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Sample records for pore complex localization

  1. Immunocytochemical localization of the major polypeptides of the nuclear pore complex-lamina fraction. Interphase and mitotic distribution

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    This laboratory has previously isolated a fraction from rat liver nuclei consisting of nuclear pore complexes associated with the proteinaceous lamina which underlies the inner nuclear membrane. Using protein eluted from sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gels, we have prepared antibodies in chickens to each of the three predominant pore complex- lamina bands. Ouchterlony double diffusion analysis shows that each of these individual bands cross-reacts strongly with all three antisera. In immunofluorescence localization performed on tissue culture cells with these antibodies, we obtain a pattern of intense staining at the periphery of the interphase nucleus, with little or no cytoplasmic reaction. Electron microscope immunoperoxidase staining of rat liver nuclei with these antibodies labels exclusively the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, reaction occurs in areas which contain the lamina, but not at the pore complexes. While our isolation procedure extracts the internal contents of nuclei completely, semiquantitative Ouchterlony analysis shows that it releases negligible amounts of these lamina antigens. Considered together, our results indicate that these three bands represent major components of a peripheral nuclear lamina, and are not structural elements of an internal "nuclear protein matrix." Fluorescence microscopy shows that the perinuclear interphase localization of these lamina proteins undergoes dramatic changes during mitosis. Concomitant with nuclear envelope disassembly in prophase, these antigens assume a diffuse localization throughout the cell. This distribution persists until telophase, when the antigens become progressively and completely localized at the surface of the daughter chromosome masses. We propose that the lamina is a biological polymer which can undergo reversible disassembly during mitosis. PMID:102651

  2. SU-E-J-61: Electrodynamics and Nano-Scale Fluid Dynamics in Protein Localization of Nuclear Pore Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J; Gatenby, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a simulation to catalyze a reevaluation of common assumptions about 3 dimensional diffusive processes and help cell biologists gain a more nuanced, intuitive understanding of the true physical hurdles of protein signaling cascades. Furthermore, to discuss the possibility of intracellular electrodynamics as a critical, unrecognized component of cellular biology and protein dynamics that is necessary for optimal information flow from the cell membrane to the nucleus. Methods: The Unity 3D gaming physics engine was used to build an accurate virtual scale model of the cytoplasm within a few hundred nanometers of the nuclear membrane. A cloud of simulated pERK proteins is controlled by the physics simulation, where diffusion is based on experimentally measured values and the electrodynamics are based on theoretical nano-fluid dynamics. The trajectories of pERK within the cytoplasm and through the 1250 nuclear pores on the nuclear surface is recorded and analyzed. Results: The simulation quickly demonstrates that pERKs moving solely by diffusion will rarely locate and come within capture distance of a nuclear pore. The addition of intracellular electrodynamics between charges on the nuclear pore complexes and on pERKs increases the number of successful translocations by allowing the electro-physical attractive effects to draw in pERKs from the cytoplasm. The effects of changes in intracellular shielding ion concentrations allowed for estimation of the “capture radius” under varying conditions. Conclusion: The simulation allows a shift in perspective that is paramount in attempting to communicate the scale and dynamics of intracellular protein cascade mechanics. This work has allowed researchers to more fully understand the parameters involved in intracellular electrodynamics, such as shielding anion concentration and protein charge. As these effects are still far below the spatial resolution of currently available measurement technology this

  3. Assembly and Preferential Localization of Nup116p on the Cytoplasmic Face of the Nuclear Pore Complex by Interaction with Nup82p

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Albert K.; Shen, Tian Xiang; Ryan, Kathryn J.; Kiseleva, Elena; Levy, Marilyn Aach; Allen, Terence D.; Wente, Susan R.

    2000-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleoporin Nup116p serves as a docking site for both nuclear import and export factors. However, the mechanism for assembling Nup116p into the nuclear pore complex (NPC) has not been resolved. By conducting a two-hybrid screen with the carboxy (C)-terminal Nup116p region as bait, we identified Nup82p. The predicted coiled-coil region of Nup82p was not required for Nup116p interaction, making the binding requirements distinct from those for the Nsp1p-Nup82p-Nup159p subcomplex (N. Belgareh, C. Snay-Hodge, F. Pasteau, S. Dagher, C. N. Cole, and V. Doye, Mol. Biol. Cell 9:3475–3492, 1998). Immunoprecipitation experiments using yeast cell lysates resulted in the coisolation of a Nup116p-Nup82p subcomplex. Although the absence of Nup116p had no effect on the NPC localization of Nup82p, overexpression of C-terminal Nup116p in a nup116 null mutant resulted in Nup82p mislocalization. Moreover, NPC localization of Nup116p was specifically diminished in a nup82-Δ108 mutant after growth at 37°C. Immunoelectron microscopy analysis showed Nup116p was localized on both the cytoplasmic and nuclear NPC faces. Its distribution was asymmetric with the majority at the cytoplasmic face. Taken together, these results suggest that Nup82p and Nup116p interact at the cytoplasmic NPC face, with nucleoplasmic Nup116p localization utilizing novel binding partners. PMID:10891509

  4. Nuclear pore complex ion channels (review).

    PubMed

    Bustamante, J O; Liepins, A; Hanover, J A

    1994-01-01

    It is currently thought that nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) primarily govern nucleocytoplasmic interactions via selective recognition and active transport of macromolecules. However, in various nuclear preparations, patch-clamp and fluorescence, luminiscence and ion microscopy support classical microelectrode measurements indicating that monoatomic ion flow across the nuclear envelope (NE) is strictly regulated. Gating of large conductance nuclear envelope ion channels (NICs) somewhat resembles that of gap junctional channels. In other respects, NICs are distinct in that they require cytosolic factors, are blocked by wheat germ agglutinin and are blocked and/or modified by antibodies to epitopes of NPC glycoproteins. Therefore, NIC activity, recorded as electrical current/conductance is likely to be intrinsic to NPCs. This observation suggests a potential use for the patch-clamp technique in establishing the mechanisms underlying nuclear pore gating in response to cytosolic and nucleosolic factors such as transcription and growth factors, oncogene and proto-oncogene products and receptors for retinoids, steroids and thyroid hormone. NIC activity may also be useful in evaluating the mechanisms of nuclear import of foreign nucleic acid material such as that contained in virons and viroids. Finally, in consideration to the electrophysiological data accumulated so far, the study of nuclear pore ion channel activity may help our understanding of other important issues such as cell suicide, programmed cell death or apoptosis.

  5. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations.

  6. Correlative super-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy of the nuclear pore complex with molecular resolution.

    PubMed

    Löschberger, Anna; Franke, Christian; Krohne, Georg; van de Linde, Sebastian; Sauer, Markus

    2014-10-15

    Here, we combine super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy with scanning electron microscopy to map the position of proteins of nuclear pore complexes in isolated Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes with molecular resolution in both imaging modes. We use the periodic molecular structure of the nuclear pore complex to superimpose direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images with a precision of <20 nm on electron micrographs. The correlative images demonstrate quantitative molecular labeling and localization of nuclear pore complex proteins by standard immunocytochemistry with primary and secondary antibodies and reveal that the nuclear pore complex is composed of eight gp210 (also known as NUP210) protein homodimers. In addition, we find subpopulations of nuclear pore complexes with ninefold symmetry, which are found occasionally among the more typical eightfold symmetrical structures.

  7. Mutant Huntingtin Disrupts the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Grima, Jonathan C; Daigle, J Gavin; Arbez, Nicolas; Cunningham, Kathleen C; Zhang, Ke; Ochaba, Joseph; Geater, Charlene; Morozko, Eva; Stocksdale, Jennifer; Glatzer, Jenna C; Pham, Jacqueline T; Ahmed, Ishrat; Peng, Qi; Wadhwa, Harsh; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C; Duan, Wenzhen; Snyder, Solomon H; Ranum, Laura P W; Thompson, Leslie M; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ross, Christopher A; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2017-04-05

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. The mechanism(s) by which mutant HTT (mHTT) causes disease is unclear. Nucleocytoplasmic transport, the trafficking of macromolecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm, is tightly regulated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) made up of nucleoporins (NUPs). Previous studies offered clues that mHTT may disrupt nucleocytoplasmic transport and a mutation of an NUP can cause HD-like pathology. Therefore, we evaluated the NPC and nucleocytoplasmic transport in multiple models of HD, including mouse and fly models, neurons transfected with mHTT, HD iPSC-derived neurons, and human HD brain regions. These studies revealed severe mislocalization and aggregation of NUPs and defective nucleocytoplasmic transport. HD repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation proteins also disrupted nucleocytoplasmic transport. Additionally, overexpression of NUPs and treatment with drugs that prevent aberrant NUP biology also mitigated this transport defect and neurotoxicity, providing future novel therapy targets.

  8. Structure, dynamics and function of nuclear pore complexes

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, M. A.; Hetzer, M. W.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are large aqueous channels that penetrate the nuclear envelope, connecting the nuclear interior with the cytoplasm. Until recently, these macromolecular complexes were viewed as static structures whose only function was to control the molecular trafficking between the two compartments. It has now become evident that this simplistic scenario is inaccurate and that nuclear pore complexes are highly dynamic multiprotein assemblies involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from the organization of the cytoskeleton to gene expression. In this review, we will discuss the most recent developments in the nuclear pore complex field, focusing in the assembly, disassembly, maintenance and function of this macromolecular structure. PMID:18786826

  9. An abiotic analogue of the nuclear pore complex hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Bird, Sean P; Baker, Lane A

    2011-09-12

    We describe an abiotic hydrogel that mimics selectivity of the nuclear pore complex. Copolymerization of peptide tetramers (phenylalanine-serine-phenylalanine-glycine, FSFG) with acrylamide results in hydrophobic interactions significant enough to allow the formation of freestanding hydrogel structures. Incorporation of FSFG motifs also renders the hydrogels selective. Selective binding of importins and nuclear transport receptor-cargo complexes is qualitatively demonstrated and compared with polyacrylamide, hydrogels prepared from a control peptide, and hydrogels prepared from the nuclear pore complex protein Nsp1. These abiotic hydrogels will enable further studies of the unique transport mechanisms of the nuclear pore complex and provide an interesting paradigm for the future development of synthetic platforms for separations and selective interfaces.

  10. Toward understanding the structure of the vertebrate nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Beck, Martin; Glavy, Joseph S

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are large macromolecular assemblies that facilitate the nucleocytoplasmic exchange of macromolecules. Because of their intricate composition, membrane association, and sheer size, the integration of various, complementary structure determination approaches is a prerequisite for elucidating their structure. We have recently employed such an integrated strategy to analyze the scaffold structure of the cytoplasmic and nuclear rings of the human nuclear pore complex. In this extra view, we highlight two specific aspects of this work: the power of electron microscopy for bridging different resolution regimes and the importance of post-translational modifications for regulating nucleoporin interactions. We review recent technological developments and give a perspective toward future structure determination approaches.

  11. Crystal structure of human nuclear pore complex component NUP43.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Li, Zhihong; He, Hao; Wernimont, Amy; Li, Yanjun; Loppnau, Peter; Min, Jinrong

    2015-10-24

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPC) form nuclear pores that cross the nuclear envelope and allow molecules to transport between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We solved the crystal structure of human Nup43 (hNUP43), an important component in the Nup107 subcomplex of NPC. hNup43 adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller fold. We confirmed by ITC that neither human Nup37 (hNup37) nor human Nup133 (hNup133) interacts with hNup43. We demonstrated by analytical gel filtration that the human Nup85-Seh1L binary complex recruits hNup43 to form a ternary complex. Based on amino acid sequence analysis, we predicted the hNup85-hSeh1L binding surface of hNup43.

  12. Atomic structure of the Y complex of the nuclear pore.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Kotaro; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Kabachinski, Greg; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2015-05-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the principal gateway for transport into and out of the nucleus. Selectivity is achieved through the hydrogel-like core of the NPC. The structural integrity of the NPC depends on ~15 architectural proteins, which are organized in distinct subcomplexes to form the >40-MDa ring-like structure. Here we present the 4.1-Å crystal structure of a heterotetrameric core element ('hub') of the Y complex, the essential NPC building block, from Myceliophthora thermophila. Using the hub structure together with known Y-complex fragments, we built the entire ~0.5-MDa Y complex. Our data reveal that the conserved core of the Y complex has six rather than seven members. Evolutionarily distant Y-complex assemblies share a conserved core that is very similar in shape and dimension, thus suggesting that there are closely related architectural codes for constructing the NPC in all eukaryotes.

  13. Intron or no intron: a matter for nuclear pore complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Amandine; Palancade, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) have been shown to regulate distinct steps of the gene expression process, from transcription to mRNA export. In particular, mRNAs expressed from intron-containing genes are surveyed by a specific NPC-dependent quality control pathway ensuring that unspliced mRNAs are retained within the nucleus. In this Extra View, we summarize the different approaches that have been developed to evaluate the contribution of various NPC components to the expression of intron-containing genes. We further present the mechanistic models that could account for pre-mRNA retention at the nuclear side of NPCs. Finally, we discuss the possibility that other stages of intron-containing gene expression could be regulated by nuclear pores, in particular through the regulation of mRNA biogenesis factors by the NPC-associated SUMO protease Ulp1. PMID:26709543

  14. Characterization of a nuclear pore protein sheds light on the roles and composition of the Toxoplasma gondii nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Courjol, Flavie; Mouveaux, Thomas; Lesage, Kevin; Saliou, Jean-Michel; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Bonabaud, Maurine; Rohmer, Marine; Slomianny, Christian; Lafont, Franck; Gissot, Mathieu

    2017-01-30

    The nuclear pore is a key structure in eukaryotes regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic transport as well as a wide range of cellular processes. Here, we report the characterization of the first Toxoplasma gondii nuclear pore protein, named TgNup302, which appears to be the orthologue of the mammalian Nup98-96 protein. We produced a conditional knock-down mutant that expresses TgNup302 under the control of an inducible tetracycline-regulated promoter. Under ATc treatment, a substantial decrease of TgNup302 protein in inducible knock-down (iKD) parasites was observed, causing a delay in parasite proliferation. Moreover, the nuclear protein TgENO2 was trapped in the cytoplasm of ATc-treated mutants, suggesting that TgNup302 is involved in nuclear transport. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that TgNup302 is essential for 18S RNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, while global mRNA export remains unchanged. Using an affinity tag purification combined with mass spectrometry, we identified additional components of the nuclear pore complex, including proteins potentially interacting with chromatin. Furthermore, reverse immunoprecipitation confirmed their interaction with TgNup302, and structured illuminated microscopy confirmed the NPC localization of some of the TgNup302-interacting proteins. Intriguingly, facilitates chromatin transcription complex (FACT) components were identified, suggesting the existence of an NPC-chromatin interaction in T. gondii. Identification of TgNup302-interacting proteins also provides the first glimpse at the NPC structure in Apicomplexa, suggesting a structural conservation of the NPC components between distant eukaryotes.

  15. Relocalization of DNA lesions to the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Freudenreich, Catherine H.; Su, Xiaofeng A.

    2016-01-01

    Early screens in yeast for mutations exhibiting sensitivity to DNA damage identified nuclear pore components, but their role in DNA repair was not well understood. Over the last decade, studies have revealed that several types of persistent DNA lesions relocate to either the nuclear pore complex (NPC) or nuclear envelope (NE). Of these two sites, the nuclear pore appears to be crucial for DNA repair of persistent double-strand breaks, eroded telomeres and sites of fork collapse at expanded CAG repeats. Using a combination of cell biological imaging techniques and yeast genetic assays for DNA repair, researchers have begun to understand both the how and why of lesion relocation to the NPC. Here we review the types of lesions that relocate to the NPC, mediators of relocation and the functional consequences of relocation understood to date. The emerging theme is that relocation to the NPC regulates recombination to influence repair pathway choice and provide a rescue mechanism for lesions or DNA structures that are resistant to repair. PMID:27799300

  16. The Structure Inventory of the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas U

    2016-05-22

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the principal gateway for molecular exchange between nucleus and cytoplasm across the nuclear envelope. Due to its sheer size of estimated 50-112MDa and its complex buildup from about 500-1000 individual proteins, it is a difficult object to study for structural biologists. Here, I review the extensive ensemble of high-resolution structures of the building blocks of the NPC. Concurrent with the increase in size and complexity, these latest, large structures and assemblies can now be used as the basis for hybrid approaches, primarily in combination with cryo-electron microscopic analysis, generating the first structure-based assembly models of the NPC. Going forward, the structures will be critically important for a detailed analysis of the NPC, including function, evolution, and assembly.

  17. Perforating the nuclear boundary - how nuclear pore complexes assemble.

    PubMed

    Weberruss, Marion; Antonin, Wolfram

    2016-12-15

    The nucleus is enclosed by the nuclear envelope, a double membrane which creates a selective barrier between the cytoplasm and the nuclear interior. Its barrier and transport characteristics are determined by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) that are embedded within the nuclear envelope, and control molecular exchange between the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. In this Commentary, we discuss the biogenesis of these huge protein assemblies from approximately one thousand individual proteins. We will summarize current knowledge about distinct assembly modes in animal cells that are characteristic for different cell cycle phases and their regulation.

  18. Nuclear pore complexes in the maintenance of genome integrity.

    PubMed

    Bukata, Lucas; Parker, Stephanie L; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A

    2013-06-01

    Maintaining genome integrity is crucial for successful organismal propagation and for cell and tissue homeostasis. Several processes contribute to safeguarding the genomic information of cells. These include accurate replication of genetic information, detection and repair of DNA damage, efficient segregation of chromosomes, protection of chromosome ends, and proper organization of genome architecture. Interestingly, recent evidence shows that nuclear pore complexes, the channels connecting the nucleus with the cytoplasm, play important roles in these processes suggesting that these multiprotein platforms are key regulators of genome integrity.

  19. Nuclear pore complexes and regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Raices, Marcela; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A

    2017-01-11

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), are large multiprotein channels that penetrate the nuclear envelope connecting the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Accumulating evidence shows that besides their main role in regulating the exchange of molecules between these two compartments, NPCs and their components also play important transport-independent roles, including gene expression regulation, chromatin organization, DNA repair, RNA processing and quality control, and cell cycle control. Here, we will describe the recent findings about the role of these structures in the regulation of gene expression.

  20. Architecture of the fungal nuclear pore inner ring complex.

    PubMed

    Stuwe, Tobias; Bley, Christopher J; Thierbach, Karsten; Petrovic, Stefan; Schilbach, Sandra; Mayo, Daniel J; Perriches, Thibaud; Rundlet, Emily J; Jeon, Young E; Collins, Leslie N; Huber, Ferdinand M; Lin, Daniel H; Paduch, Marcin; Koide, Akiko; Lu, Vincent; Fischer, Jessica; Hurt, Ed; Koide, Shohei; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Hoelz, André

    2015-10-02

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) constitutes the sole gateway for bidirectional nucleocytoplasmic transport. We present the reconstitution and interdisciplinary analyses of the ~425-kilodalton inner ring complex (IRC), which forms the central transport channel and diffusion barrier of the NPC, revealing its interaction network and equimolar stoichiometry. The Nsp1•Nup49•Nup57 channel nucleoporin heterotrimer (CNT) attaches to the IRC solely through the adaptor nucleoporin Nic96. The CNT•Nic96 structure reveals that Nic96 functions as an assembly sensor that recognizes the three-dimensional architecture of the CNT, thereby mediating the incorporation of a defined CNT state into the NPC. We propose that the IRC adopts a relatively rigid scaffold that recruits the CNT to primarily form the diffusion barrier of the NPC, rather than enabling channel dilation.

  1. Integrated structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bui, Khanh Huy; von Appen, Alexander; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Ori, Alessandro; Sparks, Lenore; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Bock, Thomas; Hagen, Wim; Andrés-Pons, Amparo; Glavy, Joseph S; Beck, Martin

    2013-12-05

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a fundamental component of all eukaryotic cells that facilitates nucleocytoplasmic exchange of macromolecules. It is assembled from multiple copies of about 30 nucleoporins. Due to its size and complex composition, determining the structure of the NPC is an enormous challenge, and the overall architecture of the NPC scaffold remains elusive. In this study, we have used an integrated approach based on electron tomography, single-particle electron microscopy, and crosslinking mass spectrometry to determine the structure of a major scaffold motif of the human NPC, the Nup107 subcomplex, in both isolation and integrated into the NPC. We show that 32 copies of the Nup107 subcomplex assemble into two reticulated rings, one each at the cytoplasmic and nuclear face of the NPC. This arrangement may explain how changes of the diameter are realized that would accommodate transport of huge cargoes.

  2. The nuclear pore complex: understanding its function through structural insight.

    PubMed

    Beck, Martin; Hurt, Ed

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) fuse the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form channels across the nuclear envelope. They are large macromolecular assemblies with a complex composition and diverse functions. Apart from facilitating nucleocytoplasmic transport, NPCs are involved in chromatin organization, the regulation of gene expression and DNA repair. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these functions has been hampered by a lack of structural knowledge about the NPC. The recent convergence of crystallographic and biochemical in vitro analysis of nucleoporins (NUPs), the components of the NPC, with cryo-electron microscopic imaging of the entire NPC in situ has provided first pseudo-atomic view of its central core and revealed that an unexpected network of short linear motifs is an important spatial organization principle. These breakthroughs have transformed the way we understand NPC structure, and they provide an important base for functional investigations, including the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying clinically manifested mutations of the nucleocytoplasmic transport system.

  3. Energetics of Transport through the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ghavami, Ali; van der Giessen, Erik; Onck, Patrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells is solely controlled by the nuclear pore complex (NPC). The NPC provides two types of nucleocytoplasmic transport: passive diffusion of small molecules and active chaperon-mediated translocation of large molecules. It has been shown that the interaction between intrinsically disordered proteins that line the central channel of the NPC and the transporting cargoes is the determining factor, but the exact mechanism of transport is yet unknown. Here, we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to quantify the energy barrier that has to be overcome for molecules to pass through the NPC. We focus on two aspects of transport. First, the passive transport of model cargo molecules with different sizes is studied and the size selectivity feature of the NPC is investigated. Our results show that the transport probability of cargoes is significantly reduced when they are larger than ∼5 nm in diameter. Secondly, we show that incorporating hydrophobic binding spots on the surface of the cargo effectively decreases the energy barrier of the pore. Finally, a simple transport model is proposed which characterizes the energy barrier of the NPC as a function of diameter and hydrophobicity of the transporting particles. PMID:26894898

  4. Towards reconciling structure and function in the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Aebi, Ueli; Fahrenkrog, Birthe

    2008-01-01

    The spatial separation between the cytoplasm and the cell nucleus necessitates the continuous exchange of macromolecular cargo across the double-membraned nuclear envelope. Being the only passageway in and out of the nucleus, the nuclear pore complex (NPC) has the principal function of regulating the high throughput of nucleocytoplasmic transport in a highly selective manner so as to maintain cellular order and function. Here, we present a retrospective review of the evidence that has led to the current understanding of both NPC structure and function. Looking towards the future, we contemplate on how various outstanding effects and nanoscopic characteristics ought to be addressed, with the goal of reconciling structure and function into a single unified picture of the NPC. PMID:18228033

  5. Structure and gating of the nuclear pore complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibauer, Matthias; Pellanda, Mauro; Turgay, Yagmur; Dubrovsky, Anna; Wild, Annik; Medalia, Ohad

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) perforate the nuclear envelope and allow the exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. To acquire a deeper understanding of this transport mechanism, we analyse the structure of the NPC scaffold and permeability barrier, by reconstructing the Xenopus laevis oocyte NPC from native nuclear envelopes up to 20 Å resolution by cryo-electron tomography in conjunction with subtomogram averaging. In addition to resolving individual protein domains of the NPC constituents, we propose a model for the architecture of the molecular gate at its central channel. Furthermore, we compare and contrast this native NPC structure to one that exhibits reduced transport activity and unveil the spatial properties of the NPC gate.

  6. Structure and gating of the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Eibauer, Matthias; Pellanda, Mauro; Turgay, Yagmur; Dubrovsky, Anna; Wild, Annik; Medalia, Ohad

    2015-06-26

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) perforate the nuclear envelope and allow the exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. To acquire a deeper understanding of this transport mechanism, we analyse the structure of the NPC scaffold and permeability barrier, by reconstructing the Xenopus laevis oocyte NPC from native nuclear envelopes up to 20 Å resolution by cryo-electron tomography in conjunction with subtomogram averaging. In addition to resolving individual protein domains of the NPC constituents, we propose a model for the architecture of the molecular gate at its central channel. Furthermore, we compare and contrast this native NPC structure to one that exhibits reduced transport activity and unveil the spatial properties of the NPC gate.

  7. A Change In Nuclear Pore Complex Composition Regulates Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maximiliano A.; Gomez-Cavazos, J. Sebastian; Mei, Arianna; Lackner, Daniel H.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are built from ~30 different proteins called nucleoporins. Previous studies have shown that several Nups exhibit cell-type-specific expression and that mutations in NPC components result in tissue-specific diseases. Here we show that a specific change in NPC composition is required for both myogenic and neuronal differentiation. The transmembrane nucleoporin Nup210 is absent in proliferating myoblasts and embryonic stem (ES) cells but becomes expressed and incorporated into NPCs during cell differentiation. Preventing Nup210 production by RNAi blocks myogenesis and the differentiation of ES cells into neuroprogenitors. We found that the addition of Nup210 to NPCs does not affect nuclear transport but is required for the induction of genes that are essential for cell differentiation. Our results identify a single change in NPC composition as an essential step in cell differentiation and establish a role for Nup210 in gene expression regulation and cell fate determination. PMID:22264802

  8. Probing nuclear pore complex architecture with proximity-dependent biotinylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae In; Birendra, K C; Zhu, Wenhong; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Doye, Valérie; Roux, Kyle J

    2014-06-17

    Proximity-dependent biotin identification (BioID) is a method for identifying protein associations that occur in vivo. By fusing a promiscuous biotin ligase to a protein of interest expressed in living cells, BioID permits the labeling of proximate proteins during a defined labeling period. In this study we used BioID to study the human nuclear pore complex (NPC), one of the largest macromolecular assemblies in eukaryotes. Anchored within the nuclear envelope, NPCs mediate the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of numerous cellular components. We applied BioID to constituents of the Nup107-160 complex and the Nup93 complex, two conserved NPC subcomplexes. A strikingly different set of NPC constituents was detected depending on the position of these BioID-fusion proteins within the NPC. By applying BioID to several constituents located throughout the extremely stable Nup107-160 subcomplex, we refined our understanding of this highly conserved subcomplex, in part by demonstrating a direct interaction of Nup43 with Nup85. Furthermore, by using the extremely stable Nup107-160 structure as a molecular ruler, we defined the practical labeling radius of BioID. These studies further our understanding of human NPC organization and demonstrate that BioID is a valuable tool for exploring the constituency and organization of large protein assemblies in living cells.

  9. Quantifying nucleoporin stoichiometry inside single nuclear pore complexes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mi, Lan; Goryaynov, Alexander; Lindquist, Andre; Rexach, Michael; Yang, Weidong

    2015-03-23

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is one of the largest supramolecular structures in eukaryotic cells. Its octagonal ring-scaffold perforates the nuclear envelope and features a unique molecular machinery that regulates nucleocytoplasmic transport. NPCs are composed of ~30 different nucleoporins (Nups), averaged at 8, 16 or 32 copies per NPC. This estimate has not been confirmed for individual NPCs in living cells due to the inherent difficulty of counting proteins inside single supramolecular complexes. Here we used single-molecule SPEED microscopy to directly count the copy-number of twenty-four different Nups within individual NPCs of live yeast, and found agreement as well as significant deviation from previous estimates. As expected, we counted 8 copies of four peripheral Nups and 16 copies of fourteen scaffold Nups. Unexpectedly, we counted a maximum of 16 copies of Nsp1 and Nic96, rather than 32 as previously estimated; and found only 10-15 copies of six other Nups, rather than 8 or 16 copies as expected. This in situ molecular-counting technology can test structure-function models of NPCs and other supramolecular structures in cells.

  10. Characterisation of the passive permeability barrier of nuclear pore complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Dagmar; Frey, Steffen; Fischer, Torsten; Güttler, Thomas; Görlich, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) restrict uncontrolled nucleocytoplasmic fluxes of inert macromolecules but permit facilitated translocation of nuclear transport receptors and their cargo complexes. We probed the passive barrier of NPCs and observed sieve-like properties with a dominating mesh or channel radius of 2.6 nm, which is narrower than proposed earlier. A small fraction of diffusion channels has a wider opening, explaining the very slow passage of larger molecules. The observed dominant passive diameter approximates the distance of adjacent hydrophobic clusters of FG repeats, supporting the model that the barrier is made of FG repeat domains cross-linked with a spacing of an FG repeat unit length. Wheat germ agglutinin and the dominant-negative importin β45-462 fragment were previously regarded as selective inhibitors of facilitated NPC passage. We now observed that they do not distinguish between the passive and the facilitated mode. Instead, their inhibitory effect correlates with the size of the NPC-passing molecule. They have little effect on small species, inhibit the passage of green fluorescent protein-sized objects >10-fold and virtually block the translocation of larger ones. This suggests that passive and facilitated NPC passage proceed through one and the same permeability barrier. PMID:19680228

  11. The nuclear pore complexes: guardians of the nuclear genome

    PubMed Central

    Capelson, M.; Doucet, C.; Hetzer, M. W.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell function depends on the physical separation of nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic components by the nuclear envelope (NE). Molecular communication between the two compartments involves active, signal-mediated trafficking, a role that is exclusively performed by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). The individual NPC components and the mechanisms that are involved in nuclear trafficking are well documented and have become textbook knowledge. However, in addition to their roles as nuclear gatekeepers, NPC components, nucleoporins, have been shown to play critical roles in chromatin organization and gene regulation. These findings have sparked new enthusiasm to study the roles of this multi-protein complex in nuclear organization and explore novel functions that in some cases appear to go beyond a role in transport. Here, we discuss our current view of NPC biogenesis, which is tightly linked to proper cell cycle progression and cell differentiation. In addition we will summarize new data suggesting that NPCs represent dynamic hubs for the integration of gene regulation and nuclear transport processes. PMID:21502404

  12. Single molecule atomic force microscopy of aerolysin pore complexes reveals unexpected star-shaped topography.

    PubMed

    He, Jianfeng; Wang, Jiabin; Hu, Jun; Sun, Jielin; Czajkowsky, Daniel Mark; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-04-01

    Aerolysin is the paradigmatic member of a large family of toxins that convert from a water-soluble monomer/dimer into a membrane-spanning oligomeric pore. While there is x-ray crystallographic data of its water-soluble conformation, the most recent structural model of the membrane-inserted pore is based primarily on data of water-soluble tetradecamers of mutant protein, together with computational modeling ultimately performed in vacuum. Here we examine this pore model with atomic force microscopy (AFM) of membrane-associated wild-type complexes and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in water. In striking contrast to a disc-shaped cap region predicted by the present model, the AFM images reveal a star-shaped complex, with a central ring surrounded by seven radial projections. Further, the MD simulations suggest that the locations of the receptor-binding (D1) domains in the present model are not correct. However, a modified model in which the D1 domains, rather than localized at fixed positions, adopt a wide range of configurations through fluctuations of an intervening linker is compatible with existing data. Thus our work not only demonstrates the importance of directly resolving such complexes in their native environment but also points to a dynamic receptor binding region, which may be critical for toxin assembly on the cell surface.

  13. Single hepatitis-B virus core capsid binding to individual nuclear pore complexes in Hela cells.

    PubMed

    Lill, Yoriko; Lill, Markus A; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Schwarz-Herion, Kyrill; Paulillo, Sara; Aebi, Ueli; Hecht, Bert

    2006-10-15

    We investigate the interaction of hepatitis B virus capsids lacking a nuclear localization signal with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in permeabilized HeLa cells. Confocal and wide-field optical images of the nuclear envelope show well-spaced individual NPCs. Specific interactions of capsids with single NPCs are characterized by extended residence times of capsids in the focal volume which are characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. In addition, single-capsid-tracking experiments using fast wide-field fluorescence microscopy at 50 frames/s allow us to directly observe specific binding via a dual-color colocalization of capsids and NPCs. We find that binding occurs with high probability on the nuclear-pore ring moiety, at 44 +/- 9 nm radial distance from the central axis.

  14. Three-Dimensional pore space and strain localization distribution in Majella limestone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yuntao; Hall, Stephen; Baud, Patrick; Wond, Teng-fong

    2015-04-01

    Brittle-ductile transition in porous rock is a topic of importance in many geological applications. Traditionally pore space in rock is characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). Advances in 3-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) and laser scanning confocal microscopy have furnished enhanced perspective on pore geometry complexity. In particular, X-ray CT has been used widely for characterizing porous clastic rocks such as sandstone, whose void space is dominated by relatively equant pores connected by throats that are sufficiently large for direct imaging by X-ray microCT. However, standard techniques for CT imaging are not directly applicable to a carbonate rock because of the geometric complexity of its pore space. In this study, we first characterized the pore structure in Majella limestone. MicroCT data was partitioned into three distinct domains: macropores, solid grains and an intermediate domain made up of voxels of solid embedded with micropores below the resolution. A morphological analysis of the microCT images shows that both the solid and intermediate domains in Majella limestone are interconnected as it has been previously reported in a less porous limestone. We however show that the macroporosity in Majella limestone is fundamentally different, in that it has a percolative backbone which may contribute to significant enhancement of its permeability. We then present the first application of 3D-volumetric Digital Image Correlation (DIC) to a very porous limestone. If images of a rock sample are acquired before and after deformation, then DIC can be used to infer the displacement and strain fields. In our study, four Majella limestone samples were triaxially compressed at confining pressures ranging from 5 MPa to 25 MPa and another under hydrostatic conditions up to 60 MPa. For each of these five samples, two CT images were acquired before and after the deformation. We then used the Tomo

  15. Simple rules for passive diffusion through the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Mironska, Roxana; Kim, Seung Joong

    2016-01-01

    Passive macromolecular diffusion through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) is thought to decrease dramatically beyond a 30–60-kD size threshold. Using thousands of independent time-resolved fluorescence microscopy measurements in vivo, we show that the NPC lacks such a firm size threshold; instead, it forms a soft barrier to passive diffusion that intensifies gradually with increasing molecular mass in both the wild-type and mutant strains with various subsets of phenylalanine-glycine (FG) domains and different levels of baseline passive permeability. Brownian dynamics simulations replicate these findings and indicate that the soft barrier results from the highly dynamic FG repeat domains and the diffusing macromolecules mutually constraining and competing for available volume in the interior of the NPC, setting up entropic repulsion forces. We found that FG domains with exceptionally high net charge and low hydropathy near the cytoplasmic end of the central channel contribute more strongly to obstruction of passive diffusion than to facilitated transport, revealing a compartmentalized functional arrangement within the NPC. PMID:27697925

  16. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Bogdanos, Dimitrios; Yang, Chen-Yen; Roberts, Krista; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Worman, Howard J.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2012-01-01

    Experimental models of autoimmune diseases have led to the conclusion that an immune response to nuclear antigens is a sentinel marker for loss of tolerance and potential tissue damage. Various proteins are targets of antinuclear antibodies in a variety of autoimmune diseases, ranging from systemic rheumatologic disorders to diseases affecting specific organs such as the liver. Autoantibodies against specific nuclear constituents have also been used as probes to understand the structure and the function of the targeted components and their relevance to disease pathogenesis. Approximately a quarter of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have antibodies targeting proteins of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), a multi-protein structure that mediates molecular transport across the nuclear envelope. Autoantibodies against the integral membrane glycoprotein gp210 and nucleoporin p62 appear to be highly specific for PBC, an autoimmune disease characterized by progressive destruction of intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells. This review discusses the diagnostic and clinical relevance of anti-NPC antibodies in PBC and the possibility that this autoimmune response may arise as a result of molecular mimicry. PMID:22487189

  17. The transmembrane nucleoporin NDC1 is required for targeting of ALADIN to nuclear pore complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazumi, Yusuke; Kamiya, Atsushi; Nishida, Ayumu; Nishihara, Ayako; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2009-11-06

    NDC1 is a transmembrane nucleoporin that is required for NPC assembly and nucleocytoplasmic transport. We show here that NDC1 directly interacts with the nucleoporin ALADIN, mutations of which are responsible for triple-A syndrome, and that this interaction is required for targeting of ALADIN to nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Furthermore, we show that NDC1 is required for selective nuclear import. Our findings suggest that NDC1-mediated localization of ALADIN to NPCs is essential for selective nuclear protein import, and that abrogation of the interaction between ALADIN and NDC1 may be important for the development of triple-A syndrome.

  18. Exceptional structural and mechanical flexibility of the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Liashkovich, Ivan; Meyring, Anne; Kramer, Armin; Shahin, Victor

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) mediate all transport between the cytosol and the nucleus and therefore take centre stage in physiology. While transport through NPCs has been extensively investigated little is known about their structural and barley anything about their mechanical flexibility. Structural and mechanical flexibility of NPCs, however, are presumably of key importance. Like the cell and the cell nucleus, NPCs themselves are regularly exposed to physiological mechanical forces. Besides, NPCs reveal striking transport properties which are likely to require fairly high structural flexibility. The NPC transports up to 1,000 molecules per second through a physically 9 nm wide channel which repeatedly opens to accommodate macromolecules significantly larger than its physical diameter. We hypothesised that NPCs possess remarkable structural and mechanical stability. Here, we tested this hypothesis at the single NPC level using the nano-imaging and probing approach atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM presents the NPC as a highly flexible structure. The NPC channel dilates by striking 35% on exposure to trans-cyclohexane-1,2-diol (TCHD), which is known to transiently collapse the hydrophobic phase in the NPC channel like receptor-cargo complexes do in transit. It constricts again to its initial size after TCHD removal. AFM-based nano-indentation measurements show that the 50 nm long NPC basket can astonishingly be squeezed completely into the NPC channel on exposure to incremental mechanical loads but recovers its original vertical position within the nuclear envelope plane when relieved. We conclude that the NPC possesses exceptional structural and mechanical flexibility which is important to fulfilling its functions.

  19. Multi-scale characterization of pore evolution in a combustion metamorphic complex, Hatrurim basin, Israel: Combining (ultra) small-angle neutron scattering and image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Burg, Avihu; Cole, David; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Jackson, Andrew J; Stack, Andrew G; Rother, Gernot; Ciarlette, Diane D

    2013-01-01

    Backscattered scanning electron micrograph and ultra small- and small-angle neutron scattering data have been combined to provide statistically meaningful data on the pore/grain structure and pore evolution of combustion metamorphic complexes from the Hatrurim basin, Israel. Three processes, anti-sintering roughening, alteration of protolith (dehydration, decarbonation, and oxidation) and crystallization of high-temperature minerals, occurred simultaneously, leading to significant changes in observed pore/grain structures. Pore structures in the protoliths, and in lowand high-grade metamorphic rocks show surface (Ds) and mass (Dm) pore fractal geometries with gradual increases in both Ds and Dm values as a function of metamorphic grade. This suggests that increases in pore volume and formation of less branching pore networks are accompanied by a roughening of pore/grain interfaces. Additionally, pore evolution during combustion metamorphism is also characterized by reduced contributions from small-scale pores to the cumulative porosity in the high-grade rocks. At high temperatures, small-scale pores may be preferentially closed by the formation of high-temperature minerals, producing a rougher morphology with increasing temperature. Alternatively, large-scale pores may develop at the expense of small-scale pores. These observations (pore fractal geometry and cumulative porosity) indicate that the evolution of pore/grain structures is correlated with the growth of high-temperature phases and is a consequence of the energy balance between pore/grain surface energy and energy arising from heterogeneous phase contacts. The apparent pore volume density further suggests that the localized time/temperature development of the high-grade Hatrurim rocks is not simply an extension of that of the low-grade rocks. The former likely represents the "hot spots (burning foci)" in the overall metamorphic terrain while the latter may represent contact aureoles.

  20. Revealing Assembly of a Pore-Forming Complex Using Single-Cell Kinetic Analysis and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Bischofberger, Mirko; Iacovache, Ioan; Boss, Daniel; Naef, Felix; van der Goot, F Gisou; Molina, Nacho

    2016-04-12

    Many biological processes depend on the sequential assembly of protein complexes. However, studying the kinetics of such processes by direct methods is often not feasible. As an important class of such protein complexes, pore-forming toxins start their journey as soluble monomeric proteins, and oligomerize into transmembrane complexes to eventually form pores in the target cell membrane. Here, we monitored pore formation kinetics for the well-characterized bacterial pore-forming toxin aerolysin in single cells in real time to determine the lag times leading to the formation of the first functional pores per cell. Probabilistic modeling of these lag times revealed that one slow and seven equally fast rate-limiting reactions best explain the overall pore formation kinetics. The model predicted that monomer activation is the rate-limiting step for the entire pore formation process. We hypothesized that this could be through release of a propeptide and indeed found that peptide removal abolished these steps. This study illustrates how stochasticity in the kinetics of a complex process can be exploited to identify rate-limiting mechanisms underlying multistep biomolecular assembly pathways.

  1. Compositionally distinct nuclear pore complexes of functionally distinct dimorphic nuclei in ciliate Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Osakada, Hiroko; Mori, Chie; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2017-04-06

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), a gateway for nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, is composed of about 30 different proteins called nucleoporins. It remains unknown whether the NPCs within a species are homogeneous or vary depending on the cell type, or physiological condition. Here, we present evidence for compositionally distinct NPCs that form within a single cell in a binucleated ciliate. In Tetrahymena thermophila, each cell contains both a transcriptionally-active macronucleus (MAC) and a germline micronucleus (MIC). By combining in silico analysis, mass spectrometry analysis for immuno-isolated proteins, and subcellular localization analysis of GFP fused proteins, we identified numerous novel components of MAC and MIC NPCs. Core members of the Nup107-160 scaffold complex were enriched in MIC NPCs. Strikingly, two paralogs of Nup214 and of Nup153 localized exclusively to either MAC or MIC NPCs. Furthermore, the transmembrane components Pom121 and Pom82 localize exclusively to MAC and MIC NPCs, respectively. Our results argue that functional nuclear dimorphism in ciliates is likely to depend on compositional and structural specificity of NPCs.

  2. Nucleation of slip-weakening rupture instability in landslides by localized increase of pore pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, Robert C.; Rice, James R.

    2012-03-01

    We model landslide initiation as slip surface growth driven by locally elevated pore pressure, with particular reference to submarine slides. Assuming an elastic medium and friction that weakens with slip, solutions exist in which the slip surface may dynamically grow, without further pore pressure increases, at a rate of the order of the sediment shear wave speed, a situation comparable to earthquake nucleation. The size of the rupture at this transition point depends weakly on the imposed pore pressure profile; however, the amount of slip at the transition depends strongly on whether the pore pressure was broadly or sharply elevated. Sharper profiles may result in pore pressures reaching the total slope-normal stress before dynamic rupture is nucleated. While we do not account for modes of failure other than pure slip on a failure surface, this may be an indication that additional modes involving liquefaction or hydraulic cracking may be factors in the initiation of shallow slope failure. We identify two length scales, one geometrical (h, depth below the free surface) and one material (ℓ, determined by the frictional weakening rate) and a transition in nucleation behavior between effectively "deep" and "shallow" limits dependent on their ratio. Whether dynamic propagation of failure is indefinite or arresting depends largely on whether the background shear stress is closer to nominal peak or residual frictional strength. This is determined in part by background pore pressures, and to consider the submarine case we simplify a common sedimentation/consolidation approach to reflect interest in near-seafloor conditions.

  3. The Nuclear Pore-Associated TREX-2 Complex Employs Mediator to Regulate Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Maren; Hellerschmied, Doris; Schubert, Tobias; Amlacher, Stefan; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Reja, Rohit; Pugh, B. Franklin; Clausen, Tim; Köhler, Alwin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) influence gene expression besides their established function in nuclear transport. The TREX-2 complex localizes to the NPC basket and affects gene-NPC interactions, transcription, and mRNA export. How TREX-2 regulates the gene expression machinery is unknown. Here, we show that TREX-2 interacts with the Mediator complex, an essential regulator of RNA Polymerase (Pol) II. Structural and biochemical studies identify a conserved region on TREX-2, which directly binds the Mediator Med31/Med7N submodule. TREX-2 regulates assembly of Mediator with the Cdk8 kinase and is required for recruitment and site-specific phosphorylation of Pol II. Transcriptome and phenotypic profiling confirm that TREX-2 and Med31 are functionally interdependent at specific genes. TREX-2 additionally uses its Mediator-interacting surface to regulate mRNA export suggesting a mechanism for coupling transcription initiation and early steps of mRNA processing. Our data provide mechanistic insight into how an NPC-associated adaptor complex accesses the core transcription machinery. PMID:26317468

  4. Super-resolution mapping of scaffold nucleoporins in the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiong; Kelich, Joseph M; Junod, Samuel L; Yang, Weidong

    2017-02-15

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), composed of ∼30 different nucleoporins (Nups), is one of the largest supramolecular structures in eukaryotic cells. Its octagonal ring-scaffold perforates the nuclear envelope and features a unique molecular machinery that regulates nucleocytoplasmic transport. However, the precise copy number and the spatial location of each Nup in the native NPC remain obscure due to the inherent difficulty of counting and localizing proteins inside the sub-micrometer supramolecular complex. Here we combined super-resolution SPEED microscopy and nanobody specific labeling to reveal the spatial distribution of scaffold Nups within three separate layers in the native NPC with a precision of ∼3 nm. Our data reveals both the radial and axial spatial distributions for Pom121, Nup37 and Nup35 and provides evidence for their copy numbers of 8, 32, and 16 respectively per NPC. This approach can help pave the path for mapping the entirety of Nups in native NPCs and also other structural components of macromolecular complexes.

  5. Nuclear pore complex contains a family of glycoproteins that includes p62: glycosylation through a previously unidentified cellular pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.I.; Blobel, G.

    1987-11-01

    Using a monoclonal antibody (mAb 414), the authors previously identified a protein of 62 kDa (p62) that was localized to the nuclear pore complex by immunoelectron microscopy. They also showed that p62 binds specifically to wheat germ agglutinin. Therefore, they proposed that this nuclear pore complex protein might be a member of a recently characterized family of glycoproteins that are labeled by in vitro galactosylation of rat liver nuclei and contain O-linked monosaccharidic GlcNAc residues. In support of this, they now show that incubation with N-acetylglucosaminidase reduces the molecular mass of p62 by approx. = 3 kDa because of the removal of terminal GlcNAc residues. Moreover, p62 can be galactosylated in vitro by using UDP-(/sup 3/H)galactose and galactosyltransferase. They also show that most of the GlcNAc residues are added within 5 min of synthesis, when p62 is soluble and cytosolic. Thus, the addition of GlcNAc is carried out in the cytoplasm and is clearly distinct from the N- and O-linked glycosylation pathways of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex. Using another mAb with a broad specificity for nuclear GlcNAc-containing proteins, they show by immunofluorescence and protein blotting of subnuclear fractions that some of these proteins are in the interior of the nucleus, and others are most likely located in the pore complex.

  6. SNARE Complex Zipping as a Driving Force in the Dilation of Proteinaceous Fusion Pores

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Meyer B.

    2010-01-01

    The assembly of SNARE proteins into a tight complex has been hypothesized to drive membrane fusion. A model of the initial fusion pore as a proteinaceous channel formed by SNARE proteins places their membrane anchors in separate membranes. This leaves the possibility of a final assembly step that brings the membrane anchors together and drives fusion pore expansion. The present study develops a model for expansion in which the final SNARE complex zipping step drives a transition from a proteinaceous fusion pore to a lipidic fusion pore. An estimate of the energy released upon merger of the helical segment of the SNARE motif with the helical membrane anchor indicates that completing the assembly of a few SNARE complexes can overcome the elastic energy that opposes lipid bilayer deformation into a narrow fusion pore. The angle between the long axes of membrane anchor and SNARE motif serves as a useful reaction coordinate for this transition. Energy was calculated as a function of this angle, incorporating contributions from membrane bending, SNARE complex assembly, membrane anchor flexing, and hydrophobic interactions. The rate of this transition was evaluated as a process of diffusion over the barrier imposed by these combined energies, and the rates estimated were consistent with experimental measurements. PMID:20512644

  7. Study of the Protein Complex, Pore Diameter, and Pore-forming Activity of the Borrelia burgdorferi P13 Porin*

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Thein, Marcus; Barbot, Mariam; Sans-Serramitjana, Eulalia; Bonde, Mari; Mentele, Reinhard; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Bergström, Sven; Benz, Roland

    2014-01-01

    P13 is one of the major outer membrane proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi. Previous studies described P13 as a porin. In the present study some structure and function aspects of P13 were studied. P13 showed according to lipid bilayer studies a channel-forming activity of 0.6 nanosiemens in 1 m KCl. Single channel and selectivity measurements demonstrated that P13 had no preference for either cations or anions and showed no voltage-gating up to ±100 mV. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to isolate and characterize the P13 protein complex in its native state. The complex had a high molecular mass of about 300 kDa and was only composed of P13 monomers. The channel size was investigated using non-electrolytes revealing an apparent diameter of about 1.4 nm with a 400-Da molecular mass cut-off. Multichannel titrations with different substrates reinforced the idea that P13 forms a general diffusion channel. The identity of P13 within the complex was confirmed by second dimension SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and the use of a p13 deletion mutant strain. The results suggested that P13 is the protein responsible for the 0.6-nanosiemens pore-forming activity in the outer membrane of B. burgdorferi. PMID:24825899

  8. Modeling of the mechano-chemical behaviour of the nuclear pore complex: current research and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Matas, Jose F.; Raimondi, Manuela T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that mechanical deformation of the cell nucleus regulates the nuclear import of the transcriptional activators of genes involved in primary physiological cell responses such as stem cell differentiation. In addition, this nuclear mechanosensing response is de-regulated in pathological states, such as cancer and neurodegeneration. One hypothesis that could greatly advance the field is that the deformation of the nuclear envelope activates nuclear pore complexes through a direct mechanical link. The understanding of this possible mechanism for nuclear pore complex stretch-activation entails studying the mechanical connection of this complex to the nuclear envelope at the nanoscale. The nanomechanics of the nuclear pore complex is thus emerging as a novel research field, bridging nanoscience with nanotechnology. This review examines the frontier of research methodologies that are potentially useful for building a computational model of this interaction. This includes, for example, electron tomography to assess the geometrical features of the nuclear pore complex and nanoindentation to estimate its mechanical properties and that of the nuclear envelope. In order to summarize the state-of-the-art and perspectives in the field of NPC nanomechanics, this review covers highly interdisciplinary experimental and theoretical research methodologies pertaining to the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, materials and mechanics. PMID:27713975

  9. Modeling of the mechano-chemical behaviour of the nuclear pore complex: current research and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Alberto; Rodriguez Matas, Jose F; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-10-10

    Recent evidence suggests that mechanical deformation of the cell nucleus regulates the nuclear import of the transcriptional activators of genes involved in primary physiological cell responses such as stem cell differentiation. In addition, this nuclear mechanosensing response is de-regulated in pathological states, such as cancer and neurodegeneration. One hypothesis that could greatly advance the field is that the deformation of the nuclear envelope activates nuclear pore complexes through a direct mechanical link. The understanding of this possible mechanism for nuclear pore complex stretch-activation entails studying the mechanical connection of this complex to the nuclear envelope at the nanoscale. The nanomechanics of the nuclear pore complex is thus emerging as a novel research field, bridging nanoscience with nanotechnology. This review examines the frontier of research methodologies that are potentially useful for building a computational model of this interaction. This includes, for example, electron tomography to assess the geometrical features of the nuclear pore complex and nanoindentation to estimate its mechanical properties and that of the nuclear envelope. In order to summarize the state-of-the-art and perspectives in the field of NPC nanomechanics, this review covers highly interdisciplinary experimental and theoretical research methodologies pertaining to the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, materials and mechanics.

  10. Towards understanding nuclear pore complex architecture and dynamics in the age of integrative structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Ed; Beck, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Determining the functional architecture of the nuclear pore complex, that remains only partially understood, requires bridging across different length scales. Recent technological advances in quantitative and cross-linking mass spectrometry, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy have enormously accelerated the integration of different types of data into coherent structural models. Moreover, high-resolution structural analysis of nucleoporins and their in vitro reconstitution into complexes is now facilitated by the use of thermostable orthologs. In this review we highlight how the application of such technologies has led to novel insights into nuclear pore architecture and to a paradigm shift. Today nuclear pores are not anymore seen as static facilitators of nucleocytoplasmic transport but ensembles of multiple overlaying functional states that are involved in various cellular processes.

  11. Structural basis for assembly and function of the Nup82 complex in the nuclear pore scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Gaik, Monika; Flemming, Dirk; von Appen, Alexander; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Mücke, Norbert; Fischer, Jessica; Stelter, Philipp; Ori, Alessandro; Bui, Khanh Huy; Baßler, Jochen; Barbar, Elisar

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are huge assemblies formed from ∼30 different nucleoporins, typically organized in subcomplexes. One module, the conserved Nup82 complex at the cytoplasmic face of NPCs, is crucial to terminate mRNA export. To gain insight into the structure, assembly, and function of the cytoplasmic pore filaments, we reconstituted in yeast the Nup82–Nup159–Nsp1–Dyn2 complex, which was suitable for biochemical, biophysical, and electron microscopy analyses. Our integrative approach revealed that the yeast Nup82 complex forms an unusual asymmetric structure with a dimeric array of subunits. Based on all these data, we developed a three-dimensional structural model of the Nup82 complex that depicts how this module might be anchored to the NPC scaffold and concomitantly can interact with the soluble nucleocytoplasmic transport machinery. PMID:25646085

  12. A local Vapnik-Chervonenkis complexity.

    PubMed

    Oneto, Luca; Anguita, Davide; Ridella, Sandro

    2016-10-01

    We define in this work a new localized version of a Vapnik-Chervonenkis (VC) complexity, namely the Local VC-Entropy, and, building on this new complexity, we derive a new generalization bound for binary classifiers. The Local VC-Entropy-based bound improves on the original Vapnik's results because it is able to discard those functions that, most likely, will not be selected during the learning phase. The result is achieved by applying the localization principle to the original global complexity measure, in the same spirit of the Local Rademacher Complexity. By exploiting and improving a recently developed geometrical framework, we show that it is also possible to relate the Local VC-Entropy to the Local Rademacher Complexity by finding an admissible range for one given the other. In addition, the Local VC-Entropy allows one to reduce the computational requirements that arise when dealing with the Local Rademacher Complexity in binary classification problems.

  13. Single Hepatitis-B Virus Core Capsid Binding to Individual Nuclear Pore Complexes in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lill, Yoriko; Lill, Markus A.; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Schwarz-Herion, Kyrill; Paulillo, Sara; Aebi, Ueli; Hecht, Bert

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of hepatitis B virus capsids lacking a nuclear localization signal with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in permeabilized HeLa cells. Confocal and wide-field optical images of the nuclear envelope show well-spaced individual NPCs. Specific interactions of capsids with single NPCs are characterized by extended residence times of capsids in the focal volume which are characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. In addition, single-capsid-tracking experiments using fast wide-field fluorescence microscopy at 50 frames/s allow us to directly observe specific binding via a dual-color colocalization of capsids and NPCs. We find that binding occurs with high probability on the nuclear-pore ring moiety, at 44 ± 9 nm radial distance from the central axis. PMID:16877503

  14. Aberrant distributions of nuclear pore complex proteins in ALS mice and ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jingwei; Yamashita, Toru; Nakano, Yumiko; Morihara, Ryuta; Li, Xianghong; Feng, Tian; Liu, Xia; Huang, Yong; Fukui, Yusuke; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Abe, Koji

    2017-03-24

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) play important roles in traffic of molecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm, aberrant distributions of components of NPCs were demonstrated in C9orf72 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (C9-ALS) patients, but it is elusive whether such abnormities are also the case with other cause of ALS disease. In the present study, we investigated the spatiotemporal distributions of RanGAP1 and 4 representative nucleoporins (GP210, NUP205, NUP107 and NUP50) of NPCs in human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase-1 mutation transgenic (SOD1-Tg) mice and sporadic ALS patients. Compared with wild type (WT), these proteins displayed age-dependent and progressive nuclear precipitations, and cytoplasmic aberrant expressions in motor neurons of lumbar cord in SOD1-Tg mice from 10 to 18weeks (W). Double immunofluorescent analysis showed abnormal nuclear retention and apparent co-localizations of RanGAPl with NUP205 and NUP205 with NUPl07, meanwhile, GP210 with NUP205 mainly co-localized in the nuclear envelope (NE) of motor neurons. Furthermore, RanGAP1, GP210 and NUP50 showed similarly abnormal nuclear precipitations and cytoplasmic upregulations in SOD1-Tg mice and ALS patients, moreover, aberrant co-localizations of RanGAP1 with TDP-43 and NUP205 with TDP-43 were also observed in motor neurons. The present study indicated that the mislocalization of these proteins of NPCs may underlie the pathogenesis of ALS both in SOD1-Tg mice and human sporadic ALS patients, and these dysfunctions may be a fundamental pathway for ALS that is not specific only in C9-ALS but also in SOD1-ALS, which may be amenable to pharmacotherapeutic intervention.

  15. Characterization of nuclear pore complex components in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Yang, Hui-Ju; Yamamoto, Takaharu G; Ohtsuki, Chizuru; Chikashige, Yuji; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Tokunaga, Makio; Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is an enormous proteinaceous complex composed of multiple copies of about 30 different proteins called nucleoporins. In this study, we analyzed the composition of the NPC in the model organism Schizosaccharomyces pombe using strains in which individual nucleoporins were tagged with GFP. We identified 31 proteins as nucleoporins by their localization to the nuclear periphery. Gene disruption analysis in previous studies coupled with gene disruption analysis in the present study indicates that 15 of these nucleoporins are essential for vegetative cell growth and the other 16 nucleoporins are non-essential. Among the 16 non-essential nucleoporins, 11 are required for normal progression through meiosis and their disruption caused abnormal spore formation or poor spore viability. Based on fluorescence measurements of GFP-fused nucleoporins, we estimated the composition of the NPC in S. pombe and found that the organization of the S. pombe NPC is largely similar to that of other organisms; a single NPC was estimated as being 45.8-47.8 MDa in size. We also used fluorescence measurements of single NPCs and quantitative western blotting to analyze the composition of the Nup107-Nup160 subcomplex, which plays an indispensable role in NPC organization and function. Our analysis revealed low amounts of Nup107 and Nup131 and high amounts of Nup132 in the Nup107-Nup160 subcomplex, suggesting that the composition of this complex in S. pombe may differ from that in S. cerevisiae and humans. Comparative analysis of NPCs in various organisms will lead to a comprehensive understanding of the functional architecture of the NPC.

  16. High content of a nuclear pore complex protein in cytoplasmic annulate lamellae of Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Cordes, V C; Reidenbach, S; Franke, W W

    1995-11-01

    The Xenopus laevis oocyte and egg represent an established model system to study nucleocytoplasmic transport and the assembly of the nuclear envelope (NE) and its pore complexes (PC). PCs, however, are not restricted to the NE but are also known to occur in cytoplasmic annulate lamellae (AL) in a variety of cells, including the Xenopus oocyte. However, the proportion of PCs found in such AL relative to those located in the NE, is unknown. In this study we have analyzed and quantified cytoplasmic AL in the full-grown (stage VI) Xenopus oocyte by immunolocalization at the light and electron microscopic level. Moreover, we have developed a method to enrich AL from enucleated oocytes, and have quantified a PC marker protein, nucleoporin p62, in both cytoplasmic AL and the NE. For this purpose we have used a specific monoclonal antibody (A225) which recognizes an epitope localized between amino acids 251 and 268 of Xenopus p62. We show that the number of PCs and p62 molecules present in AL far exceeds that of the NE. The possible implications of these findings to nucleocytoplasmic transport and nuclear PC (NPC) assembly are discussed.

  17. The diverse roles of the Nup93/Nic96 complex proteins - structural scaffolds of the nuclear pore complex with additional cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Benjamin; Antonin, Wolfram

    2014-05-01

    Nuclear pore complexes mediate the transport between the cell nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. These 125 MDa structures are among the largest assemblies found in eukaryotes, built from proteins organized in distinct subcomplexes that act as building blocks during nuclear pore complex biogenesis. In this review, we focus on one of these subcomplexes, the Nup93 complex in metazoa and its yeast counterpart, the Nic96 complex. We discuss its essential function in nuclear pore complex assembly as a linker between the nuclear membrane and the central part of the pore and its various roles in nuclear transport processes and beyond.

  18. Characterization of pore structure and strain localization in Majella limestone by X-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yuntao; Hall, Stephen A.; Baud, Patrick; Wong, Teng-fong

    2015-02-01

    Standard techniques for computed tomography imaging are not directly applicable to a carbonate rock because of the geometric complexity of its pore space. In this study, we first characterized the pore structure in Majella limestone with 30 per cent porosity. Microtomography data acquired on this rock was partitioned into three distinct domains: macropores, solid grains, and an intermediate domain made up of voxels of solid embedded with micropores below the resolution. A morphological analysis of the microtomography images shows that in Majella limestone both the solid and intermediate domains are interconnected in a manner similar to that reported previously in a less porous limestone. We however show that the macroporosity in Majella limestone is fundamentally different, in that it has a percolative backbone which may contribute significantly to its permeability. We then applied for the first time 3-D-volumetric digital image correlation (DIC) to characterize the mode of mechanical failure in this limestone. Samples were triaxially deformed over a wide range of confining pressures. Tomography imaging was performed on these samples before and after deformation. Inelastic compaction was observed at all tested pressures associated with both brittle and ductile behaviors. Our DIC analysis reveals the structure of compacting shear bands in Majella limestone deformed in the transitional regime. It also indicates an increase of geometric complexity with increasing confinement-from a planar shear band, to a curvilinear band, and ultimately to a diffuse multiplicity of bands, before shear localization is inhibited as the failure mode completes the transition to delocalized cataclastic flow.

  19. Investigation of nuclear pore complex protein interactions and the implications for nuclear transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isgro, Timothy A.

    The nucleus of the cell is of central importance to an organism, serving to store and organize genetic material, while separating and protecting this very important information from the host of other cellular components. While the nucleus requires this protective isolation, it also needs to communicate with the rest of the cell, exchanging proteins and RNA, for a variety of nuclear and cytoplasmic processes which act in concert. The nuclear pore complex is responsible for controlling the transport of large molecules into and out of the cell nucleus. It is perhaps the largest protein structure in eukaryotic cells, and because of its size, pointed experimental study has been difficult. As a result, the mechanism by which the nuclear pore complex selectively allows "good" material across the nuclear envelope, while preventing the transit of "bad", remains unknown. Here, the computer has been used to study interactions between the transport receptors that shuttle material across the nuclear pore complex and FG-nucleoporins, proteins which compose the complex itself and are of great importance in allowing protected nuclear transport. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on transport complexes formed by the transport receptors importin-beta, NTF2, and Cse1p. The simulations confirm nearly all interactions previously known about from experimental data, while serving, in some cases, to provide greater detail about these interactions. Furthermore, the simulations uncover a host of previously unknown interactions between each transport receptor and FG-nups. When the interactions are compared across all three transport receptors, a novel binding pattern is revealed that indicates how the nuclear pore complex may recognize the difference between the macromolecules destined to cross the nuclear envelope and the host of other proteins for which it must protect against transport.

  20. Structure and Function of the Nuclear Pore Complex Cytoplasmic mRNA Export Platform.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Kim, Seung Joong; Shi, Yi; Upla, Paula; Pellarin, Riccardo; Gagnon, Michael; Chemmama, Ilan E; Wang, Junjie; Nudelman, Ilona; Zhang, Wenzhu; Williams, Rosemary; Rice, William J; Stokes, David L; Zenklusen, Daniel; Chait, Brian T; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P

    2016-11-17

    The last steps in mRNA export and remodeling are performed by the Nup82 complex, a large conserved assembly at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). By integrating diverse structural data, we have determined the molecular architecture of the native Nup82 complex at subnanometer precision. The complex consists of two compositionally identical multiprotein subunits that adopt different configurations. The Nup82 complex fits into the NPC through the outer ring Nup84 complex. Our map shows that this entire 14-MDa Nup82-Nup84 complex assembly positions the cytoplasmic mRNA export factor docking sites and messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) remodeling machinery right over the NPC's central channel rather than on distal cytoplasmic filaments, as previously supposed. We suggest that this configuration efficiently captures and remodels exporting mRNP particles immediately upon reaching the cytoplasmic side of the NPC.

  1. Mislocalization of prelamin A Tyr646Phe mutant to the nuclear pore complex in human embryonic kidney 293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yong; Garg, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Anil K.

    2007-01-01

    Mature lamin A is formed after post-translational processing of prelamin A, which includes prenylation and carboxymethylation of cysteine 661 in the CAAX motif, followed by two proteolytic cleavages by zinc metalloprotease (ZMPSTE24). We expressed several prelamin A mutants, C661S (defective in prenylation), Y646F (designed to undergo prenylation but not second proteolytic cleavage), double mutant, Y646F/C661S and Y646X (mature lamin A), and the wild type construct in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. Only the Y646F mutant co-localized with nuclear pore complex proteins, including Nup53 and Nup98, whereas the other mutants localized to the nuclear envelope rim. The cells expressing Y646F mutant also revealed abnormal nuclear morphology which was partially rescued with the farnesyl transferase inhibitors. These data suggest that the unprenylated prelamin A is not toxic to the cells. The toxicity of prenylated prelamin A may be due to its association and/or accumulation at the nuclear pore complex which could be partially reversed by farnesyl transferase inhibitors. PMID:17291448

  2. Mislocalization of prelamin A Tyr646Phe mutant to the nuclear pore complex in human embryonic kidney 293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yong; Garg, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Anil K. . E-mail: anil.agarwal@utsouthwestern.edu

    2007-03-30

    Mature lamin A is formed after post-translational processing of prelamin A, which includes prenylation and carboxymethylation of cysteine 661 in the CaaX motif, followed by two proteolytic cleavages by zinc metalloprotease (ZMPSTE24). We expressed several prelamin A mutants, C661S (defective in prenylation), Y646F (designed to undergo prenylation but not second proteolytic cleavage), double mutant, Y646F/C661S and Y646X (mature lamin A), and the wild-type construct in human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells. Only the Y646F mutant co-localized with nuclear pore complex proteins, including Nup53 and Nup98, whereas the other mutants localized to the nuclear envelope rim. The cells expressing Y646F mutant also revealed abnormal nuclear morphology which was partially rescued with the farnesyl transferase inhibitors. These data suggest that the unprenylated prelamin A is not toxic to the cells. The toxicity of prenylated prelamin A may be due to its association and/or accumulation at the nuclear pore complex which could be partially reversed by farnesyl transferase inhibitors.

  3. Werner complex deficiency in cells disrupts the Nuclear Pore Complex and the distribution of lamin B1.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Zhu, Yizhou; Zhai, Yujia; R Castroagudin, Michelle; Bao, Yifei; White, Tommy E; Glavy, Joseph S

    2013-12-01

    From the surrounding shell to the inner machinery, nuclear proteins provide the functional plasticity of the nucleus. This study highlights the nuclear association of Pore membrane (POM) protein NDC1 and Werner protein (WRN), a RecQ helicase responsible for the DNA instability progeria disorder, Werner Syndrome. In our previous publication, we connected the DNA damage sensor Werner's Helicase Interacting Protein (WHIP), a binding partner of WRN, to the NPC. Here, we confirm the association of the WRN/WHIP complex and NDC1. In established WRN/WHIP knockout cell lines, we further demonstrate the interdependence of WRN/WHIP and Nucleoporins (Nups). These changes do not completely abrogate the barrier of the Nuclear Envelope (NE) but do affect the distribution of FG Nups and the RAN gradient, which are necessary for nuclear transport. Evidence from WRN/WHIP knockout cell lines demonstrates changes in the processing and nucleolar localization of lamin B1. The appearance of "RAN holes" void of RAN corresponds to regions within the nucleolus filled with condensed pools of lamin B1. From WRN/WHIP knockout cell line extracts, we found three forms of lamin B1 that correspond to mature holoprotein and two potential post-translationally modified forms of the protein. Upon treatment with topoisomerase inhibitors lamin B1 cleavage occurs only in WRN/WHIP knockout cells. Our data suggest the link of the NDC1 and WRN as one facet of the network between the nuclear periphery and genome stability. Loss of WRN complex leads to multiple alterations at the NPC and the nucleolus.

  4. The nuclear pore complex--structure and function at a glance.

    PubMed

    Kabachinski, Greg; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are indispensable for cell function and are at the center of several human diseases. NPCs provide access to the nucleus and regulate the transport of proteins and RNA across the nuclear envelope. They are aqueous channels generated from a complex network of evolutionarily conserved proteins known as nucleporins. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we discuss how transport between the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm is regulated, what we currently know about the structure of individual nucleoporins and the assembled NPC, and how the cell regulates assembly and disassembly of such a massive structure. Our aim is to provide a general overview on what we currently know about the nuclear pore and point out directions of research this area is heading to.

  5. Atomic Structure of the Y-Complex of the Nuclear Pore

    PubMed Central

    Kabachinski, Greg; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the principal gateway for transport into and out of the nucleus. Selectivity is achieved through the hydrogel-like core of the NPC. The structural integrity of the NPC depends on ~15 architectural proteins, which are organized in distinct subcomplexes to form the >40 MDa ring-like structure. Here we present the 4.1 Å crystal structure of a heterotetrameric core element (‘hub’) of the Y-complex, the essential NPC building block, from Myceliophthora thermophila. Using the ‘hub’ structure together with known Y-complex fragments we built the entire ~0.5 MDa Y-complex. Our data reveal that the conserved core of the Y-complex has 6, rather than 7 members. Evolutionarily distant Y-complex assemblies share a conserved core that is very similar in shape and dimension, suggesting that there are closely related architectural codes for constructing the NPC in all eukaryotes. PMID:25822992

  6. The crystal structure of the Ran-Nup153ZnF2 complex: a general Ran docking site at the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Nils; Koerner, Carolin; Koessmeier, Katja; Bangert, Jan-Amadé; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Stoll, Raphael; Vetter, Ingrid R

    2008-07-01

    Nucleoporin (Nup) 153 is a highly mobile, multifunctional, and essential nuclear pore protein. It contains four zinc finger motifs that are thought to be crucial for the regulation of transport-receptor/cargo interactions via their binding to the small guanine nucleotide binding protein, Ran. We found this interaction to be independent of the phoshorylation state of the nucleotide. Ran binds with the highest affinity to the second zinc finger motif of Nup153 (Nup153ZnF2). Here we present the crystal structure of this complex, revealing a new type of Ran-Ran interaction partner interface together with the solution structure of Nup153ZnF2. According to our complex structure, Nup153ZnF2 binding to Ran excludes the formation of a Ran-importin-beta complex. This finding suggests a local Nup153-mediated Ran reservoir at the nucleoplasmic distal ring of the nuclear pore, where nucleotide exchange may take place in a ternary Nup153-Ran-RCC1 complex, so that import complexes are efficiently terminated.

  7. Zero-Mode Waveguide detection of biomolecules transport through artificial nanopores and nuclear pore complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, Thomas; Auvray, Loic; Montel, Fabien

    We have developed a novel single molecule optical observation method using a custom Zero-Mode Waveguide setup to study the translocation of biopolymers through artificial and biological nanopores. Our work focuses on two aspects. First we monitored the flow driven injection of DNA molecules through solid state nanopores and showed that DNA starts translocating over a flow threshold independent of the pore radius, the DNA concentration and length. We demonstrate that the translocation is controlled by an energy barrier as proposed by the de Gennes - Brochard suction model. The height of the energy barrier can be modulated by functionalizing the nanopores with PEG-Thiols. More recently we adapted our setup to the study of transport through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) using extracted nuclear membranes from Xenopus Laevis oocytes. We aim at probing the conformation of unstructured proteins - the FG-Nucleoporins - crowding the central channel of the NPC by monitoring the free diffusion of small Dextran molecules (3kDa). We have been able to estimate the radius of the central pore of the NPC. We want to study the effects of transporter molecules, which have a high affinity for the FG-Nups, on the central pore size and correlate it to the conformation of FG-Nups.

  8. Pore-controlled formation of 0D metal complexes in anionic 3D metal-organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, MW; Bosch, M; Zhou, HC

    2015-01-01

    The host-guest chemistry between a series of anionic MOFs and their trapped counterions was investigated by single crystal XRD. The PCN-514 series contains crystallographically identifiable metal complexes trapped in the pores, where their formation is controlled by the size and shape of the MOF pores. A change in the structure and pore size of PCN-518 indicates that the existence of guest molecules may reciprocally affect the formation of host MOFs.

  9. Structure Determination of the Nuclear Pore Complex with Three-Dimensional Cryo electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    von Appen, Alexander; Beck, Martin

    2016-05-22

    Determining the structure of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) imposes an enormous challenge due to its size, intricate composition and membrane-embedded nature. In vertebrates, about 1000 protein building blocks assemble into a 110-MDa complex that fuses the inner and outer membranes of a cell's nucleus. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the in situ architecture of the NPC with a specific focus on approaches using three-dimensional cryo electron microscopy. We discuss technological benefits and limitations and give an outlook toward obtaining a high-resolution structure of the NPC.

  10. MpWIP regulates air pore complex development in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Jones, Victor A S; Dolan, Liam

    2017-04-15

    The colonisation of the land by plants was accompanied by the evolution of complex tissues and multicellular structures comprising different cell types as morphological adaptations to the terrestrial environment. Here, we show that the single WIP protein in the early-diverging land plant Marchantia polymorpha L. is required for the development of the multicellular gas exchange structure: the air pore complex. This 16-cell barrel-shaped structure surrounds an opening between epidermal cells that facilitates the exchange of gases between the chamber containing the photosynthetic cells inside the plant and the air outside. MpWIP is expressed in cells of the developing air pore complex and the morphogenesis of the complex is defective in plants with reduced MpWIP function. The role of WIP proteins in the control of different multicellular structures in M. polymorpha and the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana suggests that these proteins controlled the development of multicellular structures in the common ancestor of land plants. We hypothesise that WIP genes were subsequently co-opted in the control of morphogenesis of novel multicellular structures that evolved during the diversification of land plants.

  11. Structure, dynamics, evolution, and function of a major scaffold component in the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Upla, Paula; Rice, William J; Phillips, Jeremy; Timney, Benjamin L; Pieper, Ursula; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Ketaren, Natalia E; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Stokes, David L; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P; Almo, Steven C

    2013-04-02

    The nuclear pore complex, composed of proteins termed nucleoporins (Nups), is responsible for nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotes. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) form an annular structure composed of the nuclear ring, cytoplasmic ring, a membrane ring, and two inner rings. Nup192 is a major component of the NPC's inner ring. We report the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup192 residues 2-960 [ScNup192(2-960)], which adopts an α-helical fold with three domains (i.e., D1, D2, and D3). Small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy (EM) studies reveal that ScNup192(2-960) could undergo long-range transition between "open" and "closed" conformations. We obtained a structural model of full-length ScNup192 based on EM, the structure of ScNup192(2-960), and homology modeling. Evolutionary analyses using the ScNup192(2-960) structure suggest that NPCs and vesicle-coating complexes are descended from a common membrane-coating ancestral complex. We show that suppression of Nup192 expression leads to compromised nuclear transport and hypothesize a role for Nup192 in modulating the permeability of the NPC central channel.

  12. CKMT1 regulates the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in a process that provides evidence for alternative forms of the complex

    PubMed Central

    Datler, Christoph; Pazarentzos, Evangelos; Mahul-Mellier, Anne-Laure; Chaisaklert, Wanwisa; Hwang, Ming-Shih; Osborne, Foy; Grimm, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The permeability transition pore (PT-pore) mediates cell death through the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Because the exact composition of the PT-pore is controversial, it is crucial to investigate the actual molecular constituents and regulators of this complex. We found that mitochondrial creatine kinase-1 (CKMT1) is a universal and functionally necessary gatekeeper of the PT-pore, as its depletion induces mitochondrial depolarization and apoptotic cell death. This can be inhibited efficiently by bongkrekic acid, a compound that is widely used to inhibit the PT-pore. However, when the ‘classical’ PT-pore subunits cyclophilin D and VDAC1 are pharmacologically inhibited or their expression levels reduced, mitochondrial depolarization by CKMT1 depletion remains unaffected. At later stages of drug-induced apoptosis, CKMT1 levels are reduced, suggesting that CKMT1 downregulation acts to reinforce the commitment of cells to apoptosis. A novel high-molecular-mass CKMT1 complex that is distinct from the known CKMT1 octamer disintegrates upon treatment with cytotoxic drugs, concomitant with mitochondrial depolarization. Our study provides evidence that CKMT1 is a key regulator of the PT-pore through a complex that is distinct from the classical PT-pore. PMID:24522192

  13. Nuclear pore complex protein sequences determine overall copolymer brush structure and function.

    PubMed

    Ando, David; Zandi, Roya; Kim, Yong Woon; Colvin, Michael; Rexach, Michael; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2014-05-06

    The transport of cargo across the nuclear membrane is highly selective and accomplished by a poorly understood mechanism involving hundreds of nucleoporins lining the inside of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Currently, there is no clear picture of the overall structure formed by this collection of proteins within the pore, primarily due to their disordered nature. We perform coarse-grained simulations of both individual nucleoporins and grafted rings of nups mimicking the in vivo geometry of the NPC and supplement this with polymer brush modeling. Our results indicate that different regions or blocks of an individual NPC protein can have distinctly different forms of disorder and that this property appears to be a conserved functional feature. Furthermore, this block structure at the individual protein level is critical to the formation of a unique higher-order polymer brush architecture that can exist in distinct morphologies depending on the effective interaction energy between the phenylalanine glycine (FG) domains of different nups. Because the interactions between FG domains may be modulated by certain forms of transport factors, our results indicate that transitions between brush morphologies could play an important role in regulating transport across the NPC, suggesting novel forms of gated transport across membrane pores with wide biomimetic applicability.

  14. Nanoscale stiffness topography reveals structure and mechanics of the transport barrier in intact nuclear pore complexes.

    PubMed

    Bestembayeva, Aizhan; Kramer, Armin; Labokha, Aksana A; Osmanović, Dino; Liashkovich, Ivan; Orlova, Elena V; Ford, Ian J; Charras, Guillaume; Fassati, Ariberto; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the gate for transport between the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm. Small molecules cross the NPC by passive diffusion, but molecules larger than ∼5 nm must bind to nuclear transport receptors to overcome a selective barrier within the NPC. Although the structure and shape of the cytoplasmic ring of the NPC are relatively well characterized, the selective barrier is situated deep within the central channel of the NPC and depends critically on unstructured nuclear pore proteins, and is therefore not well understood. Here, we show that stiffness topography with sharp atomic force microscopy tips can generate nanoscale cross-sections of the NPC. The cross-sections reveal two distinct structures, a cytoplasmic ring and a central plug structure, which are consistent with the three-dimensional NPC structure derived from electron microscopy. The central plug persists after reactivation of the transport cycle and resultant cargo release, indicating that the plug is an intrinsic part of the NPC barrier. Added nuclear transport receptors accumulate on the intact transport barrier and lead to a homogenization of the barrier stiffness. The observed nanomechanical properties in the NPC indicate the presence of a cohesive barrier to transport and are quantitatively consistent with the presence of a central condensate of nuclear pore proteins in the NPC channel.

  15. Choreography of importin-α/CAS complex assembly and disassembly at nuclear pores.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changxia; Fu, Guo; Ciziene, Danguole; Stewart, Murray; Musser, Siegfried M

    2013-04-23

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) mediate the exchange of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleoplasm. Soluble nuclear transport receptors bind signal-dependent cargos to form transport complexes that diffuse through the NPC and are then disassembled. Although transport receptors enable the NPC's permeability barrier to be overcome, directionality is established by complex assembly and disassembly. Here, we delineate the choreography of importin-α/CAS complex assembly and disassembly in permeabilized cells, using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer and particle tracking. Monitoring interaction sequences in intact NPCs ensures spatiotemporal preservation of structures and interactions critical for activity in vivo. We show that key interactions between components are reversible, multiple outcomes are often possible, and the assembly and disassembly of complexes are precisely controlled to occur at the appropriate place and time. Importin-α mutants that impair interactions during nuclear import were used together with cytoplasmic Ran GTPase-activating factors to demonstrate that importin-α/CAS complexes form in the nuclear basket region, at the termination of protein import, and disassembly of importin-α/CAS complexes after export occurs in the cytoplasmic filament region of the NPC. Mathematical models derived from our data emphasize the intimate connection between transport and the coordinated assembly and disassembly of importin-α/CAS complexes for generating productive transport cycles.

  16. Functional insights from studies on the structure of the nuclear pore and coat protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) is a specific extension of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that wraps around the nucleus and enables the spatial separation of gene transcription and protein translation, one of the signature features of eukaryotes. Rather than being completely closed, the double lipid bilayer of the NE is perforated at sites where the inner and outer nuclear membranes fuse, resulting in circular openings lined with sharply bent membranes. These openings are filled with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), enormous protein assemblies that facilitate nuclear transport. The scaffold components of the NPC surprisingly share interesting similarities with elements of coat protein complexes, which have general implications for function and evolution of these membrane-coating complexes. Here I discuss, from a structural perspective, what these findings might teach us.

  17. Toward the atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex: when top down meets bottom up.

    PubMed

    Hoelz, André; Glavy, Joseph S; Beck, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Elucidating the structure of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a prerequisite for understanding the molecular mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport. However, owing to its sheer size and flexibility, the NPC is unapproachable by classical structure determination techniques and requires a joint effort of complementary methods. Whereas bottom-up approaches rely on biochemical interaction studies and crystal-structure determination of NPC components, top-down approaches attempt to determine the structure of the intact NPC in situ. Recently, both approaches have converged, thereby bridging the resolution gap from the higher-order scaffold structure to near-atomic resolution and opening the door for structure-guided experimental interrogations of NPC function.

  18. Towards the atomic structure of the Nuclear Pore Complex: When top down meets bottom up

    PubMed Central

    Hoelz, André; Glavy, Joseph S.; Beck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the structure of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a prerequisite for understanding the molecular mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport. However, due to sheer size and flexibility, the NPC is unapproachable by classical structure determination techniques and requires a joint effort of complementary methods. Whereas bottom up approaches rely on biochemical interaction studies and crystal structure determination of NPC components, top down approaches attempt to determine the structure of the intact NPC in situ. Recently, both approaches have converged, bridging the resolution gap from higher-order scaffold structure to near-atomic resolution and opening the door for structure-guided experimental interrogations of NPC function. PMID:27273515

  19. Complex resistivity spectra in relation to multiscale pore geometry in carbonates and mixed-siliciclastic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbisrath, Jan Henrik

    Carbonate rocks are known to have complex and heterogeneous pore structures, which result from their biogenic origin and strong affinity for diagenetic processes that change their pore structure after burial. The combination of sheer endless variations of precursor biogenic material, depositional environments, and diagenetic effects results in rocks that are interesting to study but intricate to understand. Many schemes to categorize the diversity of carbonate rocks are in use today; most are based on the macropore structure and qualitative thin-section analysis. Many studies, however, acknowledge that micropores have a significant influence on the macroscopic petrophysical rock properties, which are essential to determine reservoir quality. Micropores are, by definition, smaller than the thickness of a thin-section (< 30 microm) and hence cannot be quantified with conventional methods. For their analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is the logical next step. The challenge is that mechanical polishing methods produce excessive surface roughness at micron scale; the resulting surfaces are not suited for quantification of micropores. Advances in broad-ion-beam (BIB) milling enable preparation of nanometer-precision 2D sections that are suited for quantitative analysis with the SEM. To accomplish the objective of accurate quantification of carbonate micropores, part one of this dissertation employs the BIB-SEM technique on a variety of carbonate rock samples and finds four major carbonate microporosity types: (1) small intercrystalline, (2) large inter-crystalline, (3) intercement, and (4) micromoldic. Each microporosity type shows a distinct capacity to conduct electrical charge, which largely controls the magnitude and range of cementation factors (m) in rocks with such microporosity type. The BIB-SEM method is also used on a dataset of mixed carbonate-siliciclastic (mudrock) samples with high kerogen and pyrite content. Results show that the nanopore

  20. The Integral Membrane Protein Snl1p Is Genetically Linked to Yeast Nuclear Pore Complex Function

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Albert K.; Raczniak, Gregory A.; Ives, Eric B.; Wente, Susan R.

    1998-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins are predicted to play key roles in the biogenesis and function of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Revealing how the transport apparatus is assembled will be critical for understanding the mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport. We observed that expression of the carboxyl-terminal 200 amino acids of the nucleoporin Nup116p had no effect on wild-type yeast cells, but it rendered the nup116 null strain inviable at all temperatures and coincidentally resulted in the formation of nuclear membrane herniations at 23°C. To identify factors related to NPC function, a genetic screen for high-copy suppressors of this lethal nup116-C phenotype was conducted. One gene (designated SNL1 for suppressor of nup116-C lethal) was identified whose expression was necessary and sufficient for rescuing growth. Snl1p has a predicted molecular mass of 18.3 kDa, a putative transmembrane domain, and limited sequence similarity to Pom152p, the only previously identified yeast NPC-associated integral membrane protein. By both indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation studies, Snl1p was localized to both the nuclear envelope and the endoplasmic reticulum. Membrane extraction and topology assays suggested that Snl1p was an integral membrane protein, with its carboxyl-terminal region exposed to the cytosol. With regard to genetic specificity, the nup116-C lethality was also suppressed by high-copy GLE2 and NIC96. Moreover, high-copy SNL1 suppressed the temperature sensitivity of gle2–1 and nic96-G3 mutant cells. The nic96-G3 allele was identified in a synthetic lethal genetic screen with a null allele of the closely related nucleoporin nup100. Gle2p physically associated with Nup116p in vitro, and the interaction required the N-terminal region of Nup116p. Therefore, genetic links between the role of Snl1p and at least three NPC-associated proteins were established. We suggest that Snl1p plays a stabilizing role in NPC structure and function

  1. Model inspired by nuclear pore complex suggests possible roles for nuclear transport receptors in determining its structure.

    PubMed

    Osmanović, Dino; Ford, Ian J; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2013-12-17

    Nuclear transport receptors (NTRs) mediate nucleocytoplasmic transport via their affinity for unstructured proteins (polymers) in the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Here, we have modeled the effect of NTRs on polymeric structure in the nanopore confinement of the NPC central conduit. The model explicitly takes into account inter- and intramolecular interactions, as well as the finite size of the NTRs (∼20% of the NPC channel diameter). It reproduces various proposed scenarios for the channel structure, ranging from a central polymer condensate (selective phase) to brushlike polymer arrangements localized at the channel wall (virtual gate, reduction of dimensionality), with the transport receptors lining the polymer surface. In addition, it predicts a new structure in which NTRs become an integral part of the transport barrier by forming a cross-linked network with the unstructured proteins stretching across the pore. The model provides specific and distinctive predictions for the equilibrium spatial distributions of NTRs for these different scenarios that can be experimentally verified by, e.g., superresolution fluorescence microscopy. Moreover, it suggests mechanisms by which globular macromolecules (colloidal particles) can cause polymer-coated nanopores to switch between open and closed configurations, a possible explanation of the biological function of the NPC, and suggests potential technological applications for filtration and single-molecule sensing.

  2. Architecture of the Xenopus nuclear pore complex revealed by three- dimensional cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex spans the nuclear envelope and functions as a macromolecular transporter in the ATP-dependent process of nucleocytoplasmic transport. In this report, we present three dimensional (3D) structures for both membrane-associated and detergent- extracted Xenopus NPCs, imaged in frozen buffers by cryo-electron microscopy. A comparison of the differing configurations present in the 3D maps suggests that the spokes may possess an intrinsic conformational flexibility. When combined with recent data from a 3D map of negatively stained NPCs (Hinshaw, J. E., B. O. Carragher, and R. A. Milligan. 1992. Cell. 69:1133-1141), these observations suggest a minimal domain model for the spoke-ring complex which may account for the observed plasticity of this assembly. Moreover, lumenal domains in adjacent spokes are interconnected by radial arm dimers, forming a lumenal ring that may be responsible for anchoring the NPC within the nuclear envelope pore. Importantly, the NPC transporter is visualized as a centrally tapered cylinder that spans the entire width of the NPC, in a direction normal to the nuclear envelope. The central positioning, tripartite structure, and hollow nature of the transporter suggests that it may form a macromolecular transport channel, with a globular gating domain at each end. Finally, the packing of the transporter within the spokes creates a set of eight internal channels that may be responsible, in part, for the diffusion of ions and small molecules across the nuclear envelope. PMID:8314837

  3. Structure-function mapping of a heptameric module in the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Phillips, Jeremy; Sekedat, Matthew D; Diaz-Avalos, Ruben; Velazquez-Muriel, Javier; Franke, Josef D; Williams, Rosemary; Stokes, David L; Chait, Brian T; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P

    2012-02-20

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a multiprotein assembly that serves as the sole mediator of nucleocytoplasmic exchange in eukaryotic cells. In this paper, we use an integrative approach to determine the structure of an essential component of the yeast NPC, the ~600-kD heptameric Nup84 complex, to a precision of ~1.5 nm. The configuration of the subunit structures was determined by satisfaction of spatial restraints derived from a diverse set of negative-stain electron microscopy and protein domain-mapping data. Phenotypic data were mapped onto the complex, allowing us to identify regions that stabilize the NPC's interaction with the nuclear envelope membrane and connect the complex to the rest of the NPC. Our data allow us to suggest how the Nup84 complex is assembled into the NPC and propose a scenario for the evolution of the Nup84 complex through a series of gene duplication and loss events. This work demonstrates that integrative approaches based on low-resolution data of sufficient quality can generate functionally informative structures at intermediate resolution.

  4. Posttranslational marks control architectural and functional plasticity of the nuclear pore complex basket

    PubMed Central

    Niño, Carlos A.; Guet, David; Gay, Alexandre; Brutus, Sergine; Jourquin, Frédéric; Mendiratta, Shweta; Salamero, Jean; Géli, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) serves as both the unique gate between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and a major platform that coordinates nucleocytoplasmic exchanges, gene expression, and genome integrity. To understand how the NPC integrates these functional constraints, we dissected here the posttranslational modifications of the nuclear basket protein Nup60 and analyzed how they intervene to control the plasticity of the NPC. Combined approaches highlight the role of monoubiquitylation in regulating the association dynamics of Nup60 and its partner, Nup2, with the NPC through an interaction with Nup84, a component of the Y complex. Although major nuclear transport routes are not regulated by Nup60 modifications, monoubiquitylation of Nup60 is stimulated upon genotoxic stress and regulates the DNA-damage response and telomere repair. Together, these data reveal an original mechanism contributing to the plasticity of the NPC at a molecular-organization and functional level. PMID:26783300

  5. Influence of pore fluid chemistry on the complex conductivity and induced polarization responses of Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesmes, David P.; Frye, Kevin M.

    2001-01-01

    The spectral induced-polarization (IP) response of rocks and soils is a complex function of pore solution chemistry, sample microgeometry, and surface chemical properties. We measure the complex conductivity and the time domain IP responses of Berea sandstone as a function of pore fluid ionic strength and pH. Complex conductivity is measured over the frequency range 10-3 to 106 Hz, and chargeability is computed using a time window of 0.16 to 1.74 s. The field IP parameters: phase, percent frequency effect, and chargeability are functions of both the surface and bulk electrical properties of the sample and are observed to decrease with increasing solution conductivity. Dividing these parameters by the sample resistivity yields normalized IP parameters (quadrature conductivity, metal factor, normalized chargeability) that are proportional to the imaginary component of the complex surface conductivity. Normalized IP parameters increase with ionic strength up to concentrations of 10-1 M NaCl and show a reduced response at pH 3, the point of zero charge for quartz-dominated systems. For concentrations >10-1 M NaCl, the normalized parameters decrease with increasing concentration. This decrease in surface polarization may indicate a decrease in the effective mobility of polarizing charges at high solution concentration. Our data indicate that normalized IP parameters are directly related to the physiochemical parameters that control the surface conductivity responses of rocks and soils. Normalization of IP measurements in environmental investigations should increase the effectiveness of IP surveys, especially in high-conductivity environments.

  6. Local Geometrical Machinery for Complexity and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G.; Reid, Darryn J.

    2015-11-01

    In this Chapter, we present local geometrical machinery for studying complexity and control, consisting of dynamics on Kähler manifolds, which combine three geometrical structures-Riemannian, symplectic and complex (Hermitian)-in a mutually compatible way. In other words, every Kähler manifold is simultaneously Riemannian, symplectic and complex (Hermitian). It is well known that Riemannian manifolds represent the stage on which Lagrangian dynamics is set, symplectic manifolds represent the stage for Hamiltonian dynamics, and complex (Hermitian) varieties comprise the stage for quantum dynamics. Therefore, Kähler manifolds represent the richest dynamical stage available where Lagrangian, Hamiltonian, and quantum dynamics all dance together.

  7. Regulation of nuclear pore complex conformation by IP(3) receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Moore-Nichols, David; Arnott, Anne; Dunn, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, both the molecular architecture and functional dynamics of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) have been revealed with increasing detail. These large, supramolecular assemblages of proteins form channels that span the nuclear envelope of cells, acting as crucial regulators of nuclear import and export. From the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope, nuclear pore complexes exhibit an eightfold symmetric ring structure encompassing a central lumen. The lumen often appears occupied by an additional structure alternatively referred to as the central granule, nuclear transport complex, or nuclear plug. Previous studies have suggested that the central granule may play a role in mediating calcium-dependent regulation of diffusion across the nuclear envelope for intermediate sized molecules (10-40 kDa). Using atomic force microscopy to measure the surface topography of chemically fixed Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes, we present measurements of the relative position of the central granule within the NPC lumen under a variety of conditions known to modify nuclear Ca(2+) stores. These measurements reveal a large, approximately 9-nm displacement of the central granule toward the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope under calcium depleting conditions. Additionally, activation of nuclear inositol triphosphate (IP(3)) receptors by the specific agonist, adenophostin A, results in a concentration-dependent displacement of central granule position with an EC(50) of ~1.2 nM. The displacement of the central granule within the NPC is observed on both the cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic faces of the nuclear envelope. The displacement is blocked upon treatment with xestospongin C, a specific inhibitor of IP(3) receptor activation. These results extend previous models of NPC conformational dynamics linking central granule position to depletion of IP(3) sensitive nuclear envelope calcium stores. PMID:12202368

  8. Nuclear Pore Complex Protein Sequences Determine Overall Copolymer Brush Structure and Function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, David; Kim, Yongwoon; Zandi, Roya; Colvin, Michael; Rexach, Michael; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-03-01

    Disordered proteins are an interesting class of unfolded protein biopolymers which are functionally versatile. Their sequences are unconstrained by a sequence-structure relationship, and allow for a wide range of chemical and physical polymer properties. The Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) contains over one hundred of such proteins (FG nups), which collectively function to regulate the exchange of all materials between the nucleus and cytoplasm. We perform coarse grained simulations of both individual FG nups and grafted rings of nups mimicking the in vivo geometry of the NPC, supplemented with polymer brush modeling. Our results indicate that different regions or ``blocks'' of an individual FG nup can have distinctly different forms of disorder, and that this property appears to be a conserved feature across eukarya. Furthermore, this block structure at the individual protein level is critical to the formation of a unique higher-order polymer brush architecture. Because the interactions between FG nups may be modulated by certain forms of transport factors, our results indicate that transitions between brush morphologies could play an important role in regulating transport across the NPC, suggesting novel forms of gated transport across membrane pores with wide biomimetic applicability.

  9. Molecular modeling of zinc paddlewheel molecular complexes and the pores of a flexible metal organic framework.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Khalid A H; Deeth, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    A new all-atom first-principles force field (FF) is constructed for the bimetallic, four-bladed zinc paddlewheel (ZPW) motif. Zinc-ligand interactions are described via Morse functions and the angular geometry at the metal centers is modeled with a pure ligand-ligand repulsion term. The ZPW-FF is principally based on 15 DFT-optimized model systems of general formula ZnPR.nL, where ZnP is the base Zn2(O2CR)4 unit, R = H, CH3 or CF3, L = NH3 or pyridine, and n = 0, 1 or 2. It correctly generates the distorted tetrahedral coordination of the uncapped [Zn2(O2CR)4] species in their ground states as well as giving reasonable structures and energies for the higher symmetry D4h transition state conformations. The zinc-ligand Morse function reference distance, r 0 , is further refined against 30 complexes located in the Cambridge Structural Database and this FF is applied to pore models of the flexible metal-organic framework (MOF) [Zn(bdc)2(dabco)]n (bdc = 1,4-benzendicarboxylate; dabco = 1,4-diazabicyclo(2.2.2)octane). A single pore model reproduces the unit cell of the evacuated MOF system while a 3×3 grid model is necessary to provide good agreement with the observed pronounced structural changes upon adsorption of either dimethylformamide or benzene.

  10. Nucleoporin domain topology is linked to the transport status of the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, Sara M; Phillips, Erica M; Köser, Joachim; Sauder, Ursula; Ullman, Katharine S; Powers, Maureen A; Fahrenkrog, Birthe

    2005-08-26

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) facilitate macromolecular exchange between the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. The vertebrate NPC is composed of approximately 30 different proteins (nucleoporins), of which around one third contain phenylalanine-glycine (FG)-repeat domains that are thought to mediate the main interaction between the NPC and soluble transport receptors. We have recently shown that the FG-repeat domain of Nup153 is flexible within the NPC, although this nucleoporin is anchored to the nuclear side of the NPC. By using domain-specific antibodies, we have now mapped the domain topology of Nup214 in Xenopus oocytes and in human somatic cells by immuno-EM. We have found that whereas Nup214 is anchored to the cytoplasmic side of the NPC via its N-terminal and central domain, its FG-repeat domain appears flexible, residing on both sides of the NPC. Moreover, the spatial distribution of the FG-repeat domains of both Nup153 and Nup214 shifts in a transport-dependent manner, suggesting that the location of FG-repeat domains within the NPC correlates with cargo/receptor interactions and that they concomitantly move with cargo through the central pore of the NPC.

  11. Probing a Structural Model of the Nuclear Pore Complex Channel through Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lingling; Schulten, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The central pore of a nuclear pore complex (NPC) is filled with unstructured proteins that contain many FG-repeats separated by hydrophilic regions. An example of such protein is nsp1. By simulating an array of nsp1 segments, we identified, in an earlier study, a spontaneously formed brushlike structure that promises to explain selective transport in the NPC channel. Here we report four (350,000 atom, 200 ns) simulations probing this structure via its interaction with transport receptor NTF2 as well as with an inert protein. NTF2 dimers are observed to gradually enter the brush, but the inert protein is not. Both NTF2 and the inert protein are found to bind to FG-repeats, but binding periods lasted more briefly for the inert protein. A simulation also investigated the behavior of a brush made of mutant nsp1 that is known to be less effective in NPC-selective transport, finding that this brush does not attract NTF2. PMID:20409487

  12. How to operate a nuclear pore complex by Kap-centric control

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Roderick Y H; Huang, Binlu; Kapinos, Larisa E

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) mediate molecular transport between the nucleus and cytoplasm in eukaryotic cells. Tethered within each NPC lie numerous intrinsically disordered proteins known as FG nucleoporins (FG Nups) that are central to this process. Over two decades of investigation has converged on a view that a barrier mechanism consisting of FG Nups rejects non-specific macromolecules while promoting the speed and selectivity of karyopherin (Kaps) receptors (and their cargoes). Yet, the number of NPCs in the cell is exceedingly small compared to the number of Kaps, so that in fact there is a high likelihood the pores are always populated by Kaps. Here, we contemplate a view where Kaps actively participate in regulating the selectivity and speed of transport through NPCs. This so-called “Kap-centric” control of the NPC accounts for Kaps as essential barrier reinforcements that play a prerequisite role in facilitating fast transport kinetics. Importantly, Kap-centric control reconciles both mechanistic and kinetic requirements of the NPC, and in so doing potentially resolves incoherent aspects of FG-centric models. On this basis, we surmise that Kaps prime the NPC for nucleocytoplasmic transport by fine-tuning the NPC microenvironment according to the functional needs of the cell. PMID:26338152

  13. Clathrin inhibitor Pitstop-2 disrupts the nuclear pore complex permeability barrier

    PubMed Central

    Liashkovich, Ivan; Pasrednik, Dzmitry; Prystopiuk, Valeria; Rosso, Gonzalo; Oberleithner, Hans; Shahin, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Existence of a selective nucleocytoplasmic permeability barrier is attributed to Phenylalanine-Glycine rich proteins (FG-nups) within the central channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Limited understanding of the FG-nup structural arrangement hinders development of strategies directed at disrupting the NPC permeability barrier. In this report we explore an alternative approach to enhancing the NPC permeability for exogenous macromolecules. We demonstrate that the recently discovered inhibitor of clathrin coat assembly Pitstop-2 compromises the NPC permeability barrier in a rapid and effective manner. Treatment with Pitstop-2 causes a collapse of the NPC permeability barrier and a reduction of Importin β binding accompanied by alteration of the NPC ultrastructure. Interestingly, the effects are induced by the same chemical agent that is capable of inhibiting clathrin-mediated endocytosis. To our knowledge, this is the first functional indication of the previously postulated evolutionary relation between clathrin and NPC scaffold proteins. PMID:25944393

  14. Molecular Architecture of the Major Membrane Ring Component of the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Upla, Paula; Kim, Seung Joong; Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Dutta, Kaushik; Cahill, Sean M; Chemmama, Ilan E; Williams, Rosemary; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Rice, William J; Stokes, David L; Cowburn, David; Almo, Steven C; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier

    2017-03-07

    The membrane ring that equatorially circumscribes the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in the perinuclear lumen of the nuclear envelope is composed largely of Pom152 in yeast and its ortholog Nup210 (or Gp210) in vertebrates. Here, we have used a combination of negative-stain electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and small-angle X-ray scattering methods to determine an integrative structure of the ∼120 kDa luminal domain of Pom152. Our structural analysis reveals that the luminal domain is formed by a flexible string-of-pearls arrangement of nine repetitive cadherin-like Ig-like domains, indicating an evolutionary connection between NPCs and the cell adhesion machinery. The 16 copies of Pom152 known to be present in the yeast NPC are long enough to form the observed membrane ring, suggesting how interactions between Pom152 molecules help establish and maintain the NPC architecture.

  15. Nuclear Pore Complexes and Nucleocytoplasmic Transport: From Structure to Function to Disease.

    PubMed

    Dickmanns, Achim; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Fahrenkrog, Birthe

    2015-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is an essential cellular activity and occurs via nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) that reside in the double membrane of the nuclear envelope. Significant progress has been made during the past few years in unravelling the ultrastructural organization of NPCs and their constituents, the nucleoporins, by cryo-electron tomography and X-ray crystallography. Mass spectrometry and genomic approaches have provided deeper insight into the specific regulation and fine tuning of individual nuclear transport pathways. Recent research has also focused on the roles nucleoporins play in health and disease, some of which go beyond nucleocytoplasmic transport. Here we review emerging results aimed at understanding NPC architecture and nucleocytoplasmic transport at the atomic level, elucidating the specific function individual nucleoporins play in nuclear trafficking, and finally lighting up the contribution of nucleoporins and nuclear transport receptors in human diseases, such as cancer and certain genetic disorders.

  16. Nuclear pore complex composition: a new regulator of tissue-specific and developmental functions.

    PubMed

    Raices, Marcela; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are multiprotein aqueous channels that penetrate the nuclear envelope connecting the nucleus and the cytoplasm. NPCs consist of multiple copies of roughly 30 different proteins known as nucleoporins (NUPs). Due to their essential role in controlling nucleocytoplasmic transport, NPCs have traditionally been considered as structures of ubiquitous composition. The overall structure of the NPC is indeed conserved in all cells, but new evidence suggests that the protein composition of NPCs varies among cell types and tissues. Moreover, mutations in various nucleoporins result in tissue-specific diseases. These findings point towards a heterogeneity in NPC composition and function. This unexpected heterogeneity suggests that cells use a combination of different nucleoporins to assemble NPCs with distinct properties and specialized functions.

  17. Systematic analysis of barrier-forming FG hydrogels from Xenopus nuclear pore complexes.

    PubMed

    Labokha, Aksana A; Gradmann, Sabine; Frey, Steffen; Hülsmann, Bastian B; Urlaub, Henning; Baldus, Marc; Görlich, Dirk

    2013-01-23

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) control the traffic between cell nucleus and cytoplasm. While facilitating translocation of nuclear transport receptors (NTRs) and NTR·cargo complexes, they suppress passive passage of macromolecules 30 kDa. Previously, we reconstituted the NPC barrier as hydrogels comprising S. cerevisiae FG domains. We now studied FG domains from 10 Xenopus nucleoporins and found that all of them form hydrogels. Related domains with low FG motif density also substantially contribute to the NPC's hydrogel mass. We characterized all these hydrogels and observed the strictest sieving effect for the Nup98-derived hydrogel. It fully blocks entry of GFP-sized inert objects, permits facilitated entry of the small NTR NTF2, but arrests importin β-type NTRs at its surface. O-GlcNAc modification of the Nup98 FG domain prevented this arrest and allowed also large NTR·cargo complexes to enter. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed that the O-GlcNAc-modified Nup98 gel lacks amyloid-like β-structures that dominate the rigid regions in the S. cerevisiae Nsp1 FG hydrogel. This suggests that FG hydrogels can assemble through different structural principles and yet acquire the same NPC-like permeability.

  18. Interactome Mapping Reveals the Evolutionary History of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Obado, Samson O.; Brillantes, Marc; Uryu, Kunihiro; Zhang, Wenzhu; Ketaren, Natalia E.; Chait, Brian T.; Field, Mark C.; Rout, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is responsible for nucleocytoplasmic transport and constitutes a hub for control of gene expression. The components of NPCs from several eukaryotic lineages have been determined, but only the yeast and vertebrate NPCs have been extensively characterized at the quaternary level. Significantly, recent evidence indicates that compositional similarity does not necessarily correspond to homologous architecture between NPCs from different taxa. To address this, we describe the interactome of the trypanosome NPC, a representative, highly divergent eukaryote. We identify numerous new NPC components and report an exhaustive interactome, allowing assignment of trypanosome nucleoporins to discrete NPC substructures. Remarkably, despite retaining similar protein composition, there are exceptional architectural dissimilarities between opisthokont (yeast and vertebrates) and excavate (trypanosomes) NPCs. Whilst elements of the inner core are conserved, numerous peripheral structures are highly divergent, perhaps reflecting requirements to interface with divergent nuclear and cytoplasmic functions. Moreover, the trypanosome NPC has almost complete nucleocytoplasmic symmetry, in contrast to the opisthokont NPC; this may reflect divergence in RNA export processes at the NPC cytoplasmic face, as we find evidence supporting Ran-dependent mRNA export in trypanosomes, similar to protein transport. We propose a model of stepwise acquisition of nucleocytoplasmic mechanistic complexity and demonstrate that detailed dissection of macromolecular complexes provides fuller understanding of evolutionary processes. PMID:26891179

  19. cDNA cloning and characterization of Npap60: a novel rat nuclear pore-associated protein with an unusual subcellular localization during male germ cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fan, F; Liu, C P; Korobova, O; Heyting, C; Offenberg, H H; Trump, G; Arnheim, N

    1997-03-15

    We have cloned and characterized a cDNA, Npap60, encoding a rat nuclear pore-associated protein. The 3-kb cDNA was obtained by antibody screening of a rat testis expression library. The predicted NPAP60 contains 381 amino acids with a composition of 25.6% charged residues and is highly hydrophilic. The Npap60 gene appears to be conserved in mouse, rat, and human. Immunofluorescence studies with anti-NPAP60 fusion protein antibody show that the NPAP60 protein colocalizes with nuclear pore complexes in RAT1A cells. The expression of Npap60 is about 10-20 times higher in rat testis than in somatic tissues. The subcellular localization of NPAP60 protein changes dramatically during male germ cell differentiation, from nuclear pore complex-like staining in spermatocytes to whole nucleus staining in spermatids and finally to a nuclear surface staining in mature spermatozoa. These changes are temporally and spatially related to nuclear reorganization during male germ cell differentiation.

  20. An evaluation of factors influencing pore pressure in accretionary complexes: Implications for taper angle and wedge mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    At many subduction zones, accretionary complexes form as sediment is off-scraped from the subducting plate. Mechanical models that treat accretionary complexes as critically tapered wedges of sediment demonstrate that pore pressure controls their taper angle by modifying basal and internal shear strength. Here, we combine a numerical model of groundwater flow with critical taper theory to quantify the effects of sediment and de??collement permeability, sediment thickness, sediment partitioning between accretion and underthrusting, and plate convergence rate on steady state pore pressure. Our results show that pore pressure in accretionary wedges can be viewed as a dynamically maintained response to factors which drive pore pressure (source terms) and those that limit flow (permeability and drainage path length). We find that sediment permeability and incoming sediment thickness are the most important factors, whereas fault permeability and the partitioning of sediment have a small effect. For our base case model scenario, as sediment permeability is increased, pore pressure decreases from near-lithostatic to hydrostatic values and allows stable taper angles to increase from ??? 2.5?? to 8??-12.5??. With increased sediment thickness in our models (from 100 to 8000 m), increased pore pressure drives a decrease in stable taper angle from 8.4??-12.5?? to 15?? to <4??) with increased sediment thickness (from <1 to 7 km). One key implication is that hydrologic properties may strongly influence the strength of the crust in a wide range of geologic settings. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Complex Patterns of Local Adaptation in Teosinte

    PubMed Central

    Pyhäjärvi, Tanja; Hufford, Matthew B.; Mezmouk, Sofiane; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Populations of widely distributed species encounter and must adapt to local environmental conditions. However, comprehensive characterization of the genetic basis of adaptation is demanding, requiring genome-wide genotype data, multiple sampled populations, and an understanding of population structure and potential selection pressures. Here, we used single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping and data on numerous environmental variables to describe the genetic basis of local adaptation in 21 populations of teosinte, the wild ancestor of maize. We found complex hierarchical genetic structure created by altitude, dispersal events, and admixture among subspecies, which complicated identification of locally beneficial alleles. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium revealed four large putative inversion polymorphisms showing clinal patterns of frequency. Population differentiation and environmental correlations suggest that both inversions and intergenic polymorphisms are involved in local adaptation. PMID:23902747

  2. O-fucosylated glycoproteins form assemblies in close proximity to the nuclear pore complexes of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Bandini, Giulia; Haserick, John R.; Motari, Edwin; Ouologuem, Dinkorma T.; Roos, David S.; Costello, Catherine E.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that causes disseminated infections in fetuses and immunocompromised individuals. Although gene regulation is important for parasite differentiation and pathogenesis, little is known about protein organization in the nucleus. Here we show that the fucose-binding Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) binds to numerous punctate structures in the nuclei of tachyzoites, bradyzoites, and sporozoites but not oocysts. AAL also binds to Hammondia and Neospora nuclei but not to more distantly related apicomplexans. Analyses of the AAL-enriched fraction indicate that AAL binds O-linked fucose added to Ser/Thr residues present in or adjacent to Ser-rich domains (SRDs). Sixty-nine Ser-rich proteins were reproducibly enriched with AAL, including nucleoporins, mRNA-processing enzymes, and cell-signaling proteins. Two endogenous SRDs-containing proteins and an SRD-YFP fusion localize with AAL to the nuclear membrane. Superresolution microscopy showed that the majority of the AAL signal localizes in proximity to nuclear pore complexes. Host cells modify secreted proteins with O-fucose; here we describe the O-fucosylation pathway in the nucleocytosol of a eukaryote. Furthermore, these results suggest O-fucosylation is a mechanism by which proteins involved in gene expression accumulate near the NPC. PMID:27663739

  3. F-actin-rich contractile endothelial pores prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte diapedesis through local RhoA signalling.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Niels; Schimmel, Lilian; Oort, Chantal; van Rijssel, Jos; Yin, Taofei; Ma, Bin; van Unen, Jakobus; Pitter, Bettina; Huveneers, Stephan; Goedhart, Joachim; Wu, Yi; Montanez, Eloi; Woodfin, Abigail; van Buul, Jaap D

    2016-01-27

    During immune surveillance and inflammation, leukocytes exit the vasculature through transient openings in the endothelium without causing plasma leakage. However, the exact mechanisms behind this intriguing phenomenon are still unknown. Here we report that maintenance of endothelial barrier integrity during leukocyte diapedesis requires local endothelial RhoA cycling. Endothelial RhoA depletion in vitro or Rho inhibition in vivo provokes neutrophil-induced vascular leakage that manifests during the physical movement of neutrophils through the endothelial layer. Local RhoA activation initiates the formation of contractile F-actin structures that surround emigrating neutrophils. These structures that surround neutrophil-induced endothelial pores prevent plasma leakage through actomyosin-based pore confinement. Mechanistically, we found that the initiation of RhoA activity involves ICAM-1 and the Rho GEFs Ect2 and LARG. In addition, regulation of actomyosin-based endothelial pore confinement involves ROCK2b, but not ROCK1. Thus, endothelial cells assemble RhoA-controlled contractile F-actin structures around endothelial pores that prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte extravasation.

  4. Host-derived, pore-forming toxin-like protein and trefoil factor complex protects the host against microbial infection.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Yan, Chao; Guo, Xiaolong; Zhou, Kaifeng; Li, Sheng'an; Gao, Qian; Wang, Xuan; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Jie; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2014-05-06

    Aerolysins are virulence factors belonging to the bacterial β-pore-forming toxin superfamily. Surprisingly, numerous aerolysin-like proteins exist in vertebrates, but their biological functions are unknown. βγ-CAT, a complex of an aerolysin-like protein subunit (two βγ-crystallin domains followed by an aerolysin pore-forming domain) and two trefoil factor subunits, has been identified in frogs (Bombina maxima) skin secretions. Here, we report the rich expression of this protein, in the frog blood and immune-related tissues, and the induction of its presence in peritoneal lavage by bacterial challenge. This phenomena raises the possibility of its involvement in antimicrobial infection. When βγ-CAT was administrated in a peritoneal infection model, it greatly accelerated bacterial clearance and increased the survival rate of both frogs and mice. Meanwhile, accelerated Interleukin-1β release and enhanced local leukocyte recruitments were determined, which may partially explain the robust and effective antimicrobial responses observed. The release of interleukin-1β was potently triggered by βγ-CAT from the frog peritoneal cells and murine macrophages in vitro. βγ-CAT was rapidly endocytosed and translocated to lysosomes, where it formed high molecular mass SDS-stable oligomers (>170 kDa). Lysosomal destabilization and cathepsin B release were detected, which may explain the activation of caspase-1 inflammasome and subsequent interleukin-1β maturation and release. To our knowledge, these results provide the first functional evidence of the ability of a host-derived aerolysin-like protein to counter microbial infection by eliciting rapid and effective host innate immune responses. The findings will also largely help to elucidate the possible involvement and action mechanisms of aerolysin-like proteins and/or trefoil factors widely existing in vertebrates in the host defense against pathogens.

  5. ELYS/MEL-28 chromatin association coordinates nuclear pore complex assembly and replication licensing.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Peter J; Khoudoli, Guennadi A; Stewart, Graeme; Swedlow, Jason R; Blow, J Julian

    2007-10-09

    Xenopus egg extract supports all the major cell-cycle transitions in vitro. We have used a proteomics approach to identify proteins whose abundance on chromatin changes during the course of an in vitro cell cycle. One of the proteins we identified was ELYS/MEL-28, which has recently been described as the earliest-acting factor known to be required for nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly [1-4]. ELYS interacts with the Nup107-160 complex and is required for its association with chromatin. ELYS contains an AT-hook domain, which we show binds to chromatin with a high affinity. This domain can compete with full-length ELYS for chromatin association, thereby blocking NPC assembly. This provides evidence that ELYS interacts directly with chromatin and that this interaction is essential for NPC assembly and compartmentalization of chromosomal DNA within the cell. Furthermore, we detected a physical association on chromatin between ELYS and the Mcm2-7 replication-licensing proteins. ELYS chromatin loading, NPC assembly, and nuclear growth were delayed when Mcm2-7 was prevented from loading onto chromatin. Because nuclear assembly is required to shut down licensing prior to entry into S phase, our results suggest a mechanism by which these two early cell-cycle events are coordinated with one another.

  6. Three-Dimensional Mapping of mRNA Export through the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Steven J.; Ma, Jiong; Yang, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    The locations of transcription and translation of mRNA in eukaryotic cells are spatially separated by the nuclear envelope (NE). Plenty of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the NE function as the major gateway for the export of transcribed mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Whereas the NPC, perhaps one of the largest protein complexes, provides a relatively large channel for macromolecules to selectively pass through it in inherently three-dimensional (3D) movements, this channel is nonetheless below the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy. A full understanding of the mRNA export mechanism urgently requires real-time mapping of the 3D dynamics of mRNA in the NPC of live cells with innovative imaging techniques breaking the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy. Recently, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking (SPT) techniques have been applied to the study of nuclear export of mRNA in live cells. In this review, we emphasize the necessity of 3D mapping techniques in the study of mRNA export, briefly summarize the feasibility of current 3D imaging approaches, and highlight the new features of mRNA nuclear export elucidated with a newly developed 3D imaging approach combining SPT-based super-resolution imaging and 2D-to-3D deconvolution algorithms. PMID:25393401

  7. Percolation of localized attack on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai; Huang, Xuqing; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-02-01

    The robustness of complex networks against node failure and malicious attack has been of interest for decades, while most of the research has focused on random attack or hub-targeted attack. In many real-world scenarios, however, attacks are neither random nor hub-targeted, but localized, where a group of neighboring nodes in a network are attacked and fail. In this paper we develop a percolation framework to analytically and numerically study the robustness of complex networks against such localized attack. In particular, we investigate this robustness in Erdős-Rényi networks, random-regular networks, and scale-free networks. Our results provide insight into how to better protect networks, enhance cybersecurity, and facilitate the design of more robust infrastructures.

  8. Complexes of Peptide Blockers with Kv1.6 Pore Domain: Molecular Modeling and Studies with KcsA-Kv1.6 Channel.

    PubMed

    Nekrasova, O V; Volyntseva, A D; Kudryashova, K S; Novoseletsky, V N; Lyapina, E A; Illarionova, A V; Yakimov, S A; Korolkova, Yu V; Shaitan, K V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Feofanov, A V

    2016-09-17

    Potassium voltage-gated Kv1.6 channel, which is distributed primarily in neurons of central and peripheral nervous systems, is of significant physiological importance. To date, several high-affinity Kv1.6-channel blockers are known, but the lack of selective ones among them hampers the studies of tissue localization and functioning of Kv1.6 channels. Here we present an approach to advanced understanding of interactions of peptide toxin blockers with a Kv1.6 pore. It combines molecular modeling studies and an application of a new bioengineering system based on a KcsA-Kv1.6 hybrid channel for the quantitative fluorescent analysis of blocker-channel interactions. Using this system we demonstrate that peptide toxins agitoxin 2, kaliotoxin1 and OSK1 have similar high affinity to the extracellular vestibule of the K(+)-conducting pore of Kv1.6, hetlaxin is a low-affinity ligand, whereas margatoxin and scyllatoxin do not bind to Kv1.6 pore. Binding of toxins to Kv1.6 pore has considerable inverse dependence on the ionic strength. Model structures of KcsA-Kv1.6 and Kv1.6 complexes with agitoxin 2, kaliotoxin 1 and OSK1 were obtained using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation. Interaction interfaces, which are formed by 15-19 toxin residues and 10 channel residues, are described and compared. Specific sites of Kv1.6 pore recognition are identified for targeting of peptide blockers. Analysis of interactions between agitoxin 2 derivatives with point mutations (S7K, S11G, L19S, R31G) and KcsA-Kv1.6 confirms reliability of the calculated complex structure.

  9. Yeast Integral Membrane Proteins Apq12, Brl1, and Brr6 Form a Complex Important for Regulation of Membrane Homeostasis and Nuclear Pore Complex Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Museer A.; Atkinson, Aaron E.; Hodge, Christine A.; Cottier, Stéphanie; Martínez-Montañés, Fernando; Maithel, Shelley; Mène-Saffrané, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Proper functioning of intracellular membranes is critical for many cellular processes. A key feature of membranes is their ability to adapt to changes in environmental conditions by adjusting their composition so as to maintain constant biophysical properties, including fluidity and flexibility. Similar changes in the biophysical properties of membranes likely occur when intracellular processes, such as vesicle formation and fusion, require dramatic changes in membrane curvature. Similar modifications must also be made when nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are constructed within the existing nuclear membrane, as occurs during interphase in all eukaryotes. Here we report on the role of the essential nuclear envelope/endoplasmic reticulum (NE/ER) protein Brl1 in regulating the membrane composition of the NE/ER. We show that Brl1 and two other proteins characterized previously—Brr6, which is closely related to Brl1, and Apq12—function together and are required for lipid homeostasis. All three transmembrane proteins are localized to the NE and can be coprecipitated. As has been shown for mutations affecting Brr6 and Apq12, mutations in Brl1 lead to defects in lipid metabolism, increased sensitivity to drugs that inhibit enzymes involved in lipid synthesis, and strong genetic interactions with mutations affecting lipid metabolism. Mutations affecting Brl1 or Brr6 or the absence of Apq12 leads to hyperfluid membranes, because mutant cells are hypersensitive to agents that increase membrane fluidity. We suggest that the defects in nuclear pore complex biogenesis and mRNA export seen in these mutants are consequences of defects in maintaining the biophysical properties of the NE. PMID:26432634

  10. Biophysical Coarse-Grained Modeling Provides Insights into Transport through the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Moussavi-Baygi, R.; Jamali, Y.; Karimi, R.; Mofrad, M.R.K.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the gatekeeper of the nucleus, capable of actively discriminating between the active and inert cargo while accommodating a high rate of translocations. The biophysical mechanisms underlying transport, however, remain unclear due to the lack of information about biophysical factors playing role in transport. Based on published experimental data, we have established a coarse-grained model of an intact NPC structure to examine nucleocytoplasmic transport with refined spatial and temporal resolutions. Using our model, we estimate the transport time versus cargo sizes. Our findings suggest that the mean transport time of cargos smaller than 15 nm is independent of size, while beyond this size, there is a sharp increase in the mean transport time. The model confirms that kap-FG hydrophobicity is sufficient for active cargo transport. Moreover, our model predicts that during translocation, small and large cargo-complexes are hydrophobically attached to FG-repeat domains for 86 and 96% of their transport time, respectively. Inside the central channel FG-repeats form a thick layer on the wall leaving an open tube. The cargo-complex is almost always attached to this layer and diffuses back and forth, regardless of the cargo size. Finally, we propose a plausible model for transport in which the NPC can be viewed as a lubricated gate. This model incorporates basic assumptions underlying virtual-gate and reduction-of-dimensionality models with the addition of the FG-layer inside the central channel acting as a lubricant. PMID:21402022

  11. SUMO-Dependent Relocalization of Eroded Telomeres to Nuclear Pore Complexes Controls Telomere Recombination.

    PubMed

    Churikov, Dmitri; Charifi, Ferose; Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Silva, Sonia; Simon, Marie-Noelle; Lisby, Michael; Géli, Vincent

    2016-05-10

    In budding yeast, inactivation of telomerase and ensuing telomere erosion cause relocalization of telomeres to nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). However, neither the mechanism of such relocalization nor its significance are understood. We report that proteins bound to eroded telomeres are recognized by the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier)-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) Slx5-Slx8 and become increasingly SUMOylated. Recruitment of Slx5-Slx8 to eroded telomeres facilitates telomere relocalization to NPCs and type II telomere recombination, a counterpart of mammalian alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). Moreover, artificial tethering of a telomere to a NPC promotes type II telomere recombination but cannot bypass the lack of Slx5-Slx8 in this process. Together, our results indicate that SUMOylation positively contributes to telomere relocalization to the NPC, where poly-SUMOylated proteins that accumulated over time have to be removed. We propose that STUbL-dependent relocalization of telomeres to NPCs constitutes a pathway in which excessively SUMOylated proteins are removed from "congested" intermediates to ensure unconventional recombination.

  12. Gene loops function to maintain transcriptional memory through interaction with the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Tan-Wong, Sue Mei; Wijayatilake, Hashanthi D.; Proudfoot, Nick J.

    2009-01-01

    Inducible genes in yeast retain a “memory” of recent transcriptional activity during periods of short-term repression, allowing them to be reactivated faster when reinduced. This confers a rapid and versatile gene expression response to the environment. We demonstrate that this memory mechanism is associated with gene loop interactions between the promoter and 3′ end of the responsive genes HXK1 and GAL1∷FMP27. The maintenance of these memory gene loops (MGLs) during intervening periods of transcriptional repression is required for faster RNA polymerase II (Pol II) recruitment to the genes upon reinduction, thereby facilitating faster mRNA accumulation. Notably, a sua7-1 mutant or the endogenous INO1 gene that lacks this MGL does not display such faster reinduction. Furthermore, these MGLs interact with the nuclear pore complex through association with myosin-like protein 1 (Mlp1). An mlp1Δ strain does not maintain MGLs, and concomitantly loses transcriptional memory. We predict that gene loop conformations enhance gene expression by facilitating rapid transcriptional response to changing environmental conditions. PMID:19933151

  13. Nuclear pore complex integrity requires Lnp1, a regulator of cortical endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Amanda K.; Chen, Shuliang; Novick, Peter; Ferro-Novick, Susan; Wente, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are components of the same contiguous membrane system and yet have distinct cellular functions. Mounting evidence suggests roles for some ER proteins in the NE for proper nuclear pore complex (NPC) structure and function. In this study, we identify a NE role in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Lnp1 and Sey1, proteins required for proper cortical ER formation. Both lnp1Δ and sey1Δ mutants exhibit synthetic genetic interactions with mutants in genes encoding key NPC structural components. Both Lnp1 and Sey1 physically associate with other ER components that have established NPC roles, including Rtn1, Yop1, Pom33, and Per33. Of interest, lnp1Δ rtn1Δ mutants but not rtn1Δ sey1Δ mutants exhibit defects in NPC distribution. Furthermore, the essential NPC assembly factor Ndc1 has altered interactions in the absence of Sey1. Lnp1 dimerizes in vitro via its C-terminal zinc finger motif, a property that is required for proper ER structure but not NPC integrity. These findings suggest that Lnp1's role in NPC integrity is separable from functions in the ER and is linked to Ndc1 and Rtn1 interactions. PMID:26041935

  14. Simple biophysics underpins collective conformations of the intrinsically disordered proteins of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Vovk, Andrei; Gu, Chad; Opferman, Michael G; Kapinos, Larisa E; Lim, Roderick YH; Coalson, Rob D; Jasnow, David; Zilman, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Pore Complexes (NPCs) are key cellular transporter that control nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotic cells, but its transport mechanism is still not understood. The centerpiece of NPC transport is the assembly of intrinsically disordered polypeptides, known as FG nucleoporins, lining its passageway. Their conformations and collective dynamics during transport are difficult to assess in vivo. In vitro investigations provide partially conflicting results, lending support to different models of transport, which invoke various conformational transitions of the FG nucleoporins induced by the cargo-carrying transport proteins. We show that the spatial organization of FG nucleoporin assemblies with the transport proteins can be understood within a first principles biophysical model with a minimal number of key physical variables, such as the average protein interaction strengths and spatial densities. These results address some of the outstanding controversies and suggest how molecularly divergent NPCs in different species can perform essentially the same function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10785.001 PMID:27198189

  15. Slide-and-exchange mechanism for rapid and selective transport through the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Raveh, Barak; Karp, Jerome M.; Sparks, Samuel; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Cowburn, David

    2016-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is mediated by the interaction of transport factors (TFs) with disordered phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats that fill the central channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). However, the mechanism by which TFs rapidly diffuse through multiple FG repeats without compromising NPC selectivity is not yet fully understood. In this study, we build on our recent NMR investigations showing that FG repeats are highly dynamic, flexible, and rapidly exchanging among TF interaction sites. We use unbiased long timescale all-atom simulations on the Anton supercomputer, combined with extensive enhanced sampling simulations and NMR experiments, to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of FG repeats and their interaction with a model transport factor. Both the simulations and experimental data indicate that FG repeats are highly dynamic random coils, lack intrachain interactions, and exhibit significant entropically driven resistance to spatial confinement. We show that the FG motifs reversibly slide in and out of multiple TF interaction sites, transitioning rapidly between a strongly interacting state and a weakly interacting state, rather than undergoing a much slower transition between strongly interacting and completely noninteracting (unbound) states. In the weakly interacting state, FG motifs can be more easily displaced by other competing FG motifs, providing a simple mechanism for rapid exchange of TF/FG motif contacts during transport. This slide-and-exchange mechanism highlights the direct role of the disorder within FG repeats in nucleocytoplasmic transport, and resolves the apparent conflict between the selectivity and speed of transport. PMID:27091992

  16. Complex earthquake rupture and local tsunamis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to far-field tsunami amplitudes that are fairly well predicted by the seismic moment of subduction zone earthquakes, there exists significant variation in the scaling of local tsunami amplitude with respect to seismic moment. From a global catalog of tsunami runup observations this variability is greatest for the most frequently occuring tsunamigenic subduction zone earthquakes in the magnitude range of 7 < Mw < 8.5. Variability in local tsunami runup scaling can be ascribed to tsunami source parameters that are independent of seismic moment: variations in the water depth in the source region, the combination of higher slip and lower shear modulus at shallow depth, and rupture complexity in the form of heterogeneous slip distribution patterns. The focus of this study is on the effect that rupture complexity has on the local tsunami wave field. A wide range of slip distribution patterns are generated using a stochastic, self-affine source model that is consistent with the falloff of far-field seismic displacement spectra at high frequencies. The synthetic slip distributions generated by the stochastic source model are discretized and the vertical displacement fields from point source elastic dislocation expressions are superimposed to compute the coseismic vertical displacement field. For shallow subduction zone earthquakes it is demonstrated that self-affine irregularities of the slip distribution result in significant variations in local tsunami amplitude. The effects of rupture complexity are less pronounced for earthquakes at greater depth or along faults with steep dip angles. For a test region along the Pacific coast of central Mexico, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude is calculated for a large number (N = 100) of synthetic slip distribution patterns, all with identical seismic moment (Mw = 8.1). Analysis of the results indicates that for earthquakes of a fixed location, geometry, and seismic moment, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude can vary by a

  17. Spreading to localized targets in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ye; Ma, Long; Zeng, An; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-12-01

    As an important type of dynamics on complex networks, spreading is widely used to model many real processes such as the epidemic contagion and information propagation. One of the most significant research questions in spreading is to rank the spreading ability of nodes in the network. To this end, substantial effort has been made and a variety of effective methods have been proposed. These methods usually define the spreading ability of a node as the number of finally infected nodes given that the spreading is initialized from the node. However, in many real cases such as advertising and news propagation, the spreading only aims to cover a specific group of nodes. Therefore, it is necessary to study the spreading ability of nodes towards localized targets in complex networks. In this paper, we propose a reversed local path algorithm for this problem. Simulation results show that our method outperforms the existing methods in identifying the influential nodes with respect to these localized targets. Moreover, the influential spreaders identified by our method can effectively avoid infecting the non-target nodes in the spreading process.

  18. Spreading to localized targets in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Ma, Long; Zeng, An; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-01-01

    As an important type of dynamics on complex networks, spreading is widely used to model many real processes such as the epidemic contagion and information propagation. One of the most significant research questions in spreading is to rank the spreading ability of nodes in the network. To this end, substantial effort has been made and a variety of effective methods have been proposed. These methods usually define the spreading ability of a node as the number of finally infected nodes given that the spreading is initialized from the node. However, in many real cases such as advertising and news propagation, the spreading only aims to cover a specific group of nodes. Therefore, it is necessary to study the spreading ability of nodes towards localized targets in complex networks. In this paper, we propose a reversed local path algorithm for this problem. Simulation results show that our method outperforms the existing methods in identifying the influential nodes with respect to these localized targets. Moreover, the influential spreaders identified by our method can effectively avoid infecting the non-target nodes in the spreading process. PMID:27966613

  19. Localized recovery of complex networks against failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yilun

    2016-07-01

    Resilience of complex networks to failure has been an important issue in network research for decades, and recent studies have begun to focus on the inverse recovery of network functionality through strategically healing missing nodes or edges. However, the effect of network recovery is far from fully understood, and a general theory is still missing. Here we propose and study a general model of localized recovery, where a group of neighboring nodes are restored in an invasive way from a seed node. We develop a theoretical framework to compare the effect of random recovery (RR) and localized recovery (LR) in complex networks including Erdős-Rényi networks, random regular networks, and scale-free networks. We find detailed phase diagrams for the subnetwork of occupied nodes and the “complement network” of failed nodes under RR and LR. By identifying the two competitive forces behind LR, we present an analytical and numerical approach to guide us in choosing the appropriate recovery strategy and provide estimation on its effect by using the degree distribution of the original network as the only input. Our work therefore provides insight for quantitatively understanding recovery process and its implications in infrastructure protection in various complex systems.

  20. Localized recovery of complex networks against failure

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yilun

    2016-01-01

    Resilience of complex networks to failure has been an important issue in network research for decades, and recent studies have begun to focus on the inverse recovery of network functionality through strategically healing missing nodes or edges. However, the effect of network recovery is far from fully understood, and a general theory is still missing. Here we propose and study a general model of localized recovery, where a group of neighboring nodes are restored in an invasive way from a seed node. We develop a theoretical framework to compare the effect of random recovery (RR) and localized recovery (LR) in complex networks including Erdős-Rényi networks, random regular networks, and scale-free networks. We find detailed phase diagrams for the subnetwork of occupied nodes and the “complement network” of failed nodes under RR and LR. By identifying the two competitive forces behind LR, we present an analytical and numerical approach to guide us in choosing the appropriate recovery strategy and provide estimation on its effect by using the degree distribution of the original network as the only input. Our work therefore provides insight for quantitatively understanding recovery process and its implications in infrastructure protection in various complex systems. PMID:27456202

  1. Double complexes and local cochain projections

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Richard S; Winther, Ragnar

    2015-01-01

    The construction of projection operators, which commute with the exterior derivative and at the same time are bounded in the proper Sobolev spaces, represents a key tool in the recent stability analysis of finite element exterior calculus. These so-called bounded cochain projections have been constructed by combining a smoothing operator and the unbounded canonical projections defined by the degrees of freedom. However, an undesired property of these bounded projections is that, in contrast to the canonical projections, they are nonlocal. The purpose of this article is to discuss a recent alternative construction of bounded cochain projections, which also are local. A key tool for the new construction is the structure of a double complex, resembling the Čech-de Rham double complex of algebraic topology. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Numer Methods Partial Differential Eq 31: 541–551, 2015 PMID:25914441

  2. Cholesterol stimulates and ceramide inhibits Sticholysin II-induced pore formation in complex bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Alm, Ida; García-Linares, Sara; Gavilanes, José G; Martínez-Del-Pozo, Álvaro; Slotte, J Peter

    2015-04-01

    The pore forming capacity of Sticholysin II (StnII; isolated from Stichodactyla helianthus) in bilayer membranes containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), palmitoylsphingomyelin (PSM) and either cholesterol or palmitoyl ceramide (PCer) has been examined. The aim of the study was to elucidate how the presence of differently ordered PSM domains affected StnII oligomerization and pore formation. Cholesterol is known to enhance pore formation by StnII, and our results confirmed this and provide kinetic information for the process. The effect of cholesterol on bilayer permeabilization kinetics was concentration-dependent. In the concentration regime used (2.5-10nmol cholesterol in POPC:PSM 80:20 by nmol), cholesterol also increased the acyl chain order in the fluid PSM domain and thus decreased bilayer fluidity, suggesting that fluidity per se was not responsible for cholesterol's effect. Addition of PCer (2.5-10nmol) to the POPC:PSM (80:20 by nmol) bilayers attenuated StnII-induced pore formation, again in a concentration-dependent fashion. This addition also led to the formation of a PCer-rich gel phase. Addition of cholesterol to PCer-containing membranes could partially reduce the inhibitory effect of PCer on StnII pore formation. We conclude that the physical state of PSM (as influenced by either cholesterol or PCer) affected StnII binding and pore formation under the conditions examined.

  3. A-type Lamins Form Distinct Filamentous Networks with Differential Nuclear Pore Complex Associations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Chojnowski, Alexandre; Boudier, Thomas; Lim, John S Y; Ahmed, Sohail; Ser, Zheng; Stewart, Colin; Burke, Brian

    2016-10-10

    The nuclear lamina is a universal feature of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs) [1]. In mammalian cells, it appears as a 10-30 nm filamentous layer at the nuclear face of the inner nuclear membrane (INM) and is composed primarily of A- and B-type lamins, members of the intermediate filament family [2]. While providing structural integrity to the NE, the lamina also represents an important signaling and regulatory platform [3]. Two A-type lamin isoforms, lamins A and C (LaA and LaC), are expressed in most adult human cells. Encoded by a single gene, these proteins are largely identical, diverging only in their C-terminal tail domains. By contrast with that of LaC, the unique LaA tail undergoes extensive processing, including farnesylation and endo-proteolysis [4, 5]. However, functional differences between LaA and LaC are still unclear. Compounding this uncertainty, the structure of the lamina remains ill defined. In this study, we used BioID, an in vivo proximity-labeling method to identify differential interactors of A-type lamins [6]. One of these, Tpr, a nuclear pore complex (NPC) protein, is highlighted by its selective association with LaC. By employing superresolution microscopy, we demonstrate that this Tpr association is mirrored in enhanced interaction of LaC with NPCs. Further superresolution studies visualizing both endogenous A- and B-type lamins have allowed us to construct a nanometer-scale model of the mammalian nuclear lamina. Our data indicate that different A- and B-type lamin species assemble into separate filament networks that together form an extended composite structure at the nuclear periphery providing attachment sites for NPCs, thereby regulating their distribution.

  4. Importin beta negatively regulates nuclear membrane fusion and nuclear pore complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Harel, Amnon; Chan, Rene C; Lachish-Zalait, Aurelie; Zimmerman, Ella; Elbaum, Michael; Forbes, Douglass J

    2003-11-01

    Assembly of a eukaryotic nucleus involves three distinct events: membrane recruitment, fusion to form a double nuclear membrane, and nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. We report that importin beta negatively regulates two of these events, membrane fusion and NPC assembly. When excess importin beta is added to a full Xenopus nuclear reconstitution reaction, vesicles are recruited to chromatin but their fusion is blocked. The importin beta down-regulation of membrane fusion is Ran-GTP reversible. Indeed, excess RanGTP (RanQ69L) alone stimulates excessive membrane fusion, leading to intranuclear membrane tubules and cytoplasmic annulate lamellae-like structures. We propose that a precise balance of importin beta to Ran is required to create a correct double nuclear membrane and simultaneously to repress undesirable fusion events. Interestingly, truncated importin beta 45-462 allows membrane fusion but produces nuclei lacking any NPCs. This reveals distinct importin beta-regulation of NPC assembly. Excess full-length importin beta and beta 45-462 act similarly when added to prefused nuclear intermediates, i.e., both block NPC assembly. The importin beta NPC block, which maps downstream of GTPgammaS and BAPTA-sensitive steps in NPC assembly, is reversible by cytosol. Remarkably, it is not reversible by 25 microM RanGTP, a concentration that easily reverses fusion inhibition. This report, using a full reconstitution system and natural chromatin substrates, significantly expands the repertoire of importin beta. Its roles now encompass negative regulation of two of the major events of nuclear assembly: membrane fusion and NPC assembly.

  5. Heart Failure Induces Significant Changes in Nuclear Pore Complex of Human Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazón, Estefanía; Rivera, Miguel; Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Molina-Navarro, Maria Micaela; Sánchez-Lázaro, Ignacio José; España, Francisco; Montero, José Anastasio; Lago, Francisca; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Portolés, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Aims The objectives of this study were to analyse the effect of heart failure (HF) on several proteins of nuclear pore complex (NPC) and their relationship with the human ventricular function. Methods and Results A total of 88 human heart samples from ischemic (ICM, n = 52) and dilated (DCM, n = 36) patients undergoing heart transplant and control donors (CNT, n = 9) were analyzed by Western blot. Subcellular distribution of nucleoporins was analysed by fluorescence and immunocytochemistry. When we compared protein levels according to etiology, ICM showed significant higher levels of NDC1 (65%, p<0.0001), Nup160 (88%, p<0.0001) and Nup153 (137%, p = 0.004) than those of the CNT levels. Furthermore, DCM group showed significant differences for NDC1 (41%, p<0.0001), Nup160 (65%, p<0.0001), Nup153 (155%, p = 0.006) and Nup93 (88%, p<0.0001) compared with CNT. However, Nup155 and translocated promoter region (TPR) did not show significant differences in their levels in any etiology. Regarding the distribution of these proteins in cell nucleus, only NDC1 showed differences in HF. In addition, in the pathological group we obtained good relationship between the ventricular function parameters (LVEDD and LVESD) and Nup160 (r = −0382, p = 0.004; r = −0.290, p = 0.033; respectively). Conclusions This study shows alterations in specific proteins (NDC1, Nup160, Nup153 and Nup93) that compose NPC in ischaemic and dilated human heart. These changes, related to ventricular function, could be accompanied by alterations in the nucleocytoplasmic transport. Therefore, our findings may be the basis for a new approach to HF management. PMID:23152829

  6. Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM) of Adhesion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, Hari; White, Helen; Betzig, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Key to understanding a protein’s biological function is the accurate determination of its spatial distribution inside a cell. Although fluorescent protein markers allow the targeting of specific proteins with molecular precision, much of this information is lost when the resultant fusion proteins are imaged with conventional, diffraction-limited optics. In response, several imaging modalities that are capable of resolution below the diffraction limit (~200 nm) have emerged. Here, both single- and dual-color superresolution imaging of biological structures using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) are described. The examples discussed focus on adhesion complexes: dense, protein-filled assemblies that form at the interface between cells and their substrata. A particular emphasis is placed on the instrumentation and photoactivatable fluorescent protein (PA-FP) tags necessary to achieve PALM images at ~20 nm resolution in 5 to 30 min in fixed cells. PMID:23456603

  7. Age-dependent deterioration of nuclear pore complexes causes a loss of nuclear integrity in postmitotic cells.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Maximiliano A; Raices, Marcela; Panowski, Siler H; Hetzer, Martin W

    2009-01-23

    In dividing cells, nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) disassemble during mitosis and reassemble into the newly forming nuclei. However, the fate of nuclear pores in postmitotic cells is unknown. Here, we show that NPCs, unlike other nuclear structures, do not turn over in differentiated cells. While a subset of NPC components, like Nup153 and Nup50, are continuously exchanged, scaffold nucleoporins, like the Nup107/160 complex, are extremely long-lived and remain incorporated in the nuclear membrane during the entire cellular life span. Besides the lack of nucleoporin expression and NPC turnover, we discovered an age-related deterioration of NPCs, leading to an increase in nuclear permeability and the leaking of cytoplasmic proteins into the nucleus. Our finding that nuclear "leakiness" is dramatically accelerated during aging and that a subset of nucleoporins is oxidatively damaged in old cells suggests that the accumulation of damage at the NPC might be a crucial aging event.

  8. Nuclear pore complex remodeling by p75(NTR) cleavage controls TGF-β signaling and astrocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Schachtrup, Christian; Ryu, Jae Kyu; Mammadzada, Könül; Khan, Abdullah S; Carlton, Peter M; Perez, Alex; Christian, Frank; Le Moan, Natacha; Vagena, Eirini; Baeza-Raja, Bernat; Rafalski, Victoria; Chan, Justin P; Nitschke, Roland; Houslay, Miles D; Ellisman, Mark H; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Palop, Jorge J; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2015-08-01

    Astrocytes modulate neuronal activity and inhibit regeneration. We show that cleaved p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) is a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) required for glial scar formation and reduced gamma oscillations in mice via regulation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. Cleaved p75(NTR) interacts with nucleoporins to promote Smad2 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Thus, NPC remodeling by regulated intramembrane cleavage of p75(NTR) controls astrocyte-neuronal communication in response to profibrotic factors.

  9. Structures of the autoproteolytic domain from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear pore complex component, Nup145

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Ozyurt, Sinem A.; Do, Johnny; Bain, Kevin T.; Dickey, Mark; Rodgers, Logan A.; Gheyi, Tarun; Sali, Andrej; Kim, Seung Joong; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Martel, Anne; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-04-30

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large, octagonally symmetric dynamic macromolecular assemblies responsible for exchange of proteins and RNAs between the nucleus and cytoplasm. NPCs are made up of at least 456 polypeptides from {approx}30 distinct nucleoporins. Several of these components, sharing similar structural motifs, form stable subcomplexes that form a coaxial structure containing two outer rings (the nuclear and cytoplasmic rings), two inner rings, and a membrane ring. The yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Nup145 and its human counterpart are unique among the nucleoporins, in that they undergo autoproteolysis to generate functionally distinct proteins. The human counterpart of Nup145 is expressed as two alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts. The larger 190 kDa precursor undergoes post-translational autoproteolysis at the Phe863-Ser864 peptide bond yielding the 92 kDa Nup98 and the 96 kDa Nup96. The smaller 98 kDa precursor is also autoproteolysed at an analogous site giving 92 kDa Nup98-N and a 6 kDa C-terminal fragment, which may form a noncovalent complex. The yeast Nup145 precursor [Fig. 1(A)] contains twelve repeats of a 'GLFG' peptide motif (FG repeats) at its N-terminus, an internal autoproteolytic domain (a region of high conservation with the homologous yeast nucleoporins Nup110 and Nup116, neither of which undergo autoproteolysis), followed by the C-terminal domain. Various forms of the FG repeats are present in nearly half of all nucleoporins; they form intrinsically disordered regions implicated in gating mechanisms that control passage of macromolecules through NPCs. Nup145 undergoes autoproteolysis at the Phe605-Ser606 peptide bond to generate two functionally distinct proteins, Nup145N and Nup145C. Subsequently, Nup145C associates with six other proteins to form the heptameric Y-complex, a component of the outer rings of the NPC. Nup145N, on the other hand, can shuttle between the NPC and the nuclear interior. It has been suggested that Nup

  10. Host-derived, pore-forming toxin–like protein and trefoil factor complex protects the host against microbial infection

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yang; Yan, Chao; Guo, Xiaolong; Zhou, Kaifeng; Li, Sheng’an; Gao, Qian; Wang, Xuan; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Jie; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Aerolysins are virulence factors belonging to the bacterial β-pore–forming toxin superfamily. Surprisingly, numerous aerolysin-like proteins exist in vertebrates, but their biological functions are unknown. βγ-CAT, a complex of an aerolysin-like protein subunit (two βγ-crystallin domains followed by an aerolysin pore-forming domain) and two trefoil factor subunits, has been identified in frogs (Bombina maxima) skin secretions. Here, we report the rich expression of this protein, in the frog blood and immune-related tissues, and the induction of its presence in peritoneal lavage by bacterial challenge. This phenomena raises the possibility of its involvement in antimicrobial infection. When βγ-CAT was administrated in a peritoneal infection model, it greatly accelerated bacterial clearance and increased the survival rate of both frogs and mice. Meanwhile, accelerated Interleukin-1β release and enhanced local leukocyte recruitments were determined, which may partially explain the robust and effective antimicrobial responses observed. The release of interleukin-1β was potently triggered by βγ-CAT from the frog peritoneal cells and murine macrophages in vitro. βγ-CAT was rapidly endocytosed and translocated to lysosomes, where it formed high molecular mass SDS-stable oligomers (>170 kDa). Lysosomal destabilization and cathepsin B release were detected, which may explain the activation of caspase-1 inflammasome and subsequent interleukin-1β maturation and release. To our knowledge, these results provide the first functional evidence of the ability of a host-derived aerolysin-like protein to counter microbial infection by eliciting rapid and effective host innate immune responses. The findings will also largely help to elucidate the possible involvement and action mechanisms of aerolysin-like proteins and/or trefoil factors widely existing in vertebrates in the host defense against pathogens. PMID:24733922

  11. Cooperative Interactions between Different Classes of Disordered Proteins Play a Functional Role in the Nuclear Pore Complex of Baker’s Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ando, David; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2017-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is highly selective, efficient, and is regulated by a poorly understood mechanism involving hundreds of disordered FG nucleoporin proteins (FG nups) lining the inside wall of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Previous research has concluded that FG nups in Baker’s yeast (S. cerevisiae) are present in a bimodal distribution, with the “Forest Model” classifying FG nups as either di-block polymer like “trees” or single-block polymer like “shrubs”. Using a combination of coarse-grained modeling and polymer brush modeling, the function of the di-block FG nups has previously been hypothesized in the Di-block Copolymer Brush Gate (DCBG) model to form a higher-order polymer brush architecture which can open and close to regulate transport across the NPC. In this manuscript we work to extend the original DCBG model by first performing coarse grained simulations of the single-block FG nups which confirm that they have a single block polymer structure rather than the di-block structure of tree nups. Our molecular simulations also demonstrate that these single-block FG nups are likely cohesive, compact, collapsed coil polymers, implying that these FG nups are generally localized to their grafting location within the NPC. We find that adding a layer of single-block FG nups to the DCBG model increases the range of cargo sizes which are able to translocate the pore through a cooperative effect involving single-block and di-block FG nups. This effect can explain the puzzling connection between single-block FG nup deletion mutants in S. cerevisiae and the resulting failure of certain large cargo transport through the NPC. Facilitation of large cargo transport via single-block and di-block FG nup cooperativity in the nuclear pore could provide a model mechanism for designing future biomimetic pores of greater applicability. PMID:28068389

  12. Age-dependent deterioration of nuclear pore complexes causes a loss of nuclear integrity in post-mitotic cells

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maximiliano A.; Raices, Marcela; Panowski, Siler H.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In dividing cells, nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) disassemble during mitosis and reassemble into the newly forming nuclei. However, the fate of these multi-protein transport channels in post-mitotic cells, where the mitotic renewal of pores is absent, is unknown. Here we show that NPCs, unlike other nuclear structures, do not turn over in differentiated cells. While a subset of nuclear pore components, like Nup153 and Nup50, are continuously exchanged at the NPC, scaffold nucleoporins, like the Nup107/160 complex, are extremely long-lived and remain incorporated in the nuclear membrane during the entire lifespan of a cell. In addition to a lack of nucleoporin expression and NPC turnover, we discovered an age-related deterioration of NPCs leading to a loss of the nuclear permeability barrier and the leaking of cytoplasmic proteins into the nuclear compartment. Our finding that nuclear ‘leakiness’ is dramatically accelerated during aging and that a subset of nucleoporins are found to be oxidatively damaged in old cells, suggest that the accumulation of damage at the NPC structure might be a crucial event in age-related loss of nuclear integrity. PMID:19167330

  13. Metastable localization of diseases in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, R. S.; da Costa, R. A.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2016-12-01

    We describe the phenomenon of localization in the epidemic susceptible-infective-susceptible model on highly heterogeneous networks in which strongly connected nodes (hubs) play the role of centers of localization. We find that in this model the localized states below the epidemic threshold are metastable. The longevity and scale of the metastable outbreaks do not show a sharp localization transition; instead there is a smooth crossover from localized to delocalized states as we approach the epidemic threshold from below. Analyzing these long-lasting local outbreaks for a random regular graph with a hub, we show how this localization can be detected from the shape of the distribution of the number of infective nodes.

  14. The development of a single molecule fluorescence standard and its application in estimating the stoichiometry of the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Tie, Hieng Chiong; Madugula, Viswanadh; Lu, Lei

    2016-09-30

    We report here an image-based method to quantify the stoichiometry of diffraction-limited sub-cellular protein complexes in vivo under spinning disk confocal microscopy. A GFP single molecule fluorescence standard was first established by immobilizing His-tagged GFP molecules onto the glass surface via nickel nitrilotriacetic acid functionalized polyethylene glycol. When endogenous nucleoporins were knocked down and replaced by the exogenously expressed and knockdown-resistant GFP-nucleoporins, the stoichiometry of the nucleoporin was estimated by the ratio of its fluorescence intensity to that of the GFP single molecules. Our measured stoichiometry of Nup35, Nup93, Nup133 and Nup88 is 23, 18, 14 and 9 and there are possibly16 copies of Nup107-160 complex per nuclear pore complex.

  15. Comparative proteomic analyses of the nuclear envelope and pore complex suggests a wide range of heretofore unexpected functions.

    PubMed

    Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Kerr, Alastair R W; Schirmer, Eric C

    2009-02-15

    Since the discovery of several inherited diseases linked to the nuclear envelope the number of functions ascribed to this subcellular organelle has skyrocketed. However the molecular pathways underlying these functions are not clear in most cases, perhaps because of missing components. Several recent proteomic analyses of the nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex proteomes have yielded not only enough missing components to potentially elucidate these pathways, but suggest an exponentially greater number of functions at the nuclear periphery than ever imagined. Many of these functions appear to derive from recapitulation of pathways utilized at the plasma membrane and from other membrane systems. Additionally, many proteins identified in the comparative nuclear envelope studies have sequence characteristics suggesting that they might also contribute to nuclear pore complex functions. In particular, the striking enrichment for proteins in the nuclear envelope fractions that carry phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats may be significant for the mechanism of nuclear transport. In retrospect, these findings are only surprising in context of the notion held for many years that the nuclear envelope was only a barrier protecting the genome. In fact, it is arguably the most complex membrane organelle in the cell.

  16. Importin-β modulates the permeability of the nuclear pore complex in a Ran-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Alan R; Tang, Jeffrey H; Yassif, Jaime; Graf, Michael; Huang, William YC; Groves, Jay T; Weis, Karsten; Liphardt, Jan T

    2015-01-01

    Soluble karyopherins of the importin-β (impβ) family use RanGTP to transport cargos directionally through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Whether impβ or RanGTP regulate the permeability of the NPC itself has been unknown. In this study, we identify a stable pool of impβ at the NPC. A subpopulation of this pool is rapidly turned-over by RanGTP, likely at Nup153. Impβ, but not transportin-1 (TRN1), alters the pore's permeability in a Ran-dependent manner, suggesting that impβ is a functional component of the NPC. Upon reduction of Nup153 levels, inert cargos more readily equilibrate across the NPC yet active transport is impaired. When purified impβ or TRN1 are mixed with Nup153 in vitro, higher-order, multivalent complexes form. RanGTP dissolves the impβ•Nup153 complexes but not those of TRN1•Nup153. We propose that impβ and Nup153 interact at the NPC's nuclear face to form a Ran-regulated mesh that modulates NPC permeability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04052.001 PMID:25748139

  17. Structure of a Yeast Dyn2-Nup159 Complex and Molecular Basis for Dynein Light Chain-Nuclear Pore Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Romes, Erin M.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Slep, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex gates nucleocytoplasmic transport through a massive, eight-fold symmetric channel capped by a nucleoplasmic basket and structurally unique, cytoplasmic fibrils whose tentacles bind and regulate asymmetric traffic. The conserved Nup82 complex, composed of Nsp1, Nup82, and Nup159, forms the unique cytoplasmic fibrils that regulate mRNA nuclear export. Although the nuclear pore complex plays a fundamental, conserved role in nuclear trafficking, structural information about the cytoplasmic fibrils is limited. Here, we investigate the structural and biochemical interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup159 and the nucleoporin, Dyn2. We find that Dyn2 is predominantly a homodimer and binds arrayed sites on Nup159, promoting the Nup159 parallel homodimerization. We present the first structure of Dyn2, determined at 1.85 Å resolution, complexed with a Nup159 target peptide. Dyn2 resembles homologous metazoan dynein light chains, forming homodimeric composite substrate binding sites that engage two independent 10-residue target motifs, imparting a β-strand structure to each peptide via antiparallel extension of the Dyn2 core β-sandwich. Dyn2 recognizes a highly conserved QT motif while allowing sequence plasticity in the flanking residues of the peptide. Isothermal titration calorimetric analysis of the comparative binding of Dyn2 to two Nup159 target sites shows similar affinities (18 and 13 μm), but divergent thermal binding modes. Dyn2 homodimers are arrayed in the crystal lattice, likely mimicking the arrayed architecture of Dyn2 on the Nup159 multivalent binding sites. Crystallographic interdimer interactions potentially reflect a cooperative basis for Dyn2-Nup159 complex formation. Our data highlight the determinants that mediate oligomerization of the Nup82 complex and promote a directed, elongated cytoplasmic fibril architecture. PMID:22411995

  18. Structure of a yeast Dyn2-Nup159 complex and molecular basis for dynein light chain-nuclear pore interaction.

    PubMed

    Romes, Erin M; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Slep, Kevin C

    2012-05-04

    The nuclear pore complex gates nucleocytoplasmic transport through a massive, eight-fold symmetric channel capped by a nucleoplasmic basket and structurally unique, cytoplasmic fibrils whose tentacles bind and regulate asymmetric traffic. The conserved Nup82 complex, composed of Nsp1, Nup82, and Nup159, forms the unique cytoplasmic fibrils that regulate mRNA nuclear export. Although the nuclear pore complex plays a fundamental, conserved role in nuclear trafficking, structural information about the cytoplasmic fibrils is limited. Here, we investigate the structural and biochemical interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup159 and the nucleoporin, Dyn2. We find that Dyn2 is predominantly a homodimer and binds arrayed sites on Nup159, promoting the Nup159 parallel homodimerization. We present the first structure of Dyn2, determined at 1.85 Å resolution, complexed with a Nup159 target peptide. Dyn2 resembles homologous metazoan dynein light chains, forming homodimeric composite substrate binding sites that engage two independent 10-residue target motifs, imparting a β-strand structure to each peptide via antiparallel extension of the Dyn2 core β-sandwich. Dyn2 recognizes a highly conserved QT motif while allowing sequence plasticity in the flanking residues of the peptide. Isothermal titration calorimetric analysis of the comparative binding of Dyn2 to two Nup159 target sites shows similar affinities (18 and 13 μM), but divergent thermal binding modes. Dyn2 homodimers are arrayed in the crystal lattice, likely mimicking the arrayed architecture of Dyn2 on the Nup159 multivalent binding sites. Crystallographic interdimer interactions potentially reflect a cooperative basis for Dyn2-Nup159 complex formation. Our data highlight the determinants that mediate oligomerization of the Nup82 complex and promote a directed, elongated cytoplasmic fibril architecture.

  19. Cdk1 and okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatases control assembly of nuclear pore complexes in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Onischenko, Evgeny A; Gubanova, Natalia V; Kiseleva, Elena V; Hallberg, Einar

    2005-11-01

    Disassembly and reassembly of the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) is one of the major events during open mitosis in higher eukaryotes. However, how this process is controlled by the mitotic machinery is not clear. To investigate this we developed a novel in vivo model system based on syncytial Drosophila embryos. We microinjected different mitotic effectors into the embryonic cytoplasm and monitored the dynamics of disassembly/reassembly of NPCs in live embryos using fluorescently labeled wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) or in fixed embryos using electron microscopy and immunostaining techniques. We found that in live embryos Cdk1 activity was necessary and sufficient to induce disassembly of NPCs as well as their cytoplasmic mimics: annulate lamellae pore complexes (ALPCs). Cdk1 activity was also required for keeping NPCs and ALPCs disassembled during mitosis. In agreement recombinant Cdk1/cyclin B was able to induce phosphorylation and dissociation of nucleoporins from the NPCs in vitro. Conversely, reassembly of NPCs and ALPCs was dependent on the activity of protein phosphatases, sensitive to okadaic acid (OA). Our findings suggest a model where mitotic disassembly/reassembly of the NPCs is regulated by a dynamic equilibrium of Cdk1 and OA-sensitive phosphatase activities and provide evidence that mitotic phosphorylation mediates disassembly of the NPC.

  20. Nup93, a Vertebrate Homologue of Yeast Nic96p, Forms a Complex with a Novel 205-kDa Protein and Is Required for Correct Nuclear Pore Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Grandi, Paola; Dang, Tam; Pané, Nelly; Shevchenko, Andrej; Mann, Matthias; Forbes, Douglass; Hurt, Ed

    1997-01-01

    Yeast and vertebrate nuclear pores display significant morphological similarity by electron microscopy, but sequence similarity between the respective proteins has been more difficult to observe. Herein we have identified a vertebrate nucleoporin, Nup93, in both human and Xenopus that has proved to be an evolutionarily related homologue of the yeast nucleoporin Nic96p. Polyclonal antiserum to human Nup93 detects corresponding proteins in human, rat, and Xenopus cells. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy localize vertebrate Nup93 at the nuclear basket and at or near the nuclear entry to the gated channel of the pore. Immunoprecipitation from both mammalian and Xenopus cell extracts indicates that a small fraction of Nup93 physically interacts with the nucleoporin p62, just as yeast Nic96p interacts with the yeast p62 homologue. However, a large fraction of vertebrate Nup93 is extracted from pores and is also present in Xenopus egg extracts in complex with a newly discovered 205-kDa protein. Mass spectrometric sequencing of the human 205-kDa protein reveals that this protein is encoded by an open reading frame, KIAAO225, present in the human database. The putative human nucleoporin of 205 kDa has related sequence homologues in Caenorhabditis elegans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To analyze the role of the Nup93 complex in the pore, nuclei were assembled that lack the Nup93 complex after immunodepletion of a Xenopus nuclear reconstitution extract. The Nup93-complex–depleted nuclei are clearly defective for correct nuclear pore assembly. From these experiments, we conclude that the vertebrate and yeast pore have significant homology in their functionally important cores and that, with the identification of Nup93 and the 205-kDa protein, we have extended the knowledge of the nearest-neighbor interactions of this core in both yeast and vertebrates. PMID:9348540

  1. Nucleoporin's Like Charge Regions Are Major Regulators of FG Coverage and Dynamics Inside the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Peyro, Mohaddeseh; Soheilypour, Mohammad; Ghavami, Ali; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2015-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport has been the subject of a large body of research in the past few decades. Recently, the focus of investigations in this field has shifted from studies of the overall function of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) to the examination of the role of different domains of phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporin (FG Nup) sequences on the NPC function. In our recent bioinformatics study, we showed that FG Nups have some evolutionarily conserved sequence-based features that might govern their physical behavior inside the NPC. We proposed the 'like charge regions' (LCRs), sequences of charged residues with only one type of charge, as one of the features that play a significant role in the formation of FG network inside the central channel. In this study, we further explore the role of LCRs in the distribution of FG Nups, using a recently developed coarse-grained molecular dynamics model. Our results demonstrate how LCRs affect the formation of two transport pathways. While some FG Nups locate their FG network at the center of the NPC forming a homogeneous meshwork of FG repeats, other FG Nups cover the space adjacent to the NPC wall. LCRs in the former group, i.e. FG Nups that form an FG domain at the center, tend to regulate the size of the highly dense, doughnut-shaped FG meshwork and leave a small low FG density area at the center of the pore for passive diffusion. On the other hand, LCRs in the latter group of FG Nups enable them to maximize their interactions and cover a larger space inside the NPC to increase its capability to transport numerous cargos at the same time. Finally, a new viewpoint is proposed that reconciles different models for the nuclear pore selective barrier function.

  2. The Nuclear Pore Complex Function of Sec13 Protein Is Required for Cell Survival during Retinal Development*

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xubo; Hong, Jian; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Melville, David B.; Knapik, Ela W.; Meng, Anming; Peng, Jinrong

    2014-01-01

    Sec13 is a dual function protein, being a core component of both the COPII coat, which mediates protein trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, and the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which facilitates nucleo-cytoplasmic traffic. Here, we present a genetic model to differentiate the roles of these two functions of Sec13 in vivo. We report that sec13sq198 mutant embryos develop small eyes that exhibit disrupted retinal lamination and that the mutant retina contains an excessive number of apoptotic cells. Surprisingly, we found that loss of COPII function by oligonucleotide-mediated gene knockdown of sec31a and sec31b or brefeldin A treatment did not disrupt retinal lamination, although it did result in digestive organ defects similar to those seen in sec13sq198, suggesting that the digestive organ defects observed in sec13sq198 are due to loss of COPII function, whereas the retinal lamination defects are due to loss of the NPC function. We showed that the retinal cells of sec13sq198 failed to form proper nuclear pores, leading to a nuclear accumulation of total mRNA and abnormal activation of the p53-dependent apoptosis pathway, causing the retinal defect in sec13sq198. Furthermore, we found that a mutant lacking Nup107, a key NPC-specific component, phenocopied the retinal lamination phenotype as observed in sec13sq198. Our results demonstrate a requirement for the nuclear pore function of Sec13 in development of the retina and provide the first genetic evidence to differentiate the contributions of the NPC and the COPII functions of Sec13 during organogenesis. PMID:24627485

  3. Nucleoporin's Like Charge Regions Are Major Regulators of FG Coverage and Dynamics Inside the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Peyro, Mohaddeseh; Soheilypour, Mohammad; Ghavami, Ali; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport has been the subject of a large body of research in the past few decades. Recently, the focus of investigations in this field has shifted from studies of the overall function of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) to the examination of the role of different domains of phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporin (FG Nup) sequences on the NPC function. In our recent bioinformatics study, we showed that FG Nups have some evolutionarily conserved sequence-based features that might govern their physical behavior inside the NPC. We proposed the ‘like charge regions’ (LCRs), sequences of charged residues with only one type of charge, as one of the features that play a significant role in the formation of FG network inside the central channel. In this study, we further explore the role of LCRs in the distribution of FG Nups, using a recently developed coarse-grained molecular dynamics model. Our results demonstrate how LCRs affect the formation of two transport pathways. While some FG Nups locate their FG network at the center of the NPC forming a homogeneous meshwork of FG repeats, other FG Nups cover the space adjacent to the NPC wall. LCRs in the former group, i.e. FG Nups that form an FG domain at the center, tend to regulate the size of the highly dense, doughnut-shaped FG meshwork and leave a small low FG density area at the center of the pore for passive diffusion. On the other hand, LCRs in the latter group of FG Nups enable them to maximize their interactions and cover a larger space inside the NPC to increase its capability to transport numerous cargos at the same time. Finally, a new viewpoint is proposed that reconciles different models for the nuclear pore selective barrier function. PMID:26658558

  4. B-type nuclear lamin and the nuclear pore complex Nup107-160 influences maintenance of the spindle envelope required for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Tanabe, Karin; Katsube, Hiroka

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In higher eukaryotes, nuclear envelope (NE) disassembly allows chromatin to condense and spindle microtubules to access kinetochores. The nuclear lamina, which strengthens the NE, is composed of a polymer meshwork made of A- and B-type lamins. We found that the B-type lamin (Lam) is not fully disassembled and continues to localize along the spindle envelope structure during Drosophila male meiosis I, while the A-type lamin (LamC) is completely dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Among the nuclear pore complex proteins, Nup107 co-localized with Lam during this meiotic division. Surprisingly, Lam depletion resulted in a higher frequency of cytokinesis failure in male meiosis. We also observed the similar meiotic phenotype in Nup107-depleted cells. Abnormal localization of Lam was found in the Nup-depleted cells at premeiotic and meiotic stages. The central spindle microtubules became abnormal and recruitment of a contractile ring component to the cleavage sites was disrupted in Lam-depleted cells and Nup107-depleted cells. Therefore, we speculate that both proteins are required for a reinforcement of the spindle envelope, which supports the formation of central spindle microtubules essential for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis. PMID:27402967

  5. Spatiotemporal dynamics of the nuclear pore complex transport barrier resolved by high-speed atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakiyama, Yusuke; Mazur, Adam; Kapinos, Larisa E.; Lim, Roderick Y. H.

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are biological nanomachines that mediate the bidirectional traffic of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and nucleus in eukaryotic cells. This process involves numerous intrinsically disordered, barrier-forming proteins known as phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporins (FG Nups) that are tethered inside each pore. The selective barrier mechanism has so far remained unresolved because the FG Nups have eluded direct structural analysis within NPCs. Here, high-speed atomic force microscopy is used to visualize the nanoscopic spatiotemporal dynamics of FG Nups inside Xenopus laevis oocyte NPCs at timescales of ∼100 ms. Our results show that the cytoplasmic orifice is circumscribed by highly flexible, dynamically fluctuating FG Nups that rapidly elongate and retract, consistent with the diffusive motion of tethered polypeptide chains. On this basis, intermingling FG Nups exhibit transient entanglements in the central channel, but do not cohere into a tightly crosslinked meshwork. Therefore, the basic functional form of the NPC barrier is comprised of highly dynamic FG Nups that manifest as a central plug or transporter when averaged in space and time.

  6. Suilysin-induced Platelet-Neutrophil Complexes Formation is Triggered by Pore Formation-dependent Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengwei; Zheng, Yuling; Chen, Shaolong; Huang, Shujing; Liu, Keke; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Yongqiang; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation and platelet–neutrophil interactions have been found to be involved in inflammation, organ failure and soft-tissue necrosis in bacterial infections. Streptococcus suis, an emerging human pathogen, can cause streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome (STSS) similarly to Streptococcus pyogenes. Currently, S. suis–platelet interactions are poorly understood. Here, we found that suilysin (SLY), the S. suis cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC), was the sole stimulus of S. suis that induced platelet-neutrophil complexes (PNC) formation. Furthermore, P-selectin released in α-granules mediated PNC formation. This process was triggered by the SLY-induced pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx. Moreover, we demonstrated that the Ca2+ influx triggered an MLCK-dependent pathway playing critical roles in P-selectin activation and PNC formation, however, PLC-β-IP3/DAG-MLCK and Rho-ROCK-MLCK signalling were not involved. Additionally, the “outside-in” signalling had a smaller effect on the SLY-induced P-selectin release and PNC formation. Interestingly, other CDCs including pneumolysin and streptolysin O have also been found to induce PNC formation in a pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx manner. It is possible that the bacterial CDC-mediated PNC formation is a similar response mechanism used by a wide range of bacteria. These findings may provide useful insight for discovering potential therapeutic targets for S. suis-associated STSS. PMID:27830834

  7. Interaction graph mining for protein complexes using local clique merging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Li; Tan, Soon-Heng; Foo, Chuan-Sheng; Ng, See-Kiong

    2005-01-01

    While recent technological advances have made available large datasets of experimentally-detected pairwise protein-protein interactions, there is still a lack of experimentally-determined protein complex data. To make up for this lack of protein complex data, we explore the mining of existing protein interaction graphs for protein complexes. This paper proposes a novel graph mining algorithm to detect the dense neighborhoods (highly connected regions) in an interaction graph which may correspond to protein complexes. Our algorithm first locates local cliques for each graph vertex (protein) and then merge the detected local cliques according to their affinity to form maximal dense regions. We present experimental results with yeast protein interaction data to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed method. Compared with other existing techniques, our predicted complexes can match or overlap significantly better with the known protein complexes in the MIPS benchmark database. Novel protein complexes were also predicted to help biologists in their search for new protein complexes.

  8. Integrating complex functions: coordination of nuclear pore complex assembly and membrane expansion of the nuclear envelope requires a family of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Schneiter, Roger; Cole, Charles N

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear envelope harbors numerous large proteinaceous channels, the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), through which macromolecular exchange between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm occurs. This double-membrane nuclear envelope is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and thus functionally connected to such diverse processes as vesicular transport, protein maturation and lipid synthesis. Recent results obtained from studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicate that assembly of the nuclear pore complex is functionally dependent upon maintenance of lipid homeostasis of the ER membrane. Previous work from one of our laboratories has revealed that an integral membrane protein Apq12 is important for the assembly of functional nuclear pores. Cells lacking APQ12 are viable but cannot grow at low temperatures, have aberrant NPCs and a defect in mRNA export. Remarkably, these defects in NPC assembly can be overcome by supplementing cells with a membrane fluidizing agent, benzyl alcohol, suggesting that Apq12 impacts the flexibility of the nuclear membrane, possibly by adjusting its lipid composition when cells are shifted to a reduced temperature. Our new study now expands these findings and reveals that an essential membrane protein, Brr6, shares at least partially overlapping functions with Apq12 and is also required for assembly of functional NPCs. A third nuclear envelope membrane protein, Brl1, is related to Brr6, and is also required for NPC assembly. Because maintenance of membrane homeostasis is essential for cellular survival, the fact that these three proteins are conserved in fungi that undergo closed mitoses, but are not found in metazoans or plants, may indicate that their functions are performed by proteins unrelated at the primary sequence level to Brr6, Brl1 and Apq12 in cells that disassemble their nuclear envelopes during mitosis.

  9. Structural basis for binding the TREX2 complex to nuclear pores, GAL1 localisation and mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Jani, Divyang; Valkov, Eugene; Stewart, Murray

    2014-06-01

    The conserved Sac3:Thp1:Sem1:Sus1:Cdc31 (TREX2) complex binds to nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and, in addition to integrating mRNA nuclear export with preceding steps in the gene expression pathway, facilitates re-positioning of highly regulated actively transcribing genes (such as GAL1) to NPCs. Although TREX2 is thought to bind NPC protein Nup1, defining the precise role of this interaction has been frustrated by the complex pleiotropic phenotype exhibited by nup1Δ strains. To provide a structural framework for understanding the binding of TREX2 to NPCs and its function in the gene expression pathway, we have determined the structure of the Nup1:TREX2 interaction interface and used this information to engineer a Sac3 variant that impairs NPC binding while not compromising TREX2 assembly. This variant inhibited the NPC association of both de-repressed and activated GAL1 and also produced mRNA export and growth defects. These results indicate that the TREX2:Nup1 interaction facilitates the efficient nuclear export of bulk mRNA together with the re-positioning of GAL1 to NPCs that is required for transcriptional control that is mediated by removal of SUMO from repressors by NPC-bound Ulp1.

  10. Positively charged amino acids at the SNAP-25 C terminus determine fusion rates, fusion pore properties, and energetics of tight SNARE complex zippering.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qinghua; Zhao, Ying; Herbst, Adam Drew; Kim, Brian N; Lindau, Manfred

    2015-02-18

    SNAP-25 is a Q-SNARE protein mediating exocytosis of neurosecretory vesicles including chromaffin granules. Previous results with a SNAP-25 construct lacking the nine C terminal residues (SNAP-25Δ9) showed changed fusion pore properties (Fang et al., 2008), suggesting a model for fusion pore mechanics that couple C terminal zipping of the SNARE complex to the opening of the fusion pore. The deleted fragment contains the positively charged residues R198 and K201, adjacent to layers 7 and 8 of the SNARE complex. To determine how fusion pore conductance and dynamics depend on these residues, single exocytotic events in bovine chromaffin cells expressing R198Q, R198E, K201Q, or K201E mutants were investigated by carbon fiber amperometry and cell-attached patch capacitance measurements. Coarse grain molecular dynamics simulations revealed spontaneous transitions between a loose and tightly zippered state at the SNARE complex C terminus. The SNAP-25 K201Q mutant showed no changes compared with SNAP-25 wild-type. However, K201E, R198Q, and R198E displayed reduced release frequencies, slower release kinetics, and prolonged fusion pore duration that were correlated with reduced probability to engage in the tightly zippered state. The results show that the positively charged amino acids at the SNAP-25 C terminus promote tight SNARE complex zippering and are required for high release frequency and rapid release in individual fusion events.

  11. On the complex structural diffusion of proton holes in nanoconfined alkaline solutions within slit pores

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Santiburcio, Daniel; Marx, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    The hydroxide anion OH−(aq) in homogeneous bulk water, that is, the solvated proton hole, is known to feature peculiar properties compared with excess protons solvated therein. In this work, it is disclosed that nanoconfinement of such alkaline aqueous solutions strongly affects the key structural and dynamical properties of OH−(aq) compared with the bulk limit. The combined effect of the preferred hypercoordinated solvation pattern of OH−(aq), its preferred perpendicular orientation relative to the confining surfaces, the pronounced layering of nanoconfined water and the topology of the hydrogen bond network required for proton hole transfer lead to major changes of the charge transport mechanism, in such a way that the proton hole migration mechanism depends exquisitely on the width of the confined space that hosts the water film. Moreover, the anionic Zundel complex, which is of transient nature in homogeneous bulk solutions, can be dynamically trapped as a shallow intermediate species by suitable nanoconfinement conditions. PMID:27550616

  12. Nuclear pore complex evolution: a trypanosome Mlp analogue functions in chromosomal segregation but lacks transcriptional barrier activity.

    PubMed

    Holden, Jennifer M; Koreny, Ludek; Obado, Samson; Ratushny, Alexander V; Chen, Wei-Ming; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Kelly, Steven; Chait, Brian T; Aitchison, John D; Rout, Michael P; Field, Mark C

    2014-05-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) has dual roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport and chromatin organization. In many eukaryotes the coiled-coil Mlp/Tpr proteins of the NPC nuclear basket have specific functions in interactions with chromatin and defining specialized regions of active transcription, whereas Mlp2 associates with the mitotic spindle/NPC in a cell cycle-dependent manner. We previously identified two putative Mlp-related proteins in African trypanosomes, TbNup110 and TbNup92, the latter of which associates with the spindle. We now provide evidence for independent ancestry for TbNup92/TbNup110 and Mlp/Tpr proteins. However, TbNup92 is required for correct chromosome segregation, with knockout cells exhibiting microaneuploidy and lowered fidelity of telomere segregation. Further, TbNup92 is intimately associated with the mitotic spindle and spindle anchor site but apparently has minimal roles in control of gene transcription, indicating that TbNup92 lacks major barrier activity. TbNup92 therefore acts as a functional analogue of Mlp/Tpr proteins, and, together with the lamina analogue NUP-1, represents a cohort of novel proteins operating at the nuclear periphery of trypanosomes, uncovering complex evolutionary trajectories for the NPC and nuclear lamina.

  13. Biallelic Mutations in Nuclear Pore Complex Subunit NUP107 Cause Early-Childhood-Onset Steroid-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Noriko; Tsukaguchi, Hiroyasu; Koshimizu, Eriko; Shono, Akemi; Matsunaga, Satoko; Shiina, Masaaki; Mimura, Yasuhiro; Imamura, Shintaro; Hirose, Tomonori; Okudela, Koji; Nozu, Kandai; Akioka, Yuko; Hattori, Motoshi; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Kitamura, Akiko; Cheong, Hae Il; Kagami, Shoji; Yamashita, Michiaki; Fujita, Atsushi; Miyatake, Satoko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Ohashi, Kenichi; Imamoto, Naoko; Ryo, Akihide; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Iijima, Kazumoto; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a huge protein complex embedded in the nuclear envelope. It has central functions in nucleocytoplasmic transport, nuclear framework, and gene regulation. Nucleoporin 107 kDa (NUP107) is a component of the NPC central scaffold and is an essential protein in all eukaryotic cells. Here, we report on biallelic NUP107 mutations in nine affected individuals who are from five unrelated families and show early-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). These individuals have pathologically focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, a condition that leads to end-stage renal disease with high frequency. NUP107 is ubiquitously expressed, including in glomerular podocytes. Three of four NUP107 mutations detected in the affected individuals hamper NUP107 binding to NUP133 (nucleoporin 133 kDa) and NUP107 incorporation into NPCs in vitro. Zebrafish with nup107 knockdown generated by morpholino oligonucleotides displayed hypoplastic glomerulus structures and abnormal podocyte foot processes, thereby mimicking the pathological changes seen in the kidneys of the SRNS individuals with NUP107 mutations. Considering the unique properties of the podocyte (highly differentiated foot-process architecture and slit membrane and the inability to regenerate), we propose a “podocyte-injury model” as the pathomechanism for SRNS due to biallelic NUP107 mutations. PMID:26411495

  14. Local Activity Principle:. the Cause of Complexity and Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainzer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The principle of local activity is precisely the missing concept to explain the emergence of complex patterns in a homogeneous medium. Leon O. Chua discovered and defined this principle in the theory of nonlinear electronic circuits in a mathematically rigorous way. The local principle can be generalized and proven at least for the class of nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems in physics, chemistry, biology and brain research. Recently, it was realized by memristors for nanoelectronic device applications in technical brains. In general, the emergence of complex patterns and structures is explained by symmetry breaking in homogeneous media. The principle of local activity is the cause of symmetry breaking in homogeneous media. We argue that the principle of local activity is really fundamental in science and can even be identified in quantum cosmology as symmetry breaking of local gauge symmetries generating the complexity of matter and forces in our universe. Finally, we consider applications in economic, financial, and social systems with the emergence of equilibrium states, symmetry breaking at critical points of phase transitions and risky acting at the edge of chaos. In any case, the driving causes of symmetry breaking and the emergence of complexity are locally active elements, cells, units, or agents.

  15. Chm7 and Heh1 collaborate to link nuclear pore complex quality control with nuclear envelope sealing.

    PubMed

    Webster, Brant M; Thaller, David J; Jäger, Jens; Ochmann, Sarah E; Borah, Sapan; Lusk, C Patrick

    2016-11-15

    The integrity of the nuclear envelope barrier relies on membrane remodeling by the ESCRTs, which seal nuclear envelope holes and contribute to the quality control of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs); whether these processes are mechanistically related remains poorly defined. Here, we show that the ESCRT-II/III chimera, Chm7, is recruited to a nuclear envelope subdomain that expands upon inhibition of NPC assembly and is required for the formation of the storage of improperly assembled NPCs (SINC) compartment. Recruitment to sites of NPC assembly is mediated by its ESCRT-II domain and the LAP2-emerin-MAN1 (LEM) family of integral inner nuclear membrane proteins, Heh1 and Heh2. We establish direct binding between Heh2 and the "open" forms of both Chm7 and the ESCRT-III, Snf7, and between Chm7 and Snf7. Interestingly, Chm7 is required for the viability of yeast strains where double membrane seals have been observed over defective NPCs; deletion of CHM7 in these strains leads to a loss of nuclear compartmentalization suggesting that the sealing of defective NPCs and nuclear envelope ruptures could proceed through similar mechanisms.

  16. Atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex targeting domain of a Nup116 homologue from the yeast, Candida glabrata

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Manglicmot, Danalyn; Bain, Kevin T.; Gilmore, Jeremiah; Gheyi, Tarun; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Almo, Steven C.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-10-23

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), embedded in the nuclear envelope, is a large, dynamic molecular assembly that facilitates exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The yeast NPC is an eightfold symmetric annular structure composed of {approx}456 polypeptide chains contributed by {approx}30 distinct proteins termed nucleoporins. Nup116, identified only in fungi, plays a central role in both protein import and mRNA export through the NPC. Nup116 is a modular protein with N-terminal 'FG' repeats containing a Gle2p-binding sequence motif and a NPC targeting domain at its C-terminus. We report the crystal structure of the NPC targeting domain of Candida glabrata Nup116, consisting of residues 882-1034 [CgNup116(882-1034)], at 1.94 {angstrom} resolution. The X-ray structure of CgNup116(882-1034) is consistent with the molecular envelope determined in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering. Structural similarities of CgNup116(882-1034) with homologous domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup116, S. cerevisiae Nup145N, and human Nup98 are discussed.

  17. Structure of the C-terminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup133, a component of the nuclear pore complex

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Gheyi, Tarun; Miller, Stacy A.; Bain, Kevin T.; Dickey, Mark; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Kim, Seung Joong; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Martel, Anne; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-10-23

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), responsible for the nucleo-cytoplasmic exchange of proteins and nucleic acids, are dynamic macromolecular assemblies forming an eight-fold symmetric co-axial ring structure. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) NPCs are made up of at least 456 polypeptide chains of {approx}30 distinct sequences. Many of these components (nucleoporins, Nups) share similar structural motifs and form stable subcomplexes. We have determined a high-resolution crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of yeast Nup133 (ScNup133), a component of the heptameric Nup84 subcomplex. Expression tests yielded ScNup133(944-1157) that produced crystals diffracting to 1.9{angstrom} resolution. ScNup133(944-1157) adopts essentially an all {alpha}-helical fold, with a short two stranded {beta}-sheet at the C-terminus. The 11 {alpha}-helices of ScNup133(944-1157) form a compact fold. In contrast, the previously determined structure of human Nup133(934-1156) bound to a fragment of human Nup107 has its constituent {alpha}-helices are arranged in two globular blocks. These differences may reflect structural divergence among homologous nucleoporins.

  18. Atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex targeting domain of a Nup116 homologue from the yeast, Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Manglicmot, Danalyn; Bain, Kevin T; Gilmore, Jeremiah; Gheyi, Tarun; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A; Emtage, J Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R; Rout, Michael P; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J Michael; Almo, Steven C; Burley, Stephen K

    2012-08-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), embedded in the nuclear envelope, is a large, dynamic molecular assembly that facilitates exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The yeast NPC is an eightfold symmetric annular structure composed of ~456 polypeptide chains contributed by ~30 distinct proteins termed nucleoporins. Nup116, identified only in fungi, plays a central role in both protein import and mRNA export through the NPC. Nup116 is a modular protein with N-terminal "FG" repeats containing a Gle2p-binding sequence motif and a NPC targeting domain at its C-terminus. We report the crystal structure of the NPC targeting domain of Candida glabrata Nup116, consisting of residues 882-1034 [CgNup116(882-1034)], at 1.94 Å resolution. The X-ray structure of CgNup116(882-1034) is consistent with the molecular envelope determined in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering. Structural similarities of CgNup116(882-1034) with homologous domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup116, S. cerevisiae Nup145N, and human Nup98 are discussed.

  19. One Single Static Measurement Predicts Wave Localization in Complex Structures.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Gondel, Alexane; Dubois, Marc; Atlan, Michael; Feppon, Florian; Labbé, Aimé; Gillot, Camille; Garelli, Alix; Ernoult, Maxence; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Filoche, Marcel; Sebbah, Patrick

    2016-08-12

    A recent theoretical breakthrough has brought a new tool, called the localization landscape, for predicting the localization regions of vibration modes in complex or disordered systems. Here, we report on the first experiment which measures the localization landscape and demonstrates its predictive power. Holographic measurement of the static deformation under uniform load of a thin plate with complex geometry provides direct access to the landscape function. When put in vibration, this system shows modes precisely confined within the subregions delineated by the landscape function. Also the maxima of this function match the measured eigenfrequencies, while the minima of the valley network gives the frequencies at which modes become extended. This approach fully characterizes the low frequency spectrum of a complex structure from a single static measurement. It paves the way for controlling and engineering eigenmodes in any vibratory system, especially where a structural or microscopic description is not accessible.

  20. Integral membrane proteins Brr6 and Apq12 link assembly of the nuclear pore complex to lipid homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Hodg, Christine A.; Choudhary, Vineet; Wolyniak, Michael J.; Scarcelli, John J.; Schneiter, Roger; Col, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking Apq12, a nuclear envelope (NE)-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) integral membrane protein, are defective in assembly of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), possibly because of defects in regulating membrane fluidity. We identified BRR6, which encodes an essential integral membrane protein of the NE-ER, as a dosage suppressor of apq12 Δ. Cells carrying the temperature-sensitive brr6-1 allele have been shown to have defects in nucleoporin localization, mRNA metabolism and nuclear transport. Electron microscopy revealed that brr6-1 cells have gross NE abnormalities and proliferation of the ER. brr6-1 cells were hypersensitive to compounds that affect membrane biophysical properties and to inhibitors of lipid biosynthetic pathways, and displayed strong genetic interactions with genes encoding non-essential lipid biosynthetic enzymes. Strikingly, brr6-1 cells accumulated, in or near the NE, elevated levels of the two classes of neutral lipids, steryl esters and triacylglycerols, and over-accumulated sterols when they were provided exogenously. Although neutral lipid synthesis is dispensable in wild-type cells, viability of brr6-1 cells was fully dependent on neutral lipid production. These data indicate that Brr6 has an essential function in regulating lipid homeostasis in the NE-ER, thereby impacting NPC formation and nucleocytoplasmic transport. PMID:20016074

  1. Nup2 requires a highly divergent partner, NupA, to fulfill functions at nuclear pore complexes and the mitotic chromatin region

    PubMed Central

    Markossian, Sarine; Suresh, Subbulakshmi; Osmani, Aysha H.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) undergo dramatic changes during mitosis, which in vertebrates and Aspergillus nidulans involves movement of Nup2 from NPCs to the chromatin region to fulfill unknown functions. This transition is shown to require the Cdk1 mitotic kinase and be promoted prematurely by ectopic expression of the NIMA kinase. Nup2 localizes with a copurifying partner termed NupA, a highly divergent yet essential NPC protein. NupA and Nup2 locate throughout the chromatin region during prophase but during anaphase move to surround segregating DNA. NupA function is shown to involve targeting Nup2 to its interphase and mitotic locations. Deletion of either Nup2 or NupA causes identical mitotic defects that initiate a spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC)–dependent mitotic delay and also cause defects in karyokinesis. These mitotic problems are not caused by overall defects in mitotic NPC disassembly–reassembly or general nuclear import. However, without Nup2 or NupA, although the SAC protein Mad1 locates to its mitotic locations, it fails to locate to NPCs normally in G1 after mitosis. Collectively the study provides new insight into the roles of Nup2 and NupA during mitosis and in a surveillance mechanism that regulates nucleokinesis when mitotic defects occur after SAC fulfillment. PMID:25540430

  2. Dependence on injection temperature and on aquifer's petrophysical properties of the local stress applying on the pore wall of a crystallized pore in the context of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osselin, Florian; Fen-Chong, Teddy; Fabbri, Antonin; Lassin, Arnault; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Dangla, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    The development of CCS (carbon capture and storage) currently faces numerous problems and particularly the precipitation of salts induced by the drying of the porous medium during injection of carbon dioxide in deep saline aquifers. This precipitation has several consequences, and particularly the creation of a crystallization pressure which can have an important mechanical impact on the host rock. Literature on crystallization pressure is one century rich of experimental and theoretical works. However, applications have been performed in the field of civil engineering and building science only, and, despite they are of paramount importance in the context of CCS, studies about this phenomenon in deep reservoir conditions are currently lacking. In this paper, we retrieve the classic crystallization pressure equation within the framework of geochemistry and present its explicit form of dependence with temperature, pressure, and composition. Evaluation of the crystallization pressure has then been proceeded considering the injection conditions and a sketch of in-pore crystallization process. The evolution of the local stress transmitted to a crystallized pore wall is found to be strongly related to the petrophysical properties of the medium and to the injection temperature of the carbon dioxide under the assumption of constant salt concentration during the precipitation process. Values differ strongly with the considered mineral, depending particularly on the solubility, and can reach in some conditions 165 MPa, making crystallization pressure a major factor in the mechanical behavior of the aquifer.

  3. Localized motion in random matrix decomposition of complex financial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiong-Fei; Zheng, Bo; Ren, Fei; Qiu, Tian

    2017-04-01

    With the random matrix theory, we decompose the multi-dimensional time series of complex financial systems into a set of orthogonal eigenmode functions, which are classified into the market mode, sector mode, and random mode. In particular, the localized motion generated by the business sectors, plays an important role in financial systems. Both the business sectors and their impact on the stock market are identified from the localized motion. We clarify that the localized motion induces different characteristics of the time correlations for the stock-market index and individual stocks. With a variation of a two-factor model, we reproduce the return-volatility correlations of the eigenmodes.

  4. Local modularity for community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ju; Hu, Tao; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Ke; Li, Jian-Ming; Xu, Xiao-Ke; Liu, Cui-Cui; Chen, Shi

    2016-02-01

    Community detection is a topic of interest in the study of complex networks such as the protein-protein interaction networks and metabolic networks. In recent years, various methods were proposed to detect community structures of the networks. Here, a kind of local modularity with tunable parameter is derived from the Newman-Girvan modularity by a special self-loop strategy that depends on the community division of the networks. By the self-loop strategy, one can easily control the definition of modularity, and the resulting modularity can be optimized by using the existing modularity optimization algorithms. The local modularity is used as the target function for community detection, and a self-consistent method is proposed for the optimization of the local modularity. We analyze the behaviors of the local modularity and show the validity of the local modularity in detecting community structures on various networks.

  5. The nuclear pore complex protein ALADIN is anchored via NDC1 but not via POM121 and GP210 in the nuclear envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Kind, Barbara; Koehler, Katrin; Lorenz, Mike; Huebner, Angela

    2009-12-11

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) consists of {approx}30 different proteins and provides the only sites for macromolecular transport between cytoplasm and nucleus. ALADIN was discovered as a new member of the NPC. Mutations in ALADIN are known to cause triple A syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by adrenal insufficiency, alacrima, and achalasia. The function and exact location of the nucleoporin ALADIN within the NPC multiprotein complex is still unclear. Using a siRNA-based approach we downregulated the three known membrane integrated nucleoporins NDC1, GP210, and POM121 in stably expressing GFP-ALADIN HeLa cells. We identified NDC1 but not GP210 and POM121 as the main anchor of ALADIN within the NPC. Solely the depletion of NDC1 caused mislocalization of ALADIN. Vice versa, the depletion of ALADIN led also to disappearance of NDC1 at the NPC. However, the downregulation of two further membrane-integral nucleoporins GP210 and POM121 had no effect on ALADIN localization. Furthermore, we could show a direct association of NDC1 and ALADIN in NPCs by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. Based on our findings we conclude that ALADIN is anchored in the nuclear envelope via NDC1 and that this interaction gets lost, if ALADIN is mutated. The loss of integration of ALADIN in the NPC is a main pathogenetic aspect for the development of the triple A syndrome and suggests that the interaction between ALADIN and NDC1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  6. A laboratory study to estimate pore geometric parameters of sandstones using complex conductivity and nuclear magnetic resonance for permeability prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Gordon; Keating, Kristina; Binley, Andrew; Slater, Lee

    2016-06-01

    We estimate parameters from the Katz and Thompson permeability model using laboratory complex electrical conductivity (CC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data to build permeability models parameterized with geophysical measurements. We use the Katz and Thompson model based on the characteristic hydraulic length scale, determined from mercury injection capillary pressure estimates of pore throat size, and the intrinsic formation factor, determined from multisalinity conductivity measurements, for this purpose. Two new permeability models are tested, one based on CC data and another that incorporates CC and NMR data. From measurements made on forty-five sandstone cores collected from fifteen different formations, we evaluate how well the CC relaxation time and the NMR transverse relaxation times compare to the characteristic hydraulic length scale and how well the formation factor estimated from CC parameters compares to the intrinsic formation factor. We find: (1) the NMR transverse relaxation time models the characteristic hydraulic length scale more accurately than the CC relaxation time (R2 of 0.69 and 0.33 and normalized root mean square errors (NRMSE) of 0.16 and 0.21, respectively); (2) the CC estimated formation factor is well correlated with the intrinsic formation factor (NRMSE=0.23). We demonstrate that that permeability estimates from the joint-NMR-CC model (NRMSE=0.13) compare favorably to estimates from the Katz and Thompson model (NRMSE=0.074). This model advances the capability of the Katz and Thompson model by employing parameters measureable in the field giving it the potential to more accurately estimate permeability using geophysical measurements than are currently possible.

  7. Two conformational states of the membrane-associated Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba {delta}-endotoxin complex revealed by electron crystallography: Implications for toxin-pore formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ounjai, Puey; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Sigworth, Fred J.; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2007-10-05

    The insecticidal nature of Cry {delta}-endotoxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis is generally believed to be caused by their ability to form lytic pores in the midgut cell membrane of susceptible insect larvae. Here we have analyzed membrane-associated structures of the 65-kDa dipteran-active Cry4Ba toxin by electron crystallography. The membrane-associated toxin complex was crystallized in the presence of DMPC via detergent dialysis. Depending upon the charge of the adsorbed surface, 2D crystals of the oligomeric toxin complex have been captured in two distinct conformations. The projection maps of those crystals have been generated at 17 A resolution. Both complexes appeared to be trimeric; as in one crystal form, its projection structure revealed a symmetrical pinwheel-like shape with virtually no depression in the middle of the complex. The other form revealed a propeller-like conformation displaying an obvious hole in the center region, presumably representing the toxin-induced pore. These crystallographic data thus demonstrate for the first time that the 65-kDa activated Cry4Ba toxin in association with lipid membranes could exist in at least two different trimeric conformations, conceivably implying the closed and open states of the pore.

  8. Localized slip controlled by dehydration embrittlement of partly serpentinized dunites, Leka Ophiolite Complex, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Kristina G.; Austrheim, Håkon; Renard, François; Cordonnier, Benoit; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2017-04-01

    Dehydration of partly or completely serpentinized ultramafic rocks can increase the pore fluid pressure and induce brittle failure, a process referred to as dehydration embrittlement. However the extents of strain localization and unstable frictional sliding during deserpentinization are still under debate. In the layered ultramafic sections of the Leka Ophiolite Complex in the Central Norwegian Caledonides, prograde metamorphism of serpentinite veins led to local fluid production and to the growth of Mg-rich and coarse-grained olivine with abundant magnetite inclusions and δ18O values 1.0- 1.5 ‰ below the host rock. Embrittlement associated with the dehydration caused faulting along highly localized (<10 μm-wide) slip planes near the centers of the original serpentinite veins and pulverization of wall rock olivine. These features along with an earthquake-like size distribution of fault offsets suggest unstable frictional sliding rather than slower creep. Structural heterogeneities in the form of serpentinite veins clearly have first-order controls on strain localization and frictional sliding during dehydration. As most of the oceanic lithosphere is incompletely serpentinized, heterogeneities represented by a non-uniform distribution of serpentinite are common and may increase the likelihood that dehydration embrittlement triggers earthquakes.

  9. AFM visualization of sub-50nm polyplex disposition to the nuclear pore complex without compromising the integrity of the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Helene; Parhamifar, Ladan; Hunter, A Christy; Shahin, Victor; Moghimi, S Moein

    2016-12-28

    It has been questioned as to whether polyplexes in the cytoplasm can reach the nuclear compartment and if so in what form. By applying atomic force microscopy (AFM) to the nuclear envelope and the nuclear pore complexes, we demonstrate that disposition of polyethylenimine (PEI)/DNA polyplexes that were microinjected into the oocytes of Xenopus laevis, as an example of a non-dividing cell, is exclusive to the nuclear pore complex (NPC). AFM images show NPCs clogged only with sub-50nm polyplexes. This mode of disposition neither altered the morphology/integrity of the nuclear membrane nor the NPC. AFM images further show polyplexes on the nucleoplasmic side of the envelope, presumably indicating species in transit. Transmission electron microscopy studies of ruptured nuclei from transfected human cell lines demonstrate the presence of sub-50nm particles resembling polyplexes in morphology compared with control preparations.

  10. The Fission Yeast Nup107-120 Complex Functionally Interacts with the Small GTPase Ran/Spi1 and Is Required for mRNA Export, Nuclear Pore Distribution, and Proper Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Baï, Siau Wei; Rouquette, Jacques; Umeda, Makoto; Faigle, Wolfgang; Loew, Damarys; Sazer, Shelley; Doye, Valérie

    2004-01-01

    We have characterized Schizosaccharomyces pombe open reading frames encoding potential orthologues of constituents of the evolutionarily conserved Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup84 vertebrate Nup107-160 nuclear pore subcomplex, namely Nup133a, Nup133b, Nup120, Nup107, Nup85, and Seh1. In spite of rather weak sequence conservation, in vivo analyses demonstrated that these S. pombe proteins are localized at the nuclear envelope. Biochemical data confirmed the organization of these nucleoporins within conserved complexes. Although examination of the S. cerevisiae and S. pombe deletion mutants revealed different viability phenotypes, functional studies indicated that the involvement of this complex in nuclear pore distribution and mRNA export has been conserved between these highly divergent yeasts. Unexpectedly, microscopic analyses of some of the S. pombe mutants revealed cell division defects at the restrictive temperature (abnormal septa and mitotic spindles and chromosome missegregation) that were reminiscent of defects occurring in several S. pombe GTPase Ran (RanSp)/Spi1 cycle mutants. Furthermore, deletion of nup120 moderately altered the nuclear location of RanSp/Spi1, whereas overexpression of a nonfunctional RanSp/Spi1-GFP allele was specifically toxic in the Δnup120 and Δnup133b mutant strains, indicating a functional and genetic link between constituents of the S. pombe Nup107-120 complex and of the RanSp/Spi1 pathway. PMID:15226438

  11. Advanced Algorithms for Local Routing Strategy on Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Benchuan; Chen, Bokui; Gao, Yachun; Tse, Chi K.; Dong, Chuanfei; Miao, Lixin; Wang, Binghong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the significant improvement on network performance provided by global routing strategies, their applications are still limited to small-scale networks, due to the need for acquiring global information of the network which grows and changes rapidly with time. Local routing strategies, however, need much less local information, though their transmission efficiency and network capacity are much lower than that of global routing strategies. In view of this, three algorithms are proposed and a thorough investigation is conducted in this paper. These algorithms include a node duplication avoidance algorithm, a next-nearest-neighbor algorithm and a restrictive queue length algorithm. After applying them to typical local routing strategies, the critical generation rate of information packets Rc increases by over ten-fold and the average transmission time 〈T〉 decreases by 70–90 percent, both of which are key physical quantities to assess the efficiency of routing strategies on complex networks. More importantly, in comparison with global routing strategies, the improved local routing strategies can yield better network performance under certain circumstances. This is a revolutionary leap for communication networks, because local routing strategy enjoys great superiority over global routing strategy not only in terms of the reduction of computational expense, but also in terms of the flexibility of implementation, especially for large-scale networks. PMID:27434502

  12. Contagion spreading on complex networks with local deterministic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manshour, Pouya; Montakhab, Afshin

    2014-07-01

    Typically, contagion strength is modeled by a transmission rate λ, whereby all nodes in a network are treated uniformly in a mean-field approximation. However, local agents react differently to the same contagion based on their local characteristics. Following our recent work (Montakhab and Manshour, 2012 [42]), we investigate contagion spreading models with local dynamics on complex networks. We therefore quantify contagions by their quality, 0⩽α⩽1, and follow their spreading as their transmission condition (fitness) is evaluated by local agents. Instead of considering stochastic dynamics, here we consider various deterministic local rules. We find that initial spreading with exponential quality-dependent time scales is followed by a stationary state with a prevalence depending on the quality of the contagion. We also observe various interesting phenomena, for example, high prevalence without the participation of the hubs. This special feature of our "threshold rule" provides a mechanism for high prevalence spreading without the participation of "super-spreaders", in sharp contrast with many standard mechanism of spreading where hubs are believed to play the central role. On the other hand, if local nodes act as agents who stop the transmission once a threshold is reached, we find that spreading is severely hindered in a heterogeneous population while in a homogeneous one significant spreading may occur. We further decouple local characteristics from underlying topology in order to study the role of network topology in various models and find that as long as small-world effect exists, the underlying topology does not contribute to the final stationary state but only affects the initial spreading velocity.

  13. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore induction is linked to formation of the complex of ATPase C-subunit, polyhydroxybutyrate and inorganic polyphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Elustondo, P A; Nichols, M; Negoda, A; Thirumaran, A; Zakharian, E; Robertson, G S; Pavlov, E V

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening allows free movement of ions and small molecules leading to mitochondrial membrane depolarization and ATP depletion that triggers cell death. A multi-protein complex of the mitochondrial ATP synthase has an essential role in mPTP. However, the molecular identity of the central 'pore' part of mPTP complex is not known. A highly purified fraction of mammalian mitochondria containing C-subunit of ATPase (C-subunit), calcium, inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) forms ion channels with properties that resemble the native mPTP. We demonstrate here that amount of this channel-forming complex dramatically increases in intact mitochondria during mPTP activation. This increase is inhibited by both Cyclosporine A, an inhibitor of mPTP and Ruthenium Red, an inhibitor of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter. Similar increases in the amount of complex formation occurs in areas of mouse brain damaged by ischemia-reperfusion injury. These findings suggest that calcium-induced mPTP is associated with de novo assembly of a channel comprising C-subunit, polyP and PHB. PMID:27924223

  14. Local rheological probes for complex fluids: application to Laponite suspensions.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, C; Elias, F; Browaeys, J; Ponton, A; Bacri, J-C

    2002-08-01

    We present an experimental method allowing a direct measurement of the local rheological behavior of complex fluids. A magnetic probe is inserted into the bulk of the fluid and submitted to a controlled magnetic force or torque, which induces a mechanical perturbation of the fluid. The geometry of the perturbation can be varied using two kinds of probes: a magnetic bead submitted to a homogeneous magnetic force in one direction, and a magnetic needle that can turn inside the material under the effect of an applied magnetic torque. Two complex viscoelastic fluids are investigated. First, a surfactant solution, which has a linear mechanical behavior in the range of the applied stresses, is used to test and validate the experimental methodology. We then use the local probes to investigate a Laponite colloidal suspension, which exhibits nonlinear behavior such as thixotropy, shear thinning, and aging. In this latter fluid, we find an exponential growth of the rheological relaxation time versus the system age, a power-law dependence of the fluid viscosity on the applied stress, and a dynamical yield stress which saturates with the fluid aging time.

  15. Localization of Pathology on Complex Architecture Building Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiropoulos, A. A.; Lakakis, K. N.; Mouza, V. K.

    2017-02-01

    The technology of 3D laser scanning is considered as one of the most common methods for heritage documentation. The point clouds that are being produced provide information of high detail, both geometric and thematic. There are various studies that examine techniques of the best exploitation of this information. In this study, an algorithm of pathology localization, such as cracks and fissures, on complex building surfaces is being tested. The algorithm makes use of the points' position in the point cloud and tries to distinguish them in two groups-patterns; pathology and non-pathology. The extraction of the geometric information that is being used for recognizing the pattern of the points is being accomplished via Principal Component Analysis (PCA) in user-specified neighborhoods in the whole point cloud. The implementation of PCA leads to the definition of the normal vector at each point of the cloud. Two tests that operate separately examine both local and global geometric criteria among the points and conclude which of them should be categorized as pathology. The proposed algorithm was tested on parts of the Gazi Evrenos Baths masonry, which are located at the city of Giannitsa at Northern Greece.

  16. Classifying Urban Land Covers Using Local Indices of Spatial Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arumugam, Mahesh; Emerson, Charles W.; Lam, Nina Siu-Ngan; Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2003-01-01

    The skewed statistical distributions of land cover types in complex, heterogeneous urban areas limits the effectiveness of traditional spectrally based maximum-likelihood classifiers. This work examines the utility of fractal dimension and Moran's I index of spatial autocorrelation in segmenting high-resolution panchromatic and lower-resolution multispectral imagery. Tools available in the Image Characterization and Modeling System (ICAMS) were used to analyze multi-temporal and multi-platform imagery of Atlanta, Georgia. In this example, land cover change trajectories from forest or grassland to built up land covers lead to decreased spatial autocorrelation. In lower resolution imagery such as Landsat MSS, the complex details of forested land covers and urbanized areas are smoothed, and texture-based change detection is less effective. Although segmentation of panchromatic images is possible using fractal dimension or Moran's I, widely differing land covers often yield similar values of these indices. Better results are obtained when a surface of local fractal dimension or spatial autocorrelation is combined as an additional layer in a supervised maximum-likelihood multispectral classification.

  17. Nuclear Pore-Like Structures in a Compartmentalized Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Sagulenko, Evgeny; Green, Kathryn; Yee, Benjamin; Morgan, Garry; Leis, Andrew; Lee, Kuo-Chang; Butler, Margaret K.; Chia, Nicholas; Pham, Uyen Thi Phuong; Lindgreen, Stinus; Catchpole, Ryan; Poole, Anthony M.; Fuerst, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Planctomycetes are distinguished from other Bacteria by compartmentalization of cells via internal membranes, interpretation of which has been subject to recent debate regarding potential relations to Gram-negative cell structure. In our interpretation of the available data, the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus contains a nuclear body compartment, and thus possesses a type of cell organization with parallels to the eukaryote nucleus. Here we show that pore-like structures occur in internal membranes of G.obscuriglobus and that they have elements structurally similar to eukaryote nuclear pores, including a basket, ring-spoke structure, and eight-fold rotational symmetry. Bioinformatic analysis of proteomic data reveals that some of the G. obscuriglobus proteins associated with pore-containing membranes possess structural domains found in eukaryote nuclear pore complexes. Moreover, immunogold labelling demonstrates localization of one such protein, containing a β-propeller domain, specifically to the G. obscuriglobus pore-like structures. Finding bacterial pores within internal cell membranes and with structural similarities to eukaryote nuclear pore complexes raises the dual possibilities of either hitherto undetected homology or stunning evolutionary convergence. PMID:28146565

  18. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method.

  19. Localization of the membrane attack complex (MAC) in experimental immune complex glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The role of the membrane attack complex (MAC) as a mediator of renal tissue injury was evaluated in rats affected by bovine serum albumin (BSA)-induced immune complex glomerulonephritis. Immunofluorescence studies revealed concurrent deposits of IgG, BSA, C3, and the MAC along glomerular capillary walls, although the MAC manifested a more restricted distribution than that observed for immune complexes. Immunoelectron microscopic techniques were utilized to demonstrate immune complexes, C3, and the MAC within dense deposits in the subepithelial aspect of the basement membrane. Visceral epithelial foot processes were fused in areas overlying large dense deposits and exhibited intense staining for the MAC, lesser reactivity for C3 but IgG was absent from the foot process membranes. Smaller granular deposits of immune complexes, C3, and the MAC were observed in the subendothelial region of the lamina rara interna and the lamina densa. Immune complexes may activate the classical complement pathway causing diffuse injury to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), allowing subepithelial accumulation of complexes. These observations implicate the MAC as a mediator of GBM and juxtaposed podocyte membrane injury, thereby contributing to disruption of the glomerular filtration barrier. IgG and C3 were demonstrated within tubulointerstitial regions on the surface of collagen fibers in close proximity to the tubular basement membrane (TBM) of proximal convoluted tubules. Within the TBM, C3 localization was prominent with diminished reactivity for the MAC, but IgG was not detectable. The demonstration of C3 and scant MAC deposits in the TBM of nonimmunized control rats without evidence of interstitial IgG and C3 deposits suggests that both nonimmune and immune processes play a role in the pathogenesis of extraglomerular lesions. Evidence derived from these morphologic studies indicates that the MAC is associated with injury to the GBM, foot process membranes of visceral

  20. Formation of Tap/NXT1 Heterodimers Activates Tap-Dependent Nuclear mRNA Export by Enhancing Recruitment to Nuclear Pore Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wiegand, Heather L.; Coburn, Glen A.; Zeng, Yan; Kang, Yibin; Bogerd, Hal P.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2002-01-01

    The Tap protein has been shown to activate the nuclear export of mRNA species bearing retroviral constitutive transport elements and is also believed to play an essential role in the sequence nonspecific export of cellular mRNAs. However, it has remained unclear how Tap activity is regulated in vivo. Here, we report that the small NXT1/p15-1 protein functions as a critical cofactor for Tap-mediated mRNA export in both human and invertebrate cells. In the absence of NXT1 binding, the Tap protein is unable to effectively interact with components of the nuclear pore complex and both Tap nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and the nuclear export of mRNA molecules tethered to Tap are therefore severely attenuated. Formation of a Tap/NXT1 heterodimer enhances nucleoporin binding both in vitro and in vivo and induces the formation of a Tap/NXT1/nucleoporin ternary complex that is likely to be a key intermediate in the process of nuclear mRNA export. The critical importance of NXT1 for the nuclear export of poly(A)+ RNA is emphasized by the finding that specific inhibition of the expression of the Drosophila homolog of human NXT1, by using RNA interference, results in the nuclear accumulation of poly(A)+ RNA in cultured insect cells. These data suggest that NXT1 may act as a molecular switch that regulates the ability of Tap to mediate nuclear mRNA export by controlling the interaction of Tap with components of the nuclear pore. PMID:11739738

  1. Local Coherence: Helping Young Writers Manage a Complex Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutchen, Deborah; Perfetti, Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that children typically unsuccessful in planning at global levels might improve their writing by paying attention to the local coherence constraints of sentences. Local coherence is a quality of written language achieved through the use of local connections (such as "also") that relate ideas across several sentences into a coherent…

  2. Local probe investigation of emergent phenomena in complex oxide heterointerfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mengchen

    Complex oxide heterointerfaces exhibit rich physics as well as many veiled puzzles. LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) is one of the prototype of such heterointerfaces. In 2004, Ohtomo and Hwang first reported a conducing interface emerged between perovskite oxide insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. Following this seminal discovery, many emergent phenomena like metal-insulator transition, piezoresponse, superconductivity, magnetism, strong spin-orbit coupling and coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism were reported in the fascinating LAO/STO system. However, the origin of the conducting interface is still the subject of intense debate, and the physics behind these emergent phenomena remains a wild space to be explored. My Ph.D. study focused on the emergent phenomena in LAO/STO by using "local probes" -- nanostructures created by conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM) lithography and the AFM itself. I used piezoresponse force microscope (PFM) to study the electromechanical response in LAO/STO and developed a high-resolution, non-destructive PFM imaging technique to visualize nanostructures at LAO/STO interface. The results indicate that the PFM signal is related to a carrier density mediated interfacial lattice distortion, and surface adsorbates can affect the PFM signal via coupling to the electrons at the interface. I integrated graphene on LAO/STO, created field-effect devices in graphene/LAO/STO and collaborated with Dr. Giriraj Jnawali to investigate the transport properties. The high quality single layer graphene on LAO/STO exhibited the half-integer quantum Hall effect and room temperature weak antilocalization behavior. I performed transport measurements in (110)-oriented LAO/STO to investigate anisotropic quasi one-dimensional superconductivity in nanowires. Based on the results I proposed a plausible explanation related to the Lifshitz transition and anisotropic band structures of nanowires in (110)-oriented LAO/STO. Co-worked with Dr. Keith Brown, I studied

  3. The Nectin-4/Afadin Protein Complex and Intercellular Membrane Pores Contribute to Rapid Spread of Measles Virus in Primary Human Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brajesh K.; Hornick, Andrew L.; Krishnamurthy, Sateesh; Locke, Anna C.; Mendoza, Crystal A.; Mateo, Mathieu; Miller-Hunt, Catherine L.; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The discovery that measles virus (MV) uses the adherens junction protein nectin-4 as its epithelial receptor provides a new vantage point from which to characterize its rapid spread in the airway epithelium. We show here that in well-differentiated primary cultures of airway epithelial cells from human donors (HAE), MV infectious centers form rapidly and become larger than those of other respiratory pathogens: human respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus 5, and Sendai virus. While visible syncytia do not form after MV infection of HAE, the cytoplasm of an infected cell suddenly flows into an adjacent cell, as visualized through wild-type MV-expressed cytoplasmic green fluorescent protein (GFP). High-resolution video microscopy documents that GFP flows through openings that form on the lateral surfaces between columnar epithelial cells. To assess the relevance of the protein afadin, which connects nectin-4 to the actin cytoskeleton, we knocked down its mRNA. This resulted in more-limited infectious-center formation. We also generated a nectin-4 mutant without the afadin-binding site in its cytoplasmic tail. This mutant was less effective than wild-type human nectin-4 at promoting MV infection in primary cultures of porcine airway epithelia. Thus, in airway epithelial cells, MV spread requires the nectin-4/afadin complex and is based on cytoplasm transfer between columnar cells. Since the viral membrane fusion apparatus may open the passages that allow cytoplasm transfer, we refer to them as intercellular membrane pores. Virus-induced intercellular pores may contribute to extremely efficient measles contagion by promoting the rapid spread of the virus through the upper respiratory epithelium. IMPORTANCE Measles virus (MV), while targeted for eradication, still causes about 120,000 deaths per year worldwide. The recent reemergence of measles in insufficiently vaccinated populations in Europe and North America reminds us that measles is extremely

  4. Shape index distribution based local surface complexity applied to the human cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Hyung; Fonov, Vladimir; Collins, D. Louis; Gerig, Guido; Styner, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of local surface complexity in the human cortex has shown to be of interest in investigating population differences as well as developmental changes in neurodegenerative or neurodevelopment diseases. We propose a novel assessment method that represents local complexity as the difference between the observed distributions of local surface topology to its best-fit basic topology model within a given local neighborhood. This distribution difference is estimated via Earth Move Distance (EMD) over the histogram within the local neighborhood of the surface topology quantified via the Shape Index (SI) measure. The EMD scores have a range from simple complexity (0.0), which indicates a consistent local surface topology, up to high complexity (1.0), which indicates a highly variable local surface topology. The basic topology models are categorized as 9 geometric situation modeling situations such as crowns, ridges and fundi of cortical gyro and sulci. We apply a geodesic kernel to calculate the local SI histrogram distribution within a given region. In our experiments, we obtained the results of local complexity that shows generally higher complexity in the gyral/sulcal wall regions and lower complexity in some gyral ridges and lowest complexity in sulcal fundus areas. In addition, we show expected, preliminary results of increased surface complexity across most of the cortical surface within the first years of postnatal life, hypothesized to be due to the changes such as development of sulcal pits. PMID:26028803

  5. Rapid Brownian Motion Primes Ultrafast Reconstruction of Intrinsically Disordered Phe-Gly Repeats Inside the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Moussavi-Baygi, R.; Mofrad, M. R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins, such as Phe-Gly repeat domains, alters drastically when they are confined in, and tethered to, nan channels. This has challenged our understanding of how they serve to selectively facilitate translocation of nuclear transport receptor (NTR)-bearing macromolecules. Heterogeneous FG-repeats, tethered to the NPC interior, nonuniformly fill the channel in a diameter-dependent manner and adopt a rapid Brownian motion, thereby forming a porous and highly dynamic polymeric meshwork that percolates in radial and axial directions and features two distinguishable zones: a dense hydrophobic rod-like zone located in the center, and a peripheral low-density shell-like zone. The FG-meshwork is locally disrupted upon interacting with NTR-bearing macromolecules, but immediately reconstructs itself between 0.44 μs and 7.0 μs, depending on cargo size and shape. This confers a perpetually-sealed state to the NPC, and is solely due to rapid Brownian motion of FG-repeats, not FG-repeat hydrophobic bonds. Elongated-shaped macromolecules, both in the presence and absence of NTRs, penetrate more readily into the FG-meshwork compared to their globular counterparts of identical volume and surface chemistry, highlighting the importance of the shape effects in nucleocytoplasmic transport. These results can help our understanding of geometrical effects in, and the design of, intelligent and responsive biopolymer-based materials in nanofiltration and artificial nanopores. PMID:27470900

  6. Integrative Structure–Function Mapping of the Nucleoporin Nup133 Suggests a Conserved Mechanism for Membrane Anchoring of the Nuclear Pore Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Joong; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Martel, Anne; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Weiss, Thomas M.; Shi, Yi; Markina-Inarrairaegui, Ane; Bonanno, Jeffery B.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.; Chait, Brian T.; Almo, Steven C.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the sole passageway for the transport of macromolecules across the nuclear envelope. Nup133, a major component in the essential Y-shaped Nup84 complex, is a large scaffold protein of the NPC's outer ring structure. Here, we describe an integrative modeling approach that produces atomic models for multiple states of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) Nup133, based on the crystal structures of the sequence segments and their homologs, including the related Vanderwaltozyma polyspora (Vp) Nup133 residues 55 to 502 (VpNup13355–502) determined in this study, small angle X-ray scattering profiles for 18 constructs of ScNup133 and one construct of VpNup133, and 23 negative-stain electron microscopy class averages of ScNup1332–1157. Using our integrative approach, we then computed a multi-state structural model of the full-length ScNup133 and validated it with mutational studies and 45 chemical cross-links determined via mass spectrometry. Finally, the model of ScNup133 allowed us to annotate a potential ArfGAP1 lipid packing sensor (ALPS) motif in Sc and VpNup133 and discuss its potential significance in the context of the whole NPC; we suggest that ALPS motifs are scattered throughout the NPC's scaffold in all eukaryotes and play a major role in the assembly and membrane anchoring of the NPC in the nuclear envelope. Our results are consistent with a common evolutionary origin of Nup133 with membrane coating complexes (the protocoatomer hypothesis); the presence of the ALPS motifs in coatomer-like nucleoporins suggests an ancestral mechanism for membrane recognition present in early membrane coating complexes. PMID:25139911

  7. Integrative structure-function mapping of the nucleoporin Nup133 suggests a conserved mechanism for membrane anchoring of the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Joong; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Martel, Anne; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Weiss, Thomas M; Shi, Yi; Markina-Inarrairaegui, Ane; Bonanno, Jeffery B; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Chait, Brian T; Almo, Steven C; Rout, Michael P; Sali, Andrej

    2014-11-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the sole passageway for the transport of macromolecules across the nuclear envelope. Nup133, a major component in the essential Y-shaped Nup84 complex, is a large scaffold protein of the NPC's outer ring structure. Here, we describe an integrative modeling approach that produces atomic models for multiple states of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) Nup133, based on the crystal structures of the sequence segments and their homologs, including the related Vanderwaltozyma polyspora (Vp) Nup133 residues 55 to 502 (VpNup133(55-502)) determined in this study, small angle X-ray scattering profiles for 18 constructs of ScNup133 and one construct of VpNup133, and 23 negative-stain electron microscopy class averages of ScNup133(2-1157). Using our integrative approach, we then computed a multi-state structural model of the full-length ScNup133 and validated it with mutational studies and 45 chemical cross-links determined via mass spectrometry. Finally, the model of ScNup133 allowed us to annotate a potential ArfGAP1 lipid packing sensor (ALPS) motif in Sc and VpNup133 and discuss its potential significance in the context of the whole NPC; we suggest that ALPS motifs are scattered throughout the NPC's scaffold in all eukaryotes and play a major role in the assembly and membrane anchoring of the NPC in the nuclear envelope. Our results are consistent with a common evolutionary origin of Nup133 with membrane coating complexes (the protocoatomer hypothesis); the presence of the ALPS motifs in coatomer-like nucleoporins suggests an ancestral mechanism for membrane recognition present in early membrane coating complexes.

  8. Starting with Complex Primitives Pays Off: Complicate Locally, Simplify Globally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Aravind K.

    2004-01-01

    In setting up a formal system to specify a grammar formalism, the conventional (mathematical) wisdom is to start with primitives (basic primitive structures) as simple as possible, and then introduce various operations for constructing more complex structures. An alternate approach is to start with complex (more complicated) primitives, which…

  9. Photonic hybrid crystals constructed from in situ host-guest nanoconfinement of a light-emitting complex in metal-organic framework pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Abhijeet K.; Ryder, Matthew R.; Tan, Jin-Chong

    2016-03-01

    We report the concept underpinning the facile nanoconfinement of a bulky luminous guest molecule in the pores of a metal-organic framework (MOF) host, which yields a hybrid host ⊃ guest nanomaterial with tunable opto-electronic characteristics and enhanced photostability. Utilizing an in situ host-guest confinement strategy enabled by molecular self-assembly, we show that the highly emitting ZnQ [Zn-(bis-8-hydroxyquinoline)] guest complexes could be rapidly encapsulated within the sodalite nanocages of zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8) host crystals. The nature of optical and electronic transitions phenomena of the guest-encapsulated ZIF-8 ⊃ ZnQ has been elucidated by means of fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy measurements, and substantiated further via theoretical molecular orbital calculations revealing the plausible host-guest charge transfer mechanism involved. Evidence suggests that its photophysical properties are not only strongly determined by the host-guest co-operative bonding interactions within the environment of the confined MOF nanocage, but also can be engineered to manipulate its emission color chromaticity or to shield light-sensitive emitting guests against rapid photochemical degradation.We report the concept underpinning the facile nanoconfinement of a bulky luminous guest molecule in the pores of a metal-organic framework (MOF) host, which yields a hybrid host ⊃ guest nanomaterial with tunable opto-electronic characteristics and enhanced photostability. Utilizing an in situ host-guest confinement strategy enabled by molecular self-assembly, we show that the highly emitting ZnQ [Zn-(bis-8-hydroxyquinoline)] guest complexes could be rapidly encapsulated within the sodalite nanocages of zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8) host crystals. The nature of optical and electronic transitions phenomena of the guest-encapsulated ZIF-8 ⊃ ZnQ has been elucidated by means of fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy measurements, and

  10. An efficient local cascade defense method in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhong-Yuan; Ma, Jian-Feng

    Cascading failures in networked systems often lead to catastrophic consequence. Defending cascading failure propagation by employing local load redistribution method is an efficient way. Given initial load of every node, the key of improving network robustness against cascading failures is to maximally defend cascade propagation with minimum total extra capacity of all nodes. With finite total extra capacity of all nodes, we first discuss three general extra capacity distributions including degree-based distribution (DD), average distribution (AD) and random distribution (RD). To sufficiently use the total spare capacity (SC) of all neighboring nodes of a failed node, then we propose a novel SC-based local load redistribution mechanism to improve the cascade defense ability of network. We investigate the network robustness against cascading failures induced by a single node failure under the three extra capacity distributions in both scale-free networks and random networks. Compared with the degree-based (DB) local load redistribution method, our SC method achieves higher robustness under all of the three extra capacity distributions. The extensive simulation results can well confirm the effectiveness of the SC local load redistribution method.

  11. Towards quantifying cochlear implant localization performance in complex acoustic environments.

    PubMed

    Kerber, S; Seeber, B U

    2011-08-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users frequently report listening difficulties in reverberant and noisy spaces. While it is common to assess speech understanding with implants in background noise, binaural hearing performance has rarely been quantified in the presence of other sources, although the binaural system is a major contributor to the robustness of speech understanding in noisy situations with normal hearing. Here, a pointing task was used to measure horizontal localization ability of a bilateral CI user in quiet and in a continuous diffuse noise interferer at a signal-to-noise ratio of 0 dB. Results were compared to localization performance of six normal hearing listeners. The average localization error of the normal hearing listeners was within normal ranges reported previously and only increased by 1.8° when the interfering noise was introduced. In contrast, the bilateral CI user showed a localization error of 22° in quiet which rose to 31° in noise. This increase was partly due to target sounds being inaudible when presented from frontal locations between -20° and +20°. With the noise present, the implant user was only able to reliably hear target sounds presented from locations well off the median plane. The results give support to the informal complaints raised by CI users and can help to define targets for the design of, e.g., noise reduction algorithms for implant processors.

  12. Photonic hybrid crystals constructed from in situ host-guest nanoconfinement of a light-emitting complex in metal-organic framework pores.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Abhijeet K; Ryder, Matthew R; Tan, Jin-Chong

    2016-03-28

    We report the concept underpinning the facile nanoconfinement of a bulky luminous guest molecule in the pores of a metal-organic framework (MOF) host, which yields a hybrid host ⊃ guest nanomaterial with tunable opto-electronic characteristics and enhanced photostability. Utilizing an in situ host-guest confinement strategy enabled by molecular self-assembly, we show that the highly emitting ZnQ [Zn-(bis-8-hydroxyquinoline)] guest complexes could be rapidly encapsulated within the sodalite nanocages of zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8) host crystals. The nature of optical and electronic transitions phenomena of the guest-encapsulated ZIF-8 ⊃ ZnQ has been elucidated by means of fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy measurements, and substantiated further via theoretical molecular orbital calculations revealing the plausible host-guest charge transfer mechanism involved. Evidence suggests that its photophysical properties are not only strongly determined by the host-guest co-operative bonding interactions within the environment of the confined MOF nanocage, but also can be engineered to manipulate its emission color chromaticity or to shield light-sensitive emitting guests against rapid photochemical degradation.

  13. Ion permeability of the nuclear pore complex and ion-induced macromolecular permeation as studied by scanning electrochemical and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeon; Izadyar, Anahita; Shen, Mei; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2014-02-18

    Efficient delivery of therapeutic macromolecules and nanomaterials into the nucleus is imperative for gene therapy and nanomedicine. Nucleocytoplasmic molecular transport, however, is tightly regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC) with the hydrophobic transport barriers based on phenylalanine and glycine repeats. Herein, we apply scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to quantitatively study the permeability of the NPCs to small probe ions with a wide range of hydrophobicity as a measure of their hydrophobic interactions with the transport barriers. Amperometric detection of the redox-inactive probe ions is enabled by using the ion-selective SECM tips based on the micropipet- or nanopipet-supported interfaces between two immiscible electrolyte solutions. The remarkably high ion permeability of the NPCs is successfully measured by SECM and theoretically analyzed. This analysis demonstrates that the ion permeability of the NPCs is determined by the dimensions and density of the nanopores without a significant effect of the transport barriers on the transported ions. Importantly, the weak ion-barrier interactions become significant at sufficiently high concentrations of extremely hydrophobic ions, i.e., tetraphenylarsonium and perfluorobutylsulfonate, to permeabilize the NPCs to naturally impermeable macromolecules. Dependence of ion-induced permeabilization of the NPC on the pathway and mode of macromolecular transport is studied by using fluorescence microscopy to obtain deeper insights into the gating mechanism of the NPC as the basis of a new transport model.

  14. Altered RNA processing and export lead to retention of mRNAs near transcription sites and nuclear pore complexes or within the nucleolus

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Biplab; Montpetit, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Many protein factors are required for mRNA biogenesis and nuclear export, which are central to the eukaryotic gene expression program. It is unclear, however, whether all factors have been identified. Here we report on a screen of >1000 essential gene mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for defects in mRNA processing and export, identifying 26 mutants with defects in this process. Single-molecule FISH data showed that the majority of these mutants accumulated mRNA within specific regions of the nucleus, which included 1) mRNAs within the nucleolus when nucleocytoplasmic transport, rRNA biogenesis, or RNA processing and surveillance was disrupted, 2) the buildup of mRNAs near transcription sites in 3′-end processing and chromosome segregation mutants, and 3) transcripts being enriched near nuclear pore complexes when components of the mRNA export machinery were mutated. These data show that alterations to various nuclear processes lead to the retention of mRNAs at discrete locations within the nucleus. PMID:27385342

  15. Curcumin Pretreatment Prevents Potassium Dichromate-Induced Hepatotoxicity, Oxidative Stress, Decreased Respiratory Complex I Activity, and Membrane Permeability Transition Pore Opening

    PubMed Central

    García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Tapia, Edilia; Zazueta, Cecilia; Zatarain-Barrón, Zyanya Lucía; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Vega-García, Claudia Cecilia; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from turmeric with recognized antioxidant properties. Hexavalent chromium is an environmental toxic and carcinogen compound that induces oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential protective effect of curcumin on the hepatic damage generated by potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) in rats. Animals were pretreated daily by 9-10 days with curcumin (400 mg/kg b.w.) before the injection of a single intraperitoneal of K2Cr2O7 (15 mg/kg b.w.). Groups of animals were sacrificed 24 and 48 h later. K2Cr2O7-induced damage to the liver was evident by histological alterations and increase in the liver weight and in the activity of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase in plasma. In addition, K2Cr2O7 induced oxidative damage in liver and isolated mitochondria, which was evident by the increase in the content of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl and decrease in the glutathione content and in the activity of several antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, K2Cr2O7 induced decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption, in the activity of respiratory complex I, and permeability transition pore opening. All the above-mentioned alterations were prevented by curcumin pretreatment. The beneficial effects of curcumin against K2Cr2O7-induced liver oxidative damage were associated with prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23956771

  16. NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is required for nuclear envelope formation and completion of nuclear pore complex assembly in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Baur, Tina; Ramadan, Kristijan; Schlundt, Andreas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Meyer, Hemmo H

    2007-08-15

    Despite the progress in understanding nuclear envelope (NE) reformation after mitosis, it has remained unclear what drives the required membrane fusion and how exactly this is coordinated with nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. Here, we show that, like other intracellular fusion reactions, NE fusion in Xenopus laevis egg extracts is mediated by SNARE proteins that require activation by NSF. Antibodies against Xenopus NSF, depletion of NSF or the dominant-negative NSF(E329Q) variant specifically inhibited NE formation. Staging experiments further revealed that NSF was required until sealing of the envelope was completed. Moreover, excess exogenous alpha-SNAP that blocks SNARE function prevented membrane fusion and caused accumulation of non-flattened vesicles on the chromatin surface. Under these conditions, the nucleoporins Nup107 and gp210 were fully recruited, whereas assembly of FxFG-repeat-containing nucleoporins was blocked. Together, we define NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events as essential steps during NE formation downstream of Nup107 recruitment, and upstream of membrane flattening and completion of NPC assembly.

  17. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    DOE PAGES

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; ...

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that ismore » not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.« less

  18. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that is not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.

  19. Does Extension Play a Role in Ionian Tectonics? Potential Effects of Preexisting Bounding Faults, Local Brittle Failure, and Sulfur Pore Pressure on Crustal Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, William B.; Kirchoff, M.; Bland, M.

    2013-10-01

    The majority of mountains observed on Io are tectonic, upthrusted blocks. Their formation is generally thought to be related to Io’s heat-pipe volcanism, crustal subsidence, and accompanying lateral confinement. In previous work, we demonstrated that compressional thermal stresses from sustained local or regional shut down of Io’s heat-pipe volcanism could also play a vital role in mountain formation, and help explain the anticorrelation between Io’s mountains and volcanic centers [Kirchoff and McKinnon 2009, Formation of mountains on Io: Variable volcanism and thermal stresses, Icarus 201, 598-614; Kirchoff et al. 2011, Global distribution of volcanoes and mountains on Io: Control by asthenospheric heating and implications for mountain formation, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 301, 22-30]. Here we refine our previous model by using an “unconfined” horizontal boundary condition (zero average lateral stress), including brittle failure (crustal plasticity), and adding sulfur to our rheological model. The unconfined horizontal boundary condition accounts for stresses released on preexisting, more distant faults; including crustal plasticity allows us to more realistically represent stresses that would exceed the brittle failure limit otherwise, and addition of sulfur to the model composition of Io’s crust further improves the rheological model of the crust. Heated and melted at depth, liquid sulfur creates pore pressure in the lower crust and profoundly reduces the brittle failure limit. Including these modifications when the volcanic eruption rate decreases introduces a region of tensional failure in the upper crust and increases the size of the region in compressional failure in the lower crust. Finite element models show that increasing compression at depth imparts substantial bending stresses, which can drive surface faulting and block rotation. Such conditions further facilitate mountain formation at the surface, and highlight the difference between Io

  20. The cellular uptake and localization of non-emissive iridium(III) complexes as cellular reaction-based luminescence probes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Liu, Yi; Wu, Yongquan; Sun, Yun; Li, Fuyou

    2013-01-01

    Improvement of cellular uptake and subcellular resolution remains a major obstacle in the successful and broad application of cellular optical probes. In this context, we design and synthesize seven non-emissive cyclometalated iridium(III) solvent complexes [Ir(CˆN)(2)(solv)(2)](+)L(-) (LIr2-LIr8, in which CˆN = 2-phenylpyridine (ppy) or its derivative; solv = DMSO, H(2)O or CH(3)CN; L(-) = PF(6)(-) or OTf(-)) applicable in live cell imaging to facilitate selective visualization of cellular structures. Based on the above variations (including different counter ions, solvent ligands, and CˆN ligands), structure-activity relationship analyses reveal a number of clear correlations: (1) variations in counter anions and solvent ligands of iridium(III) complexes do not affect cellular imaging behavior, and (2) length of the side carbon chain in CˆN ligands has significant effects on cellular uptake and localization/accumulation of iridium complexes in living cells. Moreover, investigation of the uptake mechanism via low-temperature and metabolism inhibitor assays reveal that [Ir(4-Meppy)(2)(CH(3)CN)(2)](+)OTf(-) (LIr5) with 2-phenylpyridine derivative with side-chain of methyl group at the 4-position as CˆN ligand permeates the outer and nuclear membranes of living cells through an energy-dependent, non-endocytic entry pathway, and translocation of the complex from the cell periphery towards the perinuclear region possibly occurs through a microtubule-dependent transport pathway. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) appear to selectively control the transport of iridium(III) complexes between the cytoplasm and nucleus. A generalization of trends in behavior and structure-activity relationships is presented, which should provide further insights into the design and optimization of future probes.

  1. Global efficiency of local immunization on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Allard, Antoine; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Dubé, Louis J.

    2013-07-01

    Epidemics occur in all shapes and forms: infections propagating in our sparse sexual networks, rumours and diseases spreading through our much denser social interactions, or viruses circulating on the Internet. With the advent of large databases and efficient analysis algorithms, these processes can be better predicted and controlled. In this study, we use different characteristics of network organization to identify the influential spreaders in 17 empirical networks of diverse nature using 2 epidemic models. We find that a judicious choice of local measures, based either on the network's connectivity at a microscopic scale or on its community structure at a mesoscopic scale, compares favorably to global measures, such as betweenness centrality, in terms of efficiency, practicality and robustness. We also develop an analytical framework that highlights a transition in the characteristic scale of different epidemic regimes. This allows to decide which local measure should govern immunization in a given scenario.

  2. A New Path through the Nuclear Pore.

    PubMed

    Gozalo, Alejandro; Capelson, Maya

    2016-11-17

    Knowing the configuration of the nuclear pore is essential for appreciating the underlying mechanisms of nucleo-cytoplasmic communication. Now, Fernandez-Martinez et al. present a high-resolution structure of the cytoplasmic nuclear pore-mRNA export holo-complex, challenging our textbook depiction of this massive membrane-embedded complex.

  3. Single nuclear pores visualized by confocal microscopy and image processing.

    PubMed Central

    Kubitscheck, U; Wedekind, P; Zeidler, O; Grote, M; Peters, R

    1996-01-01

    How nuclear pore complexes, mediating the transport of nucleic acids, proteins, and metabolites between cell nucleus and cytoplasm, are arranged in the nuclear envelope is essentially unknown. Here we describe a method combining high-resolution confocal imaging with image processing and pattern recognition to visualize single nuclear pore complexes (120 nm diameter), determine their relative positions with nanometer accuracy, and analyze their distribution in situ. The method was tested by means of a model system in which the very same sample areas could be imaged by confocal and electron microscopy. It was thus found that single fluorescent beads of 105 nm nominal diameter could be localized with a lateral accuracy of <20 nm and an axial accuracy of approximately 20 nm. The method was applied to digitonin-permeabilized 3T3 cells, whose nuclear pore complexes were fluorescently labeled with the anti-nucleoporin antibody mAb414. Stacks of optical sections were generated by confocal imaging at high resolution. Herein the nuclear pore complexes appeared as bright diffraction-limited spots whose centers were localized by fitting them by three-dimensional gaussians. The nearest-neighbor distribution function and the pair correlation function were calculated and found to agree well with those of randomly distributed hard cylinders of 138 +/- 17 nm diameter, but not with those of randomly distributed points or nonrandomly distributed cylinders. This was supported by a cluster analysis. Implications for the direct observation of the transport of single particles and molecules through individual nuclear pore complexes are discussed. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 PMID:9172731

  4. Commercial Complexity and Local and Global Involvement in Programs: Effects on Viewer Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberman, Heiko; Thorson, Esther

    A study investigated the effects of local (momentary) and global (whole program) involvement in program context and the effects of message complexity on the retention of television commercials. Sixteen commercials, categorized as simple video/simple audio through complex video/complex audio were edited into two globally high- and two globally…

  5. Multimodal cues improve prey localization under complex environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rhebergen, F.; Taylor, R. C.; Ryan, M. J.; Page, R. A.; Halfwerk, W.

    2015-01-01

    Predators often eavesdrop on sexual displays of their prey. These displays can provide multimodal cues that aid predators, but the benefits in attending to them should depend on the environmental sensory conditions under which they forage. We assessed whether bats hunting for frogs use multimodal cues to locate their prey and whether their use varies with ambient conditions. We used a robotic set-up mimicking the sexual display of a male túngara frog (Physalaemus pustulosus) to test prey assessment by fringe-lipped bats (Trachops cirrhosus). These predatory bats primarily use sound of the frog's call to find their prey, but the bats also use echolocation cues returning from the frog's dynamically moving vocal sac. In the first experiment, we show that multimodal cues affect attack behaviour: bats made narrower flank attack angles on multimodal trials compared with unimodal trials during which they could only rely on the sound of the frog. In the second experiment, we explored the bat's use of prey cues in an acoustically more complex environment. Túngara frogs often form mixed-species choruses with other frogs, including the hourglass frog (Dendropsophus ebraccatus). Using a multi-speaker set-up, we tested bat approaches and attacks on the robofrog under three different levels of acoustic complexity: no calling D. ebraccatus males, two calling D. ebraccatus males and five D. ebraccatus males. We found that bats are more directional in their approach to the robofrog when more D. ebraccatus males were calling. Thus, bats seemed to benefit more from multimodal cues when confronted with increased levels of acoustic complexity in their foraging environments. Our data have important consequences for our understanding of the evolution of multimodal sexual displays as they reveal how environmental conditions can alter the natural selection pressures acting on them. PMID:26336176

  6. Multimodal cues improve prey localization under complex environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Rhebergen, F; Taylor, R C; Ryan, M J; Page, R A; Halfwerk, W

    2015-09-07

    Predators often eavesdrop on sexual displays of their prey. These displays can provide multimodal cues that aid predators, but the benefits in attending to them should depend on the environmental sensory conditions under which they forage. We assessed whether bats hunting for frogs use multimodal cues to locate their prey and whether their use varies with ambient conditions. We used a robotic set-up mimicking the sexual display of a male túngara frog (Physalaemus pustulosus) to test prey assessment by fringe-lipped bats (Trachops cirrhosus). These predatory bats primarily use sound of the frog's call to find their prey, but the bats also use echolocation cues returning from the frog's dynamically moving vocal sac. In the first experiment, we show that multimodal cues affect attack behaviour: bats made narrower flank attack angles on multimodal trials compared with unimodal trials during which they could only rely on the sound of the frog. In the second experiment, we explored the bat's use of prey cues in an acoustically more complex environment. Túngara frogs often form mixed-species choruses with other frogs, including the hourglass frog (Dendropsophus ebraccatus). Using a multi-speaker set-up, we tested bat approaches and attacks on the robofrog under three different levels of acoustic complexity: no calling D. ebraccatus males, two calling D. ebraccatus males and five D. ebraccatus males. We found that bats are more directional in their approach to the robofrog when more D. ebraccatus males were calling. Thus, bats seemed to benefit more from multimodal cues when confronted with increased levels of acoustic complexity in their foraging environments. Our data have important consequences for our understanding of the evolution of multimodal sexual displays as they reveal how environmental conditions can alter the natural selection pressures acting on them.

  7. Researching a local heroin market as a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Lee D; Bobashev, Georgiy; Morris, Robert J

    2009-12-01

    This project applies agent-based modeling (ABM) techniques to better understand the operation, organization, and structure of a local heroin market. The simulation detailed was developed using data from an 18-month ethnographic case study. The original research, collected in Denver, CO during the 1990s, represents the historic account of users and dealers who operated in the Larimer area heroin market. Working together, the authors studied the behaviors of customers, private dealers, street-sellers, brokers, and the police, reflecting the core elements pertaining to how the market operated. After evaluating the logical consistency between the data and agent behaviors, simulations scaled-up interactions to observe their aggregated outcomes. While the concept and findings from this study remain experimental, these methods represent a novel way in which to understand illicit drug markets and the dynamic adaptations and outcomes they generate. Extensions of this research perspective, as well as its strengths and limitations, are discussed.

  8. A recurrent KCNQ2 pore mutation causing early onset epileptic encephalopathy has a moderate effect on M current but alters subcellular localization of Kv7 channels.

    PubMed

    Abidi, Affef; Devaux, Jérôme J; Molinari, Florence; Alcaraz, Gisèle; Michon, François-Xavier; Sutera-Sardo, Julie; Becq, Hélène; Lacoste, Caroline; Altuzarra, Cécilia; Afenjar, Alexandra; Mignot, Cyril; Doummar, Diane; Isidor, Bertrand; Guyen, Sylvie N; Colin, Estelle; De La Vaissière, Sabine; Haye, Damien; Trauffler, Adeline; Badens, Catherine; Prieur, Fabienne; Lesca, Gaetan; Villard, Laurent; Milh, Mathieu; Aniksztejn, Laurent

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the KCNQ2 gene encoding the voltage-dependent potassium M channel Kv7.2 subunit cause either benign epilepsy or early onset epileptic encephalopathy (EOEE). It has been proposed that the disease severity rests on the inhibitory impact of mutations on M current density. Here, we have analyzed the phenotype of 7 patients carrying the p.A294V mutation located on the S6 segment of the Kv7.2 pore domain (Kv7.2(A294V)). We investigated the functional and subcellular consequences of this mutation and compared it to another mutation (Kv7.2(A294G)) associated with a benign epilepsy and affecting the same residue. We report that all the patients carrying the p.A294V mutation presented the clinical and EEG characteristics of EOEE. In CHO cells, the total expression of Kv7.2(A294V) alone, assessed by western blotting, was only 20% compared to wild-type. No measurable current was recorded in CHO cells expressing Kv7.2(A294V) channel alone. Although the total Kv7.2(A294V) expression was rescued to wild-type levels in cells co-expressing the Kv7.3 subunit, the global current density was still reduced by 83% compared to wild-type heteromeric channel. In a configuration mimicking the patients' heterozygous genotype i.e., Kv7.2(A294V)/Kv7.2/Kv7.3, the global current density was reduced by 30%. In contrast to Kv7.2(A294V), the current density of homomeric Kv7.2(A294G) was not significantly changed compared to wild-type Kv7.2. However, the current density of Kv7.2(A294G)/Kv7.2/Kv7.3 and Kv7.2(A294G)/Kv7.3 channels were reduced by 30% and 50% respectively, compared to wild-type Kv7.2/Kv7.3. In neurons, the p.A294V mutation induced a mislocalization of heteromeric mutant channels to the somato-dendritic compartment, while the p.A294G mutation did not affect the localization of the heteromeric channels to the axon initial segment. We conclude that this position is a hotspot of mutation that can give rise to a severe or a benign epilepsy. The p.A294V mutation does not exert a

  9. Localization of vanadyl complexes in polyaromatic structures of oils

    SciTech Connect

    Gal`tsev, V.E.; Grinberg, O.Ya.; Ratov, A.N.; Nemirovskaya, G.B.; Emel`yanova, A.S. |

    1994-01-01

    Many studies on vanadium in oils have been conducted to date. Among them, there have been some attempts made to elucidate the mobility of the formed associates of VC with the asphaltene molecules. Thus, the peak intensities were determined in the superposition of two vanadyl spectra of the {open_quotes}fixed{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}rapidly rotating{close_quotes} vanadyl complexes. The VC ligand transformations were studied under various conditions. The interaction between the VC and asphaltene molecules was deduced from these results. However, it should be pointed out that the study of VC rotating mobility is not enough to make definite conclusions. The authors chose to follow a different method. It involved the determination of spin relaxation times for the asphaltene paramagnetic centers. The authors succeeded in revealing new correlations between the VC and PC concentrations in the chosen series of oils with different vanadium content. The character of interaction between VC and asphaltene molecules was demonstrated by experiment using the observed distinctions in the relaxation characteristics in the series of the oil samples. The series of oils from the fields of the northern cluster, and the Fillipov group of the Ul`yanovsk oblast`, characterized by an irregularly high vanadium concentration, and its southern cluster of oil fields with less vanadium content were chosen for this study.

  10. Characterizing emerging European stock markets through complex networks: From local properties to self-similar characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraiani, Petre

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the properties of the returns of the main emerging stock markets from Europe by means of complex networks. We transform the series of daily returns into complex networks, and analyze the local properties of these networks with respect to degree distributions, clustering, or average line length. We further use the clustering coefficients as quantities describing the local structure of the network, and approach them by using multifractal analysis. We find evidence of scale-free networks and multifractality of clustering coefficients.

  11. Localized modes in χ(2 ) media with non-PT -symmetric complex localized potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, F. C.; Cavalcanti, S. B.

    2016-10-01

    We study the existence and the stability of solitons in quadratic nonlinear media with spatially localized non-PT -symmetric tunable modulation of the linear refractive index. The properties of nonlinear modes bifurcating from a linear limit of a small fundamental harmonic field are investigated. The modes bifurcating from the linear mode of the second harmonic may exist even above the real phase breaking threshold. The stability intervals for different values of the propagation constant and gain-loss gradient are obtained. Examples of dynamics and excitations of solitons obtained by numerical simulations are also given.

  12. Identifying subcellular localizations of mammalian protein complexes based on graph theory with a random forest algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan-Chao; Lai, Yan-Hua; Chen, Li-Li; Chen, Chao; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

    2013-04-05

    In the post-genome era, one of the most important and challenging tasks is to identify the subcellular localizations of protein complexes, and further elucidate their functions in human health with applications to understand disease mechanisms, diagnosis and therapy. Although various experimental approaches have been developed and employed to identify the subcellular localizations of protein complexes, the laboratory technologies fall far behind the rapid accumulation of protein complexes. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a computational method to rapidly and reliably identify the subcellular localizations of protein complexes. In this study, a novel method is proposed for predicting subcellular localizations of mammalian protein complexes based on graph theory with a random forest algorithm. Protein complexes are modeled as weighted graphs containing nodes and edges, where nodes represent proteins, edges represent protein-protein interactions and weights are descriptors of protein primary structures. Some topological structure features are proposed and adopted to characterize protein complexes based on graph theory. Random forest is employed to construct a model and predict subcellular localizations of protein complexes. Accuracies on a training set by a 10-fold cross-validation test for predicting plasma membrane/membrane attached, cytoplasm and nucleus are 84.78%, 71.30%, and 82.00%, respectively. And accuracies for the independent test set are 81.31%, 69.95% and 81.00%, respectively. These high prediction accuracies exhibit the state-of-the-art performance of the current method. It is anticipated that the proposed method may become a useful high-throughput tool and plays a complementary role to the existing experimental techniques in identifying subcellular localizations of mammalian protein complexes. The source code of Matlab and the dataset can be obtained freely on request from the authors.

  13. Subcellular localization of RNA degrading proteins and protein complexes in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena; Roppelt, Verena; Lassek, Christian; Klug, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    The archaeal exosome is a prokaryotic protein complex with RNA processing and degrading activities. Recently it was shown that the exosome is localized at the periphery of the cell in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. This localization is most likely mediated by the archaeal DnaG protein and depends on (direct or indirect) hydrophobic interactions with the membrane. A localization of RNA degrading proteins and protein complexes was also demonstrated in several bacteria. In bacteria a subcellular localization was also shown for substrates of these proteins and protein complexes, i.e. chromosomally encoded mRNAs and a small RNA. Thus, despite the missing compartmentalization, a spatial organization of RNA processing and degradation exists in prokaryotic cells. Recent data suggest that the spatial organization contributes to the temporal regulation of these processes.

  14. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schonherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li -Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2015-09-28

    In this study, multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include (1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and (2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support

  15. Benchmark Study of 3D Pore-scale Flow and Solute Transport Simulation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Yang, X.; Mehmani, Y.; Perkins, W. A.; Pasquali, A.; Schoenherr, M.; Kim, K.; Perego, M.; Parks, M. L.; Trask, N.; Balhoff, M.; Richmond, M. C.; Geier, M.; Krafczyk, M.; Luo, L. S.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that benchmark study to include additional models of the first type based on the immersed-boundary method (IMB), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all five approaches (FVM-based CFD, IMB, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The benchmark study was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence in a variety of pore-scale modeling methods, and motivates further development and application of pore-scale simulation methods.

  16. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence

  17. Laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing: Physics of complex melt flow and formation mechanisms of pores, spatter, and denudation zones

    DOE PAGES

    Khairallah, Saad A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Rubenchik, Alexander; ...

    2016-02-23

    Our study demonstrates the significant effect of the recoil pressure and Marangoni convection in laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) of 316L stainless steel. A three-dimensional high fidelity powder-scale model reveals how the strong dynamical melt flow generates pore defects, material spattering (sparking), and denudation zones. The melt track is divided into three sections: a topological depression, a transition and a tail region, each being the location of specific physical effects. The inclusion of laser ray-tracing energy deposition in the powder-scale model improves over traditional volumetric energy deposition. It enables partial particle melting, which impacts pore defects in the denudation zone.more » Different pore formation mechanisms are observed at the edge of a scan track, at the melt pool bottom (during collapse of the pool depression), and at the end of the melt track (during laser power ramp down). Finally, we discuss remedies to these undesirable pores are discussed. The results are validated against the experiments and the sensitivity to laser absorptivity.« less

  18. Laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing: Physics of complex melt flow and formation mechanisms of pores, spatter, and denudation zones

    SciTech Connect

    Khairallah, Saad A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Rubenchik, Alexander; King, Wayne E.

    2016-02-23

    Our study demonstrates the significant effect of the recoil pressure and Marangoni convection in laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) of 316L stainless steel. A three-dimensional high fidelity powder-scale model reveals how the strong dynamical melt flow generates pore defects, material spattering (sparking), and denudation zones. The melt track is divided into three sections: a topological depression, a transition and a tail region, each being the location of specific physical effects. The inclusion of laser ray-tracing energy deposition in the powder-scale model improves over traditional volumetric energy deposition. It enables partial particle melting, which impacts pore defects in the denudation zone. Different pore formation mechanisms are observed at the edge of a scan track, at the melt pool bottom (during collapse of the pool depression), and at the end of the melt track (during laser power ramp down). Finally, we discuss remedies to these undesirable pores are discussed. The results are validated against the experiments and the sensitivity to laser absorptivity.

  19. Cytoplasmic dynein participates in the centrosomal localization of the Golgi complex

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The localization of the Golgi complex depends upon the integrity of the microtubule apparatus. At interphase, the Golgi has a restricted pericentriolar localization. During mitosis, it fragments into small vesicles that are dispersed throughout the cytoplasm until telophase, when they again coalesce near the centrosome. These observations have suggested that the Golgi complex utilizes a dynein-like motor to mediate its transport from the cell periphery towards the minus ends of microtubules, located at the centrosome. We utilized semi-intact cells to study the interaction of the Golgi complex with the microtubule apparatus. We show here that Golgi complexes can enter semi-intact cells and associate stably with cytoplasmic constituents. Stable association, termed here "Golgi capture," requires ATP hydrolysis and intact microtubules, and occurs maximally at physiological temperature in the presence of added cytosolic proteins. Once translocated into the semi-intact cell cytoplasm, exogenous Golgi complexes display a distribution similar to endogenous Golgi complexes, near the microtubule-organizing center. The process of Golgi capture requires cytoplasmic tubulin, and is abolished if cytoplasmic dynein is immunodepleted from the cytosol. Cytoplasmic dynein, prepared from CHO cell cytosol, restores Golgi capture activity to reactions carried out with dynein immuno-depleted cytosol. These results indicate that cytoplasmic dynein can interact with isolated Golgi complexes, and participate in their accumulation near the centrosomes of semi-intact, recipient cells. Thus, cytoplasmic dynein appears to play a role in determining the subcellular localization of the Golgi complex. PMID:1387874

  20. Polar localization of Escherichia coli chemoreceptors requires an intact Tol-Pal complex.

    PubMed

    Santos, Thiago M A; Lin, Ti-Yu; Rajendran, Madhusudan; Anderson, Samantha M; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-06-01

    Subcellular biomolecular localization is critical for the metabolic and structural properties of the cell. The functional implications of the spatiotemporal distribution of protein complexes during the bacterial cell cycle have long been acknowledged; however, the molecular mechanisms for generating and maintaining their dynamic localization in bacteria are not completely understood. Here we demonstrate that the trans-envelope Tol-Pal complex, a widely conserved component of the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria, is required to maintain the polar positioning of chemoreceptor clusters in Escherichia coli. Localization of the chemoreceptors was independent of phospholipid composition of the membrane and the curvature of the cell wall. Instead, our data indicate that chemoreceptors interact with components of the Tol-Pal complex and that this interaction is required to polarly localize chemoreceptor clusters. We found that disruption of the Tol-Pal complex perturbs the polar localization of chemoreceptors, alters cell motility, and affects chemotaxis. We propose that the E. coli Tol-Pal complex restricts mobility of the chemoreceptor clusters at the cell poles and may be involved in regulatory mechanisms that co-ordinate cell division and segregation of the chemosensory machinery.

  1. Direct Numerical Simulation of Pore-Scale Flow in a Bead Pack: Comparison with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Codd, Sarah L.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Mckinley, Matthew I.

    2013-04-01

    A significant body of current research is aimed at developing methods for numerical simulation of flow and transport in porous media that explicitly resolve complex pore and solid geometries, and at utilizing such models to study the relationships between fundamental pore-scale processes and macroscopic manifestations at larger (i.e., Darcy) scales. A number of different numerical methods for pore-scale simulation have been developed, and have been extensively tested and validated for simplified geometries. However, validation of pore-scale simulations of fluid velocity for complex, three-dimensional (3D) pore geometries that are representative of natural porous media is challenging due to our limited ability to measure pore-scale velocity in such systems. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the opportunity to measure not only the pore geometry, but also local fluid velocities under steady-state flow conditions in 3D and with high spatial resolution. In this paper, we present a 3D velocity field measured at sub-pore resolution (tens of micrometers) over a centimeter-scale 3D domain using MRI methods. We have utilized the measured pore geometry to perform 3D simulations of Navier-Stokes flow over the same domain using direct numerical simulation techniques. We present a comparison of the numerical simulation results with the measured velocity field. It is shown that the numerical results match the observed velocity patterns well overall except for a variance and small systematic scaling which can be attributed to the known experimental error in the MRI measurements. The comparisons presented here provide strong validation of the pore-scale simulation methods and new insights for interpretation of uncertainty in MRI measurements of pore-scale velocity. This study also provides a potential benchmark for future comparison of other pore-scale simulation methods.

  2. Spectral Approach to Anderson Localization in a Disordered 2D Complex Plasma Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinova, Eva; Liaw, Constanze; Matthews, Lorin; Busse, Kyle; Hyde, Truell

    2016-10-01

    In condensed matter, a crystal without impurities acts like a perfect conductor for a travelling wave-particle. As the level of impurities reaches a critical value, the resistance in the crystal increases and the travelling wave-particle experiences a transition from an extended to a localized state, which is called Anderson localization. Due to its wide applicability, the subject of Anderson localization has grown into a rich field in both physics and mathematics. Here, we introduce the mathematics behind the spectral approach to localization in infinite disordered systems and provide physical interpretation in context of both quantum mechanics and classical physics. We argue that the spectral analysis is an important contribution to localization theory since it avoids issues related to the use of boundary conditions, scaling, and perturbation. To test accuracy and applicability we apply the spectral approach to the case of a 2D hexagonal complex plasma crystal used as a macroscopic analog for a graphene-like medium. Complex plasma crystals exhibit characteristic distance and time scales, which are easily observable by video microscopy. As such, these strongly coupled many-particle systems are ideal for the study of localization phenomena. The goal of this research is to both expand the spectral method into the classical regime and show the potential of complex plasma as a macroscopic tool for localization experiments. NSF / DOE funding is gratefully acknowledged - PHY1414523 & PHY1262031.

  3. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  4. Cellular localization of iron(II) polypyridyl complexes determines their anticancer action mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingjing; Luo, Zuandi; Zhao, Zhennan; Xie, Lina; Zheng, Wenjie; Chen, Tianfeng

    2015-12-01

    Elucidation of relationship among cellular uptake, localization and biological activities of metal complexes could make great breakthrough in the understanding of their action mechanisms and provide useful information for rational design of metal-based anticancer drugs. Iron(II) complexes have emerged as potential anticancer drug candidates with application potential in cancer imaging and therapy. Herein, a series of iron(II) polypyridyl complexes with different lipophilicity were rationally designed, synthesized and identified as potent anticancer agents. The relationship between the cellular localization and molecular action mechanisms of the complexes was also elucidated. The results showed that, the increase in planarity of the Fe(II) polypyridyl complexes enhanced their lipophilicity and cellular uptake, leading to improved anticancer efficacy. The hydrophilic Fe(II) complex entered cancer cells through transferring receptor (TfR)-mediated endocytosis, and translocated to cell nucleus, where they induced S phase cell cycle arrest through triggering DNA damage-mediated p53 pathway. Interestingly, the hydrophobic Fe(II) complexes displayed higher anticancer efficacy than the hydrophilic ones, but shared the same uptake pathway (TfR-mediated endocytosis) in cancer cells. They accumulated and localized in cell cytoplasm, and induced G0/G1 cells cycle arrest through regulation of AKT pathway and activation of downstream effector proteins. These results support that the cellular localization of Fe(II) complexes regulated by their lipophilicity could affect the anticancer efficacy and action mechanisms. Taken together, this study may enhance our understanding on the rational design of the next-generation anticancer metal complexes.

  5. Localized reconstruction of subunits from electron cryomicroscopy images of macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ilca, Serban L.; Kotecha, Abhay; Sun, Xiaoyu; Poranen, Minna M.; Stuart, David I.; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy can yield near-atomic resolution structures of highly ordered macromolecular complexes. Often however some subunits bind in a flexible manner, have different symmetry from the rest of the complex, or are present in sub-stoichiometric amounts, limiting the attainable resolution. Here we report a general method for the localized three-dimensional reconstruction of such subunits. After determining the particle orientations, local areas corresponding to the subunits can be extracted and treated as single particles. We demonstrate the method using three examples including a flexible assembly and complexes harbouring subunits with either partial occupancy or mismatched symmetry. Most notably, the method allows accurate fitting of the monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase bound at the threefold axis of symmetry inside a viral capsid, revealing for the first time its exact orientation and interactions with the capsid proteins. Localized reconstruction is expected to provide novel biological insights in a range of challenging biological systems. PMID:26534841

  6. Estimation of Distribution Algorithm with Local Sampling Strategy for Community Detection in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fahong; Li, Wenping; He, Feng; Yu, Bolin; Xia, Xiaoyun; Ma, Longhua

    2016-12-01

    It is important to discover the potential community structure for analyzing complex networks. In this paper, an estimation of distribution algorithm with local sampling strategy for community detection in complex networks is presented to optimize the modularity density function. In the proposed algorithm, the evolution probability model is built according to eminent individuals selected by simulated annealing mechanism and a local sampling strategy based on a local similarity model is adopted to improve both the speed and the accuracy for detecting community structure in complex networks. At the same time, a more general version of the criterion function with a tunable parameter λ is used to avoid the resolution limit. Experiments on synthetic and real-life networks demonstrate the performance and the comparison of experimental results with those of several state-of-the-art methods, the proposed algorithm is considerably efficient and competitive.

  7. Emergent complexity matching in interpersonal coordination: Local dynamics and global variability.

    PubMed

    Fine, Justin M; Likens, Aaron D; Amazeen, Eric L; Amazeen, Polemnia G

    2015-06-01

    Rhythmic coordination with stimuli and other people's movements containing variable or unpredictable fluctuations might involve distinct processes: detecting the fluctuation structure and tuning to or matching the structure's temporal complexity. This framework predicts that global tuning and local parameter adjustments (e.g., position, velocity or phase) can operate independently during coordination (Marmelat & Delignières, 2012). Alternatively, we propose that complexity matching is a result of local phase adjustments during coordination (Delignières & Marmelat, 2014; Torre, Varlet, & Marmelat, 2013). The current study examined this relationship in a rhythmic interpersonal coordination task. Dyads coordinated swinging pendulums that differed in their uncoupled frequencies (detuning). We predicted that frequency detuning would require increased local corrections to maintain the intended phase pattern (in phase). This was expected to yield a relative phase shift accompanied by a change in period complexity and matching. Experimental data and numerical modeling of the pendulum dynamics confirmed our predictions. Increased relative phase shifts occurred simultaneously with increased dissociation between individuals' movement period complexity. This provided evidence that global complexity matching is intricately linked to local movement adjustments and is not a distinct coordination mechanism. These findings are considered with respect to dynamical and computational approaches to interpersonal coordination.

  8. Nuclear Localization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mcm2/Cdc19p Requires MCM Complex Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Pasion, Sally G.; Forsburg, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins MCM2–MCM7 are conserved eukaryotic replication factors that assemble in a heterohexameric complex. In fission yeast, these proteins are nuclear throughout the cell cycle. In studying the mechanism that regulates assembly of the MCM complex, we analyzed the cis and trans elements required for nuclear localization of a single subunit, Mcm2p. Mutation of any single mcm gene leads to redistribution of wild-type MCM subunits to the cytoplasm, and this redistribution depends on an active nuclear export system. We identified the nuclear localization signal sequences of Mcm2p and showed that these are required for nuclear targeting of other MCM subunits. In turn, Mcm2p must associate with other MCM proteins for its proper localization; nuclear localization of MCM proteins thus requires assembly of MCM proteins in a complex. We suggest that coupling complex assembly to nuclear targeting and retention ensures that only intact heterohexameric MCM complexes remain nuclear. PMID:10588642

  9. Pore-Scale Modeling of Pore Structure Effects on P-Wave Scattering Attenuation in Dry Rocks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks. PMID:25961729

  10. Pore-scale modeling of pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zizhen; Wang, Ruihe; Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks.

  11. Analysis of HDACi-Induced Changes in Chromosomal Passenger Complex Localization.

    PubMed

    Unruhe-Knauf, Britta; Knauer, Shirley K

    2017-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) is a key regulator of cell division. Its proper localization during the different phases of mitosis and cytokinesis is crucial for the exertion of its various functions. HDACi treatment has been demonstrated to disturb the centromeric localization of the CPC in tumor cells, thus leading to severe mitotic defects often followed by apoptosis. In this chapter, we describe how HDACi-induced changes of the CPC localization can be analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence using CPC-specific primary and fluorophore-coupled secondary antibodies followed by confocal microscopy.

  12. Exploring thermal spray gray alumina coating pore network architecture by combining stereological protocols and impedance electrochemical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antou, G.; Montavon, G.; Hlawka, F.; Cornet, A.; Coddet, C.

    2006-12-01

    Complex multiscale pore network architecture characterized by multimodal pore size distribution and connectivity develops during the manufacture of ceramic thermal spray coatings from intra- and interlamellar cracks generated when each lamella spreads and solidifies to globular pores resulting from lamella stacking defects. This network significantly affects the coating properties and their in-service behaviors. De Hoff stereological analysis permits quantification of the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of spheroids (i.e., pores) from the determination of their two-dimensional (2D) distribution estimated by image analysis when analyzing the coating structure from a polished plane. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy electrochemically examines a material surface by frequency variable current and potential and analyzes the complex impedance. When a coating covers the material surface, the electrolyte percolates through the more or less connected pore network to locally passivate the substrate. The resistive and capacitive characteristics of the equivalent electrical circuit will depend upon the connected pore network architecture. Both protocols were implemented to quantify thermal spray coating structures. Al2O3-13TiO2 coatings were atmospherically plasma sprayed using several sets of power parameters, are current intensity, plasma gas total flow rate, and plasma gas composition in order to determine their effects on pore network architecture. Particle characteristics upon impact, especially their related dimensionless numbers, such as Reynolds, Weber, and Sommerfeld criteria, were also determined. Analyses permitted identification of (a) the major effects of power parameters upon pore architecture and (b) the related formation mechanisms.

  13. Local pressure components and interfacial tensions of a liquid film in the vicinity of a solid surface with a nanometer-scale slit pore obtained by the perturbative method

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, K.; Shibahara, M.

    2015-03-07

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a liquid-solid interfacial system with a nanometer-scale slit pore in order to reveal local thermodynamic states: local pressure components and interfacial tensions of a liquid film in the vicinity of the slit. The simulation also examined the transition mechanism between the two states of the liquid film: (a) liquid film on the slit and (b) liquid film in the slit, based on the local thermodynamic quantities from a molecular point of view. An instantaneous expression of the local pressure components and interfacial tensions, which is based on a volume perturbation, was presented to investigate time-dependent phenomena in molecular dynamics simulations. The interactions between the particles were described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential, and effects of the fluid-solid interaction intensity on the local pressure components and interfacial tensions of the fluid in the vicinity of the slit were examined in detail by the presented perturbative method. The results revealed that the local pressure components tangential to the solid surface in the vicinity of the 1st fluid layer from the solid surface are different in a two dimensional plane, and the difference became pronounced in the vicinity of the corner of the slit, for cases where the fluid-solid interaction intensities are relatively strong. The results for the local interfacial tensions of the fluid inside the slit suggested that the local interfacial tensions in the vicinity of the 2nd and 3rd layers of the solid atoms from the entrance of the slit act as a trigger for the transition between the two states under the influence of a varying fluid-solid interaction.

  14. Evaluation of a Florida coastal golf complex as a local and watershed source of bioavailable contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A., Robert L. Quarles, Darrin D. Dantin and James C. Moore. 2004. Evaluation of a Coastal Golf Complex as a Local and Watershed Source of Bioavailable Contaminants. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 48(3-4):254-262. (ERL,GB 1183).

    Contaminant fate in coastal areas impacte...

  15. A Low Complexity System Based on Multiple Weighted Decision Trees for Indoor Localization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, David; Hernández-Morera, Pablo; Quinteiro, José Ma; Alonso-González, Itziar

    2015-06-23

    Indoor position estimation has become an attractive research topic due to growing interest in location-aware services. Nevertheless, satisfying solutions have not been found with the considerations of both accuracy and system complexity. From the perspective of lightweight mobile devices, they are extremely important characteristics, because both the processor power and energy availability are limited. Hence, an indoor localization system with high computational complexity can cause complete battery drain within a few hours. In our research, we use a data mining technique named boosting to develop a localization system based on multiple weighted decision trees to predict the device location, since it has high accuracy and low computational complexity. The localization system is built using a dataset from sensor fusion, which combines the strength of radio signals from different wireless local area network access points and device orientation information from a digital compass built-in mobile device, so that extra sensors are unnecessary. Experimental results indicate that the proposed system leads to substantial improvements on computational complexity over the widely-used traditional fingerprinting methods, and it has a better accuracy than they have.

  16. [Hepon, promoter of local immunity in the complex therapy of dysfunctional microflora in bowel disorders].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Ruchkina, I N

    2003-01-01

    The promoter of local immunity Heponum contributes to the restoration of eubiosis and normalization of showings of the immune status in patients with post-infection IBS. It is recommended to include Heponum in the complex therapy of chronic bowels diseases with the purpose of the restoration of normal microbiocenosis.

  17. Peripheral Stimulus Localization by Infants of Moving Stimuli on Complex Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallin, Brittany M.; Richards, John E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of attention in young infants on the saccadic localization of dynamic peripheral stimuli presented on complex and interesting backgrounds. Infants at 14, 20, and 26 weeks of age were presented with scenes from a Sesame Street movie until fixation on a moving character occurred and then presented with a second segment…

  18. A Low Complexity System Based on Multiple Weighted Decision Trees for Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, David; Hernández-Morera, Pablo; Quinteiro, José Ma.; Alonso-González, Itziar

    2015-01-01

    Indoor position estimation has become an attractive research topic due to growing interest in location-aware services. Nevertheless, satisfying solutions have not been found with the considerations of both accuracy and system complexity. From the perspective of lightweight mobile devices, they are extremely important characteristics, because both the processor power and energy availability are limited. Hence, an indoor localization system with high computational complexity can cause complete battery drain within a few hours. In our research, we use a data mining technique named boosting to develop a localization system based on multiple weighted decision trees to predict the device location, since it has high accuracy and low computational complexity. The localization system is built using a dataset from sensor fusion, which combines the strength of radio signals from different wireless local area network access points and device orientation information from a digital compass built-in mobile device, so that extra sensors are unnecessary. Experimental results indicate that the proposed system leads to substantial improvements on computational complexity over the widely-used traditional fingerprinting methods, and it has a better accuracy than they have. PMID:26110413

  19. A Local Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Complex Modified KdV Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Wenting; Jiang Kun

    2010-09-30

    In this paper, we develop a local discontinuous Galerkin(LDG) method for solving complex modified KdV(CMKdV) equation. The LDG method has the flexibility for arbitrary h and p adaptivity. We prove the L{sup 2} stability for general solutions.

  20. Mono- and Dinuclear Phosphorescent Rhenium(I) Complexes: Impact of Subcellular Localization on Anticancer Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Chen, Mu-He; Hao, Liang; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-06-01

    Elucidation of relationship among chemical structure, cellular uptake, localization, and biological activity of anticancer metal complexes is important for the understanding of their mechanisms of action. Organometallic rhenium(I) tricarbonyl compounds have emerged as potential multifunctional anticancer drug candidates that can integrate therapeutic and imaging capabilities in a single molecule. Herein, two mononuclear phosphorescent rhenium(I) complexes (Re1 and Re2), along with their corresponding dinuclear complexes (Re3 and Re4), were designed and synthesized as potent anticancer agents. The subcellular accumulation of Re1-Re4 was conveniently analyzed by confocal microscopy in situ in live cells by utilizing their intrinsic phosphorescence. We found that increased lipophilicity of the bidentate ligands could enhance their cellular uptake, leading to improved anticancer efficacy. The dinuclear complexes were more potent than the mononuclear counterparts. The molecular anticancer mechanisms of action evoked by Re3 and Re4 were explored in detail. Re3 with a lower lipophilicity localizes to lysosomes and induces caspase-independent apoptosis, whereas Re4 with higher lipophilicity specially accumulates in mitochondria and induces caspase-independent paraptosis in cancer cells. Our study demonstrates that subcellular localization is crucial for the anticancer mechanisms of these phosphorescent rhenium(I) complexes.

  1. POM152 is an integral protein of the pore membrane domain of the yeast nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have identified a concanavalin A-reactive glycoprotein of 150 kD that coenriches with isolated yeast nuclear pore complexes. Molecular cloning and sequencing of this protein revealed a single canonical transmembrane segment. Epitope tagging and localization by both immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that it is a pore membrane protein. The protein was termed POM152 (for pore membrane protein of 152 kD) on the basis of its location and cDNA-deduced molecular mass. POM152 is likely to be a type II membrane protein with its NH2-terminal region (175 residues) and its COOH-terminal region (1,142 residues) positioned on the pore side and cisternal side of the pore membrane, respectively. The proposed cisternally exposed domain contains eight repetitive motifs of approximately 24 residues. Surprisingly, POM152 deletion mutants were viable and their growth rate was indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells at temperatures between 17 and 37 degrees C. However, overproduction of POM152 inhibited cell growth. When expressed in mouse 3T3 cells, POM152 was found to be localized to the pore membrane, suggesting a conserved sorting pathway between yeast and mammals. PMID:8138573

  2. Separate information required for nuclear and subnuclear localization: additional complexity in localizing an enzyme shared by mitochondria and nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, A M; Joyce, P B; Hopper, A K; Martin, N C

    1992-01-01

    The TRM1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae codes for a tRNA modification enzyme, N2,N2-dimethylguanosine-specific tRNA methyltransferase (m2(2)Gtase), shared by mitochondria and nuclei. Immunofluorescent staining at the nuclear periphery demonstrates that m2(2)Gtase localizes at or near the nuclear membrane. In determining sequences necessary for targeting the enzyme to nuclei and mitochondria, we found that information required to deliver the enzyme to the nucleus is not sufficient for its correct subnuclear localization. We also determined that mislocalizing the enzyme from the nucleus to the cytoplasm does not destroy its biological function. This change in location was caused by altering a sequence similar to other known nuclear targeting signals (KKSKKKRC), suggesting that shared enzymes are likely to use the same import pathway as proteins that localize only to the nucleus. As with other well-characterized mitochondrial proteins, the mitochondrial import of the shared methyltransferase depends on amino-terminal amino acids, and removal of the first 48 amino acids prevents its import into mitochondria. While this truncated protein is still imported into nuclei, the immunofluorescent staining is uniform throughout rather than at the nuclear periphery, a staining pattern identical to that described for a fusion protein consisting of the first 213 amino acids of m2(2)Gtase in frame with beta-galactosidase. As both of these proteins together contain the entire m2(2)Gtase coding region, the information necessary for association with the nuclear periphery must be more complex than the short linear sequence necessary for nuclear localization. Images PMID:1448094

  3. Local and landscape associations between wintering dabbling ducks and wetland complexes in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Kaminski, Richard M.; Reinecke, Kenneth J.; Dinsmore, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Landscape features influence distribution of waterbirds throughout their annual cycle. A conceptual model, the wetland habitat complex, may be useful in conservation of wetland habitats for dabbling ducks (Anatini). The foundation of this conceptual model is that ducks seek complexes of wetlands containing diverse resources to meet dynamic physiological needs. We included flooded croplands, wetlands and ponds, public-land waterfowl sanctuary, and diversity of habitats as key components of wetland habitat complexes and compared their relative influence at two spatial scales (i.e., local, 0.25-km radius; landscape, 4-km) on dabbling ducks wintering in western Mississippi, USA during winters 2002–2004. Distribution of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) groups was positively associated with flooded cropland at local and landscape scales. Models representing flooded croplands at the landscape scale best explained occurrence of other dabbling ducks. Habitat complexity measured at both scales best explained group size of other dabbling ducks. Flooded croplands likely provided food that had decreased in availability due to conversion of wetlands to agriculture. Wetland complexes at landscape scales were more attractive to wintering ducks than single or structurally simple wetlands. Conservation of wetland complexes at large spatial scales (≥5,000 ha) on public and private lands will require coordination among multiple stakeholders.

  4. Measuring Streetscape Complexity Based on the Statistics of Local Contrast and Spatial Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, André; Mansouri, Ahmed; Kacha, Lemya; Barros, Allan Kardec; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Naoji; Ohnishi, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Streetscapes are basic urban elements which play a major role in the livability of a city. The visual complexity of streetscapes is known to influence how people behave in such built spaces. However, how and which characteristics of a visual scene influence our perception of complexity have yet to be fully understood. This study proposes a method to evaluate the complexity perceived in streetscapes based on the statistics of local contrast and spatial frequency. Here, 74 streetscape images from four cities, including daytime and nighttime scenes, were ranked for complexity by 40 participants. Image processing was then used to locally segment contrast and spatial frequency in the streetscapes. The statistics of these characteristics were extracted and later combined to form a single objective measure. The direct use of statistics revealed structural or morphological patterns in streetscapes related to the perception of complexity. Furthermore, in comparison to conventional measures of visual complexity, the proposed objective measure exhibits a higher correlation with the opinion of the participants. Also, the performance of this method is more robust regarding different time scenarios. PMID:24498292

  5. Measuring streetscape complexity based on the statistics of local contrast and spatial frequency.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, André; Mansouri, Ahmed; Kacha, Lemya; Barros, Allan Kardec; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Naoji; Ohnishi, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Streetscapes are basic urban elements which play a major role in the livability of a city. The visual complexity of streetscapes is known to influence how people behave in such built spaces. However, how and which characteristics of a visual scene influence our perception of complexity have yet to be fully understood. This study proposes a method to evaluate the complexity perceived in streetscapes based on the statistics of local contrast and spatial frequency. Here, 74 streetscape images from four cities, including daytime and nighttime scenes, were ranked for complexity by 40 participants. Image processing was then used to locally segment contrast and spatial frequency in the streetscapes. The statistics of these characteristics were extracted and later combined to form a single objective measure. The direct use of statistics revealed structural or morphological patterns in streetscapes related to the perception of complexity. Furthermore, in comparison to conventional measures of visual complexity, the proposed objective measure exhibits a higher correlation with the opinion of the participants. Also, the performance of this method is more robust regarding different time scenarios.

  6. Complex frequencies and field distributions of localized surface plasmon modes in graphene-coated subwavelength wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas, Mauro; Riso, Máximo A.; Depine, Ricardo A.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we study the modal characteristics of localized surface plasmons in graphene-coated, circular cross-section wires. Localized surface plasmons are represented in terms of cylindrical multipole partial waves characterized by discrete, complex frequencies that depend on the size of the wire and can be dynamically tuned via a gate voltage. We consider both intrinsically nonplasmonic wires and intrinsically plasmonic wires. In the first case the localized surface plasmons are introduced by the graphene coating, whereas in the second case the localized eigenmodes of the graphene coating are expected to hybridize those already existing in the bare wire. We show that the approach presented here, valid for particle sizes where the retardation effects can be significant, is in good agreement with analytical expressions obtained in the limit when particle size is very small compared to the wavelength of the eigenmode and with results indirectly determined from scattering cross-section spectra.

  7. Latest Progress of Fault Detection and Localization in Complex Electrical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zheng; Wang, Can; Zhang, Yagang; Sun, Yi

    2014-01-01

    In the researches of complex electrical engineering, efficient fault detection and localization schemes are essential to quickly detect and locate faults so that appropriate and timely corrective mitigating and maintenance actions can be taken. In this paper, under the current measurement precision of PMU, we will put forward a new type of fault detection and localization technology based on fault factor feature extraction. Lots of simulating experiments indicate that, although there are disturbances of white Gaussian stochastic noise, based on fault factor feature extraction principal, the fault detection and localization results are still accurate and reliable, which also identifies that the fault detection and localization technology has strong anti-interference ability and great redundancy.

  8. Laser-driven localization of collective CO vibrations in metal-carbonyl complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisaj, Mateusz; Kühn, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    Using the example of a cobalt dicarbonyl complex it is shown that two perpendicular linearly polarized IR laser pulses can be used to trigger an excitation of the delocalized CO stretching modes, which corresponds to an alternating localization of the vibration within one CO bond. The switching time for localization in either of the two bonds is determined by the energy gap between the symmetric and asymmetric fundamental transition frequencies. The phase of the oscillation between the two local bond excitations can be tuned by the relative phase of the two pulses. The extend of control of bond localization is limited by the anharmonicity of the potential energy surfaces leading to wave packet dispersion. This prevents such a simple pulse scheme from being used for laser-driven bond breaking in the considered example.

  9. Localization of K⁺, H⁺, Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ fluxes to the excretory pore in Caenorhabditis elegans: application of scanning ion-selective microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Adlimoghaddam, Aida; Weihrauch, Dirk; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Although Caenorhabditis elegans is commonly used as a model organism for studies of cell biology, development and physiology, the small size of the worm has impeded measurements of ion transport by the excretory cell and hypodermis. Here, we use the scanning ion-selective microelectrode technique to measure efflux and influx of K(+), H(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) in intact worms. Transport of ions into, or out of, immobilized worms produces small gradients in ion concentration in the unstirred layer near the surface of the worm. These gradients are readily detectable with ion-selective microelectrodes and the corresponding ion fluxes can be estimated using the Fick equation. Our data show that effluxes of K(+), H(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) are localized to the region of the excretory pore, consistent with release of these ions from the excretory cell, and that effluxes increase after experimental preloading with Na(+), K(+) or Ca(2+). In addition, the hypodermis is a site of Na(+) influx.

  10. Isolated pores dissected from human two-pore channel 2 are functional

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Christopher J.; Rahman, Taufiq; Sula, Altin; Miles, Andrew J.; Wallace, B. A.; Patel, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Multi-domain voltage-gated ion channels appear to have evolved through sequential rounds of intragenic duplication from a primordial one-domain precursor. Whereas modularity within one-domain symmetrical channels is established, little is known about the roles of individual regions within more complex asymmetrical channels where the domains have undergone substantial divergence. Here we isolated and characterised both of the divergent pore regions from human TPC2, a two-domain channel that holds a key intermediate position in the evolution of voltage-gated ion channels. In HeLa cells, each pore localised to the ER and caused Ca2+ depletion, whereas an ER-targeted pore mutated at a residue that inactivates full-length TPC2 did not. Additionally, one of the pores expressed at high levels in E. coli. When purified, it formed a stable, folded tetramer. Liposomes reconstituted with the pore supported Ca2+ and Na+ uptake that was inhibited by known blockers of full-length channels. Computational modelling of the pore corroborated cationic permeability and drug interaction. Therefore, despite divergence, both pores are constitutively active in the absence of their partners and retain several properties of the wild-type pore. Such symmetrical ‘pore-only’ proteins derived from divergent channel domains may therefore provide tractable tools for probing the functional architecture of complex ion channels. PMID:27941820

  11. Identification of Essential Proteins Based on a New Combination of Local Interaction Density and Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiawei; Qi, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational approaches aided by computer science have been used to predict essential proteins and are faster than expensive, time-consuming, laborious experimental approaches. However, the performance of such approaches is still poor, making practical applications of computational approaches difficult in some fields. Hence, the development of more suitable and efficient computing methods is necessary for identification of essential proteins. Method In this paper, we propose a new method for predicting essential proteins in a protein interaction network, local interaction density combined with protein complexes (LIDC), based on statistical analyses of essential proteins and protein complexes. First, we introduce a new local topological centrality, local interaction density (LID), of the yeast PPI network; second, we discuss a new integration strategy for multiple bioinformatics. The LIDC method was then developed through a combination of LID and protein complex information based on our new integration strategy. The purpose of LIDC is discovery of important features of essential proteins with their neighbors in real protein complexes, thereby improving the efficiency of identification. Results Experimental results based on three different PPI(protein-protein interaction) networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli showed that LIDC outperformed classical topological centrality measures and some recent combinational methods. Moreover, when predicting MIPS datasets, the better improvement of performance obtained by LIDC is over all nine reference methods (i.e., DC, BC, NC, LID, PeC, CoEWC, WDC, ION, and UC). Conclusions LIDC is more effective for the prediction of essential proteins than other recently developed methods. PMID:26125187

  12. Norepinephrine Modulates Coding of Complex Vocalizations in the Songbird Auditory Cortex Independent of Local Neuroestrogen Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Maaya Z; Jeon, Sung David; Cowell, Rosemary A; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2015-06-24

    The catecholamine norepinephrine plays a significant role in auditory processing. Most studies to date have examined the effects of norepinephrine on the neuronal response to relatively simple stimuli, such as tones and calls. It is less clear how norepinephrine shapes the detection of complex syntactical sounds, as well as the coding properties of sensory neurons. Songbirds provide an opportunity to understand how auditory neurons encode complex, learned vocalizations, and the potential role of norepinephrine in modulating the neuronal computations for acoustic communication. Here, we infused norepinephrine into the zebra finch auditory cortex and performed extracellular recordings to study the modulation of song representations in single neurons. Consistent with its proposed role in enhancing signal detection, norepinephrine decreased spontaneous activity and firing during stimuli, yet it significantly enhanced the auditory signal-to-noise ratio. These effects were all mimicked by clonidine, an α-2 receptor agonist. Moreover, a pattern classifier analysis indicated that norepinephrine enhanced the ability of single neurons to accurately encode complex auditory stimuli. Because neuroestrogens are also known to enhance auditory processing in the songbird brain, we tested the hypothesis that norepinephrine actions depend on local estrogen synthesis. Neither norepinephrine nor adrenergic receptor antagonist infusion into the auditory cortex had detectable effects on local estradiol levels. Moreover, pretreatment with fadrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, did not block norepinephrine's neuromodulatory effects. Together, these findings indicate that norepinephrine enhances signal detection and information encoding for complex auditory stimuli by suppressing spontaneous "noise" activity and that these actions are independent of local neuroestrogen synthesis.

  13. Hybrid local FEM/global LISA modeling of damped guided wave propagation in complex composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid modeling technique for the efficient simulation of guided wave generation, propagation, and interaction with damage in complex composite structures. A local finite element model is deployed to capture the piezoelectric effects and actuation dynamics of the transmitter, while the global domain wave propagation and interaction with structural complexity (structure features and damage) are solved utilizing a local interaction simulation approach (LISA). This hybrid approach allows the accurate modeling of the local dynamics of the transducers and keeping the LISA formulation in an explicit format, which facilitates its readiness for parallel computing. The global LISA framework was extended through the 3D Kelvin-Voigt viscoelasticity theory to include anisotropic damping effects for composite structures, as an improvement over the existing LISA formulation. The global LISA framework was implemented using the compute unified device architecture running on graphic processing units. A commercial preprocessor is integrated seamlessly with the computational framework for grid generation and material property allocation to handle complex structures. The excitability and damping effects are successfully captured by this hybrid model, with experimental validation using the scanning laser doppler vibrometry. To demonstrate the capability of our hybrid approach for complex structures, guided wave propagation and interaction with a delamination in a composite panel with stiffeners is presented.

  14. Synergy and destructive interferences between local magnetic anisotropies in binuclear complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Guihéry, Nathalie; Ruamps, Renaud; Maurice, Rémi

    2015-12-31

    Magnetic anisotropy is responsible for the single molecule magnet behavior of transition metal complexes. This behavior is characterized by a slow relaxation of the magnetization for low enough temperatures, and thus for a possible blocking of the magnetization. This bistable behavior can lead to possible technological applications in the domain of data storage or quantum computing. Therefore, the understanding of the microscopic origin of magnetic anisotropy has received a considerable interest during the last two decades. The presentation focuses on the determination of the anisotropy parameters of both mono-nuclear and bi-nuclear types of complexes and on the control and optimization of the anisotropic properties. The validity of the model Hamiltonians commonly used to characterize such complexes has been questioned and it is shown that neither the standard multispin Hamiltonian nor the giant spin Hamiltonian are appropriate for weakly coupled ions. Alternative models have been proposed and used to properly extract the relevant parameters. Rationalizations of the magnitude and nature of both local anisotropies of single ions and the molecular anisotropy of polynuclear complexes are provided. The synergy and interference effects between local magnetic anisotropies are studied in a series of binuclear complexes.

  15. Renal localization of the membrane attack complex in systemic lupus erythematosus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Biesecker, G; Katz, S; Koffler, D

    1981-12-01

    The membrane attack complex (MAC) of the complement system was localized in both glomeruli and peritubular regions of 22 kidneys manifesting systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) nephritis. A similar distribution was observed for immune complex markers (IgG, Clq, and C3) and MAC in glomeruli, although the deposits of MAC were more discrete and showed lesser immunofluorescence staining intensity compared with immunoglobulins and complement components. In contrast, peritubular immune complexes were present in only 7 out of 22 kidneys, involved comparatively small clusters of tubules, exhibited weaker immunofluorescence staining than MAC, and failed to correlate with interstitial foci of inflammation. Granular or irregular, linear aggregates of the MAC were observed at the periphery of larger groups of tubules contiguous to areas of interstitial inflammation. Comparable amounts of IgG, Clq, C3, and MAC were present in blood vessel walls in areas of fibrinoid necrosis. These data suggest that the MAC is a direct mediator of tissue injury occurring in renal glomeruli, tubules, and blood vessels. The discordance between immune complexes and MAC localized in the peritubular region, but not in glomeruli or blood vessels, raises the possibility that both immune complexes and nonimmune agents, such as bacterial antigens, may activate the classical or alternative complement pathways and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of tubulointerstitial lesions of SLE nephritis.

  16. Complex-time singularity and locality estimates for quantum lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouch, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    We present and prove a well-known locality bound for the complex-time dynamics of a general class of one-dimensional quantum spin systems. Then we discuss how one might hope to extend this same procedure to higher dimensions using ideas related to the Eden growth process and lattice trees. Finally, we demonstrate with a specific family of lattice trees in the plane why this approach breaks down in dimensions greater than one and prove that there exist interactions for which the complex-time dynamics blows-up in finite imaginary time.

  17. Complex-time singularity and locality estimates for quantum lattice systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bouch, Gabriel

    2015-12-15

    We present and prove a well-known locality bound for the complex-time dynamics of a general class of one-dimensional quantum spin systems. Then we discuss how one might hope to extend this same procedure to higher dimensions using ideas related to the Eden growth process and lattice trees. Finally, we demonstrate with a specific family of lattice trees in the plane why this approach breaks down in dimensions greater than one and prove that there exist interactions for which the complex-time dynamics blows-up in finite imaginary time. .

  18. Precipitation in pores: A geochemical frontier

    DOE PAGES

    Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-07-29

    This article's purpose is to review some of the recent research in which geochemists have examined precipitation of solid phases in porous media, particularly in pores a few nanometers in diameter (nanopores). While this is a “review,” it is actually more forward-looking in that the list of things about this phenomenon that we do not know or cannot control at this time is likely longer than what we do know and can control. For example, there are three directly contradictory theories on how to predict how precipitation proceeds in a medium of varying pore size, as will be discussed below.more » The confusion on this subject likely stems from the complexity of the phenomenon itself: One can easily clog a porous medium by inducing a rapid, homogeneous precipitation directly from solution, or have limited precipitation occur that does not affect permeability or even porosity substantially. It is more difficult to engineer mineral precipitation in order to obtain a specific outcome, such as filling all available pore space over a targeted area for the purposes of contaminant sequestration. However, breakthrough discoveries could occur in the next five to ten years that enhance our ability to predict robustly and finely control precipitation in porous media by understanding how porosity and permeability evolve in response to system perturbations. These discoveries will likely stem (at least in part) from advances in our ability to 1) perform and interpret X-ray/neutron scattering experiments that reveal the extent of precipitation and its locales within porous media (Anovitz and Cole 2015, this volume), and 2) utilize increasingly powerful simulations to test concepts and models about the evolution of porosity and permeability as precipitation occurs (Steefel et al. 2015, this volume). A further important technique to isolate specific phenomena and understand reactivity is also microfluidics cell experiments that allow specific control of flow paths and fluid

  19. Precipitation in pores: A geochemical frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-07-29

    This article's purpose is to review some of the recent research in which geochemists have examined precipitation of solid phases in porous media, particularly in pores a few nanometers in diameter (nanopores). While this is a “review,” it is actually more forward-looking in that the list of things about this phenomenon that we do not know or cannot control at this time is likely longer than what we do know and can control. For example, there are three directly contradictory theories on how to predict how precipitation proceeds in a medium of varying pore size, as will be discussed below. The confusion on this subject likely stems from the complexity of the phenomenon itself: One can easily clog a porous medium by inducing a rapid, homogeneous precipitation directly from solution, or have limited precipitation occur that does not affect permeability or even porosity substantially. It is more difficult to engineer mineral precipitation in order to obtain a specific outcome, such as filling all available pore space over a targeted area for the purposes of contaminant sequestration. However, breakthrough discoveries could occur in the next five to ten years that enhance our ability to predict robustly and finely control precipitation in porous media by understanding how porosity and permeability evolve in response to system perturbations. These discoveries will likely stem (at least in part) from advances in our ability to 1) perform and interpret X-ray/neutron scattering experiments that reveal the extent of precipitation and its locales within porous media (Anovitz and Cole 2015, this volume), and 2) utilize increasingly powerful simulations to test concepts and models about the evolution of porosity and permeability as precipitation occurs (Steefel et al. 2015, this volume). A further important technique to isolate specific phenomena and understand reactivity is also microfluidics cell experiments that allow specific control of flow paths and fluid velocities

  20. Identification and subcellular localization of molecular complexes of Gq/11α protein in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Drastichova, Zdenka; Novotny, Jiri

    2012-08-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins localized in the plasma membrane convey the signals from G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to different effectors. At least some types of G-protein α subunits have been shown to be partly released from plasma membranes and to move into the cytosol after receptor activation by the agonists. However, the mechanism underlying subcellular redistribution of trimeric G-proteins is not well understood and no definitive conclusions have been reached regarding the translocation of Gα subunits between membranes and cytosol. Here we used subcellular fractionation and clear-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to identify molecular complexes of G(q/11)α protein and to determine their localization in isolated fractions and stability in naïve and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-treated HEK293 cells expressing high levels of TRH receptor and G(11)α protein. We identified two high-molecular-weight complexes of 300 and 140 kDa in size comprising the G(q/11) protein, which were found to be membrane-bound. Both of these complexes dissociated after prolonged treatment with TRH. Still other G(q/11)α protein complexes of lower molecular weight were determined in the cytosol. These 70 kDa protein complexes were barely detectable under control conditions but their levels markedly increased after prolonged (4-16 h) hormone treatment. These results support the notion that a portion of G(q/11)α can undergo translocation from the membrane fraction into soluble fraction after a long-term activation of TRH receptor. At the same time, these findings indicate that the redistribution of G(q/11)α is brought about by the dissociation of high-molecular-weight complexes and concomitant formation of low-molecular-weight complexes containing the G(q/11)α protein.

  1. Efficient genome editing in the mouse brain by local delivery of engineered Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Staahl, Brett T; Benekareddy, Madhurima; Coulon-Bainier, Claire; Banfal, Ashwin A; Floor, Stephen N; Sabo, Jennifer K; Urnes, Cole; Munares, Gabriela Acevedo; Ghosh, Anirvan; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-02-13

    We demonstrate editing of post-mitotic neurons in the adult mouse brain following injection of Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes in the hippocampus, striatum and cortex. Engineered variants of Cas9 with multiple SV40 nuclear localization sequences enabled a tenfold increase in the efficiency of neuronal editing in vivo. These advances indicate the potential of genome editing in the brain to correct or inactivate the underlying genetic causes of neurological diseases.

  2. Adaptive Multi-Scale Pore Network Method for Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. W.; Khayrat, K.; Jenny, P.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic pore network simulators are important tools in studying macroscopic quantities in two-phase flow through porous media. However, these simulators have a time complexity of order N2 for N pore bodies, which limits their usage to small domains. Quasi-static pore network simulators, which assume capillary dominated flow, are more efficient with a time complexity of order N log(N), but are unable to capture phenomena caused by viscous effects such as viscous fingering and stable displacement. It has been experimentally observed that, in several flow scenarios, capillary forces are dominant at the pore scale and viscous forces at larger scales. In order to take advantage of this behaviour and to reduce the time complexity of existing dynamic pore network simulators, we propose a multi-scale pore-network method for two phase flow. In our solution algorithm, the pore network is first divided into smaller subnetworks. The algorithm to advance the fluid interfaces within each subnetwork consists of three steps: 1) The saturation rate of each subnetwork is obtained by solving a two-phase meso-scale mass balance equation over the domain of subnetworks. Here, a multi-point flux scheme is used. 2) Depending on the local capillary number computed in the subnetwork, either an invasion percolation algorithm or a dynamic network algorithm is used to locally advance the fluid-fluid interfaces within each subnetwork until a new saturation value is matched. 3) The transmissibilities for the meso-scale equation are updated based on the updated fluid configurations in each subnetwork. For this purpose the methodoloy of the existing multi-scale finite volume (MSFV) method is employed. An important feature of the multi-scale pore-network method is that it maintains consistency of both fluid occupancy and fluxes at subnetwork interfaces. Viscous effects such as viscous fingering (see figure) can be captured at a decreased computational cost compared to dynamic pore network

  3. Control of epidemic spreading on complex networks by local traffic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Xie, Yan-Bo; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2011-10-01

    Despite extensive work on traffic dynamics and epidemic spreading on complex networks, the interplay between these two types of dynamical processes has not received adequate attention. We study the effect of local-routing-based traffic dynamics on epidemic spreading. For the case of unbounded node-delivery capacity, where the traffic is free of congestion, we obtain analytic and numerical results indicating that the epidemic threshold can be maximized by an optimal routing protocol. This means that epidemic spreading can be effectively controlled by local traffic dynamics. For the case of bounded delivery capacity, numerical results and qualitative arguments suggest that traffic congestion can suppress epidemic spreading. Our results provide quantitative insight into the nontrivial role of traffic dynamics associated with a local-routing scheme in the epidemic spreading.

  4. Control of epidemic spreading on complex networks by local traffic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Xie, Yan-Bo; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2011-10-01

    Despite extensive work on traffic dynamics and epidemic spreading on complex networks, the interplay between these two types of dynamical processes has not received adequate attention. We study the effect of local-routing-based traffic dynamics on epidemic spreading. For the case of unbounded node-delivery capacity, where the traffic is free of congestion, we obtain analytic and numerical results indicating that the epidemic threshold can be maximized by an optimal routing protocol. This means that epidemic spreading can be effectively controlled by local traffic dynamics. For the case of bounded delivery capacity, numerical results and qualitative arguments suggest that traffic congestion can suppress epidemic spreading. Our results provide quantitative insight into the nontrivial role of traffic dynamics associated with a local-routing scheme in the epidemic spreading.

  5. Strong Coupling of Localized Surface Plasmons to Excitons in Light-Harvesting Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanostructure arrays exhibit surface plasmon resonances that split after attaching light harvesting complexes 1 and 2 (LH1 and LH2) from purple bacteria. The splitting is attributed to strong coupling between the localized surface plasmon resonances and excitons in the light-harvesting complexes. Wild-type and mutant LH1 and LH2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides containing different carotenoids yield different splitting energies, demonstrating that the coupling mechanism is sensitive to the electronic states in the light harvesting complexes. Plasmon–exciton coupling models reveal different coupling strengths depending on the molecular organization and the protein coverage, consistent with strong coupling. Strong coupling was also observed for self-assembling polypeptide maquettes that contain only chlorins. However, it is not observed for monolayers of bacteriochlorophyll, indicating that strong plasmon–exciton coupling is sensitive to the specific presentation of the pigment molecules. PMID:27689237

  6. Local structure studies of some cobalt (II) complexes using extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Ninama, Samrath; Trivedi, Apurva

    2014-09-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis of Cobalt (II) complex as a ligand of 2 -methyl-3-[(bis-aniline(R) phenyl]-3H-l,5 benzodiazepine for finding local structure using conventional method .The Co(II) complexes were prepared by chemical root method. The EXAFS spectra were recorded at Cobalt K-edge i.e.; 7709 eV using Dispersive EXFAS beam line at 2.5GeV Indus-2 Synchrotron Radiation Source(SRS) at RRCAT, Indore, India. The recorded EXAFS data were analysed using the computer software Athena for determine the nearest neighbouring distances (bond lengths) of these complexes with conventional methods and it compared with Fourier transform(FT) analysis. The Fourier Transform convert EXAFS data signal into r-space or k-space. This is useful for visualizing the major contributions to the EXAFS spectrum.

  7. Velocities in Solar Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  8. Peripheral Stimulus Localization by Infants of Moving Stimuli on Complex Backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Mallin, Brittany M; Richards, John E

    2012-11-01

    This study examined the effect of attention in young infants on the saccadic localization of dynamic peripheral stimuli presented on complex and interesting backgrounds. Infants at 14, 20, and 26 weeks of age were presented with scenes from a Sesame Street movie until fixation on a moving character occurred and then presented with a second segment in the scene in which the character movement occurred in a new location. Localization of the moving character in the new location was faster when the infant was engaged in attention than when inattentive, for scenes in which the character moved from one location to another, or scenes in which the character stopped moving and characters in new locations began moving. However, localization of the character was slower during attention when the first character disappeared and a different character appeared in a new location. We also found a decrease in the linear component of the main sequence in the saccade characteristics over the three testing ages, and attention affected the main sequence for infants at the two oldest ages. These results partially replicate prior findings showing that attention to a focal stimulus affects localization of peripheral stimuli, but suggest that the nature of the stimuli being localized modifies the role of attention in affecting eye movements to peripheral stimuli.

  9. Non-iterative holographic axial localization using complex amplitude of diffraction-free vortices.

    PubMed

    Bouchal, Petr; Bouchal, Zdeněk

    2014-12-01

    We present a novel technique of digital holography using digitally implemented diffraction-free vortices for a precise three-dimensional (3D) localization of point-like objects. The localization is realized by the processing of the holographic image reconstructed at arbitrarily selected plane. Separating a single radial component of the spatial spectrum and modulating its phase by a virtual spiral mask, the holographic images of individual object points are transformed to the image structures analogous to the diffraction-free vortex beams. The real part of the complex amplitude of the digital vortices creates the shape-invariant patterns rotating due to a defocusing. Determining the angular rotation, the axial positions of the individual point objects are specified over a wide axial range. In the proposed method, a single in-line hologram is processed without phase shifting and multiplane reconstruction, so that a dynamic localization and tracking of particles becomes possible. The principle of the method is presented in a unified computational model valid for both coherent and incoherent techniques of digital holography. The functionality of the method has been verified in experiments of the Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) and its flexibility presented by controlled variations of the localization sensitivity. The application potential has been demonstrated by the defocusing image rotation of fixed fluorescent microspheres and the 3D localization and tracking of moving polystyrene beads resulting in the trajectory reconstruction of a selected particle.

  10. Protein phosphatase 4 mediates localization of the Miranda complex during Drosophila neuroblast asymmetric divisions.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Nunes, Rita; Chia, William; Somers, W Greg

    2009-02-01

    Asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants is a crucial step in neuroblast asymmetric divisions. Whereas several protein kinases have been shown to mediate this process, no protein phosphatase has so far been implicated. In a clonal screen of larval neuroblasts we identified the evolutionarily conserved Protein Phosphatase 4 (PP4) regulatory subunit PP4R3/Falafel (Flfl) as a key mediator specific for the localization of Miranda (Mira) and associated cell fate determinants during both interphase and mitosis. Flfl is predominantly nuclear during interphase/prophase and cytoplasmic after nuclear envelope breakdown. Analyses of nuclear excluded as well as membrane targeted versions of the protein suggest that the asymmetric cortical localization of Mira and its associated proteins during mitosis depends on cytoplasmic/membrane-associated Flfl, whereas nuclear Flfl is required to exclude the cell fate determinant Prospero (Pros), and consequently Mira, from the nucleus during interphase/prophase. Attenuating the function of either the catalytic subunit of PP4 (PP4C; Pp4-19C in Drosophila) or of another regulatory subunit, PP4R2 (PPP4R2r in Drosophila), leads to similar defects in the localization of Mira and associated proteins. Flfl is capable of directly interacting with Mira, and genetic analyses indicate that flfl acts in parallel to or downstream from the tumor suppressor lethal (2) giant larvae (lgl). Our findings suggest that Flfl may target PP4 to the MIra protein complex to facilitate dephosphorylation step(s) crucial for its cortical association/asymmetric localization.

  11. Norepinephrine Modulates Coding of Complex Vocalizations in the Songbird Auditory Cortex Independent of Local Neuroestrogen Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Maaya Z.; Jeon, Sung David; Cowell, Rosemary A.

    2015-01-01

    The catecholamine norepinephrine plays a significant role in auditory processing. Most studies to date have examined the effects of norepinephrine on the neuronal response to relatively simple stimuli, such as tones and calls. It is less clear how norepinephrine shapes the detection of complex syntactical sounds, as well as the coding properties of sensory neurons. Songbirds provide an opportunity to understand how auditory neurons encode complex, learned vocalizations, and the potential role of norepinephrine in modulating the neuronal computations for acoustic communication. Here, we infused norepinephrine into the zebra finch auditory cortex and performed extracellular recordings to study the modulation of song representations in single neurons. Consistent with its proposed role in enhancing signal detection, norepinephrine decreased spontaneous activity and firing during stimuli, yet it significantly enhanced the auditory signal-to-noise ratio. These effects were all mimicked by clonidine, an α-2 receptor agonist. Moreover, a pattern classifier analysis indicated that norepinephrine enhanced the ability of single neurons to accurately encode complex auditory stimuli. Because neuroestrogens are also known to enhance auditory processing in the songbird brain, we tested the hypothesis that norepinephrine actions depend on local estrogen synthesis. Neither norepinephrine nor adrenergic receptor antagonist infusion into the auditory cortex had detectable effects on local estradiol levels. Moreover, pretreatment with fadrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, did not block norepinephrine's neuromodulatory effects. Together, these findings indicate that norepinephrine enhances signal detection and information encoding for complex auditory stimuli by suppressing spontaneous “noise” activity and that these actions are independent of local neuroestrogen synthesis. PMID:26109659

  12. Ligand-dependent localization and function of ORP-VAP complexes at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Kentala, Henriikka; Peränen, Johan; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2015-05-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein/OSBP-related proteins (ORPs) constitute a conserved family of sterol/phospholipid-binding proteins with lipid transporter or sensor functions. We investigated the spatial occurrence and regulation of the interactions of human OSBP/ORPs or the S. cerevisiae orthologs, the Osh (OSBP homolog) proteins, with their endoplasmic reticulum (ER) anchors, the VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs), by employing bimolecular fluorescence complementation and pull-down set-ups. The ORP-VAP interactions localize frequently at distinct subcellular sites, shown in several cases to represent membrane contact sites (MCSs). Using established ORP ligand-binding domain mutants and pull-down assays with recombinant proteins, we show that ORP liganding regulates the ORP-VAP association, alters the subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes, or modifies organelle morphology. There is distinct protein specificity in the effects of the mutants on subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes. We provide evidence that complexes of human ORP2 and VAPs at ER-lipid droplet interfaces regulate the hydrolysis of triglycerides and lipid droplet turnover. The data suggest evolutionarily conserved, complex ligand-dependent functions of ORP-VAP complexes at MCSs, with implications for cellular lipid homeostasis and signaling.

  13. A Localized Complex of Two Protein Oligomers Controls the Orientation of Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Lasker, Keren; Ahrens, Daniel G.; Eckart, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Signaling hubs at bacterial cell poles establish cell polarity in the absence of membrane-bound compartments. In the asymmetrically dividing bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell polarity stems from the cell cycle-regulated localization and turnover of signaling protein complexes in these hubs, and yet the mechanisms that establish the identity of the two cell poles have not been established. Here, we recapitulate the tripartite assembly of a cell fate signaling complex that forms during the G1-S transition. Using in vivo and in vitro analyses of dynamic polar protein complex formation, we show that a polymeric cell polarity protein, SpmX, serves as a direct bridge between the PopZ polymeric network and the cell fate-directing DivJ histidine kinase. We demonstrate the direct binding between these three proteins and show that a polar microdomain spontaneously assembles when the three proteins are coexpressed heterologously in an Escherichia coli test system. The relative copy numbers of these proteins are essential for complex formation, as overexpression of SpmX in Caulobacter reorganizes the polarity of the cell, generating ectopic cell poles containing PopZ and DivJ. Hierarchical formation of higher-order SpmX oligomers nucleates new PopZ microdomain assemblies at the incipient lateral cell poles, driving localized outgrowth. By comparison to self-assembling protein networks and polar cell growth mechanisms in other bacterial species, we suggest that the cooligomeric PopZ-SpmX protein complex in Caulobacter illustrates a paradigm for coupling cell cycle progression to the controlled geometry of cell pole establishment. PMID:28246363

  14. Local weather conditions have complex effects on the growth of blue tit nestlings.

    PubMed

    Mainwaring, Mark C; Hartley, Ian R

    2016-08-01

    Adverse weather conditions are expected to result in impaired nestling development in birds, but empirical studies have provided equivocal support for such a relationship. This may be because the negative effects of adverse weather conditions are masked by parental effects. Globally, ambient temperatures, rainfall levels and wind speeds are all expected to increase in a changing climate and so there is a need for a better understanding of the relationship between weather conditions and nestling growth. Here, we describe a correlative study that examined the relationships between local temperatures, rainfall levels and wind speeds and the growth of individual blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) nestlings in relation to their hatching order and sex. We found that changes in a range of morphological characters were negatively related to both temperature and wind speed, but positively related to rainfall. These patterns were further influenced by the hatching order of the nestlings but not by nestling sex. This suggests that the predicted changes in local weather conditions may have complex effects on nestling growth, but that parents may be able to mitigate the adverse effects via adaptive parental effects. We therefore conclude that local weather conditions have complex effects on avian growth and the implications for patterns of avian growth in a changing climate are discussed.

  15. Subcellular localization of proteasomes and their regulatory complexes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, P; Fuertes, G; Murray, R Z; Bose, S; Knecht, E; Rechsteiner, M C; Hendil, K B; Tanaka, K; Dyson, J; Rivett, J

    2000-01-01

    Proteasomes can exist in several different molecular forms in mammalian cells. The core 20S proteasome, containing the proteolytic sites, binds regulatory complexes at the ends of its cylindrical structure. Together with two 19S ATPase regulatory complexes it forms the 26S proteasome, which is involved in ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. The 20S proteasome can also bind 11S regulatory complexes (REG, PA28) which play a role in antigen processing, as do the three variable gamma-interferon-inducible catalytic beta-subunits (e.g. LMP7). In the present study, we have investigated the subcellular distribution of the different forms of proteasomes using subunit specific antibodies. Both 20S proteasomes and their 19S regulatory complexes are found in nuclear, cytosolic and microsomal preparations isolated from rat liver. LMP7 was enriched approximately two-fold compared with core alpha-type proteasome subunits in the microsomal preparations. 20S proteasomes were more abundant than 26S proteasomes, both in liver and cultured cell lines. Interestingly, some significant differences were observed in the distribution of different subunits of the 19S regulatory complexes. S12, and to a lesser extent p45, were found to be relatively enriched in nuclear fractions from rat liver, and immunofluorescent labelling of cultured cells with anti-p45 antibodies showed stronger labelling in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm. The REG was found to be localized predominantly in the cytoplasm. Three- to six-fold increases in the level of REG were observed following gamma-interferon treatment of cultured cells but gamma-interferon had no obvious effect on its subcellular distribution. These results demonstrate that different regulatory complexes and subpopulations of proteasomes have different distributions within mammalian cells and, therefore, that the distribution is more complex than has been reported for yeast proteasomes. PMID:10657252

  16. Characterization of local complex structures in a recurrence plot to improve nonlinear dynamic discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Structures in recurrence plots (RPs), preserving the rich information of nonlinear invariants and trajectory characteristics, have been increasingly analyzed in dynamic discrimination studies. The conventional analysis of RPs is mainly focused on quantifying the overall diagonal and vertical line structures through a method, called recurrence quantification analysis (RQA). This study extensively explores the information in RPs by quantifying local complex RP structures. To do this, an approach was developed to analyze the combination of three major RQA variables: determinism, laminarity, and recurrence rate (DLR) in a metawindow moving over a RP. It was then evaluated in two experiments discriminating (1) ideal nonlinear dynamic series emulated from the Lorenz system with different control parameters and (2) data sets of human heart rate regulations with normal sinus rhythms (n = 18) and congestive heart failure (n = 29). Finally, the DLR was compared with seven major RQA variables in terms of discriminatory power, measured by standardized mean difference (DSMD). In the two experiments, DLR resulted in the highest discriminatory power with DSMD = 2.53 and 0.98, respectively, which were 7.41 and 2.09 times the best performance from RQA. The study also revealed that the optimal RP structures for the discriminations were neither typical diagonal structures nor vertical structures. These findings indicate that local complex RP structures contain some rich information unexploited by RQA. Therefore, future research to extensively analyze complex RP structures would potentially improve the effectiveness of the RP analysis in dynamic discrimination studies.

  17. Differences in soluble organic carbon chemistry in pore waters sampled from different pore size domains

    DOE PAGES

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Smith, A. P.; Tfaily, Malak; ...

    2017-01-11

    Spatial isolation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in different sized pores may be a mechanism by which otherwise labile carbon (C) could be protected in soils. When soil water content increases, the hydrologic connectivity of soil pores also increases, allowing greater transport of SOC and other resources from protected locations, to microbially colonized locations more favorable to decomposition. The heterogeneous distribution of specialized decomposers, C, and other resources throughout the soil indicates that the metabolism or persistence of soil C compounds is highly dependent on short-distance transport processes. The objective of this research was to characterize the complexity of Cmore » in pore waters held at weak and strong water tensions (effectively soil solution held behind coarse- and fine-pore throats, respectively) and evaluate the microbial decomposability of these pore waters. We saturated intact soil cores and extracted pore waters with increasing suction pressures to sequentially sample pore waters from increasingly fine pore domains. Ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry of the SOC was used to profile the major biochemical classes (i.e., lipids, proteins, lignin, carbohydrates, and condensed aromatics) of compounds present in the pore waters; some of these samples were then used as substrates for growth of Cellvibrio japonicus (DSMZ 16018), Streptomyces cellulosae (ATCC® 25439™), and Trichoderma reseei (QM6a) in 7 day incubations. The soluble C in finer pores was more complex than the soluble C in coarser pores, and the incubations revealed that the more complex C in these fine pores is not recalcitrant. The decomposition of this complex C led to greater losses of C through respiration than the simpler C from coarser pore waters. Our research suggests that soils that experience repeated cycles of drying and wetting may be accompanied by repeated cycles of increased CO2 fluxes that are driven by i) the transport of C from protected pools into

  18. Decomposing Complex, Macroscopic Phenomena Through A Set of Local Nonlinear Rules In A Cellular Automata Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avolio, M. V.; Crisci, G. M.; D'Ambrosio, D.; di Gregorio, S.; Iovine, G.; Rongo, R.; Spataro, W.

    Cellular Automata (CA) are able to capture the peculiar characteristics of systems, whose global evolution can be exclusively described on the basis of local interactions among their constituent parts ("a-centrism"). Such systems match the paradigm of parallelism with the a-centrism one. In modelling complex phenomena by means of classical CA, elementary automata characterised by few states and simple transition function have usually been involved. On the other hand, many complex macroscopic phenomena (even though characterised by properties of parallelism and a-centrism) can be very difficult to be modelled through classical CA, because of their hetero- geneous characteristics, which require a very large number of states. For such cases, which perfectly fit the general definition of CA, more complex transition rules (differ- ing from typical transition functions) would be, in fact, needed. Aiming at modelling these latter phenomena, an empirical method has been developed, based on the decom- position of the phenomenon into "elementary" components, whose behaviour can be described through local rules. Furthermore, criteria and conditions have been defined, in order to translate the local rules into a transition function, as needed for perform- ing cellular automata simulations. Applications of CA models to real cases of study have recently been attempted: landslides (earth flows, rock avalanches, debris flows), lava flows, soil erosion, soil contamination and bioremediation, forest fires have all been analysed through CA simulations, and encouraging results have been obtained. In the present paper, examples of application of the method for hazard evaluation are described, with particular reference to the Sarno 1998 debris flows and the Etna 2001 lava flows.

  19. The sarcoglycan-sarcospan complex localization in mouse retina is independent from dystrophins

    PubMed Central

    Fort, Patrice; Estrada, Francisco-Javier; Bordais, Agnès; Mornet, Dominique; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Vargas, Haydeé Rosas; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M.; Rendon, Alvaro

    2005-01-01

    The sarcoglycan–sarcospan (SG–SSPN) complex is part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that has been extensively characterized in muscle. To establish the framework for functional studies of sarcoglycans in retina here, we quantified sarcoglycans mRNA levels with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and performed immunohistochemistry to determine their cellular and subcellular distribution. We showed that the β-, δ-, γ-, ε-sarcoglycans and sarcospan are expressed in mouse retina. They are localized predominantly in the outer and the inner limiting membranes, probably in the Müller cells and also in the ganglion cells axons where the expression of dystrophins have never been reported. We also investigated the status of the sarcoglycans in the retina of mdx3cv mutant mice for all Duchene Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) gene products. The absence of dystrophin did not produce any change in the sarcoglycan–sarcospan components expression and distribution. PMID:15993965

  20. Magnetic Exchange Couplings in Heterodinuclear Complexes Based on Differential Local Spin Rotations.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajendra P; Phillips, Jordan J; Peralta, Juan E

    2016-04-12

    We analyze the performance of a new method for the calculation of magnetic exchange coupling parameters for the particular case of heterodinuclear transition metals complexes of Cu, Ni, and V. This method is based on a generalized perturbative approach which uses differential local spin rotations via formal Lagrange multipiers (Phillips, J. J.; Peralta, J. E. J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 174115). The reliability of the calculated couplings has been assessed by comparing with results from traditional energy differences with different density functional approximations and with experimental values. Our results show that this method to calculate magnetic exchange couplings can be reliably used for heteronuclear transition metal complexes, and at the same time, that it is independent from the different mapping schemes used in energy difference methods.

  1. Fluid-structure interaction of complex bodies in two-phase flows on locally refined grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidis, Dionysios; Shen, Lian; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-11-01

    Many real-life flow problems in engineering applications involve fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of arbitrarily complex geometries interacting with free surface flows. Despite the recent significant computational advances, conventional numerical methods are inefficient to resolve the prevailing complex dynamics due to the inherent large disparity of spatial and temporal scales that emerge in the air/water phases of the flow and around rigid bodies. To this end, the new generation 3D, unsteady, unstructured Cartesian incompressible flow solver, developed at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL), is integrated with a FSI immersed boundary method and is coupled with the level-set formulation. The predictive capabilities of our method to simulate non-linear free surface phenomena, with low computational cost, are significantly improved by locally refining the computational grid in the vicinity of solid boundaries and around the free surface interface. We simulate three-dimensional complex flows involving complex rigid bodies interacting with a free surface both with prescribed body motion and coupled FSI and we investigate breaking wave events. In all the cases, very good agreement with benchmark data is found. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (CBET-1509071).

  2. X-ray microtomography application in pore space reservoir rock.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M F S; Lima, I; Borghi, L; Lopes, R T

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of porosity in carbonate rocks is important in the oil and gas industry since a major hydrocarbons field is formed by this lithology and they have a complex media porous. In this context, this research presents a study of the pore space in limestones rocks by x-ray microtomography. Total porosity, type of porosity and pore size distribution were evaluated from 3D high resolution images. Results show that carbonate rocks has a complex pore space system with different pores types at the same facies.

  3. Hydrogeology and hydrodynamics of coral reef pore waters

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, R.W.; Oberdorfer, J.A.

    1988-06-29

    A wide variety of forces can produce head gradients that drive the flow and advective mixing of internal coral reef pore waters. Oscillatory gradients that produce mixing result from wave and tide action. Sustained gradients result from wave and tide-induced setup and ponding, from currents impinging on the reef structure, from groundwater heads, and from density differenced (temperature or salinity gradients). These gradients and the permeabilities and porosities of reef sediments are such that most macropore environments are dominated by advection rather than diffusion. The various driving forces must be analyzed to determine the individual and combined magnitudes of their effects on a specific reef pore-water system. Pore-water movement controls sediment diagenesis, the exchange of nutrients between sediments and benthos, and coastal/island groundwater resources. Because of the complexity of forcing functions, their interactions with specific local reef environments, experimental studies require careful incorporation of these considerations into their design and interpretation. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Flux theory for Poisson distributed pores with Gaussian permeability.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Dino G

    2016-01-01

    The mean of the solute flux through membrane pores depends on the random distribution and permeability of the pores. Mathematical models including such randomness factors make it possible to obtain statistical parameters for pore characterization. Here, assuming that pores follow a Poisson distribution in the lipid phase and that their permeabilities follow a Gaussian distribution, a mathematical model for solute dynamics is obtained by applying a general result from a previous work regarding any number of different kinds of randomly distributed pores. The new proposed theory is studied using experimental parameters obtained elsewhere, and a method for finding the mean single pore flux rate from liposome flux assays is suggested. This method is useful for pores without requiring studies by patch-clamp in single cells or single-channel recordings. However, it does not apply in the case of ion-selective channels, in which a more complex flux law combining the concentration and electrical gradient is required.

  5. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Bell, Alexis T.

    2008-05-14

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  6. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Bell, Alexis T; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-05-14

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  7. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Bell, Alexis T.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-05-01

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  8. Local human pressures influence gene flow in a hybridizing Daphnia species complex.

    PubMed

    Alric, B; Möst, M; Domaizon, I; Pignol, C; Spaak, P; Perga, M-E

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic environmental changes are considered critical drivers of the genetic structure of populations and communities through, for example, the facilitation of introgressive hybridization between syntopic species. However, the mechanisms by which environmental perturbations trigger changes in the genetic structure of populations and communities, such as the processes that determine the directionality of hybridization and patterns of mitochondrial introgression over many generations, remain largely unexplored. In this study, the changes in genetic structure of hybridizing members of the Daphnia longispina species complex were reconstructed over the last 100 years for three large temperate lakes under strong anthropogenic pressures via palaeogenetic analyses of resting egg banks. Drastic changes in the genetic structure of the Daphnia community, associated with hybridization events between D. longispina and D. galeata and subsequent introgression, were detected in Lakes Geneva and Bourget. In Lake Bourget, these changes were induced by the successful establishment of D. galeata with rising phosphorus levels and reinforced by the sensitivity of D. longispina to fish predation pressure. In Lake Geneva, the pattern of hybridization during eutrophication is more likely a function of the original taxonomic composition of the species complex in this lake. Lakes seem to require at least a meso-oligotrophic status to allow D. galeata populations to establish and accordingly no D. galeata genotypes were found in the egg bank of oligotrophic Lake Annecy. In contrast to the generally assumed pattern of unidirectional hybridization in this species complex, bidirectional hybridization was recorded in Lakes Geneva and Bourget. Our results also demonstrate complex genetic trajectories within this species complex and highlight the irreversibility of changes in the genotypic architecture of populations driven by local human pressures. Finally, we show that extensive

  9. A TB-RBP and Ter ATPase complex accompanies specific mRNAs from nuclei through the nuclear pores and into intercellular bridges in mouse male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Morales, Carlos R; Lefrancois, Stephane; Chennathukuzhi, Vargheese; El-Alfy, Mohamed; Wu, XinQi; Yang, Juxiang; Gerton, George L; Hecht, Norman B

    2002-06-15

    The testis brain RNA-binding protein (TB-RBP) functions as an RNA-binding protein in brain and testis, binding to conserved sequence elements present in specific mRNAs, such as protamine 1 and 2. We show here by RNA gel shift assays, immunoprecipitation, and by a novel in situ hybridization immunohistochemical technique that TB-RBP binds to AKAP4 mRNA in male mouse germ cells. AKAP4 is a component of the fibrous sheath and functions as a scaffolding protein in the sperm flagellum. AKAP4 is encoded by an X-linked gene, is expressed solely in postmeiotic (haploid) male germ cells, and is an essential protein in all spermatozoa, requiring its transport between spermatids as a protein or mRNA. AKAP4 mRNA forms a complex with TB-RBP and the Ter ATPase in nuclei and remains associated with these proteins as it exits nuclei into the cytoplasm and as it passes through intercellular bridges between spermatids. A similar mRNA-TB-RBP-Ter ATPase association is seen for protamine 2 mRNA, which is stored in the cytoplasm of postmeiotic germ cells about 7 days before translation. In contrast, no association is seen with PGK-2 mRNA which is initially transcribed early in meiosis with increased transcription in postmeiotic male germ cells. Although PGK-2 mRNA is subject to translational control, it lacks TB-RBP-binding sequences in its mRNA. The AKAP4 or protamine 2 mRNA-protein complexes dissociate in late-stage male germ cells when the mRNAs are translated. We propose that TB-RBP and the Ter ATPase are part of a complex that accompanies specific mRNAs in haploid mouse male germ cells in intracellular and intercellular movement. The temporal relationship of TB-RBP binding and mRNA inactivation in conjunction with the subsequent dissociation of the mRNA-protein complex at the time of mRNA translation suggests a role in translational suppression and/or mRNA stabilization.

  10. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  11. High Transmembrane Voltage Raised by Close Contact Initiates Fusion Pore.

    PubMed

    Bu, Bing; Tian, Zhiqi; Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fusion lies at the heart of neuronal communication but the detailed mechanism of a critical step, fusion pore initiation, remains poorly understood. Here, through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, a transient pore formation induced by a close contact of two apposed bilayers is firstly reported. Such a close contact gives rise to a high local transmembrane voltage that induces the transient pore formation. Through simulations on two apposed bilayers fixed at a series of given distances, the process in which two bilayers approaching to each other under the pulling force from fusion proteins for membrane fusion was mimicked. Of note, this close contact induced fusion pore formation is contrasted with previous reported electroporation under ad hoc applied external electric field or ionic charge in-balance. We show that the transmembrane voltage increases with the decrease of the distance between the bilayers. Below a critical distance, depending on the lipid composition, the local transmembrane voltage can be sufficiently high to induce the transient pores. The size of these pores is approximately 1~2 nm in diameter, which is large enough to allow passing of neurotransmitters. A resealing of the membrane pores resulting from the neutralization of the transmembrane voltage by ions through the pores was then observed. We also found that the membrane tension can either prolong the lifetime of transient pores or cause them to dilate for full collapse. This result provides a possible mechanism for fusion pore formation and regulation of pathway of fusion process.

  12. High Transmembrane Voltage Raised by Close Contact Initiates Fusion Pore

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Bing; Tian, Zhiqi; Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fusion lies at the heart of neuronal communication but the detailed mechanism of a critical step, fusion pore initiation, remains poorly understood. Here, through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, a transient pore formation induced by a close contact of two apposed bilayers is firstly reported. Such a close contact gives rise to a high local transmembrane voltage that induces the transient pore formation. Through simulations on two apposed bilayers fixed at a series of given distances, the process in which two bilayers approaching to each other under the pulling force from fusion proteins for membrane fusion was mimicked. Of note, this close contact induced fusion pore formation is contrasted with previous reported electroporation under ad hoc applied external electric field or ionic charge in-balance. We show that the transmembrane voltage increases with the decrease of the distance between the bilayers. Below a critical distance, depending on the lipid composition, the local transmembrane voltage can be sufficiently high to induce the transient pores. The size of these pores is approximately 1~2 nm in diameter, which is large enough to allow passing of neurotransmitters. A resealing of the membrane pores resulting from the neutralization of the transmembrane voltage by ions through the pores was then observed. We also found that the membrane tension can either prolong the lifetime of transient pores or cause them to dilate for full collapse. This result provides a possible mechanism for fusion pore formation and regulation of pathway of fusion process. PMID:28018169

  13. A Localized Complex of Two Protein Oligomers Controls the Orientation of Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Perez, Adam M; Mann, Thomas H; Lasker, Keren; Ahrens, Daniel G; Eckart, Michael R; Shapiro, Lucy

    2017-02-28

    Signaling hubs at bacterial cell poles establish cell polarity in the absence of membrane-bound compartments. In the asymmetrically dividing bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell polarity stems from the cell cycle-regulated localization and turnover of signaling protein complexes in these hubs, and yet the mechanisms that establish the identity of the two cell poles have not been established. Here, we recapitulate the tripartite assembly of a cell fate signaling complex that forms during the G1-S transition. Using in vivo and in vitro analyses of dynamic polar protein complex formation, we show that a polymeric cell polarity protein, SpmX, serves as a direct bridge between the PopZ polymeric network and the cell fate-directing DivJ histidine kinase. We demonstrate the direct binding between these three proteins and show that a polar microdomain spontaneously assembles when the three proteins are coexpressed heterologously in an Escherichia coli test system. The relative copy numbers of these proteins are essential for complex formation, as overexpression of SpmX in Caulobacter reorganizes the polarity of the cell, generating ectopic cell poles containing PopZ and DivJ. Hierarchical formation of higher-order SpmX oligomers nucleates new PopZ microdomain assemblies at the incipient lateral cell poles, driving localized outgrowth. By comparison to self-assembling protein networks and polar cell growth mechanisms in other bacterial species, we suggest that the cooligomeric PopZ-SpmX protein complex in Caulobacter illustrates a paradigm for coupling cell cycle progression to the controlled geometry of cell pole establishment.IMPORTANCE Lacking internal membrane-bound compartments, bacteria achieve subcellular organization by establishing self-assembling protein-based microdomains. The asymmetrically dividing bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses one such microdomain to link cell cycle progression to morphogenesis, but the mechanism for the generation of this

  14. A new view of transcriptome complexity and regulation through the lens of local splicing variations

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Garcia, Jorge; Barrera, Alejandro; Gazzara, Matthew R; González-Vallinas, Juan; Lahens, Nicholas F; Hogenesch, John B; Lynch, Kristen W; Barash, Yoseph

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) can critically affect gene function and disease, yet mapping splicing variations remains a challenge. Here, we propose a new approach to define and quantify mRNA splicing in units of local splicing variations (LSVs). LSVs capture previously defined types of alternative splicing as well as more complex transcript variations. Building the first genome wide map of LSVs from twelve mouse tissues, we find complex LSVs constitute over 30% of tissue dependent transcript variations and affect specific protein families. We show the prevalence of complex LSVs is conserved in humans and identify hundreds of LSVs that are specific to brain subregions or altered in Alzheimer's patients. Amongst those are novel isoforms in the Camk2 family and a novel poison exon in Ptbp1, a key splice factor in neurogenesis. We anticipate the approach presented here will advance the ability to relate tissue-specific splice variation to genetic variation, phenotype, and disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11752.001 PMID:26829591

  15. Intrinsic disorder within an AKAP-protein kinase A complex guides local substrate phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Smith, F Donelson; Reichow, Steve L; Esseltine, Jessica L; Shi, Dan; Langeberg, Lorene K; Scott, John D; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-11-05

    Anchoring proteins sequester kinases with their substrates to locally disseminate intracellular signals and avert indiscriminate transmission of these responses throughout the cell. Mechanistic understanding of this process is hampered by limited structural information on these macromolecular complexes. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) spatially constrain phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKA). Electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstructions of type-II PKA-AKAP18γ complexes reveal hetero-pentameric assemblies that adopt a range of flexible tripartite configurations. Intrinsically disordered regions within each PKA regulatory subunit impart the molecular plasticity that affords an ∼16 nanometer radius of motion to the associated catalytic subunits. Manipulating flexibility within the PKA holoenzyme augmented basal and cAMP responsive phosphorylation of AKAP-associated substrates. Cell-based analyses suggest that the catalytic subunit remains within type-II PKA-AKAP18γ complexes upon cAMP elevation. We propose that the dynamic movement of kinase sub-structures, in concert with the static AKAP-regulatory subunit interface, generates a solid-state signaling microenvironment for substrate phosphorylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01319.001.

  16. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; ...

    2015-09-28

    In this study, multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include (1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and (2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the firstmore » type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides

  17. Unexpected Outcomes of Thai Cassava Trade: A Case of Global Complexity and Local Unsustainability

    PubMed Central

    CURRAN, SARA R.; COOKE, ABIGAIL M.

    2014-01-01

    Tracing the Thai cassava (Manihot esculenta) trade network, between 1960 and 2000, offers a compelling example of global complexity at work. The emergence of Thailand’s dominance of world export markets caught the world by surprise. The opening up of a European market for cassava was supposed to be met by Brazilian and Indonesian producers. Instead, Thailand took over the market by 1975. Several factors facilitated this emergence including: entrepreneurial diasporic networks of Thai-Chinese traders, local political economy conditions in both Europe and Thailand, and ecological conditions in Thailand. These same factors also shaped the subsequent timing of the closing of the European market, the emergence of a new industry association, the creation of new cassava products, and the expansion to other markets. Furthermore, the dynamic nature of cassava market yielded equivocal outcomes for both Europe and Thai farmers. PMID:25328444

  18. Golgi-localized STELLO proteins regulate the assembly and trafficking of cellulose synthase complexes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Nikolovski, Nino; Sorieul, Mathias; Vellosillo, Tamara; McFarlane, Heather E.; Dupree, Ray; Kesten, Christopher; Schneider, René; Driemeier, Carlos; Lathe, Rahul; Lampugnani, Edwin; Yu, Xiaolan; Ivakov, Alexander; Doblin, Monika S.; Mortimer, Jenny C.; Brown, Steven P.; Persson, Staffan; Dupree, Paul

    2016-01-01

    As the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, cellulose is a key structural component of the plant cell wall. Cellulose is produced at the plasma membrane by cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes (CSCs), which are assembled in the endomembrane system and trafficked to the plasma membrane. While several proteins that affect CesA activity have been identified, components that regulate CSC assembly and trafficking remain unknown. Here we show that STELLO1 and 2 are Golgi-localized proteins that can interact with CesAs and control cellulose quantity. In the absence of STELLO function, the spatial distribution within the Golgi, secretion and activity of the CSCs are impaired indicating a central role of the STELLO proteins in CSC assembly. Point mutations in the predicted catalytic domains of the STELLO proteins indicate that they are glycosyltransferases facing the Golgi lumen. Hence, we have uncovered proteins that regulate CSC assembly in the plant Golgi apparatus. PMID:27277162

  19. Golgi-localized STELLO proteins regulate the assembly and trafficking of cellulose synthase complexes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Nikolovski, Nino; Sorieul, Mathias; Vellosillo, Tamara; McFarlane, Heather E; Dupree, Ray; Kesten, Christopher; Schneider, René; Driemeier, Carlos; Lathe, Rahul; Lampugnani, Edwin; Yu, Xiaolan; Ivakov, Alexander; Doblin, Monika S; Mortimer, Jenny C; Brown, Steven P; Persson, Staffan; Dupree, Paul

    2016-06-09

    As the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, cellulose is a key structural component of the plant cell wall. Cellulose is produced at the plasma membrane by cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes (CSCs), which are assembled in the endomembrane system and trafficked to the plasma membrane. While several proteins that affect CesA activity have been identified, components that regulate CSC assembly and trafficking remain unknown. Here we show that STELLO1 and 2 are Golgi-localized proteins that can interact with CesAs and control cellulose quantity. In the absence of STELLO function, the spatial distribution within the Golgi, secretion and activity of the CSCs are impaired indicating a central role of the STELLO proteins in CSC assembly. Point mutations in the predicted catalytic domains of the STELLO proteins indicate that they are glycosyltransferases facing the Golgi lumen. Hence, we have uncovered proteins that regulate CSC assembly in the plant Golgi apparatus.

  20. The complex nature of storm-time ion dynamics: Transport and local acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, M. H.; Reeves, G. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Henderson, M. G.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    Data from the Van Allen Probes Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) spectrometers reveal hitherto unresolved spatial structure and dynamics in ion populations. Complex regions of O+ dominance, at energies from a few eV to >10 keV, are observed throughout the magnetosphere. Isolated regions on the dayside that are rich in energetic O+ might easily be interpreted as strong energization of ionospheric plasma. We demonstrate, however, that both the energy spectrum and the limited magnetic local time extent of these features can be explained by energy-dependent drift of particles injected on the nightside 24 h earlier. Particle tracing simulations show that the energetic O+ can originate in the magnetotail, not in the ionosphere. Enhanced wave activity is colocated with the heavy ion-rich plasma, and we further conclude that the waves were not a source of free energy for accelerating ionospheric plasma but rather the consequence of the arrival of substorm-injected plasma.

  1. Unstable Pore-Water Flow in Intertidal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Shen, C.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important intertidal wetlands strongly influenced by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Bordered by coastal water, the marsh system undergoes cycles of inundation and exposure driven by the tide. This leads to dynamic, complex pore-water flow and solute transport in the marsh soil. Pore-water circulations occur over vastly different spatial and temporal scales with strong link to the marsh topography. These circulations control solute transport between the marsh soil and the tidal creek, and ultimately affect the overall nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal water. The pore-water flows also dictate the soil condition, particularly aeration, which influences the marsh plant growth. Numerous studies have been carried out to examine the pore-water flow process in the marsh soil driven by tides, focusing on stable flow with the assumption of homogeneity in soil and fluid properties. This assumption, however, is questionable given the actual inhomogeneous conditions in the field. For example, the salinity of surface water in the tidal creek varies temporally and spatially due to the influence of rainfall and evapotranspiration as well as the freshwater input from upland areas to the estuary, creating density gradients across the marsh surface and within the marsh soil. Many marshes possess soil stratigraphy with low-permeability mud typically overlying high-permeability sandy deposits. Macropores such as crab burrows are commonly distributed in salt marsh sediments. All these conditions are prone to the development of non-uniform, unstable preferential pore-water flow in the marsh soil, for example, funnelling and fingering. Here we present results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to explore such unstable flow. In particular, the analysis aims to address how the unstable flow modifies patterns of local pore-water movement and solute transport, as well as the overall exchange between the marsh soil and

  2. Learning and inference using complex generative models in a spatial localization task

    PubMed Central

    Bejjanki, Vikranth R.; Knill, David C.; Aslin, Richard N.

    2016-01-01

    A large body of research has established that, under relatively simple task conditions, human observers integrate uncertain sensory information with learned prior knowledge in an approximately Bayes-optimal manner. However, in many natural tasks, observers must perform this sensory-plus-prior integration when the underlying generative model of the environment consists of multiple causes. Here we ask if the Bayes-optimal integration seen with simple tasks also applies to such natural tasks when the generative model is more complex, or whether observers rely instead on a less efficient set of heuristics that approximate ideal performance. Participants localized a “hidden” target whose position on a touch screen was sampled from a location-contingent bimodal generative model with different variances around each mode. Over repeated exposure to this task, participants learned the a priori locations of the target (i.e., the bimodal generative model), and integrated this learned knowledge with uncertain sensory information on a trial-by-trial basis in a manner consistent with the predictions of Bayes-optimal behavior. In particular, participants rapidly learned the locations of the two modes of the generative model, but the relative variances of the modes were learned much more slowly. Taken together, our results suggest that human performance in a more complex localization task, which requires the integration of sensory information with learned knowledge of a bimodal generative model, is consistent with the predictions of Bayes-optimal behavior, but involves a much longer time-course than in simpler tasks. PMID:26967015

  3. Identifying the most influential spreaders in complex networks by an Extended Local K-Shell Sum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Ruisheng; Yang, Zhao; Hu, Rongjing; Li, Mengtian; Yuan, Yongna; Li, Keqin

    Identifying influential spreaders is crucial for developing strategies to control the spreading process on complex networks. Following the well-known K-Shell (KS) decomposition, several improved measures are proposed. However, these measures cannot identify the most influential spreaders accurately. In this paper, we define a Local K-Shell Sum (LKSS) by calculating the sum of the K-Shell indices of the neighbors within 2-hops of a given node. Based on the LKSS, we propose an Extended Local K-Shell Sum (ELKSS) centrality to rank spreaders. The ELKSS is defined as the sum of the LKSS of the nearest neighbors of a given node. By assuming that the spreading process on networks follows the Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered (SIR) model, we perform extensive simulations on a series of real networks to compare the performance between the ELKSS centrality and other six measures. The results show that the ELKSS centrality has a better performance than the six measures to distinguish the spreading ability of nodes and to identify the most influential spreaders accurately.

  4. Expression and localization of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    García, Daniela C; Miceli, Dora C; Rizo, Gabriela; García, Elina V; Valdecantos, Pablo A; Roldán-Olarte, Mariela

    2016-04-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine protease involved in extracellular matrix remodeling through plasmin generation. uPA usually binds to its receptor, uPAR, which is anchored to the plasma membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. uPA/uPAR binding increases proteolytic activity in the neighborhood of the cells containing uPAR and activates intracellular signaling pathways involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, cell migration and proliferation. The aim of this work was to study the expression of uPA, uPAR and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in immature and in vitro matured bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). uPA is only expressed in the cumulus cells of immature and in vitro matured COCs, while uPAR and PAI-1 are expressed in both the cumulus cells and the immature and in vitro matured oocytes. In addition, uPAR protein was localized by confocal microscopy in the plasma membrane of oocytes and cumulus cells of immature COCs. Results from this research led us to hypothesize that the uPA/uPAR interaction could cause the local production of uPA-mediated plasmin over oocyte and cumulus cell surface; plasmin formation could also be regulated by PAI-1.

  5. Generalized CNF satisfiability, local reductions and complexity of succinctly specified problems

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, M.V.; Hunt, H.B. III; Stearns, R.E.; Radhakrishnan, V.

    1995-02-01

    We, study the complexity and efficient approximability of various decision, counting and optimization problems when instances are specified using (1) the 1-dimensional finite periodic narrow specifications of Wanke, (2) the 2-way infinite 1-dimensional narrow periodic (sometimes called dynamic) specifications of Karp and Orlin et al., and (3) the hierarchical specification language of Lengauer et al. We outline how generalized CNF satisfiability problems and local reductions can be used to obtain both hardness and easiness results for a number of decision, counting, optimization and approximate optimization problems when instances are specified as in (1), (2) or (3). As corollaries we obtain a number of new PSPACE-hardness and {number_sign}PSPACE-hardness,9 results and a number of new polynomial time approximation algorithms for natural PSPACE-hard optimization problems. In particular assuming P {ne} PSPACE, we characterize completely the complexities of the generalized CNF satisfiability problems SAT(S) of Schaefer [Sc78], when instances are specified as in (1), (2) or (3).

  6. Suppression of epidemic spreading in complex networks by local information based behavioral responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Xie, Jia-Rong; Tang, Ming; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-12-01

    The interplay between individual behaviors and epidemic dynamics in complex networks is a topic of recent interest. In particular, individuals can obtain different types of information about the disease and respond by altering their behaviors, and this can affect the spreading dynamics, possibly in a significant way. We propose a model where individuals' behavioral response is based on a generic type of local information, i.e., the number of neighbors that has been infected with the disease. Mathematically, the response can be characterized by a reduction in the transmission rate by a factor that depends on the number of infected neighbors. Utilizing the standard susceptible-infected-susceptible and susceptible-infected-recovery dynamical models for epidemic spreading, we derive a theoretical formula for the epidemic threshold and provide numerical verification. Our analysis lays on a solid quantitative footing the intuition that individual behavioral response can in general suppress epidemic spreading. Furthermore, we find that the hub nodes play the role of "double-edged sword" in that they can either suppress or promote outbreak, depending on their responses to the epidemic, providing additional support for the idea that these nodes are key to controlling epidemic spreading in complex networks.

  7. Requirements of fission yeast septins for complex formation, localization, and function.

    PubMed

    An, Hanbing; Morrell, Jennifer L; Jennings, Jennifer L; Link, Andrew J; Gould, Kathleen L

    2004-12-01

    Septins are GTP binding proteins important for cytokinesis in many eukaryotes. The Schizosaccaromyces pombe genome sequence predicts orthologues of four of five Saccharomyces cerevisiae septins involved in cytokinesis and these are named Spns1-4p. That spns1-4 are not essential genes permitted the application of a combined genetic and proteomics approach to determine their functional relationships. Our findings indicate that Spns1-4p are present throughout interphase as a diffusely localized approximately 8.5S complex containing two copies of each septin linked together as a chain in the order Spn3p-Spn4p-Spn1p-Spn2p. Septin recruitment to the medial region of the cell is genetically separable from ring formation, and whereas it is normally restricted to mitosis, it can be promoted without activation of the mitotic cell cycle machinery. Coalescence into ring structures requires Spn1p and Spn4p associate with at least one other septin subunit and the expression of Mid2p that is normally restricted to mitosis. This study establishes the functional requirements for septin complex organization in vivo.

  8. Requirements of Fission Yeast Septins for Complex Formation, Localization, and FunctionD⃞

    PubMed Central

    An, Hanbing; Morrell, Jennifer L.; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Link, Andrew J.; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2004-01-01

    Septins are GTP binding proteins important for cytokinesis in many eukaryotes. The Schizosaccaromyces pombe genome sequence predicts orthologues of four of five Saccharomyces cerevisiae septins involved in cytokinesis and these are named Spns1-4p. That spns1-4 are not essential genes permitted the application of a combined genetic and proteomics approach to determine their functional relationships. Our findings indicate that Spns1-4p are present throughout interphase as a diffusely localized ∼8.5S complex containing two copies of each septin linked together as a chain in the order Spn3p-Spn4p-Spn1p-Spn2p. Septin recruitment to the medial region of the cell is genetically separable from ring formation, and whereas it is normally restricted to mitosis, it can be promoted without activation of the mitotic cell cycle machinery. Coalescence into ring structures requires Spn1p and Spn4p associate with at least one other septin subunit and the expression of Mid2p that is normally restricted to mitosis. This study establishes the functional requirements for septin complex organization in vivo. PMID:15385632

  9. Complex-periodic spiral waves in confluent cardiac cell cultures induced by localized inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seong-min; Kim, Tae Yun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2005-07-01

    Spatiotemporal wave activities in excitable heart tissues have long been the subject of numerous studies because they underlie different forms of cardiac arrhythmias. In particular, understanding the dynamics and the instabilities of spiral waves have become very important because they can cause reentrant tachycardia and their subsequent transitions to fibrillation. Although many aspects of cardiac spiral waves have been investigated through experiments and model simulations, their complex properties are far from well understood. Here, we show that intriguing complex-periodic (such as period-2, period-3, period-4, or aperiodic) spiral wave states can arise in monolayer tissues of cardiac cell culture in vitro, and demonstrate that these different dynamic states can coexist with abrupt and spontaneous transitions among them without any change in system parameters; in other words, the medium supports multistability. Based on extensive image data analysis, we have confirmed that these spiral waves are driven by their tips tracing complex orbits whose unusual, meandering shapes are formed by delicate interplay between localized conduction blocks and nonlinear properties of the culture medium. Author contributions: S.-m.H. and K.J.L. designed research; S.-m.H. and T.Y.K. performed research; S.-m.H. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; S.-m.H., T.Y.K., and K.J.L. analyzed data; and S.-m.H. and K.J.L. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Abbreviations: IBI, interbeat interval; P-n, period-n.

  10. Foam invasion through a single pore.

    PubMed

    Delbos, Aline; Pitois, Olivier

    2011-07-01

    We investigate experimentally the behavior of liquid foams pumped at a given flow rate through a single pore, in the situation where the pore diameter is smaller than the bubble diameter. Results reveal that foam invasion can be observed only within a restricted range of values for the dimensionless flow rate and the foam liquid fraction. Within this foam invasion regime, the liquid content of invading foams is measured to be three times higher than the initial liquid content. Outside this regime, both gas alone and liquid alone invasion regimes can be observed. The gas invasion regime results from the rupture of foam films during local T1, during bubble rearrangements events induced by foam flow, whereas the liquid invasion regime is allowed by the formation of a stable cluster of jammed bubbles at the pore's opening.

  11. The pore space scramble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormally, Alexandra; Bentham, Michelle; Vermeylen, Saskia; Markusson, Nils

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and energy security continue to be the context of the transition to a secure, affordable and low carbon energy future, both in the UK and beyond. This is reflected in for example, binding climate policy targets at the EU level, the introduction of renewable energy targets, and has also led to an increasing interest in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology with its potential to help mitigate against the effects of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning. The UK has proposed a three phase strategy to integrate CCS into its energy system in the long term focussing on off-shore subsurface storage (DECC, 2014). The potential of CCS therefore, raises a number of challenging questions and issues surrounding the long-term storage of CO2 captured and injected into underground spaces and, alongside other novel uses of the subsurface, contributes to opening a new field for discussion on the governance of the subsurface. Such 'novel' uses of the subsurface have lead to it becoming an increasingly contested space in terms of its governance, with issues emerging around the role of ownership, liability and property rights of subsurface pore space. For instance, questions over the legal ownership of pore space have arisen with ambiguity over the legal standpoint of the surface owner and those wanting to utilise the pore space for gas storage, and suggestions of whether there are depths at which legal 'ownership' becomes obsolete (Barton, 2014). Here we propose to discuss this 'pore space scramble' and provide examples of the competing trajectories of different stakeholders, particularly in the off-shore context given its priority in the UK. We also propose to highlight the current ambiguity around property law of pore space in the UK with reference to approaches currently taken in different national contexts. Ultimately we delineate contrasting models of governance to illustrate the choices we face and consider the ethics of these models for the common good

  12. Analysis of a spatially deconvolved solar pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.; Ruiz Cobo, B.; Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ichimoto, K.

    2016-08-01

    Solar pores are active regions with large magnetic field strengths and apparent simple magnetic configurations. Their properties resemble the ones found for the sunspot umbra although pores do not show penumbra. Therefore, solar pores present themselves as an intriguing phenomenon that is not completely understood. We examine in this work a solar pore observed with Hinode/SP using two state of the art techniques. The first one is the spatial deconvolution of the spectropolarimetric data that allows removing the stray light contamination induced by the spatial point spread function of the telescope. The second one is the inversion of the Stokes profiles assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium that let us to infer the atmospheric physical parameters. After applying these techniques, we found that the spatial deconvolution method does not introduce artefacts, even at the edges of the magnetic structure, where large horizontal gradients are detected on the atmospheric parameters. Moreover, we also describe the physical properties of the magnetic structure at different heights finding that, in the inner part of the solar pore, the temperature is lower than outside, the magnetic field strength is larger than 2 kG and unipolar, and the line-of-sight velocity is almost null. At neighbouring pixels, we found low magnetic field strengths of same polarity and strong downward motions that only occur at the low photosphere, below the continuum optical depth log τ = -1. Finally, we studied the spatial relation between different atmospheric parameters at different heights corroborating the physical properties described before.

  13. Performance of Small Pore Microchannel Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Ravinett, T.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Edgar, M.

    1995-01-01

    Small pore size microchannel plates (MCP's) are needed to satisfy the requirements for future high resolution small and large format detectors for astronomy. MCP's with pore sizes in the range 5 micron to 8 micron are now being manufactured, but they are of limited availability and are of small size. We have obtained sets of Galileo 8 micron and 6.5 micron MCP's, and Philips 6 micron and 7 micron pore MCP's, and compared them to our larger pore MCP Z stacks. We have tested back to back MCP stacks of four of these MCP's and achieved gains greater than 2 x 1O(exp 7) with pulse height distributions of less than 40% FWHM, and background rates of less than 0.3 events sec(exp -1) cm(exp -2). Local counting rates up to approx. 100 events/pore/sec have been attained with little drop of the MCP gain. The bare MCP quantum efficiencies are somewhat lower than those expected, however. Flat field images are characterized by an absence of MCP fixed pattern noise.

  14. Nuclear Pore Proteins and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Songli; Powers, Maureen A.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules, a highly specific and tightly regulated process, occurs exclusively through the Nuclear Pore Complex. This immense structure is assembled from approximately 30 proteins, termed nucleoporins. Here we discuss the four nucleoporins that have been linked to cancers, either through elevated expression in tumors (Nup88) or through involvement in chromosomal translocations that encode chimeric fusion proteins (Tpr, Nup98, Nup214). In each case we consider the normal function of the nucleoporin and its translocation partners, as well as what is known about their mechanistic contributions to carcinogenesis, particularly in leukemias. Studies of nucleoporin-linked cancers have revealed novel mechanisms of oncogenesis and. in the future, should continue to expand our understanding of cancer biology. PMID:19577736

  15. Magnetic-resonance pore imaging of nonsymmetric microscopic pore shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Stefan Andreas; Wang, Xindi; Hosking, Peter; Simpson, M. Cather; Hunter, Mark; Galvosas, Petrik

    2015-07-01

    Imaging of the microstructure of porous media such as biological tissue or porous solids is of high interest in health science and technology, engineering and material science. Magnetic resonance pore imaging (MRPI) is a recent technique based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which allows us to acquire images of the average pore shape in a given sample. Here we provide details on the experimental design, challenges, and requirements of MRPI, including its calibration procedures. Utilizing a laser-machined phantom sample, we present images of microscopic pores with a hemiequilateral triangular shape even in the presence of NMR relaxation effects at the pore walls. We therefore show that MRPI is applicable to porous samples without a priori knowledge about their pore shape and symmetry. Furthermore, we introduce "MRPI mapping," which combines MRPI with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This enables one to resolve microscopic pore sizes and shapes spatially, thus expanding the application of MRPI to samples with heterogeneous distributions of pores.

  16. Modeling branching pore structures in membrane filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Cummings, Linda J.

    2016-11-01

    Membrane filters are in widespread industrial use, and mathematical models to predict their efficacy are potentially very useful, as such models can suggest design modifications to improve filter performance and lifetime. Many models have been proposed to describe particle capture by membrane filters and the associated fluid dynamics, but most such models are based on a very simple structure in which the pores of the membrane are assumed to be simple circularly-cylindrical tubes spanning the depth of the membrane. Real membranes used in applications usually have much more complex geometry, with interconnected pores which may branch and bifurcate. Pores are also typically larger on the upstream side of the membrane than on the downstream side. We present an idealized mathematical model, in which a membrane consists of a series of bifurcating pores, which decrease in size as the membrane is traversed. Feed solution is forced through the membrane by applied pressure, and particles are removed from the feed either by sieving, or by particle adsorption within pores (which shrinks them). Thus the membrane's permeability decreases as the filtration progresses, ultimately falling to zero. We discuss how filtration efficiency depends on the characteristics of the branching structure. Partial support from NSF DMS 1261596 is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  18. Model Pores of Molecular Dimension

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, J. A.; Anderson, J. L.; Ho, W. S.; Petzny, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Extremely uniform pores of near molecular dimension can be formed by the irradiation-etching technique first demonstrated by Price and Walker. The technique has now been developed to the stage where it can be used to fabricate model membranes for examining the various steric, hydrodynamic, and electrodynamic phenomena encountered in transport through molecular-size pores. Methods for preparing and characterizing membranes with pores as small as 25 A (radius) are described in this paper. Results on pore size determination via Knudsen gas flow and electrolyte conduction are compared. Pore wall modification by monolayer deposition is also discussed. PMID:4339801

  19. Localization of the Epileptogenic Foci in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: A Pediatric Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hunold, Alexander; Haueisen, Jens; Ahtam, Banu; Doshi, Chiran; Harini, Chellamani; Camposano, Susana; Warfield, Simon K.; Grant, Patricia Ellen; Okada, Yoshio; Papadelis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare disorder of tissue growth and differentiation, characterized by benign hamartomas in the brain and other organs. Up to 90% of TSC patients develop epilepsy and 50% become medically intractable requiring resective surgery. The surgical outcome of TSC patients depends on the accurate identification of the epileptogenic zone consisting of tubers and the surrounding epileptogenic tissue. There is conflicting evidence whether the epileptogenic zone is in the tuber itself or in abnormally developed surrounding cortex. Here, we report the localization of the epileptiform activity among the many cortical tubers in a 4-year-old patient with TSC-related refractory epilepsy undergoing magnetoencephalography (MEG), electroencephalography (EEG), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). For MEG, we used a prototype system that offers higher spatial resolution and sensitivity compared to the conventional adult systems. The generators of interictal activity were localized using both EEG and MEG with equivalent current dipole (ECD) and minimum norm estimation (MNE) methods according to the current clinical standards. For DTI, we calculated four diffusion scalar parameters for the fibers passing through four ROIs defined: (i) at a large cortical tuber identified at the right quadrant, (ii) at the normal appearing tissue contralateral to the tuber, (iii) at the cluster formed by ECDs fitted at the peak of interictal spikes, and (iv) at the normal appearing tissue contralateral to the cluster. ECDs were consistently clustered at the vicinity of the large calcified cortical tuber. MNE and ECDs indicated epileptiform activity in the same areas. DTI analysis showed differences between the scalar values of the tracks passing through the tuber and the ECD cluster. In this illustrative case, we provide evidence from different neuroimaging modalities, which support the view that epileptiform activity may derive from abnormally developed tissue

  20. Localization of the epileptogenic foci in tuberous sclerosis complex: a pediatric case report.

    PubMed

    Hunold, Alexander; Haueisen, Jens; Ahtam, Banu; Doshi, Chiran; Harini, Chellamani; Camposano, Susana; Warfield, Simon K; Grant, Patricia Ellen; Okada, Yoshio; Papadelis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare disorder of tissue growth and differentiation, characterized by benign hamartomas in the brain and other organs. Up to 90% of TSC patients develop epilepsy and 50% become medically intractable requiring resective surgery. The surgical outcome of TSC patients depends on the accurate identification of the epileptogenic zone consisting of tubers and the surrounding epileptogenic tissue. There is conflicting evidence whether the epileptogenic zone is in the tuber itself or in abnormally developed surrounding cortex. Here, we report the localization of the epileptiform activity among the many cortical tubers in a 4-year-old patient with TSC-related refractory epilepsy undergoing magnetoencephalography (MEG), electroencephalography (EEG), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). For MEG, we used a prototype system that offers higher spatial resolution and sensitivity compared to the conventional adult systems. The generators of interictal activity were localized using both EEG and MEG with equivalent current dipole (ECD) and minimum norm estimation (MNE) methods according to the current clinical standards. For DTI, we calculated four diffusion scalar parameters for the fibers passing through four ROIs defined: (i) at a large cortical tuber identified at the right quadrant, (ii) at the normal appearing tissue contralateral to the tuber, (iii) at the cluster formed by ECDs fitted at the peak of interictal spikes, and (iv) at the normal appearing tissue contralateral to the cluster. ECDs were consistently clustered at the vicinity of the large calcified cortical tuber. MNE and ECDs indicated epileptiform activity in the same areas. DTI analysis showed differences between the scalar values of the tracks passing through the tuber and the ECD cluster. In this illustrative case, we provide evidence from different neuroimaging modalities, which support the view that epileptiform activity may derive from abnormally developed tissue

  1. Effects of rupture complexity on local tsunami inundation: Implications for probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Christof; Power, William; Fraser, Stuart; Wang, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the influence of earthquake source complexity on the extent of inundation caused by a resulting tsunami. We simulated 100 scenarios with sources on the Hikurangi subduction-interface in the vicinity of Hawke's Bay/Napier and Poverty Bay/Gisborne (New Zealand). For both target areas rupture complexity was found to have a first order effect on flow depth and inundation extent for the local tsunami sources investigated. The position of individual asperities in the slip distribution on the rupture interface control to some extent how severe inundation will be. However, predicting inundation extent in detail from investigating the distribution of slip on the rupture interface proves difficult. The distribution of inundation extent for one earthquake of given magnitude but different realisations of slip distribution is skewed. The extent of inundation predicted by a uniform distribution of slip on the rupture interface is roughly represented by the median of this distribution. Assuming uniform slip on the rupture interface therefore will underestimate the potential impact and extent of inundation. For example, simulation of an MW 8.7 to MW 8.8 earthquake with uniform slip reproduced the area potentially affected by inundation of an equivalent non-uniform slip event of MW 8.4 for Napier. The extent of inundation does not follow a simple monotonic relationship to the magnitude of the earthquake. Therefore de-aggregation, to establish the contribution of different sources with different slip distributions to the probabilistic hazard, cannot be performed based on magnitude considerations alone. We propose to use parameters of the tsunami wave field measured offshore as predictors for inundation severity to perform de-aggregation based on simulations with the linear wave equations.

  2. Selective NO trapping in the pores of chain-type complex assemblies based on electronically activated paddlewheel-type [Ru2(II,II)]/[Rh2(II,II)] dimers.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Wataru; Yamagishi, Kayo; Hori, Akihiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Ryotaro; Kitagawa, Susumu; Takata, Masaki; Miyasaka, Hitoshi

    2013-12-11

    The design of porous materials that undergo selective adsorption of a specific molecule is a critical issue in research on porous coordination polymers or metal-organic frameworks. For the purpose of the selective capture of molecules possessing an electron-acceptor character such as nitric oxide (NO), one-dimensional chain compounds possessing a high donor character have been synthesized using 4-chloroanisate-bridged paddlewheel-type dimetal(II, II) complexes with M = Ru and Rh and phenazine (phz) as the chain linker: [M2(4-Cl-2-OMePhCO2)4(phz)]·n(CH2Cl2) (M = Ru, 1; Rh, 2). These compounds are isostructural and are composed of chains with a [-{M2}-phz-] repeating unit and CH2Cl2 occupying the void space between the chains. Compounds 1 and 2 change to a new phase (1-dry and 2-dry) upon evacuating the crystallization solvent (CH2Cl2) and almost lose their pores in the drying process: no void space in 1-dry and 31.8 Å(3), corresponding to 2.9% of the cell volume, in 2-dry. Nevertheless, the compounds show a unique gas accommodation ability. Accompanied by a structural transformation (i.e., the first gate-opening) at low pressures of <10 kPa, both compounds show a typical physisorption isotherm for O2 (90 K) and CO2 (195 K), with the adsorption amount of ca. 2-4 gas molecules per [M2] unit. In addition, the adsorption isotherm for NO (121 K) involves the first gate-opening followed by a second gate-opening anomaly at NO pressures of ≈52 kPa for 1-dry and ≈21 kPa for 2-dry. At the first gate-opening, the absorbed amount of NO is ca. 4 molecules per [M2] unit, and then it reaches 8.4 and 6.3 for 1-dry and 2-dry, respectively, at 95 kPa. Only the isotherm for NO exhibits hysteresis in the desorption process, and some of the NO molecules are trapped in pores even after evacuating at 121 K, although it recovers to the original dried sample on heating to room temperature. The adsorbed NO molecules accrue a significant electron donation from the host framework even in

  3. Pore architecture of nanoporous gold and titania by hydrogen thermoporometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, L. T.; Biener, M. M.; Ye, J. C.; Baumann, T. F.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2015-07-01

    Nanoporous gold (NPG) and materials derived from it by templating have complex pore architecture that determines their technologically relevant physical properties. Here, we apply high-resolution hydrogen thermoporometry to study the pore structure of NPG and NPG-derived titania nanofoam (TNF). Results reveal complex multimodal pore size distributions for NPG and TNF. The freezing-melting hysteresis is pronounced, with freezing and melting scans having entirely different shapes. Experiments involving partial freeze-melt cycles reveal the lack of direct correlation between individual freezing and melting peaks, pointing to phenomena that are beyond the Gibbs-Thomson formalism. The depression of the average freezing temperature scales linearly with the ratio of the internal surface area (measured by gas sorption) and the total pore volume derived from the density of monoliths. Thermoporometry yields total pore volumes in good agreement with those derived from monolith densities for both NPG and TNF.

  4. Mechanisms and kinetics for platelet and neutrophil localization in immune complex nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.J.; Alpers, C.E.; Pruchno, C.; Schulze, M.; Baker, P.J.; Pritzl, P.; Couser, W.G. )

    1989-11-01

    We have previously reported that both neutrophils (PMNs) and platelets mediate proteinuria in a model of subendothelial immune complex (IC) nephritis (GN) in the rat. In order to understand the interaction of PMNs and platelets in this model, we quantitated the uptake of {sup 111}In-labelled platelets in glomeruli and correlated this with the number of PMNs observed histologically at 10 and 30 minutes, 1, 4 and 24 hours following induction of GN. Platelet accumulation was biphasic with a major peak at 10 minutes and a minor peak at four hours. Early platelet accumulation was complement dependent, and PMN-independent. PMN accumulation occurred after the initial platelet influx, peaking at one and four hours, was complement dependent, but was not affected by platelet depletion. Complement depletion significantly reduced proteinuria. This is the first documentation that platelet accumulation in glomeruli in IC GN is complement dependent. In addition, the enhancement of PMN-mediated injury by the platelet in this model does not involve effects of platelets on PMN localization, thus implying a functional interaction between these cells within the glomerulus.

  5. Spike voltage topography and equivalent dipole localization in complex partial epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ebersole, J S; Wade, P B

    1990-01-01

    The EEG of 45 patients with complex partial epilepsy was recorded from standard and supplementary inferior temporal electrode sites for 2 or more days via cable telemetry onto video (VHS) tape (22-25 channels, common reference). Epochs with "temporal spikes" were read into a topographic EEG device where individual spikes were visually identified and averaged in sums of 8-32. Analysis of spike voltage topography revealed two distinct patterns - dipolar, Type 1 and non-dipolar, Type 2. One or the other spike type predominated in all but two patients. Application of source modeling techniques (3 shells, single dipole, 6 parameters) to the spike topography data revealed that both spike types had similar equivalent dipoles in terms of location and orientation, except for vector elevation. However, calculated dipoles for Type 1 spikes were more stable over the course of the spike peak. Correlations with clinical data and intracranial EEG suggest that Type 1 spikes originate in mesial temporal structures, while Type 2 spikes arise from temporal or frontal neocortex. Spike voltage topography and equivalent dipole localization appear to be useful in the presurgical evaluation of patients with focal epilepsy.

  6. Genetic Structure of a Local Population of the Anopheles gambiae Complex in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Markianos, Kyriacos; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Mitri, Christian; Guelbeogo, Wamdaogo M.; Gneme, Awa; Eiglmeier, Karin; Holm, Inge; Sagnon, N’Fale; Vernick, Kenneth D.; Riehle, Michelle M.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Anopheles gambiae species complex are primary vectors of human malaria in Africa. Population heterogeneities for ecological and behavioral attributes expand and stabilize malaria transmission over space and time, and populations may change in response to vector control, urbanization and other factors. There is a need for approaches to comprehensively describe the structure and characteristics of a sympatric local mosquito population, because incomplete knowledge of vector population composition may hinder control efforts. To this end, we used a genome-wide custom SNP typing array to analyze a population collection from a single geographic region in West Africa. The combination of sample depth (n = 456) and marker density (n = 1536) unambiguously resolved population subgroups, which were also compared for their relative susceptibility to natural genotypes of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The population subgroups display fluctuating patterns of differentiation or sharing across the genome. Analysis of linkage disequilibrium identified 19 new candidate genes for association with underlying population divergence between sister taxa, A. coluzzii (M-form) and A. gambiae (S-form). PMID:26731649

  7. Linkage mapping and physical localization of the major histocompatibility complex region of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Gouin, N; Deakin, J E; Miska, K B; Miller, R D; Kammerer, C M; Graves, J A M; VandeBerg, J L; Samollow, P B

    2006-01-01

    We used genetic linkage mapping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to conduct the first analysis of genic organization and chromosome localization of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of a marsupial, the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica. Family based linkage analyses of two M. domestica MHC Class I genes (UA1, UG) and three MHC Class II genes (DAB, DMA, and DMB) revealed that these genes were tightly linked and positioned in the central region of linkage group 3 (LG3). This cluster of MHC genes was physically mapped to the centromeric region of chromosome 2q by FISH using a BAC clone containing the UA1 gene. An interesting finding from the linkage analyses is that sex-specific recombination rates were virtually identical within the MHC region. This stands in stark contrast to the genome-wide situation, wherein males exhibit approximately twice as much recombination as females, and could have evolutionary implications for maintaining equality between males and females in the ability to generate haplotype diversity in this region. These analyses also showed that three non-MHC genes that flank the MHC region on human chromosome 6, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), and prolactin (PRL), are split among two separate linkage groups (chromosomes) in M. domestica. Comparative analysis with eight other vertebrate species suggests strong conservation of the BMP6-PRL synteny among birds and mammals, although the BMP6-PRL-MHC-ME1 synteny is not conserved.

  8. Distribution of crossing over on mouse synaptonemal complexes using immunofluorescent localization of MLH1 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, L K; Reeves, A; Webb, L M; Ashley, T

    1999-01-01

    We have used immunofluorescent localization to examine the distribution of MLH1 (MutL homolog) foci on synaptonemal complexes (SCs) from juvenile male mice. MLH1 is a mismatch repair protein necessary for meiotic recombination in mice, and MLH1 foci have been proposed to mark crossover sites. We present evidence that the number and distribution of MLH1 foci on SCs closely correspond to the number and distribution of chiasmata on diplotene-metaphase I chromosomes. MLH1 foci were typically excluded from SC in centromeric heterochromatin. For SCs with one MLH1 focus, most foci were located near the middle of long SCs, but near the distal end of short SCs. For SCs with two MLH1 foci, the distribution of foci was bimodal regardless of SC length, with most foci located near the proximal and distal ends. The distribution of MLH1 foci indicated interference between foci. We observed a consistent relative distance (percent of SC length in euchromatin) between two foci on SCs of different lengths, suggesting that positive interference between MLH1 foci is a function of relative SC length. The extended length of pachytene SCs, as compared to more condensed diplotene-metaphase I bivalents, makes mapping crossover events and interference distances using MLH1 foci more accurate than using chiasmata. PMID:10101178

  9. Morphogenetic fields in embryogenesis, regeneration, and cancer: Non-local control of complex patterning

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Establishment of shape during embryonic development, and the maintenance of shape against injury or tumorigenesis, requires constant coordination of cell behaviors toward the patterning needs of the host organism. Molecular cell biology and genetics have made great strides in understanding the mechanisms that regulate cell function. However, generalized rational control of shape is still largely beyond our current capabilities. Significant instructive signals function at long range to provide positional information and other cues to regulate organism-wide systems properties like anatomical polarity and size control. Is complex morphogenesis best understood as the emergent property of local cell interactions, or as the outcome of a computational process that is guided by a physically-encoded map or template of the final goal state? Here I review recent data and molecular mechanisms relevant to morphogenetic fields: large-scale systems of physical properties that have been proposed to store patterning information during embryogenesis, regenerative repair, and cancer suppression that ultimately controls anatomy. Placing special emphasis on the role of endogenous bioelectric signals as an important component of the morphogenetic field, I speculate on novel approaches for the computational modeling and control of these fields with applications to synthetic biology, regenerative medicine, and evolutionary developmental biology. PMID:22542702

  10. A single frequency component-based re-estimated MUSIC algorithm for impact localization on complex composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shenfang; Bao, Qiao; Qiu, Lei; Zhong, Yongteng

    2015-10-01

    The growing use of composite materials on aircraft structures has attracted much attention for impact monitoring as a kind of structural health monitoring (SHM) method. Multiple signal classification (MUSIC)-based monitoring technology is a promising method because of its directional scanning ability and easy arrangement of the sensor array. However, for applications on real complex structures, some challenges still exist. The impact-induced elastic waves usually exhibit a wide-band performance, giving rise to the difficulty in obtaining the phase velocity directly. In addition, composite structures usually have obvious anisotropy, and the complex structural style of real aircrafts further enhances this performance, which greatly reduces the localization precision of the MUSIC-based method. To improve the MUSIC-based impact monitoring method, this paper first analyzes and demonstrates the influence of measurement precision of the phase velocity on the localization results of the MUSIC impact localization method. In order to improve the accuracy of the phase velocity measurement, a single frequency component extraction method is presented. Additionally, a single frequency component-based re-estimated MUSIC (SFCBR-MUSIC) algorithm is proposed to reduce the localization error caused by the anisotropy of the complex composite structure. The proposed method is verified on a real composite aircraft wing box, which has T-stiffeners and screw holes. Three typical categories of 41 impacts are monitored. Experimental results show that the SFCBR-MUSIC algorithm can localize impact on complex composite structures with an obviously improved accuracy.

  11. Vibrational transitions in hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes - A local mode perturbation theory approach to transition frequencies and intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2017-04-01

    The local mode perturbation theory (LMPT) model was developed to improve the description of hydrogen bonded XH-stretching transitions, where X is typically O or N. We present a modified version of the LMPT model to extend its application from hydrated bimolecular complexes to hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes with donors such as alcohols, amines and acids. We have applied the modified model to a series of complexes of different hydrogen bond type and complex energy. We found that the differences between local mode (LM) and LMPT calculated fundamental XH-stretching transition wavenumbers and oscillator strengths were correlated with the strength of the hydrogen bond. Overall, we have found that the LMPT model in most cases predicts transition wavenumbers within 20 cm-1 of the experimental values.

  12. Pore dynamics in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozen, I.; Dommersnes, P.

    2014-09-01

    Transient circular pores can open in plasma membrane of cells due to mechanical stress, and failure to repair such pores lead to cell death. Similar pores in the form of defects also exist among smectic membranes, such as in myelin sheaths or mitochondrial membranes. The formation and growth of membrane defects are associated with diseases, for example multiple sclerosis. A deeper understanding of membrane pore dynamics can provide a more refined picture of membrane integrity-related disease development, and possibly also treatment options and strategies. Pore dynamics is also of great importance regarding healthcare applications such as drug delivery, gene or as recently been implied, cancer therapy. The dynamics of pores significantly differ in stacks which are confined in 2D compared to those in cells or vesicles. In this short review, we will summarize the dynamics of different types of pores that can be observed in biological membranes, which include circular transient, fusion and hemi-fusion pores. We will dedicate a section to floral and fractal pores which were discovered a few years ago and have highly peculiar characteristics. Finally, we will discuss the repair mechanisms of large area pores in conjunction with the current cell membrane repair hypotheses.

  13. Immunohistochemical localization of DPP10 in rat brain supports the existence of a Kv4/KChIP/DPPL ternary complex in neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-Chen; Cheng, Chau-Fu; Tsaur, Meei-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Subthreshold A-type K(+) currents (ISA s) have been recorded from the cell bodies of hippocampal and neocortical interneurons as well as neocortical pyramidal neurons. Kv4 channels are responsible for the somatodendritic ISA s. It has been proposed that neuronal Kv4 channels are ternary complexes including pore-forming Kv4 subunits, K(+) channel-interacting proteins (KChIPs), and dipeptidyl peptidase-like proteins (DPPLs). However, colocalization evidence was still lacking. The distribution of DPP10 mRNA in rodent brain has been reported but its protein localization remains unknown. In this study, we generated a DPP10 antibody to label DPP10 protein in adult rat brain by immunohistochemistry. Absent from glia, DPP10 proteins appear mainly in the cell bodies of DPP10(+) neurons, not only at the plasma membrane but also in the cytoplasm. At least 6.4% of inhibitory interneurons in the hippocampus coexpressed Kv4.3, KChIP1, and DPP10, with the highest density in the CA1 strata alveus/oriens/pyramidale and the dentate hilus. Colocalization of Kv4.3/KChIP1/DPP10 was also detected in at least 6.9% of inhibitory interneurons scattered throughout the neocortex. Both hippocampal and neocortical Kv4.3/KChIP1/DPP10(+) inhibitory interneurons expressed parvalbumin or somatostatin, but not calbindin or calretinin. Furthermore, we found colocalization of Kv4.2/Kv4.3/KChIP3/DPP10 in neocortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons and olfactory bulb mitral cells. Together, although DPP10 is also expressed in some brain neurons lacking Kv4 (such as parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive Golgi cells in the cerebellum), colocalization of DPP10 with Kv4 and KChIP at the plasma membrane of ISA -expressing neuron somata supports the existence of Kv4/KChIP/DPPL ternary complex in vivo.

  14. Polo kinase interacts with RacGAP50C and is required to localize the cytokinesis initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Saman; Fraval, Hamilton; Murray, Michael; Saint, Robert; Gregory, Stephen L

    2010-09-10

    The assembly and constriction of an actomyosin contractile ring in cytokinesis is dependent on the activation of Rho at the equatorial cortex by a complex, here termed the cytokinesis initiation complex, between a microtubule-associated kinesin-like protein (KLP), a member of the RacGAP family, and the RhoGEF Pebble. Recently, the activity of the mammalian Polo kinase ortholog Plk1 has been implicated in the formation of this complex. We show here that Polo kinase interacts directly with the cytokinesis initiation complex by binding RacGAP50C. We find that a new domain of Polo kinase, termed the intermediate domain, interacts directly with RacGAP50C and that Polo kinase is essential for localization of the KLP-RacGAP centralspindlin complex to the cell equator and spindle midzone. In the absence of Polo kinase, RacGAP50C and Pav-KLP fail to localize normally, instead decorating microtubules along their length. Our results indicate that Polo kinase directly binds the conserved cytokinesis initiation complex and is required to trigger centralspindlin localization as a first step in cytokinesis.

  15. Arabidopsis CML38, a Calcium Sensor That Localizes to Ribonucleoprotein Complexes under Hypoxia Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Carlee; Li, Tian

    2016-01-01

    During waterlogging and the associated oxygen deprivation stress, plants respond by the induction of adaptive programs, including the redirected expression of gene networks toward the synthesis of core hypoxia-response proteins. Among these core response proteins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is the calcium sensor CML38, a protein related to regulator of gene silencing calmodulin-like proteins (rgsCaMs). CML38 transcripts are up-regulated more than 300-fold in roots within 6 h of hypoxia treatment. Transfer DNA insertional mutants of CML38 show an enhanced sensitivity to hypoxia stress, with lowered survival and more severe inhibition of root and shoot growth. By using yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) translational fusions, CML38 protein was found to be localized to cytosolic granule structures similar in morphology to hypoxia-induced stress granules. Immunoprecipitation of CML38 from the roots of hypoxia-challenged transgenic plants harboring CML38pro::CML38:YFP followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of protein targets associated with messenger RNA ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes including stress granules, which are known to accumulate as messenger RNA storage and triage centers during hypoxia. This finding is further supported by the colocalization of CML38 with the mRNP stress granule marker RNA Binding Protein 47 (RBP47) upon cotransfection of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Ruthenium Red treatment results in the loss of CML38 signal in cytosolic granules, suggesting that calcium is necessary for stress granule association. These results confirm that CML38 is a core hypoxia response calcium sensor protein and suggest that it serves as a potential calcium signaling target within stress granules and other mRNPs that accumulate during flooding stress responses. PMID:26634999

  16. Local Difference Measures between Complex Networks for Dynamical System Model Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Stefan; Donges, Jonathan F.; Volkholz, Jan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    A faithful modeling of real-world dynamical systems necessitates model evaluation. A recent promising methodological approach to this problem has been based on complex networks, which in turn have proven useful for the characterization of dynamical systems. In this context, we introduce three local network difference measures and demonstrate their capabilities in the field of climate modeling, where these measures facilitate a spatially explicit model evaluation. Building on a recent study by Feldhoff et al. [1] we comparatively analyze statistical and dynamical regional climate simulations of the South American monsoon system. Three types of climate networks representing different aspects of rainfall dynamics are constructed from the modeled precipitation space-time series. Specifically, we define simple graphs based on positive as well as negative rank correlations between rainfall anomaly time series at different locations, and such based on spatial synchronizations of extreme rain events. An evaluation against respective networks built from daily satellite data provided by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 V7 reveals far greater differences in model performance between network types for a fixed but arbitrary climate model than between climate models for a fixed but arbitrary network type. We identify two sources of uncertainty in this respect. Firstly, climate variability limits fidelity, particularly in the case of the extreme event network; and secondly, larger geographical link lengths render link misplacements more likely, most notably in the case of the anticorrelation network; both contributions are quantified using suitable ensembles of surrogate networks. Our model evaluation approach is applicable to any multidimensional dynamical system and especially our simple graph difference measures are highly versatile as the graphs to be compared may be constructed in whatever way required. Generalizations to directed as well as edge- and node

  17. Complexity of Language Ideologies in Transnational Movement: Korean "Jogi Yuhak" Families' Ambivalent Attitudes towards Local Varieties of English in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, So Hee

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the complex and competing language ideologies that Korean educational migrant families in Singapore hold about the normativity and legitimacy of English language varieties. During their educational migration in Singapore, Korean families show ambivalent attitudes toward the local variety of English in Singapore, Singlish.…

  18. Luminescent oligo(ethylene glycol)-functionalized cyclometalated platinum(II) complexes: cellular characterization and mitochondria-specific localization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhengqing; Tong, Wah-Leung; Chan, Michael C W

    2014-02-18

    A readily tunable series of non-planar oligo(ethylene glycol)-substituted phosphorescent Pt(II) complexes has been investigated as live cell imaging agents; suitable structural modifications can give good cellular uptake, traceable mitochondria-specific localization and potent cytotoxic characteristics towards HeLa cells.

  19. Tailoring Healthy Workplace Interventions to Local Healthcare Settings: A Complexity Theory-Informed Workplace of Well-Being Framework.

    PubMed

    Brand, Sarah L; Fleming, Lora E; Wyatt, Katrina M

    2015-01-01

    Many healthy workplace interventions have been developed for healthcare settings to address the consistently low scores of healthcare professionals on assessments of mental and physical well-being. Complex healthcare settings present challenges for the scale-up and spread of successful interventions from one setting to another. Despite general agreement regarding the importance of the local setting in affecting intervention success across different settings, there is no consensus on what it is about a local setting that needs to be taken into account to design healthy workplace interventions appropriate for different local settings. Complexity theory principles were used to understand a workplace as a complex adaptive system and to create a framework of eight domains (system characteristics) that affect the emergence of system-level behaviour. This Workplace of Well-being (WoW) framework is responsive and adaptive to local settings and allows a shared understanding of the enablers and barriers to behaviour change by capturing local information for each of the eight domains. We use the results of applying the WoW framework to one workplace, a UK National Health Service ward, to describe the utility of this approach in informing design of setting-appropriate healthy workplace interventions that create workplaces conducive to healthy behaviour change.

  20. Subcellular localization of K+ channels in mammalian brain neurons: remarkable precision in the midst of extraordinary complexity

    PubMed Central

    Trimmer, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium channels (KChs) are the most diverse ion channels, in part due to extensive combinatorial assembly of a large number of principal and auxiliary subunits into an assortment of KCh complexes. This structural and functional diversity allows KChs to play diverse roles in neuronal function. Localization of KChs within specialized neuronal compartments defines their physiological role, and also fundamentally impacts their activity, due to localized exposure to diverse cellular determinants of channel function. Recent studies in mammalian brain reveal an exquisite refinement of KCh subcellular localization. This includes axonal KChs at the initial segment, and near/within nodes of Ranvier and presynaptic terminals, dendritic KChs found at sites reflecting specific synaptic input, and KChs defining novel compartments. Painting the remarkable diversity of KChs onto the complex architecture of mammalian neurons creates an elegant picture of electrical signal processing underlying the sophisticated function of individual neuronal compartments, and ultimately neurotransmission and behavior. PMID:25611506

  1. Highly Charged Ruthenium(II) Polypyridyl Complexes as Lysosome-Localized Photosensitizers for Two-Photon Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huaiyi; Yu, Bole; Zhang, Pingyu; Huang, Juanjuan; Chen, Yu; Gasser, Gilles; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-11-16

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive medical technique that has received increasing attention over the last years and been applied for the treatment of certain types of cancer. However, the currently clinically used PDT agents have several limitations, such as low water solubility, poor photostability, and limited selectivity towards cancer cells, aside from having very low two-photon cross-sections around 800 nm, which limits their potential use in TP-PDT. To tackle these drawbacks, three highly positively charged ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes were synthesized. These complexes selectively localize in the lysosomes, an ideal localization for PDT purposes. One of these complexes showed an impressive phototoxicity index upon irradiation at 800 nm in 3D HeLa multicellular tumor spheroids and thus holds great promise for applications in two-photon photodynamic therapy.

  2. A role for protein phosphatase PP1γ in SMN complex formation and subnuclear localization to Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Renvoisé, Benoît; Quérol, Gwendoline; Verrier, Eloi Rémi; Burlet, Philippe; Lefebvre, Suzie

    2012-06-15

    The spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) gene product SMN forms with gem-associated protein 2-8 (Gemin2-8) and unrip (also known as STRAP) the ubiquitous survival motor neuron (SMN) complex, which is required for the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), their nuclear import and their localization to subnuclear domain Cajal bodies (CBs). The concentration of the SMN complex and snRNPs in CBs is reduced upon SMN deficiency in SMA cells. Subcellular localization of the SMN complex is regulated in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and the precise mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using co-immunoprecipitation in HeLa cell extracts and in vitro protein binding assays, we show here that the SMN complex and its component Gemin8 interact directly with protein phosphatase PP1γ. Overexpression of Gemin8 in cells increases the number of CBs and results in targeting of PP1γ to CBs. Moreover, depletion of PP1γ by RNA interference enhances the localization of the SMN complex and snRNPs to CBs. Consequently, the interaction between SMN and Gemin8 increases in cytoplasmic and nuclear extracts of PP1γ-depleted cells. Two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis revealed that SMN is hyperphosphorylated in nuclear extracts of PP1γ-depleted cells and expression of PP1γ restores these isoforms. Notably, SMN deficiency in SMA leads to the aberrant subcellular localization of Gemin8 and PP1γ in the atrophic skeletal muscles, suggesting that the function of PP1γ is likely to be affected in disease. Our findings reveal a role of PP1γ in the formation of the SMN complex and the maintenance of CB integrity. Finally, we propose Gemin8 interaction with PP1γ as a target for therapeutic intervention in SMA.

  3. Open-closed switching of synthetic tubular pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongju; Kang, Jiheong; Shen, Bowen; Wang, Yanqiu; He, Ying; Lee, Myongsoo

    2015-10-01

    While encouraging progress has been made on switchable nanopores to mimic biological channels and pores, it remains a great challenge to realize long tubular pores with a dynamic open-closed motion. Here we report μm-long, dynamic tubular pores that undergo rapid switching between open and closed states in response to a thermal signal in water. The tubular walls consist of laterally associated primary fibrils stacked from disc-shaped molecules in which the discs readily tilt by means of thermally regulated dehydration of the oligoether chains placed on the wall surfaces. Notably, this pore switching mediates a controlled water-pumping catalytic action for the dehydrative cyclization of adenosine monophosphate to produce metabolically active cyclic adenosine monophosphate. We believe that our work may allow the creation of a variety of dynamic pore structures with complex functions arising from open-closed motion.

  4. Open–closed switching of synthetic tubular pores

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongju; Kang, Jiheong; Shen, Bowen; Wang, Yanqiu; He, Ying; Lee, Myongsoo

    2015-01-01

    While encouraging progress has been made on switchable nanopores to mimic biological channels and pores, it remains a great challenge to realize long tubular pores with a dynamic open–closed motion. Here we report μm-long, dynamic tubular pores that undergo rapid switching between open and closed states in response to a thermal signal in water. The tubular walls consist of laterally associated primary fibrils stacked from disc-shaped molecules in which the discs readily tilt by means of thermally regulated dehydration of the oligoether chains placed on the wall surfaces. Notably, this pore switching mediates a controlled water-pumping catalytic action for the dehydrative cyclization of adenosine monophosphate to produce metabolically active cyclic adenosine monophosphate. We believe that our work may allow the creation of a variety of dynamic pore structures with complex functions arising from open–closed motion. PMID:26456695

  5. Characterizing 3-D flow velocity in evolving pore networks driven by CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnicki, K. N.; Yoon, H.; Martinez, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding reactive flow in geomaterials is important for optimizing geologic carbon storage practices, such as using pore space efficiently. Flow paths can be complex in large degrees of geologic heterogeneities across scales. In addition, local heterogeneity can evolve as reactive transport processes alter the pore-scale morphology. For example, dissolved carbon dioxide may react with minerals in fractured rocks, confined aquifers, or faults, resulting in heterogeneous cementation (and/or dissolution) and evolving flow conditions. Both path and flow complexities are important and poorly characterized, making it difficult to determine their evolution with traditional 2-D transport models. Here we characterize the development of 3-D pore-scale flow with an evolving pore configuration due to calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation and dissolution. A simple pattern of a microfluidic pore network is used initially and pore structures will become more complex due to precipitation and dissolution processes. At several stages of precipitation and dissolution, we directly visualize 3-D velocity vectors using micro particle image velocimetry and a laser scanning confocal microscope. Measured 3-D velocity vectors are then compared to 3-D simulated flow fields which will be used to simulate reactive transport. Our findings will highlight the importance of the 3-D flow dynamics and its impact on estimating reactive surface area over time. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001114.

  6. The Arabidopsis Wave Complex: Mechanisms Of Localized Actin Polymerization And Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Szymanski

    2012-10-23

    The objective of this project was to discover the protein complexes and control mechanisms that determine the location of actin filament roadways in plant cells. Our work provided the first molecular description of protein complexes that are converted from inactive complexes to active actin filament nucleators in the cell. These discoveries provided a conceptual framework to control to roadways in plant cells that determine the location and delivery of plant metabolites and storage molecules that are relevant to the bioenergy economy.

  7. Localization matters: a nuclear targeting two-photon absorption iridium complex in photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaohe; Zhu, Yingzhong; Zhang, Mingzhu; Luo, Lei; Wu, Jieying; Zhou, Hongping; Guan, Lijuan; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Tian, Yupeng

    2017-03-16

    We present a two-photon (2P, 800 nm) PDT cyclometalated Iridium(iii) complex (Ir-Es) that targets the intracellular nucleus. The complex is capable of migrating sequentially from the nucleus to mitochondria and inducing dual-damage under light exposure. This study suggests that with minor modification of the terminal moieties of complexes, their final intracellular destinations and PDT efficiency can be significantly impacted.

  8. Local region statistics combining multi-parameter intensity fitting module for medical image segmentation with intensity inhomogeneity and complex composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fan; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Wenda; Qu, Feng; Sui, Long

    2016-08-01

    It is difficult to segment medical image with intensity inhomogeneity and complex composition, because most region-based modules relay on the intensity distributions. In this paper, we propose a novel method which uses local region statistics and multi-parameter intensity fitting as well. By replacing the original local region statistics with the novel local region statistics after bias field correction, the effect of intensity inhomogeneity can be eliminated. Then we devise a maximum likelihood energy function based on the distribution of each local region. Segmentation and bias field estimation can be jointly obtained by minimizing the proposed energy function. Furthermore, in order to characterize the features of each local region effectively, two parameters are used to fit the average intensity inside and outside of the counter, respectively. This can well handle the medical images with complex composition, such as larger gray difference even in the same region. Comparisons with several representative methods on synthetic and medical images demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over other representative algorithms.

  9. Bypassing the need for subcellular localization of a polysaccharide export-anchor complex by overexpressing its protein subunits

    PubMed Central

    Javens, June; Wan, Zhe; Hardy, Gail G.; Brun, Yves V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Subcellular protein localization is thought to promote protein-protein interaction by increasing the effective concentration and enabling spatial coordination and proper segregation of proteins. We found that protein overexpression allowed the assembly of a productive polysaccharide biosynthesis-export-anchoring complex in the absence of polar localization in Caulobacter crescentus. Polar localization of the holdfast export protein, HfsD, depends on the presence of the other export proteins, HfsA, and HfsB, and on the polar scaffold protein PodJ. The holdfast deficiency of hfsB and podJ mutants is suppressed by the overexpression of export proteins. Restored holdfasts are randomly positioned and co-localize with a holdfast anchor protein in these strains, indicating that functional complexes can form at non-polar sites. Therefore, overexpression of export proteins surpasses a concentration threshold necessary for holdfast synthesis. Restoration of holdfast synthesis at non-polar sites reduces surface adhesion, consistent with the need to spatially coordinate the holdfast synthesis machinery with the flagellum and pili. These strains lack the cell-specific segregation of the holdfast, resulting in the presence of holdfasts in motile daughter cells. Our results highlight the fact that multiple facets of subcellular localization can be coupled to improve the phenotypic outcome of a protein assembly. PMID:23714375

  10. Pore network and pore scale modeling of reactive transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Vu, T. M.; Varloteaux, C.; Bekri, S.

    2012-12-01

    The study of the evolution of a porous medium where a reactive fluid flows is conditioned by the accurate determination of three macroscopic parameters governing the solute displacement, namely the solute velocity, dispersion and mean reaction rate. Of course, a possible application of such studies is CO2 sequestration. This presentation proposes to approach the determination of these parameters by two different ways and to compare them; both are on the pore scale. In the first one called PNM (for pore-network model), a pore-network is extracted from micro tomography images of a real porous medium. This network is composed of spherical pores joined by circular tubes; it is used to calculate transport macroscopic parameters and porosity-permeability evolution during the reactive transport flow as functions of dimensionless numbers representing the reaction and flow rate regimes. The flow is calculated by using Kirchhoff laws. Transport is determined in the asymptotic regime where the solute concentration undergoes an exponential evolution with time. In the second approach called PSM (for pore scale model), the pore-network model is used as a three dimensional medium which is discretized by the Level Set Method. The Stokes equations are solved in order to determine the local flow field and the corresponding permeability. The solute concentration is obtained by solving the local convection-diffusion equation in the 3D pore-network; numerical dispersion is reduced by a Flux Limiting Scheme. Two different geometries of porous media are addressed by both numerical codes. The first pore-network geometry is used to validate the PNM assumptions, whereas the second pore-network is defined for a better understanding of the dominant solute distribution. One of the main results obtained with the first pore-network is the dependence of the concentration profile on the Péclet number Pe in the pore-bodies. When this number increases, one has to switch from an assumption of

  11. Environment, Complexity and Professional Training in Agriculture. "Turning Local Learning into Global Knowledge."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevost, P.

    1994-01-01

    Training farmers to care for the environment must address the complex relationship between farming and the environment. The example of maize weeding in France demonstrates the process of decision making on a farm and the need for teaching about complexity and adopting a pragmatic approach to training. (SK)

  12. Localization and Function of Pals1-associated Tight Junction Protein in Drosophila Is Regulated by Two Distinct Apical Complexes.

    PubMed

    Sen, Arnab; Sun, Rui; Krahn, Michael P

    2015-05-22

    The transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) and its intracellular adaptor protein Pals1 (Stardust, Sdt in Drosophila) play a crucial role in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal polarity in epithelial cells in various organisms. In contrast, the multiple PDZ domain-containing protein Pals1-associated tight junction protein (PATJ), which has been described to form a complex with Crb/Sdt, is not essential for apical basal polarity or for the stability of the Crb/Sdt complex in the Drosophila epidermis. Here we show that, in the embryonic epidermis, Sdt is essential for the correct subcellular localization of PATJ in differentiated epithelial cells but not during cellularization. Consistently, the L27 domain of PATJ is crucial for the correct localization and function of the protein. Our data further indicate that the four PDZ domains of PATJ function, to a large extent, in redundancy, regulating the function of the protein. Interestingly, the PATJ-Sdt heterodimer is not only recruited to the apical cell-cell contacts by binding to Crb but depends on functional Bazooka (Baz). However, biochemical experiments show that PATJ associates with both complexes, the Baz-Sdt and the Crb-Sdt complex, in the mature epithelium of the embryonic epidermis, suggesting a role of these two complexes for the function of PATJ during the development of Drosophila.

  13. Human dihydrofolate reductase and thymidylate synthase form a complex in vitro and co-localize in normal and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Antosiewicz, Anna; Jarmuła, Adam; Przybylska, Dorota; Mosieniak, Grażyna; Szczepanowska, Joanna; Kowalkowska, Anna; Rode, Wojciech; Cieśla, Joanna

    2016-08-05

    Enzymes involved in thymidylate biosynthesis, thymidylate synthase (TS), and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) are well-known targets in cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time, that human TS and DHFR form a strong complex in vitro and co-localize in human normal and colon cancer cell cytoplasm and nucleus. Treatment of cancer cells with methotrexate or 5-fluorouracil did not affect the distribution of either enzyme within the cells. However, 5-FU, but not MTX, lowered the presence of DHFR-TS complex in the nucleus by 2.5-fold. The results may suggest the sequestering of TS by FdUMP in the cytoplasm and thereby affecting the translocation of DHFR-TS complex to the nucleus. Providing a strong likelihood of DHFR-TS complex formation in vivo, the latter complex is a potential new drug target in cancer therapy. In this paper, known 3D structures of human TS and human DHFR, and some protozoan bifunctional DHFR-TS structures as templates, are used to build an in silico model of human DHFR-TS complex structure, consisting of one TS dimer and two DHFR monomers. This complex structure may serve as an initial 3D drug target model for prospective inhibitors targeting interfaces between the DHFR and TS enzymes.

  14. Multi-scale, micro-computed tomography-based pore network models to simulate drainage in heterogeneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultreys, Tom; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2015-04-01

    The multi-phase flow behavior of complex rocks with broad pore size distributions often digresses from classical relations. Pore-scale simulation methods can be a great tool to improve the understanding of this behavior. However, the broad range of pore sizes present makes it difficult to gather the experimental input data needed for these simulations and poses great computational challenges. We developed a novel micro-computed-tomography (micro-CT) based dual pore network model (DPNM), which takes microporosity into account in an upscaled fashion using symbolic network elements called micro-links, while treating the macroporosity as a traditional pore network model. The connectivity and conductivity of the microporosity is derived from local information measured on micro-CT scans. Microporous connectivity is allowed both in parallel and in series to the macropore network. We allow macropores to be drained as a consequence of their connection with microporosity, permitting simulations where the macropore network alone does not percolate. The validity of the method is shown by treating an artificial network and a network extracted from a micro-CT scan of Estaillades limestone.

  15. Effect of Radiotherapy Planning Complexity on Survival of Elderly Patients With Unresected Localized Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chang H.; Bonomi, Marcelo; Cesaretti, Jamie; Neugut, Alfred I.; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether complex radiotherapy (RT) planning was associated with improved outcomes in a cohort of elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry linked to Medicare claims, we identified 1998 patients aged >65 years with histologically confirmed, unresected stage I-II NSCLC. Patients were classified into an intermediate or complex RT planning group using Medicare physician codes. To address potential selection bias, we used propensity score modeling. Survival of patients who received intermediate and complex simulation was compared using Cox regression models adjusting for propensity scores and in a stratified and matched analysis according to propensity scores. Results: Overall, 25% of patients received complex RT planning. Complex RT planning was associated with better overall (hazard ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.95) and lung cancer-specific (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.93) survival after controlling for propensity scores. Similarly, stratified and matched analyses showed better overall and lung cancer-specific survival of patients treated with complex RT planning. Conclusions: The use of complex RT planning is associated with improved survival among elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II NSCLC. These findings should be validated in prospective randomized controlled trials.

  16. Enhanced damage localization for complex structures through statistical modeling and sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Colin; Todd, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves represent a promising technique for detecting and localizing structural damage, but their application to realistic structures has been hampered by the complicated interference patterns produced by scattering from geometric features. This work presents a new damage localization paradigm based on a statistical approach to dealing with uncertainty in the guided wave signals. A bolted frame and a section of a fuselage rib are tested with different simulated damage conditions and used to conduct a detailed comparison between the proposed solution and other sparse-array localization approaches. After establishing the superiority of the statistical approach, two novel innovations to the localization procedure are proposed: an approach to sensor fusion based on the Neyman-Pearson criterion, and a method of constructing simple models of geometrical features. Including the sensor fusion and geometrical models produces a substantial improvement in the system's localization accuracy. The final result is a robust and accurate framework for single-site damage localization that moves structural health monitoring towards practical implementation on a much broader range of structures.

  17. Minority business bidding for local government contracts: the complexity of availability.

    PubMed

    Bangs, Ralph L; Murrell, Audrey; Constance-Huggins, Monique

    2007-01-01

    While minority-business enterprises (MBEs) have gained some access to local government contracts during the last three decades, these firms continue to receive a small share of local government contract spending relative to the number of available firms. Researchers have suggested two general explanations for the low representation of MBEs in contract awards: (1) lack of qualifications and capacity among MBEs, and (2) public and private discrimination against MBEs in contracting processes. This study on prime contract opportunities in a Northern central city and county with a large minority population finds that low bid rates greatly contribute to the low MBE shares of prime contracts and that bidding is reduced by both local government processes and characteristics of the firms. Some implications of these findings are that local governments need to: (1) monitor MBE shares of prime contract bids by size of contract and use share of bids as one measure of program and organizational effectiveness; (2) identify MBEs that are qualified for prime contracts and encourage and help interested firms to submit competitive bids; and (3) ensure that local government policies and practices do not diminish access to information about prime contract opportunities for qualified and interested minority firms. Another implication is that bidders lists should not be a primary basis for determining MBE availability, since many qualified and interested MBEs do not bid because of perceived barriers in local government.

  18. Mechanics of membrane fusion/pore formation.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmans, Marc; Marelli, Giovanni; Smirnova, Yuliya G; Müller, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Lipid bilayers play a fundamental role in many biological processes, and a considerable effort has been invested in understanding their behavior and the mechanism of topological changes like fusion and pore formation. Due to the time- and length-scale on which these processes occur, computational methods have proven to be an especially useful tool in their study. With their help, a number of interesting findings about the shape of fusion intermediates could be obtained, and novel hypotheses about the mechanism of topological changes and the involvement of peptides therein were suggested. In this work, we try to present a summary of these developments together with some hitherto unpublished results, featuring, among others, the shape of stalks and fusion pores, possible modes of action of the influenza HA fusion peptide and the SNARE protein complex, the mechanism of supported lipid bilayer formation by vesicle spreading, and the free energy and transition pathway of the fusion process.

  19. The Cauchy Problem in Local Spaces for the Complex Ginzburg-Landau EquationII. Contraction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginibre, J.; Velo, G.

    We continue the study of the initial value problem for the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (with a > 0, b > 0, g>= 0) in initiated in a previous paper [I]. We treat the case where the initial data and the solutions belong to local uniform spaces, more precisely to spaces of functions satisfying local regularity conditions and uniform bounds in local norms, but no decay conditions (or arbitrarily weak decay conditions) at infinity in . In [I] we used compactness methods and an extended version of recent local estimates [3] and proved in particular the existence of solutions globally defined in time with local regularity of the initial data corresponding to the spaces Lr for r>= 2 or H1. Here we treat the same problem by contraction methods. This allows us in particular to prove that the solutions obtained in [I] are unique under suitable subcriticality conditions, and to obtain for them additional regularity properties and uniform bounds. The method extends some of those previously applied to the nonlinear heat equation in global spaces to the framework of local uniform spaces.

  20. Polo kinase regulates the localization and activity of the chromosomal passenger complex in meiosis and mitosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Carmena, Mar; Lombardia, Miguel Ortiz; Ogawa, Hiromi; Earnshaw, William C

    2014-11-01

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), Polo and Aurora families of protein kinases. The levels of expression and localization of the key regulatory kinases are themselves subject to very tight control. There is increasing evidence that crosstalk between the mitotic kinases provides for an additional level of regulation. We have previously shown that Aurora B activates Polo kinase at the centromere in mitosis, and that the interaction between Polo and the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) component INCENP is essential in this activation. In this report, we show that Polo kinase is required for the correct localization and activity of the CPC in meiosis and mitosis. Study of the phenotype of different polo allele combinations compared to the effect of chemical inhibition revealed significant differences in the localization and activity of the CPC in diploid tissues. Our results shed new light on the mechanisms that control the activity of Aurora B in meiosis and mitosis.

  1. Local structure and La L1 and L3-edge XANES spectra of lanthanum complex oxides.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Hiroyuki; Shishido, Tetsuya; Teramura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Tsunehiro

    2014-06-16

    La L1 and L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) of various La oxides were classified according to the local configuration of La. We found a correlation between both of the areas of the pre-edge peaks of the La L1-edge XANES spectra and the full width at half-maximum of white line of La L3-edge XANES spectra and the local configuration of La. Theoretical calculation of the XANES spectra and local density of states reveals the difference of La L1 and L3-edge XANES spectra of various La compounds is related to the p-d hybridization of the unoccupied band and broadening of the d band of La induced by the difference of local configuration. In addition, simplified bond angle analysis parameters defined by the angles of the La atom and the two adjacent oxygen atoms are correlated to the pre-edge peak intensity of the La L1-edge XANES spectra. These results indicate that quantitative analysis of La L1 and L3-edge XANES spectra could be an indicator of the local structure of La materials.

  2. Vaginal inserts based on chitosan and carboxymethylcellulose complexes for local delivery of chlorhexidine: preparation, characterization and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Bigucci, Federica; Abruzzo, Angela; Vitali, Beatrice; Saladini, Bruno; Cerchiara, Teresa; Gallucci, Maria Caterina; Luppi, Barbara

    2015-01-30

    The aim of this work was to prepare vaginal inserts based on chitosan/carboxymethylcellulose polyelectrolyte complexes for local delivery of chlorhexidine digluconate. Complexes were prepared with different chitosan/carboxymethylcellulose molar ratios at a pH value close to pKa interval of the polymers and were characterized in terms of physico-chemical properties, complexation yield and drug loading. Then complexes were used to prepare inserts as vaginal dosage forms and their physical handling, morphology, water-uptake ability and drug release properties as well as antimicrobial activity toward Candida albicans and Escherichia coli were evaluated. Results confirmed the ionic interaction between chitosan and carboxymethylcellulose and the influence of the charge amount on the complexation yield. Complexes were characterized by high values of drug loading and showed increasing water-uptake ability with the increase of carboxymethylcellulose amount. The selection of appropriate chitosan/carboxymethylcellulose molar ratios allowed to obtain cone-like shaped solid inserts, easy to handle and able to hydrate releasing the drug over time. Finally, the formulated inserts showed antimicrobial activity against common pathogens responsible for vaginal infections.

  3. Inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging of targets with complex motion based on the local polynomial ambiguity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Qian; Su, Tao; Zheng, Jibin

    2016-01-01

    In inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging of targets with complex motion, the azimuth echoes have to be modeled as multicomponent cubic phase signals (CPSs) after motion compensation. For the CPS model, the chirp rate and the quadratic chirp rate deteriorate the ISAR image quality due to the Doppler frequency shift; thus, an effective parameter estimation algorithm is required. This paper focuses on a parameter estimation algorithm for multicomponent CPSs based on the local polynomial ambiguity function (LPAF), which is simple and can be easily implemented via the complex multiplication and fast Fourier transform. Compared with the existing parameter estimation algorithm for CPS, the proposed algorithm can achieve a better compromise between performance and computational complexity. Then, the high-quality ISAR image can be obtained by the proposed LPAF-based ISAR imaging algorithm. The results of the simulated data demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  4. SNP/RD typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains reveals local and worldwide disseminated clonal complexes.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Anita C; Kremer, Kristin; Hendriks, Amber C A; Freyee, Benthe; McEvoy, Christopher R E; van Crevel, Reinout; Boeree, Martin J; van Helden, Paul; Warren, Robin M; Siezen, Roland J; van Soolingen, Dick

    2011-01-01

    The Beijing strain is one of the most successful genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis worldwide and appears to be highly homogenous according to existing genotyping methods. To type Beijing strains reliably we developed a robust typing scheme using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and regions of difference (RDs) derived from whole-genome sequencing data of eight Beijing strains. SNP/RD typing of 259 M. tuberculosis isolates originating from 45 countries worldwide discriminated 27 clonal complexes within the Beijing genotype family. A total of 16 Beijing clonal complexes contained more than one isolate of known origin, of which two clonal complexes were strongly associated with South African origin. The remaining 14 clonal complexes encompassed isolates from different countries. Even highly resolved clonal complexes comprised isolates from distinct geographical sites. Our results suggest that Beijing strains spread globally on multiple occasions and that the tuberculosis epidemic caused by the Beijing genotype is at least partially driven by modern migration patterns. The SNPs and RDs presented in this study will facilitate future molecular epidemiological and phylogenetic studies on Beijing strains.

  5. Hydrogen bonding and proton localization in complexes of carboxybetaines with phenols and carboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dega-Szafran, Zofia; Komasa, Anna; Grundwald-Wyspiańska, Monika; Szafran, Mirosław; Buczak, Grzegorz; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    1997-02-01

    Complexes of betaine (BET) with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol (DCNP), pentachlorophenol (PCP) and trifluoroacetic, trichloroacetic, dichloroacetic, chloroacetic and maleic acids and of pyridine betaine (PBET) with DCNP in solution and in the solid state were studied by UV and FTIR spectroscopies and X-ray analysis. The crystal of BET·DCNP is triclinic, space group P 1¯, a = 7.1770(10) Å, b = 10.001(2) Å, c = 11.241(2) Å, α = 108.81(3)°, β = 100.06(3)°, γ = 106.82(3)°, Z = 2; the final R value is 0.033 for 1871 observed reflections. Protonated betaine and 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenolate are linked by an O(2)Htctdot;O(1) hydrogen bond with an Otctdot;O distance of 2.424(3) Å and the O(2)Htctdot;O(1) angle is 159(3)°. The broad absorption in the solid state FTIR spectra of the investigated complexes varies with Δp Ka, and is typical of complexes with strong hydrogen bonds. The UV spectra of phenol complexes in acetonitrile show a typical absorption for Btctdot;HA and B +Htctdot;A - species. In less polar dichloromethane, only molecular complexes are present. An exception is PBET·DCNP, where B +Htctdot;A - species appear in both solvents. The agreement between the UV and IR data is good.

  6. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, Hagan; Walker, Barbara J.; Chang, Chung-yu; Niblack, Brett; Panchal, Rekha

    1998-01-01

    An inactive pore-forming agent which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell.

  7. Machine learning framework for analysis of transport through complex networks in porous, granular media: A focus on permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, Joost H.; Narsilio, Guillermo A.; Tordesillas, Antoinette

    2016-08-01

    We present a data-driven framework to study the relationship between fluid flow at the macroscale and the internal pore structure, across the micro- and mesoscales, in porous, granular media. Sphere packings with varying particle size distribution and confining pressure are generated using the discrete element method. For each sample, a finite element analysis of the fluid flow is performed to compute the permeability. We construct a pore network and a particle contact network to quantify the connectivity of the pores and particles across the mesoscopic spatial scales. Machine learning techniques for feature selection are employed to identify sets of microstructural properties and multiscale complex network features that optimally characterize permeability. We find a linear correlation (in log-log scale) between permeability and the average closeness centrality of the weighted pore network. With the pore network links weighted by the local conductance, the average closeness centrality represents a multiscale measure of efficiency of flow through the pore network in terms of the mean geodesic distance (or shortest path) between all pore bodies in the pore network. Specifically, this study objectively quantifies a hypothesized link between high permeability and efficient shortest paths that thread through relatively large pore bodies connected to each other by high conductance pore throats, embodying connectivity and pore structure.

  8. Machine learning framework for analysis of transport through complex networks in porous, granular media: A focus on permeability.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Joost H; Narsilio, Guillermo A; Tordesillas, Antoinette

    2016-08-01

    We present a data-driven framework to study the relationship between fluid flow at the macroscale and the internal pore structure, across the micro- and mesoscales, in porous, granular media. Sphere packings with varying particle size distribution and confining pressure are generated using the discrete element method. For each sample, a finite element analysis of the fluid flow is performed to compute the permeability. We construct a pore network and a particle contact network to quantify the connectivity of the pores and particles across the mesoscopic spatial scales. Machine learning techniques for feature selection are employed to identify sets of microstructural properties and multiscale complex network features that optimally characterize permeability. We find a linear correlation (in log-log scale) between permeability and the average closeness centrality of the weighted pore network. With the pore network links weighted by the local conductance, the average closeness centrality represents a multiscale measure of efficiency of flow through the pore network in terms of the mean geodesic distance (or shortest path) between all pore bodies in the pore network. Specifically, this study objectively quantifies a hypothesized link between high permeability and efficient shortest paths that thread through relatively large pore bodies connected to each other by high conductance pore throats, embodying connectivity and pore structure.

  9. The single transmembrane segment of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane domain of the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The glycoprotein gp210 is located in the "pore membrane," a specialized domain of the nuclear envelope to which the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is anchored. gp210 contains a large cisternal domain, a single transmembrane segment (TM), and a COOH-terminal, 58-amino acid residue cytoplasmic tail (CT) (Wozniak, R. W., E. Bartnik, and G. Blobel. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:2083-2092; Greber, U. F., A. Senior, and L. Gerace. 1990. EMBO (Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.) J. 9:1495-1502). To locate determinants for sorting of gp210 to the pore membrane, we constructed various cDNAs coding for wild-type, mutant, and chimeric gp210, and monitored localization of the expressed protein in 3T3 cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using appropriate antibodies. The large cisternal domain of gp210 (95% of its mass) did not reveal any sorting determinants. Surprisingly, the TM of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane. The CT also contains a sorting determinant, but it is weaker than that of the TM. We propose specific lateral association of the transmembrane helices of two proteins to yield either a gp210 homodimer or a heterodimer of gp210 and another protein. The cytoplasmically oriented tails of these dimers may bind cooperatively to the adjacent NPCs. In addition, we demonstrate that gp210 co-localizes with cytoplasmically dispersed nucleoporins, suggesting a cytoplasmic association of these components. PMID:1281815

  10. Nearside-farside, local angular momentum and resummation theories: Useful tools for understanding the dynamics of complex-mode reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hankel, Marlies E-mail: j.n.l.connor@manchester.ac.uk; Connor, J. N. L. E-mail: j.n.l.connor@manchester.ac.uk

    2015-07-15

    A valuable tool for understanding the dynamics of direct reactions is Nearside-Farside (NF) scattering theory. It makes a decomposition of the (resummed) partial wave series for the scattering amplitude, both for the differential cross section (DCS) and the Local Angular Momentum (LAM). This paper makes the first combined application of these techniques to complex-mode reactions. We ask if NF theory is a useful tool for their identification, in particular, can it distinguish complex-mode from direct-mode reactions? We also ask whether NF theory can identify NF interference oscillations in the full DCSs of complex-mode reactions. Our investigation exploits the fact that accurate quantum scattering matrix elements have recently become available for complex-mode reactions. We first apply NF theory to two simple models for the scattering amplitude of a complex-mode reaction: One involves a single Legendre polynomial; the other involves a single Legendre function of the first kind, whose form is suggested by complex angular momentum theory. We then study, at fixed translational energies, four state-to-state complex-mode reactions. They are: S({sup 1}D) + HD → SH + D, S({sup 1}D) + DH → SD + H, N({sup 2}D) +H{sub 2} → NH + H, and H{sup +} + D{sub 2} → HD + D{sup +}. We compare the NF results for the DCSs and LAMs with those for a state-to-state direct reaction, namely, F + H{sub 2} → FH + H. We demonstrate that NF theory is a valuable tool for identifying and analyzing the dynamics of complex-mode reactions.

  11. Hydrate formation and growth in pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jong-Won; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Gas hydrates consist of guest gas molecules encaged in water cages. Methane hydrate forms in marine and permafrost sediments. In this study, we use optical, mechanical and electrical measurements to monitor hydrate formation and growth in small pores to better understand the hydrate pore habit in hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate formation in capillary tubes exposes the complex and dynamic interactions between nucleation, gas diffusion and gas solubility. The observation of hydrate growth in a droplet between transparent plates shows that the hydrate shell does not grow homogeneously but advances in the form of lobes that invade the water phase; in fact, the hydrate shell must be discontinuous and possibly cracked to justify the relatively fast growth rates observed in these experiments. Volume expansion during hydrate formation causes water to flow out of menisci; expelled water either spreads on the surface of water-wet substrates and forms a thin hydrate sheet, or remains next to menisci when substrates are oil-wet. Hydrate formation is accompanied by ion exclusion, yet, there is an overall increase in electrical resistance during hydrate formation. Hydrate growth may become salt-limited in trapped water conditions; in this case, aqueous brine and gas CH4 may be separated by hydrate and the three-phase system remains stable within the pore space of sediments.

  12. DNAH11 Localization in the Proximal Region of Respiratory Cilia Defines Distinct Outer Dynein Arm Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Gerard W.; Loges, Niki T.; Klinkenbusch, Judith A.; Olbrich, Heike; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Werner, Claudius; Westermann, Cordula; Ruckert, Christian; Mirra, Virginia; Hjeij, Rim; Memari, Yasin; Durbin, Richard; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Praveen, Kavita; Kashef, Mohammad A.; Kashef, Sara; Eghtedari, Fardin; Häffner, Karsten; Valmari, Pekka; Baktai, György; Aviram, Micha; Bentur, Lea; Amirav, Israel; Davis, Erica E.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Brueckner, Martina; Shaposhnykov, Artem; Pigino, Gaia; Dworniczak, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessively inherited disease that leads to chronic respiratory disorders owing to impaired mucociliary clearance. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a diagnostic standard to identify ultrastructural defects in respiratory cilia but is not useful in approximately 30% of PCD cases, which have normal ciliary ultrastructure. DNAH11 mutations are a common cause of PCD with normal ciliary ultrastructure and hyperkinetic ciliary beating, but its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We therefore characterized DNAH11 in human respiratory cilia by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) in the context of PCD. We used whole-exome and targeted next-generation sequence analysis as well as Sanger sequencing to identify and confirm eight novel loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. We designed and validated a monoclonal antibody specific to DNAH11 and performed high-resolution IFM of both control and PCD-affected human respiratory cells, as well as samples from green fluorescent protein (GFP)–left–right dynein mice, to determine the ciliary localization of DNAH11. IFM analysis demonstrated native DNAH11 localization in only the proximal region of wild-type human respiratory cilia and loss of DNAH11 in individuals with PCD with certain loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. GFP–left–right dynein mice confirmed proximal DNAH11 localization in tracheal cilia. DNAH11 retained proximal localization in respiratory cilia of individuals with PCD with distinct ultrastructural defects, such as the absence of outer dynein arms (ODAs). TEM tomography detected a partial reduction of ODAs in DNAH11-deficient cilia. DNAH11 mutations result in a subtle ODA defect in only the proximal region of respiratory cilia, which is detectable by IFM and TEM tomography. PMID:26909801

  13. DNAH11 Localization in the Proximal Region of Respiratory Cilia Defines Distinct Outer Dynein Arm Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Gerard W; Loges, Niki T; Klinkenbusch, Judith A; Olbrich, Heike; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Werner, Claudius; Westermann, Cordula; Ruckert, Christian; Mirra, Virginia; Hjeij, Rim; Memari, Yasin; Durbin, Richard; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Praveen, Kavita; Kashef, Mohammad A; Kashef, Sara; Eghtedari, Fardin; Häffner, Karsten; Valmari, Pekka; Baktai, György; Aviram, Micha; Bentur, Lea; Amirav, Israel; Davis, Erica E; Katsanis, Nicholas; Brueckner, Martina; Shaposhnykov, Artem; Pigino, Gaia; Dworniczak, Bernd; Omran, Heymut

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessively inherited disease that leads to chronic respiratory disorders owing to impaired mucociliary clearance. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a diagnostic standard to identify ultrastructural defects in respiratory cilia but is not useful in approximately 30% of PCD cases, which have normal ciliary ultrastructure. DNAH11 mutations are a common cause of PCD with normal ciliary ultrastructure and hyperkinetic ciliary beating, but its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We therefore characterized DNAH11 in human respiratory cilia by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) in the context of PCD. We used whole-exome and targeted next-generation sequence analysis as well as Sanger sequencing to identify and confirm eight novel loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. We designed and validated a monoclonal antibody specific to DNAH11 and performed high-resolution IFM of both control and PCD-affected human respiratory cells, as well as samples from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-left-right dynein mice, to determine the ciliary localization of DNAH11. IFM analysis demonstrated native DNAH11 localization in only the proximal region of wild-type human respiratory cilia and loss of DNAH11 in individuals with PCD with certain loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. GFP-left-right dynein mice confirmed proximal DNAH11 localization in tracheal cilia. DNAH11 retained proximal localization in respiratory cilia of individuals with PCD with distinct ultrastructural defects, such as the absence of outer dynein arms (ODAs). TEM tomography detected a partial reduction of ODAs in DNAH11-deficient cilia. DNAH11 mutations result in a subtle ODA defect in only the proximal region of respiratory cilia, which is detectable by IFM and TEM tomography.

  14. The impact of local processes and the prohibition of multiple links in the topological properties of directed complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Gómez, J.; Arjona-Villicaña, P. D.; Acosta-Elías, J.

    2015-05-01

    Local processes exert influence on the growth and evolution of complex networks, which in turn shape the topological and dynamic properties of these networks. Some local processes have been researched, for example: Addition of nodes and links, rewiring of links between nodes, accelerated growth, link removal, aging, copying and multiple links prohibition. These processes impact directly into the topological and dynamical properties of complex networks. This paper introduces a new model for growth of directed complex networks which incorporates the prohibition of multiple links, addition of nodes and links, and rewiring of links. This paper also reports on the impact that these processes have in the topological properties of the networks generated with the proposed model. Numerical simulation shows that, when the frequency of rewiring increases in the proposed model, the γ exponent of the in-degree distribution approaches a value of 1.1. When the frequency of adding new links increases, the γ exponent approaches 1. That is the proposed model is able to generate all exponent values documented in real-world networks which range 1.05 < γ < 8.94.

  15. Localized structures in complex plasmas in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongmo Tsopgue, P.; Mohamadou, A.; Kourakis, I.; Kofane, Timoleon C.; Tanga, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the general framework in which fits our investigation is that of modeling the dynamics of dust grains therein dusty plasma (complex plasma) in the presence of electromagnetic fields. The generalized discrete complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (DCGLE) is thus obtained to model discrete dynamical structure in dusty plasma with Epstein friction. In the collisionless limit, the equation reduces to the modified discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (MDNLSE). The modulational instability phenomenon is studied and we present the criterion of instability in both cases and it is shown that high values of damping extend the instability region. Equations thus obtained highlight the presence of soliton-like excitation in dusty plasma. We studied the generation of soliton in a dusty plasma taking in account the effects of interaction between dust grains and theirs neighbours. Numerical simulations are carried out to show the validity of analytical approach.

  16. Reducing the complexity of an agent-based local heroin market model.

    PubMed

    Heard, Daniel; Bobashev, Georgiy V; Morris, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    This project explores techniques for reducing the complexity of an agent-based model (ABM). The analysis involved a model developed from the ethnographic research of Dr. Lee Hoffer in the Larimer area heroin market, which involved drug users, drug sellers, homeless individuals and police. The authors used statistical techniques to create a reduced version of the original model which maintained simulation fidelity while reducing computational complexity. This involved identifying key summary quantities of individual customer behavior as well as overall market activity and replacing some agents with probability distributions and regressions. The model was then extended to allow external market interventions in the form of police busts. Extensions of this research perspective, as well as its strengths and limitations, are discussed.

  17. Role of the synaptobrevin C terminus in fusion pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Ngatchou, Annita N.; Kisler, Kassandra; Fang, Qinghua; Walter, Alexander M.; Zhao, Ying; Bruns, Dieter; Sørensen, Jakob B.; Lindau, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the SNARE proteins synaptobrevin II (sybII, also known as VAMP2), syntaxin, and SNAP-25, generating a force transfer to the membranes and inducing fusion pore formation. However, the molecular mechanism by which this force leads to opening of a fusion pore remains elusive. Here we show that the ability of sybII to support exocytosis is inhibited by addition of one or two residues to the sybII C terminus depending on their energy of transfer from water to the membrane interface, following a Boltzmann distribution. These results suggest that following stimulation, the SNARE complex pulls the C terminus of sybII deeper into the vesicle membrane. We propose that this movement disrupts the vesicular membrane continuity leading to fusion pore formation. In contrast to current models, the experiments suggest that fusion pore formation begins with molecular rearrangements at the intravesicular membrane leaflet and not between the apposed cytoplasmic leaflets. PMID:20937897

  18. The role of the C terminus of the SNARE protein SNAP-25 in fusion pore opening and a model for fusion pore mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qinghua; Berberian, Khajak; Gong, Liang-Wei; Hafez, Ismail; Sørensen, Jakob B.; Lindau, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    Formation of a fusion pore between a vesicle and its target membrane is thought to involve the so-called SNARE protein complex. However, there is no mechanistic model explaining how the fusion pore is opened by conformational changes in the SNARE complex. It has been suggested that C-terminal zipping triggers fusion pore opening. A SNAP-25 mutant named SNAP-25Δ9 (lacking the last nine C-terminal residues) should lead to a less-tight C-terminal zipping. Single exocytotic events in chromaffin cells expressing this mutant were characterized by carbon fiber amperometry and cell-attached patch capacitance measurements. Cells expressing SNAP-25Δ9 displayed smaller amperometric “foot-current” currents, reduced fusion pore conductances, and lower fusion pore expansion rates. We propose that SNARE/lipid complexes form proteolipid fusion pores. Fusion pores involving the SNAP-25Δ9 mutant will be less tightly zipped and may lead to a longer fusion pore structure, consistent with the observed decrease of fusion pore conductance. PMID:18829435

  19. Localized numerical impulse solutions in diffuse neural networks modeled by the complex fractional Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mvogo, Alain; Tambue, Antoine; Ben-Bolie, Germain H.; Kofané, Timoléon C.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate localized wave solutions in a network of Hindmarsh-Rose neural model taking into account the long-range diffusive couplings. We show by a specific analytical technique that the model equations in the infrared limit (wave number k → 0) can be governed by the complex fractional Ginzburg-Landau (CFGL) equation. According to the stiffness of the system, we propose both the semi and the linearly implicit Riesz fractional finite-difference schemes to solve efficiently the CFGL equation. The obtained fractional numerical solutions for the nerve impulse reveal localized short impulse properties. We also show the equivalence between the continuous CFGL and the discrete Hindmarsh-Rose models for relatively large network.

  20. Sphingosine kinase 2 is a chikungunya virus host factor co-localized with the viral replication complex

    PubMed Central

    Reid, St Patrick; Tritsch, Sarah R; Kota, Krishna; Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Dong, Lian; Kenny, Tara; Brueggemann, Ernest E; Ward, Michael D; Cazares, Lisa H; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging alphavirus which causes severe and prolonged arthralgic febrile illness. The recent global spread of the virus and lack of approved therapeutic options makes it imperative to gain greater insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying CHIKV pathogenesis, in particular host factors recruited by the virus. In the current study, we identify sphingosine kinase 2 (SK2) as a CHIKV host factor co-localized with the viral replication complex (VRC) during infection. SK2 was demonstrated to co-localize with viral RNA and nonstructural proteins. Targeted impairment of SK2 expression or function significantly inhibited CHIKV infection. Furthermore, affinity purification-mass spectrometry studies revealed that SK2 associates with a number of proteins involved in cellular gene expression specifically during viral infection, suggesting a role in replication. Collectively these results identify SK2 as a novel CHIKV host factor. PMID:26576339

  1. Clathrin-dependent localization of alpha 1,3 mannosyltransferase to the Golgi complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Posttranslational modification of yeast glycoproteins with alpha 1,3- linked mannose is initiated within a Golgi compartment analogous to the medial Golgi cisternae of higher eukaryotes. We have characterized the synthesis, posttranslational modification, and localization of the yeast alpha 1,3 mannosyltransferase (Mnn1p) using antibodies prepared against a segment of this protein expressed in bacteria. Mnn1p is initially synthesized as a 98.5-kD, type II integral membrane glycoprotein that is modified with both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides. It is subject to a slow, incremental increase in molecular mass that is dependent upon protein transport to the Golgi complex. Self-modification of Mnn1p with alpha 1,3 mannose epitopes, primarily on O-linked oligosaccharides, is at least partly responsible for the incremental increase in molecular mass. Mnn1p is a resident protein of the Golgi complex and colocalizes with guanosine diphosphatase to at least two physically distinct Golgi compartments by sucrose gradient fractionation, one of which may be a late Golgi compartment that also contains the Kex2 endopeptidase. Surprisingly, we found that a significant fraction of Mnn1p is mislocalized to the plasma membrane in a clathrin heavy chain temperature sensitive mutant while guanosine diphosphatase remains intracellular. A mutant Mnn1p that lacks the NH2-terminal cytoplasmic tail is properly localized to the Golgi complex, indicating that clathrin does not mediate Mnnlp Golgi retention by a direct interaction with the Mnn1p cytoplasmic tail. These results indicate that clathrin plays a broader role in the localization of Golgi proteins than anticipated. PMID:7962051

  2. [Comparative effectiveness study of local antioxidants in complex treatment of chronic periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Butiugin, I A; Kornilova, N V; Abramov, O V

    2013-01-01

    Prospective, placebo-control, randomized blind study was carried out on the clinical effectiveness of the local administration of 1% emoxipine solution, 1,5% reamberin solution and 5% mexidol solution in patients with chronic periodontitis (CP). It was determined that all medications under study cause the decrease of simplified oral hygienic index by Green and Vermillion (OHI-S, Green J.C., Vermillion J.R., 1969), papillary-marginal-alveolar index (РМА, Parma C., 1960), papillary bleeding index (PBI, Saxer U.P., Muhlemann M.R., 1975) and increase the sialometry index in the case of CP. The best clinical effect was achieved by the local administration of reamberin, which turned out to be the only medication among those under study to lower the content of lipid peroxidation products in the mixed saliva, to decrease the periodontal index (PI, Russel A., 1956) and to result in the concomitant increase of life satisfaction index in patients with chronic periodontitis.

  3. A practical approach to temperature effects in dissociative electron attachment cross sections using local complex potential theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Yuji; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki

    2012-09-01

    We propose a practical computational scheme to obtain temperature dependence of dissociative electron attachment cross sections to polyatomic molecules within a local complex potential theory formalism. First we perform quantum path-integral molecular dynamics simulations on the potential energy surface for the neutral molecule in order to sample initial nuclear configurations as well as momenta. Classical trajectories are subsequently integrated on the potential energy surface for the anionic state and survival probabilities are simultaneously calculated along the obtained trajectories. We have applied this simple scheme to dissociative electron attachment processes to H2O and CF3Cl, for which several previous studies are available from both the experimental and theoretical sides.

  4. Locally induced surface air confluence by complex terrain and its effects on air pollution in the valley of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazcilevich, Aron D.; García, Agustín R.; Caetano, Ernesto

    Using a meteorological computational model it is shown how, in the Valley of Mexico, a high pressure system together with the complex orography of the region induce the formation of a local confluence line. With the aid of a prognostic air quality model it is shown that the maximum pollutant mixing ratios are placed on and follow the confluence line which crosses over the most populated areas of Mexico City. This phenomenon provides an explanation of why and when pollutants assume its geographical distribution in the valley during high mixing ratio episodes.

  5. Misregulation of Sex-Lethal and Disruption of Male-Specific Lethal Complex Localization in Drosophila Species Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Pal Bhadra, Manika; Bhadra, Utpal; Birchler, James A.

    2006-01-01

    A major model system for the study of evolutionary divergence between closely related species has been the unisexual lethality resulting from reciprocal crosses of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Sex-lethal (Sxl), a critical gene for sex determination, is misregulated in these hybrids. In hybrid males from D. melanogaster mothers, there is an abnormal expression of Sxl and a failure of localization of the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex to the X chromosome, which causes changes in gene expression. Introduction of a Sxl mutation into this hybrid genotype will allow expression of the MSL complex but there is no sequestration to the X chromosome. Lethal hybrid rescue (Lhr), which allows hybrid males from this cross to survive, corrects the SXL and MSL defects. The reciprocal cross of D. simulans mothers by D. melanogaster males exhibits underexpression of Sxl in embryos. PMID:16951071

  6. Clonidine complexation with hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin: From physico-chemical characterization to in vivo adjuvant effect in local anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Braga, M A; Martini, M F; Pickholz, M; Yokaichiya, F; Franco, M K D; Cabeça, L F; Guilherme, V A; Silva, C M G; Limia, C E G; de Paula, E

    2016-02-05

    Clonidine (CND), an alpha-2-adrenergic agonist, is used as an adjuvant with local anesthetics. In this work, we describe the preparation and characterization of an inclusion complex of clonidine in hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD), as revealed by experimental (UV-vis absorption, SEM, X-ray diffraction, DOSY- and ROESY-NMR) and theoretical (molecular dynamics) approaches. CND was found to bind to HP-β-CD (Ka=20M(-1)) in 1:1 stoichiometry. X-ray diffractograms and SEM images provided evidence of inclusion complex formation, which was associated with changes in the diffraction patterns of the pure compounds. NMR experiments revealed changes in the chemical shift of H3HP-β-CD hydrogens (Δ=0.026ppm) that were compatible with the insertion of CND in the hydrophobic cavity of the cyclodextrin. Molecular dynamics simulation with the three CND species that exist at pH 7.4 revealed the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, especially for the neutral imino form of CND, which favored its insertion in the HP-β-CD cavity. In vitro assays revealed that complexation retarded drug diffusion without changing the intrinsic toxicity of clonidine, while in vivo tests in rats showed enhanced sensory blockade after the administration of 0.15% CND, with the effect decreasing in the order: CND:HP-β-CD+bupivacaine>CND+bupivacaine>bupivacaine>CND:HP-β-CD>clonidine. The findings demonstrated the suitability of the complex for use as a drug delivery system for clinical use in antinociceptive procedures, in association with local anesthetics.

  7. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Powell, B J

    2015-06-30

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated d(6) (t(2g)(6)) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and Ir(ppy)3, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, T1, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of T1 and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state.

  8. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskar,; Kumari, Neeti; Goyal, Neena

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study presents cloning and characterization of TCP1{gamma} gene from L. donovani. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCP1{gamma} is a subunit of T-complex protein-1 (TCP1), a chaperonin class of protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} co-localized with actin, a cytoskeleton protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The data suggests that this gene may have a role in differentiation/biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report on this chapronin in Leishmania. -- Abstract: T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1{gamma}), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1{gamma} of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1{gamma}), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1{gamma} revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1{gamma}. However, leishmanial TCP1{gamma} represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1{gamma} as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1{gamma} was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1{gamma} with actin suggests

  9. Beyond the average: Detecting global singular nodes from local features in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, L. da F.; Rodrigues, F. A.; Hilgetag, C. C.; Kaiser, M.

    2009-07-01

    Deviations from the average can provide valuable insights about the organization of natural systems. The present article extends this important principle to the systematic identification and analysis of singular motifs in complex networks. Six measurements quantifying different and complementary features of the connectivity around each node of a network were calculated, and multivariate statistical methods applied to identify singular nodes. The potential of the presented concepts and methodology was illustrated with respect to different types of complex real-world networks, namely the US air transportation network, the protein-protein interactions of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the Roget thesaurus networks. The obtained singular motifs possessed unique functional roles in the networks. Three classic theoretical network models were also investigated, with the Barabási-Albert model resulting in singular motifs corresponding to hubs, confirming the potential of the approach. Interestingly, the number of different types of singular node motifs as well as the number of their instances were found to be considerably higher in the real-world networks than in any of the benchmark networks.

  10. Low-complexity atlas-based prostate segmentation by combining global, regional, and local metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Qiuliang; Ruan, Dan

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To improve the efficiency of atlas-based segmentation without compromising accuracy, and to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method on MRI-based prostate segmentation application. Methods: Accurate and efficient automatic structure segmentation is an important task in medical image processing. Atlas-based methods, as the state-of-the-art, provide good segmentation at the cost of a large number of computationally intensive nonrigid registrations, for anatomical sites/structures that are subject to deformation. In this study, the authors propose to utilize a combination of global, regional, and local metrics to improve the accuracy yet significantly reduce the number of required nonrigid registrations. The authors first perform an affine registration to minimize the global mean squared error (gMSE) to coarsely align each atlas image to the target. Subsequently, atarget-specific regional MSE (rMSE), demonstrated to be a good surrogate for dice similarity coefficient (DSC), is used to select a relevant subset from the training atlas. Only within this subset are nonrigid registrations performed between the training images and the target image, to minimize a weighted combination of gMSE and rMSE. Finally, structure labels are propagated from the selected training samples to the target via the estimated deformation fields, and label fusion is performed based on a weighted combination of rMSE and local MSE (lMSE) discrepancy, with proper total-variation-based spatial regularization. Results: The proposed method was applied to a public database of 30 prostate MR images with expert-segmented structures. The authors’ method, utilizing only eight nonrigid registrations, achieved a performance with a median/mean DSC of over 0.87/0.86, outperforming the state-of-the-art full-fledged atlas-based segmentation approach of which the median/mean DSC was 0.84/0.82 when applying to their data set. Conclusions: The proposed method requires a fixed number of nonrigid

  11. Geostatistical Modeling of Pore Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Devary, J.L.; Doctor, P.G.

    1981-06-01

    A significant part of evaluating a geologic formation as a nuclear waste repository involves the modeling of contaminant transport in the surrounding media in the event the repository is breached. The commonly used contaminant transport models are deterministic. However, the spatial variability of hydrologic field parameters introduces uncertainties into contaminant transport predictions. This paper discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to the modeling of spatially varying hydrologic field parameters required as input to contaminant transport analyses. Kriging estimation techniques were applied to Hanford Reservation field data to calculate hydraulic conductivity and the ground-water potential gradients. These quantities were statistically combined to estimate the groundwater pore velocity and to characterize the pore velocity estimation error. Combining geostatistical modeling techniques with product error propagation techniques results in an effective stochastic characterization of groundwater pore velocity, a hydrologic parameter required for contaminant transport analyses.

  12. Designing biomimetic pores based on carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    García-Fandiño, Rebeca; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Biomimetic nanopores based on membrane-spanning single-walled carbon nanotubes have been designed to include selectivity filters based on combinations of anionic and cationic groups mimicking those present in bacterial porins and in voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels. The ion permeation and selectivity properties of these nanopores when embedded in a phospholipid bilayer have been explored by molecular dynamics simulations and free energy profile calculations. The interactions of the nanopores with sodium, potassium, calcium, and chloride ions have been explored as a function of the number of anionic and cationic groups within the selectivity filter. Unbiased molecular dynamics simulations show that the overall selectivity is largely determined by the net charge of the filter. Analysis of distribution functions reveals considerable structuring of the distribution of ions and water within the nanopores. The distributions of ions along the pore axis reveal local selectivity for cations around filter, even in those nanopores (C0) where the net filter charge is zero. Single ion free energy profiles also reveal clear evidence for cation selectivity, even in the C0 nanopores. Detailed analysis of the interactions of the C0 nanopore with Ca2+ ions reveals that local interactions with the anionic (carboxylate) groups of the selectivity filter lead to (partial) replacement of solvating water as the ion passes through the pore. These studies suggest that a computational biomimetic approach can be used to evaluate our understanding of the design principles of nanopores and channels. PMID:22509000

  13. Pro-apoptotic Bax molecules densely populate the edges of membrane pores

    PubMed Central

    Kuwana, Tomomi; Olson, Norman H.; Kiosses, William B.; Peters, Bjoern; Newmeyer, Donald D.

    2016-01-01

    How the pro-apoptotic Bax protein permeabilizes the mitochondrial outer membrane is not fully understood. Previously, using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), we showed that activated Bax forms large, growing pores. Whether formed in liposomes or in mitochondrial outer membranes, Bax-induced pores exhibit the same morphology, with negative curvature flanking the edges and with no visible protein structure protruding from the membranes. Here we used cryo-EM to show that gold-labeled Bax molecules, after activation by Bid, became localized strictly at pore edges. This argues that Bax acts at short range to deform the membrane. Also, Bax molecules populated the walls of both small and large pores at the same density, implying that Bax is continuously recruited to the pores as they widen. Moreover, because all Bax molecules became oligomerized after membrane insertion, we infer that Bax oligomers are present at pore edges. We suggest that oligomerization may promote pore enlargement. PMID:27255832

  14. Pore network model of electrokinetic transport through charged porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obliger, Amaël; Jardat, Marie; Coelho, Daniel; Bekri, Samir; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    We introduce a method for the numerical determination of the steady-state response of complex charged porous media to pressure, salt concentration, and electric potential gradients. The macroscopic fluxes of solvent, salt, and charge are computed within the framework of the Pore Network Model (PNM), which describes the pore structure of the samples as networks of pores connected to each other by channels. The PNM approach is used to capture the couplings between solvent and ionic flows which arise from the charge of the solid surfaces. For the microscopic transport coefficients on the channel scale, we take a simple analytical form obtained previously by solving the Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations in a cylindrical channel. These transport coefficients are upscaled for a given network by imposing conservation laws for each pores, in the presence of macroscopic gradients across the sample. The complex pore structure of the material is captured by the distribution of channel diameters. We investigate the combined effects of this complex geometry, the surface charge, and the salt concentration on the macroscopic transport coefficients. The upscaled numerical model preserves the Onsager relations between the latter, as expected. The calculated macroscopic coefficients behave qualitatively as their microscopic counterparts, except for the permeability and the electro-osmotic coupling coefficient when the electrokinetic effects are strong. Quantitatively, the electrokinetic couplings increase the difference between the macroscopic coefficients and the corresponding ones for a single channel of average diameter.

  15. GPU technology as a platform for accelerating local complexity analysis of protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Agathoklis; Kirmitzoglou, Ioannis; Promponas, Vasilis J; Theocharides, Theocharis

    2013-01-01

    The use of GPGPU programming paradigm (running CUDA-enabled algorithms on GPU cards) in Bioinformatics showed promising results [1]. As such a similar approach can be used to speedup other algorithms such as CAST, a popular tool used for masking low-complexity regions (LCRs) in protein sequences [2] with increased sensitivity. We developed and implemented a CUDA-enabled version (GPU_CAST) of the multi-threaded version of CAST software first presented in [3] and optimized in [4]. The proposed software implementation uses the nVIDIA CUDA libraries and the GPGPU programming paradigm to take advantage of the inherent parallel characteristics of the CAST algorithm to execute the calculations on the GPU card of the host computer system. The GPU-based implementation presented in this work, is compared against the multi-threaded, multi-core optimized version of CAST [4] and yielded speedups of 5x-10x for large protein sequence datasets.

  16. Localization of disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex to 17q21-22.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmsen, K. C.; Lynch, T.; Pavlou, E.; Higgins, M.; Nygaard, T. G.

    1994-01-01

    Disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex (DDPAC) is defined by familial adult-onset behavioral disturbance, followed by frontal lobe dementia, parkinsonism, and amyotrophy in variable proportions. A genetic etiology of DDPAC was suspected because of the familial clustering in family Mo, despite their wide geographic distribution. We have mapped the DDPAC locus to a 12-cM (sex averaged) region between D17S800 and D17S787 on chromosome 17q21-22. The basis for the variability of the clinical findings and pathology in DDPAC is unknown but suggests that the DDPAC locus should be screened as a candidate locus in family studies of conditions with behavioral abnormalities and neurological degeneration. PMID:7977375

  17. Localization of disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex to 17q21-22

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K.C.; Lynch, T.; Pavlou, E.; Higgins, M.; Nygaard, T.G.

    1994-12-01

    Disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex (DDPAC) is defined by familial adult-onset behavioral disturbance, followed by frontal lobe dementia, parkinsonism, and amyotrophy in variable proportions. A genetic etiology of DDPAC was suspected because of the familial clustering in family Mo, despite their wide geographic distribution. We have mapped the DDPAC locus to a 12-cM (sex averaged) region between D17S800 and D17S787 on chromosome 17q21-22. The basis for the variability of the clinical findings and pathology in DDPAC is unknown but suggests that the DDPAC locus should be screened as a candidate locus in family studies of conditions with behavioral abnormalities and neurological degeneration.

  18. Disruption and pseudoautosomal localization of the major histocompatibility complex in monotremes

    PubMed Central

    Dohm, Juliane C; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Reinhardt, Richard; Grützner, Frank; Himmelbauer, Heinz

    2007-01-01

    Background The monotremes, represented by the duck-billed platypus and the echidnas, are the most divergent species within mammals, featuring a flamboyant mix of reptilian, mammalian and specialized characteristics. To understand the evolution of the mammalian major histocompatibility complex (MHC), the analysis of the monotreme genome is vital. Results We characterized several MHC containing bacterial artificial chromosome clones from platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and mapped them onto chromosomes. We discovered that the MHC of monotremes is not contiguous and locates within pseudoautosomal regions of two pairs of their sex chromosomes. The analysis revealed an MHC core region with class I and class II genes on platypus and echidna X3/Y3. Echidna X4/Y4 and platypus Y4/X5 showed synteny to the human distal class III region and beyond. We discovered an intron-containing class I pseudogene on platypus Y4/X5 at a genomic location equivalent to the human HLA-B,C region, suggesting ancestral synteny of the monotreme MHC. Analysis of male meioses from platypus and echidna showed that MHC chromosomes occupy different positions in the meiotic chains of either species. Conclusion Molecular and cytogenetic analyses reveal new insights into the evolution of the mammalian MHC and the multiple sex chromosome system of monotremes. In addition, our data establish the first homology link between chicken microchromosomes and the smallest chromosomes in the monotreme karyotype. Our results further suggest that segments of the monotreme MHC that now reside on separate chromosomes must once have been syntenic and that the complex sex chromosome system of monotremes is dynamic and still evolving. PMID:17727704

  19. Localized breeding of the Anopheles gambiae complex (Diptera: Culicidae) along the River Gambia, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Bøgh, C; Bøgh, C; Clarke, S E; Jawara, M; Thomas, C J; Lindsay, S W

    2003-08-01

    A study was undertaken to identify the major larval habitats of the Anopheles gambiae (Giles) complex in rural Gambia. Mosquito larvae and pupae were sampled along transects and in specific habitats in the central region of the country during the rainy seasons of 1996 and 1997. The sampling showed that the major breeding sites were located on the flooded alluvial soils bordering the river. The largest numbers of larvae were found during September, one month after the peak rains. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of specimens showed that Anopheles melas (Theobald) was the dominant species in the flooded areas (81.5%), followed by A. gambiae sensu stricto (Giles) (18.0%) and A. arabiensis (Patton) (0.5%). By sampling in specific habitats it was evident that A. arabiensis was mainly breeding in rain-fed rice fields along the edge of the alluvial soils. Anopheles melas and A. gambiae s.s. often coexisted but whereas A. melas were found in water with a salinity of up to 72% sea water (25.2 g NaCl l(-1)), A. gambiae s.s. only occurred in water with up to 30% sea water (10.5 g NaCl l(-1)). Anopheles melas larvae were found in association with plant communities dominated by sedges and grasses (Eleocharis sp., Paspalum sp., Sporobolus sp.) and sea-purslane Sesuvium portulacastrum (L.) and the presence of cattle hoof prints, whereas A. gambiae s.s. larvae mainly occurred in association with Paspalum sp. and Eleocharis sp. The study showed that even during the peak rainy season, breeding of the A. gambiae complex is almost entirely restricted to the extensive alluvial areas along the river.

  20. Restricted Transport in Small Pores

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John L.; Quinn, John A.

    1974-01-01

    The basic hydrodynamic equations governing transport in submicron pores are reexamined. Conditions necessary for a simplified, one-dimensional treatment of the diffusion/convection process are established. Steric restrictions and Brownian motion are incorporated directly into the resulting model. Currently available fluid mechanical results are used to evaluate an upper limit on hindered diffusion; this limit is valid for small particle-to-pore ratios. Extensions of the analysis are shown to depend on numerical solutions of the related hydrodynamic problem, that of asymmetrical particle motion in a bounded fluid. PMID:4813157

  1. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  2. A theoretical approach to La L1-edge XANES spectra of La complex oxides and their local configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakura, Hiroyuki; Shishido, Tetsuya; Teramura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Tsunehiro

    2015-04-01

    The characteristic peaks (pre-edge peaks) in the La L1-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) of various La complex oxides were analyzed by both experimental and theoretical approaches. The pre-edge peak areas are correlated with the bond angle analysis (BAA) parameter, which we proposed as an indicator of the centrosymmetry or disorder of the local configuration of the La site. The origin of the pre-edge peak and the parameterization criteria of the BAA parameter were evaluated using theoretical calculations based on molecular orbital theory and multiple scattering theory. The theoretical calculations showed that the origin of the pre-edge peak at the La L1-edge is electric dipole transition from 2s to unoccupied states generated by p-d hybridization. Medium-scale theoretical simulations of the La L1-edge XANES spectra of thousands of virtual La aqueous complex models verified that the parameterization criteria of the BAA parameter are applicable to local configuration analysis of La.

  3. A theoretical approach to La L(1)-edge XANES spectra of La complex oxides and their local configuration.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Hiroyuki; Shishido, Tetsuya; Teramura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Tsunehiro

    2015-04-28

    The characteristic peaks (pre-edge peaks) in the La L1-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) of various La complex oxides were analyzed by both experimental and theoretical approaches. The pre-edge peak areas are correlated with the bond angle analysis (BAA) parameter, which we proposed as an indicator of the centrosymmetry or disorder of the local configuration of the La site. The origin of the pre-edge peak and the parameterization criteria of the BAA parameter were evaluated using theoretical calculations based on molecular orbital theory and multiple scattering theory. The theoretical calculations showed that the origin of the pre-edge peak at the La L1-edge is electric dipole transition from 2s to unoccupied states generated by p-d hybridization. Medium-scale theoretical simulations of the La L1-edge XANES spectra of thousands of virtual La aqueous complex models verified that the parameterization criteria of the BAA parameter are applicable to local configuration analysis of La.

  4. A nuclear export signal in the N-terminal regulatory domain of IκBα controls cytoplasmic localization of inactive NF-κB/IκBα complexes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tony T.; Kudo, Nobuaki; Yoshida, Minoru; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2000-01-01

    Appropriate subcellular localization is crucial for regulation of NF-κB function. Herein, we show that latent NF-κB complexes can enter and exit the nucleus in preinduction states. The nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB) sequestered NF-κB/IκBα complexes in the nucleus. Using deletion and site-directed mutagenesis, we identified a previously uncharacterized nuclear export sequence in residues 45–54 of IκBα that was required for cytoplasmic localization of inactive complexes. This nuclear export sequence also caused nuclear exclusion of heterologous proteins in a LMB-sensitive manner. Importantly, a LMB-insensitive CRM1 mutant (Crm1-K1) abolished LMB-induced nuclear accumulation of the inactive complexes. Moreover, a cell-permeable p50 NF-κB nuclear localization signal peptide also blocked these LMB effects. These results suggest that NF-κB/IκBα complexes shuttle between the cytoplasm and nucleus by a nuclear localization signal-dependent nuclear import and a CRM1-dependent nuclear export. The LMB-induced nuclear complexes could not bind DNA and were inaccessible to signaling events, because LMB inhibited NF-κB activation without affecting the subcellular localization of upstream kinases IKKβ and NIK. Our findings indicate that the dominant nuclear export over nuclear import contributes to the largely cytoplasmic localization of the inactive complexes to achieve efficient NF-κB activation by extracellular signals. PMID:10655476

  5. GATED PORES IN THE FERRITIN PROTEIN NANOCAGE

    PubMed Central

    Theil, Elizabeth C.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis and pictogram: Gated pores in the ferritin family of protein nanocages, illustrated in the pictogram, control transfer of ferrous iron into and out of the cages by regulating contact between hydrated ferric oxide mineral inside the protein cage, and reductants such as FMNH2 on the outside. The structural and functional homology between the gated ion channel proteins in inaccessible membranes and gated ferritin pores in the stable, water soluble nanoprotein, make studies of ferritin pores models for gated pores in many ion channel proteins. Properties of ferritin gated pores, which control rates of FMNH2 reduction of ferric iron in hydrated oxide minerals inside the protein nanocage, are discussed in terms of the conserved pore gate residues (arginine 72-apspartate 122 and leucine 110-leucine 134), of pore sensitivity to heat at temperatures 30 °C below that of the nanocage itself, and of pore sensitivity to physiological changes in urea (1–10 mM). Conditions which alter ferritin pore structure/function in solution, coupled with the high evolutionary conservation of the pore gates, suggest the presence of molecular regulators in vivo that recognize the pore gates and hold them either closed or open, depending on biological iron need. The apparent homology between ferrous ion transport through gated pores in the ferritin nanocage and ion transport through gated pores in ion channel proteins embedded in cell membranes, make studies of water soluble ferritin and the pore gating folding/unfolding a useful model for other gated pores. PMID:19262678

  6. Neuronal localization of the 5-HT2 receptor family in the amygdaloid complex.

    PubMed

    Bombardi, Cristiano

    2014-01-01

    The amygdaloid complex (or amygdala), a heterogeneous structure located in the medial portion of the temporal lobe, is composed of deep, superficial, and "remaining" nuclei. This structure is involved in the generation of emotional behavior, in the formation of emotional memories and in the modulation of the consolidation of explicit memories for emotionally arousing events. The serotoninergic fibers originating in the dorsal and medial raphe nuclei are critically involved in amygdalar functions. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) regulates amygdalar activity through the activation of the 5-HT2 receptor family, which includes three receptor subtypes: 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT2C. The distribution and the functional activity of the 5-HT2 receptor family has been studied more extensively than that of the 5-HT2A receptor subtypes, especially in the deep nuclei. In these nuclei, the 5-HT2A receptor is expressed on both pyramidal and non-pyramidal neurons, and could play a critical role in the formation of emotional memories. However, the exact role of the 5-HT2A receptor subtypes, as well as that of the 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C receptor subtypes, in the modulation of the amygdalar microcircuits requires additional study. The present review reports data concerning the distribution and the functional roles of the 5-HT2 receptor family in the amygdala.

  7. A theory for protein dynamics: Global anisotropy and a normal mode approach to local complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperman, Jeremy; Romano, Pablo; Guenza, Marina

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel Langevin equation description for the dynamics of biological macromolecules by projecting the solvent and all atomic degrees of freedom onto a set of coarse-grained sites at the single residue level. We utilize a multi-scale approach where molecular dynamic simulations are performed to obtain equilibrium structural correlations input to a modified Rouse-Zimm description which can be solved analytically. The normal mode solution provides a minimal basis set to account for important properties of biological polymers such as the anisotropic global structure, and internal motion on a complex free-energy surface. This multi-scale modeling method predicts the dynamics of both global rotational diffusion and constrained internal motion from the picosecond to the nanosecond regime, and is quantitative when compared to both simulation trajectory and NMR relaxation times. Utilizing non-equilibrium sampling techniques and an explicit treatment of the free-energy barriers in the mode coordinates, the model is extended to include biologically important fluctuations in the microsecond regime, such as bubble and fork formation in nucleic acids, and protein domain motion. This work supported by the NSF under the Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) program, grant DGE-0742540 and NSF grant DMR-0804145, computational support from XSEDE and ACISS.

  8. Dynamic Localization of Electronic Excitation in Photosynthetic Complexes Revealed with Chiral Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved ultrafast optical probes of chiral dynamics provide a new window allowing us to explore how interactions with such structured environments drive electronic dynamics. Incorporating optical activity into time-resolved spectroscopies has proven challenging due to the small signal and large achiral background. Here, we demonstrate that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy can be adapted to detect chiral signals and that these signals reveal how excitations delocalize and contract following excitation. We dynamically probe the evolution of chiral electronic structure in the light harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria following photoexcitation by creating a chiral two-dimensional mapping. The dynamics of the chiral two-dimensional signal directly reports on changes in the degree of delocalization of the excitonic state following photoexcitation. The mechanism of energy transfer in this system may enhance transfer probability due to the coherent coupling among chromophores while suppressing fluorescence that arises from populating delocalized states. This generally applicable spectroscopy will provide an incisive tool to probe ultrafast transient molecular fluctuations that are obscured in non-chiral experiments. PMID:24504144

  9. The relationship between structure and function in locally observed complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comin, Cesar H.; Viana, Matheus P.; Costa, Luciano da F.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, studies looking at the small scale interactions taking place in complex networks have started to unveil the wealth of interactions that occur between groups of nodes. Such findings make the claim for a new systematic methodology to quantify, at node level, how dynamics are influenced (or differentiated) by the structure of the underlying system. Here we define a new measure that, based on the dynamical characteristics obtained for a large set of initial conditions, compares the dynamical behavior of the nodes present in the system. Through this measure, we find that the geographic and Barabási-Albert models have a high capacity for generating networks that exhibit groups of nodes with distinct dynamics compared to the rest of the network. The application of our methodology is illustrated with respect to two real systems. In the first we use the neuronal network of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to show that the interneurons of the ventral cord of the nematode present a very large dynamical differentiation when compared to the rest of the network. The second application concerns the SIS epidemic model on an airport network, where we quantify how different the distribution of infection times of high and low degree nodes can be, when compared to the expected value for the network.

  10. Localization of Membrane Proteins in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 (Radial Asymmetry in the Photosynthetic Complexes).

    PubMed

    Sherman, D. M.; Troyan, T. A.; Sherman, L. A.

    1994-09-01

    Localization of membrane proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was determined by transmission electron microscopy utilizing immunocytochemistry with cells prepared by freeze-substitution. This preparation procedure maintained cellular morphology and permitted detection of cellular antigens with high sensitivity and low background. Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 is a unicellular cyanobacterium with thylakoids organized in concentric layers toward the periphery of the cell. Cytochrome oxidase was localized almost entirely in the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas a carotenoprotein (P35) was shown to be a cell wall component. The major photosystem II (PSII) proteins (D1, D2 CP43, and CP47) were localized throughout the thylakoids. Proteins of the Cyt b6/f complex were found to have a similar distribution. Thylakoid luminal proteins, such as the Mn-stabilizing protein, were located primarily in the thylakoid, but a small, reproducible fraction was found in the outer compartment. The photosystem I (PSI) reaction center proteins and the ATP synthase proteins were found associated mostly with the outermost thylakoid and with the cytoplasmic membrane. These results indicated that the photosynthetic apparatus is not evenly distributed throughout the thylakoids. Rather, there is a radial asymmetry such that much of the PSI and the ATPase synthase is located in the outermost thylakoid. The relationship of this structure to the photosynthetic mechanism is discussed. It is suggested that the photosystems are separated because of kinetic differences between PSII and PSI, as hypothesized by H.-W. Trissl and C. Wilhelm (Trends Biochem Sci [1993] 18:415-419).

  11. Relative importance of local habitat complexity and regional factors for assemblages of oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) in Sphagnum peat bogs.

    PubMed

    Minor, M A; Ermilov, S G; Philippov, D A; Prokin, A A

    2016-11-01

    We investigated communities of oribatid mites in five peat bogs in the north-west of the East European plain. We aimed to determine the extent to which geographic factors (latitude, separation distance), local environment (Sphagnum moss species, ground water level, biogeochemistry) and local habitat complexity (diversity of vascular plants and bryophytes in the surrounding plant community) influence diversity and community composition of Oribatida. There was a significant north-to-south increase in Oribatida abundance. In the variance partitioning, spatial factors explained 33.1 % of variability in abundance across samples; none of the environmental factors were significant. Across all bogs, Oribatida species richness and community composition were similar in Sphagnum rubellum and Sphagnum magellanicum, but significantly different and less diverse in Sphagnum cuspidatum. Sphagnum microhabitat explained 52.2 % of variability in Oribatida species richness, whereas spatial variables explained only 8.7 %. There was no distance decay in community similarity between bogs with increased geographical distance. The environmental variables explained 34.9 % of the variance in community structure, with vascular plants diversity, bryophytes diversity, and ground water level all contributing significantly; spatial variables explained 15.1 % of the total variance. Overall, only 50 % of the Oribatida community variance was explained by the spatial structure and environmental variables. We discuss relative importance of spatial and local environmental factors, and make general inferences about the formation of fauna in Sphagnum bogs.

  12. From link-prediction in brain connectomes and protein interactomes to the local-community-paradigm in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Alanis-Lobato, Gregorio; Ravasi, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Growth and remodelling impact the network topology of complex systems, yet a general theory explaining how new links arise between existing nodes has been lacking, and little is known about the topological properties that facilitate link-prediction. Here we investigate the extent to which the connectivity evolution of a network might be predicted by mere topological features. We show how a link/community-based strategy triggers substantial prediction improvements because it accounts for the singular topology of several real networks organised in multiple local communities - a tendency here named local-community-paradigm (LCP). We observe that LCP networks are mainly formed by weak interactions and characterise heterogeneous and dynamic systems that use self-organisation as a major adaptation strategy. These systems seem designed for global delivery of information and processing via multiple local modules. Conversely, non-LCP networks have steady architectures formed by strong interactions, and seem designed for systems in which information/energy storage is crucial. PMID:23563395

  13. Polo kinase regulates the localization and activity of the chromosomal passenger complex in meiosis and mitosis in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Carmena, Mar; Lombardia, Miguel Ortiz; Ogawa, Hiromi; Earnshaw, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), Polo and Aurora families of protein kinases. The levels of expression and localization of the key regulatory kinases are themselves subject to very tight control. There is increasing evidence that crosstalk between the mitotic kinases provides for an additional level of regulation. We have previously shown that Aurora B activates Polo kinase at the centromere in mitosis, and that the interaction between Polo and the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) component INCENP is essential in this activation. In this report, we show that Polo kinase is required for the correct localization and activity of the CPC in meiosis and mitosis. Study of the phenotype of different polo allele combinations compared to the effect of chemical inhibition revealed significant differences in the localization and activity of the CPC in diploid tissues. Our results shed new light on the mechanisms that control the activity of Aurora B in meiosis and mitosis. PMID:25376909

  14. Smectic pores and defect cores

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Elisabetta A.; Kamien, Randall D.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    Riemann's minimal surfaces, a one-parameter family of minimal surfaces, describe a bicontinuous lamellar system with pores connecting alternating layers. We demonstrate explicitly that Riemann's minimal surfaces are composed of a nonlinear sum of two oppositely handed helicoids. PMID:24098846

  15. Membrane pores induced by magainin

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtke, S.J.; He, Ke; Heller, W.T.

    1996-10-29

    Magainin, found in the skin of Xenopus laevis, belongs to a broad class of antimicrobial peptides which kill bacteria by permeabilizing the cytoplasmic membrane but do not lyse eukaryotic cells. The 23-residue peptide has been shown to form an amphiphilic helix when associated with membranes. However, its molecular mechanism of action has been controversial. Oriented circular dichroism has detected helical magainin oriented perpendicular to the plane of the membrane at high peptide concentrations, but Raman, fluorescence, differential scanning calorimetry, and NMR all indicate that the peptide is associated with the head groups of the lipid bilayer. Here we show that neutron in-plane scattering detects pores formed by magainin 2 in membranes only when a substantial fraction of the peptide is oriented perpendicular to the membrane. The pores are almost twice as large as the alamethicin pores. On the basis of the in-plane scattering data, we propose a toroidal (or wormhole) model, which differs from the barrel-stave model of alamethicin in that the lipid bends back on itself like the inside of a torus. The bending requires a lateral expansion in the head group region of the bilayer. Magainin monomers play the role of fillers in the expansion region thereby stabilizing the pore. This molecular configuration is consistent with all published magainin data. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, H.; Walker, B.J.; Chang, C.Y.; Niblack, B.; Panchal, R.

    1998-07-07

    An inactive pore-forming agent is revealed which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell. 30 figs.

  17. Cellular and Subcellular Localization of the RGS7/Gβ5/R7BP Complex in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Carolina; Orlandi, Cesare; Fajardo-Serrano, Ana; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    A member of regulator of G-protein signaling family, RGS7, is an essential modulator of signaling through GABAB receptors. RGS7 functions as a macromolecular complex with type 5 G protein β (Gβ5) and R7 binding protein (R7BP) to control the localization and function of the resultant heterotrimeric complexes. Here, we used co-immunoprecipitation, in situ hybridization, histoblot and immunohistochemical techniques at the light and electron microscopic level to advance understanding of RGS7-Gβ5-R7BP complexes in the central nervous system, focusing on distinct neuronal populations in the cerebellar cortex. Histoblot analysis showed that RGS7, Gβ5 and R7BP proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly an overlapping pattern and showing a high expression level in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments established that the RGS7/Gβ5 forms complexes with R7BP in the cerebellum. At the cellular level, RGS7 and R7BP mRNAs were expressed at the highest level in Purkinje cells (PCs) and Golgi cells, and at low levels in granule cells. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that labeling for RGS7, Gβ5 and R7BP were present in the three neuronal populations and concentrated in dendrites and spines. At the electron microscopic level, immunolabeling for RGS7, Gβ5 and R7BP proteins was found both at postsynaptic and presynaptic sites and showed similar distribution patterns. Immunoreactivity for the three proteins was mostly localized along the extrasynaptic plasma membrane of dendritic shafts and spines of PCs and to a lesser extent, in axon terminals (AT) establishing excitatory synapses. Quantitative analysis of immunogold particles for RGS7, Gβ5 and R7BP revealed that they are non-uniformly distributed along the surface of PCs, and show enrichment around excitatory synapses on dendritic spines. We further report that deletion of R7BP in mice reduced the targeting of both RGS7 and Gβ5 to the plasma membrane. Altogether, these

  18. Pore-scale simulations of drainage in granular materials: Finite size effects and the representative elementary volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chao; Chareyre, Bruno; Darve, Félix

    2016-09-01

    A pore-scale model is introduced for two-phase flow in dense packings of polydisperse spheres. The model is developed as a component of a more general hydromechanical coupling framework based on the discrete element method, which will be elaborated in future papers and will apply to various processes of interest in soil science, in geomechanics and in oil and gas production. Here the emphasis is on the generation of a network of pores mapping the void space between spherical grains, and the definition of local criteria governing the primary drainage process. The pore space is decomposed by Regular Triangulation, from which a set of pores connected by throats are identified. A local entry capillary pressure is evaluated for each throat, based on the balance of capillary pressure and surface tension at equilibrium. The model reflects the possible entrapment of disconnected patches of the receding wetting phase. It is validated by a comparison with drainage experiments. In the last part of the paper, a series of simulations are reported to illustrate size and boundary effects, key questions when studying small samples made of spherical particles be it in simulations or experiments. Repeated tests on samples of different sizes give evolution of water content which are not only scattered but also strongly biased for small sample sizes. More than 20,000 spheres are needed to reduce the bias on saturation below 0.02. Additional statistics are generated by subsampling a large sample of 64,000 spheres. They suggest that the minimal sampling volume for evaluating saturation is one hundred times greater that the sampling volume needed for measuring porosity with the same accuracy. This requirement in terms of sample size induces a need for efficient computer codes. The method described herein has a low algorithmic complexity in order to satisfy this requirement. It will be well suited to further developments toward coupled flow-deformation problems in which evolution of the

  19. Effect of Confinement on the Bubble Points of Hydrocarbons in Controlled-Pore Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Sheng; Lutkenhaus, Jodie; Nasrabadi, Hadi; Hadi Nasrabadi Team

    2015-03-01

    Phase behavior in shale remains a challenging problem in the petroleum industry due to many complexities. One complexity is the strong surface-fluid interactions in shale nano-scale pores. These interactions can lead to a heterogeneous distribution of molecules, which conventional bulk-phase thermodynamics fails to describe. Herein, we report a study on the bubble points of various hydrocarbons confined in nanoporous controlled-pore glasses of 4.3 to 38.1 nm pore diameter. Differential scanning calorimetry is used to measure the temperature at which the gas phase begins to form (i.e. bubble point). Besides pore diameter, the relative hydrocarbon loading in the controlled-pore glass is evaluated. The findings suggest that the bubble point is dramatically affected by pore diameter.

  20. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter in pore water of continental shelf sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frauke; Elvert, Marcus; Koch, Boris P.; Witt, Matthias; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2009-06-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in sediment pore water is a complex molecular mixture reflecting various sources and biogeochemical processes. In order to constrain those sources and processes, molecular variations of pore water DOM in surface sediments from the NW Iberian shelf were analyzed by ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and compared to river and marine water column DOM. Weighted average molecular element ratios of oxygen to carbon ((O/C) wa) and hydrogen to carbon ((H/C) wa) provided general information about DOM sources. DOM in local rivers was more oxygenated ((O/C) wa 0.52) and contained less hydrogen ((H/C) wa 1.15) than marine pore water DOM (mean (O/C) wa 0.50, mean (H/C) wa 1.26). The relative abundance of specific compound groups, such as highly oxygenated aromatic compounds or nitrogen-bearing compounds with low H/C ratios, correspond to a high concentration of lignin phenols (160 μg/g sediment dry weight) and a high TOC/TN ratio (13.3) in the sedimentary organic matter and were therefore assigned to terrestrial sources. The lower degree of unsaturation and a higher relative abundance of nitrogen-bearing compounds in the pore water DOM reflected microbial activity within the sediment. One sampling site on the shelf with a high sediment accumulation, and a humic-rich river sample showed a wide range of sulfur compounds in the DOM, accompanied by a higher abundance of lipid biomarkers for sulfate-reducing bacteria, probably indicating early diagenetic sulfurization of organic matter.

  1. Local path planning method of the self-propelled model based on reinforcement learning in complex conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Pang, Yongjie; Li, Hongwei; Zhang, Rubo

    2014-09-01

    Conducting hydrodynamic and physical motion simulation tests using a large-scale self-propelled model under actual wave conditions is an important means for researching environmental adaptability of ships. During the navigation test of the self-propelled model, the complex environment including various port facilities, navigation facilities, and the ships nearby must be considered carefully, because in this dense environment the impact of sea waves and winds on the model is particularly significant. In order to improve the security of the self-propelled model, this paper introduces the Q learning based on reinforcement learning combined with chaotic ideas for the model's collision avoidance, in order to improve the reliability of the local path planning. Simulation and sea test results show that this algorithm is a better solution for collision avoidance of the self navigation model under the interference of sea winds and waves with good adaptability.

  2. Influence of the intrapulse Raman scattering on the localized pulsating solutions of generalized complex-quintic Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunov, Ivan M.; Georgiev, Zhivko D.

    2014-10-01

    We study the dynamics of the localized pulsating solutions of generalized complex cubic- quintic Ginzburg-Landau equation (CCQGLE) in the presence of intrapulse Raman scattering (IRS). We present an approach for identification of periodic attractors of the generalized CCQGLE. At first using ansatz of the travelling wave, and fixing some relations between the material parameters, we derive the strongly nonlinear Lienard - Van der Pol equation for the amplitude of the nonlinear wave. Next, we apply the Melnikov method to this equation to analyze the possibility of existence of limit cycles. For a set of fixed material parameters we show the existence of limit cycle that arises around a closed phase trajectory of the unperturbed system and prove its stability.

  3. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of a human 372-kDA protein localized in the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Sohda, M; Misumi, Y; Fujiwara, T; Nishioka, M; Ikehara, Y

    1994-12-15

    Autoantibodies from a patient with chronic rheumatoid arthritis recognized an antigen localized in the Golgi complex of various cells from different tissues and species. The autoantibodies were used as a probe for screening human QGP-1 cDNA library, resulting in identification of a 10.3-kb cDNA. The cDNA insert contained an open reading frame which encodes a 3225-residue protein with a calculated mass of 372 kDa. The predicted protein was found to have no NH2-terminal signal sequence but a single hydrophobic domain at the COOH terminus. These results indicate that the 372-kDa antigen is cytoplasmically disposed and anchored to the Golgi membrane by the COOH-terminal hydrophobic domain.

  4. Prehension synergies in the grasps with complex friction patterns: local versus synergic effects and the template control.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xun; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2007-07-01

    We studied adjustments of digit forces to changes in the friction. The subjects held a handle statically in a three-digit grasp. The friction under each digit was either high or low, resulting in eight three-element friction sets (such grasps were coined the grasps with complex friction pattern). The total load was also manipulated. It was found that digit forces were adjusted not only to the supported load and local friction, but also to friction at other digits (synergic effects). When friction under a digit was low, its tangential force decreased and the normal force increased (local effects). The synergic effects were directed to maintain the equilibrium of the handle. The relation between the individual digit forces and loads agreed with the triple-product model: f(i)(n) = k(i)((2))k(i)((1))L, where f(i)(n) is normal force of digit i, L is the load (newtons), k(i)((1)) is a dimensionless coefficient representing sharing the total tangential force among the digits (summation operator k(i)((1)) = 1.0), and k(i)((2)) is a coefficient representing the relation between the tangential and normal forces of digit i (the overall friction equivalent, OFE). At each friction set, the central controller selected the grasping template -- a three-element array of k(i)((2))k(i)((1)) products -- and then scaled the template with the load magnitude.

  5. Chaos and localization in the wave functions of complex atoms Nd I, Pm I, and Sm I

    SciTech Connect

    Angom, Dilip; Kota, V.K.B.

    2005-04-01

    Wave functions of complex lanthanide atoms Nd I, Pm I, and Sm I, obtained via multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method, are analyzed for density of states in terms of partial densities, strength functions [F{sub k}(E)], number of principal components [{xi}{sub 2}(E)], and occupancies ({sup E}) of single-particle orbits using embedded Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of one plus two-body random matrix ensembles [EGOE(1+2)]. It is seen that density of states are in general multi-modal, F{sub k}(E)'s exhibit variations as function of the basis states energy and {xi}{sub 2}(E)'s show structures arising from localized states. The sources of these departures from EGOE(1+2) are investigated by examining the partial densities, correlations between F{sub k}(E), {xi}{sub 2}(E), and {sup E} and also by studying the structure of the Hamiltonian matrices. These studies point out the operation of EGOE(1+2) but at the same time suggest that weak admixing between well separated configurations should be incorporated into EGOE(1+2) for more quantitative description of chaos and localization in Nd I, Pm I, and Sm I.

  6. Saturation fluorimetry of complex organic compounds with a high local concentration of fluorophores (by the example of phytoplankton)

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, D V; Ostroumov, E E; Fadeev, V V

    2006-02-28

    Saturation of fluorescence of complex organic compounds with a high local concentration of fluorescing molecules (fluorophores), when singlet-singlet annihilation makes a noticeable contribution to saturation, is considered. The fluorescence saturation curve is obtained analytically for the case of a rectangular temporal and spatial distribution of photons in a laser pulse. It is shown that the fluorescence saturation curve depends on the parameter {Phi}{sub 0}, which is proportional to the concentration of fluorescing molecules, and on the parameters A, B, and {alpha} describing the influence of singlet-singlet annihilation, bleaching of an optically thin layer, and nonstationarity of excitation, respectively. The fluorescence saturation curves are studied experimentally for compounds with a high local concentration of fluorescing molecules such as molecules of a monoculture of diatomic alga Thalassiosira weissflogii. The experimental fluorescence saturation curves are well described by the obtained analytic expression. The values of the parameter {Phi}{sub 0}, proportional to the concentration of chlorophyll a, and the parameter A (for the first time) are obtained from the alga fluorescence saturation curves. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  7. Localization of Membrane Proteins in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 (Radial Asymmetry in the Photosynthetic Complexes).

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, D. M.; Troyan, T. A.; Sherman, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Localization of membrane proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was determined by transmission electron microscopy utilizing immunocytochemistry with cells prepared by freeze-substitution. This preparation procedure maintained cellular morphology and permitted detection of cellular antigens with high sensitivity and low background. Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 is a unicellular cyanobacterium with thylakoids organized in concentric layers toward the periphery of the cell. Cytochrome oxidase was localized almost entirely in the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas a carotenoprotein (P35) was shown to be a cell wall component. The major photosystem II (PSII) proteins (D1, D2 CP43, and CP47) were localized throughout the thylakoids. Proteins of the Cyt b6/f complex were found to have a similar distribution. Thylakoid luminal proteins, such as the Mn-stabilizing protein, were located primarily in the thylakoid, but a small, reproducible fraction was found in the outer compartment. The photosystem I (PSI) reaction center proteins and the ATP synthase proteins were found associated mostly with the outermost thylakoid and with the cytoplasmic membrane. These results indicated that the photosynthetic apparatus is not evenly distributed throughout the thylakoids. Rather, there is a radial asymmetry such that much of the PSI and the ATPase synthase is located in the outermost thylakoid. The relationship of this structure to the photosynthetic mechanism is discussed. It is suggested that the photosystems are separated because of kinetic differences between PSII and PSI, as hypothesized by H.-W. Trissl and C. Wilhelm (Trends Biochem Sci [1993] 18:415-419). PMID:12232325

  8. Zfrp8 forms a complex with fragile-X mental retardation protein and regulates its localization and function.

    PubMed

    Tan, William; Schauder, Curtis; Naryshkina, Tatyana; Minakhina, Svetlana; Steward, Ruth

    2016-02-15

    Fragile-X syndrome is the most commonly inherited cause of autism and mental disabilities. The Fmr1 (Fragile-X Mental Retardation 1) gene is essential in humans and Drosophila for the maintenance of neural stem cells, and Fmr1 loss results in neurological and reproductive developmental defects in humans and flies. FMRP (Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein) is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein, involved in mRNA silencing and translational repression. Both Zfrp8 and Fmr1 have essential functions in the Drosophila ovary. In this study, we identified FMRP, Nufip (Nuclear Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein-interacting Protein) and Tral (Trailer Hitch) as components of a Zfrp8 protein complex. We show that Zfrp8 is required in the nucleus, and controls localization of FMRP in the cytoplasm. In addition, we demonstrate that Zfrp8 genetically interacts with Fmr1 and tral in an antagonistic manner. Zfrp8 and FMRP both control heterochromatin packaging, also in opposite ways. We propose that Zfrp8 functions as a chaperone, controlling protein complexes involved in RNA processing in the nucleus.

  9. A multiscale approach to accelerate pore-scale simulation of porous electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weibo; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2017-04-01

    A new method to accelerate pore-scale simulation of porous electrodes is presented. The method combines the macroscopic approach with pore-scale simulation by decomposing a physical quantity into macroscopic and local variations. The multiscale method is applied to the potential equation in pore-scale simulation of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) catalyst layer, and validated with the conventional approach for pore-scale simulation. Results show that the multiscale scheme substantially reduces the computational cost without sacrificing accuracy.

  10. Protein crystal nucleation in pores

    PubMed Central

    Nanev, Christo N.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2017-01-01

    The most powerful method for protein structure determination is X-ray crystallography which relies on the availability of high quality crystals. Obtaining protein crystals is a major bottleneck, and inducing their nucleation is of crucial importance in this field. An effective method to form crystals is to introduce nucleation-inducing heterologous materials into the crystallization solution. Porous materials are exceptionally effective at inducing nucleation. It is shown here that a combined diffusion-adsorption effect can increase protein concentration inside pores, which enables crystal nucleation even under conditions where heterogeneous nucleation on flat surfaces is absent. Provided the pore is sufficiently narrow, protein molecules approach its walls and adsorb more frequently than they can escape. The decrease in the nucleation energy barrier is calculated, exhibiting its quantitative dependence on the confinement space and the energy of interaction with the pore walls. These results provide a detailed explanation of the effectiveness of porous materials for nucleation of protein crystals, and will be useful for optimal design of such materials. PMID:28091515

  11. DESIGN INFORMATION ON FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted over several years at municipal wastewater treatment plants employing line pore diffused aeration systems. These studies were designed to produce reliable information on the performance and operational requirements of fine pore devices under process ...

  12. Carbon turnover in pore spaces - CIPS model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuka, Katrin

    2010-05-01

    The CIPS (Carbon turnover In Pore Spaces) model has been developed to overcome the constraints of conceptual pools and to get a better insight into the nature of carbon stabilization in soil (KUKA, 2007). This pure carbon turnover model was implemented in CANDY (CArbon and Nitrogen Dynamics) model system (Franko, 1995). The CIPS model did overcome the empirical pools taking into account soil structure effects. It is based on quality driven primary stabilisation mechanism (recalcitrance of SOM) and process driven secondary stabilisation mechanism (place of turnover) of SOM in soil. In addition to the division of SOM in the qualitative pools on the basis of chemical measurability, a dependence of the turnover conditions from the location of SOM in pore space is implemented taking into account different turnover conditions in the particular pore space and the accessibility for microbial biomass. The main assumption of the CIPS model is that the biological activity is not evenly distributed through the whole pore space. The pore space classes - micro, meso and macro pores - used in the model are marked by wilting point, field capacity and pore volume as a first approach. Because of the poor aeration in the micro pores they show very low biological activity leading to a strong protection of the carbon localized in this pore space. The biological active time (BAT) concept of the CANDY model was adapted to the CIPS model in order to calculate the distribution of biological activity for each pore space class. The reduction functions of the turnover active time concept of CANDY model, related to soil temperature, soil moisture, soil texture, relative air volume and distance to the soil surface are multiplied by the step width of calendar time producing the transformed time step as total BAT (BATtot). The calculated BATtot corresponds to the time that would be required under optimal conditions in the laboratory to perform the same turnover result as under the given

  13. Long-pore Electrostatics in Inward-rectifier Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Janice L.; Palmer, Lawrence G.; Roux, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    Inward-rectifier potassium (Kir) channels differ from the canonical K+ channel structure in that they possess a long extended pore (∼85 Å) for ion conduction that reaches deeply into the cytoplasm. This unique structural feature is presumably involved in regulating functional properties specific to Kir channels, such as conductance, rectification block, and ligand-dependent gating. To elucidate the underpinnings of these functional roles, we examine the electrostatics of an ion along this extended pore. Homology models are constructed based on the open-state model of KirBac1.1 for four mammalian Kir channels: Kir1.1/ROMK, Kir2.1/IRK, Kir3.1/GIRK, and Kir6.2/KATP. By solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the electrostatic free energy of a K+ ion is determined along each pore, revealing that mammalian Kir channels provide a favorable environment for cations and suggesting the existence of high-density regions in the cytoplasmic domain and cavity. The contribution from the reaction field (the self-energy arising from the dielectric polarization induced by the ion's charge in the complex geometry of the pore) is unfavorable inside the long pore. However, this is well compensated by the electrostatic interaction with the static field arising from the protein charges and shielded by the dielectric surrounding. Decomposition of the static field provides a list of residues that display remarkable correspondence with existing mutagenesis data identifying amino acids that affect conduction and rectification. Many of these residues demonstrate interactions with the ion over long distances, up to 40 Å, suggesting that mutations potentially affect ion or blocker energetics over the entire pore. These results provide a foundation for understanding ion interactions in Kir channels and extend to the study of ion permeation, block, and gating in long, cation-specific pores. PMID:19001143

  14. Regulation of soil organic C mineralisation at the pore scale.

    PubMed

    Ruamps, Léo S; Nunan, Naoise; Pouteau, Valérie; Leloup, Julie; Raynaud, Xavier; Roy, Virginie; Chenu, Claire

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about the factors that regulate C mineralisation at the soil pore scale or how these factors vary throughout the pore network. This study sought to understand how the decomposition of organic carbon varies within the soil pore network and to determine the relative importance of local environmental properties relative to biological properties as controlling factors. This was achieved by sterilising samples of soil and reinoculating them with axenic bacterial suspensions using the matric potential to target different locations in the pore network. Carbon mineralisation curves were described with two-compartment first-order models to distinguish CO2 derived from the labile organic carbon released during sterilisation from CO2 derived from organic C unaffected by sterilisation. The data indicated that the size of the labile pool of organic C, possibly of microbial origin, varied as a function of location in the pore network but that the organic carbon unaffected by sterilisation did not. The mineralisation rate of the labile C varied with the bacterial type inoculated, but the mineralisation rate of the organic C unaffected by sterilisation was insensitive to bacterial type. Taken together, the results suggest that microbial metabolism is a less significant regulator of soil organic carbon decomposition than are microbial habitat properties.

  15. Sumoylation and transcription regulation at nuclear pores.

    PubMed

    Texari, Lorane; Stutz, Françoise

    2015-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that besides promoters, enhancers, and epigenetic modifications, nuclear organization is another parameter contributing to optimal control of gene expression. Although differences between species exist, the influence of gene positioning on expression seems to be a conserved feature from yeast to Drosophila and mammals. The nuclear periphery is one of the nuclear compartments implicated in gene regulation. It consists of the nuclear envelope (NE) and the nuclear pore complexes (NPC), which have distinct roles in the control of gene expression. The NPC has recently been shown to tether proteins involved in the sumoylation pathway. Here, we will focus on the importance of gene positioning and NPC-linked sumoylation/desumoylation in transcription regulation. We will mainly discuss observations made in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model system and highlight potential parallels in metazoan species.

  16. Pore Topology Effects in Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy of Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Zubiaga, Asier; Warringham, Robbie; Mitchell, Sharon; Gerchow, Lars; Cooke, David; Crivelli, Paolo; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-12-14

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is a powerful method to study the size and connectivity of pores in zeolites. The lifetime of positronium within the host material is commonly described by the Tao-Eldrup model. However, one of its largest limitations arises from the simple geometries considered for the shape of the pores, which cannot describe accurately the complex topologies in zeolites. Here, an atomic model that combines the Tao potential with the crystallographic structure is introduced to calculate the distribution and lifetime of Ps intrinsic to a given framework. A parametrization of the model is undertaken for a set of widely applied zeolite framework types (*BEA, FAU, FER, MFI, MOR, UTL), before extending the model to all known structures. The results are compared to structural and topological descriptors, and to the Tao-Eldrup model adapted for zeolites, demonstrating the intricate dependence of the lifetime on the pore architecture.

  17. Treatment of reactive interfaces in pore-scale reactive transport with the phase-field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Di Palma, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The two major challenges for continuum reactive transport models are the treatment of interfaces between different phases (multi-fluids like DNAPL-water, or solid-fluid) and the ability to model transient chemical gradients at the pore-scale. Pore-scale models allow us to deal naturally with chemical gradients at the discrete scale and they generally consider interfaces as boundary conditions that satisfy a local, but modified, mass balance equation. In other word grains do not take part in the mass balance of chemical species besides providing a boundary condition for the fluid. For instance, heterogeneous reactions at solid-fluid boundaries are framed as a balance between incoming chemical flux and reactions. Due to complex topology of interfaces in natural porous media, the treatment of heterogeneous reactions depends on the orientation of the interface and therefore requires a special care. It can become complicated and tedious especially when interfaces are allowed to evolve with time. Approaches such as the enthalpy method, which was developed for solving moving interfaces during melting processes, offer the advantage of a treatment that is independent of the shape of the moving interface. Similar methods have been used for modeling multiphase flows with diffuse interface successfully. Here, we expand on these approaches and introduce a phase-field approach to introduce heterogeneous reactions in single and multiphase reactive flows at the pore-scale. Mass conservation is solved in each phase and we introduce interface conditions as a source/sink term in the conservation equation rather than a boundary condition. The advantages are that the method becomes independent of the (time-dependent) topology of the interface and automatically enforces local mass conservation between the different constituents of the domain. We show validations of the model and applications to multispecies reactive transport, isotope fractionation during calcite growth and finally

  18. Impact of pore size variability and network coupling on electrokinetic transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Shima; Bazant, Martin Z.; Mani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    We have developed and validated an efficient and robust computational model to study the coupled fluid and ion transport through electrokinetic porous media, which are exposed to external gradients of pressure, electric potential, and concentration. In our approach a porous media is modeled as a network of many pores through which the transport is described by the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes equations. When the pore sizes are random, the interactions between various modes of transport may provoke complexities such as concentration polarization shocks and internal flow circulations. These phenomena impact mixing and transport in various systems including deionization and filtration systems, supercapacitors, and lab-on-a-chip devices. In this work, we present simulations of massive networks of pores and we demonstrate the impact of pore size variation, and pore-pore coupling on the overall electrokinetic transport in porous media.

  19. Assembling the puzzle: Oligomerization of α-pore forming proteins in membranes☆

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáez, Ana J.

    2016-01-01

    Pore forming proteins (PFPs) share the ability of creating pores that allow the passage of ions, proteins or other constituents through a wide variety of target membranes, ranging from bacteria to humans. They often cause cell death, as pore formation disrupts the membrane permeability barrier required for maintaining cell homeostasis. The organization into supramolecular complexes or oligomers that pierce the membrane is a common feature of PFPs. However, the molecular pathway of self-assembly and pore opening remains unclear. Here, we review the most recent discoveries in the mechanism of membrane oligomerization and pore formation of a subset of PFPs, the α-PFPs, whose pore-forming domains are formed by helical segments. Only now we are starting to grasp the molecular details of their function, mainly thanks to the introduction of single molecule microscopy and nanoscopy techniques. PMID:26375417

  20. A quantitative investigation of the effect of pore morphology on soil aggregate stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, A.

    2009-04-01

    Soil structure determines the operating environment for all physical, chemical and biological processes within the soil. Soil aggregate stability is an important measure for assessing soil structure quality. Non-destructive tomography techniques such as X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) offer great opportunities to quantitatively investigate the soil porous architecture which can provide important information for understanding soil processes and function in a multi-scale manner. For instance, the intra-aggregate pore space is of great importance for microbial activity, the sequestration of organic carbon and water flow. This paper investigates the effect of pore morphology on soil aggregate stability. Apparent porosity, pore size distribution, average pore size and fractal perimeter dimension (pore roughness) were measured from the images of the reconstructed 2-D image stacks. A new theoretical concept of soil aggregate stability is proposed. A strong relationship was observed between soil aggregate stability and pore morphological complexity.

  1. Complex rupture process of the March 19, 2013, Rudna mine (Poland) seismic event - local and regional view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzinski, Lukasz; Cesca, Simone; Lizurek, Grzegorz

    2015-04-01

    On March 19th, 2013 a strong shallow induced seismic event struck a mining panel in the room-and-pillar Rudna copper mine, SE Poland. The event caused important damages at the mining tunnel and trapped 19 miners, which were safely rescued few hour later. Despite mining induced seismicity is frequent at this mine, the March 19 event was unusual because of its larger magnitude, its occurrence far from the mining stopes, and because it was accompanied by a strong hazardous rockburst. The mining inspections following the event verified the occurrence of a rockfall with tunnel floor uplift, but also recognized the presence of a faulting structure at the hypocentral location. The availability of three monitoring networks, including local and regional data, short-period and broadband seismometers, as well as surface and in-mine installation, give an optimal set up to determine rupture parameters and compare the performance and results from different installations. We perform waveform and spectral based analysis to infer source properties, with a particular interest to the determination of the rupture processes, using different moment tensor inversion techniques. Our results are surprisingly different, ranging from a dominant thrust mechanism, resolved at closest distances, to a collapse-type rupture, resolved at regional distances. We proof that a complex rupture model is needed to explain all observations and justify these discrepancies. The final scenario indicates that the rupture nucleated as a weaker thrust mechanism, along a pre-existing weakened surface, and continued in a more energetic collapse event. The local surface LUMINEOS network has the potential to resolve both subevents, but not using a standard moment tensor decomposition. We propose here a new moment tensor decomposition and an alternative moment tensor fitting procedure, which can be used to analyze the moment tensor of collapse sources.

  2. Superposed local and regional paleostresses: Fault-slip analysis of Neogene extensional faulting near coeval caldera complexes, Yucca Flat, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, S.A.

    1995-06-10

    Numerous reduced stress tensors are computed by multiple inversions of 906 temporally and spatially partitioned fault-slip data from the Yucca Flat region in the southwest Nevada volcanic field to constrain the Neogene paleostress and faulting history and to investigate how the regional tectonic stress field was affected by local caldera magmatism. Perturbed, shallow (<400 m), pre-11 Ma paleostress configurations, determined west and northwest of present (post-11 Ma) Yucca Flat basin, existed during mild extensional faulting and are attributed to superposition of transient caldera-magmatic stresses on the regional stress field. A brief ({approximately} 0.5 m.y.) change to a strike-slip stress state occurred at about 13 Ma and was accompanied by small-offset, quasi-conjugate strike-slip faulting. This stress state was most distinct, relative to a normalslip state, near calderas where stress solutions and fault relations indicate closer affinities to a reverse-slip state. Inferred 11.6-11.45 Ma paleostress tensors indicate radial tension associated with either initial caldera collapse or local post-collapse topographic modification of the stress field. Post-11 Ma normal-slip stress tensors are associated with normal- and oblique-slip faults that accommodated subsidence and eastward extension of Yucca Flat basin away from the caldera complexes. These tensors do not indicate stress modifications due to residual caldera-related effects and thus were used to infer post-11 Ma regional stress changes. The stress field has rotated as much as 65{degrees} clockwise since 11 Ma during extensional development of Yucca Flat basin, with most of the rotation and extension occurring before about 8.5 Ma. Results suggest that shallow magmatism and caldera development can strongly alter extensional tectonic stress fields, fault patterns, and slip directions in the uppermost crust out to distances of roughly two magma chamber radii away from a magma body. 59 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Pore formation by Cry toxins.

    PubMed

    Soberón, Mario; Pardo, Liliana; Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Sánchez, Jorge; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; Bravo, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria produce insecticidal Cry and Cyt proteins used in the biological control of different insect pests. In this review, we will focus on the 3d-Cry toxins that represent the biggest group of Cry proteins and also on Cyt toxins. The 3d-Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins that induce cell death by forming ionic pores into the membrane of the midgut epithelial cells in their target insect. The initial steps in the mode of action include ingestion of the protoxin, activation by midgut proteases to produce the toxin fragment and the interaction with the primary cadherin receptor. The interaction of the monomeric CrylA toxin with the cadherin receptor promotes an extra proteolytic cleavage, where helix alpha-1 of domain I is eliminated and the toxin oligomerization is induced, forming a structure of 250 kDa. The oligomeric structure binds to a secondary receptor, aminopeptidase N or alkaline phosphatase. The secondary receptor drives the toxin into detergent resistant membrane microdomains formingpores that cause osmotic shock, burst of the midgut cells and insect death. Regarding to Cyt toxins, these proteins have a synergistic effect on the toxicity of some Cry toxins. Cyt proteins are also proteolytic activated in the midgut lumen of their target, they bind to some phospholipids present in the mosquito midgut cells. The proposed mechanism of synergism between Cry and Cyt toxins is that Cyt1Aa function as a receptor for Cry toxins. The Cyt1A inserts into midgut epithelium membrane and exposes protein regions that are recognized by Cry11Aa. It was demonstrated that this interaction facilitates the oligomerization of Cry11Aa and also its pore formation activity.

  4. Capillary Properties of Model Pores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Tim J.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Liquid menisci in small pores exhibit a curved surface across which there is a significant pressure difference. In the past it has been difficult to calculate the curvatures, of this class of menisci. Some recent studies have shown that a relatively straightforward, but hitherto neglected, method originated by Mayer & Stowe (1965) and Princen (1969a) can be applied to analyse wedging menisci. However, the method has lacked a comprehensive experimental verification. This investigation follows on from the previously limited studies. A standardised method for the application of the analysis is described, the results from which are compared to observations made using modified experimental procedures. The behaviour of the capillary surfaces formed in several model pores are analysed with the method. The model systems studied are rectangular ducts, the pores formed by a rod in an angled corner, by two contacting rods and a plate and the space between a rod and a plate. For the latter two shapes the analysis is extended to include systems of mixed wettability which have a particular bearing on enhanced oil recovery operations. Experiments in which curvatures are inferred from observations of capillary rise, are performed using two comparative techniques. An involved procedure confirms predictions of meniscus curvature to within 0.3%. Use of a more straightforward, through less accurate, technique enables variations of curvature with tube shape or contact angle(s) to be conveniently studied. Results obtained are excellent and confirm the theory within the determined experimental errors. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  5. Bayesian demosaicing using Gaussian scale mixture priors with local adaptivity in the dual tree complex wavelet packet transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Bart; Aelterman, Jan; Luong, Hiep; Pizurica, Aleksandra; Philips, Wilfried

    2013-02-01

    In digital cameras and mobile phones, there is an ongoing trend to increase the image resolution, decrease the sensor size and to use lower exposure times. Because smaller sensors inherently lead to more noise and a worse spatial resolution, digital post-processing techniques are required to resolve many of the artifacts. Color filter arrays (CFAs), which use alternating patterns of color filters, are very popular because of price and power consumption reasons. However, color filter arrays require the use of a post-processing technique such as demosaicing to recover full resolution RGB images. Recently, there has been some interest in techniques that jointly perform the demosaicing and denoising. This has the advantage that the demosaicing and denoising can be performed optimally (e.g. in the MSE sense) for the considered noise model, while avoiding artifacts introduced when using demosaicing and denoising sequentially. In this paper, we will continue the research line of the wavelet-based demosaicing techniques. These approaches are computationally simple and very suited for combination with denoising. Therefore, we will derive Bayesian Minimum Squared Error (MMSE) joint demosaicing and denoising rules in the complex wavelet packet domain, taking local adaptivity into account. As an image model, we will use Gaussian Scale Mixtures, thereby taking advantage of the directionality of the complex wavelets. Our results show that this technique is well capable of reconstructing fine details in the image, while removing all of the noise, at a relatively low computational cost. In particular, the complete reconstruction (including color correction, white balancing etc) of a 12 megapixel RAW image takes 3.5 sec on a recent mid-range GPU.

  6. A theoretical analysis and prediction of pore size and pore size distribution in electrospun multilayer nanofibrous materials.

    PubMed

    Bagherzadeh, Roohollah; Najar, Saeed Shaikhzadeh; Latifi, Masoud; Tehran, Mohammad Amani; Kong, Lingxue

    2013-07-01

    Electrospinning process can fabricate nanomaterials with unique nanostructures for potential biomedical and environmental applications. However, the prediction and, consequently, the control of the porous structure of these materials has been impractical due to the complexity of the electrospinning process. In this research, a theoretical model for characterizing the porous structure of the electrospun nanofibrous network has been developed by combining the stochastic and stereological probability approaches. From consideration of number of fiber-to-fiber contacts in an electrospun nanofibrous assembly, geometrical and statistical theory relating morphological and structural parameters of the network to the characteristic dimensions of interfibers pores is provided. It has been shown that these properties are strongly influenced by the fiber diameter, porosity, and thickness of assembly. It is also demonstrated that at a given network porosity, increasing fiber diameter and thickness of the network reduces the characteristic dimensions of pores. It is also discussed that the role of fiber diameter and number of the layer in the assembly is dominant in controlling the pore size distribution of the networks. The theory has been validated experimentally and results compared with the existing theory to predict the pore size distribution of nanofiber mats. It is believed that the presented theory for estimation of pore size distribution is more realistic and useful for further studies of multilayer random nanofibrous assemblies.

  7. Sediment Transport, Complex Topography, and Hydrokinetic Turbines: Bedform Dynamics, Local Scour, and the Effect on Turbine Performance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guala, M.; Hill, C.; Kozarek, J. L.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-scale experiments on the interactions between axial-flow marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines, sediment transport and complex channel topography were performed at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL), University of Minnesota. Model axial-flow three-bladed turbines (rotor diameters, dT = 0.15m and 0.5m) were installed in open channel flumes with both erodible and non-erodible substrates. In erodible channels, device-induced local scour was monitored over several hydraulic conditions (clear water vs. live bedload transport) and material sizes. Synchronous velocity, bed elevation and turbine performance measurements provide an indication into the effect channel topography has on device performance. A novel data acquisition imaging system provided methods for monitoring the dynamics of bedform transport as they approached and migrated past an operating axial-flow turbine. Experiments were also performed in a realistic meandering outdoor research channel with active sediment transport to investigate MHK turbine interactions with bedform migration and turbulent flow in asymmetric channels, providing new insight into turbine-sediment interactions and turbine wake behavior in curving channels. Results provide the foundation for investigating advanced turbine control strategies for optimal power production in non-stationary environments, while also providing robust data for computational model validation enabling further investigations into the interactions between energy conversion devices and the physical environment.

  8. Dissection of the NUP107 nuclear pore subcomplex reveals a novel interaction with spindle assembly checkpoint protein MAD1 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ródenas, Eduardo; González-Aguilera, Cristina; Ayuso, Cristina; Askjaer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes consist of several subcomplexes. The NUP107 complex is important for nucleocytoplasmic transport, nuclear envelope assembly, and kinetochore function. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and the roles of individual complex members remain elusive. We report the first description of a genetic disruption of NUP107 in a metazoan. Caenorhabditis elegans NUP107/npp-5 mutants display temperature-dependent lethality. Surprisingly, NPP-5 is dispensable for incorporation of most nucleoporins into nuclear pores and for nuclear protein import. In contrast, NPP-5 is essential for proper kinetochore localization of NUP133/NPP-15, another NUP107 complex member, whereas recruitment of NUP96/NPP-10C and ELYS/MEL-28 is NPP-5 independent. We found that kinetochore protein NUF2/HIM-10 and Aurora B/AIR-2 kinase are less abundant on mitotic chromatin upon NPP-5 depletion. npp-5 mutants are hypersensitive to anoxia, suggesting that the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is compromised. Indeed, NPP-5 interacts genetically and physically with SAC protein MAD1/MDF-1, whose nuclear envelope accumulation requires NPP-5. Thus our results strengthen the emerging connection between nuclear pore proteins and chromosome segregation. PMID:22238360

  9. Assessing complexity of skin blood flow oscillations in response to locally applied heating and pressure in rats: Implications for pressure ulcer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fuyuan; O'Brien, William D.; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of local heating on the complexity of skin blood flow oscillations (BFO) under prolonged surface pressure in rats. Eleven Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: 7 rats underwent surface pressure with local heating (△t=10 °C) and 4 rats underwent pressure without heating. A pressure of 700 mmHg was applied to the right trochanter area of rats for 3 h. Skin blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. The loading period was divided into nonoverlapping 30 min epochs. For each epoch, multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) was utilized to compute DFA coefficients and complexity of endothelial related metabolic, neurogenic, and myogenic frequencies of BFO. The results showed that under surface pressure, local heating led to a significant decrease in DFA coefficients of myogenic frequency during the initial epoch of loading period, a sustained decrease in complexity of myogenic frequency, and a significantly higher degree of complexity of metabolic frequency during the later phase of loading period. Surrogate tests showed that the reduction in complexity of myogenic frequency was associated with a loss of nonlinearity whereas increased complexity of metabolic frequency was associated with enhanced nonlinearity. Our results indicate that increased metabolic activity and decreased myogenic response due to local heating manifest themselves not only in magnitudes of metabolic and myogenic frequencies but also in their structural complexity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using complexity analysis of BFO to monitor the ischemic status of weight-bearing skin and risk of pressure ulcers.

  10. Effect of the hydroaffinity and topology of pore walls on the structure and dynamics of confined water

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, Michael F. Klameth, Felix; Drossel, Barbara; Vogel, Michael

    2015-01-21

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to observe the structure and dynamics of SPC/E water in amorphous silica pores and amorphous ice pores with radii slightly larger than 10 Å. In addition to atomically rough pores, we construct completely smooth pores such that the potential felt at a given distance from the pore wall is an averaged atomic potential. As compared to rough walls, smooth walls induce stronger distortions of water structure for both silica and ice confinements. On the other hand, unlike the smooth pores, the rough pores strongly slow down water dynamics at the pore wall. The slowdown vanishes when reducing the atomic charges in the wall, i.e., when varying the hydroaffinity, while keeping the surface topology, indicating that it is not a geometric effect. Rather, it is due to the fact that the wall atoms provide a static energy landscape along the surface, e.g., fixed anchor-points for hydrogen bonds, to which the water molecules need to adapt, blocking channels for structural rearrangement. In the smooth pores, water dynamics can be faster than in the bulk liquid not only at the pore wall but also in the pore center. Changes in the tetrahedral order rather than in the local density are identified as the main cause for this change of the dynamical behavior in the center of smooth pores.

  11. A thermodynamic approach to Alamethicin pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2013-01-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11 Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6 Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8 Å pore and the octamer in an 11 Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted “barrel-stave” model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself. PMID:24071593

  12. A thermodynamic approach to alamethicin pore formation.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2014-01-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8Å pore and the octamer in an 11Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted "barrel-stave" model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself.

  13. A thermodynamic approach to alamethicin pore formation.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2014-05-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8Å pore and the octamer in an 11Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted "barrel-stave" model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself.

  14. Passive permeability and effective pore size of HeLa cell nuclear membranes.

    PubMed

    Samudram, Arunkarthick; Mangalassery, Bijeesh M; Kowshik, Meenal; Patincharath, Nandakumar; Varier, Geetha K

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear pore complexes in the nuclear membrane act as the sole gateway of transport of molecules from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and vice versa. Studies on biomolecular transport through nuclear membranes provide vital data on the nuclear pore complexes. In this work, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran molecules as a model system and study the passive nuclear import of biomolecules through nuclear pore complexes in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells. Experiments are carried out under transient conditions in the time lapse imaging scheme using an in-house constructed confocal laser scanning microscope. Transport rates of dextran molecules having molecular weights of 4-70 kDa corresponding to Stokes radius of 1.4-6 nm are determined. Analyzing the permeability of the nuclear membrane for different sizes the effective pore radius of HeLa cell nuclear membrane is determined to be 5.3 nm, much larger than the value reported earlier using proteins as probe molecules. The range of values reported for the nuclear pore radius suggest that they may not be rigid structures and it is quite probable that the effective pore size of nuclear pore complexes is critically dependent on the probe molecules and on the environmental factors.

  15. How Lipid Membranes Affect Pore Forming Toxin Activity.

    PubMed

    Rojko, Nejc; Anderluh, Gregor

    2015-12-15

    Pore forming toxins (PFTs) evolved to permeate the plasma membrane of target cells. This is achieved in a multistep mechanism that usually involves binding of soluble protein monomer to the lipid membrane, oligomerization at the plane of the membrane, and insertion of part of the polypeptide chain across the lipid membrane to form a conductive channel. Introduced pores allow uncontrolled transport of solutes across the membrane, inflicting damage to the target cell. PFTs are usually studied from the perspective of structure-function relationships, often neglecting the important role of the bulk membrane properties on the PFT mechanism of action. In this Account, we discuss how membrane lateral heterogeneity, thickness, and fluidity influence the pore forming process of PFTs. In general, lipid molecules are more accessible for binding in fluid membranes due to steric reasons. When PFT specifically binds ordered domains, it usually recognizes a specific lipid distribution pattern, like sphingomyelin (SM) clusters or SM/cholesterol complexes, and not individual lipid species. Lipid domains were also suggested to act as an additional concentration platform facilitating PFT oligomerization, but this is yet to be shown. The last stage in PFT action is the insertion of the transmembrane segment across the membranes to build the transmembrane pore walls. Conformational changes are a spontaneous process, and sufficient free energy has to be available for efficient membrane penetration. Therefore, fluid bilayers are permeabilized more readily in comparison to highly ordered and thicker liquid ordered lipid phase (Lo). Energetically more costly insertion into the Lo phase can be driven by the hydrophobic mismatch between the thinner liquid disordered phase (Ld) and large protein complexes, which are unable to tilt like single transmembrane segments. In the case of proteolipid pores, membrane properties can directly modulate pore size, stability, and even selectivity. Finally

  16. An elliptical-pore model for late-stage planar viscous sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowdy, Darren G.

    2004-02-01

    A simple ‘elliptical-pore model’ of the shrinkage of compressible pores in late-stage planar viscous sintering is proposed. The model is in the spirit of matched asymptotics and relies on splitting the flow into an ‘inner’ and ‘outer’ problem. The inner problem in the vicinity of any given pore involves solving for its free-surface evolution exactly using complex-variable methods. The outer flow due to all other pores is assumed to be given by an assembly of point sinks/sources. As a test of the model, the evolution of a singly infinite periodic row of compressible pores is considered in detail. The effectiveness of the simple model is tested by comparison with a full numerical simulation. A novel boundary integral method based on Cauchy potentials and conformal mapping is used. In the case of pores with constant pressure, it is found that pores shrink faster than if in isolation. Compressible pores obeying the ideal gas law are also studied and are found to tend to a quasi-steady non-circular state. A higher-order model is also presented and compared with numerical simulations of the viscous sintering of a doubly periodic array of pores in Stokes flow.

  17. Fine structures at pore boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, L.; Quintero Noda, C.; Joshi, C.; Rakesh, S.; Pandya, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present high resolution observations of fine structures at pore boundaries. The inner part of granules towards umbra show dark striations which evolve into a filamentary structure with dark core and `Y' shape at the head of the filaments. These filaments migrate into the umbra similar to penumbral filaments. These filaments show higher temperature, lower magnetic field strength and more inclined field compared to the background umbra. The optical depth stratification of physical quantities suggests their similarity with penumbral filaments. However, line-of-sight velocity pattern is different from penumbral filaments where they show downflows in the deeper layers of the atmosphere while the higher layers show upflows. These observations show filamentation in a simple magnetic configuration.

  18. Open-pore polyurethane product

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, R.T.; Salyer, I.O.

    1974-02-17

    The method is described of producing an open-pore polyurethane foam having a porosity of at least 50% and a density of 0.1 to 0.5 g per cu cm, and which consists of coherent spherical particles of less than 10 mu diam separated by interconnected interstices. It is useful as a filter and oil absorbent. The product is admirably adapted to scavenging of crude oil from the surface of seawater by preferential wicking. The oil-soaked product may then be compressed to recover the oil or burned for disposal. The crosslinked polyurethane structures are remarkably solvent and heat-resistance as compared with known thermoplastic structures. Because of their relative inertness, they are useful filters for gasoline and other hydrocarbon compounds. (7 claims)

  19. On the localization of complex sounds: temporal encoding based on input-slope coincidence detection of envelopes.

    PubMed

    Gai, Yan; Kotak, Vibhakar C; Sanes, Dan H; Rinzel, John

    2014-08-15

    Behavioral and neural findings demonstrate that animals can locate low-frequency sounds along the azimuth by detecting microsecond interaural time differences (ITDs). Information about ITDs is also available in the amplitude modulations (i.e., envelope) of high-frequency sounds. Since medial superior olivary (MSO) neurons encode low-frequency ITDs, we asked whether they employ a similar mechanism to process envelope ITDs with high-frequency carriers, and the effectiveness of this mechanism compared with the process of low-frequency sound. We developed a novel hybrid in vitro dynamic-clamp approach, which enabled us to mimic synaptic input to brain-slice neurons in response to virtual sound and to create conditions that cannot be achieved naturally but are useful for testing our hypotheses. For each simulated ear, a virtual sound, computer generated, was used as input to a computational auditory-nerve model. Model spike times were converted into synaptic input for MSO neurons, and ITD tuning curves were derived for several virtual-sound conditions: low-frequency pure tones, high-frequency tones modulated with two types of envelope, and speech sequences. Computational models were used to verify the physiological findings and explain the biophysical mechanism underlying the observed ITD coding. Both recordings and simulations indicate that MSO neurons are sensitive to ITDs carried by spectrotemporally complex virtual sounds, including speech tokens. Our findings strongly suggest that MSO neurons can encode ITDs across a broad-frequency spectrum using an input-slope-based coincidence-detection mechanism. Our data also provide an explanation at the cellular level for human localization performance involving high-frequency sound described by previous investigators.

  20. Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Alters Local Respiratory Circuit Function at the Level of the preBötzinger Complex

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Alfredo J.; Zanella, Sebastien; Dashevskiy, Tatiana; Khan, Shakil A.; Khuu, Maggie A.; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a common state experienced in several breathing disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and apneas of prematurity. Unraveling how CIH affects the CNS, and in turn how the CNS contributes to apneas is perhaps the most challenging task. The preBötzinger complex (preBötC) is a pre-motor respiratory network critical for inspiratory rhythm generation. Here, we test the hypothesis that CIH increases irregular output from the isolated preBötC, which can be mitigated by antioxidant treatment. Electrophysiological recordings from brainstem slices revealed that CIH enhanced burst-to-burst irregularity in period and/or amplitude. Irregularities represented a change in individual fidelity among preBötC neurons, and changed transmission from preBötC to the hypoglossal motor nucleus (XIIn), which resulted in increased transmission failure to XIIn. CIH increased the degree of lipid peroxidation in the preBötC and treatment with the antioxidant, 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis (1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-21H,23H-porphyrin manganese(III) pentachloride (MnTMPyP), reduced CIH-mediated irregularities on the network rhythm and improved transmission of preBötC to the XIIn. These findings suggest that CIH promotes a pro-oxidant state that destabilizes rhythmogenesis originating from the preBötC and changes the local rhythm generating circuit which in turn, can lead to intermittent transmission failure to the XIIn. We propose that these CIH-mediated effects represent a part of the central mechanism that may perpetuate apneas and respiratory instability, which are hallmark traits in several dysautonomic conditions. PMID:26869872

  1. Localization of single- and low-copy sequences on tomato synaptonemal complex spreads using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, D G; Lapitan, N L; Stack, S M

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful means by which single- and low-copy DNA sequences can be localized on chromosomes. Compared to the mitotic metaphase chromosomes that are normally used in FISH, synaptonemal complex (SC) spreads (hypotonically spread pachytene chromosomes) have several advantages. SC spreads (1) are comparatively free of debris that can interfere with probe penetration, (2) have relatively decondensed chromatin that is highly accessible to probes, and (3) are about ten times longer than their metaphase counterparts, which permits FISH mapping at higher resolution. To investigate the use of plant SC spreads as substrates for single-copy FISH, we probed spreads of tomato SCs with two single-copy sequences and one low-copy sequence (ca. 14 kb each) that are associated with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers on SC 11. Individual SCs were identified on the basis of relative length, arm ratio, and differential staining patterns after combined propidium iodide (PI) and 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. In this first report of single-copy FISH to SC spreads, the probe sequences were unambiguously mapped on the long arm of tomato SC 11. Coupled with data from earlier studies, we determined the distance in micrometers, the number of base pairs, and the rates of crossing over between these three FISH markers. We also observed that the order of two of the FISH markers is reversed in relation to their order on the molecular linkage map. SC-FISH mapping permits superimposition of markers from molecular linkage maps directly on pachytene chromosomes and thereby contributes to our understanding of the relationship between chromosome structure, gene activity, and recombination. PMID:10224272

  2. Localization of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria in cystic fibrosis lungs and interactions with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hypoxic mucus.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Ute; Abdullah, Lubna H; Perlmutt, Olivia S; Albert, Daniel; Davis, C William; Arnold, Roland R; Yankaskas, James R; Gilligan, Peter; Neubauer, Heiner; Randell, Scott H; Boucher, Richard C

    2014-11-01

    The localization of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria in cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs, alone or during coinfection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is poorly understood. We performed immunohistochemistry for Bcc and P. aeruginosa bacteria on 21 coinfected or singly infected CF lungs obtained at transplantation or autopsy. Parallel in vitro experiments examined the growth of two Bcc species, Burkholderia cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans, in environments similar to those occupied by P. aeruginosa in the CF lung. Bcc bacteria were predominantly identified in the CF lung as single cells or small clusters within phagocytes and mucus but not as "biofilm-like structures." In contrast, P. aeruginosa was identified in biofilm-like masses, but densities appeared to be reduced during coinfection with Bcc bacteria. Based on chemical analyses of CF and non-CF respiratory secretions, a test medium was defined to study Bcc growth and interactions with P. aeruginosa in an environment mimicking the CF lung. When test medium was supplemented with alternative electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions, B. cenocepacia and B. multivorans used fermentation rather than anaerobic respiration to gain energy, consistent with the identification of fermentation products by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both Bcc species also expressed mucinases that produced carbon sources from mucins for growth. In the presence of P. aeruginosa in vitro, both Bcc species grew anaerobically but not aerobically. We propose that Bcc bacteria (i) invade a P. aeruginosa-infected CF lung when the airway lumen is anaerobic, (ii) inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm-like growth, and (iii) expand the host bacterial niche from mucus to also include macrophages.

  3. Localization of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs and Interactions with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Hypoxic Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Lubna H.; Perlmutt, Olivia S.; Albert, Daniel; Davis, C. William; Arnold, Roland R.; Yankaskas, James R.; Gilligan, Peter; Neubauer, Heiner; Randell, Scott H.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The localization of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria in cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs, alone or during coinfection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is poorly understood. We performed immunohistochemistry for Bcc and P. aeruginosa bacteria on 21 coinfected or singly infected CF lungs obtained at transplantation or autopsy. Parallel in vitro experiments examined the growth of two Bcc species, Burkholderia cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans, in environments similar to those occupied by P. aeruginosa in the CF lung. Bcc bacteria were predominantly identified in the CF lung as single cells or small clusters within phagocytes and mucus but not as “biofilm-like structures.” In contrast, P. aeruginosa was identified in biofilm-like masses, but densities appeared to be reduced during coinfection with Bcc bacteria. Based on chemical analyses of CF and non-CF respiratory secretions, a test medium was defined to study Bcc growth and interactions with P. aeruginosa in an environment mimicking the CF lung. When test medium was supplemented with alternative electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions, B. cenocepacia and B. multivorans used fermentation rather than anaerobic respiration to gain energy, consistent with the identification of fermentation products by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both Bcc species also expressed mucinases that produced carbon sources from mucins for growth. In the presence of P. aeruginosa in vitro, both Bcc species grew anaerobically but not aerobically. We propose that Bcc bacteria (i) invade a P. aeruginosa-infected CF lung when the airway lumen is anaerobic, (ii) inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm-like growth, and (iii) expand the host bacterial niche from mucus to also include macrophages. PMID:25156735

  4. The mechanism of a nuclear pore assembly: a molecular biophysics view.

    PubMed

    Kuvichkin, Vasily V

    2011-06-01

    The basic problem of nuclear pore assembly is the big perinuclear space that must be overcome for nuclear membrane fusion and pore creation. Our investigations of ternary complexes: DNA-PC liposomes-Mg²⁺, and modern conceptions of nuclear pore structure allowed us to introduce a new mechanism of nuclear pore assembly. DNA-induced fusion of liposomes (membrane vesicles) with a single-lipid bilayer or two closely located nuclear membranes is considered. After such fusion on the lipid bilayer surface, traces of a complex of ssDNA with lipids were revealed. At fusion of two identical small liposomes (membrane vesicles) < 100 nm in diameter, a "big" liposome (vesicle) with ssDNA on the vesicle equator is formed. ssDNA occurrence on liposome surface gives a biphasic character to the fusion kinetics. The "big" membrane vesicle surrounded by ssDNA is the base of nuclear pore assembly. Its contact with the nuclear envelope leads to fast fusion of half of the vesicles with one nuclear membrane; then ensues a fusion delay when ssDNA reaches the membrane. The next step is to turn inside out the second vesicle half and its fusion to other nuclear membrane. A hole is formed between the two membranes, and nucleoporins begin pore complex assembly around the ssDNA. The surface tension of vesicles and nuclear membranes along with the kinetic energy of a liquid inside a vesicle play the main roles in this process. Special cases of nuclear pore formation are considered: pore formation on both nuclear envelope sides, the difference of pores formed in various cell-cycle phases and linear nuclear pore clusters.

  5. Fluids in micropores. II. Self-diffusion in a simple classical fluid in a slit pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, M.; Cushman, J. H.; Diestler, D. J.; Rhykerd, C. L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Self-diffusion coefficients D are computed for a model slit pore consisting of a rare-gas fluid confined between two parallel face-centered cubic (100) planes (walls) of rigidly fixed rare-gas atoms. By means of an optimally vectorized molecular-dynamics program for the CYBER 205, the dependence of D on the thermodynamic state (specified by the chemical potential μ, temperature T, and the pore width h) of the pore fluid has been explored. Diffusion is governed by Fick's law, even in pores as narrow as 2 or 3 atomic diameters. The diffusion coefficient oscillates as a function of h with fixed μ and T, vanishing at critical values of h, where fluid-solid phase transitions occur. A shift of the pore walls relative to one another in directions parallel with the walls can radically alter the structure of the pore fluid and consequently the magnitude of D. Since the pore fluid forms distinct layers parallel to the walls, a local diffusion coefficient D(i)∥ associated with a given layer i can be defined. D(i)∥ is least for the contact layer, even for pores as wide as 30 atomic diameters (˜100 Å). Moreover, D(i)∥ increases with increasing distance of the fluid layer from the wall and, for pore widths between 16 and 30 atomic diameters, D(i)∥ is larger in the center of the pore than in the bulk fluid that is in equilibrium with the pore fluid. The opposite behavior is observed in corresponding smooth-wall pores, in which the discrete fluid-wall interactions have been averaged by smearing the wall atoms over the plane of the wall. The temperature dependence of D for fixed h is determined and the nature of melting of a pore solid is examined. It is found that the solid tends to melt first in the middle of the pore. All of the various results are related to the structural properties of the pore fluid, as manifested by the local density and pair correlation functions.

  6. Modeling the interaction of ultrasound with pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yichi; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Parthasarathi, Sanjai

    1991-01-01

    Factors that affect ultrasonic velocity sensing of density during consolidation of metal powders are examined. A comparison is made between experimental results obtained during the final stage of densification and the predictions of models that assume either a spherical or a spheroidal pore shape. It is found that for measurements made at low frequencies during the final stage of densification, relative density (pore fraction) and pore shape are the two most important factors determining the ultrasonic velocity, the effect of pore size is negligible.

  7. Nanoscale pore formation dynamics during aluminum anodization.

    PubMed

    Thamida, Sunil Kumar; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2002-03-01

    A theoretical analysis of nanoscale pore formation during anodization reveals its fundamental instability mechanism to be a field focusing phenomenon when perturbations on the minima of the two oxide interfaces are in phase. Lateral leakage of the layer potential at high wave number introduces a layer tension effect that balances the previous destabilizing effect to produce a long-wave instability and a selected pore separation that scales linearly with respect to voltage. At pH higher than 1.77, pores do not form due to a very thick barrier layer. A weakly nonlinear theory based on long-wave expansion of double free surface problem yields two coupled interface evolution equations that can be reduced to one without altering the dispersion relationship by assuming an equal and in-phase amplitude for the two interfaces. This interface evolution equation faithfully reproduces the initial pore ordering and their dynamics. A hodograph transformation technique is then used to determine the interior dimension of the well-developed pores in two dimensions. The ratio of pore diameter to pore separation is found to be a factor independent of voltage but varies with the pH of the electrolyte. Both the predicted pH range where pores are formed and the predicted pore dimensions are favorably compared to experimental data. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Predicting the Influence of Pore Characteristics on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die Casting Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng

    2013-06-10

    In this paper, a two-dimensional microstructure-based finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die casting Mg materials on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM50 and AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope to obtain the overall information on the pore characteristics. The experimentally quantified pore characteristics are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructures with different pore sizes, pore volume fractions and pore size distributions. Pores are explicitly represented in the synthetic microstructures and meshed out for the subsequent finite element analysis. In the finite element analysis, an intrinsic critical strain value is used for the Mg matrix material, beyond which work-hardening is no longer permissible. With no artificial failure criterion prescribed, ductility levels are predicted for the various microstructures in the form of strain localization. Mesh size effect study is also conducted, from which a mesh size dependent critical strain curve is determined. A concept of scalability of pore size effects is then presented and examined with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve. The results in this study show that, for the regions with lower pore size and lower volume fraction, the ductility generally decreases as the pore size and pore volume fraction increase whereas, for the regions with larger pore size and larger pore volume fraction, other factors such as the mean distance between the pores begin to have some substantial influence on the ductility. The results also indicate that the pore size effects may be scalable for the models with good-representative pore shape and distribution with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve.

  9. The Unique Molecular Choreography of Giant Pore Formation by the Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysins of Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tweten, Rodney K; Hotze, Eileen M; Wade, Kristin R

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) assemble their giant β-barrel pore in cholesterol-rich membranes has been the subject of intense study in the past two decades. A combination of structural, biophysical, and biochemical analyses has revealed deep insights into the series of complex and highly choreographed secondary and tertiary structural transitions that the CDCs undergo to assemble their β-barrel pore in eukaryotic membranes. Our knowledge of the molecular details of these dramatic structural changes in CDCs has transformed our understanding of how giant pore complexes are assembled and has been critical to our understanding of the mechanisms of other important classes of pore-forming toxins and proteins across the kingdoms of life. Finally, there are tantalizing hints that the CDC pore-forming mechanism is more sophisticated than previously imagined and that some CDCs are employed in pore-independent processes.

  10. Characterization of a mammalian Golgi-localized protein complex, COG, that is required for normal Golgi morphology and function

    PubMed Central

    Ungar, Daniel; Oka, Toshihiko; Brittle, Elizabeth E.; Vasile, Eliza; Lupashin, Vladimir V.; Chatterton, Jon E.; Heuser, John E.; Krieger, Monty; Waters, M. Gerard

    2002-01-01

    Multiprotein complexes are key determinants of Golgi apparatus structure and its capacity for intracellular transport and glycoprotein modification. Three complexes that have previously been partially characterized include (a) the Golgi transport complex (GTC), identified in an in vitro membrane transport assay, (b) the ldlCp complex, identified in analyses of CHO cell mutants with defects in Golgi-associated glycosylation reactions, and (c) the mammalian Sec34 complex, identified by homology to yeast Sec34p, implicated in vesicular transport. We show that these three complexes are identical and rename them the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex. The COG complex comprises four previously characterized proteins (Cog1/ldlBp, Cog2/ldlCp, Cog3/Sec34, and Cog5/GTC-90), three homologues of yeast Sec34/35 complex subunits (Cog4, -6, and -8), and a previously unidentified Golgi-associated protein (Cog7). EM of ldlB and ldlC mutants established that COG is required for normal Golgi morphology. “Deep etch” EM of purified COG revealed an ∼37-nm-long structure comprised of two similarly sized globular domains connected by smaller extensions. Consideration of biochemical and genetic data for mammalian COG and its yeast homologue suggests a model for the subunit distribution within this complex, which plays critical roles in Golgi structure and function. PMID:11980916

  11. Stress fields around two pores in an elastic body: exact quadrature domain solutions.

    PubMed

    Crowdy, Darren

    2015-08-08

    Analytical solutions are given for the stress fields, in both compression and far-field shear, in a two-dimensional elastic body containing two interacting non-circular pores. The two complex potentials governing the solutions are found by using a conformal mapping from a pre-image annulus with those potentials expressed in terms of the Schottky-Klein prime function for the annulus. Solutions for a three-parameter family of elastic bodies with two equal symmetric pores are presented and the compressibility of a special family of pore pairs is studied in detail. The methodology extends to two unequal pores. The importance for boundary value problems of plane elasticity of a special class of planar domains known as quadrature domains is also elucidated. This observation provides the route to generalization of the mathematical approach here to finding analytical solutions for the stress fields in bodies containing any finite number of pores.

  12. Physical understanding of pore formation on supported lipid bilayer by bacterial toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Agrawal, A.; Ayappa, K. G.; Visweswariah, S. S.; Basu, J. K.

    2013-02-01

    Pore forming toxins are being classified in the protein community based on their ability of forming pores in living cell membranes. Some initial study has apparently pointed out the crystallographic pathway rather can be viewed as a structural as well as morphological changes of proteins in terms of self assembly before and during the pore formation process in surfactant medium. Being a water soluble compound, it changes its conformation and originates some pre-pore complex, which later partially goes inside the cell membrane causing a pore. The physical mechanism for this whole process is still unknown. In this study we have tried to understand these types of biological processes from physical point of view by using supported lipid bilayer as a model system.

  13. Construction of Representative Pore Morphologies in Disordered Nanoporous Two-Phase Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Toney, Michael F

    2003-04-01

    Materials with nanometer size heterogeneities are commonplace in the physical and biological sciences and often exhibit complex morphologies. Although this morphology has a dramatic effect on the materials' properties (e.g., transport and reaction processes), it is often difficult to accurately characterize. We describe a method, using a novel analysis of small angle x-ray scattering data, of generating representative three-dimensional morphologies of isotropic two-phase materials (one class of heterogeneous materials) where the morphology is disordered. This is applied to thin films containing nanometer sized pores with a range of porosities (4-44%). These representations provide a visualization of the pore morphology, give the pore size scale and extent of interconnection, and permit the determination of the transitions from closed pore to interconnected pores to bicontinuous morphology. This methodology will be valuable for characterizing two-phase systems, such as polymer blends, microemulsions, porous geological materials, bones, cements and ceramics.

  14. Stress fields around two pores in an elastic body: exact quadrature domain solutions

    PubMed Central

    Crowdy, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Analytical solutions are given for the stress fields, in both compression and far-field shear, in a two-dimensional elastic body containing two interacting non-circular pores. The two complex potentials governing the solutions are found by using a conformal mapping from a pre-image annulus with those potentials expressed in terms of the Schottky–Klein prime function for the annulus. Solutions for a three-parameter family of elastic bodies with two equal symmetric pores are presented and the compressibility of a special family of pore pairs is studied in detail. The methodology extends to two unequal pores. The importance for boundary value problems of plane elasticity of a special class of planar domains known as quadrature domains is also elucidated. This observation provides the route to generalization of the mathematical approach here to finding analytical solutions for the stress fields in bodies containing any finite number of pores. PMID:26339198

  15. Assessment of chemical element migration in soil-plant complex of Urov endemic localities of East Transbaikalia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadim V., Ermakov; Valentina, Danilova; Sabsbakhor, Khushvakhtova; Aklexander, Degtyarev; Sergey, Tyutikov; Victor, Berezkin; Elena, Karpova

    2014-05-01

    The comparative evaluation of the levels of biologically active chemical elements and their migration in the soil-plant complex of two Urov endemic locations in East Transbaikalia (Zolinsky and Uryumkansky) and background areas (Western Baikal region and the western area of the Trans-Baikal region) was conducted. The predominant soil-forming rocks in East Transbaikalia are weathering products of Proterozoic carbonated granitoids PR2. The surface rocks consist from granite, granodiorite, diorite quartz diorite, gabbro, norite, gabbro-norite and other. Soils - mountain and cryogenic meadow forests, mountain permafrost taiga podzolised, meadow alluvial, peaty meadow [2]. The paludification of narrow valleys and thermokarst phenomena are typical in Urov endemic localities. It reflects on the spotted of soil and differentiation of chemical composition of soils and plants. Most of the chemical elements in soils were determined by means of X-ray fluorescence, and trace elements in soils and plants - by atomic absorption spectrometry. The selenium content was measured by spectrofluorimetric method [3]. The research processed by methods of variation statistics. It was found that the soils of two locations of the Urov subregion of the biosphere were more enriched with iron, barium, calcium, uranium, thorium, phosphorus, and to a lesser extent strontium compared to background soils. The ratio of Ca: P was significantly higher in the soil of background areas, and Ca: Sr, on the contrary, in endemic soils. In assessing the migration of trace elements in soil-plant complex by means of the total content of trace elements and biological absorption coefficient found a marked accumulation by plants manganese, chromium, arsenic and weak plants accumulation of cobalt and nickel. Soil landscape is not much different in content of selenium, but its migration in plants was reduced in places of spread of Urov disease [1]. The concentrators of cadmium (leaves of different species of willow

  16. Cavitation and pore blocking in nanoporous glasses.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, C; Kalies, G; Enke, D; Klank, D

    2011-09-06

    In gas adsorption studies, porous glasses are frequently referred to as model materials for highly disordered mesopore systems. Numerous works suggest that an accurate interpretation of physisorption isotherms requires a complete understanding of network effects upon adsorption and desorption, respectively. The present article deals with nitrogen and argon adsorption at different temperatures (77 and 87 K) performed on a series of novel nanoporous glasses (NPG) with different mean pore widths. NPG samples contain smaller mesopores and significantly higher microporosity than porous Vycor glass or controlled pore glass. Since the mean pore width of NPG can be tuned sensitively, the evolution of adsorption characteristics with respect to a broadening pore network can be investigated starting from the narrowest nanopore width. With an increasing mean pore width, a H2-type hysteresis develops gradually which finally transforms into a H1-type. In this connection, a transition from a cavitation-induced desorption toward desorption controlled by pore blocking can be observed. Furthermore, we find concrete hints for a pore size dependence of the relative pressure of cavitation in highly disordered pore systems. By comparing nitrogen and argon adsorption, a comprehensive insight into adsorption mechanisms in novel disordered materials is provided.

  17. Fluctuation of surface charge in membrane pores.

    PubMed Central

    Bashford, C Lindsay; Alder, Glenn M; Pasternak, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    Surface charge in track-etched polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes with narrow pores has been probed with a fluorescent cationic dye (3,3'-diethyloxacarbocyanine iodide (diO-C2-(3))) using confocal microscopy. Staining of negatively charged PET membranes with diO-C2-(3) is a useful measure of surface charge for the following reasons: 1) the dye inhibits K(+) currents through the pores and reduces their selectivity for cations; 2) it inhibits [3H]-choline+ transport and promotes 36Cl- transport across the membrane in a pH- and ionic-strength-dependent fashion; and 3) staining of pores by diO-C2-(3) is reduced by low pH and by the presence of divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Zn2+. Measurement of the time dependence of cyanine staining of pores shows fluctuations of fluorescence intensity that occur on the same time scale as do fluctuations of ionic current in such pores. These data support our earlier proposal that fluctuations in ionic current across pores in synthetic and biological membranes reflect fluctuations in the surface charge of the pore walls in addition to molecular changes in pore proteins. PMID:11916860

  18. User localization in complex environments by multimodal combination of GPS, WiFi, RFID, and pedometer technologies.

    PubMed

    Dao, Trung-Kien; Nguyen, Hung-Long; Pham, Thanh-Thuy; Castelli, Eric; Nguyen, Viet-Tung; Nguyen, Dinh-Van

    2014-01-01

    Many user localization technologies and methods have been proposed for either indoor or outdoor environments. However, each technology has its own drawbacks. Recently, many researches and designs have been proposed to build a combination of multiple localization technologies system which can provide higher precision results and solve the limitation in each localization technology alone. In this paper, a conceptual design of a general localization platform using combination of multiple localization technologies is introduced. The combination is realized by dividing spaces into grid points. To demonstrate this platform, a system with GPS, RFID, WiFi, and pedometer technologies is established. Experiment results show that the accuracy and availability are improved in comparison with each technology individually.

  19. Effects of Pore Distributions on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) Magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility. The results in this study show that the ductility monotonically decreases as the pore volume fraction increases and that the effect of ‘skin region’ on the ductility is noticeable under the condition of same local pore volume fraction in the center region of the sample and its existence can be beneficial for the improvement of ductility. The further synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element analyses are planned to investigate the effects of pore size and pore size distribution.

  20. The Human Arp2/3 Complex Is Composed of Evolutionarily Conserved Subunits and Is Localized to Cellular Regions of Dynamic Actin Filament Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Matthew D.; DePace, Angela H.; Verma, Suzie; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    The Arp2/3 protein complex has been implicated in the control of actin polymerization in cells. The human complex consists of seven subunits which include the actin related proteins Arp2 and Arp3, and five others referred to as p41-Arc, p34-Arc, p21-Arc, p20-Arc, and p16-Arc (Arp complex). We have determined the predicted amino acid sequence of all seven subunits. Each has homologues in diverse eukaryotes, implying that the structure and function of the