 5PD groups. Piglets treated with 5PD had lower diversity indices and fewer bacterial pathogens in their cecal digesta and mucosa than the PC group. Our results demonstrate that crude rpBD2 could provide an alternative to the traditional antibiotic feed additives given to weaned piglets. PMID:27225034

  18. Candidate chemosensory cells in the porcine stomach.

    PubMed

    Widmayer, Patricia; Breer, Heinz; Hass, Nicole

    2011-07-01

    A continuous chemosensory monitoring of the ingested food is of vital importance for adjusting digestive processes according to diet composition. Although any dysfunction of this surveillance system may be the cause of severe gastrointestinal disorders, information about the cellular and molecular basis of chemosensation in the gastrointestinal tract is limited. The porcine alimentary canal is considered as an appropriate model for the human gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, in this study we have investigated the gastric mucosa of swine for cells which express gustatory transduction elements such as TRPM5 or PLCβ2, and thus may represent candidate "chemosensors". It was found that the porcine stomach indeed contains cells expressing gustatory marker molecules; however, the morphology and topographic distribution of putative chemosensory cells varied significantly from that in mice. Whereas in the murine stomach these cells were clustered at a distinct region near the gastric entrance, no such compact cell cluster was found in the pig stomach. These results indicate substantial differences regarding the phenotype of candidate chemosensory cells of mice and swine and underline the importance of choosing the most suitable model organisms.

  19. Justifying clinical trials for porcine islet xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Cara E; Korbutt, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Edmonton Protocol encouraged a great deal of optimism that a cell-based cure for type I diabetes could be achieved. However, donor organ shortages prevent islet transplantation from being a widespread solution as the supply cannot possibly equal the demand. Porcine islet xenotransplantation has the potential to address these shortages, and recent preclinical and clinical trials show promising scientific support. Consequently, it is important to consider whether the current science meets the ethical requirements for moving toward clinical trials. Despite the potential risks and the scientific unknowns that remain to be investigated, there is optimism regarding the xenotransplantation of some types of tissue, and enough evidence has been gathered to ethically justify clinical trials for the most safe and advanced area of research, porcine islet transplantation. Researchers must make a concerted effort to maintain a positive image for xenotransplantation, as a few well-publicized failed trials could irrevocably damage public perception of xenotransplantation. Because all of society carries the burden of risk, it is important that the public be involved in the decision to proceed. As new information from preclinical and clinical trials develops, policy decisions should be frequently updated. If at any point evidence shows that islet xenotransplantation is unsafe, then clinical trials will no longer be justified and they should be halted. However, as of now, the expected benefit of an unlimited supply of islets, combined with adequate informed consent, justifies clinical trials for islet xenotransplantation.

  20. Phenol esterase activity of porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Joseph A; Smith, Leslie J; Evans, Kervin O; Compton, David L

    2015-01-01

    The alkyl esters of plant-derived phenols may serve as slow-release sources for cutaneous delivery of antioxidants. The ability of skin esterases to hydrolyze phenolic esters was examined. Esters of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol were prepared from decanoic and lipoic acids. Ferulic acid was esterified with octadecanol, glycerol, and dioleoylglycerol. These phenolic derivatives were treated in taurodeoxycholate microemulsion and unilamellar liposomes with ex vivo porcine skin and an aqueous extract of the skin. Extracted esterases hydrolyzed the microemulsions at rates in the order: tyrosyl lipoate > tyrosyl decanoate > hydroxytyrosyl lipoate > hydroxytyrosyl decanoate. The tyrosyl decanoate was subject to comparatively little hydrolysis (10-30% after 24h) when incorporated into liposomes, while hydroxytyrosyl decanoate in liposomes was not hydrolyzed at all by the skin extract. Ferulate esters were not hydrolyzed by the extract in aqueous buffer, microemulsion, nor liposomes. Tyrosyl decanoate applied topically to skin explants in microemulsion were readily hydrolyzed within 4h, while hydrolysis was minimal when applied in liposomes. These findings indicate that porcine skin displays a general esterase activity toward medium-chain esters of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol, which can be moderated by the physiochemical properties of the lipid vehicle, but no feruloyl esterase activity.

  1. Progesterone improves porcine in vitro fertilisation system.

    PubMed

    Malo, Clara; Gil, Lydia; Cano, Rafael; Martinez, Felisa; Gonzalez, Noelia

    2014-03-01

    In an effort to improve the quality of in vitro produced porcine embryos, the effect of progestagens - progesterone analogues - on the in vitro developmental competence of porcine oocytes was studied. A total of 1421 in vitro matured oocytes, from 4 replicates, were inseminated with frozen-thawed spermatozoa. Progestagens were added to late maturation and embryo cultures (10 IU/ml). Fertilisation success (pre-maturation, penetration, monospermy and efficiency) and nuclear maturation were evaluated. There were no differences among prematuration rates between groups (P = 0.221). Penetration rates were higher (P < 0.001) in the presence of progestagens (75.0%) as compared to the control (51.7%). However, no differences were observed in monospermy percentages (P = 0.246). The results indicated that supplementation with progestagens increased the efficiency of the in vitro fertilisation system (P < 0.001). An additional beneficial effect was observed in nuclear maturation with progestagens (P = 0.035). In summary, progestagen supplementation is an important factor to improve the in vitro fertilisation procedure.

  2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization investigation of potentially pathogenic bacteria involved in neonatal porcine diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal diarrhea is a multifactorial condition commonly present on pig farms and leads to economic losses due to increased morbidity and mortality of piglets. Immature immune system and lack of fully established microbiota at birth predispose neonatal piglets to infection with enteric pathogens. The microorganisms that for decades have been associated with enteritis and diarrhea in suckling piglets are: rotavirus A, coronavirus, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), Clostridium perfringens type C, Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., Cystoisospora suis and Strongyloides ransomi. However, in recent years, the pig industry has experienced an increased number of neonatal diarrhea cases in which the above mentioned pathogens are no longer detected. Potentially pathogenic bacteria have recently received focus in the research on the possible etiology of neonatal diarrhea not caused by common pathogens. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the role of E. coli, Enterococcus spp., C. perfringens and C. difficile in the pathogenesis of neonatal porcine diarrhea with no established casual agents. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes was applied on the fixed intestinal tissue samples from 51 diarrheic and 50 non-diarrheic piglets collected from four Danish farms during outbreaks of neonatal diarrhea not caused by well-known enteric pathogens. Furthermore, an association between the presence of these bacteria and histological lesions was evaluated. Results The prevalence of fluorescence signals specific for E. coli, C. perfringens and C. difficile was similar in both groups of piglets. However, Enterococcus spp. was primarily detected in the diarrheic piglets. Furthermore, adherent bacteria were detected in 37 % diarrheic and 14 % non-diarrheic piglets. These bacteria were identified as E. coli and Enterococcus spp. and their presence in the intestinal mucosa was associated with histopathological changes. Conclusions The

  3. Cell-free extract from porcine induced pluripotent stem cells can affect porcine somatic cell nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    No, Jin-Gu; Choi, Mi-Kyung; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Yoo, Jae Gyu; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Park, Jin-Ki; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment of somatic cells with undifferentiated cell extracts, such as embryonic stem cells and mammalian oocytes, is an attractive alternative method for reprogramming control. The properties of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are similar to those of embryonic stem cells; however, no studies have reported somatic cell nuclear reprogramming using iPSC extracts. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of porcine iPSC extracts treatment on porcine ear fibroblasts and early development of porcine cloned embryos produced from porcine ear skin fibroblasts pretreated with the porcine iPSC extracts. The Chariot(TM) reagent system was used to deliver the iPSC extracts into cultured porcine ear skin fibroblasts. The iPSC extracts-treated cells (iPSC-treated cells) were cultured for 3 days and used for analyzing histone modification and somatic cell nuclear transfer. Compared to the results for nontreated cells, the trimethylation status of histone H3 lysine residue 9 (H3K9) in the iPSC-treated cells significantly decreased. The expression of Jmjd2b, the H3K9 trimethylation-specific demethylase gene, significantly increased in the iPSC-treated cells; conversely, the expression of the proapoptotic genes, Bax and p53, significantly decreased. When the iPSC-treated cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes, no differences were observed in blastocyst development and total cell number in blastocysts compared with the results for control cells. However, H3K9 trimethylation of pronuclear-stage-cloned embryos significantly decreased in the iPSC-treated cells. Additionally, Bax and p53 gene expression in the blastocysts was significantly lower in iPSC-treated cells than in control cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show that an extracts of porcine iPSCs can affect histone modification and gene expression in porcine ear skin fibroblasts and cloned embryos.

  4. Inhibition of Matriptase Activity Results in Decreased Intestinal Epithelial Monolayer Integrity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pászti-Gere, E.; McManus, S.; Meggyesházi, N.; Balla, P.; Gálfi, P.; Steinmetzer, T.

    2015-01-01

    Barrier dysfunction in inflammatory bowel diseases implies enhanced paracellular flux and lowered transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) causing effective invasion of enteropathogens or altered intestinal absorption of toxins and drug compounds. To elucidate the role of matriptase-driven cell surface proteolysis in the maintenance of intestinal barrier function, the 3-amidinophenylalanine-derived matriptase inhibitor, MI-432 was used on porcine IPEC-J2 cell monolayer. Studies with two fluorescent probes revealed that short (2 h) treatment with MI-432 caused an altered distribution of oxidative species between intracellular and extracellular spaces in IPEC-J2 cells. This perturbation was partially compensated when administration of inhibitor continued for up to 48 h. Significant decrease in TER between apical and basolateral compartments of MI-432-treated IPEC-J2 cell monolayers proved that matriptase is one of the key effectors in the maintenance of barrier integrity. Changes in staining pattern of matriptase and in localization of the junctional protein occludin were observed suggesting that inhibition of matriptase by MI-432 can also exert an effect on paracellular gate opening via modulation of tight junctional protein assembly. This study confirms that non-tumorigenic IPEC-J2 cells can be used as an appropriate small intestinal model for the in vitro characterization of matriptase-related effects on intestinal epithelium. These findings demonstrate indirectly that matriptase plays a pivotal role in the development of barrier integrity; thus matriptase dysfunction can facilitate the occurence of leaky gut syndrome observed in intestinal inflammatory diseases. PMID:26488575

  5. Intestinal expression of TFF and related genes during postnatal development in a piglet probiotic trial.

    PubMed

    Scholven, Jutta; Taras, David; Sharbati, Soroush; Schön, Jennifer; Gabler, Christoph; Huber, Otmar; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, Dirk; Blin, Nikolaus; Einspanier, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides provide protective and reparative effects by enhancing epithelial integrity and promoting mucosal restitution. TFF peptide expression is induced after mucosal damage. These processes are of central physiological relevance during the postnatal intestinal development and are strongly influenced during the weaning period. In piglets, weaning at early maturation stages frequently causes mucosal inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate postnatal intestinal TFF expression in a piglet probiotic trial. Low intestinal TFF2 expression was measured at early maturation stages. Weaning, however, was associated with a distinct response of increased TFF2 expression, indicating an important role in enhancing mucosal integrity. In the distal jejunum and ileum weaning could as well be associated with increased TFF3 mRNA levels. Differential TFF1 expression was not detected. Furthermore, TFF2 localization studies in different intestinal loci were performed by means of immunohistochemistry. Expression of selected genes (TGFA, EGFR, Cox-2) known to promote TFF signaling showed differential expression pattern as well, thereby providing further functional background. Furthermore, the expression patterns of EGFR observed in this study contribute to an advanced view of previous findings of EGFR regulation mainly obtained in rodents. An upregulated EGFR expression during early postnatal development suggests a local relevance to porcine intestinal maturation. However, a feed supplementation with the probiotic strain Enterococcus faecium did not influence TFF expression.

  6. Genetic Characterization of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 from Pigs with Porcine Circovirus Associated Diseases in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Pereda, Ariel; Piñeyro, Pablo; Bratanich, Ana; Quiroga, María Alejandra; Bucafusco, Danilo; Craig, María Isabel; Cappuccio, Javier; Machuca, Mariana; Rimondi, Agustina; Dibárbora, Marina; Sanguinetti, Hector Ramón; Perfumo, Carlos Juan

    2011-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV-2) has been associated with syndromes grouped by the term porcine circovirus associated diseases (PCVAD). The PCV-2 isolates have been grouped into two major groups or genotypes according to their nucleotide sequence of whole genomes and/or ORF-2: PCV-2b, which have, in turn, been subdivided into three clusters (1A–1C), and PCV-2a, which has been subdivided into five clusters (2A–2E). In the present study, we obtained 16 sequences of PCV-2 from different farms from 2003 to 2008, from animals with confirmatory diagnosis of PCVAD. Since results showed an identity of 99.8% among them, they were grouped within a common cluster 1A-B. This preliminary study suggests a stable circulation of PCV-2b among the Argentinean pig population. PMID:23738099

  7. Activation of porcine cytomegalovirus, but not porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus, in pig-to-baboon xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Nicolas J; Livingston, Christine; Knosalla, Christoph; Barth, Rolf N; Yamamoto, Shin; Gollackner, Bernd; Dor, Frank J M F; Buhler, Leo; Sachs, David H; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Cooper, David K C; Fishman, Jay A

    2004-05-01

    Tissue-invasive disease due to porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) has been demonstrated after pig-to-baboon solid-organ xenotransplantation. Porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus (PLHV)-1 is associated with B cell proliferation and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in swine but has not been observed in pig-to-primate xenotransplantation. Activation of PCMV and PLHV-1 was investigated in 22 pig-to-baboon xenotransplants by use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction. PCMV was found in all xenografts; increased viral replication occurred in 68% of xenografts during immunosuppression. PLHV-1 was found in 12 xenografts (55%); no increases in viral replication occurred during immunosuppression. Control immunosuppressed swine coinfected with PCMV and PLHV-1 had activation of PCMV but not PLHV-1. PCMV, but not PLHV-1, is activated in solid-organ xenotransplantation.

  8. Pervasive microRNA Duplication in Chelicerates: Insights from the Embryonic microRNA Repertoire of the Spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Daniel J.; Ninova, Maria; Hilbrant, Maarten; Arif, Saad; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Ronshaugen, Matthew; McGregor, Alistair P.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small (∼22 nt) noncoding RNAs that repress translation and therefore regulate the production of proteins from specific target mRNAs. microRNAs have been found to function in diverse aspects of gene regulation within animal development and many other processes. Among invertebrates, both conserved and novel, lineage specific, microRNAs have been extensively studied predominantly in holometabolous insects such as Drosophila melanogaster. However little is known about microRNA repertoires in other arthropod lineages such as the chelicerates. To understand the evolution of microRNAs in this poorly sampled subphylum, we characterized the microRNA repertoire expressed during embryogenesis of the common house spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum. We identified a total of 148 microRNAs in P. tepidariorum representing 66 families. Approximately half of these microRNA families are conserved in other metazoans, while the remainder are specific to this spider. Of the 35 conserved microRNAs families 15 had at least two copies in the P. tepidariorum genome. A BLAST-based approach revealed a similar pattern of duplication in other spiders and a scorpion, but not among other chelicerates and arthropods, with the exception of a horseshoe crab. Among the duplicated microRNAs we found examples of lineage-specific tandem duplications, and the duplication of entire microRNA clusters in three spiders, a scorpion, and in a horseshoe crab. Furthermore, we found that paralogs of many P. tepidariorum microRNA families exhibit arm switching, which suggests that duplication was often followed by sub- or neofunctionalization. Our work shows that understanding the evolution of microRNAs in the chelicerates has great potential to provide insights into the process of microRNA duplication and divergence and the evolution of animal development. PMID:27324919

  9. MicroRNA expression profiling and DNA methylation signature for deregulated microRNA in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Juan; Díaz-Lagares, Angel; Salgado, Rocío; Servitje, Octavio; Climent, Fina; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L; Pérez-Ferriols, Amparo; Garcia-Muret, Maria P; Estrach, Teresa; Garcia, Mar; Nonell, Lara; Esteller, Manel; Pujol, Ramon M; Espinet, Blanca; Gallardo, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs usually regulate gene expression negatively, and aberrant expression has been involved in the development of several types of cancers. Microarray profiling of microRNA expression was performed to define a microRNA signature in a series of mycosis fungoides tumor stage (MFt, n=21) and CD30+ primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (CD30+ cALCL, n=11) samples in comparison with inflammatory dermatoses (ID, n=5). Supervised clustering confirmed a distinctive microRNA profile for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) with respect to ID. A 40 microRNA signature was found in MFt including upregulated onco-microRNAs (miR-146a, miR-142-3p/5p, miR-21, miR-181a/b, and miR-155) and downregulated tumor-suppressor microRNAs (miR-200ab/429 cluster, miR-10b, miR-193b, miR-141/200c, and miR-23b/27b). Regarding CD30+ cALCL, 39 differentially expressed microRNAs were identified. Particularly, overexpression of miR-155, miR-21, or miR-142-3p/5p and downregulation of the miR-141/200c clusters were observed. DNA methylation in microRNA gene promoters, as expression regulatory mechanism for deregulated microRNAs, was analyzed using Infinium 450K array and approximately one-third of the differentially expressed microRNAs showed significant DNA methylation differences. Two different microRNA methylation signatures for MFt and CD30+ cALCL were found. Correlation analysis showed an inverse relationship for microRNA promoter methylation and microRNA expression. These results reveal a subgroup-specific epigenetically regulated microRNA signatures for MFt and CD30+ cALCL patients.

  10. Uptake and Function Studies of Maternal Milk-derived MicroRNAs*

    PubMed Central

    Title, Alexandra C.; Denzler, Rémy; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of cell-autonomous gene expression that influence many biological processes. They are also released from cells and are present in virtually all body fluids, including blood, urine, saliva, sweat, and milk. The functional role of nutritionally obtained extracellular miRNAs is controversial, and irrefutable demonstration of exogenous miRNA uptake by cells and canonical miRNA function is still lacking. Here we show that miRNAs are present at high levels in the milk of lactating mice. To investigate intestinal uptake of miRNAs in newborn mice, we employed genetic models in which newborn miR-375 and miR-200c/141 knockout mice received milk from wild-type foster mothers. Analysis of the intestinal epithelium, blood, liver, and spleen revealed no evidence for miRNA uptake. miR-375 levels in hepatocytes were at the limit of detection and remained orders of magnitude below the threshold for target gene regulation (between 1000 and 10,000 copies/cell). Furthermore, our study revealed rapid degradation of milk miRNAs in intestinal fluid. Together, our results indicate a nutritional rather than gene-regulatory role of miRNAs in the milk of newborn mice. PMID:26240150

  11. Porcine circovirus type 2 detection in in vitro produced porcine blastocysts after virus sperm exposure.

    PubMed

    Galeati, Giovanna; Zannoni, Augusta; Spinaci, Marcella; Bucci, Diego; Ostanello, Fabio; Panarese, Serena; Tamanini, Carlo; Sarli, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the capability of semen experimentally infected with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) to produce porcine blastocysts PCR positive for PCV2. Embryos were obtained from in vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) of porcine oocytes or by parthenogenesis. Sperm suspension was exposed to PCV2b and utilized for IVF. PCV2 spiked semen did not reveal any reduction in sperm viability or motility but its ability to produce infected blastocysts was irrelevant as only one out of 15 blastocysts obtained by IVF were PCV2b; however two blastocysts were PCV2a positive. Furthermore, the presence of PCV2 was demonstrated also in embryos obtained by parthenogenesis (one out of 17 was PCV2b and one PCV2a positive). Even if PCV2 firmly attaches to the surface of spermatozoa, experimentally spiked sperm were not effective in infecting oocytes during IVF and in producing PCR positive embryos. The infected blastocysts we obtained derived most probably from infected oocytes recovered at the abattoir.

  12. Functional analysis of the porcine USP18 and its role during porcine arterivirus replication.

    PubMed

    Ait-Ali, Tahar; Wilson, Alison W; Finlayson, Heather; Carré, Wilfrid; Ramaiahgari, Sreenivasa Chakravarthy; Westcott, David G; Waterfall, Martin; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Drew, Trevor W; Bishop, Stephen C; Archibald, Alan L

    2009-06-15

    Emerging evidence places deubiquitylation at the core of a multitude of regulatory processes, ranging from cell growth to innate immune response and health, such as cancer, degenerative and infectious diseases. Little is known about deubiquitylation in pig and arterivirus infection. This report provides information on the biochemical and functional role of the porcine USP18 during innate immune response to the porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV). We have shown that UBP gene is the ortholog of the murine USP18 (Ubp43) gene and the human ubiquitin specific protease 18 (USP18) gene and encodes a biochemically functional de-ubiquitin enzyme which inhibits signalling pathways that lead to IFN-stimulating response element (ISRE) promotor regulation. Furthermore we have demonstrated that overexpression of the porcine USP18 leads to reduced replication and/or growth of PRRSV. Our data contrast with the conclusion of numerous reports demonstrating that USP18-deficient mice are highly resistant to viral and bacterial infections and to oncogenic transformation by BCR-ABL, and highlight USP18 as a potential target gene that promotes reduced replication of PRRSV.

  13. Biological and binding activities of ovine and porcine prolactins in porcine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of prolactin receptors may play a critical role in regulating growth and development of the mammary gland during gestation and tumor development; however, the discrepancy between specific binding of ovine prolactin (oPRL) and porcine prolactin (pPRL) in porcine mammary tissue was disturbing. It was possible that /sup 125/I-oPRL may be an unsuitable ligand for the procine prolactin receptor. The validate the use of oPRL in binding assays, the biological and binding activities of oPRL and pPRL were compared. A lactogenic bioassay of pPRL was developed using porcine mammary explants cultured in Medium 199 containing insulin, cortisol, and pPRL. The potencies of oPRL and pPRL were compared using this bioassay. Oxidation of glucose and incorporation of glucose into lipids were similarly enhanced by physiological concentrations of both oPRL and pPRL. However, specific binding of /sup 125/I-oPRL was 20%, while less than 1% of /sup 125/I-pPRL was bound. /sup 125/I-oPRL bound to high affinity sites.

  14. Chronic intestinal ischaemia: measurement of the total splanchnic blood flow.

    PubMed

    Zacho, Helle D

    2013-04-01

    A redundant collateral network between the intestinal arteries is present at all times. In case of ischaemia in the gastrointestinal tract, the collateral blood supply can develop further, thus accommodating the demand for oxygen even in the presence of significant stenosis or occlusion of the intestinal arteries without clinical symptoms of intestinal ischaemia. Symptoms of ischemia develop when the genuine and collateral blood supply no longer can accommodate the need for oxygen. Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of obliteration in the intestinal arteries. In chronic intestinal ischaemia (CII), the fasting splanchnic blood flow (SBF) is sufficient, but the postprandial increase in SBF is inadequate and abdominal pain will therefore develop in relation to food intake causing the patient to eat smaller meals at larger intervals with a resulting weight loss. Traditionally, the CII-diagnosis has exclusively been based upon morphology (angiography) of the intestinal arteries; however, substantial discrepancies between CII-symptoms and the presence of atherosclerosis/stenosis in the intestinal arteries have been described repeatedly in the literature impeding the diagnosis of CII. This PhD thesis explores a method to determine the total SBF and its potential use as a diagnostic tool in patients suspected to suffer from CII. The SBF can be measured using a continuous infusion of a tracer and catheterisation of a hepatic vein and an artery. By measuring the SBF before and after a standard meal it is possible to assess the ability or inability to enhance the SBF and thereby diagnosing CII. In Study I, measurement of SBF was tested against angiography in a group of patients suspected to suffer from CII due to pain and weight loss. A very good agreement between the postprandial increase in SBF and angiography was found. The method was validated against a well-established method independent of the hepatic extraction of tracer using pAH in a porcine model (study II

  15. Partial Optimization of the 5-Terminal Codon Increased a Recombination Porcine Pancreatic Lipase (opPPL) Expression in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Chen, Dan; Tang, Jiayong; Jia, Gang; Long, Dingbiao; Liu, Guangmang; Chen, Xiaoling; Shang, Haiying

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic lipase plays a key role in intestinal digestion of feed fat, and is often deficient in young animals such as weaning piglets. The objective of this study was to express and characterize a partial codon optimized porcine pancreatic lipase (opPPL). A 537 bp cDNA fragment encoding N-terminus amino acid residue of the mature porcine pancreatic lipase was synthesized according to the codon bias of Pichia pastoris and ligated to the full-length porcine pancreatic lipase cDNA fragment. The codon optimized PPL was cloned into the pPICZαA (Invitrogen, Beijing, China) vector. After the resultant opPPL/pPICZαΑ plasmid was transformed into P.pastoris, the over-expressed extracellular opPPL containing a His-tag to the C terminus was purified using Ni Sepharose affinity column (GE Healthcare, Piscataway, NJ, USA), and was characterized against the native enzyme (commercial PPL from porcine pancreas, Sigma). The opPPL exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 52 kDa, and showed optimal temperature (40°C), optimal pH (8.0), Km (0.041 mM), and Vmax (2.008 µmol.mg protein −1.min−1) similar to those of the commercial enzyme with p-NPP as the substrate. The recombinant enzyme was stable at 60°C, but lost 80% (P<0.05) of its activity after exposure to heat ≥60°C for 20 min. The codon optimization increased opPPL yield for ca 4 folds (146 mg.L−1 vs 36 mg.L−1) and total enzyme activity increased about 5 folds (1900 IU.L−1 vs 367 IU.L−1) compared with those native naPPL/pPICZαΑ tranformant. Comparison of gene copies and mRNA profiles between the two strains indicated the increased rePPL yields may partly be ascribed to the increased protein translational efficiency after codon optimization. In conclusion, we successfully optimized 5-terminal of porcine pancreatic lipase encoding gene and over-expressed the gene in P. pastoris as an extracellular, functional enzyme. The recombination enzyme demonstrates a potential for future use as an animal feed

  16. Unusual intestinal talcosis.

    PubMed

    Anani, P A; Ribaux, C; Gardiol, D

    1987-11-01

    A case of intestinal talcosis in a 46-year-old man is reported. At the age of 27, the patient was treated for pulmonary tuberculosis with tablets containing talc (183 g talc per 2,670 g total drug intake) over a period of 28 months. Eighteen years later, the patient was hospitalized for abdominal pain that remained refractory to antacids; he subsequently underwent a right hemicolectomy. Light-microscopic examination revealed a prominent fibrosis of the intestinal wall in which birefringent particles were demonstrated by polarized light. Using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, an analysis of these particles showed that they were predominantly composed of silicon and magnesium as well as small amounts of phosphorus, sulphur, calcium, and iron--the spectrum typically associated with talc. We believe that the source of this talc is the tablets ingested by the patient during prior antituberculosis therapy.

  17. Porcine radial artery decellularization by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Jun; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Nam, Kwangoo; Higami, Tetsuya; Kishida, Akio

    2015-11-01

    Many types of decellularized tissues have been studied and some have been commercially used in clinics. In this study, small-diameter vascular grafts were made using HHP to decellularize porcine radial arteries. One decellularization method, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), has been used to prepare the decellularized porcine tissues. Low-temperature treatment was effective in preserving collagen and collagen structures in decellularized porcine carotid arteries. The collagen and elastin structures and mechanical properties of HHP-decellularized radial arteries were similar to those of untreated radial arteries. Xenogeneic transplantation (into rats) was performed using HHP-decellularized radial arteries and an untreated porcine radial artery. Two weeks after transplantation into rat carotid arteries, the HHP-decellularized radial arteries were patent and without thrombosis. In addition, the luminal surface of each decellularized artery was covered by recipient endothelial cells and the arterial medium was fully infiltrated with recipient cells.

  18. Staufen Negatively Modulates MicroRNA Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhiji; Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Morrissey, David; Ambros, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen has been implicated in various posttranscriptional gene regulatory processes. Here, we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Staufen, STAU-1, functionally interacts with microRNAs. Loss-of-function mutations of stau-1 significantly suppress phenotypes of let-7 family microRNA mutants, a hypomorphic allele of dicer, and a lsy-6 microRNA partial loss-of-function mutant. Furthermore, STAU-1 modulates the activity of lin-14, a target of lin-4 and let-7 family microRNAs, and this modulation is abolished when the 3′ untranslated region of lin-14 is removed. Deep sequencing of small RNA cDNA libraries reveals no dramatic change in the levels of microRNAs or other small RNA populations between wild-type and stau-1 mutants, with the exception of certain endogenous siRNAs in the WAGO pathway. The modulation of microRNA activity by STAU-1 does not seem to be associated with the previously reported enhanced exogenous RNAi (Eri) phenotype of stau-1 mutants, since eri-1 exhibits the opposite effect on microRNA activity. Altogether, our results suggest that STAU-1 negatively modulates microRNA activity downstream of microRNA biogenesis, possibly by competing with microRNAs for binding on the 3′ untranslated region of target mRNAs. PMID:26921297

  19. Elenoside increases intestinal motility

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, E; Alonso, SJ; Navarro, R; Trujillo, J; Jorge, E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of elenoside, an arylnaph-thalene lignan from Justicia hyssopifolia, on gastro-intestinal motility in vivo and in vitro in rats. METHODS: Routine in vivo experimental assessments were catharsis index, water percentage of boluses, intestinal transit, and codeine antagonism. The groups included were vehicle control (propylene glycol-ethanol-plant oil-tween 80), elenoside (i.p. 25 and 50 mg/kg), cisapride (i.p. 10 mg/kg), and codeine phosphate (intragastric route, 50 mg/kg). In vitro approaches used isolated rat intestinal tissues (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum). The effects of elenoside at concentrations of 3.2 x 10-4, 6.4 x 10-4 and 1.2 x 10-3 mol/L, and cisapride at 10-6 mol/L were investigated. RESULTS: Elenoside in vivo produced an increase in the catharsis index and water percentage of boluses and in the percentage of distance traveled by a suspension of activated charcoal. Codeine phosphate antagonized the effect of 25 mg/kg of elenoside. In vitro, elenoside in duodenum, jejunum and ileum produced an initial decrease in the contraction force followed by an increase. Elenoside resulted in decreased intestinal frequency in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The in vitro and in vivo effects of elenoside were similar to those produced by cisapride. CONCLUSION: Elenoside is a lignan with an action similar to that of purgative and prokinetics drugs. Elenoside, could be an alternative to cisapride in treatment of gastrointestinal diseases as well as a preventive therapy for the undesirable gastrointestinal effects produced by opioids used for mild to moderate pain. PMID:17131476

  20. MicroRNAs in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Context: Traditionally, factors predisposing to diseases are either genetic (“nature”) or environmental, also known as lifestyle-related (“nurture”). Papillary thyroid cancer is an example of a disease where the respective roles of these factors are surprisingly unclear. Evidence Acquisition: Original articles and reviews summarizing our current understanding of the role of microRNA in thyroid tumorigenesis are reviewed and evaluated. Conclusion: The genetic predisposition to papillary thyroid cancer appears to consist of a variety of gene mutations that are mostly either of low penetrance and common or of high penetrance but rare. Moreover, they likely interact with each other and with environmental factors. The culpable genes may not be of the traditional, protein-coding type. A limited number of noncoding candidate genes have indeed been described, and we propose here that the failure to find mutations in traditional protein-coding genes is not coincidental. Instead, a more likely hypothesis is that changes in the expression of multiple regulatory RNA genes, e.g. microRNAs, may be a major mechanism. Our review of the literature strongly supports this notion in that a polymorphism in one microRNAs (miR-146a) predisposes to thyroid carcinoma, whereas numerous other microRNAs are involved in signaling (mainly PTEN/PI3K/AKT and T3/THRB) that is central to thyroid carcinogenesis. PMID:21865360

  1. microRNA in Human Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Iris; Kotaja, Noora; Goldman-Wohl, Debra; Imbar, Tal

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs constitute a large family of approximately 21-nucleotide-long, noncoding RNAs. They emerged more than 20 years ago as key posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. The regulatory role of these small RNA molecules has recently begun to be explored in the human reproductive system. microRNAs have been shown to play an important role in control of reproductive functions, especially in the processes of oocyte maturation, folliculogenesis, corpus luteum function, implantation, and early embryonic development. Knockout of Dicer, the cytoplasmic enzyme that cleaves the pre-miRNA to its mature form, results in postimplantation embryonic lethality in several animal models, attributing to these small RNA vital functions in reproduction and development. Another intriguing characteristic of microRNAs is their presence in body fluids in a remarkably stable form that is protected from endogenous RNase activity. In this chapter we will describe the current knowledge on microRNAs, specifically relating to human gonadal cells. We will focus on their role in the ovarian physiologic process and ovulation dysfunction, regulation of spermatogenesis and male fertility, and putative involvement in human normal and aberrant trophoblast differentiation and invasion through the process of placentation.

  2. The allometry of rodent intestines.

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Barry G

    2010-06-01

    This study examined the allometry of the small intestine, caecum, colon and large intestine of rodents (n = 51) using a phylogenetically informed approach. Strong phylogenetic signal was detected in the data for the caecum, colon and large intestine, but not for the small intestine. Most of the phylogenetic signal could be attributed to clade effects associated with herbivorous versus omnivorous rodents. The herbivorous rodents have longer caecums, colons and large intestines, but their small intestines, with the exception of the desert otomyine rodents, are no different to those of omnivorous rodents. Desert otomyine rodents have significantly shorter small intestines than all other rodents, reflecting a possible habitat effect and providing a partial explanation for the low basal metabolic rates of small desert mammals. However, the desert otomyines do not have shorter colons or large intestines, challenging claims for adaptation to water retention in arid environments. Data for the Arvicolidae revealed significantly larger caecums and colons, and hence longer large intestines, with no compensatory reduction in the length of the small intestine, which may explain how the smallest mammalian herbivores manage to meet the demands of a very high mass-specific metabolic rate. This study provides phylogenetically corrected allometries suitable for future prediction testing.

  3. Requirement for capsular antigen KX105 and fimbrial antigen CS1541 in the pathogenicity of porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O8:KX105 strains.

    PubMed Central

    Broes, A; Fairbrother, J M; Jacques, M; Larivière, S

    1989-01-01

    The requirement for capsular antigen KX105 and fimbrial antigen CS1541 in the pathogenicity of porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O8:KX105 strains lacking the colonization factor antigens K88, K99, 987P and F41 was investigated using two encapsulated strains and their acapsular variants, one of which produced the fimbrial antigen CS1541 in vitro. None of the strains adhered in vitro to enterocytes isolated from newborn colostrum-deprived piglets. All of the strains caused diarrhea in orally infected, hysterotomy-derived, colostrum-deprived piglets although a great variability in the clinical response of the piglets was observed. Colonization of the small intestine of infected piglets by these strains was only moderate and no differences in the ability to colonize the small intestine was noted between the strains. All of the strains reacted in the indirect fluorescent antibody test with both CS1541 and 987P antisera when applied to organisms in the intestines of infected piglets. A control strain expressing the 987P fimbrial adhesin also reacted with the CS1541 antiserum applied to organisms in the intestines of an infected piglet. It was concluded that capsular antigen KX105 was not essential for intestinal colonization and production of diarrhea in hysterotomy-derived colostrum-deprived pigs, and that fimbrial antigen CS1541 does not promote in vitro adherence to enterocyte brush borders but could be important in bacterial colonization in vivo. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2563336

  4. Alcohol and the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  5. Porcine skin flow-through diffusion cell system.

    PubMed

    Baynes, R E

    2001-11-01

    Porcine Skin Flow-Through Diffusion Cell System (Ronald E. Baynes, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina). Porcine skin can be used in a diffusion cell apparatus to study the rate and extent of absorption of topically applied chemicals through the skin. Although the skin of a number of animals can be used in this system, that of the pig most closely approximates human skin anatomically and physiologically.

  6. Lin-28 promotes symmetric stem cell division and drives adaptive growth in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Huan; Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-10-15

    Stem cells switch between asymmetric and symmetric division to expand in number as tissues grow during development and in response to environmental changes. The stem cell intrinsic proteins controlling this switch are largely unknown, but one candidate is the Lin-28 pluripotency factor. A conserved RNA-binding protein that is downregulated in most animals as they develop from embryos to adults, Lin-28 persists in populations of adult stem cells. Its function in these cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we report that Lin-28 is highly enriched in adult intestinal stem cells in the Drosophila intestine. lin-28 null mutants are homozygous viable but display defects in this population of cells, which fail to undergo a characteristic food-triggered expansion in number and have reduced rates of symmetric division as well as reduced insulin signaling. Immunoprecipitation of Lin-28-bound mRNAs identified Insulin-like Receptor (InR), forced expression of which completely rescues lin-28-associated defects in intestinal stem cell number and division pattern. Furthermore, this stem cell activity of lin-28 is independent of one well-known lin-28 target, the microRNA let-7, which has limited expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results identify Lin-28 as a stem cell intrinsic factor that boosts insulin signaling in intestinal progenitor cells and promotes their symmetric division in response to nutrients, defining a mechanism through which Lin-28 controls the adult stem cell division patterns that underlie tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  7. Comparison of microRNA expression levels between initial and recurrent glioblastoma specimens.

    PubMed

    Ilhan-Mutlu, Aysegül; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Berghoff, Anna Sophie; Widhalm, Georg; Marosi, Christine; Wagner, Ludwig; Preusser, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent primary brain tumour in adults. Recent therapeutic advances increased patient's survival, but tumour recurrence inevitably occurs. The pathobiological mechanisms involved in glioblastoma recurrence are still unclear. MicroRNAs are small RNAs proposed o have important roles for cancer including proliferation, aggressiveness and metastases development. There exist only few data on the involvement of microRNAs in glioblastoma recurrence. We selected the following 7 microRNAs with potential relevance for glioblastoma pathobiology by means of a comprehensive literature search: microRNA-10b, microRNA-21, microRNA-181b, microRNA-181c, microRNA-195, microRNA-221 and microRNA-222. We further selected 15 primary glioblastoma patients, of whom formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissue (FFPE) of the initial and recurrence surgery were available. All patients had received first line treatment consisting of postoperative combined radiochemotherapy with temozolomide (n = 15). Non-neoplastic brain tissue samples from 3 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy served as control. The expression of the microRNAs were analysed by RT-qPCR. These were correlated with each other and with clinical parameters. All microRNAs showed detectable levels of expressions in glioblastoma group, whereas microRNA-10b was not detectable in epilepsy patients. MicroRNAs except microRNA-21 showed significantly higher levels in epilepsy patients when compared to the levels of first resection of glioblastoma. Comparison of microRNA levels between first and second resections revealed no significant change. Cox regression analyses showed no significant association of microRNA expression levels in the tumor tissue with progression free survival times. Expression levels of microRNA-10b, microRNA-21, microRNA-181b, microRNA-181c, microRNA-195, microRNA-221 and microRNA-222 do not differ significantly between initial and recurrent glioblastoma.

  8. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I; Trujillo, María E; Mendoza, Susana E; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains.

  9. Tiamulin resistance in porcine Brachyspira pilosicoli isolates.

    PubMed

    Pringle, M; Landén, A; Franklin, A

    2006-02-01

    There are few studies on antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira pilosicoli, therefore this study was performed to investigate the situation among isolates from pigs. The tiamulin and tylosin susceptibility was determined by broth dilution for 93 and 86 porcine B. pilosicoli isolates, respectively. The isolates came from clinical samples taken in Swedish pig herds during the years 2002 and 2003. The tylosin minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was >16 microg/ml for 50% (n=43) of the isolates tested. A tiamulin MIC >2 microg/ml was obtained for 14% (n=13) of the isolates and these were also tested against doxycycline, salinomycin, valnemulin, lincomycin and aivlosin. For these isolates the susceptibility to salinomycin and doxycycline was high but the MICs for aivlosin varied. The relationship between the 13 tiamulin resistant isolates was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among the 13 isolates 10 different PFGE patterns were identified.

  10. Molecular Control of Innate Immune Response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection by Intestinal let-7 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daoyong; Wang, Dayong

    2017-01-01

    The microRNA (miRNA) let-7 is an important miRNA identified in Caenorhabditis elegans and has been shown to be involved in the control of innate immunity. The underlying molecular mechanisms for let-7 regulation of innate immunity remain largely unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis for intestinal let-7 in the regulation of innate immunity. Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 decreased let-7::GFP expression. Intestine- or neuron-specific activity of let-7 was required for its function in the regulation of innate immunity. During the control of innate immune response to P. aeruginosa PA14 infection, SDZ-24 was identified as a direct target for intestinal let-7. SDZ-24 was found to be predominantly expressed in the intestine, and P. aeruginosa PA14 infection increased SDZ-24::GFP expression. Intestinal let-7 regulated innate immune response to P. aeruginosa PA14 infection by suppressing both the expression and the function of SDZ-24. Knockout or RNA interference knockdown of sdz-24 dampened the resistance of let-7 mutant to P. aeruginosa PA14 infection. Intestinal overexpression of sdz-24 lacking 3’-UTR inhibited the susceptibility of nematodes overexpressing intestinal let-7 to P. aeruginosa PA14 infection. In contrast, we could observed the effects of intestinal let-7 on innate immunity in P. aeruginosa PA14 infected transgenic strain overexpressing sdz-24 containing 3’-UTR. In the intestine, certain SDZ-24-mediated signaling cascades were formed for nematodes against the P. aeruginosa PA14 infection. Our results highlight the crucial role of intestinal miRNAs in the regulation of the innate immune response to pathogenic infection. PMID:28095464

  11. Spray-dried animal plasma prevents the effects of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B on intestinal barrier function in weaned rats.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Amat, Concepció; Polo, Javier; Campbell, Joy M; Crenshaw, Joe; Russell, Louis; Moretó, Miquel

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated intestinal barrier function during inflammation as well as the effects of dietary supplementation with porcine spray-dried animal plasma (SDAP) proteins and porcine immunoglobulin concentrate (IC). Wistar Lewis rats were fed from d 21 (weaning) until d 34 or 35 either a control diet or a diet containing SDAP or IC. On d 30 and d 33, rats received an intraperitoneal dose of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB; 0.5 mg/kg body wt; groups SEB, SEB-SDAP, and SEB-IC). SEB reduced the potential difference across the jejunum by 60%, the short-circuit current by 70%, and Na-K-ATPase activity in intestinal mucosa (all P < 0.05). The fluxes of dextran flux (4 kDa) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP, 40 kDa) across the intestinal wall also increased in SEB-treated rats (P < 0.01, P = 0.068, respectively). SEB also increased HRP flux across the paracellular space (P < 0.05). Moreover, SEB-treated rats had a reduced expression of tight junction proteins, such as ZO-1 (10% reduction; P < 0.05) and beta-catenin (20% reduction; P < 0.05). Dietary supplementation with SDAP or IC prevented dextran (P < 0.05) and HRP (P < 0.05) paracellular flux across the intestinal epithelium. SDAP supplementation also prevented SEB effects on Na-K-ATPase activity (P < 0.05). In our model of SEB-induced intestinal inflammation, the increased permeability across the intestinal mucosa was due to the lower expression of tight junction proteins, an effect that can be prevented by both SDAP and IC supplementation.

  12. Persistence of porcine rubulavirus in experimentally infected boars.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Martínez-Bautista, Rebeca; Pérez-Torres, Armando; García-Contreras, Adelfa Del Carmen; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández, Jesús; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2013-03-23

    Porcine rubulavirus is the etiological agent of blue eye disease in pigs. In boars, this virus causes orchitis and epididymitis and reduces seminal quality. The objective of this study was to determine the persistence of porcine rubulavirus in experimentally infected boars. Nine 12-month-old boars were infected with 5 ml of the PAC-3 strain of porcine rubulavirus at 1 × 10(5) TCID(50)/ml and held for 142 days post infection (DPI) to evaluate humoral immune response. The virus was isolated in cell cultures and detected by RT-PCR. Infection with porcine rubulavirus produced clinical signs beginning at 5 DPI. Necropsy results showed that 3 boars had lesions in the testicles and epididymes. Histological analysis showed the characteristic lesions in all infected boars. Porcine rubulavirus antibodies were detected in the second week post infection and increased significantly (P<0.05) over time. Isolation of the virus from semen was achieved between 5 DPI and 48 DPI and from the testicles and epididymes between 64 DPI and 142 DPI. Viral RNA was detected in the serum between 2 DPI and 64 DPI and in the semen until 142 DPI. These results confirm that the RNA of the porcine rubulavirus persists in the semen and that this virus remains in the reproductive tract for prolonged periods of infection. Semen of persistently infected boars, therefore, represents an important source of the virus and a risk factor for the spread of blue eye disease in swine populations.

  13. Expression of bioactive porcine interferon-alpha in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shi-jie; Li, Kun; Li, Xin-Sheng; Guo, Xiao-Qing; Fu, Peng-Fei; Yang, Ming-Fan; Chen, Hong-Ying

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we constructed an expression cassette containing the inducible lac promoter and the secretion signal from an S-layer protein of Lactobacillus brevis for the expression of porcine interferon-alpha (IFN-α) in Lactobacillus casei (Lb. casei). Reverse-transcriptase PCR verified the presence of porcine IFN-α mRNA in the recombinant Lb. casei. The porcine IFN-α protein expressed in the recombinant Lb. casei was identified by both Western blot analysis and ELISA. We used various pH values and induction times to optimize the yield of IFN-α, and found that induction with 0.8% lactose for 16 h under anaerobic conditions produced the highest concentrations of IFN-α. Furthermore, the activity of porcine IFN-α in the cultural supernatant was evaluated on ST cells infected with pseudorabies virus. The results revealed that porcine IFN-α inhibited virus replication in vitro. The findings of our study indicate that recombinant Lb. casei producing porcine IFN-α has great potential for use as a novel oral antiviral agent in animal healthcare.

  14. How Active Are Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERVs)?

    PubMed Central

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) represent a risk factor if porcine cells, tissues, or organs were to be transplanted into human recipients to alleviate the shortage of human transplants; a procedure called xenotransplantation. In contrast to human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), which are mostly defective and not replication-competent, PERVs are released from normal pig cells and are infectious. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic viruses infecting cells of several species, among them humans; whereas PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Virus infection was shown in co-culture experiments, but also in vivo, in the pig, leading to de novo integration of proviruses in certain organs. This was shown by measurement of the copy number per cell, finding different numbers in different organs. In addition, recombinations between PERV-A and PERV-C were observed and the recombinant PERV-A/C were found to be integrated in cells of different organs, but not in the germ line of the animals. Here, the evidence for such in vivo activities of PERVs, including expression as mRNA, protein and virus particles, de novo infection and recombination, will be summarised. These activities make screening of pigs for provirus number and PERV expression level difficult, especially when only blood or ear biopsies are available for analysis. Highly sensitive methods to measure the copy number and the expression level will be required when selecting pigs with low copy number and low expression of PERV as well as when inactivating PERVs using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease (CRISPR/Cas) technology. PMID:27527207

  15. Electromechanical Reshaping of Ex Vivo Porcine Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed; Manuel, Cyrus T.; Protsenko, Dmitriy E.; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The trachea is a composite cartilaginous structure particularly prone to various forms of convexities. Electromechanical reshaping (EMR) is an emerging technique used to reshape cartilaginous tissues by applying electric current in tandem with imposed mechanical deformation to achieve shape change. In this study, EMR was used to reshape tracheal cartilage rings to demonstrate the feasibility of this technology as a potentially minimally invasive procedure to alter tracheal structure. Study Design Controlled laboratory study using ex vivo porcine tracheae. Methods The natural concavity of each porcine tracheal ring was reversed around a cork mandrel. Two pairs of electrodes were inserted along the long axis of the tracheal ring and placed 1.5 millimeters from the midline. Current was applied over a range of voltages (3 volts [V], 4V, and 5V) for either 2 or 3 minutes. The degree of EMR-induced reshaping was quantified from photographs using digital techniques. Confocal imaging with fluorescent live and dead assays was conducted to determine viability of the tissue after EMR. Results Specimens that underwent EMR for 2 or 3 minutes at 4V or 5V were observed to have undergone significant (P <.05) reshaping relative to the control. Viability results demonstrated that EMR reshaping occurs at the expense of tissue injury, although the extent of injury is modest relative to conventional techniques. Conclusion EMR reshapes tracheal cartilage rings as a function of voltage and application time. It has potential as a minimally invasive and cost-efficient endoscopic technology to treat pathologic tracheal convexities. Given our findings, consideration of EMR for use in larger ex vivo tracheal segments and animal studies is now plausible. Level of Evidence N/A. PMID:25692713

  16. Nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K M; Lovich, J E; Lam, C; Camp, M E; Wiley, A A; Bartol, F F; Bagnell, C A

    2014-07-01

    The lactocrine hypothesis suggests a mechanism whereby milk-borne bioactive factors delivered to nursing offspring affect development of neonatal tissues. The objective of this study was to assess whether nursing affects testicular development in neonatal boars as reflected by: (1) Sertoli cell number and proliferation measured by GATA-4 expression and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining patterns; (2) Leydig cell development and steroidogenic activity as reflected by insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3), and P450 side chain cleavage (scc) enzyme expression; and (3) expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A, and relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP) 1. At birth, boars were randomly assigned (n = 6-7/group) to nurse ad libitum or to be pan fed porcine milk replacer for 48 h. Testes were collected from boars at birth, before nursing and from nursed and replacer-fed boars at 50 h on postnatal day (PND) 2. Sertoli cell proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index increased (P < 0.01) from birth to PND 2 in nursed, but not in replacer-fed boars. Sertoli cell number and testicular GATA-4 protein levels increased (P < 0.01) from PND 0 to PND 2 only in nursed boars. Neither age nor nursing affected testicular INSL3, P450scc, ESR1, or VEGFA levels. However, testicular relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) levels increased (P < 0.01) with age and were greater in replacer-fed boars on PND 2. Results suggest that nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development and provide additional evidence for the importance of lactocrine signaling in pigs.

  17. Glycosaminoglycans of the porcine central nervous system†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenling; Masuko, Sayaka; Solakyildirim, Kemal; Pu, Dennis; Linhardt, Robert J.; Zhang, Fuming

    2010-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are known to participate in central nervous system processes such as development, cell migration, and neurite outgrowth. In this paper, we report an initial glycomics study on GAGs from porcine central nervous system. GAGs of the porcine central nervous system, brain and spinal cord, were isolated and purified by defating, proteolysis, anion-exchange chromatography and methanol precipitation. The isolated GAG content in brain was 5-times higher than in spinal cord (0.35 mg/g, compared to 0.07 mg/g dry sample). In both tissues, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS) were the major and the minor GAG. The average molecular weight of CS from brain and spinal cord was 35.5 and 47.1 kDa, respectively, and HS from brain and spinal cord was 56.9 and 34 kDa, respectively. The disaccharide analysis showed that the composition of CS from brain and spinal cords are similar with uronic acid (1→3) 4-O-sulfo-N-acetylgalactosamine residue corresponding to the major disaccharide unit (CS type-A) along with five minor disaccharide units. The major disaccharides of both brain and spinal cord HS were uronic acid (1→4) N-acetylglucosamine and uronic acid (1→4) 6-O-sulfo-N-sulfoglucosamine but their composition of minor disaccharides differed. Analysis by 1H- and two-dimensional-NMR spectroscopy confirmed these disaccharide analyses and provided the glucuronic/iduronic acid ratio. Finally, both purified CS and HS were biotinylated and immobilized on BIAcore SA biochips. Interactions between these GAGs and fibroblast growth factors (FGF1 and FGF2) and sonic hedgehog (Shh) were investigated by surface plasmon resonance. PMID:20954748

  18. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) enteric disease: an independent condition or part of the systemic disease?

    PubMed

    Baró, J; Segalés, J; Martínez, J

    2015-03-23

    Intestinal disorders in growing and finishing pigs have been associated with several infectious agents, including Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2). This virus has been mainly related with PCV2-systemic disease (PCV2-SD); nevertheless, some authors have suggested a possible restricted intestinal infection of this virus associated with enteric clinical signs. This condition has been referred as PCV2-enteric disease (PCV2-ED). The present study analysed retrospectively, from a pathological point of view, the relation between intestinal disorders and PCV2 infection in nursery and growing-finishing pigs. Among the 96 selected pigs suffering from enteric disease and submitted for necropsy between 1998 and 2011, the most prevalent enteric lesions were catarrhal enteritis/colitis (77.1%), followed by fibrinous lesions (11.5%), granulomatous inflammation (4.2%) and other lesions such as haemorrhages or ulceration (4.2%). Seventy-two pigs (75%) were positive for PCV2 by in situ hybridization (ISH). Among positive pigs for PCV2 ISH, 39 animals suffered from PCV2-SD and 33 had no lymphoid lesions but low amount of viral nucleic acid in several lymphoid tissues, therefore, these animals did not qualify for PCVD-ED. In conclusion, all animals with enteric disorders that were positive to PCV2 by ISH had evidence of viral systemic infection. These results suggest that PCV2-ED is probably a negligible condition and PCV2 mainly contributes to enteric clinical disorders in relation to PCV2-SD occurrence.

  19. The Intestinal Eukaryotic Virome in Healthy and Diarrhoeic Neonatal Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Hayer, Juliette; Berg, Mikael; Jacobson, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal porcine diarrhoea of uncertain aetiology has been reported from a number of European countries. The aim of the present study was to use viral metagenomics to examine a potential viral involvement in this diarrhoea and to describe the intestinal virome with focus on eukaryotic viruses. Samples from the distal jejunum of 50 diarrhoeic and 19 healthy piglets from 10 affected herds were analysed. The viral fraction of the samples was isolated and nucleic acids (RNA and DNA fractions) were subjected to sequence independent amplification. Samples from diarrhoeic piglets from the same herds were pooled whereas samples from healthy piglets were analysed individually. In total, 29 clinical samples, plus two negative controls and one positive control consisting of a mock metagenome were sequenced using the Ion Torrent platform. The resulting sequence data was subjected to taxonomic classification using Kraken, Diamond and HMMER. In the healthy specimens, eight different mammalian virus families were detected (Adenoviridae, Anelloviridae, Astroviridae, Caliciviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, Picornaviridae, and Reoviridae) compared to four in the pooled diarrhoeic samples (Anelloviridae, Circoviridae, Picornaviridae, and Reoviridae). It was not possible to associate a particular virus family with the investigated diarrhoea. In conclusion, this study does not support the hypothesis that the investigated diarrhoea was caused by known mammalian viruses. The results do, however, indicate that known mammalian viruses were present in the intestine as early as 24–48 hours after birth, indicating immediate infection post-partum or possibly transplacental infection. PMID:26982708

  20. Principles of microRNA Regulation Revealed Through Modeling microRNA Expression Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Budach, Stefan; Heinig, Matthias; Marsico, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Extensive work has been dedicated to study mechanisms of microRNA-mediated gene regulation. However, the transcriptional regulation of microRNAs themselves is far less well understood, due to difficulties determining the transcription start sites of transient primary transcripts. This challenge can be addressed using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) whose regulatory effects represent a natural source of perturbation of cis-regulatory elements. Here we used previously published cis-microRNA-eQTL data for the human GM12878 cell line, promoter predictions, and other functional annotations to determine the relationship between functional elements and microRNA regulation. We built a logistic regression model that classifies microRNA/SNP pairs into eQTLs or non-eQTLs with 85% accuracy; shows microRNA-eQTL enrichment for microRNA precursors, promoters, enhancers, and transcription factor binding sites; and depletion for repressed chromatin. Interestingly, although there is a large overlap between microRNA eQTLs and messenger RNA eQTLs of host genes, 74% of these shared eQTLs affect microRNA and host expression independently. Considering microRNA-only eQTLs we find a significant enrichment for intronic promoters, validating the existence of alternative promoters for intragenic microRNAs. Finally, in line with the GM12878 cell line derived from B cells, we find genome-wide association (GWA) variants associated to blood-related traits more likely to be microRNA eQTLs than random GWA and non-GWA variants, aiding the interpretation of GWA results. PMID:27260304

  1. Flexible CO2 laser and submucosal gel injection for safe endoluminal resection in the intestines

    PubMed Central

    Au, Joyce T.; Mittra, Arjun; Wong, Joyce; Carpenter, Susanne; Carson, Joshua; Haddad, Dana; Monette, Sebastien; Ezell, Paula; Patel, Snehal

    2012-01-01

    Background The CO2 laser’s unique wavelength of 10.6 µm has the advantage of being readily absorbed by water but historically limited it to line-of-sight procedures. Through recent technological advances, a flexible CO2 laser fiber has been developed and holds promise for endoluminal surgery. We examined whether this laser, along with injection of a water-based gel in the submucosal space, will allow safe dissection of the intestines and enhance the potential of this tool for minimally invasive surgery. Methods Using an ex vivo model with porcine intestines, spot ablation was performed with the flexible CO2 laser at different power settings until transmural perforation. Additionally, excisions of mucosal patches were performed by submucosal dissection with and without submucosal injection of a water-based gel. Results With spot ablation at 5 W, none of the specimens was perforated by 5 min, which was the maximum recorded time. The time to perforation was significantly shorter with increased laser power, and gel pretreatment protected the intestines against spot ablation, increasing the time to perforation from 6 to 37 s at 10 W and from 1 to 7 s at 15 W. During excision of mucosal patches, 56 and 83% of untreated intestines perforated at 5 and 10 W, respectively. Gel pretreatment prior to excision protected all intestines against perforation. These specimens were verified to be intact by inflation with air to over 100 mmHg. Furthermore, excision of the mucosal patch was complete in gel-pretreated specimens, whereas 22% of untreated specimens had residual islands of mucosa after excision. Conclusion The flexible CO2 laser holds promise as a precise dissection and cutting tool for endoluminal surgery of the intestines. Pretreatment with a submucosal injection of a water-based gel protects the intestines from perforation during ablation and mucosal dissection. PMID:21898027

  2. Development of an advanced intestinal in vitro triple culture permeability model to study transport of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Schimpel, Christa; Teubl, Birgit; Absenger, Markus; Meindl, Claudia; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Leitinger, Gerd; Zimmer, Andreas; Roblegg, Eva

    2014-03-03

    Intestinal epithelial cell culture models, such as Caco-2 cells, are commonly used to assess absorption of drug molecules and transcytosis of nanoparticles across the intestinal mucosa. However, it is known that mucus strongly impacts nanoparticle mobility and that specialized M cells are involved in particulate uptake. Thus, to get a clear understanding of how nanoparticles interact with the intestinal mucosa, in vitro models are necessary that integrate the main cell types. This work aimed at developing an alternative in vitro permeability model based on a triple culture: Caco-2 cells, mucus-secreting goblet cells and M cells. Therefore, Caco-2 cells and mucus-secreting goblet cells were cocultured on Transwells and Raji B cells were added to stimulate differentiation of M cells. The in vitro triple culture model was characterized regarding confluence, integrity, differentiation/expression of M cells and cell surface architecture. Permeability of model drugs and of 50 and 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles was studied. Data from the in vitro model were compared with ex vivo permeability results (Ussing chambers and porcine intestine) and correlated well. Nanoparticle uptake was size-dependent and strongly impacted by the mucus layer. Moreover, nanoparticle permeability studies clearly demonstrated that particles were capable of penetrating the intestinal barrier mainly via specialized M cells. It can be concluded that goblet cells and M cells strongly impact nanoparticle uptake in the intestine and should thus be integrated in an in vitro permeability model. The presented model will be an efficient tool to study intestinal transcellular uptake of particulate systems.

  3. Characterization and Regulation of the Amino Acid Transporter SNAT2 in the Small Intestine of Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bie; Wang, Jing; Kong, Xiangfeng; Guan, Guiping; Li, Fengna; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    The sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), which has dual transport/receptor functions, is well documented in eukaryotes and some mammalian systems, but has not yet been verified in piglets. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 in the small intestine of piglets. The 1,521-bp porcine full cDNA sequence of SNAT2 (KC769999) from the small intestine of piglets was cloned. The open reading frame of cDNA encodes 506 deduced amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 56.08 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 7.16. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that SNAT2 is highly evolutionarily conserved in mammals. SNAT2 mRNA can be detected in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum by real-time quantitative PCR. During the suckling period from days 1 to 21, the duodenum had the highest abundance of SNAT2 mRNA among the three segments of the small intestine. There was a significant decrease in the expression of SNAT2 mRNA in the duodenal and jejunal mucosa and in the expression of SNAT2 protein in the jejunal and ileal mucosa on day 1 after weaning (P < 0.05). Studies with enterocytes in vitro showed that amino acid starvation and supplementation with glutamate, arginine or leucine enhanced, while supplementation with glutamine reduced, SNAT2 mRNA expression (P < 0.05). These results regarding the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 should help to provide some information to further clarify its roles in the absorption of amino acids and signal transduction in the porcine small intestine. PMID:26107628

  4. MicroRNAs: Clinical Relevance in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joe; Ohtsuka, Masahisa; Pichler, Martin; Ling, Hui

    2015-11-25

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer diagnoses and causes of mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs are a class of small, non-coding regulatory RNAs that have shown strong associations with colorectal cancer. Through the repression of target messenger RNAs, microRNAs modulate many cellular pathways, such as those involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. The utilization of microRNAs has shown significant promise in the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer, owing to their unique expression profile associations with cancer types and malignancies. Moreover, microRNA therapeutics with mimics or antagonists show great promise in preclinical studies, which encourages further development of their clinical use for colorectal cancer patients. The unique ability of microRNAs to affect multiple downstream pathways represents a novel approach for cancer therapy. Although still early in its development, we believe that microRNAs can be used in the near future as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for colorectal cancer.

  5. How to make an intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wells, James M.; Spence, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    With the high prevalence of gastrointestinal disorders, there is great interest in establishing in vitro models of human intestinal disease and in developing drug-screening platforms that more accurately represent the complex physiology of the intestine. We will review how recent advances in developmental and stem cell biology have made it possible to generate complex, three-dimensional, human intestinal tissues in vitro through directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. These are currently being used to study human development, genetic forms of disease, intestinal pathogens, metabolic disease and cancer. PMID:24496613

  6. MicroRNAs to Pathways in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0474 TITLE: “ MICRORNAS TO PATHWAYS IN PROSTATE CANCER...2013 – 29 th Sept,2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MicroRNAs to Pathways in Prostate Cancer Progression 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER - 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...the proposal focuses on a class of non-coding RNAs called microRNAs that function to suppress large networks of genes during cell fate transitions

  7. Comparison of pathogenicities and nucleotide changes between porcine and bovine reassortant rotavirus strains possessing the same genotype constellation in piglets and calves.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Gyu; Kim, Deok-Song; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kwon, Hyoung-Jun; Zeller, Mark; Alfajaro, Mia Madel; Son, Kyu-Yeol; Hosmillo, Myra; Ryu, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ji-Yun; Lee, Ju-Hwan; Park, Su-Jin; Kang, Mun-Il; Kwon, Joseph; Choi, Jong-Soon; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2014-08-06

    Although reassortment is one of the most important characteristics of group A rotavirus (RVA) evolution, the host range restriction and/or virulence of reassortant RVAs remain largely unknown. The porcine 174-1 strain isolated from a diarrheic piglet was identified as a reassortant strain, harboring the same genotype constellation as the previously characterized bovine strain KJ56-1. Owing to its same genotype constellation, the pathogenicity of the porcine strain 174-1 in piglets and calves was examined for comparison with that of the bovine reassortant KJ56-1 strain, whose pathogenicity has already been demonstrated in piglets and calves. The porcine 174-1 strain induced diarrhea and histopathological changes in the small intestine of piglets and calves, whereas KJ56-1 had been reported to be virulent only in piglets, but not in calves. Therefore, full genomic sequences of 174-1 and KJ56-1 strains were analyzed to determine whether specific mutations might be associated with clinical and pathological phenotypes. Sequence alignment between the 174-1 and KJ56-1 strains detected one nucleotide substitution at the 3' untranslated region of the NSP3 gene and 16 amino acid substitutions at the VP7, VP4, VP1, VP3, NSP1 and NSP4 genes. These mutations may be critical molecular determinants for different virulence and/or pathogenicity of each strain. This study presents new insights into the host range restriction and/or virulence of RVAs.

  8. MicroRNAs: Emerging Novel Clinical Biomarkers for Hepatocellular Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Sumadi Lukman; Lehmann, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of small non-coding RNAs known as microRNAs has refined our view of the complexity of gene expression regulation. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the fifth most frequent cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide, dysregulation of microRNAs has been implicated in all aspects of hepatocarcinogenesis. In addition, alterations of microRNA expression have also been reported in non-cancerous liver diseases including chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. MicroRNAs have been proposed as clinically useful diagnostic biomarkers to differentiate HCC from different liver pathologies and healthy controls. Unique patterns of microRNA expression have also been implicated as biomarkers for prognosis as well as to predict and monitor therapeutic responses in HCC. Since dysregulation has been detected in various specimens including primary liver cancer tissues, serum, plasma, and urine, microRNAs represent novel non-invasive markers for HCC screening and predicting therapeutic responses. However, despite a significant number of studies, a consensus on which microRNA panels, sample types, and methodologies for microRNA expression analysis have to be used has not yet been established. This review focuses on potential values, benefits, and limitations of microRNAs as new clinical markers for diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, and therapeutic monitoring in HCC. PMID:26295264

  9. Role of micro-RNA in colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio; Menéndez Sánchez, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in carcinogenesis through postranscriptional gene regulatory activity. These molecules are involved in various physiological and pathological functions, such as apoptosis, cell proliferation and differentiation, which indicates their functionality in carcinogenesis as tumour suppressor genes or oncogenes. Several studies have determined the presence of microRNAs in different neoplastic diseases such as colon, prostate, breast, stomach, pancreas, and lung cancer. There are promising data on the usefulness of quantifying microRNAs in different organic fluids and tissues. We have conducted a review of the determinations of microRNAs in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  10. Synthetic Small Intestinal Scaffolds for Improved Studies of Intestinal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Cait M.; Hongpeng, Jia; Shaffiey, Shahab; Yu, Jiajie; Jain, Nina K.; Hackam, David

    2014-01-01

    In vitro intestinal models can provide new insights into small intestinal function, including cellular growth and proliferation mechanisms, drug absorption capabilities, and host-microbial interactions. These models are typically formed with cells cultured on 2D scaffolds or transwell inserts, but it is widely understood that epithelial cells cultured in 3D environments exhibit different phenotypes that are more reflective of native tissue. Our focus was to develop a porous, synthetic 3D tissue scaffold with villous features that could support the culture of epithelial cell types to mimic the natural microenvironment of the small intestine. We demonstrated that our scaffold could support the co-culture of Caco-2 cells with a mucus-producing cell line, HT29-MTX, as well as small intestinal crypts from mice for extended periods. By recreating the surface topography with accurately sized intestinal villi, we enable cellular differentiation along the villous axis in a similar manner to native intestines. In addition, we show that the biochemical microenvironments of the intestine can be further simulated via a combination of apical and basolateral feeding of intestinal cell types cultured on the 3D models. PMID:24390638

  11. Immunoglobulin in intestinal secretions.

    PubMed

    Cutropia de Guirao, C

    1977-12-01

    The objective of the present investigation is the study and interpretation of the role played by the immunoglobulins, especially IgA, during acute diarrhea in children. IgA, IGG and IgM values in serum and IgA in intestinal secretions were studied in a group of children (between 3 months and 5 years of age) during diarrhea, convalescence and in normals. The method of simple radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini was employed. IgA is the immunoglobulin which suffers the greastest alteration in acute diarrhea. The precipitation halos (the average values), were lower during the diarrhea than in convalescence and in normals.

  12. Recovery of mucosal barrier function in ischemic porcine ileum and colon is stimulated by a novel agonist of the ClC-2 chloride channel, lubiprostone.

    PubMed

    Moeser, Adam J; Nighot, Prashant K; Engelke, Kory J; Ueno, Ryuji; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2007-02-01

    Previous studies utilizing an ex vivo porcine model of intestinal ischemic injury demonstrated that prostaglandin (PG)E(2) stimulates repair of mucosal barrier function via a mechanism involving Cl(-) secretion and reductions in paracellular permeability. Further experiments revealed that the signaling mechanism for PGE(2)-induced mucosal recovery was mediated via type-2 Cl(-) channels (ClC-2). Therefore, the objective of the present study was to directly investigate the role of ClC-2 in mucosal repair by evaluating mucosal recovery in ischemia-injured intestinal mucosa treated with the selective ClC-2 agonist lubiprostone. Ischemia-injured porcine ileal mucosa was mounted in Ussing chambers, and short-circuit current (I(sc)) and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) were measured in response to lubiprostone. Application of 0.01-1 microM lubiprostone to ischemia-injured mucosa induced concentration-dependent increases in TER, with 1 microM lubiprostone stimulating a twofold increase in TER (DeltaTER = 26 Omega.cm(2); P < 0.01). However, lubiprostone (1 microM) stimulated higher elevations in TER despite lower I(sc) responses compared with the nonselective secretory agonist PGE(2) (1 microM). Furthermore, lubiprostone significantly (P < 0.05) reduced mucosal-to-serosal fluxes of (3)H-labeled mannitol to levels comparable to those of normal control tissues and restored occludin localization to tight junctions. Activation of ClC-2 with the selective agonist lubiprostone stimulated elevations in TER and reductions in mannitol flux in ischemia-injured intestine associated with structural changes in tight junctions. Prostones such as lubiprostone may provide a selective and novel pharmacological mechanism of accelerating recovery of acutely injured intestine compared with the nonselective action of prostaglandins such as PGE(2).

  13. miR-146a-5p inhibits TNF-α-induced adipogenesis via targeting insulin receptor in primary porcine adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Xi, Qian-Yun; Cheng, Xiao; Dong, Tao; Zhu, Xiao-Tong; Shu, Gang; Wang, Li-Na; Jiang, Qing-Yan; Zhang, Yong-Liang

    2016-08-01

    TNF-α is a multifunctional cytokine participating in immune disorders, inflammation, and tumor development with regulatory effects on energy metabolism. Our work focused on the function of TNF-α in adipogenesis of primary porcine adipocytes. TNF-α could suppress the insulin receptor (IR) at the mRNA and protein levels. Microarray analysis of TNF-α-treated porcine adipocytes was used to screen out 29 differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNAs), 13 of which were remarkably upregulated and 16 were intensely downregulated. These 29 differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted to mainly participate in the insulin signaling pathway, adipocytokine signaling pathway, and type 2 diabetes mellitus pathway by Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses. miR-146a-5p, reportedly involved in immunity and cancer relevant processes, was one of the most highly differentially expressed miRNAs after TNF-α treatment. Red Oil O staining and TG assay revealed that miR-146a-5p suppressed adipogenesis. A dual-luciferase reporter and siRNA assay verified that miR-146a-5p targeted IR and could inhibit its protein expression. miR-146a-5p was also validated to be involved in the insulin signaling pathway by reducing tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1. Our study provides the first evidence of miR-146a-5p targeting IR, which facilitates future studies related to obesity and diabetes using pig models.

  14. Localization of porcine CD29 transcripts and protein in pig cells and tissues by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Marín, Angeles; Moreno, Angela; de la Mulas, Juana Martín; Millán, Yolanda; Morera, Luis; Barbancho, Manuel; Llanes, Diego; Garrido, Juan J

    2005-04-08

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell adhesion proteins with major roles in a variety of biological processes ranging from cell migration to tissue organization, immune and non-immune defense mechanisms and oncogenic transformation. Members of the beta(1) integrin subfamily are composed of a beta(1) subunit (CD29) non-covalently associated with different alpha subunits to constitute a group of transmembrane glycoproteins that participate in many physiologically important events. Here, we have studied the CD29 expression in porcine tissues and cells at two different levels: expression of the CD29 mRNA by RT-PCR and localization of the protein by immunohistochemistry. CD29 transcripts were detected in a variety of tissues and cells: platelets, PBMC, granulocytes, alveolar macrophages, smooth muscle, intestine, lung, liver, spleen, lymph node, skin, testis, heart, kidney and bone marrow. Our results suggest that CD29 gene transcription occurs in all organs examined, although with different intensities. The precise localization of CD29 protein in paraffin-embedded tissues was detected by using a specific polyclonal antibody indicating that its expression is limited to smooth muscle, epithelium cells, endothelium of blood vessels and myeloid cells and is no detectable in cells of the lymphoid lineage. The distribution of the CD29 in normal tissues provide insight into the physiological function of the porcine beta(1) integrins and should be of importance in understanding the role of this integrin family in pathological processes.

  15. The Effect of Intra-Abdominal Hypertension Incorporating Severe Acute Pancreatitis in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhi-hui; Ni, Hai-bin; Ding, Wei-wei; Sun, Jia-kui; Li, Wei-qin; Li, Ning; Li, Jie-shou

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) and intra abdominal hypertension(IAH) are common clinical findings in patients with severe acute pancreatitis(SAP). It is thought that an increased intra abdominal pressure(IAP) is associated with poor prognosis in SAP patients. But the detailed effect of IAH/ACS on different organ system is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of SAP combined with IAH on hemodynamics, systemic oxygenation, and organ damage in a 12 h lasting porcine model. Measurements and Methods Following baseline registrations, a total of 30 animals were divided into 5 groups (6 animals in each group): SAP+IAP30 group, SAP+IAP20 group, SAP group, IAP30 group(sham-operated but without SAP) and sham-operated group. We used a N2 pneumoperitoneum to induce different levels of IAH and retrograde intra-ductal infusion of sodium taurocholate to induce SAP. The investigation period was 12 h. Hemodynamic parameters (CO, HR, MAP, CVP), urine output, oxygenation parameters(e.g., SvO2, PO2, PaCO2), peak inspiratory pressure, as well as serum parameters (e.g., ALT, amylase, lactate, creatinine) were recorded. Histological examination of liver, intestine, pancreas, and lung was performed. Main Results Cardiac output significantly decreased in the SAP+IAH animals compared with other groups. Furthermore, AST, creatinine, SUN and lactate showed similar increasing tendency paralleled with profoundly decrease in SvO2. The histopathological analyses also revealed higher grade injury of liver, intestine, pancreas and lung in the SAP+IAH groups. However, few differences were found between the two SAP+IAH groups with different levels of IAP. Conclusions Our newly developed porcine SAP+IAH model demonstrated that there were remarkable effects on global hemodynamics, oxygenation and organ function in response to sustained IAH of 12 h combined with SAP. Moreover, our model should be helpful to study the mechanisms of IAH/ACS-induced exacerbation and

  16. MicroRNA Expression Profiling of Lactating Mammary Gland in Divergent Phenotype Swine Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jing; Zhao, Jun-Sheng; Shen, Yi-Fei; Mao, Hai-Guang; Xu, Ning-Ying

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) plays a key role in development and specific biological processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Extensive studies of mammary miRNAs have been performed in different species and tissues. However, little is known about porcine mammary gland miRNAs. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of miRNAs in the lactating mammary gland in two distinct pig breeds, Jinhua and Yorkshire. Many miRNAs were detected as significantly differentially expressed between the two libraries. Among the differentially expressed miRNAs, many are known to be related to mammary gland development and lactation by interacting with putative target genes in previous studies. These findings suggest that miRNA expression patterns may contribute significantly to target mRNA regulation and influence mammary gland development and peak lactation performance. The data we obtained provide useful information about the roles of miRNAs in the biological processes of lactation and the mechanisms of target gene expression and regulation. PMID:25580536

  17. In low protein diets, microRNA-19b regulates urea synthesis by targeting SIRT5

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rui-Ping; Xi, Qian-Yun; Sun, Jia-Jie; Cheng, Xiao; Zhu, Yan-Ling; Ye, Ding-Ze; Chen, Ting; Wei, Li-Min; Ye, Rui-Song; Jiang, Qing-Yan; Zhang, Yong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia detoxification, which takes place via the hepatic urea cycle, is essential for nitrogen homeostasis and physiological well-being. It has been reported that a reduction in dietary protein reduces urea nitrogen. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are major regulatory non-coding RNAs that have significant effects on several metabolic pathways; however, little is known on whether miRNAs regulate hepatic urea synthesis. The objective of this study was to assess the miRNA expression profile in a low protein diet and identify miRNAs involved in the regulation of the hepatic urea cycle using a porcine model. Weaned 28-days old piglets were fed a corn-soybean normal protein diet (NP) or a corn-soybean low protein diet (LP) for 30 d. Hepatic and blood samples were collected, and the miRNA expression profile was assessed by sequencing and qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we evaluated the possible role of miR-19b in urea synthesis regulation. There were 25 differentially expressed miRNAs between the NP and LP groups. Six of these miRNAs were predicted to be involved in urea cycle metabolism. MiR-19b negatively regulated urea synthesis by targeting SIRT5, which is a positive regulator of CPS1, the rate limiting enzyme in the urea cycle. Our study presented a novel explanation of ureagenesis regulation by miRNAs. PMID:27686746

  18. Intestinal microbiota and obesity.

    PubMed

    Blaut, Michael; Klaus, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The human gut harbors a highly diverse microbial ecosystem of approximately 400 different species, which is characterized by a high interindividual variability. The intestinal microbiota has recently been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Transplantation of gut microbiota from obese mice to nonobese, germ-free mice resulted in transfer of metabolic syndrome-associated features from the donor to the recipient. Proposed mechanisms for the role of gut microbiota include the provision of additional energy by the conversion of dietary fiber to short-chain fatty acids, effects on gut-hormone production, and increased intestinal permeability causing elevated systemic levels of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). This metabolic endotoxemia is suggested to contribute to low-grade inflammation, a characteristic trait of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Finally, activation of the endocannabinoid system by LPS and/or high-fat diets is discussed as another causal factor. In conclusion, there is ample evidence for a role of gut microbiota in the development of obesity in rodents. However, the magnitude of its contribution to human obesity is still unknown.

  19. microRNAs and cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kathryn J.; Rayner, Katey J.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated at the cellular level. In addition to classic transcriptional regulation of cholesterol metabolism (e.g., by SREBP and LXR), members of a class of non-coding RNAs termed microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been identified to be potent post-transcriptional regulators of lipid metabolism genes, including cholesterol homeostasis. We and others have recently shown that miR-33 regulates cholesterol efflux and HDL biogenesis by downregulating the expression of the ABC transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In addition to miR-33, miR-122 and miR-370 have been shown to play important roles in regulating cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. These new data suggest important roles of microRNAs in the epigenetic regulation of cholesterol metabolism and have opened new avenues for the treatment of dyslipidemias. PMID:20880716

  20. Autophagy protects intestinal epithelial cells against deoxynivalenol toxicity by alleviating oxidative stress via IKK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Jianjun; Li, Fengna; Hu, Chien-An A; Liao, Peng; Tan, Kunrong; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Liu, Gang; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular process of homeostatic degradation that promotes cell survival under various stressors. Deoxynivalenol (DON), a fungal toxin, often causes diarrhea and disturbs the homeostasis of the intestinal system. To investigate the function of intestinal autophagy in response to DON and associated mechanisms, we firstly knocked out ATG5 (autophagy-related gene 5) in porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) using CRISPR-Cas9 technology. When treated with DON, autophagy was induced in IPEC-J2 cells but not in IPEC-J2.Atg5ko cells. The deficiency in autophagy increased DON-induced apoptosis in IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells, in part, through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The cellular stress response can be restored in IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells by overexpressing proteins involved in protein folding. Interestingly, we found that autophagy deficiency downregulated the expression of endoplasmic reticulum folding proteins BiP and PDI when IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells were treated with DON. In addition, we investigated the molecular mechanism of autophagy involved in the IKK, AMPK, and mTOR signaling pathway and found that Bay-117082 and Compound C, specific inhibitors for IKK and AMPK, respectively, inhibited the induction of autophagy. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy is pivotal for protection against DON in pig intestinal cells.

  1. Porcine respiratory disease complex: Interaction of vaccination and porcine circovirus type 2, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Chae, Chanhee

    2016-06-01

    Porcine respiratory disease is a multifactorial and complex disease caused by a combination of infectious pathogens, environmental stressors, differences in production systems, and various management practices; hence the name porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is used. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae are considered to be the most important pathogens that cause PRDC. Although interactions among the three major respiratory pathogens are well documented, it is also necessary to understand the interaction between vaccines and the three major respiratory pathogens. PRRSV and M. hyopneumoniae are well known to potentiate PCV2-associated lesions; however, PRRSV and mycoplasmal vaccines can both enhance PCV2 viraemia regardless of the effects of the actual PRRSV or M. hyopneumoniae infection. On the other hand, M. hyopneumoniae potentiates the severity of pneumonia induced by PRRSV, and vaccination against M. hyopneumoniae alone is also able to decrease PRRSV viraemia and PRRSV-induced lung lesions in dually infected pigs. This review focuses on (1) interactions between PCV2, PRRSV, and M. hyopneumoniae; and (2) interactions between vaccines and the three major respiratory pathogens.

  2. Porcine Rotaviruses: Epidemiology, Immune Responses and Control Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Amimo, Joshua O.; Saif, Linda J.

    2017-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a major cause of acute viral gastroenteritis in young animals and children worldwide. Immunocompetent adults of different species become resistant to clinical disease due to post-infection immunity, immune system maturation and gut physiological changes. Of the 9 RV genogroups (A–I), RV A, B, and C (RVA, RVB, and RVC, respectively) are associated with diarrhea in piglets. Although discovered decades ago, porcine genogroup E RVs (RVE) are uncommon and their pathogenesis is not studied well. The presence of porcine RV H (RVH), a newly defined distinct genogroup, was recently confirmed in diarrheic pigs in Japan, Brazil, and the US. The complex epidemiology, pathogenicity and high genetic diversity of porcine RVAs are widely recognized and well-studied. More recent data show a significant genetic diversity based on the VP7 gene analysis of RVB and C strains in pigs. In this review, we will summarize previous and recent research to provide insights on historic and current prevalence and genetic diversity of porcine RVs in different geographic regions and production systems. We will also provide a brief overview of immune responses to porcine RVs, available control strategies and zoonotic potential of different RV genotypes. An improved understanding of the above parameters may lead to the development of more optimal strategies to manage RV diarrheal disease in swine and humans. PMID:28335454

  3. N-Acetylgalactosamine 4,6-O-sulfate residues mediate binding and activation of heparin cofactor II by porcine mucosal dermatan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Halldórsdóttir, Anna Margrét; Zhang, Lijuan; Tollefsen, Douglas M

    2006-08-01

    Dermatan sulfate (DS) accelerates the inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II (HCII). A hexasaccharide consisting of three l-iduronic acid 2-O-sulfate (IdoA2SO3)-->N-acetyl-D-galactosamine 4-O-sulfate (GalNAc4SO3) subunits was previously isolated from porcine skin DS and shown to bind HCII with high affinity. DS from porcine intestinal mucosa has a much lower content of this disaccharide but activates HCII with potency similar to that of porcine skin DS. Therefore, we sought to characterize oligosaccharides from porcine mucosal DS that interact with HCII. DS was partially depolymerized with chondroitinase ABC, and oligosaccharides containing 2-12 monosaccharide units were isolated. The oligosaccharides were then fractionated by anion-exchange and affinity chromatography on HCII-Sepharose, and the disaccharide compositions of selected fractions were determined. We found that the smallest oligosaccharides able to bind HCII were hexasaccharides. Oligosaccharides 6-12 units long that lacked uronic acid (UA)2SO3 but contained one or two GalNAc4,6SO3 residues bound, and binding was proportional to both oligosaccharide size and number of GalNAc4,6SO3 residues. Intact DS and bound dodecasaccharides contained predominantly IdoA but little D-glucuronic acid. Decasaccharides and dodecasaccharides containing one or two GalNAc4,6SO3 residues stimulated thrombin inhibition by HCII and prolonged the clotting time of normal but not HCII-depleted human plasma. These data support the hypothesis that modification of IdoA-->GalNAc4SO3 subunits in the DS polymer by either 2-O-sulfation of IdoA or 6-O-sulfation of GalNAc can generate molecules with HCII-binding sites and anticoagulant activity.

  4. Formation of reactive aldehydes (MDA, HHE, HNE) during the digestion of cod liver oil: comparison of human and porcine in vitro digestion models.

    PubMed

    Tullberg, Cecilia; Larsson, Karin; Carlsson, Nils-Gunnar; Comi, Irene; Scheers, Nathalie; Vegarud, Gerd; Undeland, Ingrid

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we investigated lipid oxidation of cod liver oil during gastrointestinal (GI) digestion using two types of in vitro digestion models. In the first type of model, we used human GI juices, while we used digestive enzymes and bile from porcine origin in the second type of model. Human and porcine models were matched with respect to factors important for lipolysis, using a standardized digestion protocol. The digests were analysed for reactive oxidation products: malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE), and 4-hydroxy-trans-2-hexenal (HHE) by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS), and for free fatty acids (FFA) obtained during the digestion by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The formation of the oxidation products MDA, HHE, and HNE was low during the gastric digestion, however, it increased during the duodenal digestion. The formation of the oxidation products reached higher levels when digestive juices of human origin were used (60 μM of MDA, 0.96 μM of HHE, and 1.6 μM of HNE) compared to when using enzymes and bile of porcine origin (9.8, and 0.36 μM of MDA; 0.16, and 0.026 μM of HHE; 0.23, and 0.005 μM of HNE, respectively, in porcine models I and II). In all models, FFA release was only detected during the intestinal step, and reached up to 31% of total fatty acids (FA). The findings in this work may be of importance when designing oxidation oriented lipid digestion studies.

  5. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus jensenii modulates the Toll-like receptor 4-induced inflammatory response via negative regulation in porcine antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Villena, Julio; Suzuki, Rie; Fujie, Hitomi; Chiba, Eriko; Takahashi, Takuya; Tomosada, Yohsuke; Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Aso, Hisashi; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Suda, Yoshihito; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Alvarez, Susana; Saito, Tadao; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2012-07-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus jensenii TL2937 attenuates the inflammatory response triggered by activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) in porcine intestinal epithelial cells. In view of the critical importance of antigen-presenting cell (APC) polarization in immunoregulation, the objective of the present study was to examine the effect of strain TL2937 on the activation patterns of APCs from swine Peyer's patches (PPs). We demonstrated that direct exposure of porcine APCs to L. jensenii in the absence of inflammatory signals increased expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor β in CD172a(+) APCs and caused them to display tolerogenic properties. In addition, pretreatment of CD172a(+) APCs with L. jensenii resulted in differential modulation of the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in response to TLR4 activation. The immunomodulatory effect of strain TL2937 was not related to a downregulation of TLR4 but was related to an upregulation of the expression of three negative regulators of TLRs: single immunoglobulin IL-1-related receptor (SIGIRR), A20, and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAK-M). Our results also indicated that TLR2 has an important role in the anti-inflammatory activity of L. jensenii TL2937, since anti-TLR2 antibodies blocked the upregulation of SIGIRR and IRAK-M in CD172a(+) APCs and the production of IL-10 in response to TLR4 activation. We performed, for the first time, a precise functional characterization of porcine APCs from PPs, and we demonstrated that CD172a(+) cells were tolerogenic. Our findings demonstrate that adherent cells and isolated CD172a(+) cells harvested from swine PPs were useful for in vitro study of the inflammatory responses in the porcine gut and the immunomodulatory effects of immunobiotic microorganisms.

  6. What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? For some people with small intestine cancer, ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Stops Working More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  7. Establishment and characterisation of a porcine rubulavirus (LPMV) persistent infection in porcine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Hjertner, B; Linné, T; Moreno-López, J

    1997-01-01

    Porcine rubulavirus (LPMV) can establish persistent infections in porcine kidney cells. Cell cultures characterised at passages 25 and 65 demonstrated haemadsorption, formation of syncytia, and a slower growth rate. The nucleoprotein (NP) and haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein were present in all cells, although not to the same extent as in wild type infected cells. Incubation of the cell cultures with virus neutralising antibodies could not cure them from the infection. The cells were resistant to LPMV high multiplicity superinfection, but lysed rapidly upon infection with VSV. These cells thus fulfilled the criteria of a true persistent infection. Viral particles were released into the medium from the persistently infected cells as measured by HA and infection of PK-15 cells with medium from the persistently infected cells. The infectious titer of the virus released from the persistently infected cells was 3 logs lower compared to wild type virus, the HN titer still being comparable. Virus released from the persistently infected cells was unable to cause a lytic infection in PK-15 cells, and showed a reduced ability to spread when compared to a LPMV lytic infection.

  8. Porcine relaxin, a 500 million-year-old hormone? the tunicate Ciona intestinalis has porcine relaxin.

    PubMed

    Georges, D; Schwabe, C

    1999-07-01

    The fossil record of tunicates reaches back to the upper Cambrian period. Ascidians have mobile, tadpole-like juvenile forms with a notochord, which inspired the classification of tunicates as Urochordata, i.e., predecessors of vertebrates. The genome of the tunicate Ciona intestinalis contains a relaxin coding region that is organized like a mammalian gene, i.e., signal peptide, B-chain domain, connecting peptide domain, followed by the A-chain domain with a stop codon after cysteine A-22. RNA-derived cDNA encodes a relaxin that is identical to the circulating form of the porcine hormone. In contrast to the porcine gene, the ascidian gene has no intron in the C-peptide domain, and in that respect is similar to the bombyxin gene of the silkworm. During the spawning period, only enough relaxin could be extracted and isolated from gonads of C. intestinalis for a partial sequence analysis. Remarkable as it may be, these findings suggest that relaxin is identical in pigs, whales, and the tunicate C. intestinalis.

  9. Porcine allergy and IgE.

    PubMed

    Rupa, Prithy; Schmied, Julie; Wilkie, Bruce N

    2009-11-15

    Anaphylaxis was reported in 1963 in pigs experimentally sensitized with ovalbumin and was subsequently associated indirectly with IgE-related antibodies by functional assays to confirm heat-labile passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA), reverse passive anaphylaxis (RPA) and Prausnitz-Küstner (PK) reactions to this and other allergens. The immunoglobulin mediating immediate hypersensitivity could be cross-adsorbed with anti-human IgE. Porcine IgE epsilon chain has been cloned and sequenced. Rabbit anti-pig IgE has been described by two groups, as has cross reactivity with pig IgE of various heterologous polyclonal and monoclonal anti-IgEs. Pigs develop transient post-weaning food allergy to soy allergens which can be prevented by pre-weaning feeding of soy proteins in sufficient quantity. Natural hypersensitivity also occurs to nematodes. Recently, experimental allergy has been induced in outbred pigs to peanut and to egg allergens which manifest as respiratory, cutaneous and enteric signs similar to those of human food allergy. These models are platforms for comparative allergy research as realistic alternatives to use of inbred mice or humans for investigation of pathogenesis, prophylaxis and therapy.

  10. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I.; Trujillo, María E.; Mendoza, Susana E.; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A.

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  11. Ultrafast laser machining of porcine sclera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, W. S.; Carter, R. M.; Dhillon, B.; Hand, D. P.; Shephard, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    The use of ultrafast lasers (pulsed lasers with pulse lengths of a few picoseconds or less) offers the possibility for minimally invasive removal of soft ophthalmic tissue. The potential for using pico- and femtosecond pulses for modification of scleral tissue has been reported elsewhere [1-6] and has resulted in the introduction of new, minimally invasive, procedures into clinical practice [3, 5-10]. Our research is focused on finding optimal parameters for picosecond laser machining of scleral tissue without introducing any unwanted collateral damage to the tissue. Experiments were carried out on hydrated porcine sclera in vitro, which has similar collagen organization, histology and water content (~70%) to human tissue. In this paper we present a 2D finite element ablation model which employs a one-step heating process. It is assumed that the incident laser radiation that is not reflected is absorbed in the tissue according to the Beer-Lambert law and transformed into heat energy. The experimental setup uses an industrial picosecond laser (TRUMPF TruMicro 5x50) with 5.9 ps pulses at 1030 nm, with pulse energies up to 125 μJ and a focused spot diameter of 35 μm. The use of a scan head allows flexibility in designing various scanning patterns. We show that picosecond pulses are capable of modifying scleral tissue without introducing collateral damage. This offers a possible route for minimally invasive sclerostomy. Many scanning patterns including single line ablation, square and circular cavity removal were tested.

  12. Steroid binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, S.; Nii, A.; Sakai, M.; Muramatsu, M.

    1987-05-05

    For the purpose of characterizing the estrogen binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor (ER), the authors have made use of affinity labeling of partially purified ER with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine. The labeling is very efficient and selective particularly after partial purification of ER. A 65,000-dalton (65-kDa) band was detected on the fluorogram of a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel, together with a 50-kDa band and a few more smaller bands. The 50-kDa protein appears to be a degradation product of the 65-kDa protein in view of the similar peptide map. ER was affinity labeled before or after controlled limited proteolysis with either trypsin, papain, or ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin. The labeling patterns of limited digests indicate that a fragment of about 30 kDa is relatively resistant to proteases and has a full and specific binding activity to estrogen, whereas smaller fragments have lost much of the binding activity. This fragment is very hydrophobic and probably corresponds to the carboxy half of ER.

  13. KBSH parvovirus: comparison with porcine parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, T W; Joo, H S; Collett, M S

    1985-01-01

    We compared the molecular, antigenic, and pathogenic properties of KBSH parvovirus to those of porcine parvovirus (PPV) isolate NADL-8. KBSH, propagated in swine testes cells in culture, possessed two major capsid polypeptides of 83 and 64 kilodaltons that were similar in size to those of PPV. KBSH-infected cells also contained an 86-kilodalton nonstructural polypeptide that was identical in size to the PPV nonstructural polypeptide (NS-1). The KBSH polypeptides were structurally similar but not identical to the corresponding PPV polypeptides, as revealed by partial proteolysis mapping. Viral replicative-form DNA from KBSH-infected cells was similar in size to PPV replicative-form DNA and exhibited similar but not identical restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns to that of PPV replicative-form DNA. Antigenically, the two viruses were also very closely related. By using heterologous and homologous antisera, the two viruses were indistinguishable in hemagglutination inhibition and immunoprecipitation assays. However, pathogenically these viruses were dramatically different. NADL-8 caused fetal death when injected into swine fetuses in utero and viremia and high persisting antibody titers when administered orally to weaning-age swine. KBSH-inoculated fetuses were normal in appearance, and pigs orally exposed to KBSH failed to establish viremia and demonstrated only transient antibody titers. Thus, KBSH appears to be a PPV that is very closely related to a highly pathogenic PPV isolate, yet is itself nonpathogenic in swine. This reduced pathogenic potential of KBSH may be attributable to its poor ability to replicate in swine. Images PMID:2991553

  14. A Genetic Porcine Model of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schook, Lawrence B.; Collares, Tiago V.; Hu, Wenping; Liang, Ying; Rodrigues, Fernanda M.; Rund, Laurie A.; Schachtschneider, Kyle M.; Seixas, Fabiana K.; Singh, Kuldeep; Wells, Kevin D.; Walters, Eric M.; Prather, Randall S.; Counter, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The large size of the pig and its similarity in anatomy, physiology, metabolism, and genetics to humans make it an ideal platform to develop a genetically defined, large animal model of cancer. To this end, we created a transgenic “oncopig” line encoding Cre recombinase inducible porcine transgenes encoding KRASG12D and TP53R167H, which represent a commonly mutated oncogene and tumor suppressor in human cancers, respectively. Treatment of cells derived from these oncopigs with the adenovirus encoding Cre (AdCre) led to KRASG12D and TP53R167H expression, which rendered the cells transformed in culture and tumorigenic when engrafted into immunocompromised mice. Finally, injection of AdCre directly into these oncopigs led to the rapid and reproducible tumor development of mesenchymal origin. Transgenic animals receiving AdGFP (green fluorescent protein) did not have any tumor mass formation or altered histopathology. This oncopig line could thus serve as a genetically malleable model for potentially a wide spectrum of cancers, while controlling for temporal or spatial genesis, which should prove invaluable to studies previously hampered by the lack of a large animal model of cancer. PMID:26132737

  15. Nuclear protein extraction from frozen porcine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Diederik W D; Merkus, Daphne; Jorna, Huub J J; Dekkers, Dick H W; Duncker, Dirk J; Verhoeven, Adrie J M

    2011-06-01

    Protocols for the extraction of nuclear proteins have been developed for cultured cells and fresh tissue, but sometimes only frozen tissue is available. We have optimized the homogenization procedure and subsequent fractionation protocol for the preparation of nuclear protein extracts from frozen porcine left ventricular (LV) tissue. This method gave a highly reproducible protein yield (6.5±0.7% of total protein; mean±SE, n=9) and a 6-fold enrichment of the nuclear marker protein B23. The nuclear protein extracts were essentially devoid of cytosolic, myofilament, and histone proteins. Compared to nuclear extracts from fresh LV tissue, some loss of nuclear proteins to the cytosolic fraction was observed. Using this method, we studied the distribution of tyrosine phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (PY-STAT3) in LV tissue of animals treated with the β-agonist dobutamine. Upon treatment, PY-STAT3 increased 30.2±8.5-fold in total homogenates, but only 6.9±2.1-fold (n=4, P=0.03) in nuclear protein extracts. Of all PY-STAT3 formed, only a minor fraction appeared in the nuclear fraction. This simple and reproducible protocol yielded nuclear protein extracts that were highly enriched in nuclear proteins with almost complete removal of cytosolic and myofilament proteins. This nuclear protein extraction protocol is therefore well-suited for nuclear proteome analysis of frozen heart tissue collected in biobanks.

  16. Half-life of porcine antibodies absorbed from a colostrum supplement containing porcine immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Polo, J; Campbell, J M; Crenshaw, J; Rodríguez, C; Pujol, N; Navarro, N; Pujols, J

    2012-12-01

    Absorption of immunoglobulins (Ig) at birth from colostrum is essential for piglet survival. The objective was to evaluate the half-life of antibodies absorbed in the bloodstream of newborn piglets orally fed a colostrum supplement (CS) containing energy (fat and carbohydrates) and IgG from porcine plasma. Viable piglets (n = 23; 900 to 1,800 g BW) from 6 sows were colostrum deprived and blood sampled and within the next 2 h of life randomly allocated to either control group (n = 9) providing 30 mL of Ig-free milk replacer or a group (n = 14) receiving 30 mL of CS by oral gavage. Piglets were transported to a Biosafety Level 3 facility (Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal, Spain) and fed Ig-free milk replacer every 3 to 4 h for 15 d. Survival, weight, plasma IgG content by radial immunodiffusion (RID), and antibodies against porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine parvovirus (PPV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhy), and swine influenza virus (SIV) were determined by specific ELISA before treatment administration, at 24 h, and weekly for 56 d. Clinical symptoms were not observed for either group. Mortality index was lower (17 vs. 38%; P < 0.02) and BW higher (17.7 vs. 15.3 kg; P = 0.035) for pigs supplemented with CS than piglets in the control group. At 24 h postadministration, the CS group had a plasma IgG mean of 7.6 ± 0.06 vs. 0.14 ± 0.03 mg/mL for the control group. The IgG levels in the CS group decayed until day 21 when de novo synthesis of IgG was detected in 25% of piglets. Half-life of antibody concentration (HLAC) by RID was 6.2 d. In the CS group, efficiency of PCV2 and PPV antibody transfer was high. For PCV2, all animals remained positive by day 56 and the calculated HLAC was 17.7 d. For PPV, 72.7% of piglets were ELISA positive by day 35 and HLAC was 12.0 d. For PRRS, all piglets remained positive by day 14 and the calculated HLAC was 11.9 d. For Mhy and SIV the calculated HLAC were 8.4 and 3.0 d

  17. Diet-responsive microRNAs are likely exogenous

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a recent report Title "et al". fostered miRNA-375 and miR-200c knock-out pups to wild-type dams and arrived at the conclusion that milk microRNAs are bioavailable in trace amounts at best and that postprandial concentrations of microRNAs are too low to elicit biological effects. Their take home m...

  18. Magnetic Ligation Method for Quantitative Detection of MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Liong, Monty; Im, Hyungsoon; Majmudar, Maulik D.; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Sebas, Matthew; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic ligation method is utilized for the detection of microRNAs amongst a complex biological background without polymerase chain reaction or nucleotide modification. The sandwich probes assay can be adapted to analyze a panel of microRNAs associated with cardiovascular diseases in heart tissue samples. PMID:24532323

  19. MicroRNA Transcriptome Profiles During Swine Skeletal Muscle Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNA (miR) are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression by inhibiting translation of protein encoding transcripts. To evaluate the role of miR in skeletal muscle of swine, global microRNA abundance was measured at specific developmental stages including proliferating satellite cells,...

  20. Suppressive effect of microRNA-143 in retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Lun; Hu, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan-Qin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate microRNA-143 expression and effect on suppression of retinoblastoma (RB) cells. METHODS The expression of microRNA-143 was investigated and compared in normal human retina tissue samples and in RB cell lines of Y79 and Weri1. The microRNA-143 mimics were transfected into the RB cell lines separately, and its effect on RB cell lines was detected using reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting methods. RESULTS The microRNA-143 expression was significantly suppressed in RB cell lines. Overexpression of microRNA-143 significantly lowered cell viability and invasion of the RB cell lines, and increased the number of apoptotic cells. Meanwhile, the Bax expression was up-regulated and much higher in the microRNA-143 mimics transfected group than that in the negative control and the microRNA-143 inhibitor groups. CONCLUSION MicroRNA-143 exhibits suppressive effects in RB. The current study provides the perspective of a potential therapeutic treatment for RB. PMID:27990360

  1. [Malaria and intestinal protozoa].

    PubMed

    Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Cuadros-González, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Malaria is life threatening and requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Incidence and mortality are being reduced in endemic areas. Clinical features are unspecific so in imported cases it is vital the history of staying in a malarious area. The first line treatments for Plasmodium falciparum are artemisinin combination therapies, chloroquine in most non-falciparum and intravenous artesunate if any severity criteria. Human infections with intestinal protozoa are distributed worldwide with a high global morbid-mortality. They cause diarrhea and sometimes invasive disease, although most are asymptomatic. In our environment populations at higher risk are children, including adopted abroad, immune-suppressed, travelers, immigrants, people in contact with animals or who engage in oral-anal sex. Diagnostic microscopic examination has low sensitivity improving with antigen detection or molecular methods. Antiparasitic resistances are emerging lately.

  2. Comparison of human and porcine skin for characterization of sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigmann, Hans-Jürgen; Schanzer, Sabine; Patzelt, Alexa; Bahaban, Virginie; Durat, Fabienne; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    The universal sun protection factor (USPF) characterizing sunscreen efficacy based on spectroscopically determined data, which were obtained using the tape stripping procedure. The USPF takes into account the complete ultraviolet (UV) spectral range in contrast to the classical sun protection factor (SPF). Until now, the USPF determination has been evaluated only in human skin. However, investigating new filters not yet licensed excludes in vivo investigation on human skin but requires the utilization of a suitable skin model. The penetration behavior and the protection efficacy of 10 commercial sunscreens characterized by USPF were investigated, comparing human and porcine skin. The penetration behavior found for typical UV filter substances is nearly identical for both skin types. The comparison of the USPF obtained for human and porcine skin results in a linear relation between both USPF values with a correlation factor R2=0.98. The results demonstrate the possibility for the use of porcine skin to determine the protection efficacy of sunscreens.

  3. Spatial Clustering of Porcine Cysticercosis in Mbulu District, Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Ngowi, Helena A.; Kassuku, Ayub A.; Carabin, Hélène; Mlangwa, James E. D.; Mlozi, Malongo R. S.; Mbilinyi, Boniface P.; Willingham, Arve L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Porcine cysticercosis is caused by a zoonotic tapeworm, Taenia solium, which causes serious disease syndromes in human. Effective control of the parasite requires knowledge on the burden and pattern of the infections in order to properly direct limited resources. The objective of this study was to establish the spatial distribution of porcine cysticercosis in Mbulu district, northern Tanzania, to guide control strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings This study is a secondary analysis of data collected during the baseline and follow-up periods of a randomized community trial aiming at reducing the incidence rate of porcine cysticercosis through an educational program. At baseline, 784 randomly selected pig-keeping households located in 42 villages in 14 wards were included. Lingual examination of indigenous pigs aged 2–12 (median 8) months, one randomly selected from each household, were conducted. Data from the control group of the randomized trial that included 21 of the 42 villages were used for the incidence study. A total of 295 pig-keeping households were provided with sentinel pigs (one each) and reassessed for cysticercosis incidence once or twice for 2–9 (median 4) months using lingual examination and antigen ELISA. Prevalence of porcine cysticercosis was computed in Epi Info 3.5. The prevalence and incidence of porcine cysticercosis were mapped at household level using ArcView 3.2. K functions were computed in R software to assess general clustering of porcine cysticercosis. Spatial scan statistics were computed in SatScan to identify local clusters of the infection. The overall prevalence of porcine cysticercosis was 7.3% (95% CI: 5.6, 9.4; n = 784). The K functions revealed a significant overall clustering of porcine cysticercosis incidence for all distances between 600 m and 5 km from a randomly chosen case household based on Ag-ELISA. Lingual examination revealed clustering from 650 m to 6 km and between 7.5 and 10 km. The

  4. [Recent advance on blood group antigen modification of porcine erythrocytes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie-Xi; Zhang, Yang-Pei

    2002-06-01

    Advances in the field of xenotransplantation raise the intriguing possibility of using porcine red blood cells (pRBCs) as an alternative source for blood transfusion. Serologically, pRBCs share a number of characteristics with human red blood cells (RBCs), so pRBCs are considered the most likely donor for xenotransfusion. However, xenoantigens on porcine erythrocytes play major roles in antibody-mediated RBC destruction. Although the alphaGal epitope (Galalpha1, 3Galbeta1, 4GalNAc-R) is the major xenoantigen on porcine erythrocytes and is responsible for the binding of the majority of human natural antibodies, other non-alphaGal xenoantigens have been identified. The importance of these non-alphaGal xenoantigens in binding human natural antibodies and subsequently triggering immunological responses cannot be underestimated.

  5. Physiological Concentration of Exogenous Lactate Reduces Antimycin A Triggered Oxidative Stress in Intestinal Epithelial Cell Line IPEC-1 and IPEC-J2 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kahlert, Stefan; Junnikkala, Sami; Renner, Lydia; Hynönen, Ulla; Hartig, Roland; Nossol, Constanze; Barta-Böszörményi, Anikó; Dänicke, Sven; Souffrant, Wolfgang-Bernhard; Palva, Airi; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Kluess, Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    Weaning triggers an adaptation of the gut function including luminal lactate generation by lactobacilli, depending on gastrointestinal site. We hypothesized that both lactobacilli and lactate influence porcine intestinal epithelial cells. In vivo experiments showed that concentration of lactate was significantly higher in gastric, duodenal and jejunal chyme of suckling piglets compared to their weaned counterparts. In an in vitro study we investigated the impact of physiological lactate concentration as derived from the in vivo study on the porcine intestinal epithelial cells IPEC-1 and IPEC-J2. We detected direct adherence of lactobacilli on the apical epithelial surface and a modulated F-actin structure. Application of lactobacilli culture supernatant alone or lactate (25 mM) at low pH (pH 4) changed the F-actin structure in a similar manner. Treatment of IPEC cultures with lactate at near neutral pH resulted in a significantly reduced superoxide-generation in Antimycin A-challenged cells. This protective effect was nearly completely reversed by inhibition of cellular lactate uptake via monocarboxylate transporter. Lactate treatment enhanced NADH autofluorescence ratio (Fcytosol/Fnucleus) in non-challenged cells, indicating an increased availability of reduced nucleotides, but did not change the overall ATP content of the cells. Lactobacilli-derived physiological lactate concentration in intestine is relevant for alleviation of redox stress in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:27054581

  6. The Intestinal Microbiome and Health

    PubMed Central

    Tuddenham, Susan; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review A diverse array of microbes colonizes the human intestine. In this review we seek to outline the current state of knowledge on what characterizes a “healthy” or “normal” intestinal microbiome, what factors modify the intestinal microbiome in the healthy state and how the intestinal microbiome affects normal host physiology Recent Findings What constitutes a “normal” or “healthy” intestinal microbiome is an area of active research, but key characteristics may include diversity, richness and a microbial community’s resilience and ability to resist change. A number of factors, including age, the host immune system, host genetics, diet and antibiotic use appear to modify the intestinal microbiome in the normal state. New research shows that the microbiome likely plays a critical role in the healthy human immune system and metabolism. Summary It is clear that there is a complicated bi-directional relationship between the intestinal microbiota and host which is vital to health. An enhanced understanding of this relationship will be critical not only to maximize and maintain human health but also to shape our understanding of disease and to foster new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26237547

  7. Intestinal flora, probiotics, and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero Hernández, Ignacio; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo; Vargas Vorackova, Florencia; Uribe, Misael

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal microflora constitutes a symbiotic ecosystem in permanent equilibrium, composed mainly of anaerobic bacteria. However, such equilibrium may be altered by daily conditions as drug use or pathologies interfering with intestinal physiology, generating an unfavorable environment for the organism. Besides, there are factors which may cause alterations in the intestinal wall, creating the conditions for translocation or permeation of substances or bacteria. In cirrhotic patients, there are many conditions that combine to alter the amount and populations of intestinal bacteria, as well as the functional capacity of the intestinal wall to prevent the permeation of substances and bacteria. Nowadays, numerous complications associated with cirrhosis have been identified, where such mechanisms could play an important role. There is evidence that some probiotic microorganisms could restore the microbiologic and immunologic equilibrium in the intestinal wall in cirrhotic patients and help in the treatment of complications due to cirrhosis. This article has the objective to review the interactions between intestinal flora, gut permeability, and the actual role of probiotics in the field of cirrhotic patients.

  8. Experimental infection of conventional nursing pigs and their dams with Porcine deltacoronavirus.

    PubMed

    Vitosh-Sillman, Sarah; Loy, John Dustin; Brodersen, Bruce; Kelling, Clayton; Doster, Alan; Topliff, Christina; Nelson, Eric; Bai, Jianfa; Schirtzinger, Erin; Poulsen, Elizabeth; Meadors, Barbara; Anderson, Joseph; Hause, Benjamin; Anderson, Gary; Hesse, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is a newly identified virus that has been detected in swine herds of North America associated with enteric disease. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the pathogenicity, course of infection, virus kinetics, and aerosol transmission of PDCoV using 87 conventional piglets and their 9 dams, including aerosol and contact controls to emulate field conditions. Piglets 2-4 days of age and their dams were administered an oronasal PDCoV inoculum with a quantitative real-time reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR quantification cycle (Cq) value of 22 that was generated from a field sample having 100% nucleotide identity to USA/Illinois121/2014 determined by metagenomic sequencing and testing negative for other enteric disease agents using standard assays. Serial samples of blood, serum, oral fluids, nasal and fecal swabs, and tissues from sequential autopsy, conducted daily on days 1-8 and regular intervals thereafter, were collected throughout the 42-day study for qRT-PCR, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Diarrhea developed in all inoculated and contact control pigs, including dams, by 2 days post-inoculation (dpi) and in aerosol control pigs and dams by 3-4 dpi, with resolution occurring by 12 dpi. Mild to severe atrophic enteritis with PDCoV antigen staining was observed in the small intestine of affected piglets from 2 to 8 dpi. Mesenteric lymph node and small intestine were the primary sites of antigen detection by immunohistochemistry, and virus RNA was detected in these tissues to the end of the study. Virus RNA was detectable in piglet fecal swabs to 21 dpi, and dams to 14-35 dpi.

  9. Temperature profiles of different cooling methods in porcine pancreas procurement.

    PubMed

    Weegman, Bradley P; Suszynski, Thomas M; Scott, William E; Ferrer Fábrega, Joana; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S; Anazawa, Takayuki; O'Brien, Timothy D; Rizzari, Michael D; Karatzas, Theodore; Jie, Tun; Sutherland, David E R; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2014-01-01

    Porcine islet xenotransplantation is a promising alternative to human islet allotransplantation. Porcine pancreas cooling needs to be optimized to reduce the warm ischemia time (WIT) following donation after cardiac death, which is associated with poorer islet isolation outcomes. This study examines the effect of four different cooling Methods on core porcine pancreas temperature (n = 24) and histopathology (n = 16). All Methods involved surface cooling with crushed ice and chilled irrigation. Method A, which is the standard for porcine pancreas procurement, used only surface cooling. Method B involved an intravascular flush with cold solution through the pancreas arterial system. Method C involved an intraductal infusion with cold solution through the major pancreatic duct, and Method D combined all three cooling Methods. Surface cooling alone (Method A) gradually decreased core pancreas temperature to <10 °C after 30 min. Using an intravascular flush (Method B) improved cooling during the entire duration of procurement, but incorporating an intraductal infusion (Method C) rapidly reduced core temperature 15-20 °C within the first 2 min of cooling. Combining all methods (Method D) was the most effective at rapidly reducing temperature and providing sustained cooling throughout the duration of procurement, although the recorded WIT was not different between Methods (P = 0.36). Histological scores were different between the cooling Methods (P = 0.02) and the worst with Method A. There were differences in histological scores between Methods A and C (P = 0.02) and Methods A and D (P = 0.02), but not between Methods C and D (P = 0.95), which may highlight the importance of early cooling using an intraductal infusion. In conclusion, surface cooling alone cannot rapidly cool large (porcine or human) pancreata. Additional cooling with an intravascular flush and intraductal infusion results in improved core porcine pancreas temperature profiles during procurement and

  10. Tritiated porcine dynorphin (1-17): synthesis and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Houghten, R.A.

    1982-10-18

    Tritiated porcine dynorphin (1-17) has been prepared from its corresponding iodinated analog. The iodinated analog (diiodotyrosine at position 1) was synthesized, along with its non-iodinated counterpart, by the solid-phase method. Catalytic exchange of this iodinated analog in the presence of tritium yielded tritiated porcine dynorphin having a specific activity of 42 Ci/mmole. Both the native, iodinated and tritiated dynorphin analogs were shown to be homogenous by chromatography on carboxymethylcellulose, paper chromatography, amino acid analysis, electrophoresis, high performance liquid chromatography and isoelectric focusing on polyacrylamide.

  11. Regulation of cardiac microRNAs by serum response factor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Azhar, Gohar; Helms, Scott A; Wei, Jeanne Y

    2011-02-08

    Serum response factor (SRF) regulates certain microRNAs that play a role in cardiac and skeletal muscle development. However, the role of SRF in the regulation of microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis in cardiac hypertrophy has not been well established. In this report, we employed two distinct transgenic mouse models to study the impact of SRF on cardiac microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis. Cardiac-specific overexpression of SRF (SRF-Tg) led to altered expression of a number of microRNAs. Interestingly, downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a and upregulation of miR-21 occurred by 7 days of age in these mice, long before the onset of cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that SRF overexpression impacted the expression of microRNAs which contribute to cardiac hypertrophy. Reducing cardiac SRF level using the antisense-SRF transgenic approach (Anti-SRF-Tg) resulted in the expression of miR-1, miR-133a and miR-21 in the opposite direction. Furthermore, we observed that SRF regulates microRNA biogenesis, specifically the transcription of pri-microRNA, thereby affecting the mature microRNA level. The mir-21 promoter sequence is conserved among mouse, rat and human; one SRF binding site was found to be in the mir-21 proximal promoter region of all three species. The mir-21 gene is regulated by SRF and its cofactors, including myocardin and p49/Strap. Our study demonstrates that the downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a, and upregulation of miR-21 can be reversed by one single upstream regulator, SRF. These results may help to develop novel therapeutic interventions targeting microRNA biogenesis.

  12. MicroRNA Modulation in Obesity and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Perri, R.; Nares, S.; Zhang, S.; Barros, S.P.; Offenbacher, S.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this pilot investigation was to determine if microRNA expression differed in the presence or absence of obesity, comparing gingival biopsies obtained from patients with or without periodontal disease. Total RNA was extracted from gingival biopsy samples collected from 20 patients: 10 non-obese patients (BMI < 30 kg/m2) and 10 obese patients (BMI > 30 kg/m2), each group with 5 periodontally healthy sites and 5 chronic periodontitis sites. MicroRNA expression patterns were assessed with a quantitative microRNA PCR array to survey 88 candidate microRNA species. Four microRNA databases were used to identify potential relevant mRNA target genes of differentially expressed microRNAs. Two microRNA species (miR-18a, miR-30e) were up-regulated among obese individuals with a healthy periodontium. Two microRNA species (miR-30e, miR-106b) were up-regulated in non-obese individuals with periodontal disease. In the presence of periodontal disease and obesity, 9 of 11 listed microRNAs were significantly up-regulated (miR-15a, miR-18a, miR-22, miR-30d, miR-30e, miR-103, miR-106b, miR-130a, miR-142-3p, miR-185, and miR-210). Predicted targets include 69 different mRNAs from genes that comprise cytokines, chemokines, specific collagens, and regulators of glucose and lipid metabolism. The expression of specific microRNA species in obesity, which could also target and post-transcriptionally modulate cytokine mRNA, provides new insight into possible mechanisms of how risk factors might modify periodontal inflammation and may represent novel therapeutic targets. PMID:22043006

  13. MicroRNA in 2012: Biotherapeutic potential of microRNAs in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pers, Yves-Marie; Jorgensen, Christian

    2013-02-01

    A number of microRNAs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various rheumatic diseases, and evidence in support of the therapeutic potential of microRNA-based strategies for these conditions is growing, as demonstrated by several new findings published in 2012.

  14. Coated fatty acids alter virulence properties of Salmonella Typhimurium and decrease intestinal colonization of pigs.

    PubMed

    Boyen, F; Haesebrouck, F; Vanparys, A; Volf, J; Mahu, M; Van Immerseel, F; Rychlik, I; Dewulf, J; Ducatelle, R; Pasmans, F

    2008-12-10

    Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs are a major source of human foodborne salmonellosis. To reduce the number of infected pigs, acidification of feed or drinking water is a common practice. The aim of the present study was to determine whether some frequently used short- (SCFA) and medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) are able to alter virulence gene expression and to decrease Salmonella Typhimurium colonization and shedding in pigs using well established and controlled in vitro and in vivo assays. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 4 SCFA (formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid) and 2 MCFA (caproic and caprylic acid) were determined using 54 porcine Salmonella Typhimurium field strains. MIC values increased at increasing pH-values and were two to eight times lower for MCFA than for SCFA. Expression of virulence gene fimA was significantly lower when bacteria were grown in LB-broth supplemented with sub-MIC concentrations of caproic or caprylic acid (2 mM). Expression of hilA and invasion in porcine intestinal epithelial cells was significantly lower when bacteria were grown in LB-broth containing sub-MIC concentrations of butyric acid or propionic acid (10 mM) and caproic or caprylic acid (2 mM). When given as feed supplement to pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella Typhimurium, coated butyric acid decreased the levels of faecal shedding and intestinal colonization, but had no influence on the colonization of tonsils, spleen and liver. Uncoated fatty acids, however, did not influence fecal shedding, intestinal or tonsillar colonization in pigs. In conclusion, supplementing feed with certain coated fatty acids, such as butyric acid, may help to reduce the Salmonella load in pigs.

  15. A gene expression programme induced by bovine colostrum whey promotes growth and wound-healing processes in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blais, M; Pouliot, Y; Gauthier, S; Boutin, Y; Lessard, M

    2014-01-01

    Bovine colostrum is well known for its beneficial properties on health and development. It contains a wide variety of bioactive ingredients that are known to promote a number of cellular processes. Therefore the use of colostrum whey as a feed additive to promote intestinal health has been proposed, yet little is known about mechanisms implicated in its beneficial properties on intestinal epithelial cells. In the present paper, casein were removed from bovine colostrum and the remaining liquid, rich in bioactive compounds, was evaluated for its capacity to modulate cellular processes in porcine intestinal epithelial cell line IPEC-J2 and human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2/15. First, we verified the effect of colostrum whey and cheese whey on processes involved in intestinal wound healing, including cell proliferation, attachment, morphology and migration. Our results showed that colostrum whey promoted proliferation and migration, and decreased specifically the attachment of Caco-2/15 cells on the culture dish. On the other hand, cheese whey induced proliferation and morphological changes in IPEC-J2 cells, but failed to induce migration. The gene expression profile of IPEC-J2 cells following colostrum whey treatment was evaluated by microarray analysis. Results revealed that the expression of a significant number of genes involved in cell migration, adhesion and proliferation was indeed affected in colostrum whey-treated cells. In conclusion, colostrum specific bioactive content could be beneficial for intestinal epithelial cell homoeostasis by controlling biological processes implicated in wound healing through a precise gene expression programme.

  16. Histomorphometric evaluation of intestinal cellular immune responses in pigs immunized with live oral F4ac+ non-enterotoxigenic E. coli vaccine against postweaning colibacillosis

    PubMed Central

    Kovšca Janjatović, A.; Lacković, G.; Božić, F.; Kezić, D.; Popović, M.; Valpotić, H.; Harapin, I.; Pavižić, Ž.; Njari, B.; Valpotić, I.

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is the most common type of porcine postweaning colibacillosis (PWC). Among fimbriae of porcine ETEC strains the best studied family of fimbriae are the members of F4 adhesins, existing in at least three variants: ab, ac, ad. Active immunization against porcine PWC is difficult due to: i) ETEC strains are only one of the essential predisposing factors, ii) the success of vaccinal antigen uptake depends on the presence of enterocyte receptors for F4 adhesins, iii) the intestinal immune system may react with tolerance or hypersensitivity to the same antigens depending on the dose and form of the vaccinal immunogen, and iv) kinetics of the specific immune responses may be different in the case of F4 (earlier) and the other ETEC adhesins, particularly F18 (later). The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a live attenuated F4ac+ non-ETEC vaccine against porcine PWC by analyzing quantitative differences in the small intestinal lymphoid and myeloid cell subsets of immunized (with or without levamisole given as an adjuvant) vs control non-immunized pigs. Four week-old pigs were intragastrically immunized with a vaccine candidate F4ac + non-ETEC strain 2407 at day 0, challenged 7 days later with a virulent F4ac+ strain ETEC 11-800/1/94, euthanatized at day 13 and sampled for immunohistology. Non-immunized pigs received saline at day 0 and were processed as the principals. Immunophenotypes of lymphoid and myeloid cell subsets were demonstrated within jejunal and ileal mucosa by immunohistochemical avidinbiotin complex method and corresponding morphometric data were analyzed using software program Lucia G for digital image analyses. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with surface molecules on porcine immune cells such as CD3, CD45RA, CD45RC, CD21 and SWC3 enabled clear insight into distribution patterns and amount of these cells within the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) examined. The numbers of jejunal and

  17. US variant porcine epidemic diarrhea virus: histological lesions and genetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leyi; Hayes, Jeff; Byrum, Beverly; Zhang, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was first recognized in pigs in the United States (US) in May 2013. Since then, the virus has spread to over 30 states and caused significant economic losses in the US swine industry due to the high mortality in newborn piglets less than 2 weeks of age. A mild-variant strain OH851 of PEDV in the US was first reported in January 2014. Here, we report histological changes in the small intestines of five piglets infected with the variant strain OH851 of PEDV. The lesions observed were milder, compared to the US classical strain of PEDV. Our study, for the first time, reports the histological lesions caused by the variant PEDV OH851 strain from a field case. In addition, genomic characterization demonstrated that US variant PEDV is more closely related to European-like strains in the first 1170 nt of the 5' spike gene but to US classical PEDV strains in the remaining genome, suggesting that the variant PEDV strain may derive from a recombinant event between the US classical and European-like PEDV strains.

  18. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna-F; Caputo, Carla; De Giorgio, Roberto; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-05-21

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases.

  19. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna F; Caputo, Carla; Giorgio, Roberto De; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases. PMID:18494042

  20. Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flannigan, Kyle L.; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota that populate the mammalian intestine are critical for proper host physiology, yet simultaneously pose a potential danger. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells, namely macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are integral components of the mucosal innate immune system that maintain co-existence with the microbiota in face of this constant threat. Intestinal macrophages and DCs integrate signals from the microenvironment to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses that ultimately lead to durable tolerance of the microbiota. Tolerance is not a default response, however, because macrophages and DCs remain poised to vigorously respond to pathogens that breach the epithelial barrier. In this review, we summarize the salient features of macrophages and DCs in the healthy and inflamed intestine and discuss how signals from the microbiota can influence their function. PMID:25976247

  1. MicroRNAs associated with ischemia-reperfusion injury and cardioprotection by ischemic pre- and postconditioning: protectomiRs.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltán V; Zvara, Agnes; Faragó, Nóra; Kocsis, Gabriella F; Pipicz, Márton; Gáspár, Renáta; Bencsik, Péter; Görbe, Anikó; Csonka, Csaba; Puskás, László G; Thum, Thomas; Csont, Tamás; Ferdinandy, Péter

    2014-07-15

    We aimed to characterize early changes in microRNA expression in acute cardioprotection by ischemic pre- and postconditioning in rat hearts. Hearts isolated from male Wistar rats were subjected to 1) time-matched nonischemic perfusion, 2) ischemia-reperfusion (30 min of coronary occlusion and 120 min of reperfusion), 3) preconditioning (3 × 5 min of coronary occlusion) followed by ischemia-reperfusion, or 4) ischemia-reperfusion with postconditioning (6 × 10 s of global ischemia-reperfusion at the onset of reperfusion). Infarct size was significantly reduced by both interventions. Of 350 different microRNAs assessed by microarray analysis, 147-160 microRNAs showed detectable expression levels. Compared with microRNA alterations induced by ischemia-reperfusion versus time-matched nonischemic controls, five microRNAs were significantly affected by both pre- and postconditioning (microRNA-125b*, microRNA-139-3p, microRNA-320, microRNA-532-3p, and microRNA-188), four microRNAs were significantly affected by preconditioning (microRNA-487b, microRNA-139-5p, microRNA-192, and microRNA-212), and nine microRNAs were significantly affected by postconditioning (microRNA-1, microRNA let-7i, microRNA let-7e, microRNA let-7b, microRNA-181a, microRNA-208, microRNA-328, microRNA-335, and microRNA-503). Expression of randomly selected microRNAs was validated by quantitative real-time PCR. By a systematic comparison of the direction of microRNA expression changes in all groups, we identified microRNAs, specific mimics, or antagomiRs that may have pre- and postconditioning-like cardioprotective effects (protectomiRs). Transfection of selected protectomiRs (mimics of microRNA-139-5p, microRNA-125b*, microRNA let-7b, and inhibitor of microRNA-487b) into cardiac myocytes subjected to simulated ischemia-reperfusion showed a significant cytoprotective effect. This is the first demonstration that the ischemia-reperfusion-induced microRNA expression profile is significantly influenced by

  2. Association of Escherichia coli with the Small Intestinal Epithelium II. Variations in Association Index and the Relationship Between Association Index and Enterosorption in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bertschinger, Hans U.; Moon, Harley W.; Whipp, Shannon C.

    1972-01-01

    The association between small intestinal epithelium and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EEC) was studied in ligated intestinal loops of pigs and rabbits. The association indexes (degree of association) for each of two porcine EEC strains varied widely among pigs and independently of each other. Significant litter-to-litter variations in association indexes among colostrum-deprived newborn pigs were interpreted to be the result of congenital resistance to association with specific EEC in some pigs. Since enterosorption occurred in loops with low association indexes, it was not necessary for EEC to establish a high association index for them to cause enterosorption in ligated intestinal loops. Two strains of EEC which are enteropathogenic for humans caused enterosorption in ligated loops in pigs 3 weeks old or less but not in 6-week-old pigs. Images PMID:4564681

  3. Intestinal angioedema mimicking Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, A; Prather, C M

    1999-10-18

    Angioedema usually presents as episodic attacks of swelling of the face, airway and extremities, but it may also involve visceral tissues. A 58-year-old woman with repeated episodes of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting had two laparotomies and was treated for Crohn's disease for two years before a diagnosis of acquired intestinal angioedema was made. This case provides important insights into the presentation of intestinal angioedema.

  4. Role of microRNAs in resveratrol-mediated mitigation of colitis-associated tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Altamemi, Ibrahim; Murphy, E Angela; Catroppo, James F; Zumbrun, Elizabeth E; Zhang, Jiajia; McClellan, Jamie L; Singh, Udai P; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2014-07-01

    The pleiotropic effects of resveratrol include anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer activities, and thus unique possibilities exist to explore mechanistic pathways of chemoprevention. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of microRNA (miRNA) alterations induced by resveratrol in the context of chemopreventive mechanisms against dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis-associated tumorigenesis in the Apc(Min/+) mouse. To that end, Apc(Min/+) mice were exposed to 2% DSS to enhance intestinal inflammation and polyp development. Concurrently, mice received either vehicle or resveratrol treatment via oral gavage for 5 weeks. Interestingly, treatment of DSS-exposed mice with resveratrol resulted in decreased number and size of polyps, fewer histologic signs of cell damage, and decreased proliferating epithelial cells in intestinal mucosa compared with vehicle. Resveratrol treatment dramatically reversed the effects of DSS on the numbers of specific inflammatory CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, B cells, natural killer T cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mesenteric lymph nodes. Resveratrol treatment also decreased interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α protein levels and reduced IL-6 and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression. Microarray analysis revealed 104 miRNAs exhibiting >1.5-fold differences in expression in the intestinal tissue of resveratrol-treated mice. Among them, two miRNAs with anti-inflammatory properties, miRNA-101b and miRNA-455, were validated to be upregulated with resveratrol treatment by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Pathway analysis revealed that numerous differentially regulated miRNAs targeted mRNAs associated with inflammatory processes with known roles in intestinal tumorigenesis. These results suggest that resveratrol mediates anti-inflammatory properties and suppresses intestinal tumorigenesis through miRNA modulation.

  5. MicroRNAs in renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Arthur C.-K.; Lan, Hui Y.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous short non-coding RNAs that regulate most of important cellular processes by inhibiting gene expression through the post-transcriptional repression of their target mRNAs. In kidneys, miRNAs have been associated in renal development, homeostasis, and physiological functions. Results from clinical and experimental animal studies demonstrate that miRNAs play essential roles in the pathogenesis of various renal diseases. Chronic kidney diseases (CKD) is characterized by renal fibrosis. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is recognized as a major mediator of renal fibrosis because it is able to stimulate the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins to impair normal kidney function. Recently, emerging evidence demonstrate the relationship between TGF-β signaling and miRNAs expression during renal diseases. TGF-β regulates expression of several microRNAs, such as miR-21, miR-192, miR-200, miR-433, and miR-29. MiR-21, miR-192, and miR-433 which are positively induced by TGF-β signaling play a pathological role in kidney diseases. In contrast, members in both miR-29 and miR-200 families which are inhibited by TGF-β signaling protect kidneys from renal fibrosis by suppressing the deposition of ECM and preventing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, respectively. Clinically, the presence of miRNAs in blood and urine has been examined to be early biomarkers for detecting renal diseases. From experimental animal studies of CKD, targeting microRNAs also provides evidence about therapeutic potential of miRNAs during renal diseases. Now, it comes to the stage to examine the exact mechanisms of miRNAs during the initiation and progression of renal diseases. Therefore, determining the function of miRNAs in renal fibrosis may facilitate the development of both early diagnosis and treatment of renal diseases. PMID:25750628

  6. microRNAs and Fragile X Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is one of the major causes for autism and mental retardation in humans. The etiology of FXS is linked to the expansion of the CGG trinucleotide repeats, r(CGG), suppressing the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene on the X chromosome, resulting in a loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression, which is required for regulating normal neuronal connectivity and plasticity. Recent studies have further identified that microRNAs are involved in the mechanisms underlying FXS pathogenesis at three different developmental stages. During early embryogenesis before the blastocyst stage, an embryonic stem cell (ESC)-specific microRNA, miR-302, interferes with FMR1 mRNA translation to maintain the stem cell status and inhibit neural development. After blastocyst, the downregulation of miR-302 releases FMRP synthesis and subsequently leads to neuronal development; yet, in FXS, certain r(CGG)-derived microRNAs, such as miR-fmr1s, are expressed and accumulated and then induce DNA hypermethylation on the FMR1 gene promoter regions, resulting in transcriptional inactivation of the FMR1 gene and the loss of FMRP. In normal neuronal development, FMRP is an RNA-binding protein responsible for interacting with miR-125 and miR-132 to regulate the signaling of Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), respectively, and consequently affecting synaptic plasticity. As a result, the loss of FMRP impairs these signaling controls and eventually causes FXS-associated disorders, such as autism and mental retardation. Based on these current findings, this chapter will summarize the etiological causes of FXS and further provides significant insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying microRNA-mediated FXS pathogenesis and the related therapy development.

  7. Modulation of porcine (Sus scrofa domestica) and pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) carbonyl reducing enzymes by anthelmintic therapy with flubendazole.

    PubMed

    Szotáková, Barbora; Nobilis, Milan; Lamka, Jirí; Krízová, Veronika; Savlík, Michal; Skálová, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    Flubendazole (FLU) is a widely administered benzimidazole anthelmintic indicated for the control of parasitic diseases in farm animals including pigs and pheasants. This study was designed to test the biotransformation of FLU in control animals and animals treated with FLU in recommended therapeutic doses. The activities of several pheasant and porcine hepatic and intestinal carbonyl reducing enzymes and their modulation by FLU were also studied. Twelve adult pheasant hens, approximately 1 year old, were divided into two groups and treated for 7 days with placebo or 6 mg of FLU/kg of body weight. Eight male hog weaners, approximately 3 month old, were divided into two groups and treated for 5 days with placebo or 1.57 mg of FLU/kg of body weight. Subcellular fractions, prepared from livers and small intestines of control and FLU treated animals, were incubated with FLU. In vitro formation of two main FLU metabolites, reduced FLU, and hydrolyzed FLU were analyzed using HPLC. While FLU was reduced significantly more intensively in FLU-treated pheasants than in control animals, no differences were observed in pigs. These results were confirmed by measuring the enzyme activities: carbonyl reducing enzyme activities were increased in pheasants treated by FLU, whereas FLU did not affect these enzymes in pigs.

  8. MicroRNA biogenesis pathways in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shuibin; Gregory, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of gene expression. Amplification and overexpression of individual ‘oncomiRs’ or genetic loss of tumour suppressor miRNAs are associated with human cancer and are sufficient to drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. Furthermore, global miRNA depletion caused by genetic and epigenetic alterations in components of the miRNA biogenesis machinery is oncogenic. This, together with the recent identification of novel miRNA regulatory factors and pathways, highlights the importance of miRNA dysregulation in cancer. PMID:25998712

  9. A sense-able microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Pasquinelli, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Genes & Development, Drexel and colleagues (pp. 2042–2047) present a beautiful example of how microRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate tissue-specific gene expression in a biologically relevant setting. They found that miR-791 is expressed in only three types of carbon dioxide (CO2)-sensing neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, and its primary function there seems to be repression of two target genes that interfere with the behavioral response to CO2. Interestingly, these two targets are broadly expressed across other tissues. Thus, restricted miRNA expression can lead to target repression in select tissues to promote distinct cellular physiologies. PMID:27798846

  10. Identification of plant microRNA homologs.

    PubMed

    Dezulian, Tobias; Remmert, Michael; Palatnik, Javier F; Weigel, Detlef; Huson, Daniel H

    2006-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered class of non-coding RNAs that regulate gene and protein expression in plants and animals. MiRNAs have so far been identified mostly by specific cloning of small RNA molecules, complemented by computational methods. We present a computational identification approach that is able to identify candidate miRNA homologs in any set of sequences, given a query miRNA. The approach is based on a sequence similarity search step followed by a set of structural filters.

  11. MicroRNAs in gastric cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhaoqi; Wei, Qingxia; She, Junjun

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is common worldwide and has a high rate of metastasis. The underlying molecular mechanism of metastasis are not entirely clear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally and are reported to be involved in multiple steps of tumor metastasis. Clarifying their roles in GC metastasis will improve understanding of this disease. Here, we review the involvement of miRNAs in multiple steps of GC metastasis, including epithelial-mesenchymal transitions, anoikis, angiogenesis, invasion, and migration. The clinical application of miRNAs as prognostic biomarkers in GC is also discussed.

  12. Bio-barcode gel assay for microRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyojin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNA has been identified as a potential biomarker because expression level of microRNA is correlated with various cancers. Its detection at low concentrations would be highly beneficial for cancer diagnosis. Here, we develop a new type of a DNA-modified gold nanoparticle-based bio-barcode assay that uses a conventional gel electrophoresis platform and potassium cyanide chemistry and show this assay can detect microRNA at aM levels without enzymatic amplification. It is also shown that single-base-mismatched microRNA can be differentiated from perfectly matched microRNA and the multiplexed detection of various combinations of microRNA sequences is possible with this approach. Finally, differently expressed microRNA levels are selectively detected from cancer cells using the bio-barcode gel assay, and the results are compared with conventional polymerase chain reaction-based results. The method and results shown herein pave the way for practical use of a conventional gel electrophoresis for detecting biomolecules of interest even at aM level without polymerase chain reaction amplification.

  13. Emerging roles of microRNAs in chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Atsushi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2014-11-01

    Chronic pain is a debilitating syndrome caused by a variety of disorders, and represents a major clinical problem because of the lack of adequate medication. In chronic pain, massive changes in gene expression are observed in a variety of cells, including neurons and glia, in the overall somatosensory system from the sensory ganglia to the higher central nervous system. The protein expressions of hundreds of genes are thought to be post-transcriptionally regulated by a single type of microRNA in a sequence-specific manner. Recently, critical roles of microRNAs in the pathophysiology of chronic pain have been emerging. Genome-wide screenings of microRNA expression changes have been reported in a variety of painful conditions, including peripheral nerve injury, inflammatory diseases, cancer and spinal cord injury. The data obtained suggest that a wide range of microRNAs change their expressions in individual pain conditions, although the pathological significance of individual microRNAs as causal mediators in distinct pain conditions remains to be revealed for a limited number of microRNAs. Insights into the roles of microRNAs in chronic pain will enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic pain and allow prompt therapeutic application of microRNA-related drugs against intractable persistent pain.

  14. The Biology of Circulating MicroRNAs in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Min, Pil-Ki; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Since their first description in mammalian cells, more than 2,500 microRNA molecules have been predicted or verified within human cells. Recently, extracellular microRNAs have been described, protected from degradation by specialized packaging in extracellular vesicles or RNA-binding proteins. Such microRNAs, circulating in the bloodstream and extracellular space, have been proposed as attractive candidates as both diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in various diseases, including a spectrum of cardiovascular conditions. Moreover, consistent with our evolving appreciation of the role of exosomes and microvesicles in intercellular communication, it has been proposed that delivery of active microRNAs to recipient tissues may serve as a primary mode of intercellular communication. Indeed, the transfer of functional microRNAs has been demonstrated in in vitro models and has been reported in a few in vivo contexts. In this review, we will discuss the recent data of circulating microRNAs in cardiovascular disease with an emphasis on their potential roles as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers as well as the challenges of proving their potential clinical utility. In addition, we will discuss the evidence regarding the role of circulating microRNAs in intercellular communication as well as known molecular factors affecting their packaging, transfer, and uptake in recipient cardiovascular cell types. PMID:26046787

  15. Hypoxia-regulated microRNAs in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guomin; Li, Xiaobo; Jia, Yong-feng; Piazza, Gary A; Xi, Yaguang

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in the tumor microenvironment by allowing the development and maintenance of cancer cells, but the regulatory mechanisms by which tumor cells adapt to hypoxic conditions are not yet well understood. MicroRNAs are recognized as a new class of master regulators that control gene expression and are responsible for many normal and pathological cellular processes. Studies have shown that hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1) regulates a panel of microRNAs, whereas some of microRNAs target HIF1. The interaction between microRNAs and HIF1 can account for many vital events relevant to tumorigenesis, such as angiogenesis, metabolism, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, proliferation, metastasis, and resistance to anticancer therapy. This review will summarize recent findings on the roles of hypoxia and microRNAs in human cancer and illustrate the machinery by which microRNAs interact with hypoxia in tumor cells. It is expected to update our knowledge about the regulatory roles of microRNAs in regulating tumor microenvironments and thus benefit the development of new anticancer drugs. PMID:23377548

  16. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus among Farmed Pigs, Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Carr, John; Ellis, Richard J.; Steinbach, Falko; Williamson, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of porcine epidemic diarrhea occurred in the summer of 2014 in Ukraine, severely affecting piglets <10 days of age; the mortality rate approached 100%. Full genome sequencing showed the virus to be closely related to strains reported from North America, showing a sequence identity of up to 99.8%. PMID:26584081

  17. Shotgun proteomic analysis of porcine colostrum and mature milk.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shohei; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Nishibayashi, Ryoichiro; Nakatani, Masako; Okutani, Mie; Nakanishi, Nobuo; Ushida, Kazunari; Inoue, Ryo

    2014-04-01

    The epitheliochorial nature of the porcine placenta prevents the transfer of maternal immunity. Therefore, ingestion of the colostrum immediately after birth is crucial for neonatal piglets to acquire passive immunity from the sow. We performed a shotgun proteomic analysis of porcine milk to reveal in detail the protein composition of porcine milk. On the basis of the Swiss-Prot database, 113 and 118 proteins were identified in the porcine colostrum and mature milk, respectively, and 50 of these proteins were common to both samples. Some immune-related proteins, including interleukin-18 (IL-18), were unique to the colostrum. The IL-18 concentration in the colostrum and mature milk of four sows was measured to validate the proteomic analysis, and IL-18 was only detected in the colostrum (191.0 ± 53.9 pg/mL) and not in mature milk. In addition, some proteins involved in primary defense, such as azurocidin, which has never been detected in any other mammal's milk, were also identified in the colostrum.

  18. Dystrophin deficiency-induced changes in porcine skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel porcine stress syndrome was detected in the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center’s swine research population when two sibling barrows died of apparent stress symptoms (open mouth breathing, vocalization, and refusal to move or stand) after transport at 12 weeks of age. At eight weeks of age, the...

  19. Adenosine modulates LPS-induced cytokine production in porcine monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ondrackova, Petra; Kovaru, Hana; Kovaru, Frantisek; Leva, Lenka; Faldyna, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Adenosine plays an important role during inflammation, particularly through modulation of monocyte function. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of synthetic adenosine analogs on cytokine production by porcine monocytes. The LPS-stimulated cytokine production was measured by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR. Adenosine receptor expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. The present study demonstrates that adenosine analog N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine (NECA) down-regulates TNF-α production and up-regulates IL-8 production by LPS-stimulated porcine monocytes. The effect was more pronounced in CD163(-) subset of monocytes compared to the CD163(+) subset. Although both monocyte subsets express mRNA for A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors, the treatment of monocytes with various adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists proved that the effect of adenosine is mediated preferentially via A2A adenosine receptor. Moreover, the study suggests that the effect of NECA on porcine monocytes alters the levels of the cytokines which could play a role in the differentiation of naive T cells into Th17 cells. The results suggest that adenosine plays an important role in modulation of cytokine production by porcine monocytes.

  20. Age and nursing affect the neonatal porcine uterine transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lactocrine hypothesis for maternal programming of neonatal development was proposed to describe a mechanism through which milk-borne bioactive factors, delivered from mother to nursing offspring, could affect development of tissues, including the uterus. Porcine uterine development, initiated be...

  1. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS): an immune dysregulatory pandemic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory disease syndrome (PRRS) is a viral pandemic that especially affects neonates within the "critical window" of immunological development. PRRS was recognized in 1987 and within a few years became pandemic causing an estimated yearly $600,000 economic loss in the US...

  2. Cryopreservation of primarily isolated porcine hepatocytes with UW solution.

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Takemi; Maruyama, Masanobu; Okitsu, Teru; Shibata, Norikuni; Takesue, Michihiko; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Kosaka, Yoshikazu; Arata, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Ikeda, Hideaki; Oshita, Mizuko; Nakaji, Shuhei; Ohmoto, Kenji; Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Kurabayashi, Yuzuru; Kodama, Makoto; Tanaka, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    Development of liver-targeted cell therapies, such as hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial livers, requires a large amount of functional hepatocytes as needed. To achieve this development, establishing an excellent cryopreservation method of hepatocytes is an extremely important issue. Therefore, we performed a comparative review of cryoprotective effects of various cryopreservation solutions using primarily isolated porcine hepatocytes. Porcine hepatocytes were isolated with a four-step dispase and collagenase perfusion method. The obtained hepatocytes with the initial viabilities of 76%, 84%, and 96% were assigned to the following four groups for cryopreservation at -80 degrees C: Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) + 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) + 12% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (group A), University of Wisconsin (UW) solution + 12% DMSO (group B), Cell Banker 1 (group C), and Cell Banker 2 (group D). The hepatocytes in each group were thawed at 3 days, 10 days, and 5 months of cryopreservation and subjected to comparative analyses, including viability, plating efficiency, LDH release, ammonia removal test, and lentiviral gene transfer. These parameters were the most favorable in the hepatocytes cryopreserved with UW solution. Approximately 5% of thawed cryopreserved porcine hepatocytes expressed LacZ activity after lentiviral transduction. Intrasplenic transplantation of UW solution-cryopreserved hepatocytes improved the survival of rats treated with D-galactosamine. UW solution maintained the functions of cryopreserved porcine hepatocytes.

  3. Osteogenic and adipogenic potential of porcine adipose mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chang-qing; Zhang, Guo-hua; Zhang, Li-jie; Yang, Gong-she

    2007-02-01

    Human, rat, and mouse studies have demonstrated the existence of a population of adipose mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) that can undergo multilineage differentiation in vitro. Understanding the clinical potential of AMSCs may require their use in preclinical large-animal models such as pigs. Thus, the objectives of this study were to establish a protocol for the isolation of porcine AMSCs from adipose tissue and to examine their ex vivo differentiation potential to adipocytes and osteoblast. The porcine AMSCs from passage 4 were selected for differentiation analysis. The adipocytes were identified morphologically by staining with Oil Red O, and the adipogenic marker genes were examined by RT-PCR technique. Osteogenic lineage was documented by deposition of calcium stained with Alzarin Red S, visualization of alkaline phosphatase activity, and expression of marker gene. Our result indicates that porcine AMSCs have been successfully isolated and induced differentiation into adipocytes and osteoblasts. This study suggested that porcine AMSCs are also a valuable model system for the study on the mesenchymal lineages for basic research and tissue engineering.

  4. Introduction to porcine red blood cells: implications for xenotransfusion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, A

    2000-04-01

    Advances in the field of xenotransplantation raise the intriguing possibility of using porcine red blood cells (pRBCs) as an alternative source for blood transfusion. The domestic pig is considered the most likely donor species for xenotransplantation. However, identification of xenoantigens on porcine erythrocytes and elucidation of their possible roles in antibody-mediated RBC destruction are necessary for developing clinical strategies to circumvent immunological incompatibility between humans and pigs. Although the alphaGal epitope (Galalpha1,3Galbeta1,4GIcNAc-R) is the major xenoantigen on porcine erythrocytes and is responsible for the binding of the majority of human natural antibodies, other non-alphaGal xenoantigens have been identified. The importance of these non-alphaGal xenoantigens in binding human natural antibodies and subsequently triggering immunological responses cannot be underestimated. Our data suggest that non-alphaGal xenoantigen(s) identified on the porcine erythrocyte membrane are not only recognized by xenoreactive human natural antibodies but are also involved in complement-mediated hemolysis.

  5. Blood gas and hematological changes in experimental peracute porcine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiorpes, A L; MacWilliams, P S; Schenkman, D I; Bäckström, L R

    1990-01-01

    The effect of experimental, peracute, porcine pleuropneumonia on arterial blood gases, acid base status, the leukogram, and gross and microscopic lung structure was studied in nine growing pigs (mean weight +/- SD 10.6 +/- 2.0 kg). Pigs were inoculated intranasally with a virulent serotype 5 isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and all showed signs typical of the disease within four hours. Death occurred in all pigs from 4.5 to 32 hours postinoculation (mean 14 hours). Gross and microscopic changes were typical of porcine pleuropneumonia in all pigs. Changes in the leukogram included a rapid decline in total white cells, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and eosinophils. Pigs maintained alveolar ventilation throughout the study as arterial CO2 tension was unchanged; however, arterial O2 tension and pH decreased from (mean +/- SD) 95.2 +/- 5.7 torr and 7.463 +/- 0.018 at baseline to 62.1 +/- 12.3 torr and 7.388 +/- 0.045, respectively, within 90 minutes prior to death. The data showed that in this model of peracute porcine pleuropneumonia, progressive ventilatory failure was not a feature of the disease, and the blood gas values and acid base status were maintained within physiological ranges. The histopathological hematological and physiological findings were consistent with the hypothesis that peracute porcine pleuropneumonia resembles septic shock. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2106382

  6. Porcine circovirus: transcription and rolling-circle DNA replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review summarizes the molecular studies pertaining to porcine circovirus (PCV) transcription and DNA replication. The genome of PCV is circular, single-stranded DNA and contains 1759-1768 nucleotides. Both the genome-strand (packaged in the virus particle) and the complementary-strand (synthesi...

  7. Detection of a Novel Porcine Parvovirus in Chinese Swine Herds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine whether the recently reported novel porcine parvovirus type 4 (PPV4) is prevalent in China, a set of PPV4 specific primers were designed and used for the molecular survey of PPV4 among clinical samples. The results indicated a positive detection for PPV4 in Chinese swine herds of 1.84% ...

  8. A hypothetical model of host-pathogen interaction of Streptococcus suis in the gastro-intestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Maria Laura; Schultsz, Constance

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus suis (SS) is a zoonotic pathogen that can cause systemic infection in pigs and humans. The ingestion of contaminated pig meat is a well-established risk factor for zoonotic S. suis disease. In our studies, we provide experimental evidence that S. suis is capable to translocate across the host gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) using in vivo and in vitro models. Hence, S. suis should be considered an emerging foodborne pathogen. In this addendum, we give an overview of the complex interactions between S. suis and host-intestinal mucosa which depends on the host origin, the serotype and genotype of S. suis, as well as the presence and expression of virulence factors involved in host-pathogen interaction. Finally, we propose a hypothetical model of S. suis interaction with the host-GIT taking in account differences in conditions between the porcine and human host. PMID:26900998

  9. Structural and functional annotation of the porcine immunome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The domestic pig is known as an excellent model for human immunology and the two species share many pathogens. Susceptibility to infectious disease is one of the major constraints on swine performance, yet the structure and function of genes comprising the pig immunome are not well-characterized. The completion of the pig genome provides the opportunity to annotate the pig immunome, and compare and contrast pig and human immune systems. Results The Immune Response Annotation Group (IRAG) used computational curation and manual annotation of the swine genome assembly 10.2 (Sscrofa10.2) to refine the currently available automated annotation of 1,369 immunity-related genes through sequence-based comparison to genes in other species. Within these genes, we annotated 3,472 transcripts. Annotation provided evidence for gene expansions in several immune response families, and identified artiodactyl-specific expansions in the cathelicidin and type 1 Interferon families. We found gene duplications for 18 genes, including 13 immune response genes and five non-immune response genes discovered in the annotation process. Manual annotation provided evidence for many new alternative splice variants and 8 gene duplications. Over 1,100 transcripts without porcine sequence evidence were detected using cross-species annotation. We used a functional approach to discover and accurately annotate porcine immune response genes. A co-expression clustering analysis of transcriptomic data from selected experimental infections or immune stimulations of blood, macrophages or lymph nodes identified a large cluster of genes that exhibited a correlated positive response upon infection across multiple pathogens or immune stimuli. Interestingly, this gene cluster (cluster 4) is enriched for known general human immune response genes, yet contains many un-annotated porcine genes. A phylogenetic analysis of the encoded proteins of cluster 4 genes showed that 15% exhibited an accelerated

  10. microRNAs in Essential Hypertension and Blood Pressure Regulation.

    PubMed

    Marques, Francine Z; Charchar, Fadi J

    2015-01-01

    Unravelling the complete genetic predisposition to high blood pressure (BP) has proven to be challenging. This puzzle and the fact that coding regions of the genome account for less than 2 % of the entire human DNA support the hypothesis that mechanisms besides coding genes are likely to contribute to BP regulation. Non-coding RNAs, especially microRNAs, are emerging as key players of transcription regulation in both health and disease states. They control basic functions in virtually all cell types relevant to the cardiovascular system and, thus, a direct involvement with BP regulation is highly probable. Here we review the literature about microRNAs associated with regulation of BP and hypertension, highlighting investigations, methodology and difficulties arising in the field. These molecules are being studied for exploitation in diagnostics, prognostics and therapeutics in many diseases. There have been some studies that examined biological fluid microRNAs as biomarkers for hypertension, but most remain inconclusive due to the small sample sizes and differences in methodological standardisation. Fewer studies have analysed tissue microRNA levels in vascular smooth muscle cells and the kidney. Others focused on the interaction between single nucleotide polymorphisms and microRNA binding sites. Studies in animals have shown that angiotensin II, high-salt diet and exercise change microRNA levels in hypertension. Treatment of spontaneously hypertensive rats with a miR-22 inhibitor and treatment of hypertensive Schlager BPH/2J mice with a miR-181a mimic decreased their BP. This supports the use of microRNAs as therapeutic targets in hypertension, and future studies should test the use of other microRNAs found in human association studies. In conclusion, there is a clear need of increased pace of human, animal and functional studies to help us understand the multifaceted roles of microRNAs as critical regulators of the development and physiology of BP.

  11. Salvianolic Acid B Restored Impaired Barrier Function via Downregulation of MLCK by microRNA-1 in Rat Colitis Model.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yongjian; Wang, Jingyu; Chu, Hongwei; Chen, Dapeng; Guo, Huishu

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is isolated from the traditional Chinese medical herb Salvia miltiorrhiza and is reported to have a wide range of therapeutic benefits. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Sal B on epithelial barrier dysfunction in rat colitis and to uncover related mechanisms. Rat colitis model was established by intracolonic administration of 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The intestinal barrier function was evaluated by measuring the serum recovery of fluorescein isothiocyanate-4 kD dextran in vivo and transepithelial electrical resistance in vitro respectively. The protein expression related to intestinal barrier function was studied using western blotting. The effects of Sal B on inflammatory responses, oxidative damage and colitis recurrence were also studied in this study. The intestinal barrier dysfunction in colitis was reversed by Sal B, accompanied with the decrease of tight junction proteins, and the effect could be blocked by microRNA-1(miR-1) inhibition. The inflammatory responses, oxidative damage and colitis recurrence were also decreased by Sal B. The colitis symptoms and recurrences were ameliorated by Sal B, and restoration of impaired barrier function via downregulation of MLCK by miR-1 maybe involved in this effect. This study provides some novel insights into both of the pathological mechanisms and treatment alternatives of inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Salvianolic Acid B Restored Impaired Barrier Function via Downregulation of MLCK by microRNA-1 in Rat Colitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yongjian; Wang, Jingyu; Chu, Hongwei; Chen, Dapeng; Guo, Huishu

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is isolated from the traditional Chinese medical herb Salvia miltiorrhiza and is reported to have a wide range of therapeutic benefits. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Sal B on epithelial barrier dysfunction in rat colitis and to uncover related mechanisms. Rat colitis model was established by intracolonic administration of 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The intestinal barrier function was evaluated by measuring the serum recovery of fluorescein isothiocyanate-4 kD dextran in vivo and transepithelial electrical resistance in vitro respectively. The protein expression related to intestinal barrier function was studied using western blotting. The effects of Sal B on inflammatory responses, oxidative damage and colitis recurrence were also studied in this study. The intestinal barrier dysfunction in colitis was reversed by Sal B, accompanied with the decrease of tight junction proteins, and the effect could be blocked by microRNA-1(miR-1) inhibition. The inflammatory responses, oxidative damage and colitis recurrence were also decreased by Sal B. The colitis symptoms and recurrences were ameliorated by Sal B, and restoration of impaired barrier function via downregulation of MLCK by miR-1 maybe involved in this effect. This study provides some novel insights into both of the pathological mechanisms and treatment alternatives of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27303297

  13. The role of viral and host microRNAs in the Aujeszky's disease virus during the infection process.

    PubMed

    Timoneda, Oriol; Núñez-Hernández, Fernando; Balcells, Ingrid; Muñoz, Marta; Castelló, Anna; Vera, Gonzalo; Pérez, Lester J; Egea, Raquel; Mir, Gisela; Córdoba, Sarai; Rosell, Rosa; Segalés, Joaquim; Tomàs, Anna; Sánchez, Armand; Núñez, José I

    2014-01-01

    Porcine production is a primary market in the world economy. Controlling swine diseases in the farm is essential in order to achieve the sector necessities. Aujeszky's disease is a viral condition affecting pigs and is endemic in many countries of the world, causing important economic losses in the swine industry. microRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs which modulates gene expression in animals, plants and viruses. With the aim of understanding miRNA roles during the Aujeszky's disease virus [ADV] (also known as suid herpesvirus type 1 [SuHV-1]) infection, the expression profiles of host and viral miRNAs were determined through deep sequencing in SuHV-1 infected porcine cell line (PK-15) and in an animal experimental SuHV-1 infection with virulent (NIA-3) and attenuated (Begonia) strains. In the in vivo approach miR-206, miR-133a, miR-133b and miR-378 presented differential expression between virus strains infection. In the in vitro approach, most miRNAs were down-regulated in infected groups. miR-92a and miR-92b-3p were up-regulated in Begonia infected samples. Functional analysis of all this over expressed miRNAs during the infection revealed their association in pathways related to viral infection processes and immune response. Furthermore, 8 viral miRNAs were detected by stem loop RT-qPCR in both in vitro and in vivo approaches, presenting a gene regulatory network affecting 59 viral genes. Most described viral miRNAs were related to Large Latency Transcript (LLT) and to viral transcription activators EP0 and IE180, and also to regulatory genes regarding their important roles in the host-pathogen interaction during viral infection.

  14. MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities and Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Detroit, MI. Little is known about the role of microRNAs ( miRNAs ) and their biogenesis in prostate cancer (PCa), and less is understood about the possible...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0477 TITLE: MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities and Aggressiveness PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cathryn...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sept 2013-29 Sept 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial

  15. MicroRNAs as Mediators of Viral Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Bryan R.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular microRNAs play a key role in the post-transcriptional regulation of almost every cellular gene regulatory pathway and it therefore is not surprising that viruses have found ways to subvert this process. Several viruses encode microRNAs that directly downregulate the expression of innate immune factors, including proteins involved in promoting apoptosis and recruiting immune effector cells. Viruses have also evolved the ability to downregulate or upregulate specific cellular miRNAs in order to enhance their replication. This perspective provides an overview of our current knowledge of the complex interplay of viruses with the microRNA machinery of cells. PMID:23416678

  16. Kangaroo vs. porcine aortic valves: calcification potential after glutaraldehyde fixation.

    PubMed

    Narine, K; Chéry, Cyrille C; Goetghebeur, Els; Forsyth, R; Claeys, E; Cornelissen, Maria; Moens, L; Van Nooten, G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the calcification potential of kangaroo and porcine aortic valves after glutaraldehyde fixation at both low (0.6%) and high (2.0%) concentrations of glutaraldehyde in the rat subcutaneous model. To our knowledge this is the first report comparing the time-related, progressive calcification of these two species in the rat subcutaneous model. Twenty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were each implanted with two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 0.6% glutaraldehyde and two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 2% glutaraldehyde respectively. Animals were sacrificed after 24 h and thereafter weekly for up to 10 weeks after implantation. Calcium content was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and confirmed histologically. Mean calcium content per milligram of tissue (dry weight) treated with 0.6 and 2% glutaraldehyde was 116.2 and 110.4 microg/mg tissue for kangaroo and 95.0 and 106.8 microg/mg tissue for porcine valves. Calcium content increased significantly over time (8.8 microg/mg tissue per week) and was not significantly different between groups. Regression analysis of calcification over time showed no significant difference in calcification of valves treated with 0.6 or 2% glutaraldehyde within and between the two species. Using the subcutaneous model, we did not detect a difference in calcification potential between kangaroo and porcine aortic valves treated with either high or low concentrations of glutaraldehyde.

  17. [Construction and specificity of porcine bmp15 gene reporter vector].

    PubMed

    Qin, Mingming; Wei, Jianghua; Yu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jinglong; Liu, Xiaopeng; Ma, Xiaoling; Wang, Huayan

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the express specificity of bone morphogenetic protein 15 (Bmp15) in porcine. The pBMP15-EGFP reporter vector was constructed from the 2.2 kb fragment of porcine bmp15 promoter to trace the differentiation process of stem cells into oocyte-like cells. We used porcine ovary and Chinese Hamster Ovary cell line (CHO), mouse myoblast cell line (C2C12) and porcine amniotic fluid stem cell (pAFSC) to investigate the expression and regulation of this gene via RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, cell transfection, and microinjection methods. We also used single layer cell differentiation to detect the application potential of bmp15. The results show that bmp15 gene was specifically expressed in the porcine ovary and CHO rather than in C2C12 and pAFSC. In addition, the characteristic of tissue-specific of Bmp15 was detected on CHO instead of other cell lines by transient transfection. We also detected the expression of Bmp15 in oocyte at different development stages by immunofluorescence of fixed paraffin-embedded ovary sections. Furthermore, microinjection results show that bmp15 expressed in oocytes at 18 h of maturation in vitro, and continued up to 4-cell stage embryos. Most importantly, we found that the expression of Bmp15 started at day 12 after inducing pAFSC into oocyte-like cells by transfection; green fluorescent was visible in round cell masses. It indicated that bmp15 has the expression specificity and the pBMP15-EGFP reporter vector can be used to trace Bmp15 action in the differentiation of stem cells into germ cells.

  18. Dietary MicroRNA Database (DMD): An Archive Database and Analytic Tool for Food-Borne microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kevin; Shu, Jiang; Zempleni, Janos; Cui, Juan

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of high throughput technology, a huge amount of microRNA information has been added to the growing body of knowledge for non-coding RNAs. Here we present the Dietary MicroRNA Databases (DMD), the first repository for archiving and analyzing the published and novel microRNAs discovered in dietary resources. Currently there are fifteen types of dietary species, such as apple, grape, cow milk, and cow fat, included in the database originating from 9 plant and 5 animal species. Annotation for each entry, a mature microRNA indexed as DM0000*, covers information of the mature sequences, genome locations, hairpin structures of parental pre-microRNAs, cross-species sequence comparison, disease relevance, and the experimentally validated gene targets. Furthermore, a few functional analyses including target prediction, pathway enrichment and gene network construction have been integrated into the system, which enable users to generate functional insights through viewing the functional pathways and building protein-protein interaction networks associated with each microRNA. Another unique feature of DMD is that it provides a feature generator where a total of 411 descriptive attributes can be calculated for any given microRNAs based on their sequences and structures. DMD would be particularly useful for research groups studying microRNA regulation from a nutrition point of view. The database can be accessed at http://sbbi.unl.edu/dmd/.

  19. Dietary MicroRNA Database (DMD): An Archive Database and Analytic Tool for Food-Borne microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kevin; Shu, Jiang; Zempleni, Janos; Cui, Juan

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of high throughput technology, a huge amount of microRNA information has been added to the growing body of knowledge for non-coding RNAs. Here we present the Dietary MicroRNA Databases (DMD), the first repository for archiving and analyzing the published and novel microRNAs discovered in dietary resources. Currently there are fifteen types of dietary species, such as apple, grape, cow milk, and cow fat, included in the database originating from 9 plant and 5 animal species. Annotation for each entry, a mature microRNA indexed as DM0000*, covers information of the mature sequences, genome locations, hairpin structures of parental pre-microRNAs, cross-species sequence comparison, disease relevance, and the experimentally validated gene targets. Furthermore, a few functional analyses including target prediction, pathway enrichment and gene network construction have been integrated into the system, which enable users to generate functional insights through viewing the functional pathways and building protein-protein interaction networks associated with each microRNA. Another unique feature of DMD is that it provides a feature generator where a total of 411 descriptive attributes can be calculated for any given microRNAs based on their sequences and structures. DMD would be particularly useful for research groups studying microRNA regulation from a nutrition point of view. The database can be accessed at http://sbbi.unl.edu/dmd/. PMID:26030752

  20. In vivo characterization of ischemic small intestine using bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Strand-Amundsen, R J; Tronstad, C; Kalvøy, H; Gundersen, Y; Krohn, C D; Aasen, A O; Holhjem, L; Reims, H M; Martinsen, Ø G; Høgetveit, J O; Ruud, T E; Tønnessen, T I

    2016-02-01

    The standard clinical method for the assessment of viability in ischemic small intestine is still visual inspection and palpation. This method is non-specific and unreliable, and requires a high level of clinical experience. Consequently, viable tissue might be removed, or irreversibly damaged tissue might be left in the body, which may both slow down patient recovery. Impedance spectroscopy has been used to measure changes in electrical parameters during ischemia in various tissues. The physical changes in the tissue at the cellular and structural levels after the onset of ischemia lead to time-variant changes in the electrical properties. We aimed to investigate the use of bioimpedance measurement to assess if the tissue is ischemic, and to assess the ischemic time duration. Measurements were performed on pigs (n = 7) using a novel two-electrode setup, with a Solartron 1260/1294 impedance gain-phase analyser. After induction of anaesthesia, an ischemic model with warm, full mesenteric arterial and venous occlusion on 30 cm of the jejunum was implemented. Electrodes were placed on the serosal surface of the ischemic jejunum, applying a constant voltage, and measuring the resulting electrical admittance. As a control, measurements were done on a fully perfused part of the jejunum in the same porcine model. The changes in tan δ (dielectric parameter), measured within a 6 h period of warm, full mesenteric occlusion ischemia in seven pigs, correlates with the onset and duration of ischemia. Tan δ measured in the ischemic part of the jejunum differed significantly from the control tissue, allowing us to determine if the tissue was ischemic or not (P < 0.0001, F = (1,75.13) 188.19). We also found that we could use tan δ to predict ischemic duration. This opens up the possibility of real-time monitoring and assessment of the presence and duration of small intestinal ischemia.

  1. Hsp90 inhibitor reduces porcine circovirus 2 replication in the porcine monocytic line 3D4/31.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xuliang; Ma, Chang; Jiang, Ping; Yun, Shifeng

    2017-02-01

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is an important pathogen of swine, which causes porcine circovirus disease and porcine circovirus-associated diseases (PCVD/PCVAD). However, no effective countermeasures exist to combat this virus infection so far. Recently, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) was found to be an important host factor for the replication of multiple viruses and the inhibition of Hsp90 showed significant antiviral effects. Inhibition of Hsp90 by treatment of porcine monocytic line 3D4/31 with geldanamycin (GA), a specific inhibitor of Hsp90, caused a 70 % decrease in viral Cap protein expression. Further, individual knockdown targeting Hsp90α or Hsp90β with siRNAs resulted in down to 20-25 % of decrease in viral replication, and inhibited the PCV2 titer by approximately 12- and 15-fold, respectively. In addition, we investigated alteration of several cytokine production in PCV2-infected cells following treatment with GA. Then, we found that GA could decrease IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p40 mRNA levels, respectively, by 30, 40, and 40 % in PCV2-infected cells. Our results shed light on the possibility of developing potential therapeutics targeting Hsp90 against PCV2 infection.

  2. An in-depth comparison of the porcine, murine and human inflammasomes; lessons from the porcine genome and transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence suggests that swine are a scientifically acceptable intermediate species between rodents and humans to model immune function relevant to humans. The swine genome has recently been sequenced and several preliminary structural and functional analysis of the porcine immunome have been...

  3. Light-regulated microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Jayanthy, Ashika; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2015-01-01

    In addition to exposure to passive diurnal cycles of sunlight, humans are also subjected to intentional acute exposure to other types of electromagnetic radiation (EM). Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the physiological, pathological and therapeutic responses to exposure to radiation is an active area of research. With the advent of methods to readily catalog and identify patterns of changes in gene expression, many studies have reported changes in gene expression upon exposure of various human and mouse cells in vitro, whole experimental organisms such as mice and parts of human body. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these broad ranging changes in gene expression are not yet fully understood. MicroRNAs, which are short, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeting many messenger RNAs, are also emerging as important mediators of radiation-induced changes in gene expression and hence critical for the manifestation of light-induced cellular phenotypes and physiological responses. In this article, we review available knowledge on microRNAs implicated in responses to various forms of solar and other EM radiation. Based on this knowledge, we elaborate some unifying themes in the regulation and functions of some of these miRNAs.

  4. Circulating microRNAs in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Orlicka-Płocka, Marta; Gurda, Dorota; Fedoruk-Wyszomirska, Agnieszka; Smolarek, Iwona; Wyszko, Eliza

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CD) are currently one of the most common causes of death. Because heart related deaths occur on such an enormous scale this phenomenon is referred to as an epidemic. Chronic and acute injury of the heart could be an effect of cardiac remodeling, which is a result of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes, influenced by hemodynamic load or neurohormonal activation (Cohn et al., 2000). These small deviations in cardiac activity and morphology may lead to an enormous negative effect. Despite a significant progress, knowledge of standard risk factors for cardiovascular diseases has become less and less effective, which is why predicting and seeking an appropriate treatment is very challenging. As a result, there is a growing interest in finding new markers of the CD. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), are short, non-coding RNAs responsible for regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Among them that have the greatest potential are microRNA molecules that circulate in the blood plasma or serum, that are related to direct activation of signaling pathways, implicated in the aging process and thus for the development of cardiovascular disease. This paper is a summary of the current state of knowledge on miRNAs, their biogenesis and potential role as biomarkers to diagnose heart disease.

  5. Intestinal microbiota and overweight.

    PubMed

    Lyra, A; Lahtinen, S; Tiihonen, K; Ouwehand, A C

    2010-11-01

    The microbes in our gut can influence our weight by providing us with energy through the degradation of nondigestable carbohydrates and by affecting the cellular energy status of liver and muscle cells and the accumulation of lipids in adipose tissue. Thus, it is not surprising that in several studies the gastrointestinal microbiota of overweight and obese subjects has been found to differ from that of lean subjects. The initial findings linked obesity with proportionally decreased levels of the phylum Bacteroidetes and increased levels of the phylum Firmicutes. Later, several studies have assessed the association between overweight or obesity and the gastrointestinal microbiota, applying an array of molecular methods targeting the microbiota as a whole or specific bacterial groups or species within. However, at present it is difficult to draw conclusions on which of the observed microbiota alterations are relevant; essentially all of the bacterial groups that have been studied in more than one trial have given contradictory results in regard to their association with weight. Some of these discrepancies can result from methodological issues and some from the nature of the gastrointestinal microbiota, which is an extremely complex and dynamic microbial ecosystem with high subject specificity. In addition, selecting subjects purely based on weight may result in a largely heterogeneous group with several potentially confounding factors. While it may be premature to conclude which specific groups of bacteria are prominent in the intestinal tract of overweight and obese subjects, it appears clear that microbes contribute to weight gain and related health issues, such as the metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes. Therefore, it is important to continue to search for common microbial markers and predictors of obesity, and to study how these may be modulated with probiotics and prebiotics to promote health.

  6. Microarray analysis of microRNA expression in the developing mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Miska, Eric A; Alvarez-Saavedra, Ezequiel; Townsend, Matthew; Yoshii, Akira; Šestan, Nenad; Rakic, Pasko; Constantine-Paton, Martha; Horvitz, H Robert

    2004-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are a large new class of tiny regulatory RNAs found in nematodes, plants, insects and mammals. MicroRNAs are thought to act as post-transcriptional modulators of gene expression. In invertebrates microRNAs have been implicated as regulators of developmental timing, neuronal differentiation, cell proliferation, programmed cell death and fat metabolism. Little is known about the roles of microRNAs in mammals. Results We isolated 18-26 nucleotide RNAs from developing rat and monkey brains. From the sequences of these RNAs and the sequences of the rat and human genomes we determined which of these small RNAs are likely to have derived from stem-loop precursors typical of microRNAs. Next, we developed a microarray technology suitable for detecting microRNAs and printed a microRNA microarray representing 138 mammalian microRNAs corresponding to the sequences of the microRNAs we cloned as well as to other known microRNAs. We used this microarray to determine the profile of microRNAs expressed in the developing mouse brain. We observed a temporal wave of expression of microRNAs, suggesting that microRNAs play important roles in the development of the mammalian brain. Conclusion We describe a microarray technology that can be used to analyze the expression of microRNAs and of other small RNAs. MicroRNA microarrays offer a new tool that should facilitate studies of the biological roles of microRNAs. We used this method to determine the microRNA expression profile during mouse brain development and observed a temporal wave of gene expression of sequential classes of microRNAs. PMID:15345052

  7. In depth global analysis of transcript abundance levels in porcine alveolar macrophages following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. Infection of the primary target cells, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not under...

  8. In depth global analysis of gene expression levels in porcine alveolar macrophages following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide. Infection of the preferential target cells, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not understood. Serial Analysis of Gene Ex...

  9. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting the length of small intestine in a White Duroc x Chinese Erhualian intercross resource population.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; Ren, J; Zhou, L H; Ren, D R; Li, L; Xiao, S J; Yang, B; Huang, L S

    2010-04-01

    The small intestine is a vital organ in animal gastrointestinal system, in which a large variety of nutrients are absorbed. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for the length of porcine small intestine, phenotypic values were measured in 1034 individuals at 240 d from a White Duroc x Chinese Erhualian intercross F(2) population. The length of small intestine showed strong correlation with growth traits and carcass length in the F2 population. A whole-genome scan was performed based on 183 microsatellites covering the pig genome in the F(2) population. A total of 10 QTL for this trait were identified on 8 pig chromosomes (SSC), including four 1% genome-wide significant QTL on SSC2, 4, 7 and 8, one 5% genome-wide significant QTL on SSC12, and five 5% chromosome-wide significant QTL on SSC5, 7, 13 and 14. The Erhualian alleles were generally associated with shorter length of the small intestine except the alleles on SSC7 and 13. The QTL on SSC4 overlapped with the previously reported QTL for the length of small intestine. Several significant QTL on SSC2, 8, and 12 were consistent with previous reports. The significant QTL detected on SSC7 was reported for the first time. All QTL identified in this study corresponded to the known region significantly associated with growth traits, supporting the important role of the length of small intestine in pig growth.

  10. Stress, Nutrition, and Intestinal Immune Responses in Pigs — A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In Kyu; Kye, Yoon Chul; Kim, Girak; Kim, Han Wool; Gu, Min Jeong; Umboh, Johnny; Maaruf, Kartini; Kim, Sung Woo; Yun, Cheol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    Modern livestock production became highly intensive and large scaled to increase production efficiency. This production environment could add stressors affecting the health and growth of animals. Major stressors can include environment (air quality and temperature), nutrition, and infection. These stressors can reduce growth performance and alter immune systems at systemic and local levels including the gastrointestinal tract. Heat stress increases the permeability, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses in the gut. Nutritional stress from fasting, antinutritional compounds, and toxins induces the leakage and destruction of the tight junction proteins in the gut. Fasting is shown to suppress pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas deoxynivalenol increases the recruitment of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and the level of lymphocytes in the gut. Pathogenic and viral infections such as Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus can lead to loosening the intestinal epithelial barrier. On the other hand, supplementation of Lactobacillus or Saccharaomyces reduced infectious stress by ETEC. It was noted that major stressors altered the permeability of intestinal barriers and profiles of genes and proteins of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in mucosal system in pigs. However, it is not sufficient to fully explain the mechanism of the gut immune system in pigs under stress conditions. Correlation and interaction of gut and systemic immune system under major stressors should be better defined to overcome aforementioned obstacles. PMID:27189643