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Sample records for pore domains cloned

  1. Gating of two pore domain potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Mathie, Alistair; Al-Moubarak, Ehab; Veale, Emma L

    2010-01-01

    Two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels are responsible for background leak currents which regulate the membrane potential and excitability of many cell types. Their activity is modulated by a variety of chemical and physical stimuli which act to increase or decrease the open probability of individual K2P channels. Crystallographic data and homology modelling suggest that all K+ channels possess a highly conserved structure for ion selectivity and gating mechanisms. Like other K+ channels, K2P channels are thought to have two primary conserved gating mechanisms: an inactivation (or C-type) gate at the selectivity filter close to the extracellular side of the channel and an activation gate at the intracellular entrance to the channel involving key, identified, hinge glycine residues. Zinc and hydrogen ions regulate Drosophila KCNK0 and mammalian TASK channels, respectively, by interacting with the inactivation gate of these channels. In contrast, the voltage dependence of TASK3 channels is mediated through its activation gate. For KCNK0 it has been shown that the gates display positive cooperativity. It is of much interest to determine whether other K2P regulatory compounds interact with either the activation gate or the inactivation gate to alter channel activity or, indeed, whether additional regulatory gating pathways exist. PMID:20566661

  2. Gating of two pore domain potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Mathie, Alistair; Al-Moubarak, Ehab; Veale, Emma L

    2010-09-01

    Two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels are responsible for background leak currents which regulate the membrane potential and excitability of many cell types. Their activity is modulated by a variety of chemical and physical stimuli which act to increase or decrease the open probability of individual K2P channels. Crystallographic data and homology modelling suggest that all K(+) channels possess a highly conserved structure for ion selectivity and gating mechanisms. Like other K(+) channels, K2P channels are thought to have two primary conserved gating mechanisms: an inactivation (or C-type) gate at the selectivity filter close to the extracellular side of the channel and an activation gate at the intracellular entrance to the channel involving key, identified, hinge glycine residues. Zinc and hydrogen ions regulate Drosophila KCNK0 and mammalian TASK channels, respectively, by interacting with the inactivation gate of these channels. In contrast, the voltage dependence of TASK3 channels is mediated through its activation gate. For KCNK0 it has been shown that the gates display positive cooperativity. It is of much interest to determine whether other K2P regulatory compounds interact with either the activation gate or the inactivation gate to alter channel activity or, indeed, whether additional regulatory gating pathways exist.

  3. The pore domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: molecular modeling, pore dimensions, and electrostatics.

    PubMed Central

    Sankararamakrishnan, R; Adcock, C; Sansom, M S

    1996-01-01

    The pore domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor has been modeled as a bundle of five kinked M2 helices. Models were generated via molecular dynamics simulations incorporating restraints derived from 9-A resolution cryoelectron microscopy data (Unwin, 1993; 1995), and from mutagenesis data that identify channel-lining side chains. Thus, these models conform to current experimental data but will require revision as higher resolution data become available. Models of the open and closed states of a homopentameric alpha 7 pore are compared. The minimum radius of the closed-state model is less than 2 A; the minimum radius of the open-state models is approximately 6 A. It is suggested that the presence of "bound" water molecules within the pore may reduce the effective minimum radii below these values by up to approximately 3 A. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations are used to obtain a first approximation to the potential energy of a monovalent cation as it moves along the pore axis. The differences in electrostatic potential energy profiles between the open-state models of alpha 7 and of a mutant of alpha 7 are consistent with the experimentally observed change in ion selectivity from cationic to anionic. Models of the open state of the heteropentameric Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor pore domain are also described. Relatively small differences in pore radius and electrostatic potential energy profiles are seen when the Torpedo and alpha 7 models are compared. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 PMID:8889144

  4. Differences in soluble organic carbon chemistry in pore waters sampled from different pore size domains

    DOE PAGES

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Smith, A. P.; Tfaily, Malak; ...

    2017-01-11

    Spatial isolation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in different sized pores may be a mechanism by which otherwise labile carbon (C) could be protected in soils. When soil water content increases, the hydrologic connectivity of soil pores also increases, allowing greater transport of SOC and other resources from protected locations, to microbially colonized locations more favorable to decomposition. The heterogeneous distribution of specialized decomposers, C, and other resources throughout the soil indicates that the metabolism or persistence of soil C compounds is highly dependent on short-distance transport processes. The objective of this research was to characterize the complexity of Cmore » in pore waters held at weak and strong water tensions (effectively soil solution held behind coarse- and fine-pore throats, respectively) and evaluate the microbial decomposability of these pore waters. We saturated intact soil cores and extracted pore waters with increasing suction pressures to sequentially sample pore waters from increasingly fine pore domains. Ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry of the SOC was used to profile the major biochemical classes (i.e., lipids, proteins, lignin, carbohydrates, and condensed aromatics) of compounds present in the pore waters; some of these samples were then used as substrates for growth of Cellvibrio japonicus (DSMZ 16018), Streptomyces cellulosae (ATCC® 25439™), and Trichoderma reseei (QM6a) in 7 day incubations. The soluble C in finer pores was more complex than the soluble C in coarser pores, and the incubations revealed that the more complex C in these fine pores is not recalcitrant. The decomposition of this complex C led to greater losses of C through respiration than the simpler C from coarser pore waters. Our research suggests that soils that experience repeated cycles of drying and wetting may be accompanied by repeated cycles of increased CO2 fluxes that are driven by i) the transport of C from protected pools into

  5. Differences in soluble organic carbon chemistry in pore waters sampled from different pore size domains

    DOE PAGES

    Bailey, V. L.; Smith, A. P.; Tfaily, M.; ...

    2017-04-01

    Spatial isolation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in different sized pores may be a mechanism by which otherwise labile carbon (C) could be protected in soils. When soil water content increases, the hydrologic connectivity of soil pores also increases, allowing greater transport of SOC and other resources from protected locations, to microbially colonized locations more favorable to decomposition. The heterogeneous distribution of specialized decomposers, C, and other resources throughout the soil indicates that the metabolism or persistence of soil C compounds is highly dependent on short-distance transport processes. The objective of this research was to characterize the complexity of Cmore » in pore waters held at weak and strong water tensions (effectively soil solution held behind coarse- and fine-pore throats, respectively) and evaluate the microbial decomposability of these pore waters. We saturated intact soil cores and extracted pore waters with increasing suction pressures to sequentially sample pore waters from increasingly fine pore domains. Ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry of the SOC was used to profile the major biochemical classes (i.e., lipids, proteins, lignin, carbohydrates, and condensed aromatics) of compounds present in the pore waters; some of these samples were then used as substrates for growth of Cellvibrio japonicus (DSMZ 16018), Streptomyces cellulosae (ATCC® 25439™), and Trichoderma reseei (QM6a) in 7 day incubations. The soluble C in finer pores was more complex than the soluble C in coarser pores, and the incubations revealed that the more complex C in these fine pores is not recalcitrant. The decomposition of this complex C led to greater losses of C through respiration than the simpler C from coarser pore waters. Our research suggests that soils that experience repeated cycles of drying and wetting may result in patterns of CO2 fluxes that are driven by i) the transport of C from protected pools into active, ii) the chemical

  6. POM152 is an integral protein of the pore membrane domain of the yeast nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have identified a concanavalin A-reactive glycoprotein of 150 kD that coenriches with isolated yeast nuclear pore complexes. Molecular cloning and sequencing of this protein revealed a single canonical transmembrane segment. Epitope tagging and localization by both immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that it is a pore membrane protein. The protein was termed POM152 (for pore membrane protein of 152 kD) on the basis of its location and cDNA-deduced molecular mass. POM152 is likely to be a type II membrane protein with its NH2-terminal region (175 residues) and its COOH-terminal region (1,142 residues) positioned on the pore side and cisternal side of the pore membrane, respectively. The proposed cisternally exposed domain contains eight repetitive motifs of approximately 24 residues. Surprisingly, POM152 deletion mutants were viable and their growth rate was indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells at temperatures between 17 and 37 degrees C. However, overproduction of POM152 inhibited cell growth. When expressed in mouse 3T3 cells, POM152 was found to be localized to the pore membrane, suggesting a conserved sorting pathway between yeast and mammals. PMID:8138573

  7. A functional protein pore with a "retro" transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Cheley, S.; Braha, O.; Lu, X.; Conlan, S.; Bayley, H.

    1999-01-01

    Extended retro (reversed) peptide sequences have not previously been accommodated within functional proteins. Here, we show that the entire transmembrane portion of the beta-barrel of the pore-forming protein alpha-hemolysin can be formed by retrosequences comprising a total of 175 amino acid residues, 25 contributed by the central sequence of each subunit of the heptameric pore. The properties of wild-type and retro heptamers in planar bilayers are similar. The single-channel conductance of the retro pore is 15% less than that of the wild-type heptamer and its current-voltage relationship denotes close to ohmic behavior, while the wild-type pore is weakly rectifying. Both wild-type and retro pores are very weakly anion selective. These results and the examination of molecular models suggest that beta-barrels may be especially accepting of retro sequences compared to other protein folds. Indeed, the ability to form a retro domain could be diagnostic of a beta-barrel, explaining, for example, the activity of the retro forms of many membrane-permeabilizing peptides. By contrast with the wild-type subunits, monomeric retro subunits undergo premature assembly in the absence of membranes, most likely because the altered central sequence fails to interact with the remainder of the subunit, thereby initiating assembly. Despite this difficulty, a technique was devised for obtaining heteromeric pores containing both wild-type and retro subunits. Most probably as a consequence of unfavorable interstrand side-chain interactions, the heteromeric pores are less stable than either the wild-type or retro homoheptamers, as judged by the presence of subconductance states in single-channel recordings. Knowledge about the extraordinary plasticity of the transmembrane beta-barrel of alpha-hemolysin will be very useful in the de novo design of functional membrane proteins based on the beta-barrel motif. PMID:10386875

  8. An integral membrane protein of the pore membrane domain of the nuclear envelope contains a nucleoporin-like region

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have identified an integral membrane protein of 145 kD (estimated by SDS-PAGE) of rat liver nuclear envelopes that binds to WGA. We obtained peptide sequence from purified p145 and cloned and sequenced several cDNA clones and one genomic clone. The relative molecular mass of p145 calculated from its complete, cDNA deduced primary structure is 120.7 kD. Antibodies raised against a synthetic peptide represented in p145 reacted monospecifically with p145. In indirect immunofluorescence these antibodies gave punctate staining of the nuclear envelope. Immunogold EM showed specific decoration of the nuclear pores. Thus p145 is an integral membrane protein located specifically in the "pore membrane" domain of the nuclear envelope. To indicate this specific location, and based on its calculated relative molecular mass, the protein is termed POM 121 (pore membrane protein of 121 kD). The 1,199- residue-long primary structure shows a hydrophobic region (residues 29- 72) that is likely to form one (or two adjacent) transmembrane segment(s). The bulk of the protein (residues 73-1199) is predicted to be exposed not on the cisternal side but on the pore side of the pore membrane. It contains 36 consensus sites for various kinases. However, its most striking feature is a repetitive pentapeptide motif XFXFG that has also been shown to occur in several nucleoporins. This nucleoporin- like domain of POM 121 is proposed to function in anchoring components of the nuclear pore complex to the pore membrane. PMID:8335683

  9. Two-pore Domain Potassium Channels in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Kanghyun

    2016-01-01

    Two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels have a distinct structure and channel properties, and are involved in a background K+ current. The 15 members of the K2P channels are identified and classified into six subfamilies on the basis of their sequence similarities. The activity of the channels is dynamically regulated by various physical, chemical, and biological effectors. The channels are expressed in a wide variety of tissues in mammals in an isoform specific manner, and play various roles in many physiological and pathophysiological conditions. To function as channels, the K2P channels form dimers, and some isoforms form heterodimers that provide diversity in channel properties. In the brain, TWIK1, TREK1, TREK2, TRAAK, TASK1, and TASK3 are predominantly expressed in various regions, including the cerebral cortex, dentate gyrus, CA1-CA3, and granular layer of the cerebellum. TWIK1, TREK1, and TASK1 are highly expressed in astrocytes, where they play specific cellular roles. Astrocytes keep leak K+ conductance, called the passive conductance, which mainly involves TWIK1-TREK1 heterodimeric channel. TWIK1 and TREK1 also mediate glutamate release from astrocytes in an exocytosis-independent manner. The expression of TREK1 and TREK2 in astrocytes increases under ischemic conditions, that enhance neuroprotection from ischemia. Accumulated evidence has indicated that astrocytes, together with neurons, are involved in brain function, with the K2P channels playing critical role in these astrocytes. PMID:27790056

  10. Trafficking of Neuronal Two Pore Domain Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Mathie, Alistair; Rees, Kathryn A; El Hachmane, Mickael F; Veale, Emma L

    2010-01-01

    The activity of two pore domain potassium (K2P) channels regulates neuronal excitability and cell firing. Post-translational regulation of K2P channel trafficking to the membrane controls the number of functional channels at the neuronal membrane affecting the functional properties of neurons. In this review, we describe the general features of K channel trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the plasma membrane via the Golgi apparatus then focus on established regulatory mechanisms for K2P channel trafficking. We describe the regulation of trafficking of TASK channels from the ER or their retention within the ER and consider the competing hypotheses for the roles of the chaperone proteins 14-3-3, COP1 and p11 in these processes and where these proteins bind to TASK channels. We also describe the localisation of TREK channels to particular regions of the neuronal membrane and the involvement of the TREK channel binding partners AKAP150 and Mtap2 in this localisation. We describe the roles of other K2P channel binding partners including Arf6, EFA6 and SUMO for TWIK1 channels and Vpu for TASK1 channels. Finally, we consider the potential importance of K2P channel trafficking in a number of disease states such as neuropathic pain and cancer and the protection of neurons from ischemic damage. We suggest that a better understanding of the mechanisms and regulations that underpin the trafficking of K2P channels to the plasma membrane and to localised regions therein may considerably enhance the probability of future therapeutic advances in these areas. PMID:21358977

  11. Nanodisc-cell fusion: control of fusion pore nucleation and lifetimes by SNARE protein transmembrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhenyong; Auclair, Sarah M.; Bello, Oscar; Vennekate, Wensi; Dudzinski, Natasha R.; Krishnakumar, Shyam S.; Karatekin, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    The initial, nanometer-sized connection between the plasma membrane and a hormone- or neurotransmitter-filled vesicle –the fusion pore– can flicker open and closed repeatedly before dilating or resealing irreversibly. Pore dynamics determine release and vesicle recycling kinetics, but pore properties are poorly known because biochemically defined single-pore assays are lacking. We isolated single flickering pores connecting v-SNARE-reconstituted nanodiscs to cells ectopically expressing cognate, “flipped” t-SNAREs. Conductance through single, voltage-clamped fusion pores directly reported sub-millisecond pore dynamics. Pore currents fluctuated, transiently returned to baseline multiple times, and disappeared ~6 s after initial opening, as if the fusion pore fluctuated in size, flickered, and resealed. We found that interactions between v- and t-SNARE transmembrane domains (TMDs) promote, but are not essential for pore nucleation. Surprisingly, TMD modifications designed to disrupt v- and t-SNARE TMD zippering prolonged pore lifetimes dramatically. We propose that the post-fusion geometry of the proteins contribute to pore stability. PMID:27264104

  12. Domain decomposition approach to extract pore-network models from large 3D porous media images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofey, Sizonenko; Marina, Karsanina; Irina, Bayuk; Kirill, Gerke

    2017-04-01

    Pore-network are very useful and effective method to model porous media structure and properties such as permeability and multi-phase flow. Several methods for pore-network extraction were proposed to date, including median axis, maximal inscribed ball, watershed techniques and their modifications. Input data for pore-network extraction algorithms usually represent 3D binary image. Modern X-ray tomography devices can easily provide scans with dimensions of 4k x 4k x 10k voxels. For such large images extraction algorithms may hit the problem of memory (RAM) consumption or will too time consuming. To overcome such problems or create parallelizable algorithm here we propose to divide the whole volume into sub-volumes with smaller size and extract pore- network sequentially/in parallel manner separately. However, the problem of correct pore-network extraction at the sub-volume connection areas is challenging. In this contribution we address this issue in detail. We propose a method to merge such sub-volumes. Our method explores the slices of porous medium under study at the sub-volumes intersections. Each slice has its own geometric features and associated with a number of pores or throats. Characteristics of pore that associated with slice such as diameter, distance its center to the sub-domain boundary are also taken into account. Based on the pore element properties and also properties of aforementioned slices the algorithm makes decision about how pores from opposite sides of sub-volumes should be connected. There are 3 cases of merging: 1) building a throat between pores, 2) absorption of one pore by the other, 3) breaking connection (no pore or throat are built). We have tested our approach on several different binary 3D images, including soil, sandstones, and carbonates. We also compared this new approach against a conventional one where the extraction is performed using the whole domain without its decomposition into sub-domains. We show that our approach

  13. Stress fields around two pores in an elastic body: exact quadrature domain solutions.

    PubMed

    Crowdy, Darren

    2015-08-08

    Analytical solutions are given for the stress fields, in both compression and far-field shear, in a two-dimensional elastic body containing two interacting non-circular pores. The two complex potentials governing the solutions are found by using a conformal mapping from a pre-image annulus with those potentials expressed in terms of the Schottky-Klein prime function for the annulus. Solutions for a three-parameter family of elastic bodies with two equal symmetric pores are presented and the compressibility of a special family of pore pairs is studied in detail. The methodology extends to two unequal pores. The importance for boundary value problems of plane elasticity of a special class of planar domains known as quadrature domains is also elucidated. This observation provides the route to generalization of the mathematical approach here to finding analytical solutions for the stress fields in bodies containing any finite number of pores.

  14. Stress fields around two pores in an elastic body: exact quadrature domain solutions

    PubMed Central

    Crowdy, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Analytical solutions are given for the stress fields, in both compression and far-field shear, in a two-dimensional elastic body containing two interacting non-circular pores. The two complex potentials governing the solutions are found by using a conformal mapping from a pre-image annulus with those potentials expressed in terms of the Schottky–Klein prime function for the annulus. Solutions for a three-parameter family of elastic bodies with two equal symmetric pores are presented and the compressibility of a special family of pore pairs is studied in detail. The methodology extends to two unequal pores. The importance for boundary value problems of plane elasticity of a special class of planar domains known as quadrature domains is also elucidated. This observation provides the route to generalization of the mathematical approach here to finding analytical solutions for the stress fields in bodies containing any finite number of pores. PMID:26339198

  15. Classification of 2-pore domain potassium channels based on rectification under quasi-physiological ionic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Zuo, Dongchuan; Zhang, Jianing; Zhou, Min; Ma, Liqun

    2014-01-01

    It is generally expected that 2-pore domain K+ (K2P) channels are open or outward rectifiers in asymmetric physiological K+ gradients, following the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz (GHK) current equation. Although cloned K2P channels have been extensively studied, their current-voltage (I-V) relationships are not precisely characterized and previous definitions are contradictory. Here we study all the functional channels from 6 mammalian K2P subfamilies in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells with patch-clamp technique, and examine whether their I-V relationships are described by the GHK current equation. K2P channels display 2 distinct types of I-V curves in asymmetric physiological K+ gradients. Two K2P isoforms in the TWIK subfamily conduct large inward K+ currents and have a nearly linear I-V curve. Ten isoforms from 5 other K2P subfamilies conduct small inward K+ currents and exhibit open rectification, but fits with the GHK current equation cannot precisely reveal the differences in rectification among K2P channels. The Rectification Index, a ratio of limiting I-V slopes for outward and inward currents, is used to quantitatively describe open rectification of each K2P isoform, which is previously qualitatively defined as strong or weak open rectification. These results systematically and precisely classify K2P channels and suggest that TWIK K+ channels have a unique feature in regulating cellular function. PMID:25616686

  16. A Specific Two-pore Domain Potassium Channel Blocker Defines the Structure of the TASK-1 Open Pore*

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Anne K.; Netter, Michael F.; Kempf, Franca; Walecki, Magdalena; Rinné, Susanne; Bollepalli, Murali K.; Preisig-Müller, Regina; Renigunta, Vijay; Daut, Jürgen; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Decher, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels play a key role in setting the membrane potential of excitable cells. Despite their role as putative targets for drugs and general anesthetics, little is known about the structure and the drug binding site of K2P channels. We describe A1899 as a potent and highly selective blocker of the K2P channel TASK-1. As A1899 acts as an open-channel blocker and binds to residues forming the wall of the central cavity, the drug was used to further our understanding of the channel pore. Using alanine mutagenesis screens, we have identified residues in both pore loops, the M2 and M4 segments, and the halothane response element to form the drug binding site of TASK-1. Our experimental data were used to validate a K2P open-pore homology model of TASK-1, providing structural insights for future rational design of drugs targeting K2P channels. PMID:21362619

  17. A specific two-pore domain potassium channel blocker defines the structure of the TASK-1 open pore.

    PubMed

    Streit, Anne K; Netter, Michael F; Kempf, Franca; Walecki, Magdalena; Rinné, Susanne; Bollepalli, Murali K; Preisig-Müller, Regina; Renigunta, Vijay; Daut, Jürgen; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Sansom, Mark S P; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Decher, Niels

    2011-04-22

    Two-pore domain potassium (K(2P)) channels play a key role in setting the membrane potential of excitable cells. Despite their role as putative targets for drugs and general anesthetics, little is known about the structure and the drug binding site of K(2P) channels. We describe A1899 as a potent and highly selective blocker of the K(2P) channel TASK-1. As A1899 acts as an open-channel blocker and binds to residues forming the wall of the central cavity, the drug was used to further our understanding of the channel pore. Using alanine mutagenesis screens, we have identified residues in both pore loops, the M2 and M4 segments, and the halothane response element to form the drug binding site of TASK-1. Our experimental data were used to validate a K(2P) open-pore homology model of TASK-1, providing structural insights for future rational design of drugs targeting K(2P) channels.

  18. Cohesiveness tunes assembly and morphology of FG nucleoporin domain meshworks – Implications for nuclear pore permeability

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Nico B.; Labokha, Aksana A.; Frey, Steffen; Görlich, Dirk; Richter, Ralf P.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes control the exchange of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. A selective permeability barrier that arises from a supramolecular assembly of intrinsically unfolded nucleoporin domains rich in phenylalanine-glycine dipeptides (FG domains) fills the nuclear pore. There is increasing evidence that selective transport requires cohesive FG domain interactions. To understand the functional roles of cohesive interactions, we studied monolayers of end-grafted FG domains as a bottom-up nanoscale model system of the permeability barrier. Based on detailed physicochemical analysis of the model films and comparison of the data with polymer theory, we propose that cohesiveness is tuned to promote rapid assembly of the permeability barrier and to generate a stable and compact pore-filling meshwork with a small mesh size. Our results highlight the functional importance of weak interactions, typically a few kBT per chain, and contribute important information to understand the mechanism of size-selective transport. PMID:24138862

  19. The voltage-sensing domain of a phosphatase gates the pore of a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Cristina; Schroeder, Indra; Romani, Giulia; Van Etten, James L; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2013-03-01

    The modular architecture of voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels suggests that they resulted from the fusion of a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) to a pore module. Here, we show that the VSD of Ciona intestinalis phosphatase (Ci-VSP) fused to the viral channel Kcv creates Kv(Synth1), a functional voltage-gated, outwardly rectifying K(+) channel. Kv(Synth1) displays the summed features of its individual components: pore properties of Kcv (selectivity and filter gating) and voltage dependence of Ci-VSP (V(1/2) = +56 mV; z of ~1), including the depolarization-induced mode shift. The degree of outward rectification of the channel is critically dependent on the length of the linker more than on its amino acid composition. This highlights a mechanistic role of the linker in transmitting the movement of the sensor to the pore and shows that electromechanical coupling can occur without coevolution of the two domains.

  20. Membrane-Pore Forming Characteristics of the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin Domain.

    PubMed

    Kurehong, Chattip; Kanchanawarin, Chalermpol; Powthongchin, Busaba; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2015-04-30

    Previously, the 126-kDa Bordetella pertussis CyaA pore-forming/hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) domain was shown to retain its hemolytic activity causing lysis of susceptible erythrocytes. Here, we have succeeded in producing, at large quantity and high purity, the His-tagged CyaA-Hly domain over-expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble hemolytically-active form. Quantitative assays of hemolysis against sheep erythrocytes revealed that the purified CyaA-Hly domain could function cooperatively by forming an oligomeric pore in the target cell membrane with a Hill coefficient of ~3. When the CyaA-Hly toxin was incorporated into planar lipid bilayers (PLBs) under symmetrical conditions at 1.0 M KCl, 10 mM HEPES buffer (pH 7.4), it produced a clearly resolved single channel with a maximum conductance of ~35 pS. PLB results also revealed that the CyaA-Hly induced channel was unidirectional and opened more frequently at higher negative membrane potentials. Altogether, our results first provide more insights into pore-forming characteristics of the CyaA-Hly domain as being the major pore-forming determinant of which the ability to induce such ion channels in receptor-free membranes could account for its cooperative hemolytic action on the target erythrocytes.

  1. Nucleoporin domain topology is linked to the transport status of the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, Sara M; Phillips, Erica M; Köser, Joachim; Sauder, Ursula; Ullman, Katharine S; Powers, Maureen A; Fahrenkrog, Birthe

    2005-08-26

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) facilitate macromolecular exchange between the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. The vertebrate NPC is composed of approximately 30 different proteins (nucleoporins), of which around one third contain phenylalanine-glycine (FG)-repeat domains that are thought to mediate the main interaction between the NPC and soluble transport receptors. We have recently shown that the FG-repeat domain of Nup153 is flexible within the NPC, although this nucleoporin is anchored to the nuclear side of the NPC. By using domain-specific antibodies, we have now mapped the domain topology of Nup214 in Xenopus oocytes and in human somatic cells by immuno-EM. We have found that whereas Nup214 is anchored to the cytoplasmic side of the NPC via its N-terminal and central domain, its FG-repeat domain appears flexible, residing on both sides of the NPC. Moreover, the spatial distribution of the FG-repeat domains of both Nup153 and Nup214 shifts in a transport-dependent manner, suggesting that the location of FG-repeat domains within the NPC correlates with cargo/receptor interactions and that they concomitantly move with cargo through the central pore of the NPC.

  2. Conserved Spatial Organization of FG Domains in the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Claire E.; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kampmann, Martin; Simon, Sanford M.

    2013-01-01

    Selective transport through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) requires nucleoporins containing natively unfolded phenylalanine-glycine (FG) domains. Several differing models for their dynamics within the pore have been proposed. We characterize the behavior of the FG nucleoporins in vivo using polarized fluorescence microscopy. Using nucleoporins tagged with green fluorescent protein along their FG domains, we show that some of these proteins are ordered, indicating an overall orientational organization within the NPC. This orientational ordering of the FG domains depends on their specific context within the NPC, but is independent of active transport and cargo load. For most nups, behavior does not depend on the FG motifs. These data support a model whereby local geometry constrains the orientational organization of the FG nups. Intriguingly, homologous yeast and mammalian proteins show conserved behavior, suggesting functional relevance. Our findings have implications for mechanistic models of NPC transport. PMID:23332057

  3. Conserved spatial organization of FG domains in the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Claire E; Mattheyses, Alexa L; Kampmann, Martin; Simon, Sanford M

    2013-01-08

    Selective transport through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) requires nucleoporins containing natively unfolded phenylalanine-glycine (FG) domains. Several differing models for their dynamics within the pore have been proposed. We characterize the behavior of the FG nucleoporins in vivo using polarized fluorescence microscopy. Using nucleoporins tagged with green fluorescent protein along their FG domains, we show that some of these proteins are ordered, indicating an overall orientational organization within the NPC. This orientational ordering of the FG domains depends on their specific context within the NPC, but is independent of active transport and cargo load. For most nups, behavior does not depend on the FG motifs. These data support a model whereby local geometry constrains the orientational organization of the FG nups. Intriguingly, homologous yeast and mammalian proteins show conserved behavior, suggesting functional relevance. Our findings have implications for mechanistic models of NPC transport. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inter-Subunit Interactions across the Upper Voltage Sensing-Pore Domain Interface Contribute to the Concerted Pore Opening Transition of Kv Channels

    PubMed Central

    Shem-Ad, Tzilhav; Irit, Orr; Yifrach, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    The tight electro-mechanical coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains of Kv channels lies at the heart of their fundamental roles in electrical signaling. Structural data have identified two voltage sensor pore inter-domain interaction surfaces, thus providing a framework to explain the molecular basis for the tight coupling of these domains. While the contribution of the intra-subunit lower domain interface to the electro-mechanical coupling that underlies channel opening is relatively well understood, the contribution of the inter-subunit upper interface to channel gating is not yet clear. Relying on energy perturbation and thermodynamic coupling analyses of tandem-dimeric Shaker Kv channels, we show that mutation of upper interface residues from both sides of the voltage sensor-pore domain interface stabilizes the closed channel state. These mutations, however, do not affect slow inactivation gating. We, moreover, find that upper interface residues form a network of state-dependent interactions that stabilize the open channel state. Finally, we note that the observed residue interaction network does not change during slow inactivation gating. The upper voltage sensing-pore interaction surface thus only undergoes conformational rearrangements during channel activation gating. We suggest that inter-subunit interactions across the upper domain interface mediate allosteric communication between channel subunits that contributes to the concerted nature of the late pore opening transition of Kv channels. PMID:24340010

  5. Cohesiveness tunes assembly and morphology of FG nucleoporin domain meshworks - Implications for nuclear pore permeability.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Nico B; Labokha, Aksana A; Frey, Steffen; Görlich, Dirk; Richter, Ralf P

    2013-10-15

    Nuclear pore complexes control the exchange of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. A selective permeability barrier that arises from a supramolecular assembly of intrinsically unfolded nucleoporin domains rich in phenylalanine-glycine dipeptides (FG domains) fills the nuclear pore. There is increasing evidence that selective transport requires cohesive FG domain interactions. To understand the functional roles of cohesive interactions, we studied monolayers of end-grafted FG domains as a bottom-up nanoscale model system of the permeability barrier. Based on detailed physicochemical analysis of the model films and comparison of the data with polymer theory, we propose that cohesiveness is tuned to promote rapid assembly of the permeability barrier and to generate a stable and compact pore-filling meshwork with a small mesh size. Our results highlight the functional importance of weak interactions, typically a few kBT per chain, and contribute important information to understand the mechanism of size-selective transport. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Minimal nuclear pore complexes define FG repeat domains essential for transport.

    PubMed

    Strawn, Lisa A; Shen, Tianxiang; Shulga, Nataliya; Goldfarb, David S; Wente, Susan R

    2004-03-01

    Translocation through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) requires interactions between receptor-cargo complexes and phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats in multiple FG domain-containing NPC proteins (FG-Nups). We have systematically deleted the FG domains of 11 Saccharomyces cerevisiae FG-Nups in various combinations. All five asymmetrically localized FG domains deleted together were non-essential. However, specific combinations of symmetrically localized FG domains were essential. Over half the total mass of FG domains could be deleted without loss of viability or the NPC's normal permeability barrier. Significantly, symmetric deletions caused mild reductions in Kap95-Kap60-mediated import rates, but virtually abolished Kap104 import. These results suggest the existence of multiple translocation pathways.

  7. Modification of the Cytoplasmic Domain of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Affects Enlargement of the Fusion Pore

    PubMed Central

    Kozerski, Christine; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Schroth-Diez, Britta; Schmidt, Michael F. G.; Herrmann, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The fusion activity of chimeras of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) (from A/fpv/Rostock/34; subtype H7) with the transmembrane domain (TM) and/or cytoplasmic tail (CT) either from the nonviral, nonfusogenic T-cell surface protein CD4 or from the fusogenic Sendai virus F-protein was studied. Wild-type or chimeric HA was expressed in CV-1 cells by the transient T7-RNA-polymerase vaccinia virus expression system. Subsequently, the fusion activity of the expression products was monitored with red blood cells or ghosts as target cells. To assess the different steps of fusion, target cells were labeled with the fluorescent membrane label octadecyl rhodamine B-chloride (R18) (membrane fusion) and with the cytoplasmic fluorophores calcein (molecular weight [MW], 623; formation of small aqueous fusion pore) and tetramethylrhodamine-dextran (MW, 10,000; enlargement of fusion pore). All chimeric HA/F-proteins, as well as the chimera with the TM of CD4 and the CT of HA, were able to mediate the different steps of fusion very similarly to wild-type HA. Quite differently, chimeric proteins with the CT of CD4 were strongly impaired in mediating pore enlargement. However, membrane fusion and formation of small pores were similar to those of wild-type HA, indicating that the conformational change of the ectodomain and earlier fusion steps were not inhibited. Various properties of the CT which may affect pore enlargement are considered. We surmise that the hydrophobicity of the sequence adjacent to the transmembrane domain is important for pore dilation. PMID:10906206

  8. Sur domains that associate with and gate KATP pores define a novel gatekeeper.

    PubMed

    Babenko, Andrey P; Bryan, Joseph

    2003-10-24

    Structure-function analyses of K+ channels identify a common pore architecture whose gating depends on diverse signal sensing elements. The "gatekeepers" of the long, ATP-inhibited KIR6.0 pores of KATP channels are ABC proteins, SURs, receptors for channel opening and closing drugs. Several competing models for SUR/KIR coupling exist. We show that SUR TMD0, the N-terminal bundle of five transmembrane helices, specifically associates with KIR6.2, forcing nearly silent pores to burst like native KATP channels and enhancing surface expression. Inclusion of adjacent submembrane residues of L0, the linker between TMD0 and the stimulatory nucleotide- and drug-binding ABC core, generates constitutively active channels, whereas additional cytoplasmic residues counterbalance this activation establishing a relationship between the mean open and burst times of intact pores. SUR fragments, lacking TMD0, fail to modulate KIR. TMD0 is thus the domain that anchors SUR to the KIR pore. Consistent with data on chimeric ABCC/KIRs and a modeled channel structure, we propose that interactions of TMD0-L0 with the outer helix and N terminus of KIR bidirectionally modulate gating. The results explain and predict pathologies associated with alteration of the 5' ends of clustered ABCC8 (9)/KCNJ11 (8) genes.

  9. The role of sulfatide lipid domains in the membrane pore-forming activity of cobra cardiotoxin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Po-Long; Chiu, Chang-Ru; Huang, Wei-Ning; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2012-05-01

    Cobra CTX A3, the major cardiotoxin (CTX) from Naja atra, is a cytotoxic, basic β-sheet polypeptide that is known to induce a transient membrane leakage of cardiomyocytes through a sulfatide-dependent CTX membrane pore formation and internalization mechanism. The molecular specificity of CTX A3-sulfatide interaction at atomic levels has also been shown by both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray diffraction techniques to reveal a role of CTX-induced sulfatide conformational changes for CTX A3 binding and dimer formation. In this study, we investigate the role of sulfatide lipid domains in CTX pore formation by various biophysical methods, including fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy, and suggest an important role of liquid-disordered (ld) and solid-ordered (so) phase boundary in lipid domains to facilitate the process. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies on the kinetics of membrane leakage and CTX oligomerization further reveal that, although most CTXs can oligomerize on membranes, only a small fraction of CTXs oligomerizations form leakage pores. We therefore suggest that CTX binding at the boundary between the so and so/ld phase coexistence sulfatide lipid domains could form effective pores to significantly enhance the CTX-induced membrane leakage of sulfatide-containing phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The model is consistent with our earlier observations that CTX may penetrate and lyse the bilayers into small aggregates at a lipid/protein molar ratio of about 20 in the ripple P(β)' phase of phosphatidylcholine bilayers and suggest a novel mechanism for the synergistic action of cobra secretary phospholipase A2 and CTXs.

  10. Obligate coupling of CFTR pore opening to tight nucleotide-binding domain dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Mihályi, Csaba; Töröcsik, Beáta; Csanády, László

    2016-01-01

    In CFTR, the chloride channel mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, ATP-binding-induced dimerization of two cytosolic nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) opens the pore, and dimer disruption following ATP hydrolysis closes it. Spontaneous openings without ATP are rare in wild-type CFTR, but in certain CF mutants constitute the only gating mechanism, stimulated by ivacaftor, a clinically approved CFTR potentiator. The molecular motions underlying spontaneous gating are unclear. Here we correlate energetic coupling between residues across the dimer interface with spontaneous pore opening/closure in single CFTR channels. We show that spontaneous openings are also strictly coupled to NBD dimerization, which may therefore occur even without ATP. Coordinated NBD/pore movements are therefore intrinsic to CFTR: ATP alters the stability, but not the fundamental structural architecture, of open- and closed-pore conformations. This explains correlated effects of phosphorylation, mutations, and drugs on ATP-driven and spontaneous activity, providing insights for understanding CF mutation and drug mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18164.001 PMID:27328319

  11. Voltage-sensing domain of voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 shares mechanism of block with pore domains

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Liang; Pathak, Medha M.; Kim, Iris H.; Ta, Dennis; Tombola, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Voltage-gated sodium, potassium, and calcium channels are made of a pore domain (PD) controlled by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs). The PD contains the ion permeation pathway and the activation gate located on the intracellular side of the membrane. A large number of small molecules are known to inhibit the PD by acting as open channel blockers. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is made of two VSDs and lacks the PD. The location of the activation gate in the VSD is unknown and open channel blockers for VSDs have not yet been identified. Here we describe a class of small molecules which act as open channel blockers on the Hv1 VSD and find that a highly conserved phenylalanine in the charge transfer center of the VSD plays a key role in blocker binding. We then use one of the blockers to show that Hv1 contains two intracellular and allosterically-coupled gates. PMID:23352164

  12. Pore network modeling of the electrical signature of solute transport in dual-domain media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Linde, N.; Haggerty, R.; Singha, K.; Briggs, M. A.

    2017-05-01

    Dual-domain models are used to explain anomalous solute transport behavior observed in diverse hydrologic settings and applications, from groundwater remediation to hyporheic exchange. To constrain such models, new methods are needed with sensitivity to both immobile and mobile domains. Recent experiments indicate that dual-domain transport of ionic tracers has an observable geoelectrical signature, appearing as a nonlinear, hysteretic relation between paired bulk and fluid electrical conductivity. Here we present a mechanistic explanation for this geoelectrical signature and evaluate assumptions underlying a previously published petrophysical model for bulk conductivity in dual-domain media. Pore network modeling of fluid flow, solute transport, and electrical conduction (1) verifies the geoelectrical signature of dual-domain transport, (2) reveals limitations of the previously used petrophysical model, and (3) demonstrates that a new petrophysical model, based on differential effective media theory, closely approximates the simulated bulk/fluid conductivity relation. These findings underscore the potential of geophysically based calibration of dual-domain models.

  13. Effects of amino acid mutations in the pore-forming domain of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Tomonao; Masaki, Risa; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2016-10-01

    The hemolytic lectin CEL-III forms transmembrane pores in the membranes of target cells. A study on the effect of site-directed mutation at Lys405 in domain 3 of CEL-III indicated that replacements of this residue by relatively smaller residues lead to a marked increase in hemolytic activity, suggesting that moderately destabilizing domain 3 facilitates formation of transmembrane pores through conformational changes.

  14. Functional domains in nuclear import factor p97 for binding the nuclear localization sequence receptor and the nuclear pore.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, N C; Adam, S A

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of the nuclear protein import factor p97 with the nuclear localization sequence (NLS) receptor, the nuclear pore complex, and Ran/TC4 is important for coordinating the events of protein import to the nucleus. We have mapped the binding domains on p97 for the NLS receptor and the nuclear pore. The NLS receptor-binding domain of p97 maps to the C-terminal 60% of the protein between residues 356 and 876. The pore complex-binding domain of p97 maps to residues 152-352. The pore complex-binding domain overlaps the Ran-GTP- and Ran-GDP-binding domains on p97, but only Ran-GTP competes for docking in permeabilized cells. The N-ethylmaleimide sensitivity of the p97 for docking was investigated and found to be due to inhibition of p97 binding to the pore complex and to the NLS receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved cysteine residues in the pore- and receptor-binding domains identified two cysteines, C223 and C228, that were required for p97 to bind the nuclear pore. Inhibition studies on docking and accumulation of a NLS protein provided additional evidence that the domains identified biochemically are the functional domains involved in protein import. Together, these results suggest that Ran-GTP dissociates the receptor complex and prevents p97 binding to the pore by inducing a conformational change in the structure of p97 rather than simple competition for binding sites. Images PMID:9201707

  15. Coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains in a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Schow, Eric V; Freites, J Alfredo; Nizkorodov, Alex; White, Stephen H; Tobias, Douglas J

    2012-07-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv), sodium (Nav), and calcium channels open and close in response to changes in transmembrane (TM) potential, thus regulating cell excitability by controlling ion flow across the membrane. An outstanding question concerning voltage gating is how voltage-induced conformational changes of the channel voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) are coupled through the S4-S5 interfacial linking helices to the opening and closing of the pore domain (PD). To investigate the coupling between the VSDs and the PD, we generated a closed Kv channel configuration from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) using atomistic simulations with experiment-based restraints on the VSDs. Full closure of the channel required, in addition to the experimentally determined TM displacement, that the VSDs be displaced both inwardly and laterally around the PD. This twisting motion generates a tight hydrophobic interface between the S4-S5 linkers and the C-terminal ends of the pore domain S6 helices in agreement with available experimental evidence.

  16. Myometrial relaxation of mice via expression of two pore domain acid sensitive K+ (TASK-2) channels

    PubMed Central

    Kyeong, Kyu-Sang; Hong, Seung Hwa; Cho, Woong; Myung, Sun Chul; Lee, Moo Yeol; You, Ra Young; Kim, Chan Hyung; Kwon, So Yeon; Suzuki, Hikaru; Park, Yeon Jin; Jeong, Eun-Hwan; Kim, Hak Soon; Kim, Heon; Lim, Seung Woon; Xu, Wen-Xie; Lee, Sang Jin

    2016-01-01

    Myometrial relaxation of mouse via expression of two-pore domain acid sensitive (TASK) channels was studied. In our previous report, we suggested that two-pore domain acid-sensing K+ channels (TASK-2) might be one of the candidates for the regulation of uterine circular smooth muscles in mice. In this study, we tried to show the mechanisms of relaxation via TASK-2 channels in marine myometrium. Isometric contraction measurements and patch clamp technique were used to verify TASK conductance in murine myometrium. Western blot and immunehistochemical study under confocal microscopy were used to investigate molecular identity of TASK channel. In this study, we showed that TEA and 4-AP insensitive non-inactivating outward K+ current (NIOK) may be responsible for the quiescence of murine pregnant longitudinal myometrium. The characteristics of NIOK coincided with two-pore domain acid-sensing K+ channels (TASK-2). NIOK in the presence of K+ channel blockers was inhibited further by TASK inhibitors such as quinidine, bupivacaine, lidocaine, and extracellular acidosis. Furthermore, oxytocin and estrogen inhibited NIOK in pregnant myometrium. When compared to non-pregnant myometrium, pregnant myometrium showed stronger inhibition of NIOK by quinidine and increased immunohistochemical expression of TASK-2. Finally, TASK-2 inhibitors induced strong myometrial contraction even in the presence of L-methionine, a known inhibitor of stretch-activated channels in the longitudinal myometrium of mouse. Activation of TASK-2 channels seems to play an essential role for relaxing uterus during pregnancy and it might be one of the alternatives for preventing preterm delivery. PMID:27610042

  17. Therapeutic targeting of two-pore-domain potassium (K(2P)) channels in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Wiedmann, Felix; Schmidt, Constanze; Lugenbiel, Patrick; Staudacher, Ingo; Rahm, Ann-Kathrin; Seyler, Claudia; Schweizer, Patrick A; Katus, Hugo A; Thomas, Dierk

    2016-05-01

    The improvement of treatment strategies in cardiovascular medicine is an ongoing process that requires constant optimization. The ability of a therapeutic intervention to prevent cardiovascular pathology largely depends on its capacity to suppress the underlying mechanisms. Attenuation or reversal of disease-specific pathways has emerged as a promising paradigm, providing a mechanistic rationale for patient-tailored therapy. Two-pore-domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels conduct outward K(+) currents that stabilize the resting membrane potential and facilitate action potential repolarization. K(2P) expression in the cardiovascular system and polymodal K2P current regulation suggest functional significance and potential therapeutic roles of the channels. Recent work has focused primarily on K(2P)1.1 [tandem of pore domains in a weak inwardly rectifying K(+) channel (TWIK)-1], K(2P)2.1 [TWIK-related K(+) channel (TREK)-1], and K(2P)3.1 [TWIK-related acid-sensitive K(+) channel (TASK)-1] channels and their role in heart and vessels. K(2P) currents have been implicated in atrial and ventricular arrhythmogenesis and in setting the vascular tone. Furthermore, the association of genetic alterations in K(2P)3.1 channels with atrial fibrillation, cardiac conduction disorders and pulmonary arterial hypertension demonstrates the relevance of the channels in cardiovascular disease. The function, regulation and clinical significance of cardiovascular K(2P) channels are summarized in the present review, and therapeutic options are emphasized. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  18. The Caenorhabditis elegans Iodotyrosine Deiodinase Ortholog SUP-18 Functions through a Conserved Channel SC-Box to Regulate the Muscle Two-Pore Domain Potassium Channel SUP-9

    PubMed Central

    de la Cruz, Ignacio Perez; Ma, Long; Horvitz, H. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans gene sup-18 suppress the defects in muscle contraction conferred by a gain-of-function mutation in SUP-10, a presumptive regulatory subunit of the SUP-9 two-pore domain K+ channel associated with muscle membranes. We cloned sup-18 and found that it encodes the C. elegans ortholog of mammalian iodotyrosine deiodinase (IYD), an NADH oxidase/flavin reductase that functions in iodine recycling and is important for the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones that regulate metabolism. The FMN-binding site of mammalian IYD is conserved in SUP-18, which appears to require catalytic activity to function. Genetic analyses suggest that SUP-10 can function with SUP-18 to activate SUP-9 through a pathway that is independent of the presumptive SUP-9 regulatory subunit UNC-93. We identified a novel evolutionarily conserved serine-cysteine-rich region in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of SUP-9 required for its specific activation by SUP-10 and SUP-18 but not by UNC-93. Since two-pore domain K+ channels regulate the resting membrane potentials of numerous cell types, we suggest that the SUP-18 IYD regulates the activity of the SUP-9 channel using NADH as a coenzyme and thus couples the metabolic state of muscle cells to muscle membrane excitability. PMID:24586202

  19. The Pore-Domain of TRPA1 Mediates the Inhibitory Effect of the Antagonist 6-Methyl-5-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-1H-indazole

    PubMed Central

    Moldenhauer, Hans; Latorre, Ramon; Grandl, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential ion channel TRPA1 confers the ability to detect tissue damaging chemicals to sensory neurons and as a result mediates chemical nociception in vivo. Mouse TRPA1 is activated by electrophilic compounds such as mustard-oil and several physical stimuli such as cold temperature. Due to its sensory function inhibition of TRPA1 activity might provide an effective treatment against chronic and inflammatory pain. Therefore, TRPA1 has become a target for the development of analgesic drugs. 6-Methyl-5-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-1H-indazole (Compound 31) has been identified by a chemical screen and lead optimization as an inhibitor of chemical activation of TRPA1. However, the structures or domains of TRPA1 that mediate the inhibitory effect of Compound 31 are unknown. Here, we screened 12,000 random mutant clones of mouse TRPA1 for their sensitivity to mustard-oil and the ability of Compound 31 to inhibit chemical activation by mustard-oil. In addition, we separately screened this mutant library while stimulating it with cold temperatures. We found that the single-point mutation I624N in the N-terminus of TRPA1 specifically affects the sensitivity to mustard-oil, but not to cold temperatures. This is evidence that sensitivity of TRPA1 to chemicals and cold temperatures is conveyed by separable mechanisms. We also identified five mutations located within the pore domain that cause loss of inhibition by Compound 31. This result demonstrates that the pore-domain is a regulator of chemical activation and suggests that Compound 31 might be acting directly on the pore-domain. PMID:25181545

  20. Cloning and Expressing Recombinant Protective Antigen Domains of B. anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Bacillus Anthracis in Escherichia Coli . Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2001, 283 (2), 308–15. 15. Ivins, B. E .; Welkos, S. L. Cloning and Expression of the...Buffer 4 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) at 37 ºC for at least 2 h. The enzymes were heat -inactivated for 20 min at 65 ºC. The pET-22b(+) vector was...to the previous reaction. The phosphatase was heat -inactivated for 20 min at 65 ºC prior to ligation. For each ligation, T4 DNA ligase and its

  1. cDNA cloning and embryonic expression of mouse nuclear pore membrane glycoprotein 210 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Olsson, M; Ekblom, M; Fecker, L; Kurkinen, M; Ekblom, P

    1999-09-01

    In embryonic kidneys, mesenchymal cells convert into epithelium in response to an induction by the tip of the ureter bud. Metanephric mesenchyme can also be induced to convert into epithelium in vitro. It is a model system to identify genes that could be important for epithelial development. By differential screening of a cDNA library made from mesenchymes induced in transfilter cultures by embryonic spinal cord for 24 hours, we selected cDNA clones representing genes that were preferentially expressed in 24-hour-induced mesenchyme and not in uninduced mesenchyme. The sequence of one clone was determined and used to obtain the sequence of a complete open reading frame. By Northern blotting and in situ hybridization, the expression of the mRNA in embryonic kidneys was determined. We report the sequence and expression pattern of a marker for the 24-hour-induced state, mouse nuclear pore membrane glycoprotein 210 (mPOM210). The deduced 1886 amino acid sequence shows a 95% identity to the sequence of rat gp210. Northern blotting revealed a single 7.5 kb mRNA in 24-hour-induced mesenchyme, whereas message levels were fourfold to fivefold lower in uninduced mesenchyme. In situ hybridization of in vivo development confirmed the preferential expression of mPOM210 in epithelial cells. In the kidney, expression was seen in both the epithelium derived from the ureteric tree and the mesenchyme-derived epithelium. In other tissues of 13-day-old embryos, expression was also confined to the epithelium. In nervous tissues, the olfactory epithelium and walls of the lateral ventricle were the most prominently stained. Weak expression was seen in the heart. mPOM210 mRNA is an early marker for developing epithelial cells. Furthermore, our results suggest that nuclear pore membrane proteins could be more cell-type specific than previously anticipated.

  2. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    Cloning describes the processes used to create an exact genetic replica of another cell, tissue or organism. ... named Dolly. There are three different types of cloning: Gene cloning, which creates copies of genes or ...

  3. Interactive domains between pore loops of the yeast K+ channel TOK1 associate with extracellular K+ sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ingela; Blatt, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Gating of the outward-rectifying K+ channel TOK1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is controlled by membrane voltage and extracellular K+ concentration. Previous studies identified two kinetically distinct effects of K+, and site-mutagenic analysis associated these K+-dependencies with domains of the extracellular turrets of the channel protein. We have mapped the TOK1 pore domains to extant K+ channel crystal structures to target additional residues contributing to TOK1 gating. Leu270, located in the first pore domain of TOK1, was found to be critical for gating and its K+ sensitivity. Analysis of amino acid substitutions indicated that spatial position of the polypeptide backbone is a primary factor determining gating sensitivity to K+. The strongest effects, with L270Y, L270F and L270W, led to more than a 30-fold decrease in apparent K+ affinity and an inversion in the apparent K+-dependence of voltage-dependent gating compared with the wild-type current. A partial rescue of wild-type gating was obtained on substitution in the second pore domain with the double mutant L270D/A428Y. These, and additional results, demarcate extracellular domains that are associated with the K+-sensitivity of TOK1 and they offer primary evidence for a synergy in gating between the two pore domains of TOK1, demonstrating an unexpected degree of long-distance interaction across the mouth of the K+ channel. PMID:16287426

  4. Two structurally distinct domains of the nucleoporin Nup170 cooperate to tether a subset of nucleoporins to nuclear pores

    PubMed Central

    Flemming, Dirk; Sarges, Phillip; Stelter, Philipp; Hellwig, Andrea; Böttcher, Bettina

    2009-01-01

    How individual nucleoporins (Nups) perform their role in nuclear pore structure and function is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the structure of purified Nup170 to obtain clues about its function. We show that Nup170 adopts a crescent moon shape with two structurally distinct and separable domains, a β-propeller N terminus and an α-solenoid C terminus. To address the individual roles of each domain, we expressed these domains separately in yeast. Notably, overexpression of the Nup170 C domain was toxic in nup170Δ cells and caused accumulation of several Nups in cytoplasmic foci. Further experiments indicated that the C-terminal domain anchors Nup170 to nuclear pores, whereas the N-terminal domain functions to recruit or retain a subset of Nups, including Nup159, Nup188, and Pom34, at nuclear pores. We conclude that Nup170 performs its role as a structural adapter between cytoplasmically oriented Nups and the nuclear pore membrane. PMID:19414606

  5. Pore helices play a dynamic role as integrators of domain motion during Kv11.1 channel inactivation gating.

    PubMed

    Perry, Matthew D; Ng, Chai Ann; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2013-04-19

    Proteins that form ion-selective pores in the membrane of cells are integral to many rapid signaling processes, including regulating the rhythm of the heartbeat. In potassium channels, the selectivity filter is critical for both endowing an exquisite selectivity for potassium ions, as well as for controlling the flow of ions through the pore. Subtle rearrangements in the complex hydrogen-bond network that link the selectivity filter to the surrounding pore helices differentiate conducting (open) from nonconducting (inactivated) conformations of the channel. Recent studies suggest that beyond the selectivity filter, inactivation involves widespread rearrangements of the channel protein. Here, we use rate equilibrium free energy relationship analysis to probe the structural changes that occur during selectivity filter gating in Kv11.1 channels, at near atomic resolution. We show that the pore helix plays a crucial dynamic role as a bidirectional interface during selectivity filter gating. We also define the molecular bases of the energetic coupling between the pore helix and outer helix of the pore domain that occurs early in the transition from open to inactivated states, as well as the coupling between the pore helix and inner helix late in the transition. Our data demonstrate that the pore helices are more than just static structural elements supporting the integrity of the selectivity filter; instead they play a crucial dynamic role during selectivity filter gating.

  6. Incorporation of a polypeptide segment into the beta-domain pore during the assembly of a bacterial autotransporter.

    PubMed

    Ieva, Raffaele; Skillman, Kristen M; Bernstein, Harris D

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial autotransporters consist of an N-terminal 'passenger domain' that is transported into the extracellular space by an unknown mechanism and a C-terminal 'beta-domain' that forms a beta-barrel in the outer membrane. Recent studies have revealed that fully assembled autotransporters have an unusual architecture in which a small passenger domain segment traverses the pore formed by the beta-domain. It is unclear, however, whether this configuration forms prior to passenger domain translocation or results from the translocation of the passenger domain through the beta-domain pore. By examining the accessibility of tobacco etch virus protease sites and single-cysteine residues in the passenger domain of the Escherichia coli O157:H7 autotransporter EspP at different stages of protein biogenesis, we identified a novel pre-translocation intermediate whose topology resembles that of the fully assembled protein. This intermediate was isolated in the periplasm in cell fractionation experiments. The data strongly suggest that the EspP beta-domain and an embedded polypeptide segment are integrated into the outer membrane as a single pre-formed unit. The data also provide indirect evidence that at least some outer membrane proteins acquire considerable tertiary structure prior to their membrane integration.

  7. Cloning, expression and purification of the SRCR domains of glycoprotein 340.

    PubMed

    Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2013-08-01

    Glycoprotein 340 (gp340), an innate immunity molecule is secreted luminally by monolayered epithelia and associated glands within the human oral cavity. Gp340 contains 14 scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domains, two CUB (C1r/C1s Uegf Bmp1) domains and one zona pellucida (ZP) domain. Oral streptococci are known to adhere to the tooth immobilized gp340 via its surface protein Antigen I/II (AgI/II), which is considered to be the critical first step in pathogenesis that eventually results in colonization and infection. In order to decipher the interactions between gp340's domains and oral streptococcal AgI/II domains, we undertook to express human gp340's first SRCR domain (SRCR1) and the first three tandem SRCR domains (SRCR123) in Drosophila S2 cells. While our initial attempts with human codons did not produce optimal results, codon-optimization for expression in Drosophila S2 cells and usage of inducible/secretory Drosophila expression system (DES) pMT/BiP/V5-HisA vector greatly enhanced the expression of the SRCR domains. Here we report the successful cloning, expression, and purification of the SRCR domains of gp340. Recognition of expressed SRCRs by the conformational dependent gp340 antibody indicate that these domains are appropriately folded and furthermore, surface plasmon resonance studies confirmed functional adherence of the SRCR domains to AgI/II.

  8. Lipids and two-pore domain K+ channels in excitable cells.

    PubMed

    Besana, Alessandra; Robinson, Richard B; Feinmark, Steven J

    2005-09-01

    Two-pore domain potassium channels (2PK) make up the newest branch of the potassium channel super-family. The channels are time- and voltage-independent and carry leak or "background" currents that are regulated by many different signaling molecules. These currents play an important role in setting the resting membrane potential and excitability of excitable cells, and, as a consequence, modulation of 2PK channel activity is thought to underlie the function of physiological processes as diverse as the sedation of anesthesia, regulation of normal cardiac rhythm and synaptic plasticity associated with simple forms of learning. Lipids, including arachidonate and its lipoxygenase metabolites, platelet-activating factor and anandamide have been identified as important mediators of some 2PK channels. Regulation can be effected by several different mechanisms. Some channels are regulated by G-protein-coupled receptors using well described signaling pathways that terminate in the activation of protein kinase C, whereas others are modulated by the direct interaction of the lipid with the channel.

  9. Differential expression of two-pore domain potassium channels in rat cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Paulina; Zúñiga, Rafael; Domínguez, Pedro; Delgado-López, Fernando; Plant, Leigh D; Zúñiga, Leandro

    2014-10-31

    Two pore domain potassium (K2P) channels are mostly present in the central nervous system (CNS) where they play important roles in modulating neuronal excitability. K2P channels give rise to background K(+) currents (IKSO) a key component in setting and maintaining the resting membrane potential in excitable cells. Here, we studied the expression and relative abundances of K2P channels in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), combining molecular biology, electrophysiology and immunologic techniques. The CGN IKSO was very sensitive to external pH, as previously reported. Quantitative determination of mRNA expression level demonstrated the existence of an accumulation pattern of transcripts in CGN that encode K2P9>K2P1>K2P3>K2P18>K2P2=K2P10>K2P4>K2P5 subunits. The presence of the major K2P subunits expressed was then confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis, demonstrating robust expression of K2P1 (TWIK-1), K2P3 (TASK-1), K2P9 (TASK-3) and K2P18 (TRESK) channel protein. Based, on these results, it is concluded that K2P1, -3, -9 and -18 subunits represent the majority component of IKSO current in CGN.

  10. The single transmembrane segment of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane domain of the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, R W; Blobel, G

    1992-12-01

    The glycoprotein gp210 is located in the "pore membrane," a specialized domain of the nuclear envelope to which the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is anchored. gp210 contains a large cisternal domain, a single transmembrane segment (TM), and a COOH-terminal, 58-amino acid residue cytoplasmic tail (CT) (Wozniak, R. W., E. Bartnik, and G. Blobel. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:2083-2092; Greber, U. F., A. Senior, and L. Gerace. 1990. EMBO (Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.) J. 9:1495-1502). To locate determinants for sorting of gp210 to the pore membrane, we constructed various cDNAs coding for wild-type, mutant, and chimeric gp210, and monitored localization of the expressed protein in 3T3 cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using appropriate antibodies. The large cisternal domain of gp210 (95% of its mass) did not reveal any sorting determinants. Surprisingly, the TM of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane. The CT also contains a sorting determinant, but it is weaker than that of the TM. We propose specific lateral association of the transmembrane helices of two proteins to yield either a gp210 homodimer or a heterodimer of gp210 and another protein. The cytoplasmically oriented tails of these dimers may bind cooperatively to the adjacent NPCs. In addition, we demonstrate that gp210 co-localizes with cytoplasmically dispersed nucleoporins, suggesting a cytoplasmic association of these components.

  11. The single transmembrane segment of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane domain of the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The glycoprotein gp210 is located in the "pore membrane," a specialized domain of the nuclear envelope to which the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is anchored. gp210 contains a large cisternal domain, a single transmembrane segment (TM), and a COOH-terminal, 58-amino acid residue cytoplasmic tail (CT) (Wozniak, R. W., E. Bartnik, and G. Blobel. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:2083-2092; Greber, U. F., A. Senior, and L. Gerace. 1990. EMBO (Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.) J. 9:1495-1502). To locate determinants for sorting of gp210 to the pore membrane, we constructed various cDNAs coding for wild-type, mutant, and chimeric gp210, and monitored localization of the expressed protein in 3T3 cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using appropriate antibodies. The large cisternal domain of gp210 (95% of its mass) did not reveal any sorting determinants. Surprisingly, the TM of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane. The CT also contains a sorting determinant, but it is weaker than that of the TM. We propose specific lateral association of the transmembrane helices of two proteins to yield either a gp210 homodimer or a heterodimer of gp210 and another protein. The cytoplasmically oriented tails of these dimers may bind cooperatively to the adjacent NPCs. In addition, we demonstrate that gp210 co-localizes with cytoplasmically dispersed nucleoporins, suggesting a cytoplasmic association of these components. PMID:1281815

  12. Structures of the autoproteolytic domain from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear pore complex component, Nup145

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Ozyurt, Sinem A.; Do, Johnny; Bain, Kevin T.; Dickey, Mark; Rodgers, Logan A.; Gheyi, Tarun; Sali, Andrej; Kim, Seung Joong; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Martel, Anne; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-04-30

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large, octagonally symmetric dynamic macromolecular assemblies responsible for exchange of proteins and RNAs between the nucleus and cytoplasm. NPCs are made up of at least 456 polypeptides from {approx}30 distinct nucleoporins. Several of these components, sharing similar structural motifs, form stable subcomplexes that form a coaxial structure containing two outer rings (the nuclear and cytoplasmic rings), two inner rings, and a membrane ring. The yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Nup145 and its human counterpart are unique among the nucleoporins, in that they undergo autoproteolysis to generate functionally distinct proteins. The human counterpart of Nup145 is expressed as two alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts. The larger 190 kDa precursor undergoes post-translational autoproteolysis at the Phe863-Ser864 peptide bond yielding the 92 kDa Nup98 and the 96 kDa Nup96. The smaller 98 kDa precursor is also autoproteolysed at an analogous site giving 92 kDa Nup98-N and a 6 kDa C-terminal fragment, which may form a noncovalent complex. The yeast Nup145 precursor [Fig. 1(A)] contains twelve repeats of a 'GLFG' peptide motif (FG repeats) at its N-terminus, an internal autoproteolytic domain (a region of high conservation with the homologous yeast nucleoporins Nup110 and Nup116, neither of which undergo autoproteolysis), followed by the C-terminal domain. Various forms of the FG repeats are present in nearly half of all nucleoporins; they form intrinsically disordered regions implicated in gating mechanisms that control passage of macromolecules through NPCs. Nup145 undergoes autoproteolysis at the Phe605-Ser606 peptide bond to generate two functionally distinct proteins, Nup145N and Nup145C. Subsequently, Nup145C associates with six other proteins to form the heptameric Y-complex, a component of the outer rings of the NPC. Nup145N, on the other hand, can shuttle between the NPC and the nuclear interior. It has been suggested that Nup

  13. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2001, researchers produced the first clone of an endangered species: a type of Asian ox known as a ... few days after its birth. In 2003, another endangered type of ox, called the ... many species that would otherwise disappear, others argue that cloning ...

  14. Atomic constraints between the voltage sensor and the pore domain in a voltage-gated K+ channel of known structure.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Anthony; Jogini, Vishwanath; Blachowicz, Lydia; Lainé, Muriel; Roux, Benoît

    2008-06-01

    In voltage-gated K(+) channels (Kv), membrane depolarization promotes a structural reorganization of each of the four voltage sensor domains surrounding the conducting pore, inducing its opening. Although the crystal structure of Kv1.2 provided the first atomic resolution view of a eukaryotic Kv channel, several components of the voltage sensors remain poorly resolved. In particular, the position and orientation of the charged arginine side chains in the S4 transmembrane segments remain controversial. Here we investigate the proximity of S4 and the pore domain in functional Kv1.2 channels in a native membrane environment using electrophysiological analysis of intersubunit histidine metallic bridges formed between the first arginine of S4 (R294) and residues A351 or D352 of the pore domain. We show that histidine pairs are able to bind Zn(2+) or Cd(2+) with high affinity, demonstrating their close physical proximity. The results of molecular dynamics simulations, consistent with electrophysiological data, indicate that the position of the S4 helix in the functional open-activated state could be shifted by approximately 7-8 A and rotated counterclockwise by 37 degrees along its main axis relative to its position observed in the Kv1.2 x-ray structure. A structural model is provided for this conformation. The results further highlight the dynamic and flexible nature of the voltage sensor.

  15. Nucleoporin FG Domains Facilitate mRNP Remodeling at the Cytoplasmic Face of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rebecca L.; Terry, Laura J.; Wente, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    Directional export of messenger RNA (mRNA) protein particles (mRNPs) through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) requires multiple factors. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the NPC proteins Nup159 and Nup42 are asymmetrically localized to the cytoplasmic face and have distinct functional domains: a phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeat domain that docks mRNP transport receptors and domains that bind the DEAD-box ATPase Dbp5 and its activating cofactor Gle1, respectively. We speculated that the Nup42 and Nup159 FG domains play a role in positioning mRNPs for the terminal mRNP-remodeling steps carried out by Dbp5. Here we find that deletion (Δ) of both the Nup42 and Nup159 FG domains results in a cold-sensitive poly(A)+ mRNA export defect. The nup42ΔFG nup159ΔFG mutant also has synthetic lethal genetic interactions with dbp5 and gle1 mutants. RNA cross-linking experiments further indicate that the nup42ΔFG nup159ΔFG mutant has a reduced capacity for mRNP remodeling during export. To further analyze the role of these FG domains, we replaced the Nup159 or Nup42 FG domains with FG domains from other Nups. These FG “swaps” demonstrate that only certain FG domains are functional at the NPC cytoplasmic face. Strikingly, fusing the Nup42 FG domain to the carboxy-terminus of Gle1 bypasses the need for the endogenous Nup42 FG domain, highlighting the importance of proximal positioning for these factors. We conclude that the Nup42 and Nup159 FG domains target the mRNP to Gle1 and Dbp5 for mRNP remodeling at the NPC. Moreover, these results provide key evidence that character and context play a direct role in FG domain function and mRNA export. PMID:24931410

  16. Nucleoporin FG domains facilitate mRNP remodeling at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rebecca L; Terry, Laura J; Wente, Susan R

    2014-08-01

    Directional export of messenger RNA (mRNA) protein particles (mRNPs) through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) requires multiple factors. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the NPC proteins Nup159 and Nup42 are asymmetrically localized to the cytoplasmic face and have distinct functional domains: a phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeat domain that docks mRNP transport receptors and domains that bind the DEAD-box ATPase Dbp5 and its activating cofactor Gle1, respectively. We speculated that the Nup42 and Nup159 FG domains play a role in positioning mRNPs for the terminal mRNP-remodeling steps carried out by Dbp5. Here we find that deletion (Δ) of both the Nup42 and Nup159 FG domains results in a cold-sensitive poly(A)+ mRNA export defect. The nup42ΔFG nup159ΔFG mutant also has synthetic lethal genetic interactions with dbp5 and gle1 mutants. RNA cross-linking experiments further indicate that the nup42ΔFG nup159ΔFG mutant has a reduced capacity for mRNP remodeling during export. To further analyze the role of these FG domains, we replaced the Nup159 or Nup42 FG domains with FG domains from other Nups. These FG "swaps" demonstrate that only certain FG domains are functional at the NPC cytoplasmic face. Strikingly, fusing the Nup42 FG domain to the carboxy-terminus of Gle1 bypasses the need for the endogenous Nup42 FG domain, highlighting the importance of proximal positioning for these factors. We conclude that the Nup42 and Nup159 FG domains target the mRNP to Gle1 and Dbp5 for mRNP remodeling at the NPC. Moreover, these results provide key evidence that character and context play a direct role in FG domain function and mRNA export. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Altered Expression of Two-Pore Domain Potassium (K2P) Channels in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sarah; Bateman, Andrew; O'Kelly, Ita

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels have become a focus in cancer biology as they play roles in cell behaviours associated with cancer progression, including proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels are background channels which enable the leak of potassium ions from cells. As these channels are open at rest they have a profound effect on cellular membrane potential and subsequently the electrical activity and behaviour of cells in which they are expressed. The K2P family of channels has 15 mammalian members and already 4 members of this family (K2P2.1, K2P3.1, K2P9.1, K2P5.1) have been implicated in cancer. Here we examine the expression of all 15 members of the K2P family of channels in a range of cancer types. This was achieved using the online cancer microarray database, Oncomine (www.oncomine.org). Each gene was examined across 20 cancer types, comparing mRNA expression in cancer to normal tissue. This analysis revealed all but 3 K2P family members (K2P4.1, K2P16.1, K2P18.1) show altered expression in cancer. Overexpression of K2P channels was observed in a range of cancers including breast, leukaemia and lung while more cancers (brain, colorectal, gastrointestinal, kidney, lung, melanoma, oesophageal) showed underexpression of one or more channels. K2P1.1, K2P3.1, K2P12.1, were overexpressed in a range of cancers. While K2P1.1, K2P3.1, K2P5.1, K2P6.1, K2P7.1 and K2P10.1 showed significant underexpression across the cancer types examined. This analysis supports the view that specific K2P channels may play a role in cancer biology. Their altered expression together with their ability to impact the function of other ion channels and their sensitivity to environmental stimuli (pO2, pH, glucose, stretch) makes understanding the role these channels play in cancer of key importance. PMID:24116006

  18. Altered expression of two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels in cancer.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sarah; Bateman, Andrew; O'Kelly, Ita

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels have become a focus in cancer biology as they play roles in cell behaviours associated with cancer progression, including proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels are background channels which enable the leak of potassium ions from cells. As these channels are open at rest they have a profound effect on cellular membrane potential and subsequently the electrical activity and behaviour of cells in which they are expressed. The K2P family of channels has 15 mammalian members and already 4 members of this family (K2P2.1, K2P3.1, K2P9.1, K2P5.1) have been implicated in cancer. Here we examine the expression of all 15 members of the K2P family of channels in a range of cancer types. This was achieved using the online cancer microarray database, Oncomine (www.oncomine.org). Each gene was examined across 20 cancer types, comparing mRNA expression in cancer to normal tissue. This analysis revealed all but 3 K2P family members (K2P4.1, K2P16.1, K2P18.1) show altered expression in cancer. Overexpression of K2P channels was observed in a range of cancers including breast, leukaemia and lung while more cancers (brain, colorectal, gastrointestinal, kidney, lung, melanoma, oesophageal) showed underexpression of one or more channels. K2P1.1, K2P3.1, K2P12.1, were overexpressed in a range of cancers. While K2P1.1, K2P3.1, K2P5.1, K2P6.1, K2P7.1 and K2P10.1 showed significant underexpression across the cancer types examined. This analysis supports the view that specific K2P channels may play a role in cancer biology. Their altered expression together with their ability to impact the function of other ion channels and their sensitivity to environmental stimuli (pO2, pH, glucose, stretch) makes understanding the role these channels play in cancer of key importance.

  19. Role of the Outer Pore Domain in Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Dynamic Permeability to Large Cations*

    PubMed Central

    Munns, Clare H.; Chung, Man-Kyo; Sanchez, Yuly E.; Amzel, L. Mario; Caterina, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) has been shown to alter its ionic selectivity profile in a time- and agonist-dependent manner. One hallmark of this dynamic process is an increased permeability to large cations such as N-methyl-d-glucamine (NMDG). In this study, we mutated residues throughout the TRPV1 pore domain to identify loci that contribute to dynamic large cation permeability. Using resiniferatoxin (RTX) as the agonist, we identified multiple gain-of-function substitutions within the TRPV1 pore turret (N628P and S629A), pore helix (F638A), and selectivity filter (M644A) domains. In all of these mutants, maximum NMDG permeability was substantially greater than that recorded in wild type TRPV1, despite similar or even reduced sodium current density. Two additional mutants, located in the pore turret (G618W) and selectivity filter (M644I), resulted in significantly reduced maximum NMDG permeability. M644A and M644I also showed increased and decreased minimum NMDG permeability, respectively. The phenotypes of this panel of mutants were confirmed by imaging the RTX-evoked uptake of the large cationic fluorescent dye YO-PRO1. Whereas none of the mutations selectively altered capsaicin-induced changes in NMDG permeability, the loss-of-function phenotypes seen with RTX stimulation of G618W and M644I were recapitulated in the capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake assay. Curiously, the M644A substitution resulted in a loss, rather than a gain, in capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake. Modeling of our mutations onto the recently determined TRPV1 structure revealed several plausible mechanisms for the phenotypes observed. We conclude that side chain interactions at a few specific loci within the TRPV1 pore contribute to the dynamic process of ionic selectivity. PMID:25568328

  20. Crucial Role of Perfringolysin O D1 Domain in Orchestrating Structural Transitions Leading to Membrane-perforating Pores

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzyk-Stokowiec, Aleksandra; Kulma, Magdalena; Traczyk, Gabriela; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Sobota, Andrzej; Dadlez, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a toxic protein that binds to cholesterol-containing membranes, oligomerizes, and forms a β-barrel transmembrane pore, leading to cell lysis. Previous studies have uncovered the sequence of events in this multistage structural transition to a considerable detail, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. By measuring hydrogen-deuterium exchange patterns of peptide bond amide protons monitored by mass spectrometry (MS), we have mapped structural changes in PFO and its variant bearing a point mutation during incorporation to the lipid environment. We have defined all regions that undergo structural changes caused by the interaction with the lipid environment both in wild-type PFO, thus providing new experimental constraints for molecular modeling of the pore formation process, and in a point mutant, W165T, for which the pore formation process is known to be inefficient. We have demonstrated that point mutation W165T causes destabilization of protein solution structure, strongest for domain D1, which interrupts the pathway of structural transitions in other domains necessary for proper oligomerization in the membrane. In PFO, the strongest changes accompanying binding to the membrane focus in D1; the C-terminal part of D4; and strands β1, β4, and β5 of D3. These changes were much weaker for PFOW165Tlipo where substantial stabilization was observed only in D4 domain. In this study, the application of hydrogen-deuterium exchange analysis monitored by MS provided new insight into conformational changes of PFO associated with the membrane binding, oligomerization, and lytic pore formation. PMID:25164812

  1. Nup98 FG domains from diverse species spontaneously phase-separate into particles with nuclear pore-like permselectivity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hermann Broder; Görlich, Dirk

    2015-01-06

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) conduct massive transport mediated by shuttling nuclear transport receptors (NTRs), while keeping nuclear and cytoplasmic contents separated. The NPC barrier in Xenopus relies primarily on the intrinsically disordered FG domain of Nup98. We now observed that Nup98 FG domains of mammals, lancelets, insects, nematodes, fungi, plants, amoebas, ciliates, and excavates spontaneously and rapidly phase-separate from dilute (submicromolar) aqueous solutions into characteristic 'FG particles'. This required neither sophisticated experimental conditions nor auxiliary eukaryotic factors. Instead, it occurred already during FG domain expression in bacteria. All Nup98 FG phases rejected inert macromolecules and yet allowed far larger NTR cargo complexes to rapidly enter. They even recapitulated the observations that large cargo-domains counteract NPC passage of NTR⋅cargo complexes, while cargo shielding and increased NTR⋅cargo surface-ratios override this inhibition. Their exquisite NPC-typical sorting selectivity and strong intrinsic assembly propensity suggest that Nup98 FG phases can form in authentic NPCs and indeed account for the permeability properties of the pore.

  2. Nup98 FG domains from diverse species spontaneously phase-separate into particles with nuclear pore-like permselectivity

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Hermann Broder; Görlich, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) conduct massive transport mediated by shuttling nuclear transport receptors (NTRs), while keeping nuclear and cytoplasmic contents separated. The NPC barrier in Xenopus relies primarily on the intrinsically disordered FG domain of Nup98. We now observed that Nup98 FG domains of mammals, lancelets, insects, nematodes, fungi, plants, amoebas, ciliates, and excavates spontaneously and rapidly phase-separate from dilute (submicromolar) aqueous solutions into characteristic ‘FG particles’. This required neither sophisticated experimental conditions nor auxiliary eukaryotic factors. Instead, it occurred already during FG domain expression in bacteria. All Nup98 FG phases rejected inert macromolecules and yet allowed far larger NTR cargo complexes to rapidly enter. They even recapitulated the observations that large cargo-domains counteract NPC passage of NTR⋅cargo complexes, while cargo shielding and increased NTR⋅cargo surface-ratios override this inhibition. Their exquisite NPC-typical sorting selectivity and strong intrinsic assembly propensity suggest that Nup98 FG phases can form in authentic NPCs and indeed account for the permeability properties of the pore. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04251.001 PMID:25562883

  3. Cloning, expression and functional characterization of the C2 domain from tomato phospholipase Dα.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Krishnaraj; Paliyath, Gopinadhan

    2011-01-01

    C2 domains exist as highly conserved N-terminal or C-terminal calcium- and lipid-binding motifs comprising nearly 130 amino acids, responsible for recruiting proteins to the membrane during signal transduction. In this study, the sequence corresponding to the N-terminal 164 amino acids of a full length cDNA of phospholipase Dα from tomato fruit was cloned in pET28(b) vector and expressed in E. coli as a His-tagged protein. Recombinant C2 domain showed micromolar affinity towards Ca(++) with a maximum of 2 high affinity binding sites. Interaction of C2 domain with synthetic unilamellar vesicles, evaluated by protein- lipid fluorescence resonance energy transfer, showed maximum affinity towards phosphatidic acid, and virtually no binding with phosphatidylcholine. The binding towards phosphoinositides was reduced with increasing degree of phosphorylation. Acid- and chaotropic salt- titrations indicated an electrostatic, rather than a hydrophobic mode of interaction between C2 domain and the phospholipid vesicles. Conformational analyses of the recombinant C2 domain showed a much longer calcium binding loop region, a far less electropositive phosphoinositide-binding region, unique calcium binding pockets with high electro-negativity, and other features that are distinct from the typical C2 domains of phospholipase A2 and Protein kinase C α, signifying the uniqueness of Phospholipase Dα in fruit developmental events. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. DAMGO modulates two-pore domain K(+) channels in the substantia gelatinosa neurons of rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Cho, Pyung Sun; Lee, Han Kyu; Lee, Sang Hoon; Im, Jay Zoon; Jung, Sung Jun

    2016-09-01

    The analgesic mechanism of opioids is known to decrease the excitability of substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons receiving the synaptic inputs from primary nociceptive afferent fiber by increasing inwardly rectifying K(+) current. In this study, we examined whether a µ-opioid agonist, [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO), affects the two-pore domain K(+) channel (K2P) current in rat SG neurons using a slice whole-cell patch clamp technique. Also we confirmed which subtypes of K2P channels were associated with DAMGO-induced currents, measuring the expression of K2P channel in whole spinal cord and SG region. DAMGO caused a robust hyperpolarization and outward current in the SG neurons, which developed almost instantaneously and did not show any time-dependent inactivation. Half of the SG neurons exhibited a linear I~V relationship of the DAMGO-induced current, whereas rest of the neurons displayed inward rectification. In SG neurons with a linear I~V relationship of DAMGO-induced current, the reversal potential was close to the K(+) equilibrium potentials. The mRNA expression of TWIK (tandem of pore domains in a weak inwardly rectifying K(+) channel) related acid-sensitive K(+) channel (TASK) 1 and 3 was found in the SG region and a low pH (6.4) significantly blocked the DAMGO-induced K(+) current. Taken together, the DAMGO-induced hyperpolarization at resting membrane potential and subsequent decrease in excitability of SG neurons can be carried by the two-pore domain K(+) channel (TASK1 and 3) in addition to inwardly rectifying K(+) channel.

  5. A bivalent tarantula toxin activates the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1, by targeting the outer pore domain.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, Christopher J; Priel, Avi; Zhou, Sharleen; King, David; Siemens, Jan; Julius, David

    2010-05-28

    Toxins have evolved to target regions of membrane ion channels that underlie ligand binding, gating, or ion permeation, and have thus served as invaluable tools for probing channel structure and function. Here, we describe a peptide toxin from the Earth Tiger tarantula that selectively and irreversibly activates the capsaicin- and heat-sensitive channel, TRPV1. This high-avidity interaction derives from a unique tandem repeat structure of the toxin that endows it with an antibody-like bivalency. The "double-knot" toxin traps TRPV1 in the open state by interacting with residues in the presumptive pore-forming region of the channel, highlighting the importance of conformational changes in the outer pore region of TRP channels during activation.

  6. A Bivalent Tarantula Toxin Activates the Capsaicin Receptor, TRPV1, by Targeting the Outer Pore Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bohlen, Christopher J.; Priel, Avi; Zhou, Sharleen; King, David; Siemens, Jan; Julius, David

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Toxins have evolved to target regions of membrane ion channels that underlie ligand binding, gating, or ion permeation, and have thus served as invaluable tools for probing channel structure and function. Here we describe a peptide toxin from the Earth Tiger tarantula that selectively and irreversibly activates the capsaicin- and heat-sensitive channel, TRPV1. This high avidity interaction derives from a unique tandem repeat structure of the toxin that endows it with an antibody-like bivalency, illustrating a new paradigm in toxin structure and evolution. The ‘double-knot’ toxin traps TRPV1 in the open state by interacting with residues in the presumptive pore-forming region of the channel, highlighting the importance of conformational changes in the outer pore region of TRP channels during activation. PMID:20510930

  7. Pore dynamics and conductance of RyR1 transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Shirvanyants, David; Ramachandran, Srinivas; Mei, Yingwu; Xu, Le; Meissner, Gerhard; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2014-06-03

    Ryanodine receptors (RyR) are calcium release channels, playing a major role in the regulation of muscular contraction. Mutations in skeletal muscle RyR (RyR1) are associated with congenital diseases such as malignant hyperthermia and central core disease (CCD). The absence of high-resolution structures of RyR1 has limited our understanding of channel function and disease mechanisms at the molecular level. Previously, we have reported a hypothetical structure of the RyR1 pore-forming region, obtained by homology modeling and supported by mutational scans, electrophysiological measurements, and cryo-electron microscopy. Here, we utilize the expanded model encompassing six transmembrane helices to calculate the RyR1 pore region conductance, to analyze its structural stability, and to hypothesize the mechanism of the Ile4897 CCD-associated mutation. The calculated conductance of the wild-type RyR1 suggests that the proposed pore structure can sustain ion currents measured in single-channel experiments. We observe a stable pore structure on timescales of 0.2 μs, with multiple cations occupying the selectivity filter and cytosolic vestibule, but not the inner chamber. We further suggest that stability of the selectivity filter critically depends on the interactions between the I4897 residue and several hydrophobic residues of the neighboring subunit. Loss of these interactions in the case of polar substitution I4897T results in destabilization of the selectivity filter, a possible cause of the CCD-specific reduced Ca(2+) conductance.

  8. Temperature-induced opening of TRPV1 ion channel is stabilized by the pore domain

    PubMed Central

    Grandl, Jörg; Kim, Sung Eun; Uzzell, Valerie; Bursulaya, Badry; Petrus, Matt; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2010-01-01

    Summary TRPV1 is the founding and best-studied member of the family of temperature-activated transient receptor potential ion channels (thermoTRPs). Voltage, chemicals, and heat amongst other agonists allosterically gate TRPV1. Molecular determinants for TRPV1 activation by capsaicin, allicin, acid, ammonia, and voltage have been identified. However, the structures and mechanisms mediating its pronounced temperature-sensitivity remain unclear. Recent studies of the related channel TRPV3 identified residues within the pore region required for heat activation. Here we use both random and targeted mutagenesis screens of TRPV1 and identify point mutations in the outer pore region that specifically impair temperature-activation. Single channel analysis shows that TRPV1 mutations disrupt heat-sensitivity by ablating long channel openings, that are part of the temperature-gating pathway. We propose that sequential occupancy of short and long open states upon activation provides a mechanism to enhance temperature-sensitivity. Our study suggests that the outer pore plays a general role in heat-sensitivity of thermoTRPs. PMID:20414199

  9. Probing the Disordered Domain of the Nuclear Pore Complex through Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ghavami, Ali; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; van der Giessen, Erik; Onck, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of disordered proteins (FG-nups) that line the transport channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is investigated by means of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. A one-bead-per-amino-acid model is presented that accounts for the hydrophobic/hydrophilic and electrostatic interactions between different amino acids, polarity of the solvent, and screening of free ions. The results indicate that the interaction of the FG-nups forms a high-density, doughnut-like distribution inside the NPC, which is rich in FG-repeats. We show that the obtained distribution is encoded in the amino-acid sequence of the FG-nups and is driven by both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. To explore the relation between structure and function, we have systematically removed different combinations of FG-nups from the pore to simulate inviable and viable NPCs that were previously studied experimentally. The obtained density distributions show that the maximum density of the FG-nups inside the pore does not exceed 185 mg/mL in the inviable NPCs, whereas for the wild-type and viable NPCs, this value increases to 300 mg/mL. Interestingly, this maximum density is not correlated to the total mass of the FG-nups, but depends sensitively on the specific combination of essential Nups located in the central plane of the NPC. PMID:25229147

  10. Glucoamylase starch-binding domain of Aspergillus niger B1: molecular cloning and functional characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Paldi, Tzur; Levy, Ilan; Shoseyov, Oded

    2003-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are protein domains located within a carbohydrate-active enzyme, with a discrete fold that can be separated from the catalytic domain. Starch-binding domains (SBDs) are CBMs that are usually found at the C-terminus in many amylolytic enzymes. The SBD from Aspergillus niger B1 (CMI CC 324262) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as an independent domain and the recombinant protein was purified on starch. The A. niger B1 SBD was found to be similar to SBD from A. kawachii, A. niger var. awamori and A. shirusami (95-96% identity) and was classified as a member of the CBM family 20. Characterization of SBD binding to starch indicated that it is essentially irreversible and that its affinity to cationic or anionic starch, as well as to potato or corn starch, does not differ significantly. These observations indicate that the fundamental binding area on these starches is essentially the same. Natural and chemically modified starches are among the most useful biopolymers employed in the industry. Our study demonstrates that SBD binds effectively to both anionic and cationic starch. PMID:12646045

  11. Localization of TREK-1, a two-pore-domain K+ channel in the peripheral vestibular system of mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Marie-Thérèse; Lesage, Florian; Reyes, Roberto; Barhanin, Jacques; Demêmes, Danielle

    2004-08-13

    The distribution of two-pore-domain (2P-domain) K(+) channels of the TREK subfamily was studied using immunocytochemistry in the peripheral vestibular system of mouse and rat. Using RT-PCR, the mRNA for TREK-1, but not for TREK-2 or TRAAK, were detected in mouse vestibular endorgans and ganglia. The TREK-1 channel protein was immunodetected in both nerve fibers and nerve cell bodies in the vestibular ganglion, both afferent fibers and nerve calyces innervating type I hair cells in the utricle and cristae. The post-synaptic localization in afferent calyces may suggest a neuroprotective role in glutamatergic excitotoxicity during ischemic conditions. In non-neuronal cells, TREK-1 was immunodetected in the apical membrane of dark cells and transitional cells, both of which are involved in endolymph K(+) secretion and recycling. TREK-1 may subserve some neuroprotective function in afferent nerve fibers as well as play a role in endolymph potassium homeostasis.

  12. The pore, not cytoplasmic domains, underlies inactivation in a prokaryotic sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Evgeny; Bladen, Christopher; Winkfein, Robert; Diao, Catherine; Dhaliwal, Perry; French, Robert J

    2005-07-01

    Kinetics and voltage dependence of inactivation of a prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channel (NaChBac) were investigated in an effort to understand its molecular mechanism. NaChBac inactivation kinetics show strong, bell-shaped voltage dependence with characteristic time constants ranging from approximately 50 ms at depolarized voltages to a maximum of approximately 100 s at the inactivation midpoint. Activation and inactivation parameters for four different covalently linked tandem dimer or tandem tetramer constructs were indistinguishable from those of the wild-type channel. Point mutations in the outer part of the pore revealed an important influence of the S195 residue on the process of inactivation. For two mutants (S195D and S195E), the maximal and minimal rates of inactivation observed were increased by approximately 2.5-fold, and the midpoint of the steady-state inactivation curve was shifted approximately 20 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction, compared to the wild-type channel. Our data suggest that pore vestibule structure is an important determinant of NaChBac inactivation, whereas the inactivation mechanism is independent of the number of free cytoplasmic N- and C-termini in the functional channel. In these respects, NaChBac inactivation resembles C-type or slow inactivation modes observed in other voltage-gated K and Na channels.

  13. Structural and functional analysis of Nup133 domains reveals modular building blocks of the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Berke, Ian C.; Boehmer, Thomas; Blobel, Günter; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2004-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport occurs through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) whose complex architecture is generated from a set of only ∼30 proteins, termed nucleoporins. Here, we explore the domain structure of Nup133, a nucleoporin in a conserved NPC subcomplex that is crucial for NPC biogenesis and is believed to form part of the NPC scaffold. We show that human Nup133 contains two domains: a COOH-terminal domain responsible for its interaction with its subcomplex through Nup107; and an NH2-terminal domain whose crystal structure reveals a seven-bladed β-propeller. The surface properties and conservation of the Nup133 β-propeller suggest it may mediate multiple interactions with other proteins. Other β-propellers are predicted in a third of all nucleoporins. These and several other repeat-based motifs appear to be major elements of nucleoporins, indicating a level of structural repetition that may conceptually simplify the assembly and disassembly of this huge protein complex. PMID:15557116

  14. cDNA cloning and characterization of Npap60: a novel rat nuclear pore-associated protein with an unusual subcellular localization during male germ cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fan, F; Liu, C P; Korobova, O; Heyting, C; Offenberg, H H; Trump, G; Arnheim, N

    1997-03-15

    We have cloned and characterized a cDNA, Npap60, encoding a rat nuclear pore-associated protein. The 3-kb cDNA was obtained by antibody screening of a rat testis expression library. The predicted NPAP60 contains 381 amino acids with a composition of 25.6% charged residues and is highly hydrophilic. The Npap60 gene appears to be conserved in mouse, rat, and human. Immunofluorescence studies with anti-NPAP60 fusion protein antibody show that the NPAP60 protein colocalizes with nuclear pore complexes in RAT1A cells. The expression of Npap60 is about 10-20 times higher in rat testis than in somatic tissues. The subcellular localization of NPAP60 protein changes dramatically during male germ cell differentiation, from nuclear pore complex-like staining in spermatocytes to whole nucleus staining in spermatids and finally to a nuclear surface staining in mature spermatozoa. These changes are temporally and spatially related to nuclear reorganization during male germ cell differentiation.

  15. Atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex targeting domain of a Nup116 homologue from the yeast, Candida glabrata

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Manglicmot, Danalyn; Bain, Kevin T.; Gilmore, Jeremiah; Gheyi, Tarun; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Almo, Steven C.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-10-23

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), embedded in the nuclear envelope, is a large, dynamic molecular assembly that facilitates exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The yeast NPC is an eightfold symmetric annular structure composed of {approx}456 polypeptide chains contributed by {approx}30 distinct proteins termed nucleoporins. Nup116, identified only in fungi, plays a central role in both protein import and mRNA export through the NPC. Nup116 is a modular protein with N-terminal 'FG' repeats containing a Gle2p-binding sequence motif and a NPC targeting domain at its C-terminus. We report the crystal structure of the NPC targeting domain of Candida glabrata Nup116, consisting of residues 882-1034 [CgNup116(882-1034)], at 1.94 {angstrom} resolution. The X-ray structure of CgNup116(882-1034) is consistent with the molecular envelope determined in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering. Structural similarities of CgNup116(882-1034) with homologous domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup116, S. cerevisiae Nup145N, and human Nup98 are discussed.

  16. Proton Sensors in the Pore Domain of the Cardiac Voltage-gated Sodium Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David K.; Peters, Colin H.; Allard, Charlene R.; Claydon, Tom W.; Ruben, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Protons impart isoform-specific modulation of inactivation in neuronal, skeletal muscle, and cardiac voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels. Although the structural basis of proton block in NaV channels has been well described, the amino acid residues responsible for the changes in NaV kinetics during extracellular acidosis are as yet unknown. We expressed wild-type (WT) and two pore mutant constructs (H880Q and C373F) of the human cardiac NaV channel, NaV1.5, in Xenopus oocytes. C373F and H880Q both attenuated proton block, abolished proton modulation of use-dependent inactivation, and altered pH modulation of the steady-state and kinetic parameters of slow inactivation. Additionally, C373F significantly reduced the maximum probability of use-dependent inactivation and slow inactivation, relative to WT. H880Q also significantly reduced the maximum probability of slow inactivation and shifted the voltage dependence of activation and fast inactivation to more positive potentials, relative to WT. These data suggest that Cys-373 and His-880 in NaV1.5 are proton sensors for use-dependent and slow inactivation and have implications in isoform-specific modulation of NaV channels. PMID:23283979

  17. Terahertz time-domain spectra of aromatic carboxylic acids incorporated in nano-sized pores of mesoporous silicate.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yuko; Ajito, Katsuhiro

    2007-07-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is used to study the intra- and intermolecular vibrational modes of aromatic carboxylic acids, for example, o-phthalic acid, benzoic acid, and salicylic acid, which form either intra- or intermolecular hydrogen bond(s) in different ways. Incorporating the target molecules in nano-sized spaces in mesoporous silicate (SBA-16) is found to be effective for the separate detection of intramolecular hydrogen bonding modes and intermolecular modes. The results are supported by an analysis of the differences in the peak shifts, which depend on temperature, caused by the different nature of the THz absorption. Raman spectra revealed that incorporating the molecules in the nano-sized pores of SBA-16 slightly changes the molecular structures. In the future, THz-TDS using nanoporous materials will be used to analyze the intra- and intermolecular vibrational modes of molecules with larger hydrogen bonding networks such as proteins or DNA.

  18. cDNA cloning and characterization of a novel squid rhodopsin kinase encoding multiple modular domains.

    PubMed

    Mayeenuddin, L H; Mitchell, J

    2001-01-01

    Rhodopsin phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms of inactivation in vertebrate and invertebrate visual signal transduction. Here we report the cDNA cloning and protein characterization of a 70-kDa squid rhodopsin kinase, SQRK. The cDNA encoding the 70-kDa protein demonstrates high sequence identity with octopus rhodopsin kinase (92%) and mammalian beta-adrenergic receptor kinases (63-65%), but only 33% similarity with bovine rhodopsin kinase, suggesting that invertebrate rhodopsin kinases may be structurally similar to beta-adrenergic receptor kinases. This cDNA encodes three distinct modular domains: RGS, S/TKc, and PH domains. The native SQRK is an eye-specific protein that is only expressed in photoreceptor cells and the optic ganglion as determined by immunoblotting. Purified SQRK is able to phosphorylate both squid and bovine rhodopsin. Squid rhodopsin phosphorylation by purified SQRK was sensitive to both Mg2+ and GTPgammaS but was insensitive to Ca2+/CaM regulation. The ability of SQRK to phosphorylate rhodopsin was totally lost in the presence of SQRK-specific antibodies. Our results suggest that SQRK plays an important role in squid visual signal termination.

  19. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of duck nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1).

    PubMed

    Li, Huilin; Jin, Hui; Li, Yaqian; Liu, Dejian; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Jiang, Yunbo; Luo, Rui

    2017-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) is an imperative cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and considered as a key member of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family which plays a critical role in innate immunity through sensing microbial components derived from bacterial peptidoglycan. In the current study, the full-length of duck NOD1 (duNOD1) cDNA from duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs) was cloned. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that duNOD1 exhibited a strong evolutionary relationship with chicken and rock pigeon NOD1. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that duNOD1 was widely distributed in various organs, with the highest expression observed in the liver. Furthermore, duNOD1 overexpression induced NF-κB activation in DEFs and the CARD domain is crucial for duNOD1-mediated NF-κB activation. In addition, silencing the duNOD1 decreased the activity of NF-κB in DEFs stimulated by iE-DAP. Overexpression of duNOD1 significantly increased the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and RANTES in DEFs. These findings highlight the crucial role of duNOD1 as an intracellular sensor in duck innate immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The F-Actin Binding Protein Cortactin Regulates the Dynamics of the Exocytotic Fusion Pore through its SH3 Domain.

    PubMed

    González-Jamett, Arlek M; Guerra, María J; Olivares, María J; Haro-Acuña, Valentina; Baéz-Matus, Ximena; Vásquez-Navarrete, Jacqueline; Momboisse, Fanny; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa; Cárdenas, Ana M

    2017-01-01

    Upon cell stimulation, the network of cortical actin filaments is rearranged to facilitate the neurosecretory process. This actin rearrangement includes both disruption of the preexisting actin network and de novo actin polymerization. However, the mechanism by which a Ca(2+) signal elicits the formation of new actin filaments remains uncertain. Cortactin, an actin-binding protein that promotes actin polymerization in synergy with the nucleation promoting factor N-WASP, could play a key role in this mechanism. We addressed this hypothesis by analyzing de novo actin polymerization and exocytosis in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells expressing different cortactin or N-WASP domains, or cortactin mutants that fail to interact with proline-rich domain (PRD)-containing proteins, including N-WASP, or to be phosphorylated by Ca(2+)-dependent kinases, such as ERK1/2 and Src. Our results show that the activation of nicotinic receptors in chromaffin cells promotes cortactin translocation to the cell cortex, where it colocalizes with actin filaments. We further found that, in association with PRD-containing proteins, cortactin contributes to the Ca(2+)-dependent formation of F-actin, and regulates fusion pore dynamics and the number of exocytotic events induced by activation of nicotinic receptors. However, whereas the actions of cortactin on the fusion pore dynamics seems to depend on the availability of monomeric actin and its phosphorylation by ERK1/2 and Src kinases, cortactin regulates the extent of exocytosis by a mechanism independent of actin polymerization. Together our findings point out a role for cortactin as a critical modulator of actin filament formation and exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells.

  1. The F-Actin Binding Protein Cortactin Regulates the Dynamics of the Exocytotic Fusion Pore through its SH3 Domain

    PubMed Central

    González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Guerra, María J.; Olivares, María J.; Haro-Acuña, Valentina; Baéz-Matus, Ximena; Vásquez-Navarrete, Jacqueline; Momboisse, Fanny; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa; Cárdenas, Ana M.

    2017-01-01

    Upon cell stimulation, the network of cortical actin filaments is rearranged to facilitate the neurosecretory process. This actin rearrangement includes both disruption of the preexisting actin network and de novo actin polymerization. However, the mechanism by which a Ca2+ signal elicits the formation of new actin filaments remains uncertain. Cortactin, an actin-binding protein that promotes actin polymerization in synergy with the nucleation promoting factor N-WASP, could play a key role in this mechanism. We addressed this hypothesis by analyzing de novo actin polymerization and exocytosis in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells expressing different cortactin or N-WASP domains, or cortactin mutants that fail to interact with proline-rich domain (PRD)-containing proteins, including N-WASP, or to be phosphorylated by Ca2+-dependent kinases, such as ERK1/2 and Src. Our results show that the activation of nicotinic receptors in chromaffin cells promotes cortactin translocation to the cell cortex, where it colocalizes with actin filaments. We further found that, in association with PRD-containing proteins, cortactin contributes to the Ca2+-dependent formation of F-actin, and regulates fusion pore dynamics and the number of exocytotic events induced by activation of nicotinic receptors. However, whereas the actions of cortactin on the fusion pore dynamics seems to depend on the availability of monomeric actin and its phosphorylation by ERK1/2 and Src kinases, cortactin regulates the extent of exocytosis by a mechanism independent of actin polymerization. Together our findings point out a role for cortactin as a critical modulator of actin filament formation and exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells. PMID:28522963

  2. Polyproline type II conformation in the C-terminal domain of the nuclear pore complex protein gp210.

    PubMed

    Pilpel, Yair; Bogin, Oren; Brumfeld, Vlad; Reich, Ziv

    2003-04-01

    gp210 is a major constituent of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) with possible structural and regulatory roles. It interacts with components of the NPC via its C-terminal domain (CTD), which follows a transmembrane domain and a massive ( approximately 200 kDa) N-terminal region that resides in the lumen of the perinuclear space. Here, we report the solution structure of the human gp210 CTD as determined by various spectroscopic techniques. In water, the CTD adopts an extended, largely unordered conformation, which contains a significant amount of left-handed polyproline type II (PII) helical structure. The conformation of the CTD is altered by high pH, charged detergents, and the hydrogen bond-promoting reagent trifluoroethanol (TFE), which decrease the PII fraction of the fragment. TFE also induces a conformational change in a region containing an SPXX motif whose serine becomes specifically phosphorylated during mitosis. We propose that PII elements in the CTD may play a role in its interaction with the NPC and may serve as recognition sites for regulatory proteins bearing WW or other, unknown PII-binding motifs.

  3. A unique alkaline pH-regulated and fatty acid-activated tandem pore domain potassium channel (K2P) from a marine sponge

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Gregory D.; Tang, Qiong-Yao; Heler, Robert; Tompkins-MacDonald, Gabrielle J.; Pritchard, Erica N.; Leys, Sally P.; Logothetis, Diomedes E.; Boland, Linda M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A cDNA encoding a potassium channel of the two-pore domain family (K2P, KCNK) of leak channels was cloned from the marine sponge Amphimedon queenslandica. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that AquK2P cannot be placed into any of the established functional groups of mammalian K2P channels. We used the Xenopus oocyte expression system, a two-electrode voltage clamp and inside-out patch clamp electrophysiology to determine the physiological properties of AquK2P. In whole cells, non-inactivating, voltage-independent, outwardly rectifying K+ currents were generated by external application of micromolar concentrations of arachidonic acid (AA; EC50 ∼30 μmol l–1), when applied in an alkaline solution (≥pH 8.0). Prior activation of channels facilitated the pH-regulated, AA-dependent activation of AquK2P but external pH changes alone did not activate the channels. Unlike certain mammalian fatty-acid-activated K2P channels, the sponge K2P channel was not activated by temperature and was insensitive to osmotically induced membrane distortion. In inside-out patch recordings, alkalinization of the internal pH (pKa 8.18) activated the AquK2P channels independently of AA and also facilitated activation by internally applied AA. The gating of the sponge K2P channel suggests that voltage-independent outward rectification and sensitivity to pH and AA are ancient and fundamental properties of animal K2P channels. In addition, the membrane potential of some poriferan cells may be dynamically regulated by pH and AA. PMID:22723483

  4. Intersubunit Concerted Cooperative and cis-Type Mechanisms Modulate Allosteric Gating in Two-Pore-Domain Potassium Channel TREK-2

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Ren-Gong; Peng, Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Hai-Tao; Xu, Jiang-Ping; Zheng, Jian-Quan; Wei, Xiao-Li; Ma, Xiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    In response to diverse stimuli, two-pore-domain potassium channel TREK-2 regulates cellular excitability, and hence plays a key role in mediating neuropathic pain, mood disorders and ischemia through. Although more and more input modalities are found to achieve their modulations via acting on the channel, the potential role of subunit interaction in these modulations remains to be explored. In the current study, the deletion (lack of proximal C-terminus, ΔpCt) or point mutation (G312A) was introduced into TREK-2 subunits to limit K+ conductance and used to report subunit stoichiometry. The constructs were then combined with wild type (WT) subunit to produce concatenated dimers with defined composition, and the gating kinetics of these channels to 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) and extracellular pH (pHo) were characterized. Our results show that combination of WT and ΔpCt/G312A subunits reserves similar gating properties to that of WT dimmers, suggesting that the WT subunit exerts dominant and positive effects on the mutated one, and thus the two subunits controls channel gating via a concerted cooperative manner. Further introduction of ΔpCt into the latter subunit of heterodimeric channel G312A-WT or G312A-G312A attenuated their sensitivity to 2-APB and pHo alkalization, implicating that these signals were transduced by a cis-type mechanism. Together, our findings elucidate the mechanisms for how the two subunits control the pore gating of TREK-2, in which both intersubunit concerted cooperative and cis-type manners modulate the allosteric regulations induced by 2-APB and pHo alkalization. PMID:27242438

  5. The Structures of Coiled-Coil Domains from Type III Secretion System Translocators Reveal Homology to Pore-Forming Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-03-26

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) that is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus is composed of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are composed of extended-length (114 {angstrom} in IpaB and 71 {angstrom} in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably, colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically separate and functionally distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events.

  6. THE STRUCTURES OF COILED-COIL DOMAINS FROM TYPE THREE SECRETION SYSTEM TRANSLOCATORS REVEAL HOMOLOGY TO PORE-FORMING TOXINS

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-01-01

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SS) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) which is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) is comprised of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 Å and 2.8 Å limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are comprised of extended length (114 Å in IpaB and 71 Å in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically-separate and functionally-distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events. PMID:22321794

  7. Cloning, expression, purification, and characterization of the catalytic domain of sika deer MMP-13.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Jiawen; Liu, Meichen; Wang, Siming; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yu

    2016-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 13 is one of three mammalian collagenases that are capable of initiating the degradation of interstitial collagens during wound healing. Herein, we report for the first time the molecular cloning of the catalytic domain (CD) of sika deer MMP-13, followed by protein expression in Escherichia coli and purification by affinity chromatography. The final yield was approximately 90.4 mg per liter of growth culture with a purity of 91.6%. The mass recovery during the purification and renaturation were 70.2% and 81.5%, respectively. Using gelatin zymography and a degradation assay, we found that the refolded sika deer MMP-13 (CD) could digest gelatin. The optimal pH and temperature for the enzyme bioactivity was 8.0 and 37 °C, respectively. The Km value for the enzyme-catalyzed digestion of gelatin was 136+/-8 μg/mL, and the Vmax was 4.12 × 10(3) U/μg. sdMMP13 (CD) was able to completely degrade collagen II and gelatin, and partially degrade fibronectin. The sdMMP-13 (CD) activity was significantly inhibited by several chemicals including 1, 10-phenanthroline, EDTA, Fe(2+), Cu(2+), and Mn(2+). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cloning and biochemical characterization of LIMK-2, a protein kinase containing two LIM domains.

    PubMed

    Smolich, B; Vo, M; Buckley, S; Plowman, G; Papkoff, J

    1997-02-01

    We have isolated human and rat clones of the LIM motif-containing protein kinase, termed LIMK-2. LIMK-2 is related to the neuronally expressed LIM-kinase, whose hemizygous deletion appears to result in cognitive impairment in patients with Williams syndrome. The hallmark of this protein family is the presence of 1 or 2-terminal LIM motifs and an atypical C-terminal protein kinase domain. LIMK-2 mRNA was detected by Northern blot analysis in human tissues, most abundantly in placenta, lung, liver, and pancreas, and also in a variety of cell lines including neuronal, glioblastoma, and mammary carcinoma lines. The LIMK-2 transcript was also induced upon neuroectodermal differentiation of mouse P19 embryonal carcinoma cells. A 65 kDa recombinant LIMK-2 protein was identified in 293 cells stably transfected with a LIMK-2 expression vector. An in vitro kinase assay demonstrates LIMK-2 is autophosphorylated and exhibits serine/threonine kinase activity towards the exogenous substrate MBP. The endogenous 65 kDa LIMK-2 protein was detected in a variety of cell lines, and coprecipitates with a 140 kDa tyrosine phosphorylated protein, but was not itself tyrosine phosphorylated. At the subcellular level, LIMK-2 is localized in both the nucleus and in a Triton X-100 soluble fraction.

  9. Low pH-Induced Pore Formation by the T Domain of Botulinum Toxin Type A is Dependent upon NaCl Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, B.; Swaminathan, S.; Agarwal, R.; Nelson, L. D.; London, E.

    2010-07-19

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) undergo low pH-triggered membrane insertion, resulting in the translocation of their light (catalytic) chains into the cytoplasm. The T (translocation) domain of the BoNT heavy chain is believed to carry out translocation. Here, the behavior of isolated T domain from BoNT type A has been characterized, both in solution and when associated with model membranes. When BoNT T domain prepared in the detergent dodecylmaltoside was diluted into aqueous solution, it exhibited a low pH-dependent conformational change below pH 6. At low pH the T domain associated with, and formed pores within, model membrane vesicles composed of 30 mol% dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol/70 mol% dioleoylphosphatidylcholine. Although T domain interacted with vesicles at low (50 mM) and high (400 mM) NaCl concentrations, the interaction required much less lipid at low salt. However, even at high lipid concentrations pore formation was much more pronounced at low NaCl concentrations than at high NaCl concentration. Increasing salt concentration after insertion in the presence of 50 mM NaCl did not decrease pore formation. A similar effect of NaCl concentration upon pore formation was observed in vesicles composed solely of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, showing that the effect of NaCl did not solely involve modulation of electrostatic interactions between protein and anionic lipids. These results indicate that some feature of membrane-bound T domain tertiary structure critical for pore formation is highly dependent upon salt concentration.

  10. Mutations in the Voltage Sensors of Domains I and II of Nav1.5 that are Associated with Arrhythmias and Dilated Cardiomyopathy Generate Gating Pore Currents.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Chahine, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Voltage gated sodium channels (Nav) are transmembrane proteins responsible for action potential initiation. Mutations mainly located in the voltage sensor domain (VSD) of Nav1.5, the cardiac sodium channel, have been associated with the development of arrhythmias combined with dilated cardiomyopathy. Gating pore currents have been observed with three unrelated mutations associated with similar clinical phenotypes. However, gating pores have never been associated with mutations outside the first domain of Nav1.5. The aim of this study was to explore the possibility that gating pore currents might be caused by the Nav1.5 R225P and R814W mutations (R3, S4 in DI and DII, respectively), which are associated with rhythm disturbances and dilated cardiomyopathy. Nav1.5 WT and mutant channels were transiently expressed in tsA201 cells. The biophysical properties of the alpha pore currents and the presence of gating pore currents were investigated using the patch-clamp technique. We confirmed the previously reported gain of function of the alpha pores of the mutant channels, which mainly consisted of increased window currents mostly caused by shifts in the voltage dependence of activation. We also observed gating pore currents associated with the R225P and R814W mutations. This novel permeation pathway was open under depolarized conditions and remained temporarily open at hyperpolarized potentials after depolarization periods. Gating pore currents could represent a molecular basis for the development of uncommon electrical abnormalities and changes in cardiac morphology. We propose that this biophysical defect be routinely evaluated in the case of Nav1.5 mutations on the VSD.

  11. Functional mapping of the lectin activity site on the β-prism domain of vibrio cholerae cytolysin: implications for the membrane pore-formation mechanism of the toxin.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Paul, Karan; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2013-01-18

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a prominent member in the family of β-barrel pore-forming toxins. It induces lysis of target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β-barrel channels. VCC also exhibits prominent lectin-like activity in interacting with β1-galactosyl-terminated glycoconjugates. Apart from the cytolysin domain, VCC harbors two lectin-like domains: the β-Trefoil and the β-Prism domains; however, precise contribution of these domains in the lectin property of VCC is not known. Also, role(s) of these lectin-like domains in the mode of action of VCC remain obscure. In the present study, we show that the β-Prism domain of VCC acts as the structural scaffold to determine the lectin activity of the protein toward β1-galactosyl-terminated glycoconjugates. Toward exploring the physiological implication of the β-Prism domain, we demonstrate that the presence of the β-Prism domain-mediated lectin activity is crucial for an efficient interaction of the toxin toward the target cells. Our results also suggest that such lectin activity may act to regulate the oligomerization ability of the membrane-bound VCC toxin. Based on the data presented here, and also consistent with the existing structural information, we propose a novel mechanism of regulation imposed by the β-Prism domain's lectin activity, implicated in the process of membrane pore formation by VCC.

  12. Selective Removal of FG Repeat Domains from the Nuclear Pore Complex by Enterovirus 2A(pro).

    PubMed

    Park, Nogi; Schweers, Nicholas J; Gustin, Kurt E

    2015-11-01

    Enteroviruses proteolyze nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (Nups) during infection, leading to disruption of host nuclear transport pathways and alterations in nuclear permeability. To better understand how enteroviruses exert these effects on nuclear transport, the mechanisms and consequences of Nup98 proteolysis were examined. The results indicate that Nup98 is rapidly targeted for degradation following enterovirus infection and that this is mediated by the enterovirus 2A protease (2A(pro)). Incubation of bacterially expressed or in vitro-translated Nup98 with 2A(pro) results in proteolytic cleavage at multiple sites in vitro, indicating that 2A(pro) cleaves Nup98 directly. Site-directed mutagenesis of putative cleavage sites identified Gly374 and Gly552 as the sites of 2A(pro) proteolysis in Nup98 in vitro and in infected cells. Indirect immunofluorescence assays using an antibody that recognizes the N terminus of Nup98 revealed that proteolysis releases the N-terminal FG-rich region from the NPC. In contrast, similar analyses using an antibody to the C terminus indicated that this region is retained at the nuclear rim. Nup88, a core NPC component that serves as a docking site for Nup98, also remains at the NPC in infected cells. These findings support a model whereby the selective removal of Nup FG repeat domains leads to increased NPC permeability and inhibition of certain transport pathways, while retention of structural domains maintains the overall NPC structure and leaves other transport pathways unaffected. Enteroviruses are dependent upon host nuclear RNA binding proteins for efficient replication. This study examines the mechanisms responsible for alterations in nuclear transport in enterovirus-infected cells that lead to the cytoplasmic accumulation of these proteins. The results demonstrate that the enterovirus 2A protease directly cleaves the nuclear pore complex (NPC) protein, Nup98, at amino acid positions G374 and G552 both in vitro and in

  13. The Disulfide Bond Cys255-Cys279 in the Immunoglobulin-Like Domain of Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2 Is Required for Membrane Insertion of Anthrax Protective Antigen Pore

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Kyle; Altiyev, Agamyrat; Puschhof, Jens; Sauter, Roland; Arigi, Emma; Ruiz, Blanca; Peng, Xiuli; Almeida, Igor; Sherman, Michael; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptors act as molecular clamps or switches that control anthrax toxin entry, pH-dependent pore formation, and translocation of enzymatic moieties across the endosomal membranes. We previously reported that reduction of the disulfide bonds in the immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain of the anthrax toxin receptor 2 (ANTXR2) inhibited the function of the protective antigen (PA) pore. In the present study, the disulfide linkage in the Ig domain was identified as Cys255-Cys279 and Cys230-Cys315. Specific disulfide bond deletion mutants were achieved by replacing Cys residues with Ala residues. Deletion of the disulfide bond C255-C279, but not C230-C315, inhibited the PA pore-induced release of the fluorescence dyes from the liposomes, suggesting that C255-C279 is essential for PA pore function. Furthermore, we found that deletion of C255-C279 did not affect PA prepore-to-pore conversion, but inhibited PA pore membrane insertion by trapping the PA membrane-inserting loops in proteinaceous hydrophobic pockets. Fluorescence spectra of Trp59, a residue adjacent to the PA-binding motif in von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain of ANTXR2, showed that deletion of C255-C279 resulted in a significant conformational change on the receptor ectodomain. The disulfide deletion-induced conformational change on the VWA domain was further confirmed by single-particle 3D reconstruction of the negatively stained PA-receptor heptameric complexes. Together, the biochemical and structural data obtained in this study provides a mechanistic insight into the role of the receptor disulfide bond C255-C279 in anthrax toxin action. Manipulation of the redox states of the receptor, specifically targeting to C255-C279, may become a novel strategy to treat anthrax. PMID:26107617

  14. The Disulfide Bond Cys255-Cys279 in the Immunoglobulin-Like Domain of Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2 Is Required for Membrane Insertion of Anthrax Protective Antigen Pore.

    PubMed

    Jacquez, Pedro; Avila, Gustavo; Boone, Kyle; Altiyev, Agamyrat; Puschhof, Jens; Sauter, Roland; Arigi, Emma; Ruiz, Blanca; Peng, Xiuli; Almeida, Igor; Sherman, Michael; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptors act as molecular clamps or switches that control anthrax toxin entry, pH-dependent pore formation, and translocation of enzymatic moieties across the endosomal membranes. We previously reported that reduction of the disulfide bonds in the immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain of the anthrax toxin receptor 2 (ANTXR2) inhibited the function of the protective antigen (PA) pore. In the present study, the disulfide linkage in the Ig domain was identified as Cys255-Cys279 and Cys230-Cys315. Specific disulfide bond deletion mutants were achieved by replacing Cys residues with Ala residues. Deletion of the disulfide bond C255-C279, but not C230-C315, inhibited the PA pore-induced release of the fluorescence dyes from the liposomes, suggesting that C255-C279 is essential for PA pore function. Furthermore, we found that deletion of C255-C279 did not affect PA prepore-to-pore conversion, but inhibited PA pore membrane insertion by trapping the PA membrane-inserting loops in proteinaceous hydrophobic pockets. Fluorescence spectra of Trp59, a residue adjacent to the PA-binding motif in von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain of ANTXR2, showed that deletion of C255-C279 resulted in a significant conformational change on the receptor ectodomain. The disulfide deletion-induced conformational change on the VWA domain was further confirmed by single-particle 3D reconstruction of the negatively stained PA-receptor heptameric complexes. Together, the biochemical and structural data obtained in this study provides a mechanistic insight into the role of the receptor disulfide bond C255-C279 in anthrax toxin action. Manipulation of the redox states of the receptor, specifically targeting to C255-C279, may become a novel strategy to treat anthrax.

  15. Snake acetylcholine receptor: cloning of the domain containing the four extracellular cysteines of the alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Horowitz, M; Kochva, E; Fuchs, S

    1989-01-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) at the neuromuscular junction of elapid snakes binds cholinergic ligands but unlike other muscle AcChoRs does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. Numerous studies indicate that the ligand-binding site of the AcChoR includes cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193 of the alpha subunit. We have previously shown that a synthetic dodecapeptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the Torpedo AcChoR alpha subunit contains the essential elements of the ligand-binding site. In an attempt to elucidate the structural basis for the precise binding properties of snake AcChoR, we sequenced a portion of the snake AcChoR alpha subunit. First, a mouse AcChoR alpha-subunit cDNA probe was used to screen a size-selected snake (Natrix tessellata) genomic library. A genomic clone was isolated and was found to contain sequences homologous to the exon including the first two cysteines (Cys-128 and -142) of AcChoR alpha subunit. The domain of the alpha subunit from Natrix and cobra AcChoR (amino acid residues 119-222), which contains the four extracellular cysteines (128, 142, 192, and 193), was amplified by reverse transcription of mRNA and the polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that the snake alpha subunit contains the two tandem cysteines at positions 192 and 193, resembling all other AcChoR alpha subunits. Sequence comparison revealed that the cloned region of the snake alpha subunit is highly homologous (75-80%) to other muscle AcChoRs and not to neuronal AcChoR, which also does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. In the presumed ligand-binding site, in the vicinity of Cys-192 and Cys-193, four major substitutions occur in the snake sequence--at positions 184 (Trp----Phe), 185 (Lys----Trp), 187 (Trp----Ser), and 194 (Pro----Leu). In addition, Asn-189 is a putative N-glycosylation site, present only in the snake. These changes, or part of them, may explain the lack of alpha-bungarotoxin-binding to snake Ac

  16. Snake acetylcholine receptor: cloning of the domain containing the four extracellular cysteines of the alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Horowitz, M; Kochva, E; Fuchs, S

    1989-09-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) at the neuromuscular junction of elapid snakes binds cholinergic ligands but unlike other muscle AcChoRs does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. Numerous studies indicate that the ligand-binding site of the AcChoR includes cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193 of the alpha subunit. We have previously shown that a synthetic dodecapeptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the Torpedo AcChoR alpha subunit contains the essential elements of the ligand-binding site. In an attempt to elucidate the structural basis for the precise binding properties of snake AcChoR, we sequenced a portion of the snake AcChoR alpha subunit. First, a mouse AcChoR alpha-subunit cDNA probe was used to screen a size-selected snake (Natrix tessellata) genomic library. A genomic clone was isolated and was found to contain sequences homologous to the exon including the first two cysteines (Cys-128 and -142) of AcChoR alpha subunit. The domain of the alpha subunit from Natrix and cobra AcChoR (amino acid residues 119-222), which contains the four extracellular cysteines (128, 142, 192, and 193), was amplified by reverse transcription of mRNA and the polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that the snake alpha subunit contains the two tandem cysteines at positions 192 and 193, resembling all other AcChoR alpha subunits. Sequence comparison revealed that the cloned region of the snake alpha subunit is highly homologous (75-80%) to other muscle AcChoRs and not to neuronal AcChoR, which also does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. In the presumed ligand-binding site, in the vicinity of Cys-192 and Cys-193, four major substitutions occur in the snake sequence--at positions 184 (Trp----Phe), 185 (Lys----Trp), 187 (Trp----Ser), and 194 (Pro----Leu). In addition, Asn-189 is a putative N-glycosylation site, present only in the snake. These changes, or part of them, may explain the lack of alpha-bungarotoxin-binding to snake AcChoR.

  17. Cloning, Functional Characterization, and Mode of Action of a Novel Insecticidal Pore-Forming Toxin, Sphaericolysin, Produced by Bacillus sphaericus▿

    PubMed Central

    Nishiwaki, Hisashi; Nakashima, Kenta; Ishida, Chiharu; Kawamura, Tadayuki; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2007-01-01

    An insecticidal protein produced by Bacillus sphaericus A3-2 was purified to elucidate its structure and mode of action. The active principle purified from the culture broth of A3-2 was a protein with a molecular mass of 53 kDa that rapidly intoxicated German cockroaches (Blattela germanica) at a dose of about 100 ng when injected. The insecticidal protein sphaericolysin possessed the undecapeptide motif of cholesterol-dependent cytolysins and had a unique N-terminal sequence. The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli was equally as potent as the native protein. Sphaericolysin-induced hemolysis resulted from the protein's pore-forming action. This activity as well as the insecticidal activity was markedly reduced by a Y159A mutation. Also, coapplication of sphaericolysin with cholesterol abolished the insecticidal action, suggesting that cholesterol binding plays an important role in insecticidal activity. Sphaericolysin-lysed neurons dissociated from the thoracic ganglia of the German cockroaches. In addition, sphaericolysin's activity in ganglia was suppressed by the Y159A mutation. The sphaericolysin-induced damage to the cockroach ganglia was greater than the damage to the ganglia of common cutworms (Spodoptera litura), which accounts, at least in part, for the higher sensitivity to sphaericolysin displayed by the cockroaches than that displayed by cutworms. PMID:17400778

  18. Interaction between permeation and gating in a putative pore domain mutant in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z R; McDonough, S I; McCarty, N A

    2000-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel with distinctive kinetics. At the whole-cell level, CFTR currents in response to voltage steps are time independent for wild type and for the many mutants reported so far. Single channels open for periods lasting up to tens of seconds; the openings are interrupted by brief closures at hyperpolarized, but not depolarized, potentials. Here we report a serine-to-phenylalanine mutation (S1118F) in the 11th transmembrane domain that confers voltage-dependent, single-exponential current relaxations and moderate inward rectification of the macroscopic currents upon expression in Xenopus oocytes. At steady state, the S1118F-CFTR single-channel conductance rectifies, corresponding to the whole-cell rectification. In addition, the open-channel burst duration is decreased 10-fold compared with wild-type channels. S1118F-CFTR currents are blocked in a voltage-dependent manner by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC); the affinity of S1118F-CFTR for DPC is similar to that of the wild-type channel, but blockade exhibits moderately reduced voltage dependence. Selectivity of the channel to a range of anions is also affected by this mutation. Furthermore, the permeation properties change during the relaxations, which suggests that there is an interaction between gating and permeation in this mutant. The existence of a mutation that confers voltage dependence upon CFTR currents and that changes kinetics and permeation properties of the channel suggests a functional role for the 11th transmembrane domain in the pore in the wild-type channel. PMID:10866956

  19. Numerical and Experimental Pore-scale Analyses of Inert and Reactive Multiple Colloidal Particles in Complex Flow Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basagaoglu, H.; Succi, S.; Melchionna, S.; Allwein, S.; Dixon, H.

    2008-12-01

    A fluctuating lattice-Boltzmann model was developed to simulate pore-scale flow and transport of multiple particles in geometrically complex porous and fractured domains. The model is based on the original work of Ladd [J. Fluid Mech., 271, 285, 1994] and the modeling approach based on the virtual intraparticle fluid nodes as proposed by Ding and Aidun [J. Stat. Phys., 112, 685, 2003]. The model has been improved by introducing two-body electrostatic and van der Waals potentials. Moreover, the commonly used bounce-back algorithm to simulate no-slip conditions has been replaced by an immersed boundary condition to simulate softer particle-wall interactions. The simulation results captured the wall and inertial effects on trajectories of a single particle in different Reynolds number flows in smooth-walled channels, consistent with earlier numerical simulation results. Multiple-particle simulations in porous and fractured domains captured trains of particles crossing multiple streamlines in fast-flow paths and lagged particles in slow-flow paths as has been observed in our experiments and reported in the literature. Experimental studies are focused on two-dimensional flow for three microflow cell geometries and use monodispersed particles in dense and dilute concentrations. The average particle sizes are 2, 10 and 30 microns, and the interaction between particle surfaces is controlled by the use of surfactants. Three two- dimensional flow cells with a 50 to 500 micron width have been manufactured to evaluate scale effects. Preliminary results are available for the flow of 2 micron poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) [PLGA] microspheres dispersed in polyvinyl alcohol solution (PVA) in a 500-micron tube with inline flow obstruction with dilute and concentrated solutions. These results demonstrate particle streamlines and show particle-particle and particle-wall interactions. The experimental findings are compared with simulation results.

  20. Identification of two-pore domain potassium channels as potent modulators of osmotic volume regulation in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Andronic, Joseph; Bobak, Nicole; Bittner, Stefan; Ehling, Petra; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Herrmann, Alexander M; Zimmermann, Heiko; Sauer, Markus; Wiendl, Heinz; Budde, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G; Sukhorukov, Vladimir L

    2013-02-01

    Many functions of T lymphocytes are closely related to cell volume homeostasis and regulation, which utilize a complex network of membrane channels for anions and cations. Among the various potassium channels, the voltage-gated K(V)1.3 is well known to contribute greatly to the osmoregulation and particularly to the potassium release during the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) of T cells faced with hypotonic environment. Here we address a putative role of the newly identified two-pore domain (K(2P)) channels in the RVD of human CD4(+) T lymphocytes, using a series of potent well known channel blockers. In the present study, the pharmacological profiles of RVD inhibition revealed K(2P)5.1 and K(2P)18.1 as the most important K(2P) channels involved in the RVD of both naïve and stimulated T cells. The impact of chemical inhibition of K(2P)5.1 and K(2P)18.1 on the RVD was comparable to that of K(V)1.3. K(2P)9.1 also notably contributed to the RVD of T cells but the extent of this contribution and its dependence on the activation status could not be unambiguously resolved. In summary, our data provide first evidence that the RVD-related potassium efflux from human T lymphocytes relies on K(2P) channels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Structure of the C-terminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup133, a component of the nuclear pore complex

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Gheyi, Tarun; Miller, Stacy A.; Bain, Kevin T.; Dickey, Mark; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Kim, Seung Joong; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Martel, Anne; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-10-23

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), responsible for the nucleo-cytoplasmic exchange of proteins and nucleic acids, are dynamic macromolecular assemblies forming an eight-fold symmetric co-axial ring structure. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) NPCs are made up of at least 456 polypeptide chains of {approx}30 distinct sequences. Many of these components (nucleoporins, Nups) share similar structural motifs and form stable subcomplexes. We have determined a high-resolution crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of yeast Nup133 (ScNup133), a component of the heptameric Nup84 subcomplex. Expression tests yielded ScNup133(944-1157) that produced crystals diffracting to 1.9{angstrom} resolution. ScNup133(944-1157) adopts essentially an all {alpha}-helical fold, with a short two stranded {beta}-sheet at the C-terminus. The 11 {alpha}-helices of ScNup133(944-1157) form a compact fold. In contrast, the previously determined structure of human Nup133(934-1156) bound to a fragment of human Nup107 has its constituent {alpha}-helices are arranged in two globular blocks. These differences may reflect structural divergence among homologous nucleoporins.

  2. Importance of polarity of the α4-α5 loop residue-Asn(166) in the pore-forming domain of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba toxin: implications for ion permeation and pore opening.

    PubMed

    Juntadech, Thanate; Kanintronkul, Yodsoi; Kanchanawarin, Chalermpol; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba toxin is lethal to mosquito-larvae by forming ion-permeable pores in the target midgut cell membrane. Previously, the polarity of Asn(166) located within the α4-α5 loop composing the Cry4Ba pore-forming domain was shown to be crucial for larvicidal activity. Here, structurally stable-mutant toxins of both larvicidal-active (N166D) and inactive (N166A and N166I) mutants were FPLC-purified and characterized for their relative activities in liposomal-membrane permeation and single-channel formation. Similar to the 65-kDa trypsin-activated wild-type toxin, the N166D bio-active mutant toxin was still capable of releasing entrapped calcein from lipid vesicles. Conversely, the two other bio-inactive mutants showed a dramatic decrease in causing membrane permeation. When the N166D mutant was incorporated into planar lipid bilayers (under symmetrical conditions at 150mM KCl, pH8.5), it produced single-channel currents with a maximum conductance of about 425pS comparable to the wild-type toxin. However, maximum conductances for single K(+)-channels formed by both bio-inactive mutants (N166I and N166A) were reduced to approximately 165-205pS. Structural dynamics of 60-ns simulations of a trimeric α4-α5 pore model in a fully hydrated-DMPC system revealed that an open-pore structure could be observed only for the simulated pores of the wild type and N166D. Additionally, the number of lipid molecules interacting with both wild-type and N166D pores is relatively higher than those of N166A and N166I pores. Altogether, our results further signify that the polarity at the α4-α5 loop residue-Asn(166) is directly involved in ion permeation through the Cry4Ba toxin-induced ionic pore and pore opening at the membrane-water interface.

  3. Characterization of the Pore Structure of Functionalized Calcium Carbonate Tablets by Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy and X-Ray Computed Microtomography.

    PubMed

    Markl, Daniel; Wang, Parry; Ridgway, Cathy; Karttunen, Anssi-Pekka; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Bawuah, Prince; Pääkkönen, Pertti; Gane, Patrick; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Zeitler, J Axel

    2017-06-01

    Novel excipients are entering the market to enhance the bioavailability of drug particles by having a high porosity and, thus, providing a rapid liquid uptake and disintegration to accelerate subsequent drug dissolution. One example of such a novel excipient is functionalized calcium carbonate, which enables the manufacture of compacts with a bimodal pore size distribution consisting of larger interparticle and fine intraparticle pores. Five sets of functionalized calcium carbonate tablets with a target porosity of 45%-65% were prepared in 5% steps and characterized using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and X-ray computed microtomography. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy was used to derive the porosity using effective medium approximations, that is, the traditional and an anisotropic Bruggeman model. The anisotropic Bruggeman model yields the better correlation with the nominal porosity (R(2) = 0.995) and it provided additional information about the shape and orientation of the pores within the powder compact. The spheroidal (ellipsoids of revolution) shaped pores have a preferred orientation perpendicular to the compaction direction causing an anisotropic behavior of the dielectric porous medium. The results from X-ray computed microtomography confirmed the nonspherical shape and the orientation of the pores, and it further revealed that the anisotropic behavior is mainly caused by the interparticle pores. The information from both techniques provides a detailed insight into the pore structure of pharmaceutical tablets. This is of great interest to study the impact of tablet microstructure on the disintegration and dissolution performance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Structure and Organization within the Membrane of the Helices Composing the Pore-Forming Domain of Bacillus thuringiensis δ -Endotoxin are Consistent with an ``Umbrella-Like'' Structure of the Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazit, Ehud; La Rocca, Paolo; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Shai, Yechiel

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of membrane insertion and the structural organization of pores formed by Bacillus thuringiensis δ -endotoxin. We determined the relative affinities for membranes of peptides corresponding to the seven helices that compose the toxin pore-forming domain, their modes of membrane interaction, their structures within membranes, and their orientations relative to the membrane normal. In addition, we used resonance energy transfer measurements of all possible combinatorial pairs of membrane-bound helices to map the network of interactions between helices in their membrane-bound state. The interaction of the helices with the bilayer membrane was also probed by a Monte Carlo simulation protocol to determine lowest-energy orientations. Our results are consistent with a situation in which helices α 4 and α 5 insert into the membrane as a helical hairpin in an antiparallel manner, while the other helices lie on the membrane surface like the ribs of an umbrella (the ``umbrella model''). Our results also support the suggestion that α 7 may serve as a binding sensor to initiate the structural rearrangement of the pore-forming domain.

  5. Asymmetric Cryo-EM Structure of Anthrax Toxin Protective Antigen Pore with Lethal Factor N-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Machen, Alexandra J; Akkaladevi, Narahari; Trecazzi, Caleb; O'Neil, Pierce T; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Qi, Yifei; Dillard, Rebecca; Im, Wonpil; Gogol, Edward P; White, Tommi A; Fisher, Mark T

    2017-09-22

    The anthrax lethal toxin consists of protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor (LF). Understanding both the PA pore formation and LF translocation through the PA pore is crucial to mitigating and perhaps preventing anthrax disease. To better understand the interactions of the LF-PA engagement complex, the structure of the LFN-bound PA pore solubilized by a lipid nanodisc was examined using cryo-EM. CryoSPARC was used to rapidly sort particle populations of a heterogeneous sample preparation without imposing symmetry, resulting in a refined 17 Å PA pore structure with 3 LFN bound. At pH 7.5, the contributions from the three unstructured LFN lysine-rich tail regions do not occlude the Phe clamp opening. The open Phe clamp suggests that, in this translocation-compromised pH environment, the lysine-rich tails remain flexible and do not interact with the pore lumen region.

  6. The Presence of Sterols Favors Sticholysin I-Membrane Association and Pore Formation Regardless of Their Ability to Form Laterally Segregated Domains.

    PubMed

    Pedrera, Lohans; Gomide, Andreza B; Sánchez, Rafael E; Ros, Uris; Wilke, Natalia; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, María E; Itri, Rosangela; Fanani, María Laura; Alvarez, Carlos

    2015-09-15

    Sticholysin I (St I) is a pore-forming toxin (PFT) produced by the Caribbean Sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus belonging to the actinoporin protein family, a unique class of eukaryotic PFT. As for actinoporins, it has been proposed that the presence of cholesterol (Chol) and the coexistence of lipid phases increase binding to the target membrane and pore-forming ability. However, little is known about the role of membrane structure and dynamics (phase state, fluidity, and the presence of lipid domains) on the activity of actinoporins or which regions of the membrane are the most favorable for protein insertion, oligomerization, and eventually pore formation. To gain insight into the role of membrane properties on the functional activity of St I, we studied its binding to monolayers and vesicles of phosphatidylcholine (PC), sphingomyelin (SM), and sterols inducing (ergosterol -Erg and cholesterol -Chol) or not (cholestenone - Cln) membrane phase segregation in liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains. This study revealed that St I binds and permeabilizes with higher efficiency sterol-containing membranes independently of their ability to form domains. We discuss the results in terms of the relevance of different membrane properties for the actinoporins mechanism of action, namely, molecular heterogeneity, specially potentiated in membranes with sterols inducers of phase separation (Chol or Erg) or Cln, a sterol noninducer of phase separation but with a high propensity to induce nonlamellar phase. The role of the Ld phase is pointed out as the most suitable platform for pore formation. In this regard, such regions in Chol-containing membranes seem to be the most favored due to its increased fluidity; this property promotes toxin insertion, diffusion, and oligomerization leading to pore formation.

  7. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the thioesterase domain of the rat fatty acid synthetase.

    PubMed

    Naggert, J; Witkowski, A; Mikkelsen, J; Smith, S

    1988-01-25

    A cloned cDNA containing the entire coding sequence for the long-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolase (thioesterase I) component as well as the 3'-noncoding region of the fatty acid synthetase has been isolated using an expression vector and domain-specific antibodies. The coding region was assigned to the thioesterase I domain by identification of sequences coding for characterized peptide fragments, amino-terminal analysis of the isolated thioesterase I domain and the presence of the serine esterase active-site sequence motif. The thioesterase I domain is 306 amino acids long with a calculated molecular mass of 33,476 daltons; its DNA is flanked at the 5'-end by a region coding for the acyl carrier protein domain and at the 3'-end by a 1,537-base pairs-long noncoding sequence with a poly(A) tail. The thioesterase I domain exhibits a low, albeit discernible, homology with the discrete medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolases (thioesterase II) from rat mammary gland and duck uropygial gland, suggesting a distant but common evolutionary ancestry for these proteins.

  8. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the TIR domain from the Brucella melitensis TIR-domain-containing protein TcpB.

    PubMed

    Alaidarous, Mohammed; Ve, Thomas; Ullah, M Obayed; Valkov, Eugene; Mansell, Ashley; Schembri, Mark A; Sweet, Matthew J; Kobe, Bostjan

    2013-10-01

    In mammals, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved microbial molecular signatures and induce an early innate immune response in the host. TLR signalling is mediated by interactions between the cytosolic TIR (Toll/interleukin-1 receptor) domains of the receptor and the adaptor proteins. Increasingly, it is apparent that pathogens target this interaction via pathogen-expressed TIR-domain-containing proteins to modulate immune responses. A TIR-domain-containing protein TcpB has been reported in the pathogenic bacterium Brucella melitensis. Studies have shown that TcpB interferes with the TLR2 and TLR4 signalling pathways to inhibit TLR-mediated inflammatory responses. Such interference may involve TIR-TIR-domain interactions between bacterial and mammalian proteins, but there is a lack of information about these interactions at the molecular level. In this study, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the protein construct corresponding to the TIR domain of TcpB (residues 120-250) are reported. The crystals diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution, have the symmetry of the monoclinic space group P2₁ and are most likely to contain four molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure should help in understanding the molecular basis of how TcpB affects the innate immunity of the host.

  9. Cloning and sequence analysis of an Ophiophagus hannah cDNA encoding a precursor of two natriuretic peptide domains.

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Guoyu; Jiang, Ping; He, Yingying; Lee, Wenhui; Zhang, Yun

    2011-04-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) is the largest venomous snake. Despite the components are mainly neurotoxins, the venom contains several proteins affecting blood system. Natriuretic peptide (NP), one of the important components of snake venoms, could cause local vasodilatation and a promoted capillary permeability facilitating a rapid diffusion of other toxins into the prey tissues. Due to the low abundance, it is hard to purify the snake venom NPs. The cDNA cloning of the NPs become a useful approach. In this study, a 957 bp natriuretic peptide-encoding cDNA clone was isolated from an O. hannah venom gland cDNA library. The open-reading frame of the cDNA encodes a 210-amino acid residues precursor protein named Oh-NP. Oh-NP has a typical signal peptide sequence of 26 amino acid residues. Surprisingly, Oh-NP has two typical NP domains which consist of the typical sequence of 17-residue loop of CFGXXDRIGC, so it is an unusual NP precursor. These two NP domains share high amino acid sequence identity. In addition, there are two homologous peptides of unknown function within the Oh-NP precursor. To our knowledge, Oh-NP is the first protein precursor containing two NP domains. It might belong to another subclass of snake venom NPs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of molecular chaperones and TPR-domain proteins in the cytoplasmic transport of steroid receptors and their passage through the nuclear pore.

    PubMed

    Galigniana, Mario D; Echeverría, Pablo C; Erlejman, Alejandra G; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of hormone, corticosteroid receptors such as GR (glucocorticoid receptor) and (mineralocorticoid receptor) are primarily located in the cytoplasm. Upon steroid-binding, they rapidly accumulate in the nucleus. Regardless of their primary location, these receptors and many other nuclear factors undergo a constant and dynamic nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. All members of the steroid receptor family are known to form large oligomeric structures with the heat-shock proteins of 90-kDa (hsp90) and 70-kDa (hsp70), the small acidic protein p23, and a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) -domain protein such as FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs), cyclophilins (CyPs) or the serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5). It has always been stated that the dissociation of the chaperone heterocomplex (a process normally referred to as receptor "transformation") is the first step that permits the nuclear import of steroid receptors. However the experimental evidence is consistent with a model where the chaperone machinery is required for the retrotransport of the receptor through the cytoplasm and also facilitates the passage through the nuclear pore. Recent evidence indicates that the hsp90-based chaperone system also interacts with structures of the nuclear pore such as importin β and the integral nuclear pore glycoprotein Nup62 facilitating the passage of the untransformed receptor through the nuclear pore.

  11. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction crystallographic study of human synaptotagmin 5 C2A domain.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaoting; Huang, Kai; Liu, Yiwei; Zhang, Xiao; Gao, Yongxiang

    2011-11-01

    Synaptotagmin acts as the Ca(2+) sensor for neural and endocrine exocytosis. Synaptotagmin 5 has been demonstrated to play a key role in the acquisition of cathepsin D and the vesicular proton ATPase and in Ca(2+)-dependent insulin exocytosis. The C2 domains modulate the interaction of synaptotagmin with the phospholipid bilayer of the presynaptic terminus and effector proteins such as the SNARE complex. This study reports the cloning, expression in Escherichia coli, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the C2A domain of human synaptotagmin 5 with an N-terminal His(6) tag. The crystals diffracted to 1.90 Å resolution and belonged to the hexagonal space group P6(5), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 93.97, c = 28.05 Å. A preliminary model of the protein structure has been built and refinement of the model is ongoing. © 2011 International Union of Crystallography. All rights reserved.

  12. Neutralization of a single arginine residue gates open a two-pore domain, alkali-activated K+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; González-Nilo, Fernando D.; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Wendy; Cid, L. Pablo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V.

    2007-01-01

    Potassium channels share a common selectivity filter that determines the conduction characteristics of the pore. Diversity in K+ channels is given by how they are gated open. TASK-2, TALK-1, and TALK-2 are two-pore region (2P) KCNK K+ channels gated open by extracellular alkalinization. We have explored the mechanism for this alkalinization-dependent gating using molecular simulation and site-directed mutagenesis followed by functional assay. We show that the side chain of a single arginine residue (R224) near the pore senses pH in TASK-2 with an unusual pKa of 8.0, a shift likely due to its hydrophobic environment. R224 would block the channel through an electrostatic effect on the pore, a situation relieved by its deprotonation by alkalinization. A lysine residue in TALK-2 fulfills the same role but with a largely unchanged pKa, which correlates with an environment that stabilizes its positive charge. In addition to suggesting unified alkaline pH-gating mechanisms within the TALK subfamily of channels, our results illustrate in a physiological context the principle that hydrophobic environment can drastically modulate the pKa of charged amino acids within a protein. PMID:17197424

  13. Neutralization of a single arginine residue gates open a two-pore domain, alkali-activated K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Wendy; Cid, L Pablo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V

    2007-01-09

    Potassium channels share a common selectivity filter that determines the conduction characteristics of the pore. Diversity in K+ channels is given by how they are gated open. TASK-2, TALK-1, and TALK-2 are two-pore region (2P) KCNK K+ channels gated open by extracellular alkalinization. We have explored the mechanism for this alkalinization-dependent gating using molecular simulation and site-directed mutagenesis followed by functional assay. We show that the side chain of a single arginine residue (R224) near the pore senses pH in TASK-2 with an unusual pKa of 8.0, a shift likely due to its hydrophobic environment. R224 would block the channel through an electrostatic effect on the pore, a situation relieved by its deprotonation by alkalinization. A lysine residue in TALK-2 fulfills the same role but with a largely unchanged pKa, which correlates with an environment that stabilizes its positive charge. In addition to suggesting unified alkaline pH-gating mechanisms within the TALK subfamily of channels, our results illustrate in a physiological context the principle that hydrophobic environment can drastically modulate the pKa of charged amino acids within a protein.

  14. Triatoma infestans Calreticulin: Gene Cloning and Expression of a Main Domain That Interacts with the Host Complement System.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Katherine; Collazo, Norberto; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Molina, María Carmen; Rosas, Carlos; Peña, Jaime; Pizarro, Javier; Maldonado, Ismael; Cattan, Pedro E; Apt, Werner; Ferreira, Arturo

    2017-02-08

    Triatoma infestans is an important hematophagous vector of Chagas disease, a neglected chronic illness affecting approximately 6 million people in Latin America. Hematophagous insects possess several molecules in their saliva that counteract host defensive responses. Calreticulin (CRT), a multifunctional protein secreted in saliva, contributes to the feeding process in some insects. Human CRT (HuCRT) and Trypanosoma cruzi CRT (TcCRT) inhibit the classical pathway of complement activation, mainly by interacting through their central S domain with complement component C1. In previous studies, we have detected CRT in salivary gland extracts from T. infestans We have called this molecule TiCRT. Given that the S domain is responsible for C1 binding, we have tested its role in the classical pathway of complement activation in vertebrate blood. We have cloned and characterized the complete nucleotide sequence of CRT from T. infestans, and expressed its S domain. As expected, this S domain binds to human C1 and, as a consequence, it inhibits the classical pathway of complement, at its earliest stage of activation, namely the generation of C4b. Possibly, the presence of TiCRT in the salivary gland represents an evolutionary adaptation in hematophagous insects to control a potential activation of complement proteins, present in the massive blood meal that they ingest, with deleterious consequences at least on the anterior digestive tract of these insects.

  15. Structural refinement of the hERG1 pore and voltage-sensing domains with ROSETTA-membrane and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Subbotina, Julia; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Lees-Miller, James; Durdagi, Serdar; Guo, Jiqing; Duff, Henry J; Noskov, Sergei Yu

    2010-11-01

    The hERG1 gene (Kv11.1) encodes a voltage-gated potassium channel. Mutations in this gene lead to one form of the Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) in humans. Promiscuous binding of drugs to hERG1 is known to alter the structure/function of the channel leading to an acquired form of the LQTS. Expectably, creation and validation of reliable 3D model of the channel have been a key target in molecular cardiology and pharmacology for the last decade. Although many models were built, they all were limited to pore domain. In this work, a full model of the hERG1 channel is developed which includes all transmembrane segments. We tested a template-driven de-novo design with ROSETTA-membrane modeling using side-chain placements optimized by subsequent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Although backbone templates for the homology modeled parts of the pore and voltage sensors were based on the available structures of KvAP, Kv1.2 and Kv1.2-Kv2.1 chimera channels, the missing parts are modeled de-novo. The impact of several alignments on the structure of the S4 helix in the voltage-sensing domain was also tested. Herein, final models are evaluated for consistency to the reported structural elements discovered mainly on the basis of mutagenesis and electrophysiology. These structural elements include salt bridges and close contacts in the voltage-sensor domain; and the topology of the extracellular S5-pore linker compared with that established by toxin foot-printing and nuclear magnetic resonance studies. Implications of the refined hERG1 model to binding of blockers and channels activators (potent new ligands for channel activations) are discussed. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. [Cloning and expression of a single human immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable domain with vascular endothelial growth factor binding activity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Heng; Liu, Siguo; Wu, Yi; Zili, M; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Aimin; Chen, Jianquan; Cheng, Guoxiang

    2010-11-01

    In the application of therapeutic antibodies, large molecular weight of antibodies is always a problem that prevents them from penetrating into tissues or binding to antigenic determinants. To overcome this problem, we investigated the function of the heavy chain variable domain of a monoclonal anti-VEGF human IgM antibody derived from the Five-Feature Translocus Mice. We cloned the cDNA of the heavy chain variable domain, which was then inserted into pET28a vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. After purification and renaturation of the denatured recombinant protein, we obtained a 16 kDa antibody fragment, which is named as rhVVH. By immunoassaying its VEGF-binding capability in vitro, we proved that rhVVH retains this activity as the complete IgM. Importantly, rhVVH is shown to inhibit the HUVEC cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Our results indicate that the single heavy chain variable domain might inherit part of the biological function of the complete IgM antibody, which provided a valuable potential in further research on antibody miniaturisation.

  17. Russell body inducing threshold depends on the variable domain sequences of individual human IgG clones and the cellular protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stoops, Janelle; Byrd, Samantha; Hasegawa, Haruki

    2012-10-01

    Russell bodies are intracellular aggregates of immunoglobulins. Although the mechanism of Russell body biogenesis has been extensively studied by using truncated mutant heavy chains, the importance of the variable domain sequences in this process and in immunoglobulin biosynthesis remains largely unknown. Using a panel of structurally and functionally normal human immunoglobulin Gs, we show that individual immunoglobulin G clones possess distinctive Russell body inducing propensities that can surface differently under normal and abnormal cellular conditions. Russell body inducing predisposition unique to each immunoglobulin G clone was corroborated by the intrinsic physicochemical properties encoded in the heavy chain variable domain/light chain variable domain sequence combinations that define each immunoglobulin G clone. While the sequence based intrinsic factors predispose certain immunoglobulin G clones to be more prone to induce Russell bodies, extrinsic factors such as stressful cell culture conditions also play roles in unmasking Russell body propensity from immunoglobulin G clones that are normally refractory to developing Russell bodies. By taking advantage of heterologous expression systems, we dissected the roles of individual subunit chains in Russell body formation and examined the effect of non-cognate subunit chain pair co-expression on Russell body forming propensity. The results suggest that the properties embedded in the variable domain of individual light chain clones and their compatibility with the partnering heavy chain variable domain sequences underscore the efficiency of immunoglobulin G biosynthesis, the threshold for Russell body induction, and the level of immunoglobulin G secretion. We propose that an interplay between the unique properties encoded in variable domain sequences and the state of protein homeostasis determines whether an immunoglobulin G expressing cell will develop the Russell body phenotype in a dynamic cellular setting.

  18. [Cloning, expression and immunodiagnostic analysis of Schistosoma japonicum calcium-binding EF-hand domain containing protein].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Xu, Bin; Ju, Chuan; Mo, Xiao-Jin; Chen, Shen-Bo; Feng, Zheng; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Hu, Wei

    2012-06-30

    To clone and expression Schistosoma japonicum calcium-binding EF-hand domain containing protein (SjEFCAB), purify the expressed protein, and evaluate its antigenicity and diagnostic value. The positive clone screened from egg cDNA library was used as template to amplify the SjEFCAB gene by PCR. The target fragment was cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-1. The positive recombinant plasmids were transformed into E.coli BL21 and induced by IPTG for expression of the protein. The recombinant protein was purified with GST-tag affinity chromatography. Western blotting was used to analyze the antigenicity. The purified protein was used as coating antigen for indirect ELISA to evaluate its diagnostic effect. Serum samples from patients with schistosomiasis japonica (78 cases), clonorchiasis sinensis (5 cases), cysticercosis (10 cases), paragonimiasis westermani (6 cases), trichinosis (9 cases) and healthy persons (50 cases) were examined. The recombinant plasmid pGEX-4T-1-SjEFCAB was constructed and the SjEFCAB recombinant protein (Mr 8 200) was expressed in E. coli. The soluble fusion protein was purified with affinity chromatography. Western blotting analysis showed that the recombinant protein was recognized by sera of infected rabbits and pooled sera of schistosomiasis japonica patients. The sensitivity and specificity of ELISA for diagnosis of schistosomiasis japonica were 82.1% (64/78) and 95.0% (76/80), respectively. The cross reaction with sera of clonorchiasis sinensis, cysticercosis, and trichinosis patients were 1/5, 1/10, and 1/9, respectively. There was no cross reaction with sera of paragonimiasis westermani patients. The recombinant SjEFCAB antigen has potential diagnostic value for schistosomiasis japonica.

  19. Single-channel SCAM Identifies Pore-lining Residues in the First Extracellular Loop and First Transmembrane Domains of Cx46 Hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Kronengold, J.; Trexler, E.B.; Bukauskas, F.F.; Bargiello, T.A.; Verselis, V.K.

    2003-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) channels provide an important pathway for direct intercellular transmission of signaling molecules. Previously we showed that fixed negative charges in the first extracellular loop domain (E1) strongly influence charge selectivity, conductance, and rectification of channels and hemichannels formed of Cx46. Here, using excised patches containing Cx46 hemichannels, we applied the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) at the single channel level to residues in E1 to determine if they are pore-lining. We demonstrate residues D51, G46, and E43 at the amino end of E1 are accessible to modification in open hemichannels to positively and negatively charged methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents added to cytoplasmic or extracellular sides. Positional effects of modification along the length of the pore and opposing effects of oppositely charged modifying reagents on hemichannel conductance and rectification are consistent with placement in the channel pore and indicate a dominant electrostatic influence of the side chains of accessible residues on ion fluxes. Hemichannels modified by MTS-EA+, MTS-ET+, or MTS-ES− were refractory to further modification and effects of substitutions with positively charged residues that electrostatically mimicked those caused by modification with the positively charged MTS reagents were similar, indicating all six subunits were likely modified. The large reductions in conductance caused by MTS-ET+ were visible as stepwise reductions in single-channel current, indicative of reactions occurring at individual subunits. Extension of single-channel SCAM using MTS-ET+ into the first transmembrane domain, TM1, revealed continued accessibility at the extracellular end at A39 and L35. The topologically complementary region in TM3 showed no evidence of reactivity. Structural models show GJ channels in the extracellular gap to have continuous inner and outer walls of protein. If representative of open channels and hemichannels

  20. Autoantibodies from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis preferentially react with the amino-terminal domain of nuclear pore complex glycoprotein gp210.

    PubMed

    Wesierska-Gadek, J; Hohenauer, H; Hitchman, E; Penner, E

    1995-10-01

    Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis frequently develop autoantibodies directed to gp210, a major glycoprotein of the nuclear pore complex. This protein contains a large glycosylated cisternal domain, a single transmembrane segment, and a short cytoplasmic tail. It has been previously shown that autoantibodies from primary biliary cirrhosis patients exclusively react with the cytoplasmic tail. We demonstrate that autoantibodies against gp210 recognize at least two different epitopes. 4 out of 12 anti-gp210 positive sera reacted with the fragment consisting of the cytoplasmic tail, and 8 sera targeted a novel epitope located within the large glycosylated lumenal domain. Moreover, our data prove that carbohydrate moieties are an essential part of this novel epitope. We propose, therefore, that future screening assays should be performed with antigens possessing both epitopes to detect all sera with anti-gp210 specificity.

  1. Peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane protein Mep45 of rumen anaerobe Selenomonas ruminantium forms a non-specific diffusion pore via its C-terminal transmembrane domain

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Seiji; Hayashi, Kanako; Tochigi, Saeko; Kusano, Tomonobu; Kaneko, Jun; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein Mep45 of Selenomonas ruminantium, an anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium, comprises two distinct domains: the N-terminal S-layer homologous (SLH) domain that protrudes into the periplasm and binds to peptidoglycan, and the remaining C-terminal transmembrane domain, whose function has been unknown. Here, we solubilized and purified Mep45 and characterized its function using proteoliposomes reconstituted with Mep45. We found that Mep45 forms a nonspecific diffusion channel via its C-terminal region. The channel was permeable to solutes smaller than a molecular weight of roughly 600, and the estimated pore radius was 0.58 nm. Truncation of the SLH domain did not affect the channel property. On the basis of the fact that Mep45 is the most abundant outer membrane protein in S. ruminantium, we conclude that Mep45 serves as a main pathway through which small solutes diffuse across the outer membrane of this bacterium. PMID:27310312

  2. Crystal structure of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata: implications of domain structure for its membrane pore-formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsuya; Yamasaki, Takayuki; Eto, Seiichiro; Sugawara, Hajime; Kurisu, Genji; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Kusunoki, Masami; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2004-08-27

    CEL-III is a Ca(2+)-dependent and galactose-specific lectin purified from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, which exhibits hemolytic and hemagglutinating activities. Six molecules of CEL-III are assumed to oligomerize to form an ion-permeable pore in the cell membrane. We have determined the crystal structure of CELIII by using single isomorphous replacement aided by anomalous scattering in lead at 1.7 A resolution. CEL-III consists of three distinct domains as follows: the N-terminal two carbohydrate-binding domains (1 and 2), which adopt beta-trefoil folds such as the B-chain of ricin and are members of the (QXW)(3) motif family; and domain 3, which is a novel fold composed of two alpha-helices and one beta-sandwich. CEL-III is the first Ca(2+)-dependent lectin structure with two beta-trefoil folds. Despite sharing the structure of the B-chain of ricin, CEL-III binds five Ca(2+) ions at five of the six subdomains in both domains 1 and 2. Considering the relatively high similarity among the five subdomains, they are putative binding sites for galactose-related carbohydrates, although it remains to be elucidated whether bound Ca(2+) is directly involved in interaction with carbohydrates. The paucity of hydrophobic interactions in the interfaces between the domains and biochemical data suggest that these domains rearrange upon carbohydrate binding in the erythrocyte membrane. This conformational change may be responsible for oligomerization of CEL-III molecules and hemolysis in the erythrocyte membranes.

  3. Cloning, purification and preliminary X-ray analysis of the C-terminal domain of Helicobacter pylori MotB

    SciTech Connect

    Roujeinikova, Anna

    2008-04-01

    The cloning, overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a putative peptidoglycan-binding domain of H. pylori MotB, a stator component of the bacterial flagellar motor, are reported. The C-terminal domain of MotB (MotB-C) contains a putative peptidoglycan-binding motif and is believed to anchor the MotA/MotB stator unit of the bacterial flagellar motor to the cell wall. Crystals of Helicobacter pylori MotB-C (138 amino-acid residues) were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. These crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 50.8, b = 89.5, c = 66.3 Å, β = 112.5°. The crystals diffract X-rays to at least 1.6 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. Self-rotation function and Matthews coefficient calculations suggest that the asymmetric unit contains one tetramer with 222 point-group symmetry. The anomalous difference Patterson maps calculated for an ytterbium-derivative crystal using diffraction data at a wavelength of 1.38 Å showed significant peaks on the v = 1/2 Harker section, suggesting that ab initio phase information could be derived from the MAD data.

  4. Mutation in pore domain uncovers cation- and voltage-sensitive recovery from inactivation in KAT1 channel.

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, A; Gazzarrini, S; Cerana, R; Colombo, R; Sutter, J U; DiFrancesco, D; Gradmann, D; Thiel, G

    2000-01-01

    Effects of threonine substitution by glutamine at position 256 in the pore of the KAT1 channel have been investigated by voltage-clamp, using heterologous gene expression in Xenopus oocytes. The major discrepancy in T256Q from the wild-type channel (wt) was cation specific. While K(+) currents were reduced in a largely scalar fashion, the NH(4)(+) current exhibited slow, voltage-dependent inhibition during hyperpolarization. The same effects could be induced in wt, or intensified in T256Q, by addition of the impermeant cation methylammonium (MA(+)) to the bath. This stresses that both the mutation and MA(+) affect a mechanism already present in the wt. Assuming that current inhibition could be described as entry of the channel into an inactive state, we modeled in both wt and in T256Q the relaxation kinetics of the clamp currents by a C-O-I gating scheme, where C (closed) and I (inactivated) are nonconductive states, and O is an open state allowing K(+) and NH(4)(+) passage. The key reaction is the transition I-O. This cation-sensitive transition step ensures release of the channel from the inactive state and is approximately 30 times smaller in T256Q compared to wt. It can be inhibited by external MA(+) and is stimulated strongly by K(+) and weakly by NH(4)(+). This sensitivity of gating to external cations may prevent K(+) leakage from cation-starved cells. PMID:10733966

  5. Molecular modeling of a tandem two pore domain potassium channel reveals a putative binding site for general anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Bertaccini, Edward J; Dickinson, Robert; Trudell, James R; Franks, Nicholas P

    2014-12-17

    Anesthetics are thought to mediate a portion of their activity via binding to and modulation of potassium channels. In particular, tandem pore potassium channels (K2P) are transmembrane ion channels whose current is modulated by the presence of general anesthetics and whose genetic absence has been shown to confer a level of anesthetic resistance. While the exact molecular structure of all K2P forms remains unknown, significant progress has been made toward understanding their structure and interactions with anesthetics via the methods of molecular modeling, coupled with the recently released higher resolution structures of homologous potassium channels to act as templates. Such models reveal the convergence of amino acid regions that are known to modulate anesthetic activity onto a common three- dimensional cavity that forms a putative anesthetic binding site. The model successfully predicts additional important residues that are also involved in the putative binding site as validated by the results of suggested experimental mutations. Such a model can now be used to further predict other amino acid residues that may be intimately involved in the target-based structure-activity relationships that are necessary for anesthetic binding.

  6. Differential phospholipase C-dependent modulation of TASK and TREK two-pore domain K+ channels in rat thalamocortical relay neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bista, Pawan; Pawlowski, Matthias; Cerina, Manuela; Ehling, Petra; Leist, Michael; Meuth, Patrick; Aissaoui, Ania; Borsotto, Marc; Heurteaux, Catherine; Decher, Niels; Pape, Hans-Christian; Oliver, Dominik; Meuth, Sven G; Budde, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The activity of two-pore domain potassium channels (K2P) regulates the excitability and firing modes of thalamocortical (TC) neurons. In particular, the inhibition of two-pore domain weakly inwardly rectifying K+ channel (TWIK)-related acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channels and TWIK-related K+ (TREK) channels, as a consequence of the stimulation of muscarinic ACh receptors (MAChRs) which are coupled to phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLCβ), induces a shift from burst to tonic firing. By using a whole cell patch-clamp approach, the contribution of the membrane-bound second messenger molecules phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and diacylglycerol (DAG) acting downstream of PLCβ was probed. The standing outward current (ISO) was used to monitor the current through TASK and TREK channels in TC neurons. By exploiting different manoeuvres to change the intracellular PIP2 level in TC neurons, we here show that the scavenging of PIP2 (by neomycin) results in an increased muscarinic effect on ISO whereas increased availability of PIP2 (inclusion to the patch pipette; histone-based carrier) decreased muscarinic signalling. The degree of muscarinic inhibition specifically depends on phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and PIP2 but no other phospholipids (phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine). The use of specific blockers revealed that PIP2 is targeting TREK but not TASK channels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the inhibition of TASK channels is induced by the application of the DAG analogue 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG). Under current clamp conditions the activation of MAChRs and PLCβ as well as the application of OAG resulted in membrane depolarization, while PIP2 application via histone carrier induced a hyperpolarization. These results demonstrate a differential role of PIP2 and DAG in K2P channel modulation in native neurons which allows a fine-tuned inhibition of TREK (via PIP2 depletion) and TASK (via DAG) channels following MACh

  7. The Pore Loop Domain of TRPV1 Is Required for Its Activation by the Volatile Anesthetics Chloroform and Isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Corinna; Luo, Jialie; Yin, Shijin; Hu, Hongzhen; Dhaka, Ajay

    2015-07-01

    The environmental irritant chloroform, a naturally occurring small volatile organohalogen, briefly became the world's most popular volatile general anesthetic (VGA) before being abandoned because of its low therapeutic index. When chloroform comes in contact with skin or is ingested, it causes a painful burning sensation. The molecular basis for the pain associated with chloroform remains unknown. In this study, we assessed the role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family members in mediating chloroform activation and the molecular determinants of VGA activation of TRPV1. We identified the subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that are activated by chloroform. Additionally, we transiently expressed wild-type or specifically mutated TRP channels in human embryonic kidney cells and used calcium imaging or whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to assess the effects of chloroform or the VGA isoflurane on TRP channel activation. The results revealed that chloroform activates DRG neurons via TRPV1 activation. Furthermore, chloroform activates TRPV1, and it also activates TRPM8 and functions as a potent inhibitor of the noxious chemical receptor TRPA1. The results also indicate that residues in the outer pore region of TRPV1 previously thought to be required for either proton or heat activation of the channel are also required for activation by chloroform and isoflurane. In addition to identifying the molecular basis of DRG neuron activation by chloroform and the opposing effects chloroform has on different TRP channel family members, the findings of this study provide novel insights into the structural basis for the activation of TRPV1 by VGAs.

  8. Molecular cloning and tissue distribution of the phosphotyrosine interaction domain containing 1 (PID1) gene in Tianfu goat.

    PubMed

    Xu, Honggang; Xu, Gangyi; Wang, Daihua; Zheng, Chengli; Wan, Lu

    2013-02-15

    Phosphotyrosine interaction domain containing 1 (PID1) is an important mediator in the development of obesity-related insulin resistance in humans and animals. For a better understanding of the structure and function of the PID1 gene and to study its effect in caprine, the cDNA of the PID1 gene from the abdominal muscle of Tianfu goat was cloned and sequenced. The structure of PID1 was analyzed using bioinformatics tools. The results showed that the full sequence of the caprine PID1 cDNA was 896 bp long and contained a 654 bp long coding region that encoded a 217 amino acid sequence. Fifteen phosphorylation sites were predicted in the translated PID1 protein. The protein had a phosphotyrosine-binding domain between Arg(53) and Ile(199). A phylogenic tree based on the PID1 proteins from other species revealed that the caprine protein was closely related to cattle PID1. Fluorescence quantitative PCR analyses revealed that PID1 was expressed in the heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, leg muscle, abdominal muscle and longissimus dorsi muscle of goats. In particular, high expression levels of PID1 were detected in liver and abdominal muscle, and low expression levels were seen in lung. Furthermore, the PID1 mRNA expression levels in the longissimus dorsi muscles increased gradually with the age of the goats (P<0.05). Western blotting results detected the PID1 protein in six of the tissues in which PID1 was shown to be expressed; the two exceptions were liver and spleen. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The blast resistance gene Pi54of cloned from Oryza officinalis interacts with Avr-Pi54 through its novel non-LRR domains.

    PubMed

    Devanna, Navadagi B; Vijayan, Joshitha; Sharma, Tilak R

    2014-01-01

    The dominant rice blast resistance gene Pi54 cloned by map-based cloning approach from indica rice cultivar Tetep confers broad spectrum resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae. In this investigation, an orthologue of Pi54 designated as Pi54of was cloned from Oryza officinalis conferring high degree of resistance to M. oryzae and is functionally validated. We have also characterized the Pi54of protein and demonstrate its interaction with AVR-Pi54 protein. The Pi54of encoded ∼43 kDa small and unique cytoplasmic LRR family of disease resistance protein having unique Zinc finger domain overlapped with the leucine rich repeat regions. Pi54of showed Magnaporthe-induced expression. The phylogenetic and western blot analysis confirmed orthologous nature of Pi54 and Pi54of genes, whereas the identity of protein was confirmed through MALDI-TOF analysis. The in silico analysis showed that Pi54of is structurally more stable than other cloned Pi54 proteins. The molecular docking revealed that Pi54of protein interacts with AVR-Pi54 through novel non-LRR domains such as STI1 and RhoGEF. The STI1 and GEF domains which interact with AVR-Pi54 are also components of rice defensome complex. The Pi54of protein showed differential domain specificity while interacting with the AVR protein. Functional complementation revealed that Pi54of transferred in two rice lines belonging to indica and japonica background imparts enhanced resistance against three highly virulent strains of M. oryzae. In this study, for the first time, we demonstrated that a rice blast resistance gene Pi54of cloned from wild species of rice provides high degree of resistance to M. oryzae and might display different molecular mechanism involved in AVRPi54-Pi54of interaction.

  10. The Blast Resistance Gene Pi54of Cloned from Oryza officinalis Interacts with Avr-Pi54 through Its Novel Non-LRR Domains

    PubMed Central

    Devanna, Navadagi B.; Vijayan, Joshitha; Sharma, Tilak R.

    2014-01-01

    The dominant rice blast resistance gene Pi54 cloned by map-based cloning approach from indica rice cultivar Tetep confers broad spectrum resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae. In this investigation, an orthologue of Pi54 designated as Pi54of was cloned from Oryza officinalis conferring high degree of resistance to M. oryzae and is functionally validated. We have also characterized the Pi54of protein and demonstrate its interaction with AVR-Pi54 protein. The Pi54of encoded ∼43 kDa small and unique cytoplasmic LRR family of disease resistance protein having unique Zinc finger domain overlapped with the leucine rich repeat regions. Pi54of showed Magnaporthe-induced expression. The phylogenetic and western blot analysis confirmed orthologous nature of Pi54 and Pi54of genes, whereas the identity of protein was confirmed through MALDI-TOF analysis. The in silico analysis showed that Pi54of is structurally more stable than other cloned Pi54 proteins. The molecular docking revealed that Pi54of protein interacts with AVR-Pi54 through novel non-LRR domains such as STI1 and RhoGEF. The STI1 and GEF domains which interact with AVR-Pi54 are also components of rice defensome complex. The Pi54of protein showed differential domain specificity while interacting with the AVR protein. Functional complementation revealed that Pi54of transferred in two rice lines belonging to indica and japonica background imparts enhanced resistance against three highly virulent strains of M. oryzae. In this study, for the first time, we demonstrated that a rice blast resistance gene Pi54of cloned from wild species of rice provides high degree of resistance to M. oryzae and might display different molecular mechanism involved in AVRPi54-Pi54of interaction. PMID:25111047

  11. Membrane Partitioning of the Pore-Forming Domain of Colicin A. Role of the Hydrophobic Helical Hairpin

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Ivan L.; Arnulphi, Cristina; Ibáñez de Opakua, Alain; Alonso-Mariño, Marián; Goñi, Félix M.; Viguera, Ana R.

    2013-01-01

    The colicins are bacteriocins that target Escherichia coli and kill bacterial cells through different mechanisms. Colicin A forms ion channels in the inner membranes of nonimmune bacteria. This activity resides exclusively in its C-terminal fragment (residues 387–592). The soluble free form of this domain is a 10 α-helix bundle. The hydrophobic helical hairpin, H8–H9, is buried inside the structure and shielded by eight amphipathic surface helices. The interaction of the C-terminal colicin A domain and several chimeric variants with lipidic vesicles was examined here by isothermal titration calorimetry. In the mutant constructions, natural sequences of the hydrophobic helices H8 and H9 were either removed or substituted by polyalanine or polyleucine. All the constructions fully associated with DOPG liposomes including the mutant that lacked helices H8 and H9, indicating that amphipathic rather than hydrophobic helices were the major determinants of the exothermic binding reactions. Alanine is not specially favored in the lipid-bound form; the chimeric construct with polyalanine produced lower enthalpy gain. On the other hand, the large negative heat capacities associated with partitioning, a characteristic feature of the hydrophobic effect, were found to be dependent on the sequence hydrophobicity of helices H8 and H9. PMID:24047995

  12. Cloning, expression, and immunocharacterization of surface protein containing an altered thrombospondin repeat domain (SPATR) from Plasmodium knowlesi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium knowlesi is the fifth species identified to cause malaria in humans and is often misdiagnosed as Plasmodium malariae due to morphological similarities. The development of an inexpensive, serological detection method utilizing antibodies specific to P. knowlesi would be a valuable tool for diagnosis. However, the identification of specific antigens for these parasites remains a major challenge for generating such assays. In this study, surface protein containing an altered thrombospondin repeat domain (SPATR) was selected as a potentially specific antigen from P. knowlesi. Its multistage expression by sporozoites, asexual erythrocytic forms and gametocytes, along with its possible role in liver cell invasion, suggests that SPATR could be used as a biomarker for diagnosis of P. knowlesi. Methods The spatr gene from P. knowlesi was codon optimized and cloned (pkhspatr). Recombinant pkHSPATR protein was expressed, purified, and evaluated for its sensitivity and specificity in immunoblot and ELISA-based assays for detecting P. knowlesi infection. Results The recombinant pkHSPATR protein allows sensitive detection of human P. knowlesi infection in serum samples by immunoblot and ELISA. Conclusions With further research, recombinant pkHSPATR protein could be exploited as a marker for detection of P. knowlesi infection in humans. Therefore, this finding should contribute to the development of immunodiagnostic assays for the species-specific detection of malaria. PMID:23734702

  13. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the duck TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF) gene.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoqin; Qian, Wei; Sizhu, Suolang; Shi, Lijuan; Jin, Meilin; Zhou, Hongbo

    2016-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) trigger the innate immune response by responding to specific components of microorganisms. The TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF) plays an essential role in mammalian TLR-mediated signaling. The role of TRIF in ducks (duTRIF) remains poorly understood. In this study, we cloned and characterized the full-length coding sequence of duTRIF from duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs). In healthy ducks, duTRIF transcripts were broadly expressed in different tissues, with higher expression levels in the spleen and liver. Using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), we demonstrated the upregulation of duTRIF in DEFs infected with AIV or DTMUV, and DEFs treated with Poly I:C or LPS. Overexpression of duTRIF was able to induce the NF-κB and IFN-β expression. Furthermore, the IFN induction function of duTRIF was impaired when Ala517 was mutated to Pro or His. Taken together, these results suggested that duTRIF regulated duck innate immune responses.

  14. [Cloning and expression of N-terminal protective domain of spaA gene from Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae C43311].

    PubMed

    Nazierbieke, Wulumuhan; Liu, Zhuxiang; Li, Ke; Chen, Yiguang; Borrathybay, Entomack

    2008-02-01

    The spaA gene was amplified by PCR from the genomic DNA of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae C43311 strain, and inserted into the pMD18-T vector and then sequenced. The N-terminal protective domain of the spaA gene was amplified by PCR from the recombinant plasmid pMD18-spaA, then cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-6p-2 and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) by IPTG induction. The expressed protein was identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The sequence analyses showed that the coding region of the spaA gene of C43311 strain was 1881bp in length, and the nucleotide sequence homology of the spaA genes between the C43311 strain and the previously reported different serotype strains of E. rhusiopathiae was 93 to 99%. The SDS-PAGE analyses revealed a single fusion protein band with a molecular weight of 64kDa, and the Western blot results showed that the GST-SpaA-N fusion protein was recognized specifically by an antiserum against the SpaA protein of C43311 strain, suggesting that the fusion protein of GST-SpaA-N possessed high immunoreactivity.

  15. Gating of the two-pore cation channel AtTPC1 in the plant vacuole is based on a single voltage-sensing domain.

    PubMed

    Jaślan, D; Mueller, T D; Becker, D; Schultz, J; Cuin, T A; Marten, I; Dreyer, I; Schönknecht, G; Hedrich, R

    2016-09-01

    The two-pore cation channel TPC1 operates as a dimeric channel in animal and plant endomembranes. Each subunit consists of two homologous Shaker-like halves, with 12 transmembrane domains in total (S1-S6, S7-S12). In plants, TPC1 channels reside in the vacuolar membrane, and upon voltage stimulation, give rise to the well-known slow-activating SV currents. Here, we combined bioinformatics, structure modelling, site-directed mutagenesis, and in planta patch clamp studies to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of voltage-dependent channel gating in TPC1 in its native plant background. Structure-function analysis of the Arabidopsis TPC1 channel in planta confirmed that helix S10 operates as the major voltage-sensing site, with Glu450 and Glu478 identified as possible ion-pair partners for voltage-sensing Arg537. The contribution of helix S4 to voltage sensing was found to be negligible. Several conserved negative residues on the luminal site contribute to calcium binding, stabilizing the closed channel. During evolution of plant TPC1s from two separate Shaker-like domains, the voltage-sensing function in the N-terminal Shaker-unit (S1-S4) vanished.

  16. Targeting two-pore domain K+ channels TREK-1 and TASK-3 for the treatment of depression: a new therapeutic concept

    PubMed Central

    Borsotto, M; Veyssiere, J; Moha ou Maati, H; Devader, C; Mazella, J; Heurteaux, C

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a disease that is particularly frequent, affecting up to 20% of the population in Western countries. The origins of this pathology involve multiple genes as well as environmental and developmental factors leading to a disorder that remains difficult to treat. Several therapies for depression have been developed and these mainly target monoamine neurotransmitters. However, these treatments are not only associated with numerous adverse effects, but they are also ineffective for more than one-third of patients. Therefore, the need to develop new concepts to treat depression is crucial. Recently, studies using knockout mouse models have provided evidence for a crucial role of two members of the two-pore domain potassium channel (K2P) family, tandem P-domain weak inward rectifying K+ (TWIK)-related K+ channel 1 (TREK-1) and TWIK-related acid-sensitive K+ channel 3 (TASK-3) in the pathophysiology of depression. It is believed that TREK-1 and TASK-3 antagonists could lead to the development of new antidepressants. Herein, we describe the discovery of spadin, a natural peptide released from the maturation of the neurotensin receptor-3 (also known as sortilin), which specifically blocks the activity of the TREK-1 channel and displays particular antidepressant properties, with a rapid onset of action and the absence of adverse effects. The development of such molecules may open a new era in the field of psychiatry. PMID:25263033

  17. Interactions of amino terminal domains of Shaker K channels with a pore blocking site studied with synthetic peptides

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Synthetic peptides of the five alternative NH2-terminal sequences of Shaker when applied to the cytoplasmic side of ShB channels that have an NH2-terminal deletion (ShB delta 6-46) block the channel with potencies correlated with the rate of inactivation in the corresponding variant. These peptides share no sequence similarity and yet three out of the five have apparent dissociation constants between 2 and 15 microM, suggesting that the specificity requirements for binding are low. To identify the primary structural determinants required for effective block of ShB delta 6-46, we examined the effects of substitutions made to the 20 residue ShB peptide on association and dissociation rates. Nonpolar residues within the peptide appear to be important in stabilizing the binding through hydrophobic interactions. Substitutions to leucine-7 showed there was a clear correlation between hydrophobicity and the dissociation rate constant (koff) with little effect on the association rate constant (kon). Substituting charged residues for hydrophobic residues within the region 4-8 disrupted binding. Within the COOH-terminal half of the peptide, substitutions that increased the net positive charge increased kon with relatively small changes in koff, suggesting the involvement of long-range electrostatic interactions in increasing the effective concentration of the peptide. Neutralizing charged residues produced small changes in koff. Charges within the region 12-20 act equivalently; alterations which conserved net charge produced little effect on either kon or koff. The results are consistent with this region of the peptide having an extended conformation and suggest that when bound this region makes few contacts with the channel protein and remains relatively unconstrained. Analogous mutations within the NH2-terminal domain of the intact ShB channel produced qualitatively similar effects on blocking and unblocking rates. PMID:8133245

  18. Coupled Motions between Pore and Voltage-Sensor Domains: A Model for Shaker B, a Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Treptow, Werner; Maigret, Bernard; Chipot, Christophe; Tarek, Mounir

    2004-01-01

    A high-resolution crystal structure of KvAP, an archeabacterial voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, complexed with a monoclonal Fab fragment has been recently determined. Based on this structure, a mechanism for the activation (opening) of Kv channels has been put forward. This mechanism has since been criticized, suggesting that the resolved structure is not representative of the family of voltage-gated potassium channels. Here, we propose a model of the transmembrane domain of Shaker B, a well-characterized Kv channel, built by homology modeling and docking calculations. In this model, the positively charged S4 helices are oriented perpendicular to the membrane and localized in the groove between segments S5 and S6 of adjacent subunits. The structure and the dynamics of the full atomistic model embedded in a hydrated lipid bilayer were investigated by means of two large-scale molecular dynamics simulations under transmembrane-voltage conditions known to induce, respectively, the resting state (closed) and the activation (opening) of voltage-gated channels. Upon activation, the model undergoes conformational changes that lead to an increase of the hydration of the charged S4 helices, correlated with an upward translation and a tilting of the latter, concurrently with movements of the S5 helices and the activation gate. Although small, these conformational changes ultimately result in an alteration of the ion-conduction pathway. Our findings support the transporter model devised by Bezanilla and collaborators, and further underline the crucial role played by internal hydration in the activation of the channel. PMID:15454436

  19. Cloning and high level expression of the biologically active extracellular domain of Macaca mulatta CD40 in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shengyun; Wan, Lin; Yang, Hao; Cheng, Jingqiu; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2016-03-01

    The CD40-mediated immune response contributes to a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases. CD40 antagonists have potential as novel therapies for immune disorders. However, the CD40 pathway has not been well characterized in the rhesus monkey Macaca mulatta, which is a valuable animal model for human immune disease. An 834 bp transcript was cloned from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of rhesus monkey using specific primers designed according to the predicted sequence of M. mulatta CD40 (mmCD40) in GenBank. Sequence analysis demonstrated that mmCD40 is highly homologous to human CD40 (hCD40), with an amino acid sequence identity of 94%. Genes encoding the extracellular domain of mmCD40 and the Fc fragment of the hIgG1 were inserted into a pPIC9K plasmid to produce mmCD40Ig by Pichia pastoris. Approximately 15-20 mg of the mmCD40Ig protein with ∼90% purity could be recovered from 1 L of culture. The purified mmCD40Ig protein can form dimers and can specifically bind CD40L-positive cells. Additionally, the mmCD40Ig protein can bind hCD40L protein in phosphate buffered saline and form a stable combination in a size-exclusion chromatography assay using a Superdex 200 column. Moreover, mmCD40Ig is as efficient as M. mulatta CTLA4Ig (mmCTLA4Ig) to suppress Con A-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. Additionally, mmCD40Ig only showed mild immunosuppressive activity in a one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) system. These results suggest that mmCD40Ig secreted by P. pastoris was productive and functional, and it could be used as a tool for pathogenesis and therapies for chronic inflammatory diseases in a M. mulatta model.

  20. C-terminal modulatory domain controls coupling of voltage-sensing to pore opening in Cav1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    Lieb, Andreas; Ortner, Nadine; Striessnig, Jörg

    2014-04-01

    Activity of voltage-gated Cav1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels is required for proper hearing as well as sinoatrial node and brain function. This critically depends on their negative activation voltage range, which is further fine-tuned by alternative splicing. Shorter variants miss a C-terminal regulatory domain (CTM), which allows them to activate at even more negative potentials than C-terminally long-splice variants. It is at present unclear whether this is due to an increased voltage sensitivity of the Cav1.3 voltage-sensing domain, or an enhanced coupling of voltage-sensor conformational changes to the subsequent opening of the activation gate. We studied the voltage-dependence of voltage-sensor charge movement (QON-V) and of current activation (ICa-V) of the long (Cav1.3L) and a short Cav1.3 splice variant (Cav1.342A) expressed in tsA-201 cells using whole cell patch-clamp. Charge movement (QON) of Cav1.3L displayed a much steeper voltage-dependence and a more negative half-maximal activation voltage than Cav1.2 and Cav3.1. However, a significantly higher fraction of the total charge had to move for activation of Cav1.3 half-maximal conductance (Cav1.3: 68%; Cav1.2: 52%; Cav3.1: 22%). This indicated a weaker coupling of Cav1.3 voltage-sensor charge movement to pore opening. However, the coupling efficiency was strengthened in the absence of the CTM in Cav1.342A, thereby shifting ICa-V by 7.2 mV to potentials that were more negative without changing QON-V. We independently show that the presence of intracellular organic cations (such as n-methyl-D-glucamine) induces a pronounced negative shift of QON-V and a more negative activation of ICa-V of all three channels. These findings illustrate that the voltage sensors of Cav1.3 channels respond more sensitively to depolarization than those of Cav1.2 or Cav3.1. Weak coupling of voltage sensing to pore opening is enhanced in the absence of the CTM, allowing short Cav1.342A splice variants to activate at lower voltages

  1. C-Terminal Modulatory Domain Controls Coupling of Voltage-Sensing to Pore Opening in Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, Andreas; Ortner, Nadine; Striessnig, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Activity of voltage-gated Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels is required for proper hearing as well as sinoatrial node and brain function. This critically depends on their negative activation voltage range, which is further fine-tuned by alternative splicing. Shorter variants miss a C-terminal regulatory domain (CTM), which allows them to activate at even more negative potentials than C-terminally long-splice variants. It is at present unclear whether this is due to an increased voltage sensitivity of the Cav1.3 voltage-sensing domain, or an enhanced coupling of voltage-sensor conformational changes to the subsequent opening of the activation gate. We studied the voltage-dependence of voltage-sensor charge movement (QON-V) and of current activation (ICa-V) of the long (Cav1.3L) and a short Cav1.3 splice variant (Cav1.342A) expressed in tsA-201 cells using whole cell patch-clamp. Charge movement (QON) of Cav1.3L displayed a much steeper voltage-dependence and a more negative half-maximal activation voltage than Cav1.2 and Cav3.1. However, a significantly higher fraction of the total charge had to move for activation of Cav1.3 half-maximal conductance (Cav1.3: 68%; Cav1.2: 52%; Cav3.1: 22%). This indicated a weaker coupling of Cav1.3 voltage-sensor charge movement to pore opening. However, the coupling efficiency was strengthened in the absence of the CTM in Cav1.342A, thereby shifting ICa-V by 7.2 mV to potentials that were more negative without changing QON-V. We independently show that the presence of intracellular organic cations (such as n-methyl-D-glucamine) induces a pronounced negative shift of QON-V and a more negative activation of ICa-V of all three channels. These findings illustrate that the voltage sensors of Cav1.3 channels respond more sensitively to depolarization than those of Cav1.2 or Cav3.1. Weak coupling of voltage sensing to pore opening is enhanced in the absence of the CTM, allowing short Cav1.342A splice variants to activate at lower voltages

  2. Structures of the Karyopherins Kap121p and Kap60p Bound to the Nuclear Pore-Targeting Domain of the SUMO Protease Ulp1p.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Hidemi; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-20

    The budding yeast small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protease Ulp1p catalyzes both the processing of newly synthesized SUMO to its mature form and the deconjugation of SUMO from target proteins, thereby regulating a wide range of cellular processes including cell division, DNA repair, DNA replication, transcription, and mRNA quality control. Ulp1p is localized primarily at the nuclear pore complex (NPC) through interactions involving the karyopherins Kap121p and Kap95p-Kap60p heterodimer and a subset of nuclear pore-associated proteins. The sequestration of Ulp1p at the nuclear periphery is crucial for the proper control of protein desumoylation. To gain insights into the role of the karyopherins in regulating the localization of Ulp1p, we have determined the crystal structures of Kap121p and Kap60p bound to the N-terminal non-catalytic domain of Ulp1p that is necessary and sufficient for NPC targeting. Contrary to a previous proposal that Ulp1p is tethered to the transport channel of the NPC through unconventional interactions with the karyopherins, our structures reveal that Ulp1p has canonical nuclear localization signals (NLSs): (1) an isoleucine-lysine-NLS (residues 51-55) that binds to the NLS-binding site of Kap121p, and (2) a classical bipartite NLS (residues 154-172) that binds to the major and minor NLS-binding sites of Kap60p. Ulp1p also binds Kap95p directly, and the Ulp1p-Kap95p binding is enhanced by the importin-β-binding domain of Kap60p. GTP-bound Gsp1p (the yeast Ran ortholog) and the exportin Cse1p cooperate to release Ulp1p from the karyopherins, indicating that the stable sequestration of Ulp1p to the NPC would require a karyopherin-independent mechanism to anchor Ulp1p at the NPC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cloning of the Thermomonospora fusca Endoglucanase E2 Gene in Streptomyces lividans: Affinity Purification and Functional Domains of the Cloned Gene Product

    PubMed Central

    Ghangas, Gurdev S.; Wilson, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Thermomonospora fusca YX grown in the presence of cellulose produces a number of β-1-4-endoglucanases, some of which bind to microcrystalline cellulose. By using a multicopy plasmid, pIJ702, a gene coding for one of these enzymes (E2) was cloned into Streptomyces lividans and then mobilized into both Escherichia coli and Streptomyces albus. The gene was localized to a 1.6-kilobase PvuII-ClaI segment of the originally cloned 3.0-kilobase SstI fragment of Thermomonospora DNA. The culture supernatants of Streptomyces transformants contain a major endoglucanase that cross-reacts with antibody against Thermomonospora cellulase E2 and has the same molecular weight (43,000) as T. fusca E2. This protein binds quickly and tightly to Avicel, from which it can be eluted with guanidine hydrochloride but not with water. It also binds to filter paper but at a slower rate than to Avicel. Several large proteolytic degradation products of this enzyme generated in vivo lose the ability to bind to Avicel and have higher activity on carboxymethyl cellulose than the native enzyme. Other smaller products bind to Avicel but lack activity. A weak cellobiose-binding site not observed in the native enzyme was present in one of the degradation products. In E. coli, the cloned gene produced a cellulase that also binds tightly to Avicel but appeared to be slightly larger than T. fusca E2. The activity of intact E2 from all organisms can be inactivated by Hg2+ ions. Dithiothreitol protected against Hg2+ inactivation and reactivated both unbound and Avicel-bound Hg2+-inhibited E2, but at different rates. Images PMID:16347759

  4. Cloning of the Thermomonospora fusca Endoglucanase E2 gene in Streptomyces lividans: Affinity purification and functional domains of the cloned gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Ghangas, G.S.; Wilson, D.B. )

    1988-10-01

    Thermomonospora fusca YX grown in the presence of cellulose produces a number of {beta}-1-4-endoglucanases, some of which bind to microcrystalline cellulose. By using a multicopy plasmid, pIJ702, a gene coding for one of these enzymes (E2) was cloned into Streptomyces lividans and then mobilized into both Escherichia coli and Streptomyces albus. The gene was localized to a 1.6-kilobase PvuII-ClaI segment of the originally cloned 3.0-kilobase SstI fragment of Thermomonospora DNA. The culture supernatants of Streptomyces transformants contain a major endoglucanase that cross-reacts with antibody against Thermomonospora cellulase E2 and has the same molecular weight (43,000) as T. fusca E2. This protein binds quickly and tightly to Avicel. It also binds to filter paper but at a slower rate than to Avicel. Several large proteolytic degradation products of this enzyme generated in vivo lose the ability to bind to Avicel and have higher activity on carboxymethyl cellulose than the native enzyme. Other smaller products bind to Avicel but lack activity. A weak cellobiose-binding site not observed in the native enzyme was present in one of the degradation products. In E. coli, the cloned gene produced a cellulase that also binds tightly to Avicel but appeared to be slightly larger than T. fusca E2. The activity of intact E2 from all organisms can be inactivated by Hg{sup 2+} ions. Dithiothreitol protected against Hg{sup 2+} inactivation and reactivated both unbound and Avicel-bound Hg{sub 2+}-inhibited E2, but at different rates.

  5. Modulation of cardiac Ca(V)1.2 channels by dihydropyridine and phosphatase inhibitor requires Ser-1142 in the domain III pore loop.

    PubMed

    Erxleben, Christian; Gomez-Alegria, Claudio; Darden, Thomas; Mori, Yasuo; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Armstrong, David L

    2003-03-04

    Dihydropyridine-sensitive, voltage-activated calcium channels respond to membrane depolarization with two distinct modes of activity: short bursts of very short openings (mode 1) or repetitive openings of much longer duration (mode 2). Here we show that both the dihydropyridine, BayK8644 (BayK), and the inhibitor of SerThr protein phosphatases, okadaic acid, have identical effects on the gating of the recombinant cardiac calcium channel, Ca(V)1.2 (alpha(1)C). Each produced identical mode 2 gating in cell-attached patches, and each prevented rundown of channel activity when the membrane patch was excised into ATP-free solutions. These effects required Ser or Thr at position 1142 in the domain III pore loop between transmembrane segments S5 and S6, where dihydropyridines bind to the channel. Mutation of Ser-1142 to Ala or Cys produced channels with very low activity that could not be modulated by either BayK or okadaic acid. A molecular model of Ca(V)1.2 indicates that Ser-1142 is unlikely to be phosphorylated, and thus we conclude that BayK binding stabilizes mode 2 gating allosterically by either protecting a phospho Ser/Thr on the alpha(1)C subunit or mimicking phosphorylation at that site.

  6. Avertin®, but Not Volatile Anesthetics Addressing the Two-Pore Domain K+ Channel, TASK-1, Slows Down Cilia-Driven Particle Transport in the Mouse Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Mermer, Petra; Pfeil, Uwe; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Volatile anesthetics inhibit mucociliary clearance in the airways. The two-pore domain K+ channel, TASK-1, represents one of their molecular targets in that they increase its open probability. Here, we determine whether particle transport speed (PTS) at the mucosal surface of the mouse trachea, an important factor of the cilia-driven mechanism in mucociliary clearance, is regulated by TASK-1. Methodology/Results RT-PCR analysis revealed expression of TASK-1 mRNA in the manually dissected and laser-assisted microdissected tracheal epithelium of the mouse. Effects of anesthetics (isoflurane and Avertin®) and TASK-1 inhibitors (anandamide and A293) on ciliary activity were investigated by assessment of PTS at the mucosal surface of the explanted and opened murine trachea. Neither TASK-1 inhibitors nor isoflurane had any impact on basal and ATP-stimulated PTS. Avertin® reduced basal PTS, and ATP-stimulated PTS decreased in its presence in wild-type (WT) mice. Avertin®-induced decrease in basal PTS persisted in WT mice in the presence of TASK-1 inhibitors, and in two different strains of TASK-1 knockout mice. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that TASK-1 is expressed by the tracheal epithelium but is not critically involved in the regulation of tracheal PTS in mice. Avertin® reduces PTS independent of TASK-1. PMID:27930725

  7. The pungent substances piperine, capsaicin, 6-gingerol and polygodial inhibit the human two-pore domain potassium channels TASK-1, TASK-3 and TRESK.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Leopoldo R; Dawid, Corinna; Beltrán, Madeline; Gisselmann, Guenter; Degenhardt, Katharina; Mathie, Klaus; Hofmann, Thomas; Hatt, Hanns

    2013-01-01

    For a long time, the focus of trigeminal chemoperception has rested almost exclusively on TRP channels. However, two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels have recently been identified as targets for substances associated with typical trigeminal sensations, such as numbing and tingling. In addition, they have been shown to be modulated by several TRP agonists. We investigated whether the pungent substances piperine, capsaicin, 6-gingerol and polygodial have an effect on human K2P channels. For this purpose, we evaluated the effects of these pungent substances on both wild-type and mutant K2P channels by means of two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes. All four pungent substances were found to inhibit the basal activity of TASK-1 (K2P 3.1), TASK-3 (K2P 9.1), and TRESK (K2P 18.1) channels. This inhibitory effect was dose-dependent and, with the exception of polygodial on TASK-1, fully reversible. However, only piperine exhibited an IC50 similar to its reported EC50 on TRP channels. Finally, we observed for TASK-3 that mutating H98 to E markedly decreased the inhibition induced by piperine, capsaicin, and 6-gingerol, but not by polygodial. Our data contribute to the relatively sparse knowledge concerning the pharmacology of K2P channels and also raise the question of whether K2P channels could be involved in the pungency perception of piperine.

  8. The pungent substances piperine, capsaicin, 6-gingerol and polygodial inhibit the human two-pore domain potassium channels TASK-1, TASK-3 and TRESK

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Leopoldo R.; Dawid, Corinna; Beltrán, Madeline; Gisselmann, Guenter; Degenhardt, Katharina; Mathie, Klaus; Hofmann, Thomas; Hatt, Hanns

    2013-01-01

    For a long time, the focus of trigeminal chemoperception has rested almost exclusively on TRP channels. However, two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels have recently been identified as targets for substances associated with typical trigeminal sensations, such as numbing and tingling. In addition, they have been shown to be modulated by several TRP agonists. We investigated whether the pungent substances piperine, capsaicin, 6-gingerol and polygodial have an effect on human K2P channels. For this purpose, we evaluated the effects of these pungent substances on both wild-type and mutant K2P channels by means of two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes. All four pungent substances were found to inhibit the basal activity of TASK-1 (K2P 3.1), TASK-3 (K2P 9.1), and TRESK (K2P 18.1) channels. This inhibitory effect was dose-dependent and, with the exception of polygodial on TASK-1, fully reversible. However, only piperine exhibited an IC50 similar to its reported EC50 on TRP channels. Finally, we observed for TASK-3 that mutating H98 to E markedly decreased the inhibition induced by piperine, capsaicin, and 6-gingerol, but not by polygodial. Our data contribute to the relatively sparse knowledge concerning the pharmacology of K2P channels and also raise the question of whether K2P channels could be involved in the pungency perception of piperine. PMID:24302912

  9. Silencing of the Tandem Pore Domain Halothane-inhibited K+ Channel 2 (THIK2) Relies on Combined Intracellular Retention and Low Intrinsic Activity at the Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Chatelain, Franck C.; Bichet, Delphine; Feliciangeli, Sylvain; Larroque, Marie-Madeleine; Braud, Véronique M.; Douguet, Dominique; Lesage, Florian

    2013-01-01

    The tandem pore domain halothane-inhibited K+ channel 1 (THIK1) produces background K+ currents. Despite 62% amino acid identity with THIK1, THIK2 is not active upon heterologous expression. Here, we show that this apparent lack of activity is due to a unique combination of retention in the endoplasmic reticulum and low intrinsic channel activity at the plasma membrane. A THIK2 mutant containing a proline residue (THIK2-A155P) in its second inner helix (M2) produces K+-selective currents with properties similar to THIK1, including inhibition by halothane and insensitivity to extracellular pH variations. Another mutation in the M2 helix (I158D) further increases channel activity and affects current kinetics. We also show that the cytoplasmic amino-terminal region of THIK2 (Nt-THIK2) contains an arginine-rich motif (RRSRRR) that acts as a retention/retrieval signal. Mutation of this motif in THIK2 induces a relocation of the channel to the plasma membrane, resulting in measurable currents, even in the absence of mutations in the M2 helix. Cell surface delivery of a Nt-THIK2-CD161 chimera is increased by mutating the arginines of the retention motif but also by converting the serine embedded in this motif to aspartate, suggesting a phosphorylation-dependent regulation of THIK2 trafficking. PMID:24163367

  10. Map-based cloning and characterization of BPH29, a B3 domain-containing recessive gene conferring brown planthopper resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Cao, Liming; Zhang, Yuexiong; Cao, Changxiang; Liu, Fang; Huang, Fengkuan; Qiu, Yongfu; Li, Rongbai; Lou, Xiaojin

    2015-09-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) production, essential for global food security, is threatened by the brown planthopper (BPH). The breeding of host-resistant crops is an economical and environmentally friendly strategy for pest control, but few resistance gene resources have thus far been cloned. An indica rice introgression line RBPH54, derived from wild rice Oryza rufipogon, has been identified with sustainable resistance to BPH, which is governed by recessive alleles at two loci. In this study, a map-based cloning approach was used to fine-map one resistance gene locus to a 24kb region on the short arm of chromosome 6. Through genetic analysis and transgenic experiments, BPH29, a resistance gene containing a B3 DNA-binding domain, was cloned. The tissue specificity of BPH29 is restricted to vascular tissue, the location of BPH attack. In response to BPH infestation, RBPH54 activates the salicylic acid signalling pathway and suppresses the jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent pathway, similar to plant defence responses to biotrophic pathogens. The cloning and characterization of BPH29 provides insights into molecular mechanisms of plant-insect interactions and should facilitate the breeding of rice host-resistant varieties. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Molecular structure of bovine Gtl2 gene and DNA methylation status of Dlk1-Gtl2 imprinted domain in cloned bovines.

    PubMed

    Su, Hong; Li, Dongjie; Hou, Xiaohui; Tan, Beibei; Hu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Cui; Dai, Yunping; Li, Ning; Li, Shijie

    2011-08-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is an inefficient process, which is due to incomplete reprogramming of the donor nucleus. DNA methylation of imprinted genes is essential to the reprogramming of the somatic cell nucleus in SCNT. Dlk1-Gtl2 imprinted domain has been widely studied in mouse and human. However, little is known in bovine, possibly because of limited appropriate sequences of bovine. In our study, we first isolated the cDNA sequence and found multiple transcript variants occurred in bovine Gtl2 gene, which was conserved among species. A probably 110-kb-long Dlk1-Gtl2 imprinted domain was detected on bovine chromosome 21. We identified the putative Gtl2 DMR and IG-DMR corresponding to the mouse and human DMRs and assessed the methylation status of the two DMRs and Dlk1 5' promoter in lungs of deceased SCNT bovines that died within 48h after birth and the normal controls. In cloned bovines, Gtl2 DMR exhibited hypermethylation, which was similar to controls. However, the methylation status of IG-DMR and Dlk1 5' promoter in clones was significantly different from controls, with severe loss of methylation in IG-DMR and hypermethylation in the Dlk1 5' promoter region. Our data suggested that abnormal methylation patterns of IG-DMR may lead to the abnormal expression of Gtl2 and Dlk1 5' hypermethylated promoter is associated with the aberrant development of lungs of cloned bovines, which consequently may contribute to the low efficiency of SCNT.

  12. Proximal C-terminal domain of sulphonylurea receptor 2A interacts with pore-forming Kir6 subunits in KATP channels.

    PubMed Central

    Rainbow, Richard D; James, Marian; Hudman, Diane; Al Johi, Mohammed; Singh, Harprit; Watson, Peter J; Ashmole, Ian; Davies, Noel W; Lodwick, David; Norman, Robert I

    2004-01-01

    Functional KATP (ATP-sensitive potassium) channels are hetero-octamers of four Kir6 (inwardly rectifying potassium) channel subunits and four SUR (sulphonylurea receptor) subunits. Possible interactions between the C-terminal domain of SUR2A and Kir6.2 were investigated by co-immunoprecipitation of rat SUR2A C-terminal fragments with full-length Kir6.2 and by analysis of cloned KATP channel function and distribution in HEK-293 cells (human embryonic kidney 293 cells) in the presence of competing rSUR2A fragments. Three maltose-binding protein-SUR2A fusions, rSUR2A-CTA (rSUR2A residues 1254-1545), rSUR2A-CTB (residues 1254-1403) and rSUR2A-CTC (residues 1294-1403), were co-immunoprecipitated with full-length Kir6.2 using a polyclonal anti-Kir6.2 antiserum. A fourth C-terminal domain fragment, rSUR2A-CTD (residues 1358-1545) did not co-immunoprecipitate with Kir6.2 under the same conditions, indicating a direct interaction between Kir6.2 and a 65-amino-acid section of the cytoplasmic C-terminal region of rSUR2A between residues 1294 and 1358. ATP- and glibenclamide-sensitive K+ currents were decreased in HEK-293 cells expressing full-length Kir6 and SUR2 subunits that were transiently transfected with fragments rSUR2A-CTA, rSUR2A-CTC and rSUR2A-CTE (residues 1294-1359) compared with fragment rSUR2A-CTD or mock-transfected cells, suggesting either channel inhibition or a reduction in the number of functional KATP channels at the cell surface. Anti-KATP channel subunit-associated fluorescence in the cell membrane was substantially lower and intracellular fluorescence increased in rSUR2A-CTE expressing cells; thus, SUR2A fragments containing residues 1294-1358 reduce current by decreasing the number of channel subunits in the cell membrane. These results identify a site in the C-terminal domain of rSUR2A, between residues 1294 and 1358, whose direct interaction with full-length Kir6.2 is crucial for the assembly of functional KATP channels. PMID:14672537

  13. Bicarbonate efflux via GABAA receptors depolarizes membrane potential and inhibits two-pore domain potassium channels of astrocytes in rat hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bao-Feng; Xie, Min-Jie; Zhou, Min

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates the functional expression of ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAA-R) in astrocytes. However, it remains controversial in regard to the intracellular Cl− concentration ([Cl−]i) and the functional role of anion-selective GABAA-R in astrocytes. In gramicidin perforated-patch recordings from rat hippocampal CA1 astrocytes, GABA and GABAA-R specific agonist THIP depolarized astrocyte membrane potential (Vm), and the THIP induced currents reversed at the voltages between −75.3 to −78.3 mV, corresponding to a [Cl−]i of 3.1 – 3.9 mM that favors a passive distribution of Cl− anions across astrocyte membrane. Further analysis showed that GABAA-R induced Vm depolarization is ascribed to HCO3− efflux, while a passively distributed Cl− mediates no net flux or influx of Cl-that leads to an unchanged or hyperpolarized Vm. In addition to a rapidly activated GABAA-R current component, GABA and THIP also induced a delayed inward current (DIC) in 63% of astrocytes. The DIC became manifest after agonist withdrawal and enhanced in amplitude with increasing agonist application duration or concentrations. Astrocytic two-pore domain K+ channels (K2Ps), especially TWIK-1, appeared to underlie the DIC, because 1) acidic intracellular pH, as a result of HCO3− efflux, inhibited TWIK-1; 2) the DIC remained in the Cs+ recording solutions that inhibited conventional K+ channels and 3) the DIC was completely inhibited by 1 mM quinine but not by blockers for other cation/anion channels. Altogether, HCO3− efflux through activated GABAA-R depolarizes astrocyte Vm and induces a delayed inhibition of K2Ps K+ channels via intracellular acidification. PMID:22855415

  14. Locomotion Behavior Is Affected by the GαS Pathway and the Two-Pore-Domain K(+) Channel TWK-7 Interacting in GABAergic Motor Neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Gottschling, Dieter-Christian; Döring, Frank; Lüersen, Kai

    2017-05-01

    Adjusting the efficiency of movement in response to environmental cues is an essential integrative characteristic of adaptive locomotion behavior across species. However, the modulatory molecules and the pathways involved are largely unknown. Recently, we demonstrated that in Caenorhabditis elegans, a loss-of-function of the two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channel TWK-7 causes a fast, coordinated, and persistent forward crawling behavior in which five central aspects of stimulated locomotion-velocity, direction, wave parameters, duration, and straightness-are affected. Here, we isolated the reduction-of-function allele cau1 of the C. elegans gene kin-2 in a forward genetic screen and showed that it phenocopies the locomotor activity and locomotion behavior of twk-7(null) animals. Kin-2 encodes the negative regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (KIN-1/PKA). Consistently, we found that other gain-of-function mutants of the GαS-KIN-1/PKA pathway resemble kin-2(cau1) and twk-7(null) in locomotion phenotype. Using the powerful genetics of the C. elegans system in combination with cell type-specific approaches and detailed locomotion analyses, we identified TWK-7 as a putative downstream target of the GαS-KIN-1/PKA pathway at the level of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic D-type motor neurons. Due to this epistatic interaction, we suggest that KIN-1/PKA and TWK-7 may share a common pathway that is probably involved in the modulation of both locomotor activity and locomotion behavior during forward crawling. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. Acid-sensitive TWIK and TASK Two-pore Domain Potassium Channels Change Ion Selectivity and Become Permeable to Sodium in Extracellular Acidification*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liqun; Zhang, Xuexin; Zhou, Min; Chen, Haijun

    2012-01-01

    Two-pore domain K+ channels (K2P) mediate background K+ conductance and play a key role in a variety of cellular functions. Among the 15 mammalian K2P isoforms, TWIK-1, TASK-1, and TASK-3 K+ channels are sensitive to extracellular acidification. Lowered or acidic extracellular pH (pHo) strongly inhibits outward currents through these K2P channels. However, the mechanism of how low pHo affects these acid-sensitive K2P channels is not well understood. Here we show that in Na+-based bath solutions with physiological K+ gradients, lowered pHo largely shifts the reversal potential of TWIK-1, TASK-1, and TASK-3 K+ channels, which are heterologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, into the depolarizing direction and significantly increases their Na+ to K+ relative permeability. Low pHo-induced inhibitions in these acid-sensitive K2P channels are more profound in Na+-based bath solutions than in channel-impermeable N-methyl-d-glucamine-based bath solutions, consistent with increases in the Na+ to K+ relative permeability and decreases in electrochemical driving forces of outward K+ currents of the channels. These findings indicate that TWIK-1, TASK-1, and TASK-3 K+ channels change ion selectivity in response to lowered pHo, provide insights on the understanding of how extracellular acidification modulates acid-sensitive K2P channels, and imply that these acid-sensitive K2P channels may regulate cellular function with dynamic changes in their ion selectivity. PMID:22948150

  16. Protein Kinase A Is Central for Forward Transport of Two-pore Domain Potassium Channels K2P3.1 and K2P9.1*

    PubMed Central

    Mant, Alexandra; Elliott, David; Eyers, Patrick A.; O'Kelly, Ita M.

    2011-01-01

    Acid-sensitive two-pore domain potassium channels (K2P3.1 and K2P9.1) play key roles in both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms, the most fundamental of which is control of resting membrane potential of cells in which they are expressed. These background “leak” channels are constitutively active once expressed at the plasma membrane, and hence tight control of their targeting and surface expression is fundamental to the regulation of K+ flux and cell excitability. The chaperone protein, 14-3-3, binds to a critical phosphorylated serine in the channel C termini of K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 (Ser393 and Ser373, respectively) and overcomes retention in the endoplasmic reticulum by βCOP. We sought to identify the kinase responsible for phosphorylation of the terminal serine in human and rat variants of K2P3.1 and K2P9.1. Adopting a bioinformatic approach, three candidate protein kinases were identified: cAMP-dependent protein kinase, ribosomal S6 kinase, and protein kinase C. In vitro phosphorylation assays were utilized to determine the ability of the candidate kinases to phosphorylate the channel C termini. Electrophysiological measurements of human K2P3.1 transiently expressed in HEK293 cells and cell surface assays of GFP-tagged K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 enabled the determination of the functional implications of phosphorylation by specific kinases. All of our findings support the conclusion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase is responsible for the phosphorylation of the terminal serine in both K2P3.1 and K2P9.1. PMID:21357689

  17. Protein kinase A is central for forward transport of two-pore domain potassium channels K2P3.1 and K2P9.1.

    PubMed

    Mant, Alexandra; Elliott, David; Eyers, Patrick A; O'Kelly, Ita M

    2011-04-22

    Acid-sensitive two-pore domain potassium channels (K2P3.1 and K2P9.1) play key roles in both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms, the most fundamental of which is control of resting membrane potential of cells in which they are expressed. These background "leak" channels are constitutively active once expressed at the plasma membrane, and hence tight control of their targeting and surface expression is fundamental to the regulation of K(+) flux and cell excitability. The chaperone protein, 14-3-3, binds to a critical phosphorylated serine in the channel C termini of K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 (Ser(393) and Ser(373), respectively) and overcomes retention in the endoplasmic reticulum by βCOP. We sought to identify the kinase responsible for phosphorylation of the terminal serine in human and rat variants of K2P3.1 and K2P9.1. Adopting a bioinformatic approach, three candidate protein kinases were identified: cAMP-dependent protein kinase, ribosomal S6 kinase, and protein kinase C. In vitro phosphorylation assays were utilized to determine the ability of the candidate kinases to phosphorylate the channel C termini. Electrophysiological measurements of human K2P3.1 transiently expressed in HEK293 cells and cell surface assays of GFP-tagged K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 enabled the determination of the functional implications of phosphorylation by specific kinases. All of our findings support the conclusion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase is responsible for the phosphorylation of the terminal serine in both K2P3.1 and K2P9.1.

  18. Cloning, overexpression, purification and preliminary X-ray analysis of the protein kinase domain of enhanced disease resistance 1 (EDR1) from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kaljunen, Heidi; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced disease resistance 1 is a member of the Raf-like mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) family that negatively regulates disease resistance, ethylene-induced senescence and programmed cell death in response to both abiotic and biotic stresses. A catalytically inactive form of the EDR1 kinase domain was successfully cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystallization was conducted in the presence of the ATP analogue AMP-PNP. The crystals belonged to space group P3221 and contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.55 Å resolution. PMID:25005098

  19. The complex between SOS3 and SOS2 regulatory domain from Arabidopsis thaliana: cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Barrena, María José; Moreno-Pérez, Sandra; Angulo, Iván; Martínez-Ripoll, Martín; Albert, Armando

    2007-01-01

    The salt-tolerance genes SOS3 (salt overly sensitive 3) and SOS2 (salt overly sensitive 2) regulatory domain of Arabidopsis thaliana were cloned into a polycistronic plasmid and the protein complex was expressed in Escherichia coli, allowing purification to homogeneity in three chromatographic steps. Crystals were grown using vapour-diffusion techniques. The crystals belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.14, b = 57.39, c = 141.90 Å. PMID:17620712

  20. Molecular cloning, genomic structure, and tissue distribution of EW135, a novel chicken egg white protein with group B scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Whayoung; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Asanuma, Hideki; Matsushita, Misao

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 80 proteins are reported to be present in chicken egg white. The major function of egg white proteins isolated so far is to defend the egg yolk against infections. We recently isolated a novel protein termed EW135 from chicken egg white. In this paper, we have determined the complete amino acid sequence of EW135 based on cDNA cloning. EW135 consists of 970 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 17 amino acids. It is composed exclusively of tandem repeats of nine group B scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains separated by eight seven-amino acid peptides. The features of consensus sequences found in the group B SRCR domain were well conserved in EW135. The EW135 gene consists of putative 11 exons, with each SRCR domain being encoded by a single exon. Reverse transcription PCR showed that EW135 is expressed in only the oviduct among the 11 types of tissues tested. EW135 is a second soluble protein belonging to the group B SRCR domain superfamily identified in chickens. One of the important functions of proteins belonging to the group B SRCR domain superfamily is to recognize pathogens in innate immunity. It is, therefore, conceivable that EW135 could be involved in host defense in egg white.

  1. Sequence of a cDNA clone encoding the polysialic acid-rich and cytoplasmic domains of the neural cell adhesion molecule N-CAM.

    PubMed Central

    Hemperly, J J; Murray, B A; Edelman, G M; Cunningham, B A

    1986-01-01

    Purified fractions of the neural cell-adhesion molecule N-CAM from embryonic chicken brain contain two similar polypeptides (Mr, 160,000 and 130,000), each containing an amino-terminal external binding region, a carbohydrate-rich central region, and a carboxyl-terminal region that is associated with the cell. Previous studies indicate that the two polypeptides arise by alternative splicing of mRNAs transcribed from a single gene. We report here the 3556-nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone (pEC208) that encodes 964 amino acids from the carbohydrate and cell-associated domains of the larger N-CAM polypeptide followed by 664 nucleotides of 3' untranslated sequence. The predicted protein sequence contains attachment sites for polysialic acid-containing oligosaccharides, four tandem homologous regions of polypeptide resembling those seen in the immunoglobulin superfamily, and a single hydrophobic sequence that appears to be the membrane-spanning segment. The cytoplasmic domain carboxyl terminal to this segment includes a block of approximately equal to 250 amino acids present in the larger but not in the smaller N-CAM polypeptide. We designate these the ld (large domain) polypeptide and the sd (small domain) polypeptide. The intracellular domains of the ld and sd polypeptides are likely to be critical for cell-surface modulation of N-CAM by interacting in a differential fashion with other intrinsic proteins or with the cytoskeleton. PMID:3458261

  2. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the first two Ig domains from human roundabout 1 (Robo1).

    PubMed

    Morlot, Cecile; Hemrika, Wieger; Romijn, Roland A; Gros, Piet; Cusack, Stephen; McCarthy, Andrew A

    2007-08-01

    Activation of Roundabout 1 (Robo1) by Slit proteins results in axon repulsion from the midline. Robo1 is a large transmembrane receptor expressed on the axon growth cone and the minimal Robo1-binding region required for Slit activation has been mapped to the N-terminal Ig1-2 domains. The cDNA encoding the first two Ig domains of Robo1 has been cloned and the protein has been expressed in HEK293 EBNA-1 mammalian cells. Here, the purification and crystallization conditions of this Robo1 construct are reported. The crystals are orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.8, b = 69.4, c = 103.3 A and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.8 A resolution on beamline ID29 at the ESRF.

  3. KCNKØ: opening and closing the 2-P-domain potassium leak channel entails "C-type" gating of the outer pore.

    PubMed

    Zilberberg, N; Ilan, N; Goldstein, S A

    2001-11-20

    Essential to nerve and muscle function, little is known about how potassium leak channels operate. KCNKØ opens and closes in a kinase-dependent fashion. Here, the transition is shown to correspond to changes in the outer aspect of the ion conduction pore. Voltage-gated potassium (VGK) channels open and close via an internal gate; however, they also have an outer pore gate that produces "C-type" inactivation. While KCNKØ does not inactivate, KCNKØ and VGK channels respond in like manner to outer pore blockers, potassium, mutations, and chemical modifiers. Structural relatedness is confirmed: VGK residues that come close during C-type gating predict KCNKØ sites that crosslink (after mutation to cysteine) to yield channels controlled by reduction and oxidization. We conclude that similar outer pore gates mediate KCNKØ opening and closing and VGK channel C-type inactivation despite their divergent structures and physiological roles.

  4. Expression cloning of a human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor: a structural mosaic of hematopoietin receptor, immunoglobulin, and fibronectin domains

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We report the isolation from a placental library, of two cDNAs that can encode high affinity receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) when expressed in COS-7 cells. The cDNAs are predicted to encode integral membrane proteins of 759 and 812 amino acids in length. The predicted extracellular and membrane spanning sequences of the two clones are identical, as are the first 96 amino acids of their respective cytoplasmic regions. Different COOH termini of 34 or 87 residues are predicted for the two cDNAs, due apparently to alternate splicing. The receptor with the longer cytoplasmic domain is the closest human homologue of the murine G-CSF receptor recently described by Fukunaga et al. (Fukunaga, R., E. Ishizaka-Ikeda, Y. Seto, and S. Nagata. 1990. Cell. 61:341). A hybridization probe derived from the placental G-CSF receptor cDNA detects a approximately 3-kb transcript in RNAs isolated from placenta and a number of lymphoid and myeloid cells. The extracellular region of the G-CSF receptors is composed of four distinct types of structural domains, previously recognized in other cell surface proteins. In addition to the two domains of the HP receptor family-defining region (Patthy, L. 1990. Cell. 61:13) it incorporates one NH2-terminal Ig-like domain, and three additional repeats of fibronectin type III-like domains. The presence of both an NH2-terminal Ig-like domain and multiple membrane-proximal FN3-like domains suggests that the G-CSF receptor may be derived from an ancestral NCAM-like molecule and that the G-CSF receptor may function in some adhesion or recognition events at the cell surface in addition to the binding of G-CSF. PMID:2147944

  5. Cloning, expression and purification of binding domains of lethal factor and protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis in Escherichia coli and evaluation of their related murine antibody.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mehdi; Honari, Hossein; Kooshk, Mohammad Reza Ashrafi

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax is common disease between human and animals caused by Bacillus anthracis. The cell binding domain of protective antigen (PAD4) and the binding domain of lethal factor (LFD1) have high immunogenicity potential and always were considered as a vaccine candidate against anthrax. The aims of this study are cloning and expressing of PAD4 and LFD1 in Escherichia coli, purification of the recombinant proteins and determination of their immunogenicity through evaluating of the relative produced polyclonal antibodies in mice. PAD4 and LFD1 genes were cloned in pET28a(+) vector and expressed in E. coli Bl21(DE3)PlysS. Expression and purification of the two recombinant proteins were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting techniques. The PAD4 and LFD1 were purified using Ni(+)-NTA affinity chromatography (95-98 %), yielding 37.5 and 45 mg/l of culture, respectively. The antigens were injected three times into mice and production of relative antibodies was evaluated by ELISA test. The results showed that both PAD4 and LFD1 are immunogenic, but LFD1 has higher potential to stimulate Murine immune system. With regard to the high level of LFD1 and PAD4 expression and also significant increment in produced polyclonal antibodies, these recombinant proteins can be considered as a recombinant vaccine candidate against anthrax.

  6. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of pseudo death-effector domain of HIPPI, a molecular partner of Huntingtin-interacting protein HIP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Manisha; Majumder, Pritha; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.; Dattagupta, Jiban K.; Sen, Udayaditya

    2006-12-01

    A pseudo death-effector domain (pDED) of HIPPI, a partner of Huntingtin-interacting protein HIP1, has been cloned, overexpressed and crystallized. The crystals of pDED-HIPPI diffracted to 2.2 Å. The formation of a heterodimer between Huntingtin-interacting protein-1 (HIP-1) and its novel partner HIPPI (HIP-1 protein interactor) through their pseudo death-effector domains (pDEDs) is a key step that recruits caspase-8 and initiates apoptosis. This could be one of the pathways by which apoptosis is increased in Huntington’s disease (HD). A construct consisting of the pDED of HIPPI has been cloned and overexpressed as 6NH-tagged protein and purified by Ni–NTA affinity chromatography. Crystals of the pDED of HIPPI were grown in space group P4{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 77.42, c = 33.31 Å and a calculated Matthews coefficient of 1.88 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} (33% solvent content) with two molecules per asymmetric unit.

  7. Two pore domain potassium channels in cerebral ischemia: a focus on K2P9.1 (TASK3, KCNK9)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, members of the two-pore domain potassium channel family (K2P channels) could be shown to be involved in mechanisms contributing to neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia. K2P3.1-/- animals showed larger infarct volumes and a worse functional outcome following experimentally induced ischemic stroke. Here, we question the role of the closely related K2P channel K2P9.1. Methods We combine electrophysiological recordings in brain-slice preparations of wildtype and K2P9.1-/- mice with an in vivo model of cerebral ischemia (transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO)) to depict a functional impact of K2P9.1 in stroke formation. Results Patch-clamp recordings reveal that currents mediated through K2P9.1 can be obtained in slice preparations of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) as a model of central nervous relay neurons. Current characteristics are indicative of K2P9.1 as they display an increase upon removal of extracellular divalent cations, an outward rectification and a reversal potential close to the potassium equilibrium potential. Lowering extracellular pH values from 7.35 to 6.0 showed comparable current reductions in neurons from wildtype and K2P9.1-/- mice (68.31 ± 9.80% and 69.92 ± 11.65%, respectively). These results could be translated in an in vivo model of cerebral ischemia where infarct volumes and functional outcomes showed a none significant tendency towards smaller infarct volumes in K2P9.1-/- animals compared to wildtype mice 24 hours after 60 min of tMCAO induction (60.50 ± 17.31 mm3 and 47.10 ± 19.26 mm3, respectively). Conclusions Together with findings from earlier studies on K2P2.1-/- and K2P3.1-/- mice, the results of the present study on K2P9.1-/- mice indicate a differential contribution of K2P channel subtypes to the diverse and complex in vivo effects in rodent models of cerebral ischemia. PMID:20646278

  8. Cloning and characterization of human inducible nitric oxide synthase splice variants: A domain, encoded by exons 8 and 9, is critical for dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, N. Tony; Yuan, Jean W.; Haggerty, Cynthia M.; Choo, Esther K.; Palmer, Celeste D.; Moss, Joel

    1998-01-01

    The inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) contains an amino-terminal oxygenase domain, a carboxy-terminal reductase domain, and an intervening calmodulin-binding region. For the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), iNOS is active as a homodimer. The human iNOS mRNA is subject to alternative splicing, including deletion of exons 8 and 9 that encode amino acids 242–335 of the oxygenase domain. In this study, iNOS8−9− and full-length iNOS (iNOSFL) were cloned from bronchial epithelial cells. Expression of iNOS8−9− in 293 cell line resulted in generation of iNOS8−9− mRNA and protein but did not lead to NO production. In contrast to iNOSFL, iNOS8−9− did not form dimers. Similar to iNOSFL, iNOS8−9− exhibited NADPH-diaphorase activity and contained tightly bound calmodulin, indicating that the reductase and calmodulin-binding domains were functional. To identify sequences in exons 8 and 9 that are critical for dimerization, iNOSFL was used to construct 12 mutants, each with deletion of eight residues in the region encoded by exons 8 and 9. In addition, two “control” iNOS deletion mutants were synthesized, lacking either residues 45–52 of the oxygenase domain or residues 1131–1138 of the reductase domain. Whereas both control deletion mutants generated NO and formed dimers, none of the 12 other mutants formed dimers or generated NO. The region encoded by exons 8 and 9 is critical for iNOS dimer formation and NO production but not for reductase activity. This region could be a potential target for therapeutic interventions aimed at inhibiting iNOS dimerization and hence NO synthesis. PMID:9636200

  9. Identification, Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of the Gene for Plasmodium knowlesi Surface Protein Containing an Altered Thrombospondin Repeat Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-27

    respectively. The PCR-amplified fragment was cloned in-frame as a glutathione S - transferase (GST) fusion protein in pGEX-3X, a T7 promoter-based E. coli...studies. The complex life cycle of malaria parasites and stage-specific expression of the majority of malarial antigens present a unique challenge for...localization of PkSPATR. To demonstrate the ex- pression of PkSPATR on malaria parasites and to determine 5404 MAHAJAN ET AL. INFECT. IMMUN. at U S U H S LR

  10. [MAST2-like protein kinase from grape vine Vitis vinifera: cloning of catalytic domain cDNA].

    PubMed

    Briantseva, S A; Gavriushina, E S; Emets, A I; Karpov, P A; Blium, Ia B; Drygin, Iu F; Nadezhdina, E S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of our work is the identification of protein kinases phosphorylating microtubule proteins in plant cells. Using bioinformatic approach, we found genes of putative homologues of microtubule-associated mammalian protein kinase MAST2 in higher plant genomes. The gene of closest MAST2 homologue, putative protein, named GMLK (Grape MAST2-Like Kinase, A7NTE9_VITVI), was found in grape Vitis vinifera. We report here the cloning of cDNA of GMLK (A7NTE9) from Pinot Noir grape vine leaves.

  11. STEADY-FATE FIELD-SCALE GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION AND PORE-GAS VELOCITY CALCULATION IN A DOMAIN OPEN TO THE ATMOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field-scale estimation of gas permeability and subsequent computation of pore-gas velocity profiles are critical elements of sound soil venting design. It has been our experience however in U.S. EPA's technical assistance program, provided by the Office of Research and Developme...

  12. STEADY-FATE FIELD-SCALE GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION AND PORE-GAS VELOCITY CALCULATION IN A DOMAIN OPEN TO THE ATMOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field-scale estimation of gas permeability and subsequent computation of pore-gas velocity profiles are critical elements of sound soil venting design. It has been our experience however in U.S. EPA's technical assistance program, provided by the Office of Research and Developme...

  13. Gene cloning, homology comparison and analysis of the main functional structure domains of beta estrogen receptor in Jining Gray goat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-gang; Li, Hong-mei; Wang, Shu-ying; Huang, Li-bo; Guo, Hui-jun

    2014-08-01

    To clarify the molecular evolution and characteristic of beta estrogen receptor (ERβ) gene in Jining Gray goat in China, the entire ERβ gene from Jining Gray goat ovary was amplified, identified and sequenced, and the gene sequences were compared with those of other animals. Functional structural domains and variations in DNA binding domains (DBD) and ligand binding domains (LBD) between Jining Gray goat and Boer goat were analyzed. The results indicate that the ERβ gene in Jining Gray goat includes a 1584bp sequence with a complete open-reading-frame (ORF), encoding a 527 amino acid (aa) receptor protein. Compared to other species, the nucleotide homology is 73.9-98.9% and the amino acid homology is 79.5-98.5%. The main antigenic structural domains lie from the 97th aa to the 286th aa and from the 403rd aa to the 527th aa. The hydrophilicity and the surface probability of the structural domains are distributed throughout a range of amino acids. There are two different amino acids in the DBD and three different amino acids in the LBD between Jining Gray and Boer goats, resulting in dramatically different spatial structures for ERβ protein. These differences may explain the different biological activities of ERβ between the two goat species. This study firstly acquired the whole ERβ gene sequence of Jining Gray goat with a complete open reading frame, and analyzed its gene evolutionary relationship and predicted its mainly functional structural domains, which may very help for further understanding the genome evolution and gene diversity of goat ERβ. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Complexes of Peptide Blockers with Kv1.6 Pore Domain: Molecular Modeling and Studies with KcsA-Kv1.6 Channel.

    PubMed

    Nekrasova, O V; Volyntseva, A D; Kudryashova, K S; Novoseletsky, V N; Lyapina, E A; Illarionova, A V; Yakimov, S A; Korolkova, Yu V; Shaitan, K V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Feofanov, A V

    2016-09-17

    Potassium voltage-gated Kv1.6 channel, which is distributed primarily in neurons of central and peripheral nervous systems, is of significant physiological importance. To date, several high-affinity Kv1.6-channel blockers are known, but the lack of selective ones among them hampers the studies of tissue localization and functioning of Kv1.6 channels. Here we present an approach to advanced understanding of interactions of peptide toxin blockers with a Kv1.6 pore. It combines molecular modeling studies and an application of a new bioengineering system based on a KcsA-Kv1.6 hybrid channel for the quantitative fluorescent analysis of blocker-channel interactions. Using this system we demonstrate that peptide toxins agitoxin 2, kaliotoxin1 and OSK1 have similar high affinity to the extracellular vestibule of the K(+)-conducting pore of Kv1.6, hetlaxin is a low-affinity ligand, whereas margatoxin and scyllatoxin do not bind to Kv1.6 pore. Binding of toxins to Kv1.6 pore has considerable inverse dependence on the ionic strength. Model structures of KcsA-Kv1.6 and Kv1.6 complexes with agitoxin 2, kaliotoxin 1 and OSK1 were obtained using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation. Interaction interfaces, which are formed by 15-19 toxin residues and 10 channel residues, are described and compared. Specific sites of Kv1.6 pore recognition are identified for targeting of peptide blockers. Analysis of interactions between agitoxin 2 derivatives with point mutations (S7K, S11G, L19S, R31G) and KcsA-Kv1.6 confirms reliability of the calculated complex structure.

  15. Molecular Cloning of Rat and Porcine Retina-derived POU Domain Factor 1 (POU6F2) from a Pituitary cDNA Library

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIDA, Saishu; UEHARU, Hiroki; HIGUCHI, Masashi; HORIGUCHI, Kotaro; NISHIMURA, Naoto; SHIBUYA, Shiori; MITSUISHI, Hideo; KATO, Takako; KATO, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Homeobox transcription factors are known to play crucial roles in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland. During molecular cloning with the Yeast One-Hybrid System using a 5’-upstream region of the porcine Fshβ as a bait sequence, we have cloned a cDNA encoding a partial sequence of the retina-derived POU domain factor 1 (RPF1) from the porcine pituitary cDNA library and confirmed its specific binding to the bait sequence. In situ hybridization was performed to examine localization of Rpf1 and showed that this gene is expressed in the stem/progenitor cells of the rat pituitary primordium as well as the diencephalon and retina. In addition, real-time PCR demonstrated that Rpf1 transcripts are abundant in early embryonic periods but that this is followed by a decrease during pituitary development, indicating that this factor plays a role in differentiating cells of the pituitary. The transcriptional activity of RPF1 for genes of Prop1, Prrx1 and Prrx2, which were characterized as genes participating in the pituitary stem/progenitor cells by our group, was then examined with full-length cDNA obtained from the rat pituitary. RPF1 showed regulatory activity for Prop1 and Prrx2, but not for Prrx1. These results indicate the involvement of this retina-derived factor in pituitary development. PMID:24804940

  16. Binding of Substrates to the Central Pore of the Vps4 ATPase Is Autoinhibited by the Microtubule Interacting and Trafficking (MIT) Domain and Activated by MIT Interacting Motifs (MIMs).

    PubMed

    Han, Han; Monroe, Nicole; Votteler, Jörg; Shakya, Binita; Sundquist, Wesley I; Hill, Christopher P

    2015-05-22

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) pathway drives reverse topology membrane fission events within multiple cellular pathways, including cytokinesis, multivesicular body biogenesis, repair of the plasma membrane, nuclear membrane vesicle formation, and HIV budding. The AAA ATPase Vps4 is recruited to membrane necks shortly before fission, where it catalyzes disassembly of the ESCRT-III lattice. The N-terminal Vps4 microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains initially bind the C-terminal MIT-interacting motifs (MIMs) of ESCRT-III subunits, but it is unclear how the enzyme then remodels these substrates in response to ATP hydrolysis. Here, we report quantitative binding studies that demonstrate that residues from helix 5 of the Vps2p subunit of ESCRT-III bind to the central pore of an asymmetric Vps4p hexamer in a manner that is dependent upon the presence of flexible nucleotide analogs that can mimic multiple states in the ATP hydrolysis cycle. We also find that substrate engagement is autoinhibited by the Vps4p MIT domain and that this inhibition is relieved by binding of either Type 1 or Type 2 MIM elements, which bind the Vps4p MIT domain through different interfaces. These observations support the model that Vps4 substrates are initially recruited by an MIM-MIT interaction that activates the Vps4 central pore to engage substrates and generate force, thereby triggering ESCRT-III disassembly. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Binding of Substrates to the Central Pore of the Vps4 ATPase Is Autoinhibited by the Microtubule Interacting and Trafficking (MIT) Domain and Activated by MIT Interacting Motifs (MIMs)*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Han; Monroe, Nicole; Votteler, Jörg; Shakya, Binita; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) pathway drives reverse topology membrane fission events within multiple cellular pathways, including cytokinesis, multivesicular body biogenesis, repair of the plasma membrane, nuclear membrane vesicle formation, and HIV budding. The AAA ATPase Vps4 is recruited to membrane necks shortly before fission, where it catalyzes disassembly of the ESCRT-III lattice. The N-terminal Vps4 microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains initially bind the C-terminal MIT-interacting motifs (MIMs) of ESCRT-III subunits, but it is unclear how the enzyme then remodels these substrates in response to ATP hydrolysis. Here, we report quantitative binding studies that demonstrate that residues from helix 5 of the Vps2p subunit of ESCRT-III bind to the central pore of an asymmetric Vps4p hexamer in a manner that is dependent upon the presence of flexible nucleotide analogs that can mimic multiple states in the ATP hydrolysis cycle. We also find that substrate engagement is autoinhibited by the Vps4p MIT domain and that this inhibition is relieved by binding of either Type 1 or Type 2 MIM elements, which bind the Vps4p MIT domain through different interfaces. These observations support the model that Vps4 substrates are initially recruited by an MIM-MIT interaction that activates the Vps4 central pore to engage substrates and generate force, thereby triggering ESCRT-III disassembly. PMID:25833946

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel genes from hexaploid wheat that encode double PR-1 domains coupled with a receptor-like protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shunwen; Faris, Justin D; Edwards, Michael C

    2017-04-01

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) contains at least 23 TaPr-1 genes encoding the group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins as identified in our previous work. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of TaPr-1-rk1 and TaPr-1-rk2, two novel genes closely related to the wheat PR-1 family. The two TaPr-1-rk genes are located on homoeologous chromosomes 3D and 3A, respectively, and each contains a large open reading frame (7385 or 6060 bp) that is interrupted by seven introns and subjected to alternative splicing (AS) with five or six isoforms of mRNA transcripts. The deduced full-length TaPR-1-RK1 and TaPR-1-RK2 proteins (95% identity) contain two repeat PR-1 domains, the second of which is fused via a transmembrane helix to a serine/threonine kinase catalytic (STKc) domain characteristic of receptor-like protein kinases. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two PR-1 domains of the TaPR-1-RK proteins form sister clades with their homologues identified in other monocot plants and are well separated from stand-alone PR-1 proteins, whereas the STKc domains may have originated from cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs). Reverse-transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that the TaPr-1-rk genes are predominantly expressed in wheat leaves and their expression levels are elevated in response to pathogen attack, such as infection by barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV), and also to stress conditions, most obviously, to soil salinity. This is the first report of PR-1-CRK hybrid proteins in wheat. The data may shed new insights into the function/evolutionary origin of the PR-1 family and the STKc-mediated defense/stress response pathways in plants.

  19. cDNA cloning of a snake venom metalloproteinase from the eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus), and the expression of its disintegrin domain with anti-platelet effects.

    PubMed

    Suntravat, Montamas; Jia, Ying; Lucena, Sara E; Sánchez, Elda E; Pérez, John C

    2013-03-15

    A 5' truncated snake venom metalloproteinase was identified from a cDNA library constructed from venom glands of an eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus). The 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was used to obtain the 1865 bp full-length cDNA sequence of a snake venom metalloproteinase (CamVMPII). CamVMPII encodes an open reading frame of 488 amino acids, which includes a signal peptide, a pro-domain, a metalloproteinase domain, a spacer, and an RGD-disintegrin domain. The predicted amino acid sequence of CamVMPII showed a 91%, 90%, 83%, and 82% sequence homology to the P-II class enzymes of C. adamanteus metalloproteinase 2, Crotalus atrox CaVMP-II, Gloydius halys agkistin, and Protobothrops jerdonii jerdonitin, respectively. Disintegrins are potent inhibitors of both platelet aggregation and integrin-dependent cell adhesion. Therefore, the disintegrin domain (Cam-dis) of CamVMPII was amplified by PCR, cloned into a pET-43.1a vector, and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. Affinity purified recombinantly modified Cam-dis (r-Cam-dis) with a yield of 8.5 mg/L culture medium was cleaved from the fusion tags by enterokinase cleavage. r-Cam-dis was further purified by two-step chromatography consisting of HiTrap™ Benzamidine FF column, followed by Talon Metal affinity column with a final yield of 1 mg/L culture. r-Cam-dis was able to inhibit all three processes of platelet thrombus formation including platelet adhesion with an estimated IC(50) of 1 nM, collagen- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation with the estimated IC(50)s of 18 and 6 nM, respectively, and platelet function on clot retraction. It is a potent anti-platelet inhibitor, which should be further investigated for drug discovery to treat stroke patients or patients with thrombotic disorders.

  20. Cloning and expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of a Trichoderma reesei beta-mannanase gene containing a cellulose binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Stålbrand, H; Saloheimo, A; Vehmaanperä, J; Henrissat, B; Penttilä, M

    1995-01-01

    beta-Mannanase (endo-1,4-beta-mannanase; mannan endo-1,4-beta-mannosidase; EC 3.2.1.78) catalyzes endo-wise hydrolysis of the backbone of mannan and heteromannans, including hemicellulose polysaccharides, which are among the major components of plant cell walls. The gene man1, which encodes beta-mannanase, of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei was isolated from an expression library by using antiserum raised towards the earlier-purified beta-mannanase protein. The deduced beta-mannanase consists of 410 amino acids. On the basis of hydrophobic cluster analysis, the beta-mannanase was assigned to family 5 of glycosyl hydrolases (cellulase family A). The C terminus of the beta-mannanase has strong amino acid sequence similarity to the cellulose binding domains of fungal cellulases and is preceded by a serine-, threonine-, and proline-rich region. Consequently, the beta-mannanase is probably organized similarly to the T. reesei cellulases, having a catalytic core domain separated from the substrate-binding domain by an O-glycosylated linker. Active beta-mannanase was expressed and secreted by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the host. The results indicate that the man1 gene encodes the two beta-mannanases with different isoelectric points (pIs 4.6 and 5.4) purified earlier from T. reesei. PMID:7793911

  1. Cloning of a novel phosphotyrosine binding domain containing molecule, Odin, involved in signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Akhilesh; Blagoev, Blagoy; Kratchmarova, Irina; Fernandez, Minerva; Nielsen, Mogens; Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias; Ohara, Osamu; Podtelejnikov, Alexandre V; Roche, Serge; Lodish, Harvey F; Mann, Matthias

    2002-11-14

    We have used a proteomic approach using mass spectrometry to identify signaling molecules involved in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways. Using affinity purification by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies to enrich for tyrosine phosphorylated proteins, we have identified a novel signaling molecule in the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway. This molecule, designated Odin, contains several ankyrin repeats, two sterile alpha motifs and a phosphotyrosine binding domain and is ubiquitously expressed. Using antibodies against endogenous Odin, we show that it undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation upon addition of growth factors such as EGF or PDGF but not by cytokines such as IL-3 or erythropoietin. Immunofluorescence experiments as well as Western blot analysis on subcellular fractions demonstrated that Odin is localized to the cytoplasm both before and after growth factor treatment. Deletion analysis showed that the phosphotyrosine binding domain of Odin is not required for its tyrosine phosphorylation. Overexpression of Odin, but not an unrelated adapter protein, Grb2, inhibited EGF-induced activation of c-Fos promoter. Microinjection of wild-type or a mutant version lacking the PTB domain into NIH3T3 fibroblasts inhibited PDGF-induced mitogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that Odin may play a negative role in growth factor receptor signaling pathways.

  2. Molecular cloning of six novel Krüppel-like zinc finger genes from hematopoietic cells and identification of a novel transregulatory domain KRNB.

    PubMed

    Han, Z G; Zhang, Q H; Ye, M; Kan, L X; Gu, B W; He, K L; Shi, S L; Zhou, J; Fu, G; Mao, M; Chen, S J; Yu, L; Chen, Z

    1999-12-10

    To clone zinc finger genes expressed in hematopoietic system, we designed primers based on conserved Cys(2)/His(2) zinc finger sequences to amplify corresponding domains from mRNA of normal bone marrow and leukemia cell line NB4. DNA fragments of novel zinc finger genes were chosen and used as probe pool to screen cDNA libraries or subject to rapid amplification of cDNA ends in order to obtain full-length cDNA. Six cDNAs including whole open reading frame of zinc finger proteins, named as ZNF191, ZNF253 (BMZF-1), ZNF255 (BMZF-2), ZNF256 (BMZF-3), ZNF257 (BMZF-4), and ZNF254 (BMZF-5) were obtained. All six belong to the Krüppel-like zinc finger gene family, and typical transcriptional regulatory motifs exist in the N-terminal moiety, such as the SCAN box in ZNF191, and the KRAB domains in ZNF253, ZNF254, ZNF256, and ZNF257. A previously undefined sequence nominated as Krüppel-related novel box, which may represent a new transregulatory motif, was revealed at the N terminus of ZNF255. The transregulatory function of non-zinc finger regions of ZNF191, ZNF253, and ZNF255 were addressed in yeast and mammalian cells. The results indicated that ZNF255 might be a conditional transactivator, whereas ZNF253 and ZNF191 displayed a suppressive effect on the transcription in yeast and/or mammalian systems.

  3. The external pore loop interacts with S6 and S3-S4 linker in domain 4 to assume an essential role in gating control and anticonvulsant action in the Na+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ya-Chin; Hsieh, Jui-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Carbamazepine, phenytoin, and lamotrigine are widely prescribed anticonvulsants in neurological clinics. These drugs bind to the same receptor site, probably with the diphenyl motif in their structure, to inhibit the Na+ channel. However, the location of the drug receptor remains controversial. In this study, we demonstrate close proximity and potential interaction between an external aromatic residue (W1716 in the external pore loop) and an internal aromatic residue (F1764 in the pore-lining part of the sixth transmembrane segment, S6) of domain 4 (D4), both being closely related to anticonvulsant and/or local anesthetic binding to the Na+ channel. Double-mutant cycle analysis reveals significant cooperativity between the two phenyl residues for anticonvulsant binding. Concomitant F1764C mutation evidently decreases the susceptibility of W1716C to external Cd2+ and membrane-impermeable methanethiosulfonate reagents. Also, the W1716E/F1764R and G1715E/F1764R double mutations significantly alter the selectivity for Na+ over K+ and markedly shift the activation curve, respectively. W1716 and F1764 therefore very likely form a link connecting the outer and inner compartments of the Na+ channel pore (in addition to the selectivity filter). Anticonvulsants and local anesthetics may well traverse this “S6 recess” without trespassing on the selectivity filter. Furthermore, we found that Y1618K, a point mutation in the S3-4 linker (the extracellular extension of D4S4), significantly alters the consequences of carbamazepine binding to the Na+ channel. The effect of Y1618K mutation, however, is abolished by concomitant point mutations in the vicinity of Y1618, but not by those in the internally located inactivation machinery, supporting a direct local rather than a long-range allosteric action. Moreover, Y1618 could interact with D4 pore residues W1716 and L1719 to have a profound effect on both channel gating and anticonvulsant action. We conclude that there are direct

  4. Cloning, expression, purification, and characterisation of the HEAT-repeat domain of TOR from the thermophilic eukaryote Chaetomium thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Graham C; Vegunta, Yogesh; Gabus, Caroline; Gaubitz, Christl; Thore, Stéphane

    2017-05-01

    The Target of Rapamycin Complex is a central controller of cell growth and differentiation in eukaryotes. Its global architecture has been described by cryoelectron microscopy, and regions of its central TOR protein have been described by X-ray crystallography. However, the N-terminal region of this protein, which consists of a series of HEAT repeats, remains uncharacterised at high resolution, most likely due to the absence of a suitable purification procedure. Here, we present a robust method for the preparation of the HEAT-repeat domain, utilizing the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum as a source organism. We describe construct design and stable expression in insect cells. An efficient two-step purification procedure is presented, and the purified product is characterised by SEC and MALDI-TOF MS. The methods described pave the way for a complete high-resolution characterisation of this elusive region of the TOR protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Extracellular zinc ion regulates transient receptor potential melastatin 5 (TRPM5) channel activation through its interaction with a pore loop domain.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kunitoshi; Tominaga, Makoto

    2013-09-06

    The transient receptor potential melastatin 5 (TRPM5) channel is a monovalent cation channel activated by intracellular Ca(2+). Expression of this channel is restricted to taste cells, the pancreas and brainstem, and is thought to be involved in controlling membrane potentials. Its endogenous ligands are not well characterized. Here, we show that extracellular application of Zn(2+) inhibits TRPM5 activity. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, extracellular application of ZnCl2 inhibited step-pulse-induced TRPM5 currents with 500 nM free intracellular Ca(2+) in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 4.3 μM at -80 mV). ZnSO4 also inhibited TRPM5 activity. Extracellular application of ZnCl2 inhibited TRPM5 activation at several temperatures. Furthermore, inhibition by 30 μM ZnCl2 was impaired in TRPM5 mutants in which His at 896, and Glu at 926 and/or Glu at 939 in the outer pore loop were replaced with Gln. From these results, we conclude that extracellular Zn(2+) inhibits TRPM5 channels, and the residues in the outer pore loop of TRPM5 are critically involved in the inhibition.

  6. cDNA cloning reveals two mouse beta5 integrin transcripts distinct in cytoplasmic domains as a result of alternative splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Tan, S M; Lu, J

    1998-01-01

    The integrin beta5 subunit has only been found to form a heterodimer with subunit alphav which acts as a vitronectin receptor. Integrin alphavbeta5 has been implicated in cell migration and growth factor-induced angiogenesis. In the present study, a mouse liver cDNA library was screened using a human beta5 cDNA fragment obtained by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Three of the clones (MB5, MB15 and MB17) overlapped to give an open reading frame, called beta5A, which is homologous to the human beta5 subunit. The sequence of another clone (MB26), called beta5B, was identical with beta5A, except for a deletion of 29 bp near the 3' end of the open reading frame. The 29 bp deletion resulted in an open-reading-frame shift and a completely different C-terminal sequence in beta5B. beta5A and beta5B were shown, by RT-PCR, to be co-expressed in most mouse tissues tested, although beta5B mRNA was detected at much lower levels than beta5A. beta5A and beta5B mRNAs were also detected in the mouse monocytic cell line, J774, and in isolated mouse peritoneal macrophages. Adhesion of peritoneal macrophages has been shown to up-regulate the expression of both beta5A and beta5B mRNAs. The 29 bp sequence begins with a putative intron-splicing donor site (GTGAT...). A 3' fragment of the mouse integrin beta5 gene was cloned by PCR and sequenced showing that the 29 bp sequence was also immediately followed by an intron. Therefore, the 29 bp sequence was apparently expressed as part of the beta5A mRNA but was spliced out as part of the downstream intron in beta5B. Since the cytoplasmic domains of the integrin beta subunits are important in cytoskeleton attachment and signalling, the two alternatively spliced beta5 isoforms may have distinct roles in cell adhesion and other cellular functions. PMID:9531507

  7. Molecular cloning of a new secreted sulfated mucin-like protein with a C-type lectin domain that is expressed in lymphoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Bannwarth, S; Giordanengo, V; Lesimple, J; Lefebvre, J C

    1998-01-23

    We have previously demonstrated hyposialylation of the two major CD45 and leukosialin (CD43) molecules at the surface of latently human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected CEM T cells (CEMLAI/NP), (Lefebvre, J. C., Giordanengo, V., Doglio, A., Cagnon, L., Breittmayer, J. P., Peyron, J. F., and Lesimple, J. (1994) Virology 199, 265-274; Lefebvre, J. C., Giordanengo, V., Limouse, M., Doglio, A., Cucchiarini, M., Monpoux, F., Mariani, R., and Peyron, J. F. (1994) J. Exp. Med. 180, 1609-1617). Searching to clarify mechanism(s) of hyposialylation, we observed two sulfated secreted glycoproteins (molecular mass approximately 47 and approximately 40 kDa) (P47 and P40), which were differentially sulfated and/or differentially secreted in the culture supernatants of CEMLAI/NP cells when compared with parental CEM cells. A hybridoma clone (7H1) resulting from the fusion between CEMLAI/NP and human embryonic fibroblasts MRC5 cells produced very large amounts of P47 that was purified using Jacalin lectin (specific for O-glycans) and microsequenced. Cloning of P47 was achieved using a CEMLAI/NP cDNA library screened with a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. A single open reading frame encoding a protein of 323 amino acids was deduced from the longest isolated recombinant (1.4 kilobase). P47 is a secreted sulfated protein. It carries an NH2-terminal RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) triplet, a striking alpha-helical leucine zipper composed of six heptads, and a C-terminal C-type lectin domain. The NH2-terminal portion is rich in glutamic acids with a predicted pI of 3.9. In addition, a hinge region with numerous condensed potential sites for O-glycan side chains, which are also the most likely sulfation sites, is located between the RGD and leucine zipper domains. Transcripts were detected in lymphoid tissues (notably bone marrow) and abundantly in T and B lymphoblastoid but very faintly in monocytoid cell lines.

  8. Cloning and Iron Transportation of Nucleotide Binding Domain of Cryptosporidium andersoni ATP-Binding Cassette (CaABC) Gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju-Hua; Xue, Xiu-Heng; Zhou, Jie; Fan, Cai-Yun; Xie, Qian-Qian; Wang, Pan

    2015-06-01

    Cryptosporidium andersoni ATP-binding cassette (CaABC) is an important membrane protein involved in substrate transport across the membrane. In this research, the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of CaABC gene was amplified by PCR, and the eukaryotic expression vector of pEGFP-C1-CaNBD was reconstructed. Then, the recombinant plasmid of pEGFP-C1-CaNBD was transformed into the mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to study the iron transportation function of CaABC. The results indicated that NBD region of CaABC gene can significantly elevate the transport efficiency of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), and HCO3 (-) in IECs (P<0.05). The significance of this study is to find the ATPase inhibitors for NBD region of CaABC gene and to inhibit ATP binding and nutrient transport of CaABC transporter. Thus, C. andersoni will be killed by inhibition of nutrient uptake. This will open up a new way for treatment of cryptosporidiosis.

  9. Isolated pores dissected from human two-pore channel 2 are functional

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Christopher J.; Rahman, Taufiq; Sula, Altin; Miles, Andrew J.; Wallace, B. A.; Patel, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Multi-domain voltage-gated ion channels appear to have evolved through sequential rounds of intragenic duplication from a primordial one-domain precursor. Whereas modularity within one-domain symmetrical channels is established, little is known about the roles of individual regions within more complex asymmetrical channels where the domains have undergone substantial divergence. Here we isolated and characterised both of the divergent pore regions from human TPC2, a two-domain channel that holds a key intermediate position in the evolution of voltage-gated ion channels. In HeLa cells, each pore localised to the ER and caused Ca2+ depletion, whereas an ER-targeted pore mutated at a residue that inactivates full-length TPC2 did not. Additionally, one of the pores expressed at high levels in E. coli. When purified, it formed a stable, folded tetramer. Liposomes reconstituted with the pore supported Ca2+ and Na+ uptake that was inhibited by known blockers of full-length channels. Computational modelling of the pore corroborated cationic permeability and drug interaction. Therefore, despite divergence, both pores are constitutively active in the absence of their partners and retain several properties of the wild-type pore. Such symmetrical ‘pore-only’ proteins derived from divergent channel domains may therefore provide tractable tools for probing the functional architecture of complex ion channels. PMID:27941820

  10. Cloning and expression of acetylcholinesterase from Bungarus fasciatus venom. A new type of cooh-terminal domain; involvement of a positively charged residue in the peripheral site.

    PubMed

    Cousin, X; Bon, S; Duval, N; Massoulié, J; Bon, C

    1996-06-21

    As deduced from cDNA clones, the catalytic domain of Bungarus fasciatus venom acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is highly homologous to those of other AChEs. It is, however, associated with a short hydrophilic carboxyl-terminal region, containing no cysteine, that bears no resemblance to the alternative COOH-terminal peptides of the GPI-anchored molecules (H) or of other homomeric or heteromeric tailed molecules (T). Expression of complete and truncated AChE in COS cells showed that active hydrophilic monomers are produced and secreted in all cases, and that cleavage of a very basic 8-residue carboxyl-terminal fragment occurs upon secretion. The COS cells produced Bungarus AChE about 30 times more efficiently than an equivalent secreted monomeric rat AChE. The recombinant Bungarus AChE, like the natural venom enzyme, showed a distinctive ladder pattern in nondenaturing electrophoresis, probably reflecting a variation in the number of sialic acids. By mutagenesis, we showed that two differences (methionine instead of tyrosine at position 70; lysine instead of aspartate or glutamate at position 285) explain the low sensitivity of Bungarus AChE to peripheral site inhibitors, compared to the Torpedo or mammalian AChEs. These results illustrate the importance of both the aromatic and the charged residues, and the fact that peripheral site ligands (propidium, gallamine, D-tubocurarine, and fasciculin 2) interact with diverse subsets of residues.

  11. Molecular cloning of the goose ACSL3 and ACSL5 coding domain sequences and their expression characteristics during goose fatty liver development.

    PubMed

    He, H; Liu, H H; Wang, J W; Lv, J; Li, L; Pan, Z X

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that ACSL3 and ACSL5 play important roles in fat metabolism. To investigate the primary functions of ACSL3 and ACSL5 and to evaluate their expression levels during goose fatty liver development, we cloned the ACSL3 and ACSL5 coding domain sequences (CDSs) of geese using RT-PCR and analyzed their expression characteristics under different conditions using qRT-PCR. The results showed that the goose ACSL3 (JX511975) and ACSL5 (JX511976) sequences have high similarities with the chicken sequences both at the nucleotide and amino acid levels. Both ACSL3 and ACSL5 have high expression levels in goose liver. The expression levels of ACSL3 and ACSL5 in goose liver and hepatocytes can be changed by overfeeding geese and by treatment with unsaturated fatty acids, respectively. Together, these results indicate that ACSL3 and ACSL5 play important roles during fatty liver development. The different expression characteristics of goose ACSL3 and ACSL5 suggest that these two genes may be responsible for specific functions.

  12. Mapping the Interaction Site for a β-Scorpion Toxin in the Pore Module of Domain III of Voltage-gated Na+ Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Joel Z.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Scheuer, Todd; Karbat, Izhar; Cohen, Lior; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Catterall, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels initiates and propagates action potentials in electrically excitable cells. β-Scorpion toxins, including toxin IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (CssIV), enhance activation of NaV channels. CssIV stabilizes the voltage sensor in domain II in its activated state via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism. Amino acid residues required for the action of CssIV have been identified in the S1-S2 and S3-S4 extracellular loops of domain II. The extracellular loops of domain III are also involved in toxin action, but individual amino acid residues have not been identified. We used site-directed mutagenesis and voltage clamp recording to investigate amino acid residues of domain III that are involved in CssIV action. In the IIISS2-S6 loop, five substitutions at four positions altered voltage-sensor trapping by CssIVE15A. Three substitutions (E1438A, D1445A, and D1445Y) markedly decreased voltage-sensor trapping, whereas the other two substitutions (N1436G and L1439A) increased voltage-sensor trapping. These bidirectional effects suggest that residues in IIISS2-S6 make both positive and negative interactions with CssIV. N1436G enhanced voltage-sensor trapping via increased binding affinity to the resting state, whereas L1439A increased voltage-sensor trapping efficacy. Based on these results, a three-dimensional model of the toxin-channel interaction was developed using the Rosetta modeling method. These data provide additional molecular insight into the voltage-sensor trapping mechanism of toxin action and define a three-point interaction site for β-scorpion toxins on NaV channels. Binding of α- and β-scorpion toxins to two distinct, pseudo-symmetrically organized receptor sites on NaV channels acts synergistically to modify channel gating and paralyze prey. PMID:22761417

  13. Mapping the interaction site for a β-scorpion toxin in the pore module of domain III of voltage-gated Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Joel Z; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Scheuer, Todd; Karbat, Izhar; Cohen, Lior; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Catterall, William A

    2012-08-31

    Activation of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v)) channels initiates and propagates action potentials in electrically excitable cells. β-Scorpion toxins, including toxin IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (CssIV), enhance activation of Na(V) channels. CssIV stabilizes the voltage sensor in domain II in its activated state via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism. Amino acid residues required for the action of CssIV have been identified in the S1-S2 and S3-S4 extracellular loops of domain II. The extracellular loops of domain III are also involved in toxin action, but individual amino acid residues have not been identified. We used site-directed mutagenesis and voltage clamp recording to investigate amino acid residues of domain III that are involved in CssIV action. In the IIISS2-S6 loop, five substitutions at four positions altered voltage-sensor trapping by CssIV(E15A). Three substitutions (E1438A, D1445A, and D1445Y) markedly decreased voltage-sensor trapping, whereas the other two substitutions (N1436G and L1439A) increased voltage-sensor trapping. These bidirectional effects suggest that residues in IIISS2-S6 make both positive and negative interactions with CssIV. N1436G enhanced voltage-sensor trapping via increased binding affinity to the resting state, whereas L1439A increased voltage-sensor trapping efficacy. Based on these results, a three-dimensional model of the toxin-channel interaction was developed using the Rosetta modeling method. These data provide additional molecular insight into the voltage-sensor trapping mechanism of toxin action and define a three-point interaction site for β-scorpion toxins on Na(V) channels. Binding of α- and β-scorpion toxins to two distinct, pseudo-symmetrically organized receptor sites on Na(V) channels acts synergistically to modify channel gating and paralyze prey.

  14. Specific Binding of Adamantane Drugs and Direction of their Polar Amines in the Pore of the Influenza M2 Transmembrane Domain in Lipid Bilayers and Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles Determined by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Sarah D.; Wang, Jun; Wu, Yibing; DeGrado, William F.; Hong, Mei

    2011-01-01

    The transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein (M2TM) forms a tetrameric proton channel important for the virus lifecycle. The proton-channel activity is inhibited by amine-containing adamantyl drugs amantadine and rimantadine, which have been shown to bind specifically to the pore of M2TM near Ser31. However, whether the polar amine points to the N- or C-terminus of the channel has not yet been determined. Elucidating the polar group direction will shed light on the mechanism by which drug binding inhibits this proton channel and will facilitate rational design of new inhibitors. In this study, we determine the polar amine direction using M2TM reconstituted in lipid bilayers as well as DPC micelles. 13C-2H rotational-echo double-resonance NMR experiments of 13C-labeled M2TM and methyl-deuterated rimantadine in lipid bilayers showed that the polar amine pointed to the C-terminus of the channel, with the methyl group close to Gly34. Solution NMR experiments of M2TM in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles indicate that drug binding causes significant chemical shift perturbations of the protein that are very similar to those seen for M2TM and M2(18–60) bound to lipid bilayers. Specific 2H-labeling of the drugs permitted the assignment of drug-protein cross peaks, which indicate that amantadine and rimantadine bind to the pore in the same fashion as for bilayer-bound M2TM. These results strongly suggest that adamantyl inhibition of M2TM is achieved not only by direct physical occlusion of the pore but also by perturbing the equilibrium constant of the proton-sensing residue His37. The reproduction of the pharmacologically relevant specific pore-binding site in DPC micelles, which was not observed with a different detergent, DHPC, underscores the significant influence of the detergent environment on the functional structure of membrane proteins. PMID:21381693

  15. [Cloning and characterization of a novel mouse short-chain dehydrogenase/reductases cDNA mHsdl2#, encoding a protein with a SDR domaid and a SCP2 domain].

    PubMed

    Dai, J; Li, P; Ji, Ch; Feng, C; Gui, M; Sun, Y; Zhang, J; Zhu, J; Dou, Ch; Gu, Sh

    2005-01-01

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) play important roles in body's metabolism. We cloned a novel mouse SDR cDNA which encodes a deduced HSD-like protein with a conserved SDR domain and a SCP2 domain. The 1.8 kb cDNA consists of 11 exons and is mapped to mouse chromosome 4B3. The corresponding gene is widely expressed in normal mouse tissues and its expression level in liver increases after inducement with cholesterol food. The predicted mouse HSDL2 protein, which has a peroxisomal target signal, is localized in the cytoplasm of NIH 3T3 cells.

  16. TprC/D (Tp0117/131), a Trimeric, Pore-Forming Rare Outer Membrane Protein of Treponema pallidum, Has a Bipartite Domain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star; Caimano, Melissa J.; Karanian, Carson; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cruz, Adriana R.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has been a longstanding objective of syphilis researchers. We recently developed a consensus computational framework that employs a battery of cellular localization and topological prediction tools to generate ranked clusters of candidate rare OMPs (D. L. Cox et al., Infect. Immun. 78:5178–5194, 2010). TP0117/TP0131 (TprC/D), a member of the T. pallidum repeat (Tpr) family, was a highly ranked candidate. Circular dichroism, heat modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning, and liposome incorporation confirmed that full-length, recombinant TprC (TprCFl) forms a β-barrel capable of integrating into lipid bilayers. Moreover, TprCFl increased efflux of terbium-dipicolinic acid complex from large unilamellar vesicles and migrated as a trimer by blue-native PAGE. We found that in T. pallidum, TprC is heat modifiable, trimeric, expressed in low abundance, and, based on proteinase K accessibility and opsonophagocytosis assays, surface exposed. From these collective data, we conclude that TprC is a bona fide rare OMP as well as a functional ortholog of Escherichia coli OmpF. We also discovered that TprC has a bipartite architecture consisting of a soluble N-terminal portion (TprCN), presumably periplasmic and bound directly or indirectly to peptidoglycan, and a C-terminal β-barrel (TprCC). Syphilitic rabbits generate antibodies exclusively against TprCC, while secondary syphilis patients fail to mount a detectable antibody response against either domain. The syphilis spirochete appears to have resolved a fundamental dilemma arising from its extracellular lifestyle, namely, how to enhance OM permeability without increasing its vulnerability to the antibody-mediated defenses of its natural human host. PMID:22389487

  17. Cloning and the mRNA expression of a C-type lectin with one carbohydrate recognition domain from Fenneropenaeus merguiensis in response to pathogenic inoculation.

    PubMed

    Runsaeng, Phanthipha; Thepnarong, Supattra; Rattanaporn, Onnicha; Utarabhand, Prapaporn

    2015-12-01

    Crustaceans are deficient in an adaptive immune system and depend solely on their innate immunity. One kind of pattern recognition proteins which plays an important role in the shrimp immunity is lectin. A new C-type lectin called FmLC2 was cloned from the stomach of the banana shrimp Fenneropenaeus merguiensis by means of RT-PCR and 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Its full-length cDNA contains 1098 bp with a single open reading frame of 738 bp, encoding a peptide of 245 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of FmLC2 consists of a signal peptide of 17 amino acids with a molecular mass of 28,115 Da and an isoelectric point of 6.94. The primary structure of FmLC2 comprises a single carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) with a QPD (Gln-Pro-Asp) motif and one Ca(2+) binding site. Like other C-type lectins, its CRD structure contains a double-loop characteristic being stabilized by two conserved disulfide linkages. The mRNA expression of FmLC2 was detected specifically in the stomach and gills, less was found in the hepatopancreas. Upon inoculation of shrimp with Vibrio harveyi or white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), the FmLC2 expression either in stomach or gills was higher than in the hepatopancreas. Besides, its expression in these tissues was up-regulated to reach the highest levels at 12 or 18 h for V. harveyi or WSSV stimulation, respectively. RNAi-based silencing of FmLC2 resulted in suppression of its expression, increases in mortality when the shrimp were challenged with V. harveyi or WSSV, and the median lethal time was reduced compared with controls. These results suggest that FmLC2 may serve as receptor molecules which recognize invading bacterial and viral pathogens and thus contribute a role in the shrimp immune response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cloning cattle.

    PubMed

    Oback, B; Wells, D N

    2003-01-01

    Over the past six years, hundreds of apparently normal calves have been cloned worldwide from bovine somatic donor cells. However, these surviving animals represent less than 5% of all cloned embryos transferred into recipient cows. Most of the remaining 95% die at various stages of development from a predictable pattern of placental and fetal abnormalities, collectively referred to as the "cloning-syndrome." The low efficiency seriously limits commercial applicability and ethical acceptance of somatic cloning and enforces the development of improved cloning methods. In this paper, we describe our current standard operating procedure (SOP) for cattle cloning using zona-free nuclear transfer. Following this SOP, the output of viable and healthy calves at weaning is about 9% of embryos transferred. Better standardization of cloning protocols across and within research groups is needed to separate technical from biological factors underlying low cloning efficiency.

  19. [Cloning - controversies].

    PubMed

    Twardowski, T; Michalska, A

    2001-01-01

    Cloning of the human being is not only highly controversial; in the opinion of the authors it is impossible - we are not able to reproduce human behaviour and character traits. Reproduction through cloning is limited to personal genome resources. The more important is protection of genomic characteristics as private property and taking advantage of cloning for production of the human organs directly or through xenotransplants. In this paper we present the legislation related to cloning in Poland, in the European Union and other countries. We also indicate who and why is interested in cloning.

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel genes from hexaploid wheat that encode double PR-1 domains coupled with a receptor-like protein kinase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) contains at least 23 TaPr-1 genes encoding the group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins as identified in our previous work. Here we report the cloning and characterization of TaPr-1-rk1 and TaPr-1-rk2, two novel genes closely related to the wheat PR-1 famil...

  1. Human Cloning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-20

    not believe that noncoital, asexual reproduction , such as cloning, would be considered a fundamental right by the Supreme Court. A ban on human...society by “crossing the boundary from sexual to asexual reproduction , thus approving in principle the genetic manipulation and control of nascent human... reproductive cloning and, by a vote of 10 to 7, a four-year moratorium on cloning for medical research purposes. The ethical issues surrounding reproductive

  2. Pathophysiological significance of the two-pore domain K+ channel K2P5.1 in splenic CD4+CD25− T cell subset from a chemically-induced murine inflammatory bowel disease model

    PubMed Central

    Nakakura, Sawa; Matsui, Miki; Sato, Aya; Ishii, Mizuki; Endo, Kyoko; Muragishi, Sayaka; Murase, Miki; Kito, Hiroaki; Niguma, Hiroki; Kurokawa, Natsumi; Fujii, Masanori; Araki, Masatake; Araki, Kimi; Ohya, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    The alkaline pH-activated, two-pore domain K+ channel K2P5.1 (also known as TASK2/KCNK5) plays an important role in maintaining the resting membrane potential, and contributes to the control of Ca2+ signaling in several types of cells. Recent studies highlighted the potential role of the K2P5.1 K+ channel in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the pathological significance of the K2P5.1 K+ channel in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The degrees of colitis, colonic epithelial damage, and colonic inflammation were quantified in the dextran sulfate sodium-induced mouse IBD model by macroscopic and histological scoring systems. The expression and functional activity of K2P5.1 in splenic CD4+ T cells were measured using real-time PCR, Western blot, and fluorescence imaging assays. A significant increase was observed in the expression of K2P5.1 in the splenic CD4+ T cells of the IBD model. Concomitant with this increase, the hyperpolarization response induced by extracellular alkaline pH was significantly larger in the IBD model with the corresponding intracellular Ca2+ rises. The expression of K2P5.1 was higher in CD4+CD25− T cells than in CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. The knockout of K2P5.1 in mice significantly suppressed the disease responses implicated in the IBD model. Alternations in intracellular Ca2+ signaling following the dysregulated expression of K2P5.1 were associated with the disease pathogenesis of IBD. The results of the present study suggest that the K2P5.1 K+ channel in CD4+CD25− T cell subset is a potential therapeutic target and biomarker for IBD. PMID:26578971

  3. Differences in the expression of transient receptor potential channel V1, transient receptor potential channel A1 and mechanosensitive two pore-domain K+ channels between the lumbar splanchnic and pelvic nerve innervations of mouse urinary bladder and colon.

    PubMed

    La, J H; Schwartz, E S; Gebhart, G F

    2011-07-14

    The bladder and distal colon are innervated by lumbar splanchnic (LSN) and pelvic nerves (PN) whose axons arise from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons at thoracolumbar (TL) and lumbosacral (LS) spinal levels, respectively. In an attempt to understand the molecular basis of differences between LSN and PN mechanosensitive afferents, we analyzed the gene expression of two potentially counteracting ion channel groups involved in mechanosensation, transient receptor potential channels (TRPV1 and TRPA1) and mechanosensitive two pore-domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels (TREK-1, TREK-2 and TRAAK), in TL and LS DRG neurons innervating mouse bladder or distal colon. The proportion of TRPV1-expressing cells (41∼61%) did not differ between TL and LS neurons innervating bladder or colon. TRPA1 was seldom detected in bladder LS neurons whereas it was expressed in 64∼66% of bladder TL, colon TL and colon LS neurons. Coexpression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 was frequent. TREK-1-expressing cells were more prevalent in LS than TL ganglia in both bladder- and colon-DRG neurons. All three K(2P) channels were detected more frequently in TRPV1-positive neurons in TL ganglia. More than half of TL neurons expressing only TRPA1 were devoid of any of the three K(2P) channels, whereas all TL neurons expressing both TRPA1 and TRPV1 expressed at least one of the K(2P) channels. These results reveal clear differences between LSN and PN sensory pathways in TRPA1 and TREK-1 gene expression and in the gene expression of K(2P) channels in TRPV1-expressing neurons. This study further documents heterogeneity of visceral afferents based on combinations of the five channels examined.

  4. Cloning and sequence analysis of human breast epithelial antigen BA46 reveals an RGD cell adhesion sequence presented on an epidermal growth factor-like domain.

    PubMed

    Couto, J R; Taylor, M R; Godwin, S G; Ceriani, R L; Peterson, J A

    1996-04-01

    The BA46 antigen of the human milk fat globule (HMFG) membrane is expressed in human breast carcinomas and has been used successfully as a target for experimental breast cancer radioimmunotherapy. To characterize this antigen further, we obtained the entire cDNA sequence and focused on its possible role in cell adhesion. The derived protein sequence of BA46 encodes a 387-residue precursor composed of a putative signal peptide, an amino-terminal epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain containing the cell adhesion tripeptide arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD), and human factor V and factor VIII C1/C2-like domains. The EGF-like domain of BA46 is similar to the calcium-binding EGF-like domains of several coagulation factors, but the BA46 domain lacks a residue required for calcium binding and the coagulation factor domains do not include an RGD sequence. Assuming that all EGF-like domains fold into a similar structure, the RGD-containing sequence in BA46 is inserted between two antiparallel beta strands. This positioning suggests a novel function for the EGF-like domain as a scaffold for RGD presentation.

  5. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  6. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  7. Structure of synaptophysin: a hexameric MARVEL-domain channel protein.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Christopher P; Stowell, Michael H B

    2007-06-01

    Synaptophysin I (SypI) is an archetypal member of the MARVEL-domain family of integral membrane proteins and one of the first synaptic vesicle proteins to be identified and cloned. Most all MARVEL-domain proteins are involved in membrane apposition and vesicle-trafficking events, but their precise role in these processes is unclear. We have purified mammalian SypI and determined its three-dimensional (3D) structure by using electron microscopy and single-particle 3D reconstruction. The hexameric structure resembles an open basket with a large pore and tenuous interactions within the cytosolic domain. The structure suggests a model for Synaptophysin's role in fusion and recycling that is regulated by known interactions with the SNARE machinery. This 3D structure of a MARVEL-domain protein provides a structural foundation for understanding the role of these important proteins in a variety of biological processes.

  8. The nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Stephen A

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes, the conduits for information exchange between the nucleus and cytoplasm, appear broadly similar in eukaryotes from yeast to human. Precisely how nuclear pore complexes regulate macromolecular and ionic traffic remains unknown, but recent advances in the identification and characterization of components of the complex by proteomics and genomics have provided new insights. PMID:11574060

  9. Characterization of a cDNA clone encoding the carboxy-terminal domain of a 90-kilodalton surface antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes.

    PubMed Central

    Franco, F R; Paranhos-Bacallà, G S; Yamauchi, L M; Yoshida, N; da Silveira, J F

    1993-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a cDNA for a metacyclic trypomastigote-specific glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 90 kDa, termed MTS-gp90. By immunoblotting, antibodies to the MTS-gp90 recombinant protein reacted exclusively with a 90-kDa antigen of metacyclic trypomastigotes. The insert of the MTS-gp90 cDNA clone strongly hybridized with a single 3.0-kb mRNA of metacyclic forms, whereas the hybridization signal with epimastigote mRNA was weak and those with RNAs from other developmental stages were negative, indicating that transcription of the MTS-gp90 gene is developmentally regulated. A series of experiments showed that the MTS-gp90 gene is present in multiple copies in the Trypanosoma cruzi genome, arranged in a nontandem manner, and that there are at least 40 copies of the gene per haploid genome. Sequence analysis of recombinant MTS-gp90 revealed 40 to 60% identity at the amino acid level with members of a family of mammalian stage-specific, 85-kDa surface antigens of T. cruzi. However, there are considerable differences in the amino acid compositions outside the homology region. Images PMID:8406808

  10. Why Clone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. Find out more about Stem Cells . Reviving Endangered or Extinct Species You might have seen the Jurassic Park movies. ... related goat species to make a male. Cloning endangered species is much easier, mainly because the surviving animals ...

  11. Channel gating pore: a new therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Kornilov, Polina; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2013-09-01

    Each subunit of voltage-gated cation channels comprises a voltage-sensing domain and a pore region. In a paper recently published in Cell Research, Li et al. showed that the gating charge pathway of the voltage sensor of the KCNQ2 K+ channel can accommodate small opener molecules and offer a new target to treat hyperexcitability disorders.

  12. Molecular cloning and cold shock induced overexpression of the DNA encoding phor sensor domain from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a target molecule for novel anti-tubercular drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langi, Gladys Emmanuella Putri; Moeis, Maelita R.; Ihsanawati, Giri-Rachman, Ernawati Arifin

    2014-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the sole cause of Tuberculosis (TB), is still a major global problem. The discovery of new anti-tubercular drugs is needed to face the increasing TB cases, especially to prevent the increase of cases with resistant Mtb. A potential novel drug target is the Mtb PhoR sensor domain protein which is the histidine kinase extracellular domain for receiving environmental signals. This protein is the initial part of the two-component system PhoR-PhoP regulating 114 genes related to the virulence of Mtb. In this study, the gene encoding PhoR sensor domain (SensPhoR) was subcloned from pGEM-T SensPhoR from the previous study (Suwanto, 2012) to pColdII. The construct pColdII SensPhoR was confirmed through restriction analysis and sequencing. Using the construct, SensPhoR was overexpressed at 15°C using Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Low temperature was chosen because according to the solubility prediction program of recombinant proteins from The University of Oklahama, the PhoR sensor domain has a chance of 79.8% to be expressed as insoluble proteins in Escherichia coli's (E. coli) cytoplasm. This prediction is also supported by other similar programs: PROSO and PROSO II. The SDS PAGE result indicated that the PhoR sensor domain recombinant protein was overexpressed. For future studies, this protein will be purified and used for structure analysis which can be used to find potential drugs through rational drug design.

  13. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the LRR domain of the LePRK1 receptor-like kinase from tomato.

    PubMed

    Xu, Anbi; Huang, Laiqiang

    2014-02-01

    LePRK1 is a receptor-like kinase involved in successful fertilization in Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato). Importantly, the extracellular leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of LePRK1 mediates transmembrane signal transduction for pollen-tube growth and pollen germination. In this study, the N-terminal extracellular LRR domain of L. esculentum-derived LePRK1 was purified using an insect-cell secretion expression system and was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 2.75 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 136.53, b = 56.01, c = 62.93 Å, β = 108.99° and two molecules per asymmetric unit.

  14. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding Clostridium paraputrificum chitinase ChiB and analysis of the functions of novel cadherin-like domains and a chitin-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, K; Karita, S; Kimura, T; Sakka, K; Ohmiya, K

    1997-01-01

    The Clostridium paraputrificum chiB gene, encoding chitinase B (ChiB), consists of an open reading frame of 2,493 nucleotides and encodes 831 amino acids with a deduced molecular weight of 90,020. The deduced ChiB is a modular enzyme composed of a family 18 catalytic domain responsible for chitinase activity, two reiterated domains of unknown function, and a chitin-binding domain (CBD). The reiterated domains are similar to the repeating units of cadherin proteins but not to fibronectin type III domains, and therefore they are referred to as cadherin-like domains. ChiB was purified from the periplasm fraction of Escherichia coli harboring the chiB gene. The molecular weight of the purified ChiB (87,000) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis, was in good agreement with the value (86,578) calculated from the deduced amino acid sequence excluding the signal peptide. ChiB was active toward chitin from crab shells, colloidal chitin, glycol chitin, and 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-N,N'-diacetylchitobioside [4-MU-(GlcNAc)2]. The pH and temperature optima of the enzyme were 6.0 and 45 degrees C, respectively. The Km and Vmax values for 4-MU-(GlcNAc)2 were estimated to be 6.3 microM and 46 micromol/min/mg, respectively. SDS-PAGE, zymogram, and Western blot analyses using antiserum raised against purified ChiB suggested that ChiB was one of the major chitinase species in the culture supernatant of C. paraputrificum. Deletion analysis showed clearly that the CBD of ChiB plays an important role in hydrolysis of native chitin but not processed chitin such as colloidal chitin. PMID:9393694

  15. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the central zinc-binding domain of the human Mcm10 DNA-replication factor.

    PubMed

    Jung, Nam Young; Bae, Won Jin; Chang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Young Chang; Cho, Yunje

    2008-06-01

    The initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires the tightly controlled assembly of a set of replication factors. Mcm10 is a highly conserved nuclear protein that plays a key role in the initiation and elongation processes of DNA replication by providing a physical link between the Mcm2-7 complex and DNA polymerases. The central domain, which contains the CCCH zinc-binding motif, is most conserved within Mcm10 and binds to DNA and several proteins, including proliferative cell nuclear antigen. In this study, the central domain of human Mcm10 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of PEG 3350. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 2.6 A on a synchrotron beamline. The crystals formed belonged to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 99.5, c = 133.0 A. According to Matthews coefficient calculations, the crystals were predicted to contain six MCM10 central domain molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  16. Velocities in Solar Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  17. Molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Juliane C

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes the basic steps involved in conventional plasmid-based cloning. The goals are to insert a DNA fragment of interest into a receiving vector plasmid, transform the plasmid into E. coli, recover the plasmid DNA, and check for correct insertion events.

  18. Pore formation by Cry toxins.

    PubMed

    Soberón, Mario; Pardo, Liliana; Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Sánchez, Jorge; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; Bravo, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria produce insecticidal Cry and Cyt proteins used in the biological control of different insect pests. In this review, we will focus on the 3d-Cry toxins that represent the biggest group of Cry proteins and also on Cyt toxins. The 3d-Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins that induce cell death by forming ionic pores into the membrane of the midgut epithelial cells in their target insect. The initial steps in the mode of action include ingestion of the protoxin, activation by midgut proteases to produce the toxin fragment and the interaction with the primary cadherin receptor. The interaction of the monomeric CrylA toxin with the cadherin receptor promotes an extra proteolytic cleavage, where helix alpha-1 of domain I is eliminated and the toxin oligomerization is induced, forming a structure of 250 kDa. The oligomeric structure binds to a secondary receptor, aminopeptidase N or alkaline phosphatase. The secondary receptor drives the toxin into detergent resistant membrane microdomains formingpores that cause osmotic shock, burst of the midgut cells and insect death. Regarding to Cyt toxins, these proteins have a synergistic effect on the toxicity of some Cry toxins. Cyt proteins are also proteolytic activated in the midgut lumen of their target, they bind to some phospholipids present in the mosquito midgut cells. The proposed mechanism of synergism between Cry and Cyt toxins is that Cyt1Aa function as a receptor for Cry toxins. The Cyt1A inserts into midgut epithelium membrane and exposes protein regions that are recognized by Cry11Aa. It was demonstrated that this interaction facilitates the oligomerization of Cry11Aa and also its pore formation activity.

  19. Cloning, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of the periplasmic sensing domain of Pseudomonas fluorescens chemotactic transducer of amino acids type A (CtaA).

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Abu Iftiaf Md Salah; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2016-09-05

    Chemotaxis towards nutrients plays a crucial role in root colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens. The P. fluorescens chemotactic transducer of amino acids type A (CtaA) mediates movement towards amino acids present in root exudates. In this study, the periplasmic sensory domain of CtaA has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as a precipitating agent. A complete data set was collected to 1.9 Å resolution using cryocooling conditions and synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to space group I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.2, b = 76.0, c = 113.3 Å. This is an important step towards elucidation of the structural basis of how CtaA recognizes its signal molecules and transduces the signal across the membrane.

  20. Positional cloning of zinc finger domain transcription factor Zfp69, a candidate gene for obesity-associated diabetes contributed by mouse locus Nidd/SJL.

    PubMed

    Scherneck, Stephan; Nestler, Matthias; Vogel, Heike; Blüher, Matthias; Block, Marcel-Dominique; Berriel Diaz, Mauricio; Herzig, Stephan; Schulz, Nadja; Teichert, Marko; Tischer, Sina; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Kluge, Reinhart; Schürmann, Annette; Joost, Hans-Georg

    2009-07-01

    Polygenic type 2 diabetes in mouse models is associated with obesity and results from a combination of adipogenic and diabetogenic alleles. Here we report the identification of a candidate gene for the diabetogenic effect of a QTL (Nidd/SJL, Nidd1) contributed by the SJL, NON, and NZB strains in outcross populations with New Zealand Obese (NZO) mice. A critical interval of distal chromosome 4 (2.1 Mbp) conferring the diabetic phenotype was identified by interval-specific congenic introgression of SJL into diabetes-resistant C57BL/6J, and subsequent reporter cross with NZO. Analysis of the 10 genes in the critical interval by sequencing, qRT-PCR, and RACE-PCR revealed a striking allelic variance of Zfp69 encoding zinc finger domain transcription factor 69. In NZO and C57BL/6J, a retrotransposon (IAPLTR1a) in intron 3 disrupted the gene by formation of a truncated mRNA that lacked the coding sequence for the KRAB (Krüppel-associated box) and Znf-C2H2 domains of Zfp69, whereas the diabetogenic SJL, NON, and NZB alleles generated a normal mRNA. When combined with the B6.V-Lep(ob) background, the diabetogenic Zfp69(SJL) allele produced hyperglycaemia, reduced gonadal fat, and increased plasma and liver triglycerides. mRNA levels of the human orthologue of Zfp69, ZNF642, were significantly increased in adipose tissue from patients with type 2 diabetes. We conclude that Zfp69 is the most likely candidate for the diabetogenic effect of Nidd/SJL, and that retrotransposon IAPLTR1a contributes substantially to the genetic heterogeneity of mouse strains. Expression of the transcription factor in adipose tissue may play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

  1. Engineering, cloning, and functional characterization of recombinant LIM mineralization protein-1 containing an N-terminal HIV-derived membrane transduction domain.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, Sreedhara; Okada, Motohiro; Liu, Yunshan; Viggeswarapu, Manjula; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D

    2009-06-01

    Short peptide sequences known as protein transduction domains have become increasingly prevalent as tools to internalize molecules that would otherwise remain extracellular. Here, we determine whether a purified recombinant mammalian intracellular osteogenic factor delivered by a HIV-derived TAT-peptide tag is indeed capable of intracellular localization in a form accessible to interaction with other proteins. We engineered and bacterially expressed a TAT-fusion-cDNA construct of a known osteogenic factor, LIM mineralization protein-1 (LMP-1) involved in the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway that has the potential to serve as an enhancer of BMP-2 efficacy. The expressed recombinant protein contains an N-terminal (His)(6)-tag, a hemagglutinin(HA)-tag, and an 11-amino acid HIV-derived TAT-membrane transduction domain and was purified to homogeneity by Sephacryl S-100 molecular exclusion and Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography. The purified TAT-LMP-1 protein was chemically labeled with fluorescein, and its time and concentration dependent entry into rabbit blood cells was monitored by flow cytometry. We demonstrate the accumulation of TAT-tagged LMP-1 both in cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. By performing affinity pull-down assays, we confirm our earlier findings that the recombinant TAT-LMP-1, when used as molecular bait to identify the intracellular binding proteins, interacts with Smurf1, a known binding partner of LMP-1. We also show potentiation of BMP-2 activity using the purified TAT-LMP-1 in mouse muscle C2C12 cells by assaying a heterologous luciferase-reporter construct containing multiple copies of a BMP-responsive sequence motif. Finally, we also confirm the biological activity of the purified TAT-LMP-1 by showing enhancement of BMP-2 induced increase of alkaline phosphatase mRNA and protein by RT-PCR and enzyme activity, respectively.

  2. Expression in yeast of a cDNA clone encoding a transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 fragment (a.a. 591-642) bearing the major immunodominant domain of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Gairin, J E; Madaule, P; Traincard, F; Barrès, E; Rossier, J

    1991-04-01

    A cDNA clone corresponding to the gp41 gene fragment nucl. 7573-7730 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was selected from a random HIV-1 genomic library expressed in yeast. This clone encodes a 52-residue long peptide (amino acid (a.a.)) 591-642) bearing the major immunodominant domain (a.a. 598-609) of the HIV-1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. Expression of the recombinant peptide pSE-env591-642 was driven by the alpha-mating factor leader sequence contained in a plasmid pSE-x allowing the synthesis and secretion of foreign gene product in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Time-course analysis of the secretion into culture medium revealed an optimal production of the glycoprotein fragment at 28-30 h with no observable cytotoxicity. The secreted peptide is highly glycosylated with NH2-terminal heterogeneity probably due to different post-translational modifications. The secreted peptide shows an extreme antigenicity since in ELISA assays, as few as 5 microliters/well of crude supernatant are sufficient to obtain a strong detection by monoclonal antibodies or by 100% of sera from HIV-infected individuals. The purified glycopeptide pSE-env591-642 binds to a monoclonal antibody directed against the immunodominant epitope (a.a. 603-609) with an affinity similar to that of the complete glycoprotein gp160 (Kd values within the 10(-10) M range) and with a 100-fold higher affinity than that of a linear peptide fragment SP-env584-609. These results indicate that overexpression in yeast can efficiently provide an abundant source of highly antigenic gp41 protein fragment pSE-env591-642 which retains the antigenic properties of the native gp160 protein. Such a recombinant peptide should therefore be considered as a good candidate for antigen in HIV detection tests.

  3. Electrokinetic induced solute dispersion in porous media; pore network modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuai; Schotting, Ruud; Raoof, Amir

    2013-04-01

    Electrokinetic flow plays an important role in remediation process, separation technique, and chromatography. The solute dispersion is a key parameter to determine transport efficiency. In this study, we present the electrokinetic effects on solute dispersion in porous media at the pore scale, using a pore network model. The analytical solution of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was obtained to quantity the fluid flow velocity in a cylinder capillary. The effect of electrical double layer on the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was investigated by applying different ionic concentration. By averaging the velocity over cross section within a single pore, the average flux was obtained. Applying such single pore relationships, in the thin electrical double layer limit, to each and every pore within the pore network, potential distribution and the induced fluid flow was calculated for the whole domain. The resulting pore velocities were used to simulate solute transport within the pore network. By averaging the results, we obtained the breakthrough curve (BTC) of the average concentration at the outlet of the pore network. Optimizing the solution of continuum scale advection-dispersion equation to such a BTC, solute dispersion coefficient was estimated. We have compared the dispersion caused by electrokinetic flow and pure pressure driven flow under different Peclet number values. In addition, the effect of microstructure and topological properties of porous media on fluid flow and solute dispersion is presented, mainly based on different pore coordination numbers.

  4. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the N-­terminal carbohydrate-recognition domain of human galectin-4

    PubMed Central

    Zimbardi, Ana Lucia L. R.; Pinheiro, Matheus P.; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Nonato, M. Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Galectin-4 is a tandem-repeat-type galectin that is expressed in the epithelium of the alimentary tract from the tongue to the large intestine. Additionally, strong expression of galectin-4 can also be induced in cancers in other tissues, including the breast and liver. In order to explore its potential as a target for anticancer drug design, elucidation of the structural basis of the carbohydrate-binding specificities of galectin-4 has been focused on. As an initial step, the N-­terminal carbohydrate-recognition domain of human galectin-4 (hGal4-CRD-­1) has been successfully crystallized using the vapour-diffusion technique, a complete data set has been collected to 2.2 Å resolution and the structure has been solved by the molecular-replacement technique. The crystals belonged to space group P6122, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 71.25, c = 108.66 Å. The asymmetric unit contained one molecule of hGal4-CRD-1, with a V M value of 2.34 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 47.51%. PMID:20445255

  5. Cloning, expression analysis, and RNA interference study of a HORMA domain containing autophagy-related gene 13 (ATG13) from the coleopteran beetle, Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hee; Jo, Yong Hun; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Park, Ki Beom; Tindwa, Hamisi; Seo, Gi Won; Chandrasekar, Raman; Lee, Yong Seok; Han, Yeon Soo

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a process that is necessary during starvation, as it replenishes metabolic precursors by eliminating damaged organelles. Autophagy is mediated by more than 35 autophagy-related (Atg) proteins that participate in the nucleation, elongation, and curving of the autophagosome membrane. In a pursuit to address the role of autophagy during development and immune resistance of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, we screened ATG gene sequences from the whole-larva transcriptome database. We identified a homolog of ATG13 gene in T. molitor (designated as TmATG13) that comprises a cDNA of 1176 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 391 amino acids. Analyses of the structure-specific features of TmAtg13 showed an intrinsically disordered middle and C-terminal region that was rich in regulatory phosphorylation sites. The N-terminal Atg13 domain had a HORMA (Hop1, Rev7, and Mad2) fold containing amino acid residues conserved across the Atg13 insect orthologs. A quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that TmATG13 was expressed ubiquitously during all developmental stages of the insect. TmATG13 mRNA expression was high in the fat body and gut of the larval and adult stages of the insect. The TmATG13 transcripts were expressed at a high level until 6 days of ovarian development, followed by a significant decline. Silencing of ATG13 transcripts in T. molitor larvae showed a reduced survivability of 39 and 38% in response to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus infection. Furthermore, the role of TmAtg13 in initiating autophagy as a part of the host cell autophagic complex of the host cells against the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is currently under study and will be critical to unfold the structure-function relationships.

  6. Cloning, expression analysis, and RNA interference study of a HORMA domain containing autophagy-related gene 13 (ATG13) from the coleopteran beetle, Tenebrio molitor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hee; Jo, Yong Hun; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Park, Ki Beom; Tindwa, Hamisi; Seo, Gi Won; Chandrasekar, Raman; Lee, Yong Seok; Han, Yeon Soo

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a process that is necessary during starvation, as it replenishes metabolic precursors by eliminating damaged organelles. Autophagy is mediated by more than 35 autophagy-related (Atg) proteins that participate in the nucleation, elongation, and curving of the autophagosome membrane. In a pursuit to address the role of autophagy during development and immune resistance of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, we screened ATG gene sequences from the whole-larva transcriptome database. We identified a homolog of ATG13 gene in T. molitor (designated as TmATG13) that comprises a cDNA of 1176 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 391 amino acids. Analyses of the structure-specific features of TmAtg13 showed an intrinsically disordered middle and C-terminal region that was rich in regulatory phosphorylation sites. The N-terminal Atg13 domain had a HORMA (Hop1, Rev7, and Mad2) fold containing amino acid residues conserved across the Atg13 insect orthologs. A quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that TmATG13 was expressed ubiquitously during all developmental stages of the insect. TmATG13 mRNA expression was high in the fat body and gut of the larval and adult stages of the insect. The TmATG13 transcripts were expressed at a high level until 6 days of ovarian development, followed by a significant decline. Silencing of ATG13 transcripts in T. molitor larvae showed a reduced survivability of 39 and 38% in response to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus infection. Furthermore, the role of TmAtg13 in initiating autophagy as a part of the host cell autophagic complex of the host cells against the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is currently under study and will be critical to unfold the structure-function relationships. PMID:26136688

  7. The mouse glucocorticoid receptor: mapping of functional domains by cloning, sequencing and expression of wild-type and mutant receptor proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, M; Northrop, J P; Ringold, G M

    1986-01-01

    We have isolated mouse glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cDNAs which, when expressed in transfected mammalian cells, produce a fully functional GR protein. Sequence analysis reveals an open reading frame of 2349 bp which could encode a protein of approximately 86,000 daltons. We have also isolated two receptor cDNAs from mouse S49 nuclear transfer-deficient (nt-) cells which encode mutant forms of the receptor protein. One cDNA encodes a protein that is unable to bind hormone and represents the endogenous hormone binding deficient receptor recently discovered in S49 cells. The lesion in this receptor is due to a single amino acid substitution (Glu-546 to Gly). The second cDNA from nt- cells produces a receptor protein that is able to bind hormone but has reduced nuclear binding. This cDNA, therefore, encodes for the S49 nt- receptor which has been shown to have reduced affinity for DNA. The lesion maps to a single amino acid substitution (Arg-484 to His) located in a highly Cys, Lys, Arg-rich region of the protein previously implicated in DNA binding. Our studies provide unambiguous identification of receptor domains and specific amino acids critical for the hormone and DNA binding properties of this transcriptional regulatory protein. Contained within the first 106 amino acids of the mouse GR is a stretch of nine glutamines with two prolines which are related to the family of transcribed repetitive elements, opa, found in Drosophila melanogaster. A truncated receptor lacking these 106 amino acids is functionally indistinguishable from the wild-type receptor. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3780669

  8. Cloning and characterization of PIMT, a protein with a methyltransferase domain, which interacts with and enhances nuclear receptor coactivator PRIP function.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Qi, C; Cao, W Q; Yeldandi, A V; Rao, M S; Reddy, J K

    2001-08-28

    The nuclear receptor coactivators participate in the transcriptional activation of specific genes by nuclear receptors. In this study, we report the isolation of a nuclear receptor coactivator-interacting protein from a human liver cDNA library by using the coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-interacting protein (PRIP) (ASC2/AIB3/RAP250/NRC/TRBP) as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen. Human PRIP-interacting protein cDNA has an ORF of 2,556 nucleotides, encodes a protein with 852 amino acids, and contains a 9-aa VVDAFCGVG methyltransferase motif I and an invariant GXXGXXI segment found in K-homology motifs of many RNA-binding proteins. The gene encoding this protein, designated PRIP-interacting protein with methyltransferase domain (PIMT), is localized on chromosome 8q11 and spans more than 40 kb. PIMT mRNA is ubiquitously expressed, with a high level of expression in heart, skeletal muscle, kidney, liver, and placenta. Using the immunofluorescence localization method, we found that PIMT and PRIP proteins appear colocalized in the nucleus. PIMT strongly interacts with PRIP under in vitro and in vivo conditions, and the PIMT-binding site on PRIP is in the region encompassing amino acids 773-927. PIMT binds S-adenosyl-l-methionine, the methyl donor for methyltransfer reaction, and it also binds RNA, suggesting that it is a putative RNA methyltransferase. PIMT enhances the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and retinoid-X-receptor alpha, which is further stimulated by coexpression of PRIP, implying that PIMT is a component of nuclear receptor signal transduction apparatus acting through PRIP. Definitive identification of the specific substrate of PIMT and the role of this RNA-binding protein in transcriptional regulation remain to be determined.

  9. Cloning and characterization of PIMT, a protein with a methyltransferase domain, which interacts with and enhances nuclear receptor coactivator PRIP function

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yijun; Qi, Chao; Cao, Wen-Qing; Yeldandi, Anjana V.; Rao, M. Sambasiva; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear receptor coactivators participate in the transcriptional activation of specific genes by nuclear receptors. In this study, we report the isolation of a nuclear receptor coactivator-interacting protein from a human liver cDNA library by using the coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-interacting protein (PRIP) (ASC2/AIB3/RAP250/NRC/TRBP) as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen. Human PRIP-interacting protein cDNA has an ORF of 2,556 nucleotides, encodes a protein with 852 amino acids, and contains a 9-aa VVDAFCGVG methyltransferase motif I and an invariant GXXGXXI segment found in K-homology motifs of many RNA-binding proteins. The gene encoding this protein, designated PRIP-interacting protein with methyltransferase domain (PIMT), is localized on chromosome 8q11 and spans more than 40 kb. PIMT mRNA is ubiquitously expressed, with a high level of expression in heart, skeletal muscle, kidney, liver, and placenta. Using the immunofluorescence localization method, we found that PIMT and PRIP proteins appear colocalized in the nucleus. PIMT strongly interacts with PRIP under in vitro and in vivo conditions, and the PIMT-binding site on PRIP is in the region encompassing amino acids 773–927. PIMT binds S-adenosyl-l-methionine, the methyl donor for methyltransfer reaction, and it also binds RNA, suggesting that it is a putative RNA methyltransferase. PIMT enhances the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and retinoid-X-receptor α, which is further stimulated by coexpression of PRIP, implying that PIMT is a component of nuclear receptor signal transduction apparatus acting through PRIP. Definitive identification of the specific substrate of PIMT and the role of this RNA-binding protein in transcriptional regulation remain to be determined. PMID:11517327

  10. Structure and mechanism of peptide-induced membrane pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Shuo

    This thesis reports the studies of the structure and mechanism of peptide-induced membrane pores by antimicrobial peptide alamethicin and by a peptide named Baxalpha5, which is derived from Bax protein. Alamethicin is one of best known antimicrobial peptides, which are ubiquitous throughout the biological world. Bax-alpha5 peptide is the pore-forming domain of apoptosis regulator protein Bax, which activates pore formation on outer mitochondrial membrane to release cytochrome c to initiate programmed cell death. Both peptides as well as many other pore-forming peptides, induce pores in membrane, however the structure and mechanism of the pore formation were unknown. By utilizing grazing angle x-ray diffraction, I was able to reconstruct the electron density profile of the membrane pores induced by both peptides. The fully hydrated multiple bilayers of peptide-lipid mixture on solid substrate were prepared in the condition that pores were present, as established previously by neutron in-plane scattering and oriented circular dichroism. At dehydrated conditions, the inter bilayer distance of the sample shortened and the interactions between bilayers caused the membrane pores to become long-ranged correlated and formed a periodically ordered lattice of rhombohedral symmetry, so that x-ray diffraction can be applied. To help solving the phase problem of diffraction, a brominated lipid was used and multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction was performed below the bromine K-edge. The reconstructed electron density profiles unambiguously revealed that the alamethicin-induced membrane pore is of barrel-stave type, while the Bax-alpha5 induced pore is of lipidic toroidal (wormhole) type. The underlying mechanism of pore formation was resolved by observing the time-dependent process of pore formation in vesicles exposed to Bax-alpha5 solutions, as well as the membrane thinning experiment. This demonstrated that Bax-alpha5 exhibited the same sigmoidal concentration dependence as

  11. The pore space scramble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormally, Alexandra; Bentham, Michelle; Vermeylen, Saskia; Markusson, Nils

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and energy security continue to be the context of the transition to a secure, affordable and low carbon energy future, both in the UK and beyond. This is reflected in for example, binding climate policy targets at the EU level, the introduction of renewable energy targets, and has also led to an increasing interest in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology with its potential to help mitigate against the effects of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning. The UK has proposed a three phase strategy to integrate CCS into its energy system in the long term focussing on off-shore subsurface storage (DECC, 2014). The potential of CCS therefore, raises a number of challenging questions and issues surrounding the long-term storage of CO2 captured and injected into underground spaces and, alongside other novel uses of the subsurface, contributes to opening a new field for discussion on the governance of the subsurface. Such 'novel' uses of the subsurface have lead to it becoming an increasingly contested space in terms of its governance, with issues emerging around the role of ownership, liability and property rights of subsurface pore space. For instance, questions over the legal ownership of pore space have arisen with ambiguity over the legal standpoint of the surface owner and those wanting to utilise the pore space for gas storage, and suggestions of whether there are depths at which legal 'ownership' becomes obsolete (Barton, 2014). Here we propose to discuss this 'pore space scramble' and provide examples of the competing trajectories of different stakeholders, particularly in the off-shore context given its priority in the UK. We also propose to highlight the current ambiguity around property law of pore space in the UK with reference to approaches currently taken in different national contexts. Ultimately we delineate contrasting models of governance to illustrate the choices we face and consider the ethics of these models for the common good

  12. Cloning and expression of a jellyfish calcium channel beta subunit reveal functional conservation of the alpha1-beta interaction.

    PubMed

    Jeziorski, M C; Greenberg, R M; Anderson, P A

    1999-01-01

    In high voltage-activated calcium channels, the binding between the pore-forming alpha1 subunit and the modulatory beta subunit is mediated by interaction domains in each molecule that are highly conserved among most known subunits. However, the interaction domain within CyCaalpha1, an alpha1 subunit cloned from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata, matches the canonical sequence of the alpha1 interaction domain at only four of nine sites. We have now cloned a cDNA from Cyanea neuromuscular tissue that encodes a Ca2+ channel beta subunit. The subunit, named CyCabeta, shares 47-54% identity with vertebrate beta subunit isoforms, but is most highly conserved within its interaction domain. Coexpression of CyCabeta with CyCaalpha1 in Xenopus oocytes increases the amplitude of the CyCaalpha1 current and shifts its activation to more hyperpolarized potentials. These responses are mimicked by coexpression of the rat beta2a subunit, demonstrating that the alpha1 beta interaction is functionally conserved between cnidarians and mammals. CyCabeta also markedly accelerates the rate of recovery of CyCaalpha1 from inactivation, an action that is modestly duplicated by beta2a and may represent an additional mechanism by which beta subunit isoforms differentially modulate alpha1 subunits. These findings establish that limited conservation within the alpha1 interaction domain is sufficient to allow full modulation by a beta subunit, as well as altered regulation by different beta isoforms.

  13. Exocytotic fusion pores are composed of both lipids and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Huan; Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel; Jeggle, Pia; Chanda, Baron; Edwardson, J Michael; Chapman, Edwin R

    2016-01-01

    During exocytosis, fusion pores form the first aqueous connection that allows escape of neurotransmitters and hormones from secretory vesicles. Although it is well established that SNARE proteins catalyze fusion, the structure and composition of fusion pores remain unknown. Here, we exploited the rigid framework and defined size of nanodiscs to interrogate the properties of reconstituted fusion pores, using the neurotransmitter glutamate as a content-mixing marker. Efficient Ca2+-stimulated bilayer fusion, and glutamate release, occurred with approximately two molecules of mouse synaptobrevin 2 reconstituted into ~6-nm nanodiscs. The transmembrane domains of SNARE proteins assumed distinct roles in lipid mixing versus content release and were exposed to polar solvent during fusion. Additionally, tryptophan substitutions at specific positions in these transmembrane domains decreased glutamate flux. Together, these findings indicate that the fusion pore is a hybrid structure composed of both lipids and proteins. PMID:26656855

  14. [Eugenics and human cloning].

    PubMed

    Boloz, W

    2001-01-01

    Because of legislative bans there are still no reports of human cloning. However eager public debate is currently running, concerning medical, legal, social and ethical aspects of human cloning. Arguments for and against human cloning are presented. An important argument against cloning is the danger of eugenic tendencies connected with cloning, which could lead to genetic discrimination.

  15. Magnetic-resonance pore imaging of nonsymmetric microscopic pore shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Stefan Andreas; Wang, Xindi; Hosking, Peter; Simpson, M. Cather; Hunter, Mark; Galvosas, Petrik

    2015-07-01

    Imaging of the microstructure of porous media such as biological tissue or porous solids is of high interest in health science and technology, engineering and material science. Magnetic resonance pore imaging (MRPI) is a recent technique based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which allows us to acquire images of the average pore shape in a given sample. Here we provide details on the experimental design, challenges, and requirements of MRPI, including its calibration procedures. Utilizing a laser-machined phantom sample, we present images of microscopic pores with a hemiequilateral triangular shape even in the presence of NMR relaxation effects at the pore walls. We therefore show that MRPI is applicable to porous samples without a priori knowledge about their pore shape and symmetry. Furthermore, we introduce "MRPI mapping," which combines MRPI with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This enables one to resolve microscopic pore sizes and shapes spatially, thus expanding the application of MRPI to samples with heterogeneous distributions of pores.

  16. Biophysics, pathophysiology, and pharmacology of ion channel gating pores

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Chahine, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Voltage sensor domains (VSDs) are a feature of voltage gated ion channels (VGICs) and voltage sensitive proteins. They are composed of four transmembrane (TM) segments (S1–S4). Currents leaking through VSDs are called omega or gating pore currents. Gating pores are caused by mutations of the highly conserved positively charged amino acids in the S4 segment that disrupt interactions between the S4 segment and the gating charge transfer center (GCTC). The GCTC separates the intracellular and extracellular water crevices. The disruption of S4–GCTC interactions allows these crevices to communicate and create a fast activating and non-inactivating alternative cation-selective permeation pathway of low conductance, or a gating pore. Gating pore currents have recently been shown to cause periodic paralysis phenotypes. There is also increasing evidence that gating pores are linked to several other familial diseases. For example, gating pores in Nav1.5 and Kv7.2 channels may underlie mixed arrhythmias associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) phenotypes and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH), respectively. There is little evidence for the existence of gating pore blockers. Moreover, it is known that a number of toxins bind to the VSD of a specific domain of Na+ channels. These toxins may thus modulate gating pore currents. This focus on the VSD motif opens up a new area of research centered on developing molecules to treat a number of cell excitability disorders such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmias, and pain. The purpose of the present review is to summarize existing knowledge of the pathophysiology, biophysics, and pharmacology of gating pore currents and to serve as a guide for future studies aimed at improving our understanding of gating pores and their pathophysiological roles. PMID:24772081

  17. Model Pores of Molecular Dimension

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, J. A.; Anderson, J. L.; Ho, W. S.; Petzny, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Extremely uniform pores of near molecular dimension can be formed by the irradiation-etching technique first demonstrated by Price and Walker. The technique has now been developed to the stage where it can be used to fabricate model membranes for examining the various steric, hydrodynamic, and electrodynamic phenomena encountered in transport through molecular-size pores. Methods for preparing and characterizing membranes with pores as small as 25 A (radius) are described in this paper. Results on pore size determination via Knudsen gas flow and electrolyte conduction are compared. Pore wall modification by monolayer deposition is also discussed. PMID:4339801

  18. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  19. Nuclear Pore-Like Structures in a Compartmentalized Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Sagulenko, Evgeny; Green, Kathryn; Yee, Benjamin; Morgan, Garry; Leis, Andrew; Lee, Kuo-Chang; Butler, Margaret K.; Chia, Nicholas; Pham, Uyen Thi Phuong; Lindgreen, Stinus; Catchpole, Ryan; Poole, Anthony M.; Fuerst, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Planctomycetes are distinguished from other Bacteria by compartmentalization of cells via internal membranes, interpretation of which has been subject to recent debate regarding potential relations to Gram-negative cell structure. In our interpretation of the available data, the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus contains a nuclear body compartment, and thus possesses a type of cell organization with parallels to the eukaryote nucleus. Here we show that pore-like structures occur in internal membranes of G.obscuriglobus and that they have elements structurally similar to eukaryote nuclear pores, including a basket, ring-spoke structure, and eight-fold rotational symmetry. Bioinformatic analysis of proteomic data reveals that some of the G. obscuriglobus proteins associated with pore-containing membranes possess structural domains found in eukaryote nuclear pore complexes. Moreover, immunogold labelling demonstrates localization of one such protein, containing a β-propeller domain, specifically to the G. obscuriglobus pore-like structures. Finding bacterial pores within internal cell membranes and with structural similarities to eukaryote nuclear pore complexes raises the dual possibilities of either hitherto undetected homology or stunning evolutionary convergence. PMID:28146565

  20. Characterization of fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5) gene in chickens: Cloning, tissue expression, and regulation of its expression in the muscle by fasting and cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Fang, Wenqian; Hu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yajun; Li, Juan

    2015-10-10

    Irisin, a novel myokine encoded by fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 gene (FNDC5), is reported to stimulate brown fat-like development of white fat tissue and thermogenesis in mammals recently. However, information about the structure, tissue expression, and roles of FNDC5/irisin remains unknown in non-mammalian vertebrates including birds. In this study, we first cloned the FNDC5 (cFNDC5) cDNA from chickens. cFNDC5 is predicted to encode a 220-amino acid precursor containing the putative 'irisin peptide' of 112 amino acids, which shows high amino acid sequence identity with irisin of humans (97%), mice (97%), anole lizards (93%) and zebrafish (~80%). Using quantitative real-time PCR, we further examined cFNDC5 mRNA expression in chicken tissues. The results showed that in adult chickens, cFNDC5 is abundantly expressed in the muscle, heart, pituitary, ovary and various brain regions, and moderately expressed in adipose tissue, kidneys, lung, testes and small intestine. Moreover, cFNDC5 is also abundantly expressed in the muscle, brain, hypothalamus and pituitary of developing embryos and post-hatching chicks. Interestingly, we noted that cFNDC5 expression in the muscle of 3-week-old chicks could be induced by fasting and cold exposure, while its expression decreases during differentiation of pre-adipocytes cultured in vitro. Collectively, our data suggest that FNDC5/irisin is more than a 'myokine' and may be related to the development/functions of many tissues (e.g. muscle, brain, fat), as well as metabolic status of chickens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pore dynamics in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozen, I.; Dommersnes, P.

    2014-09-01

    Transient circular pores can open in plasma membrane of cells due to mechanical stress, and failure to repair such pores lead to cell death. Similar pores in the form of defects also exist among smectic membranes, such as in myelin sheaths or mitochondrial membranes. The formation and growth of membrane defects are associated with diseases, for example multiple sclerosis. A deeper understanding of membrane pore dynamics can provide a more refined picture of membrane integrity-related disease development, and possibly also treatment options and strategies. Pore dynamics is also of great importance regarding healthcare applications such as drug delivery, gene or as recently been implied, cancer therapy. The dynamics of pores significantly differ in stacks which are confined in 2D compared to those in cells or vesicles. In this short review, we will summarize the dynamics of different types of pores that can be observed in biological membranes, which include circular transient, fusion and hemi-fusion pores. We will dedicate a section to floral and fractal pores which were discovered a few years ago and have highly peculiar characteristics. Finally, we will discuss the repair mechanisms of large area pores in conjunction with the current cell membrane repair hypotheses.

  2. Push-and-pull regulation of the fusion pore by synaptotagmin-7.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Margarita; Alés, Eva; Montes, María Angeles; Bonifas, Imelda; Jemal, Imane; Lindau, Manfred; Maximov, Anton; Südhof, Thomas C; Alvarez de Toledo, Guillermo

    2010-11-02

    In chromaffin cells, Ca(2+) binding to synaptotagmin-1 and -7 triggers exocytosis by promoting fusion pore opening and fusion pore expansion. Synaptotagmins contain two C2 domains that both bind Ca(2+) and contribute to exocytosis; however, it remains unknown whether the C2 domains act similarly or differentially to promote opening and expansion of fusion pores. Here, we use patch amperometry measurements in WT and synaptotagmin-7-mutant chromaffin cells to analyze the role of Ca(2+) binding to the two synaptotagmin-7 C2 domains in exocytosis. We show that, surprisingly, Ca(2+) binding to the C2A domain suffices to trigger fusion pore opening but that the resulting fusion pores are unstable and collapse, causing a dramatic increase in kiss-and-run fusion events. Thus, synaptotagmin-7 controls fusion pore dynamics during exocytosis via a push-and-pull mechanism in which Ca(2+) binding to both C2 domains promotes fusion pore opening, but the C2B domain is selectively essential for continuous expansion of an otherwise unstable fusion pore.

  3. Push-and-pull regulation of the fusion pore by synaptotagmin-7

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Margarita; Alés, Eva; Montes, María Angeles; Bonifas, Imelda; Jemal, Imane; Lindau, Manfred; Maximov, Anton; Südhof, Thomas C.; Alvarez de Toledo, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    In chromaffin cells, Ca2+ binding to synaptotagmin-1 and -7 triggers exocytosis by promoting fusion pore opening and fusion pore expansion. Synaptotagmins contain two C2 domains that both bind Ca2+ and contribute to exocytosis; however, it remains unknown whether the C2 domains act similarly or differentially to promote opening and expansion of fusion pores. Here, we use patch amperometry measurements in WT and synaptotagmin-7–mutant chromaffin cells to analyze the role of Ca2+ binding to the two synaptotagmin-7 C2 domains in exocytosis. We show that, surprisingly, Ca2+ binding to the C2A domain suffices to trigger fusion pore opening but that the resulting fusion pores are unstable and collapse, causing a dramatic increase in kiss-and-run fusion events. Thus, synaptotagmin-7 controls fusion pore dynamics during exocytosis via a push-and-pull mechanism in which Ca2+ binding to both C2 domains promotes fusion pore opening, but the C2B domain is selectively essential for continuous expansion of an otherwise unstable fusion pore. PMID:20956309

  4. On classical cloning and no-cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Nicholas J.

    2012-02-01

    It is part of information theory folklore that, while quantum theory prohibits the generic (or universal) cloning of states, such cloning is allowed by classical information theory. Indeed, many take the phenomenon of no-cloning to be one of the features that distinguishes quantum mechanics from classical mechanics. In this paper, we argue that pace conventional wisdom, in the case where one does not include a machine system, there is an analog of the no-cloning theorem for classical systems. However, upon adjoining a non-trivial machine system (or ancilla) one finds that, pace the quantum case, the obstruction to cloning disappears for pure states. We begin by discussing some conceptual points and category-theoretic generalities having to do with cloning, and proceed to discuss no-cloning in both the case of (non-statistical) classical mechanics and classical statistical mechanics.

  5. The Clone Factory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Have humans been cloned? Is it possible? Immediate interest is sparked when students are asked these questions. In response to their curiosity, the clone factory activity was developed to help them understand the process of cloning. In this activity, students reenact the cloning process, in a very simplified simulation. After completing the…

  6. The Clone Factory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Have humans been cloned? Is it possible? Immediate interest is sparked when students are asked these questions. In response to their curiosity, the clone factory activity was developed to help them understand the process of cloning. In this activity, students reenact the cloning process, in a very simplified simulation. After completing the…

  7. Stimulus-responsive track pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masaru; Tamada, Masao; Asano, Masaharu; Omichi, Hideki; Kubota, Hitoshi; Katakai, Ryoichi; Spohr, Reimar; Vetter, Johann

    1993-03-01

    Ion track grafting enables the manufacture of chemically responsive track pores analogous to the discrete membrane channels found in biology. For this purpose etched ion tracks generated in CR-39 are surface-grafted by methacryloyl-L-alaninemethylester. In the future, the responsive track pores could be used to model the actively controlled channels in biomembranes and may lead to interesting technological applications.

  8. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  9. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  10. Molecular biology and biophysical properties of ion channel gating pores.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Chahine, Mohamed

    2014-11-01

    The voltage sensitive domain (VSD) is a pivotal structure of voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs) and plays an essential role in the generation of electrochemical signals by neurons, striated muscle cells, and endocrine cells. The VSD is not unique to VGICs. Recent studies have shown that a VSD regulates a phosphatase. Similarly, Hv1, a voltage-sensitive protein that lacks an apparent pore domain, is a self-contained voltage sensor that operates as an H⁺ channel. VSDs are formed by four transmembrane helices (S1-S4). The S4 helix is positively charged due to the presence of arginine and lysine residues. It is surrounded by two water crevices that extend into the membrane from both the extracellular and intracellular milieus. A hydrophobic septum disrupts communication between these water crevices thus preventing the permeation of ions. The septum is maintained by interactions between the charged residues of the S4 segment and the gating charge transfer center. Mutating the charged residue of the S4 segment allows the water crevices to communicate and generate gating pore or omega pore. Gating pore currents have been reported to underlie several neuronal and striated muscle channelopathies. Depending on which charged residue on the S4 segment is mutated, gating pores are permeant either at depolarized or hyperpolarized voltages. Gating pores are cation selective and seem to converge toward Eisenmann's first or second selectivity sequences. Most gating pores are blocked by guanidine derivatives as well as trivalent and quadrivalent cations. Gating pores can be used to study the movement of the voltage sensor and could serve as targets for novel small therapeutic molecules.

  11. Multipartite asymmetric quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Iblisdir, S.; Gisin, N.; Acin, A.; Cerf, N.J.; Filip, R.; Fiurasek, J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the optimal distribution of quantum information over multipartite systems in asymmetric settings. We introduce cloning transformations that take N identical replicas of a pure state in any dimension as input and yield a collection of clones with nonidentical fidelities. As an example, if the clones are partitioned into a set of M{sub A} clones with fidelity F{sup A} and another set of M{sub B} clones with fidelity F{sup B}, the trade-off between these fidelities is analyzed, and particular cases of optimal N{yields}M{sub A}+M{sub B} cloning machines are exhibited. We also present an optimal 1{yields}1+1+1 cloning machine, which is an example of a tripartite fully asymmetric cloner. Finally, it is shown how these cloning machines can be optically realized.

  12. Aristotle and headless clones.

    PubMed

    Mosteller, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Cloned organisms can be genetically altered so that they do not exhibit higher brain functioning. This form of therapeutic cloning allows for genetically identical organs and tissues to be harvested from the clone for the use of the organism that is cloned. "Spare parts" cloning promises many opportunities for future medical advances. What is the ontological and ethical status of spare parts, headless clones? This paper attempts to answer this question from the perspective of Aristotle's view of the soul. Aristotle's metaphysics as applied to his view of biological essences generates an ethic that can contribute to moral reasoning regarding the use of headless spare parts clones. The task of this paper is to show the implications that Aristotle's view of the soul, if it is true, would have on the ethics of headless, spare parts cloning.

  13. Ethical issues in cloning.

    PubMed

    Satris, S

    2000-01-01

    There is great public concern with the ethics of human cloning. This paper briefly examines some of what I identify as pseudo-problems or myths associated with cloning, and some of the more substantial ethical concerns.

  14. Cloning in reproductive medicine.

    PubMed

    Illmensee, K

    2001-08-01

    This review article summarizes the historical development of mammalian cloning, presents current advances and presumed risk factors in the field of reproductive cloning, discusses possible clinical applications of therapeutic and diagnostic cloning and outlines prospective commercial trends in pharmaceutical cloning. Predictable progress in biotechnology and stem cell engineering should prove to be advantageous for patients' health and for novel benefits in reproductive and regenerative medicine.

  15. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, Hagan; Walker, Barbara J.; Chang, Chung-yu; Niblack, Brett; Panchal, Rekha

    1998-01-01

    An inactive pore-forming agent which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell.

  16. Quick and clean cloning.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Frank; Marillonnet, Sylvestre

    2014-01-01

    Identification of unknown sequences that flank known sequences of interest requires PCR amplification of DNA fragments that contain the junction between the known and unknown flanking sequences. Since amplified products often contain a mixture of specific and nonspecific products, the quick and clean (QC) cloning procedure was developed to clone specific products only. QC cloning is a ligation-independent cloning procedure that relies on the exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase to generate single-stranded extensions at the ends of the vector and insert. A specific feature of QC cloning is the use of vectors that contain a sequence called catching sequence that allows cloning specific products only. QC cloning is performed by a one-pot incubation of insert and vector in the presence of T4 DNA polymerase at room temperature for 10 min followed by direct transformation of the incubation mix in chemo-competent Escherichia coli cells.

  17. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  18. Geostatistical Modeling of Pore Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Devary, J.L.; Doctor, P.G.

    1981-06-01

    A significant part of evaluating a geologic formation as a nuclear waste repository involves the modeling of contaminant transport in the surrounding media in the event the repository is breached. The commonly used contaminant transport models are deterministic. However, the spatial variability of hydrologic field parameters introduces uncertainties into contaminant transport predictions. This paper discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to the modeling of spatially varying hydrologic field parameters required as input to contaminant transport analyses. Kriging estimation techniques were applied to Hanford Reservation field data to calculate hydraulic conductivity and the ground-water potential gradients. These quantities were statistically combined to estimate the groundwater pore velocity and to characterize the pore velocity estimation error. Combining geostatistical modeling techniques with product error propagation techniques results in an effective stochastic characterization of groundwater pore velocity, a hydrologic parameter required for contaminant transport analyses.

  19. Cloning and Characterization of Two Bistructural S-Layer-RTX Proteins from Campylobacter rectus

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Martin; Kuhnert, Peter; Nicolet, Jacques; Burnens, André P.; Frey, Joachim

    1999-01-01

    Campylobacter rectus is an important periodontal pathogen in humans. A surface-layer (S-layer) protein and a cytotoxic activity have been characterized and are thought to be its major virulence factors. The cytotoxic activity was suggested to be due to a pore-forming protein toxin belonging to the RTX (repeats in the structural toxins) family. In the present work, two closely related genes, csxA and csxB (for C. rectus S-layer and RTX protein) were cloned from C. rectus and characterized. The Csx proteins appear to be bifunctional and possess two structurally different domains. The N-terminal part shows similarity with S-layer protein, especially SapA and SapB of C. fetus and Crs of C. rectus. The C-terminal part comprising most of CsxA and CsxB is a domain with 48 and 59 glycine-rich canonical nonapeptide repeats, respectively, arranged in three blocks. Purified recombinant Csx peptides bind Ca2+. These are characteristic traits of RTX toxin proteins. The S-layer and RTX domains of Csx are separated by a proline-rich stretch of 48 amino acids. All C. rectus isolates studied contained copies of either the csxA or csxB gene or both; csx genes were absent from all other Campylobacter and Helicobacter species examined. Serum of a patient with acute gingivitis showed a strong reaction to recombinant Csx protein on immunoblots. PMID:10198015

  20. Cloning and characterization of two bistructural S-layer-RTX proteins from Campylobacter rectus.

    PubMed

    Braun, M; Kuhnert, P; Nicolet, J; Burnens, A P; Frey, J

    1999-04-01

    Campylobacter rectus is an important periodontal pathogen in humans. A surface-layer (S-layer) protein and a cytotoxic activity have been characterized and are thought to be its major virulence factors. The cytotoxic activity was suggested to be due to a pore-forming protein toxin belonging to the RTX (repeats in the structural toxins) family. In the present work, two closely related genes, csxA and csxB (for C. rectus S-layer and RTX protein) were cloned from C. rectus and characterized. The Csx proteins appear to be bifunctional and possess two structurally different domains. The N-terminal part shows similarity with S-layer protein, especially SapA and SapB of C. fetus and Crs of C. rectus. The C-terminal part comprising most of CsxA and CsxB is a domain with 48 and 59 glycine-rich canonical nonapeptide repeats, respectively, arranged in three blocks. Purified recombinant Csx peptides bind Ca2+. These are characteristic traits of RTX toxin proteins. The S-layer and RTX domains of Csx are separated by a proline-rich stretch of 48 amino acids. All C. rectus isolates studied contained copies of either the csxA or csxB gene or both; csx genes were absent from all other Campylobacter and Helicobacter species examined. Serum of a patient with acute gingivitis showed a strong reaction to recombinant Csx protein on immunoblots.

  1. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance

    PubMed Central

    Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K+ channels discriminate K+ over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K+ channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K+ channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K+ channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance. PMID:27619418

  2. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, David; Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías; Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K(+) channels discriminate K(+) over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K(+) channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K(+) channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K(+) channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance.

  3. Assembling the puzzle: Oligomerization of α-pore forming proteins in membranes☆

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáez, Ana J.

    2016-01-01

    Pore forming proteins (PFPs) share the ability of creating pores that allow the passage of ions, proteins or other constituents through a wide variety of target membranes, ranging from bacteria to humans. They often cause cell death, as pore formation disrupts the membrane permeability barrier required for maintaining cell homeostasis. The organization into supramolecular complexes or oligomers that pierce the membrane is a common feature of PFPs. However, the molecular pathway of self-assembly and pore opening remains unclear. Here, we review the most recent discoveries in the mechanism of membrane oligomerization and pore formation of a subset of PFPs, the α-PFPs, whose pore-forming domains are formed by helical segments. Only now we are starting to grasp the molecular details of their function, mainly thanks to the introduction of single molecule microscopy and nanoscopy techniques. PMID:26375417

  4. Restricted Transport in Small Pores

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John L.; Quinn, John A.

    1974-01-01

    The basic hydrodynamic equations governing transport in submicron pores are reexamined. Conditions necessary for a simplified, one-dimensional treatment of the diffusion/convection process are established. Steric restrictions and Brownian motion are incorporated directly into the resulting model. Currently available fluid mechanical results are used to evaluate an upper limit on hindered diffusion; this limit is valid for small particle-to-pore ratios. Extensions of the analysis are shown to depend on numerical solutions of the related hydrodynamic problem, that of asymmetrical particle motion in a bounded fluid. PMID:4813157

  5. Heterogeneous nucleation in and out of pores.

    PubMed

    Page, Amanda J; Sear, Richard P

    2006-08-11

    We study the nucleation of a new thermodynamic phase in pores and find that the nucleation often proceeds via two steps: nucleation of pore filling, and nucleation out of the pore. These two rates have opposing dependencies on pore size, resulting in a pore size at which the nucleation rate of the new phase is maximal. This finding is relevant to attempts to design and use porous media to crystallize proteins.

  6. Pore and Continuum Scale Study of the Effect of Subgrid Transport Heterogeneity on Redox Reaction Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chongxuan; Zhang, Changyong; Yang, Xiaofan; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    A micromodel system with a pore structure for heterogeneous flow and transport was used to investigate the effect of subgrid transport heterogeneity on redox reaction rates. Hematite reductive dissolution by injecting a reduced form of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) at variable flow rates was used as an example to probe the variations of redox reaction rates in different subgrid transport domains. Experiments, pore-scale simulations, and macroscopic modeling were performed to measure and simulate in-situ hematite reduction and to evaluate the scaling behavior of the redox reaction rates from the pore to macroscopic scales. The results indicated that the measured pore-scale rates of hematite reduction were consistent with the predictions from a pore scale reactive transport model. A general trend is that hematite reduction followed reductant transport pathways, starting from the advection-dominated pores toward the interior of diffusion-dominated domains. Two types of diffusion domains were considered in the micromodel: a micropore diffusion domain, which locates inside solid grains or aggregates where reactant transport is limited by diffusion; and a macropore diffusion domain, which locates at wedged, dead-end pore spaces created by the grain-grain contacts. The rate of hematite reduction in the advection-dominated domain was faster than those in the diffusion-controlled domains, and the rate in the macropore diffusion domain was faster than that in the micropore domain. The reduction rates in the advection and macropore diffusion domains increased with increasing flow rate, but were affected by different mechanisms. The rate increase in the advection domain was controlled by the mass action effect as a faster flow supplied more reactants, and the rate increase in the macropore domain was more affected by the rate of mass exchange with the advection domain, which increased with increasing flow rate. The hematite reduction rate in the micropore domain was, however

  7. Nuclear transfer and cloning.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P

    2001-10-01

    The use of nuclear transfer in human reproductive and therapeutic cloning is reviewed with attention on the origins of this technology from its evolution to the present. The successes and limitations of mammalian reproductive cloning are itemized. A case is made against the use of human reproductive cloning to reproduce an existing person, based on the unacceptable risks to the embryo, fetus, or newborn. However, support is extended for human therapeutic cloning involving the derivation and use of embryonic stem cells to treat human disease.

  8. [Cloning--ethical aspects].

    PubMed

    Munzarová, M

    2004-01-01

    Ethical problems related to cloning are discussed on three model situations: cloning of human beings (for example by utilizing the techniques of embryo splitting or nuclear transfer), use of embryonic cells in cloning techniques and cloning of nonembryonic cells. The first situation is strictly condemned, the second has been examined up present (it should be condemned as well) and the third is--under certain conditions--fully acceptable. The issue is discussed from the point of view of relevant Council of Europe documents as well.

  9. GATED PORES IN THE FERRITIN PROTEIN NANOCAGE

    PubMed Central

    Theil, Elizabeth C.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis and pictogram: Gated pores in the ferritin family of protein nanocages, illustrated in the pictogram, control transfer of ferrous iron into and out of the cages by regulating contact between hydrated ferric oxide mineral inside the protein cage, and reductants such as FMNH2 on the outside. The structural and functional homology between the gated ion channel proteins in inaccessible membranes and gated ferritin pores in the stable, water soluble nanoprotein, make studies of ferritin pores models for gated pores in many ion channel proteins. Properties of ferritin gated pores, which control rates of FMNH2 reduction of ferric iron in hydrated oxide minerals inside the protein nanocage, are discussed in terms of the conserved pore gate residues (arginine 72-apspartate 122 and leucine 110-leucine 134), of pore sensitivity to heat at temperatures 30 °C below that of the nanocage itself, and of pore sensitivity to physiological changes in urea (1–10 mM). Conditions which alter ferritin pore structure/function in solution, coupled with the high evolutionary conservation of the pore gates, suggest the presence of molecular regulators in vivo that recognize the pore gates and hold them either closed or open, depending on biological iron need. The apparent homology between ferrous ion transport through gated pores in the ferritin nanocage and ion transport through gated pores in ion channel proteins embedded in cell membranes, make studies of water soluble ferritin and the pore gating folding/unfolding a useful model for other gated pores. PMID:19262678

  10. Long-pore Electrostatics in Inward-rectifier Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Janice L.; Palmer, Lawrence G.; Roux, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    Inward-rectifier potassium (Kir) channels differ from the canonical K+ channel structure in that they possess a long extended pore (∼85 Å) for ion conduction that reaches deeply into the cytoplasm. This unique structural feature is presumably involved in regulating functional properties specific to Kir channels, such as conductance, rectification block, and ligand-dependent gating. To elucidate the underpinnings of these functional roles, we examine the electrostatics of an ion along this extended pore. Homology models are constructed based on the open-state model of KirBac1.1 for four mammalian Kir channels: Kir1.1/ROMK, Kir2.1/IRK, Kir3.1/GIRK, and Kir6.2/KATP. By solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the electrostatic free energy of a K+ ion is determined along each pore, revealing that mammalian Kir channels provide a favorable environment for cations and suggesting the existence of high-density regions in the cytoplasmic domain and cavity. The contribution from the reaction field (the self-energy arising from the dielectric polarization induced by the ion's charge in the complex geometry of the pore) is unfavorable inside the long pore. However, this is well compensated by the electrostatic interaction with the static field arising from the protein charges and shielded by the dielectric surrounding. Decomposition of the static field provides a list of residues that display remarkable correspondence with existing mutagenesis data identifying amino acids that affect conduction and rectification. Many of these residues demonstrate interactions with the ion over long distances, up to 40 Å, suggesting that mutations potentially affect ion or blocker energetics over the entire pore. These results provide a foundation for understanding ion interactions in Kir channels and extend to the study of ion permeation, block, and gating in long, cation-specific pores. PMID:19001143

  11. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, H.; Walker, B.J.; Chang, C.Y.; Niblack, B.; Panchal, R.

    1998-07-07

    An inactive pore-forming agent is revealed which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell. 30 figs.

  12. Smectic pores and defect cores

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Elisabetta A.; Kamien, Randall D.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    Riemann's minimal surfaces, a one-parameter family of minimal surfaces, describe a bicontinuous lamellar system with pores connecting alternating layers. We demonstrate explicitly that Riemann's minimal surfaces are composed of a nonlinear sum of two oppositely handed helicoids. PMID:24098846

  13. Membrane pores induced by magainin

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtke, S.J.; He, Ke; Heller, W.T.

    1996-10-29

    Magainin, found in the skin of Xenopus laevis, belongs to a broad class of antimicrobial peptides which kill bacteria by permeabilizing the cytoplasmic membrane but do not lyse eukaryotic cells. The 23-residue peptide has been shown to form an amphiphilic helix when associated with membranes. However, its molecular mechanism of action has been controversial. Oriented circular dichroism has detected helical magainin oriented perpendicular to the plane of the membrane at high peptide concentrations, but Raman, fluorescence, differential scanning calorimetry, and NMR all indicate that the peptide is associated with the head groups of the lipid bilayer. Here we show that neutron in-plane scattering detects pores formed by magainin 2 in membranes only when a substantial fraction of the peptide is oriented perpendicular to the membrane. The pores are almost twice as large as the alamethicin pores. On the basis of the in-plane scattering data, we propose a toroidal (or wormhole) model, which differs from the barrel-stave model of alamethicin in that the lipid bends back on itself like the inside of a torus. The bending requires a lateral expansion in the head group region of the bilayer. Magainin monomers play the role of fillers in the expansion region thereby stabilizing the pore. This molecular configuration is consistent with all published magainin data. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Measurement of variation in soil solute tracer concentration across a range of effective pore sizes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Judson W.

    1993-01-01

    Solute transport concepts in soil are based on speculation that solutes are distributed nonuniformly within large and small pores. Solute concentrations have not previously been measured across a range of pore sizes and examined in relation to soil hydrological properties. For this study, modified pressure cells were used to measure variation in concentration of a solute tracer across a range of pore sizes. Intact cores were removed from the site of a field tracer experiment, and soil water was eluted from 10 or more discrete classes of pore size. Simultaneous changes in water content and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity were determined on cores using standard pressure cell techniques. Bromide tracer concentration varied by as much as 100% across the range of pore sizes sampled. Immediately following application of the bromide tracer on field plots, bromide was most concentrated in the largest pores; concentrations were lower in pores of progressively smaller sizes. After 27 days, bromide was most dilute in the largest pores and concentrations were higher in the smaller pores. A sharp, threefold decrease in specific water capacity during elution indicated separation of two major pore size classes at a pressure of 47 cm H2O and a corresponding effective pore diameter of 70 μm. Variation in tracer concentration, on the other hand, was spread across the entire range of pore sizes investigated in this study. A two-porosity characterization of the transport domain, based on water retention criteria, only broadly characterized the pattern of variation in tracer concentration across pore size classes during transport through a macroporous soil.

  15. Cloning, killing, and identity.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, J

    1999-01-01

    One potentially valuable use of cloning is to provide a source of tissues or organs for transplantation. The most important objection to this use of cloning is that a human clone would be the sort of entity that it would be seriously wrong to kill. I argue that entities of the sort that you and I essentially are do not begin to exist until around the seventh month of fetal gestation. Therefore to kill a clone prior to that would not be to kill someone like you or me but would be only to prevent one of us from existing. And even after one of us begins to exist, the objections to killing it remain comparatively weak until its psychological capacities reach a certain level of maturation. These claims support the permissibility of killing a clone during the early stages of its development in order to use its organs for transplantation. PMID:10226909

  16. Enhanced Performance by Enlarged Nano-pores of Holly Leaf-derived Lamellar Carbon for Sodium-ion Battery Anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Peng; Liu, Ting; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Lifeng; Liu, Yi; Huang, Jianfeng; Guo, Shouwu

    2016-05-01

    Lamellar hard carbon derived from holly leaf with enlarged pores of tiny graphite-like domains and meso-pores was prepared by hydrothermal followed high temperature pyrolysis process. Benefiting from the enlarged nano-pores of tiny graphite-like domains and the thin sheet structure with meso-pores, the derived carbon delivered a high reversible capacity of 318 mAh g‑1 at a current rate of 20 mA g‑1 and excellent rate capability as the anode of sodium-ion battery. And the hydrothermal followed high temperature pyrolysis method was also confirmed an effective approach for betula platyphylla and sophora japonica leaf as precursor respectively to synthesis hard carbon of lamellar structure with enlarged nano-pores of tiny graphite-like domains.

  17. Enhanced Performance by Enlarged Nano-pores of Holly Leaf-derived Lamellar Carbon for Sodium-ion Battery Anode

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Peng; Liu, Ting; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Lifeng; Liu, Yi; Huang, Jianfeng; Guo, Shouwu

    2016-01-01

    Lamellar hard carbon derived from holly leaf with enlarged pores of tiny graphite-like domains and meso-pores was prepared by hydrothermal followed high temperature pyrolysis process. Benefiting from the enlarged nano-pores of tiny graphite-like domains and the thin sheet structure with meso-pores, the derived carbon delivered a high reversible capacity of 318 mAh g−1 at a current rate of 20 mA g−1 and excellent rate capability as the anode of sodium-ion battery. And the hydrothermal followed high temperature pyrolysis method was also confirmed an effective approach for betula platyphylla and sophora japonica leaf as precursor respectively to synthesis hard carbon of lamellar structure with enlarged nano-pores of tiny graphite-like domains. PMID:27189794

  18. Pore volume is most highly correlated with the visual assessment of skin pores.

    PubMed

    Kim, S J; Shin, M K; Back, J H; Koh, J S

    2014-11-01

    Many studies have been focused on evaluating assessment techniques for facial pores amid growing attention on skin care. Ubiquitous techniques used to assess the size of facial pores include visual assessment, cross-section images of the skin surface, and profilometric analysis of silicone replica of the facial skin. In addition, there are indirect assessment methods, including observation of pores based on confocal laser scanning microscopy and the analysis of sebum secretion and skin elasticity. The aim of this study was to identify parameters useful in estimating pore of surface in normal skin. The severity of pores on the cheek area by frontal optical images was divided on a 0-6 scale with '0' being faint and small pore and '6' being obvious and large pore. After the photos of the frontal cheek of 32 women aged between 35 and 49 were taken, the size of their pores was measured on a 0-6 scale; and the correlation between visual grading of pore and various evaluations (pore volume by 3-D image, pore area and number by Optical Image Analyzer) contributing to pore severity investigated using direct, objective, and noninvasive evaluations. The visual score revealed that the size of pores was graded on a 1-6 scale. Visual grading of pore was highly correlated with pore volume measured from 3-D images and pore area measured from 2-D optical images in the order (P < 0.01). Visual grading of pore was also slightly correlated with the number of pores in size of over 0.04 mm(2) (P < 0.05). High correlation between pore score and pore volume can be explained by 3-D structural characteristics of pores. It is concluded that pore volume and area serve as useful parameters in estimating pore of skin surface. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Protein crystal nucleation in pores

    PubMed Central

    Nanev, Christo N.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2017-01-01

    The most powerful method for protein structure determination is X-ray crystallography which relies on the availability of high quality crystals. Obtaining protein crystals is a major bottleneck, and inducing their nucleation is of crucial importance in this field. An effective method to form crystals is to introduce nucleation-inducing heterologous materials into the crystallization solution. Porous materials are exceptionally effective at inducing nucleation. It is shown here that a combined diffusion-adsorption effect can increase protein concentration inside pores, which enables crystal nucleation even under conditions where heterogeneous nucleation on flat surfaces is absent. Provided the pore is sufficiently narrow, protein molecules approach its walls and adsorb more frequently than they can escape. The decrease in the nucleation energy barrier is calculated, exhibiting its quantitative dependence on the confinement space and the energy of interaction with the pore walls. These results provide a detailed explanation of the effectiveness of porous materials for nucleation of protein crystals, and will be useful for optimal design of such materials. PMID:28091515

  20. On cloning human beings.

    PubMed

    de Melo-Martin, Inmaculada

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that arguments for and against cloning fail to make their case because of one or both of the following reasons: 1) they take for granted customary beliefs and assumptions that are far from being unquestionable; 2) they tend to ignore the context in which human cloning is developed. I will analyze some of the assumptions underlying the main arguments that have been offered for and against cloning. Once these assumptions are critically analyzed, arguments both rejecting and supporting human cloning seem to lose weight. I will first briefly present the main arguments that have been proposed against cloning and I will argue that they fail to establish their case. In the next section I will evaluate some of the positive arguments that have been offered supporting such technology. This analysis will show that the case for cloning also fails. Finally, I will maintain that because critics and especially supporters of this technology neglect the context in which human cloning is developed and might be implemented, their arguments are far from compelling.

  1. [Human cloning or cannibalism].

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, L M

    2001-01-01

    In this article I develop the idea presented in my previous work that human cloning would be of little practical use since almost any aim that one would like to attain by multiple cloning of a concrete man or a group of people, are unattainable or it might be achieved by easier, cheaper and more efficient traditional methods. For this reason cloning of a man is unlikely to occur on a larger scale and only few people will decide to clone themselves. In this sense no social effects of human cloning will be disastrous for the human population. Yet investigations in human genetics are very important since they may provide medical applications far more important than human cloning. It is argued that the main trend of modern medicine: organ transplantation from an alien donor, will become socially dangerous in near future since the number of donors will be drastically smaller than the number of potential patients waiting for transplantations. This in turn may cause social conflicts and a form of medical cannibalism may arise. These problems and conflicts will be avoided if organ transplantation from an alien donor is replaced by organ cloning, i.e. by transplanting an organ developed from the patient.

  2. DESIGN INFORMATION ON FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted over several years at municipal wastewater treatment plants employing line pore diffused aeration systems. These studies were designed to produce reliable information on the performance and operational requirements of fine pore devices under process ...

  3. Interactions of cations with the cytoplasmic pores of inward rectifier K(+) channels in the closed state.

    PubMed

    Inanobe, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Kurachi, Yoshihisa

    2011-12-02

    Ion channels gate at membrane-embedded domains by changing their conformation along the ion conduction pathway. Inward rectifier K(+) (Kir) channels possess a unique extramembrane cytoplasmic domain that extends this pathway. However, the relevance and contribution of this domain to ion permeation remain unclear. By qualitative x-ray crystallographic analysis, we found that the pore in the cytoplasmic domain of Kir3.2 binds cations in a valency-dependent manner and does not allow the displacement of Mg(2+) by monovalent cations or spermine. Electrophysiological analyses revealed that the cytoplasmic pore of Kir3.2 selectively binds positively charged molecules and has a higher affinity for Mg(2+) when it has a low probability of being open. The selective blocking of chemical modification of the side chain of pore-facing residues by Mg(2+) indicates that the mode of binding of Mg(2+) is likely to be similar to that observed in the crystal structure. These results indicate that the Kir3.2 crystal structure has a closed conformation with a negative electrostatic field potential at the cytoplasmic pore, the potential of which may be controlled by conformational changes in the cytoplasmic domain to regulate ion diffusion along the pore.

  4. Pore-scale simulation of calcium carbonate precipitation and dissolution under highly supersaturated conditions in a microfludic pore network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.; Valocchi, A. J.; Werth, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Dissolved CO2 during geological CO2 storage may react with minerals in fractured rocks or confined aquifers and cause mineral precipitation. The overall rate of reaction can be affected by coupled processes among hydrodynamics, transport, and reactions at pore-scale. Pore-scale models of coupled fluid flow, reactive transport, and CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution are applied to account for transient experimental results of CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution under highly supersaturated conditions in a microfluidic pore network (i.e., micromodel). Pore-scale experiments in the micromodel are used as a basis for understanding coupled physics of systems perturbed by geological CO2 injection. In the micromodel, precipitation is induced by transverse mixing along the centerline in pore bodies. Overall, the pore-scale model qualitatively captured the governing physics of reactions such as precipitate morphology, precipitation rate, and maximum precipitation area in first few pore spaces. In particular, we found that proper estimation of the effective diffusion coefficient and the reactive surface area is necessary to adequately simulate precipitation and dissolution rates. As the model domain increases, the effect of flow patterns affected by precipitation on the overall reaction rate also increases. The model is also applied to account for the effect of different reaction rate laws on mineral precipitation and dissolution at pore-scale. Reaction rate laws tested include the linear rate law, nonlinear power law, and newly-developed rate law based on in-situ measurements at nano scale in the literature. Progress on novel methods for upscaling pore-scale models for reactive transport are discussed, and are being applied to mineral precipitation patterns observed in natural analogues. H.Y. and T. D. were supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of

  5. Arrangement and mobility of the voltage sensor domain in prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Takushi; Irie, Katsumasa; Nagura, Hitoshi; Imai, Tomoya; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-03-04

    Prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) form homotetramers with each subunit contributing six transmembrane α-helices (S1-S6). Helices S5 and S6 form the ion-conducting pore, and helices S1-S4 function as the voltage sensor with helix S4 thought to be the essential element for voltage-dependent activation. Although the crystal structures have provided insight into voltage-gated K channels (K(V)s), revealing a characteristic domain arrangement in which the voltage sensor domain of one subunit is close to the pore domain of an adjacent subunit in the tetramer, the structural and functional information on Na(V)s remains limited. Here, we show that the domain arrangement in NaChBac, a firstly cloned prokaryotic Na(V), is similar to that in K(V)s. Cysteine substitutions of three residues in helix S4, Q107C, T110C, and R113C, effectively induced intersubunit disulfide bond formation with a cysteine introduced in helix S5, M164C, of the adjacent subunit. In addition, substituting two acidic residues with lysine, E43K and D60K, shifted the activation of the channel to more positive membrane potentials and consistently shifted the preferentially formed disulfide bond from T110C/M164C to Q107C/M164C. Because Gln-107 is located closer to the extracellular side of helix S4 than Thr-110, this finding suggests that the functional shift in the voltage dependence of activation is related to a restriction of the position of helix S4 in the lipid bilayer. The domain arrangement and vertical mobility of helix S4 in NaChBac indicate that the structure and the mechanism of voltage-dependent activation in prokaryotic Na(V)s are similar to those in canonical K(V)s.

  6. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  7. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  8. cDNA cloning of a mouse mammary epithelial cell surface protein reveals the existence of epidermal growth factor-like domains linked to factor VIII-like sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, J.D.; Bui, A. San Francisco State Univ., CA ); Lekutis, C.; Singer, K.L.; Srinivasan, U.; Parry, G. ); Yuzuki, D. )

    1990-11-01

    A 2.1-kilobase cDNA coding for a surface protein of mammary epithelial cells has been isolated from a mouse mammary gland {lambda}gt11 cDNA library. Sequence analysis of this cDNA reveals an open reading frame of 1,389 base pairs that defines a protein with a molecular mass of 51.5 dKa. Structural analysis of the predicted sequence identifies two putative functional domains of the protein: (i) an N-terminal cysteine-rich region that is similar to epidermal growth factor-like domains of Drosophila Notch-1 protein and (ii) a large segment of the sequence that exhibited 54.5% identify with C-terminal domains of human coagulation factors VIII and V. These similarities in structure are used to predict the possible functions of the protein and its means of interaction with the cell surface. mRNA expression was detectable in mammary tissue from nonpregnant animals but was maximal in the lactating gland. In cultured cells, mRNA levels also correlated with the degree of cellular differentiation.

  9. Sensitivity of stress inversion of focal mechanisms to pore pressure changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Garzón, Patricia; Vavryčuk, Václav; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Bohnhoff, Marco

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of stress inversion from focal mechanisms to pore pressure changes. Synthetic tests reveal that pore pressure variations can cause apparent changes in the retrieved stress ratio R relating the magnitude of the intermediate principal stress with respect to the maximum and minimum principal stresses. Pore pressure and retrieved R are negatively correlated when R is low (R < 0.6). The spurious variations in retrieved R are suppressed when R > 0.6. This observation is independent of faulting style, and it may be related to different performance of the fault plane selection criterion and variability in orientation of activated faults under different pore pressures. Our findings from synthetic data are supported by results obtained from induced seismicity at The Geysers geothermal field. Therefore, the retrieved stress ratio variations can be utilized for monitoring pore pressure changes at seismogenic depth in stress domains with overall low R.

  10. Do Managers Clone Themselves?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    A recent questionnaire survey provides statistics on male managers' views of female managers. The author recommends that male managers break out of their cloning behavior and that the goal ought to be a plurality in management. (Author/WD)

  11. Clone clustering by hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavijevic, A.; Zeremski, M.; Paunesku, T.

    1995-05-01

    DNA sequencing by hybridization (SBH) Format 1 technique is based on experiments in which thousands of short oligomers are consecutively hybridized with dense arrays of clones. In this paper the authors present the description of a method for obtaining hybridization signatures for individual clones that guarantees reproducibility despite a wide range of variations in experimental circumstances, a sensitive method for signature comparison at prespecified significance levels, and a clustering algorithm that correctly identifies clusters of significantly similar signatures. The methods and the algorithm have been verified experimentally on a control set of 422 signatures that originate from 9 distinct clones of known sequence. Experiments indicate that only 30 to 50 oligomer probes suffice for correct clustering. This information about the identity of clones can be used to guide both genomic and cDNA sequencing by SBH or by standard gel-based methods. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Do Managers Clone Themselves?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    A recent questionnaire survey provides statistics on male managers' views of female managers. The author recommends that male managers break out of their cloning behavior and that the goal ought to be a plurality in management. (Author/WD)

  13. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  14. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  15. Twins: A cloning experience.

    PubMed

    Prainsack, Barbara; Spector, Tim D

    2006-11-01

    Drawing upon qualitative interviews with monozygotic (identical) twins sharing 100% of their genes, and with dizygotic (fraternal) twins and singletons as control groups, this paper explores what it means to be genetically identical. (The twins interviewed were from the TwinsUK register in London.) In the context of the ongoing debate on human reproductive cloning, it examines questions such as: To what extent do identical twins perceive their emotional and physical bond to be a result of their genetic makeup? What would they think if they had been deliberately created genetically identical? How would they feel about being genetically identical to a person who was born a few years earlier or later? First, our respondents ascribed no great significance to the role of genes in their understanding of what it means to be identical twins. Second, the opinion that human reproductive cloning would "interfere with nature", or "contradict God's will", was expressed by our respondents exclusively on the abstract level. The more our respondents were able to relate a particular invented cloning scenario to their own life-worlds, the lower the prevalence of the argument. Third, for all three groups of respondents, the scenario of having been born in one of the other groups was perceived as strange. Fourth, the aspect that our respondents disliked about cloning scenarios was the potential motives of the cloners. Without equating monozygotic twins directly with "clones", these results from "naturally" genetically identical individuals add a new dimension to what a future cloning situation could entail: The cloned person might possibly (a) perceive a close physical and emotional connection to the progenitor as a blessing; (b) suffer from preconceptions of people who regard physical likeness as a sign of incomplete individuality; and (c) perceive the idea of not having been born a clone of a particular person as unpleasant.

  16. Large pore size nanoporous materials from the self-assembly of asymmetric bottlebrush block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Justin; Bailey, Travis S; Rzayev, Javid

    2011-03-09

    Asymmetric polystyrene-polylactide (PS-PLA) bottlebrush block copolymers have been shown to self-assemble into a cylindrical morphology with large domain spacings. PLA cylinders can be selectively etched out of the shear-aligned polymer monoliths to generate nanoporous materials with an average cylindrical pore diameter of 55 nm. The remaining bottlebrush backbone provides a functional, hydrophilic coating inside the nanopores. This methodology significantly expands the range of pore sizes attainable in block copolymer based nanoporous materials.

  17. The Outer Pore and Selectivity Filter of TRPA1

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Adam P.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    TRPA1 (transient-receptor-potential-related ion channel with ankyrin domains) is a direct receptor or indirect effector for a wide variety of nociceptive signals, and thus is a compelling target for development of analgesic pharmaceuticals such as channel blockers. Recently, the structure of TRPA1 was reported, providing insights into channel assembly and pore architecture. Here we report whole-cell and single-channel current recordings of wild-type human TRPA1 as well as TRPA1 bearing point mutations of key charged residues in the outer pore. These measurements demonstrate that the glutamate at position 920 plays an important role in collecting cations into the mouth of the pore, by changing the effective surface potential by ~16 mV, while acidic residues further out have little effect on permeation. Electrophysiology experiments also confirm that the aspartate residue at position 915 represents a constriction site of the TRPA1 pore and is critical in controlling ion permeation. PMID:27824920

  18. Molecular cloning and expression-profile analysis of sea cucumber DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 and methyl-CpG binding domain type 2/3 genes during aestivation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ye; Chen, Muyan; Su, Lin; Wang, Tianming; Liu, Shilin; Yang, Hongsheng

    2013-05-01

    The sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus Selenka survives high summer temperature by entering aestivation, characterized by hypometabolism and global gene silencing. We investigated the hypothesis that aestivation is associated with DNA methylation-dependent epigenetic mechanisms by cloning, sequencing and measuring the transcript abundances of two genes dnmt1 and mbd2/3, which comprise the DNA methylation system in A. japonicus Selenka. The deduced amino acid sequences and characteristic motifs of sea cucumber DNMT1 and MBD2/3 showed high homology to those of their mammalian counterparts. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that dnmt1 and mbd2/3 genes were similarly expressed in all four tissues examined (intestine, respiratory tree, muscle and body wall). Dnmt1 expression in the intestine was up-regulated during deep aestivation (P<0.05), while mbd2/3 was over-expressed in both the intestine and respiratory tree during the same period (P<0.01). No differences in expression levels were observed between other tissues. The results of this study suggest that DNA methylation may be involved in transcriptional silencing, and that the intestine is the major site for epigenetic regulation during aestivation in the sea cucumber.

  19. Capillary Properties of Model Pores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Tim J.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Liquid menisci in small pores exhibit a curved surface across which there is a significant pressure difference. In the past it has been difficult to calculate the curvatures, of this class of menisci. Some recent studies have shown that a relatively straightforward, but hitherto neglected, method originated by Mayer & Stowe (1965) and Princen (1969a) can be applied to analyse wedging menisci. However, the method has lacked a comprehensive experimental verification. This investigation follows on from the previously limited studies. A standardised method for the application of the analysis is described, the results from which are compared to observations made using modified experimental procedures. The behaviour of the capillary surfaces formed in several model pores are analysed with the method. The model systems studied are rectangular ducts, the pores formed by a rod in an angled corner, by two contacting rods and a plate and the space between a rod and a plate. For the latter two shapes the analysis is extended to include systems of mixed wettability which have a particular bearing on enhanced oil recovery operations. Experiments in which curvatures are inferred from observations of capillary rise, are performed using two comparative techniques. An involved procedure confirms predictions of meniscus curvature to within 0.3%. Use of a more straightforward, through less accurate, technique enables variations of curvature with tube shape or contact angle(s) to be conveniently studied. Results obtained are excellent and confirm the theory within the determined experimental errors. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  20. Importance of lipid-pore loop interface for potassium channel structure and function.

    PubMed

    van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Nand, Deepak; Weingarth, Markus; Prokofyev, Alexander; Hornig, Sönke; Cukkemane, Abhishek Arun; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Becker, Stefan; Hulse, Raymond E; Perozo, Eduardo; Pongs, Olaf; Baldus, Marc

    2013-08-06

    Potassium (i.e., K(+)) channels allow for the controlled and selective passage of potassium ions across the plasma membrane via a conserved pore domain. In voltage-gated K(+) channels, gating is the result of the coordinated action of two coupled gates: an activation gate at the intracellular entrance of the pore and an inactivation gate at the selectivity filter. By using solid-state NMR structural studies, in combination with electrophysiological experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the turret region connecting the outer transmembrane helix (transmembrane helix 1) and the pore helix behind the selectivity filter contributes to K(+) channel inactivation and exhibits a remarkable structural plasticity that correlates to K(+) channel inactivation. The transmembrane helix 1 unwinds when the K(+) channel enters the inactivated state and rewinds during the transition to the closed state. In addition to well-characterized changes at the K(+) ion coordination sites, this process is accompanied by conformational changes within the turret region and the pore helix. Further spectroscopic and computational results show that the same channel domain is critically involved in establishing functional contacts between pore domain and the cellular membrane. Taken together, our results suggest that the interaction between the K(+) channel turret region and the lipid bilayer exerts an important influence on the selective passage of potassium ions via the K(+) channel pore.

  1. Alloreactive T cell clones.

    PubMed

    Fitch, F W

    1984-01-01

    T cell clones are useful models for studying lymphocyte function both at the level of the individual cell and in interacting systems. Murine cytolytic and non- cytolyic T cell clones have been obtained with relative ease, and the particular procedure used to derive and maintain T cell clones may influence profoundly the characteristics of the resulting cells. The method of choice depends on the specific question to be asked. Although some clones have characteristics that would have been expected on the basis of results observed with bulk cell populations, other clones have rather unexpected properties. Although most T cell clones appear to be either cytolytic or non-cytolytic, this distinction is not always absolute. A high proportion of both cytolytic and non-cytolytic T cell clones have dual reactivity. This is true for cells which by other criteria appear to be true clones. The frequency of such cells is high enough to suggest that most if not all T cells may have reactivity for more than one antigenic determinant or that antigenic determinants recognized by T cells are shared widely and unexpectedly. It is not clear whether one or two different antigen receptors account for such dual reactivity. The nature of the T cell receptor for antigen remains obscure. T cell clones, because of their homogeneous nature, should make it easier to answer these important immunological questions. Although it remains to be determined how many distinct molecules account for the numerous biological activities found in the culture supernatants from antigen-stimulated T cell clones, it is clear that these factors influence several different types of cells that are involved directly and indirectly in immune responses. IL-2 stimulates both cytolytic and non-cytolytic T cells to proliferate. BCSF causes polyclonal activation of B cells, and there may be other factors which influence B cell responses to antigenic stimulation. IL-3 apparently stimulates maturation of immature T cells

  2. A new model for pore formation by cholesterol-dependent cytolysins.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Cyril F; Whisstock, James C; Dunstone, Michelle A

    2014-08-01

    Cholesterol Dependent Cytolysins (CDCs) are important bacterial virulence factors that form large (200-300 Å) membrane embedded pores in target cells. Currently, insights from X-ray crystallography, biophysical and single particle cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) experiments suggest that soluble monomers first interact with the membrane surface via a C-terminal Immunoglobulin-like domain (Ig; Domain 4). Membrane bound oligomers then assemble into a prepore oligomeric form, following which the prepore assembly collapses towards the membrane surface, with concomitant release and insertion of the membrane spanning subunits. During this rearrangement it is proposed that Domain 2, a region comprising three β-strands that links the pore forming region (Domains 1 and 3) and the Ig domain, must undergo a significant yet currently undetermined, conformational change. Here we address this problem through a systematic molecular modeling and structural bioinformatics approach. Our work shows that simple rigid body rotations may account for the observed collapse of the prepore towards the membrane surface. Support for this idea comes from analysis of published cryo-EM maps of the pneumolysin pore, available crystal structures and molecular dynamics simulations. The latter data in particular reveal that Domains 1, 2 and 4 are able to undergo significant rotational movements with respect to each other. Together, our data provide new and testable insights into the mechanism of pore formation by CDCs.

  3. A New Model for Pore Formation by Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysins

    PubMed Central

    Reboul, Cyril F.; Whisstock, James C.; Dunstone, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol Dependent Cytolysins (CDCs) are important bacterial virulence factors that form large (200–300 Å) membrane embedded pores in target cells. Currently, insights from X-ray crystallography, biophysical and single particle cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) experiments suggest that soluble monomers first interact with the membrane surface via a C-terminal Immunoglobulin-like domain (Ig; Domain 4). Membrane bound oligomers then assemble into a prepore oligomeric form, following which the prepore assembly collapses towards the membrane surface, with concomitant release and insertion of the membrane spanning subunits. During this rearrangement it is proposed that Domain 2, a region comprising three β-strands that links the pore forming region (Domains 1 and 3) and the Ig domain, must undergo a significant yet currently undetermined, conformational change. Here we address this problem through a systematic molecular modeling and structural bioinformatics approach. Our work shows that simple rigid body rotations may account for the observed collapse of the prepore towards the membrane surface. Support for this idea comes from analysis of published cryo-EM maps of the pneumolysin pore, available crystal structures and molecular dynamics simulations. The latter data in particular reveal that Domains 1, 2 and 4 are able to undergo significant rotational movements with respect to each other. Together, our data provide new and testable insights into the mechanism of pore formation by CDCs. PMID:25144725

  4. [Human cloning in the activities of the European Union].

    PubMed

    Mik, C

    2001-01-01

    The European Union has been concerned with human cloning since the late 80. It resulted from inclusion of biotechnology into the sphere of European integration. The attitude of the European Union in the domain of human cloning was shaped, in principle in the second part of the 90. As the Community law stands at present, the European Union is not able to regulate all aspects of the cloning of human beings. It has no general power to decide in that sphere, especially, as far as bioethic aspects are concerned. The cloning of human beings in the European Union is understood as a process aiming at producing new human being, genetically identical with another live or dead human being. Thus the notion of human cloning is reduced to reproductive cloning. Three instruments are at the disposal of the European Union in the domain of human cloning. The first is prohibition of reproductive cloning as a general principle of Community law. However, that principle is not the result of judicial activity of the European Court of Justice (as general principles normally are), but the logical consequence of views formally expressed by the European Parliament, the Council of the Europe as well as the Commission. The principle was finally included in the Charter of fundamental rights of the European Union. The second instrument is an imperative prohibition of patent granting to biotechnological inventions on human reproductive cloning. Last, but not least, the Union applies a prohibition of financing scientific research connected with human cloning from the budget of the European Communities within the V Framework Programme in the field of research and technological development.

  5. Killing machines: three pore-forming proteins of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Ryan; de Armas, Lesley; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of early multicellular eukaryotes 400–500 million years ago required a defensive strategy against microbial invasion. Pore-forming proteins containing the membrane-attack-complex-perforin (MACPF) domain were selected as the most efficient means to destroy bacteria or virally infected cells. The mechanism of pore formation by the MACPF domain is distinctive in that pore formation is purely physical and unspecific. The MACPF domain polymerizes, refolds, and inserts itself into bilayer membranes or bacterial outer cell walls. The displacement of surface lipid/carbohydrate molecules by the polymerizing MACPF domain creates clusters of large, water-filled holes that destabilize the barrier function and provide access for additional anti-bacterial or anti-viral effectors to sensitive sites that complete the destruction of the invader via enzymatic or chemical attack. The highly efficient mechanism of anti-microbial defense by a combined physical and chemical strategy using pore-forming MACPF-proteins has been retargeted during evolution of vertebrates and mammals for three purposes: (1) to kill extracellular bacteria C9/polyC9 evolved in conjunction with complement, (2) to kill virus infected and cancer cells perforin-1/polyperforin-1 CTL evolved targeted by NK and CTL, and (3) to kill intracellular bacteria transmembrane perforin-2/putative polyperforin-2 evolved targeted by phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells. Our laboratory has been involved in the discovery and description of each of the three pore-formers that will be reviewed here. PMID:24293008

  6. Phospholipids Induce Conformational Changes of SecA to Form Membrane-Specific Domains: AFM Structures and Implication on Protein-Conducting Channels

    PubMed Central

    You, Zhipeng; Liao, Meijiang; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Hsiuchin; Pan, Xijian; Houghton, John E.; Sui, Sen-fang; Tai, Phang C.

    2013-01-01

    SecA, an essential component of the Sec machinery, exists in a soluble and a membrane form in Escherichia coli. Previous studies have shown that the soluble SecA transforms into pore structures when it interacts with liposomes, and integrates into membranes containing SecYEG in two forms: SecAS and SecAM; the latter exemplified by two tryptic membrane-specific domains, an N-terminal domain (N39) and a middle M48 domain (M48). The formation of these lipid-specific domains was further investigated. The N39 and M48 domains are induced only when SecA interacts with anionic liposomes. Additionally, the N-terminus, not the C-terminus of SecA is required for inducing such conformational changes. Proteolytic treatment and sequence analyses showed that liposome-embedded SecA yields the same M48 and N39 domains as does the membrane-embedded SecA. Studies with chemical extraction and resistance to trypsin have also shown that these proteoliposome-embedded SecA fragments exhibit the same stability and characteristics as their membrane-embedded SecA equivalents. Furthermore, the cloned lipid-specific domains N39 and M48, but not N68 or C34, are able to form partial, but imperfect ring-like structures when they interact with phospholipids. These ring-like structures are characteristic of a SecA pore-structure, suggesting that these domains contribute part of the SecA-dependent protein-conducting channel. We, therefore, propose a model in which SecA alone is capable of forming a lipid-specific, asymmetric dimer that is able to function as a viable protein-conducting channel in the membrane, without any requirement for SecYEG. PMID:23977317

  7. A thermodynamic approach to Alamethicin pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2013-01-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11 Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6 Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8 Å pore and the octamer in an 11 Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted “barrel-stave” model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself. PMID:24071593

  8. A thermodynamic approach to alamethicin pore formation.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2014-01-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8Å pore and the octamer in an 11Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted "barrel-stave" model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself.

  9. A thermodynamic approach to alamethicin pore formation.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2014-05-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8Å pore and the octamer in an 11Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted "barrel-stave" model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself.

  10. Potential for cloning dogs.

    PubMed

    Westhusin, M E; Burghardt, R C; Ruglia, J N; Willingham, L A; Liu, L; Shin, T; Howe, L M; Kraemer, D C

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether nuclear transplantation could be used to clone a dog using donor nucleus cells collected from an adult female. Fibroblasts obtained from skin biopsies were fused with enucleated bovine or canine oocytes. The resulting cloned embryos were cultured in vitro to monitor embryonic development. A proportion of the resulting embryos was transferred into surrogate bitches for development to term. When canine oocytes were used as recipient ova for canine fibroblasts, 23% of the resulting embryos cleaved at least once after culture in vitro. Five cloned embryos were transferred into three synchronized recipient bitches, but no pregnancies resulted. When bovine oocytes were used as recipinets for canine fibroblasts, 38% cleaved to the two- to four-cell stage and 43% cleaved to the eight- to 16-cell stage. Forty-seven of these embryos were transferred into four recipient females, resulting in a single conceptus that ceased development at about day 20 of gestation. The desire for cloned dogs is considerable and will undoubtedly incite the development of successful methods for cloning companion animals. However, significant investment into additional research is required, especially in the areas of in vitro maturation of oocytes and control of the oestrous cycle of bitches.

  11. Tiny Pores observed by HINODE/SOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K.; Bong, S.; Chae, J.; Kim, Y.; Park, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The study of pores, small penumbraless sunspots, can give us a chance to understand how strong magnetic fields interact with convective motions in the photosphere. For a better understanding of this interaction, we investigate the temporal variation of several tiny pores smaller than 2“. These pores were observed by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard Hinode on 2006 December 29. We have analyzed the high resolution spectropolarimetric (SP) data and the G-band filtergrams taken during the observation. Magnetic flux density and Doppler velocities of the pores are estimated by applying the center of gravity (COG) method to the SP data. The horizontal motions in and around the pores are tracked by adopting the Nonlinear Affine Velocity Estimator (NAVE) method to the G-band filter images. As results, we found the followings. (1) Darkness of pores is positively correlated with magnetic flux density. (2) Downflows always exist inside and around the pores. (3) The speed of downflows inside the pores is negatively correlated with their darkness. (4) The pores are surrounded by strong downflows. (5) Brightness changes of the pores are correlated with the divergence of mass flow (correlation coefficient > 0.9). (6) The pores in the growing phase are associated with the converging flow pattern and the pores in the decay phase with the diverging flow pattern. Our results support the idea that a pore grows as magnetic flux density increases due to the convergence of ambient mass flow and it decays with the decrease of the flux density due to the diverging mass flow.

  12. The amino- and carboxyl-terminal fragments of the Bacillus thuringensis Cyt1Aa toxin have differential roles on toxin oligomerization and pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Almazan, Claudia; Ruiz de Escudero, Iñigo; Emiliano Cantón, Pablo; Muñoz-Garay, Carlos; Pérez, Claudia; Gill, Sarjeet S.; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2011-01-01

    The Cyt toxins produced by the bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis show insecticidal activity against some insects, mainly dipteran larvae, being able to kill mosquitoes and black flies. However, they also possess a general cytolytic activity in vitro showing hemolytic activity in red blood cells. These proteins are composed of two outer layers of α-helix hairpins wrapped around a β-sheet. Regarding to their mode of action, one model proposed that the two outer layers of α-helix hairpins swing away from the β-sheet allowing insertion of β-strands into the membrane forming a pore after toxin oligomerization. The other model suggested a detergent-like mechanism of action of the toxin on the surface of the lipid bilayer. In this work we cloned the N- and C-terminal domains form Cyt1Aa and analyzed their effects in Cyt1Aa toxin action. The N-terminal domain shows a dominant negative phenotype inhibiting the in vitro hemolytic activity of Cyt1Aa in red blood cells and the in vivo insecticidal activity of Cyt1Aa against Aedes aegypti larvae. In addition, N-terminal region is able to induce aggregation of Cyt1Aa toxin in solution. Finally, C-terminal domain composed mainly of β-strands, is able to bind to the SUV liposomes, suggesting that this region of the toxin is involved in membrane interaction. Overall, our data indicate that the two isolated domains of Cyt1Aa have different roles in toxin action. The N-terminal region is involved in toxin aggregation while the C-terminal domain in the interaction of the toxin with the lipid membrane. PMID:21142020

  13. Extremal quantum cloning machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiribella, G.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.; Cerf, N. J.

    2005-10-01

    We investigate the problem of cloning a set of states that is invariant under the action of an irreducible group representation. We then characterize the cloners that are extremal in the convex set of group covariant cloning machines, among which one can restrict the search for optimal cloners. For a set of states that is invariant under the discrete Weyl-Heisenberg group, we show that all extremal cloners can be unitarily realized using the so-called double-Bell states, whence providing a general proof of the popular ansatz used in the literature for finding optimal cloners in a variety of settings. Our result can also be generalized to continuous-variable optimal cloning in infinite dimensions, where the covariance group is the customary Weyl-Heisenberg group of displacements.

  14. Extremal quantum cloning machines

    SciTech Connect

    Chiribella, G.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.; Cerf, N.J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the problem of cloning a set of states that is invariant under the action of an irreducible group representation. We then characterize the cloners that are extremal in the convex set of group covariant cloning machines, among which one can restrict the search for optimal cloners. For a set of states that is invariant under the discrete Weyl-Heisenberg group, we show that all extremal cloners can be unitarily realized using the so-called double-Bell states, whence providing a general proof of the popular ansatz used in the literature for finding optimal cloners in a variety of settings. Our result can also be generalized to continuous-variable optimal cloning in infinite dimensions, where the covariance group is the customary Weyl-Heisenberg group of displacement000.

  15. Open-pore polyurethane product

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, R.T.; Salyer, I.O.

    1974-02-17

    The method is described of producing an open-pore polyurethane foam having a porosity of at least 50% and a density of 0.1 to 0.5 g per cu cm, and which consists of coherent spherical particles of less than 10 mu diam separated by interconnected interstices. It is useful as a filter and oil absorbent. The product is admirably adapted to scavenging of crude oil from the surface of seawater by preferential wicking. The oil-soaked product may then be compressed to recover the oil or burned for disposal. The crosslinked polyurethane structures are remarkably solvent and heat-resistance as compared with known thermoplastic structures. Because of their relative inertness, they are useful filters for gasoline and other hydrocarbon compounds. (7 claims)

  16. Fine structures at pore boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, L.; Quintero Noda, C.; Joshi, C.; Rakesh, S.; Pandya, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present high resolution observations of fine structures at pore boundaries. The inner part of granules towards umbra show dark striations which evolve into a filamentary structure with dark core and `Y' shape at the head of the filaments. These filaments migrate into the umbra similar to penumbral filaments. These filaments show higher temperature, lower magnetic field strength and more inclined field compared to the background umbra. The optical depth stratification of physical quantities suggests their similarity with penumbral filaments. However, line-of-sight velocity pattern is different from penumbral filaments where they show downflows in the deeper layers of the atmosphere while the higher layers show upflows. These observations show filamentation in a simple magnetic configuration.

  17. Nuclear Pore Proteins and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Songli; Powers, Maureen A.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules, a highly specific and tightly regulated process, occurs exclusively through the Nuclear Pore Complex. This immense structure is assembled from approximately 30 proteins, termed nucleoporins. Here we discuss the four nucleoporins that have been linked to cancers, either through elevated expression in tumors (Nup88) or through involvement in chromosomal translocations that encode chimeric fusion proteins (Tpr, Nup98, Nup214). In each case we consider the normal function of the nucleoporin and its translocation partners, as well as what is known about their mechanistic contributions to carcinogenesis, particularly in leukemias. Studies of nucleoporin-linked cancers have revealed novel mechanisms of oncogenesis and. in the future, should continue to expand our understanding of cancer biology. PMID:19577736

  18. Translocation of knotted proteins through a pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, P.

    2014-09-01

    We report the results of molecular dynamics simulations of translocation of knotted proteins through pores. The protein is pulled into the pore with a constant force, which in many cases leads to the tightening of the knot. Since the radius of tightened knot is larger than that of the pore opening, the tight knot can block the pore thus preventing further translocation of the chain. Analyzing six different proteins, we show that the stuck probability increases with the applied force and that final positions of the tightened knot along the protein backbone are not random but are usually associated with sharp turns in the polypeptide chain. The combined effect of the confining geometry of the pore and the inhomogeneous character of the protein chain leads thus to the appearance of topological traps, which can immobilize the knot and lead to the jamming of the pore.

  19. Pore network extraction for fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; van Dijke, M. I. J.; Geiger, S.; Ma, J.; Couples, G. D.; Li, X.

    2017-09-01

    Although flow through fractured rocks involves many different length-scales, it is crucial for the prediction of continuum-scale single- and multi-phase flow functions to understand, at the pore-scale, the interaction between the rock matrix and fractures. Here we present a pore-network extraction method in which the pore diameters and fracture apertures are of similar size. The method involves a shrinking algorithm to extract a hybrid skeleton of medial axes and surfaces, and it includes a workflow to convert the medial surfaces of fractures into dense networks of virtual medial axes, allowing generation of an integrated pore-network for the entire pore space. Appropriate single- and two-phase flow properties are assigned to network elements representing the fractures. We validate the method via comparisons between pore network flow simulations and an analytical solution, direct flow simulations and experimental observations. The network calculations are several orders of magnitude faster than the direct simulations.

  20. Effects of pore-scale precipitation on permeability and flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noiriel, Catherine; Steefel, Carl I.; Yang, Li; Bernard, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    rate boundary conditions, precipitation resulted in an increase in both the average and maximum velocities. Increases in pore roughness led to a more heterogeneous flow field, principally through the effects on the fastest and slowest velocities within the domain.

  1. Reciprocal voltage sensor-to-pore coupling leads to potassium channel C-type inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Luca; Renhorn, Jakob; Gabrielsson, Anders; Turesson, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I.; Lindahl, Erik; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open at depolarized membrane voltages. A prolonged depolarization causes a rearrangement of the selectivity filter which terminates the conduction of ions – a process called slow or C-type inactivation. How structural rearrangements in the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) cause alteration in the selectivity filter, and vice versa, are not fully understood. We show that pulling the pore domain of the Shaker potassium channel towards the VSD by a Cd2+ bridge accelerates C-type inactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that such pulling widens the selectivity filter and disrupts the K+ coordination, a hallmark for C-type inactivation. An engineered Cd2+ bridge within the VSD also affect C-type inactivation. Conversely, a pore domain mutation affects VSD gating-charge movement. Finally, C-type inactivation is caused by the concerted action of distant amino acid residues in the pore domain. All together, these data suggest a reciprocal communication between the pore domain and the VSD in the extracellular portion of the channel.

  2. Reciprocal voltage sensor-to-pore coupling leads to potassium channel C-type inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Luca; Renhorn, Jakob; Gabrielsson, Anders; Turesson, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I; Lindahl, Erik; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open at depolarized membrane voltages. A prolonged depolarization causes a rearrangement of the selectivity filter which terminates the conduction of ions – a process called slow or C-type inactivation. How structural rearrangements in the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) cause alteration in the selectivity filter, and vice versa, are not fully understood. We show that pulling the pore domain of the Shaker potassium channel towards the VSD by a Cd2+ bridge accelerates C-type inactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that such pulling widens the selectivity filter and disrupts the K+ coordination, a hallmark for C-type inactivation. An engineered Cd2+ bridge within the VSD also affect C-type inactivation. Conversely, a pore domain mutation affects VSD gating-charge movement. Finally, C-type inactivation is caused by the concerted action of distant amino acid residues in the pore domain. All together, these data suggest a reciprocal communication between the pore domain and the VSD in the extracellular portion of the channel. PMID:27278891

  3. To clone alone: the United Nations' Human Cloning Declaration.

    PubMed

    Isasi, Rosario M; Annas, George J

    2006-01-01

    The United Nations labored for almost four years to create a treaty governing human cloning. In 2005 that effort was abandoned, and instead the United Nations' General Assembly adopted a "Declaration on Human Cloning".

  4. Nanoscale pore formation dynamics during aluminum anodization.

    PubMed

    Thamida, Sunil Kumar; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2002-03-01

    A theoretical analysis of nanoscale pore formation during anodization reveals its fundamental instability mechanism to be a field focusing phenomenon when perturbations on the minima of the two oxide interfaces are in phase. Lateral leakage of the layer potential at high wave number introduces a layer tension effect that balances the previous destabilizing effect to produce a long-wave instability and a selected pore separation that scales linearly with respect to voltage. At pH higher than 1.77, pores do not form due to a very thick barrier layer. A weakly nonlinear theory based on long-wave expansion of double free surface problem yields two coupled interface evolution equations that can be reduced to one without altering the dispersion relationship by assuming an equal and in-phase amplitude for the two interfaces. This interface evolution equation faithfully reproduces the initial pore ordering and their dynamics. A hodograph transformation technique is then used to determine the interior dimension of the well-developed pores in two dimensions. The ratio of pore diameter to pore separation is found to be a factor independent of voltage but varies with the pH of the electrolyte. Both the predicted pH range where pores are formed and the predicted pore dimensions are favorably compared to experimental data. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Modeling the interaction of ultrasound with pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yichi; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Parthasarathi, Sanjai

    1991-01-01

    Factors that affect ultrasonic velocity sensing of density during consolidation of metal powders are examined. A comparison is made between experimental results obtained during the final stage of densification and the predictions of models that assume either a spherical or a spheroidal pore shape. It is found that for measurements made at low frequencies during the final stage of densification, relative density (pore fraction) and pore shape are the two most important factors determining the ultrasonic velocity, the effect of pore size is negligible.

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of Pore-Scale Flow in a Bead Pack: Comparison with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Codd, Sarah L.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Mckinley, Matthew I.

    2013-04-01

    A significant body of current research is aimed at developing methods for numerical simulation of flow and transport in porous media that explicitly resolve complex pore and solid geometries, and at utilizing such models to study the relationships between fundamental pore-scale processes and macroscopic manifestations at larger (i.e., Darcy) scales. A number of different numerical methods for pore-scale simulation have been developed, and have been extensively tested and validated for simplified geometries. However, validation of pore-scale simulations of fluid velocity for complex, three-dimensional (3D) pore geometries that are representative of natural porous media is challenging due to our limited ability to measure pore-scale velocity in such systems. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the opportunity to measure not only the pore geometry, but also local fluid velocities under steady-state flow conditions in 3D and with high spatial resolution. In this paper, we present a 3D velocity field measured at sub-pore resolution (tens of micrometers) over a centimeter-scale 3D domain using MRI methods. We have utilized the measured pore geometry to perform 3D simulations of Navier-Stokes flow over the same domain using direct numerical simulation techniques. We present a comparison of the numerical simulation results with the measured velocity field. It is shown that the numerical results match the observed velocity patterns well overall except for a variance and small systematic scaling which can be attributed to the known experimental error in the MRI measurements. The comparisons presented here provide strong validation of the pore-scale simulation methods and new insights for interpretation of uncertainty in MRI measurements of pore-scale velocity. This study also provides a potential benchmark for future comparison of other pore-scale simulation methods.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of pore-scale flow in a bead pack: Comparison with magnetic resonance imaging observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Codd, Sarah L.; Seymour, Joseph D.; McKinley, Matthew I.

    2013-04-01

    A significant body of current research is aimed at developing methods for numerical simulation of flow and transport in porous media that explicitly resolve complex pore and solid geometries, and at utilizing such models to study the relationships between fundamental pore-scale processes and macroscopic manifestations at larger (i.e., Darcy) scales. A number of different numerical methods for pore-scale simulation have been developed, and have been extensively tested and validated for simplified geometries. However, validation of pore-scale simulations of fluid velocity for complex, three-dimensional (3D) pore geometries that are representative of natural porous media is challenging due to our limited ability to measure pore-scale velocity in such systems. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the opportunity to measure not only the pore geometry, but also local fluid velocities under steady-state flow conditions in 3D and with high spatial resolution. In this paper, we present a 3D velocity field measured at sub-pore resolution (tens of micrometers) over a centimeter-scale 3D domain using MRI methods. We have utilized the measured pore geometry to perform 3D simulations of Navier-Stokes flow over the same domain using direct numerical simulation techniques. We present a comparison of the numerical simulation results with the measured velocity field. It is shown that the numerical results match the observed velocity patterns well overall except for a variance and small systematic scaling which can be attributed to the known experimental uncertainty in the MRI measurements. The comparisons presented here provide strong validation of the pore-scale simulation methods and new insights for interpretation of uncertainty in MRI measurements of pore-scale velocity. This study also provides a potential benchmark for future comparison of other pore-scale simulation methods. 2012 Elsevier Science.

  8. The Metarhizium anisopliae trp1 gene: cloning and regulatory analysis.

    PubMed

    Staats, Charley Christian; Silva, Marcia Suzana Nunes; Pinto, Paulo Marcos; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Schrank, Augusto

    2004-07-01

    The trp1 gene from the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae, cloned by heterologous hybridization with the plasmid carrying the trpC gene from Aspergillus nidulans, was sequence characterized. The predicted translation product has the conserved catalytic domains of glutamine amidotransferase (G domain), indoleglycerolphosphate synthase (C domain), and phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase (F domain) organized as NH2-G-C-F-COOH. The ORF is interrupted by a single intron of 60 nt that is position conserved in relation to trp genes from Ascomycetes and length conserved in relation to Basidiomycetes species. RT-PCR analysis suggests constitutive expression of trp1 gene in M. anisopliae.

  9. Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of nucleoporins and nuclear pore membrane protein Gp210.

    PubMed

    Favreau, C; Worman, H J; Wozniak, R W; Frappier, T; Courvalin, J C

    1996-06-18

    During mitosis in higher eukaryotic cells, the nuclear envelope membranes break down into distinct populations of vesicles and the proteins of the nuclear lamina and the nuclear pore complexes disperse in the cytoplasm. Since phosphorylation can alter protein-protein interactions and membrane traffic, we have examined the cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of nuclear pore complex proteins. Nonmembrane nucleoporins Nup153, Nup214, and Nup358 that are modified by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine and recognized by a monoclonal antibody were phosphorylated throughout the cell cycle and hyperphosphorylated during M phase. Pore membrane glycoprotein gp210, that has a cytoplasmic, carboxyl-terminal domain facing the pore, was not phosphorylated in interphase but specifically phosphorylated in mitosis. Mutant and wild-type fusion proteins containing the cytoplasmic domain of gp210 were phosphorylated in vitro and their phosphopeptide maps compared to that of mitotic gp210. This analysis showed that Ser1880 of gp210 was phosphorylated in mitosis, possibly by cyclin B-p34cdc2 or a related kinase. Several nuclear pore complex proteins are therefore differentially phosphorylated during mitosis when pore complexes disassemble and reassemble.

  10. Cholesterol stimulates and ceramide inhibits Sticholysin II-induced pore formation in complex bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Alm, Ida; García-Linares, Sara; Gavilanes, José G; Martínez-Del-Pozo, Álvaro; Slotte, J Peter

    2015-04-01

    The pore forming capacity of Sticholysin II (StnII; isolated from Stichodactyla helianthus) in bilayer membranes containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), palmitoylsphingomyelin (PSM) and either cholesterol or palmitoyl ceramide (PCer) has been examined. The aim of the study was to elucidate how the presence of differently ordered PSM domains affected StnII oligomerization and pore formation. Cholesterol is known to enhance pore formation by StnII, and our results confirmed this and provide kinetic information for the process. The effect of cholesterol on bilayer permeabilization kinetics was concentration-dependent. In the concentration regime used (2.5-10nmol cholesterol in POPC:PSM 80:20 by nmol), cholesterol also increased the acyl chain order in the fluid PSM domain and thus decreased bilayer fluidity, suggesting that fluidity per se was not responsible for cholesterol's effect. Addition of PCer (2.5-10nmol) to the POPC:PSM (80:20 by nmol) bilayers attenuated StnII-induced pore formation, again in a concentration-dependent fashion. This addition also led to the formation of a PCer-rich gel phase. Addition of cholesterol to PCer-containing membranes could partially reduce the inhibitory effect of PCer on StnII pore formation. We conclude that the physical state of PSM (as influenced by either cholesterol or PCer) affected StnII binding and pore formation under the conditions examined.

  11. The Cloning of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Judith E.; Dobson, Russell L.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes that the U.S. school system purports to prize human variability, but many educators are engaged in activities that seek to homogenize students. Describes these activities, including diagnosis, labeling, ability grouping, and positive reinforcement. Presents suggestions for counselors to combat sources of cloning and self-validation. (RC)

  12. Secure the Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Thomas; Kirchner, Florent; Pichardie, David

    Exchanging mutable data objects with untrusted code is a delicate matter because of the risk of creating a data space that is accessible by an attacker. Consequently, secure programming guidelines for Java stress the importance of using defensive copying before accepting or handing out references to an internal mutable object. However, implementation of a copy method (like clone()) is entirely left to the programmer. It may not provide a sufficiently deep copy of an object and is subject to overriding by a malicious sub-class. Currently no language-based mechanism supports secure object cloning. This paper proposes a type-based annotation system for defining modular copy policies for class-based object-oriented programs. A copy policy specifies the maximally allowed sharing between an object and its clone. We present a static enforcement mechanism that will guarantee that all classes fulfill their copy policy, even in the presence of overriding of copy methods, and establish the semantic correctness of the overall approach in Coq. The mechanism has been implemented and experimentally evaluated on clone methods from several Java libraries.

  13. Applications of quantum cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomarico, E.; Sanguinetti, B.; Sekatski, P.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.

    2011-10-01

    Quantum Cloning Machines (QCMs) allow for the copying of information, within the limits imposed by quantum mechanics. These devices are particularly interesting in the high-gain regime, i.e., when one input qubit generates a state of many output qubits. In this regime, they allow for the study of certain aspects of the quantum to classical transition. The understanding of these aspects is the root of the two recent applications that we will review in this paper: the first one is the Quantum Cloning Radiometer, a device which is able to produce an absolute measure of spectral radiance. This device exploits the fact that in the quantum regime information can be copied with only finite fidelity, whereas when a state becomes macroscopic, this fidelity gradually increases to 1. Measuring the fidelity of the cloning operation then allows to precisely determine the absolute spectral radiance of the input optical source. We will then discuss whether a Quantum Cloning Machine could be used to produce a state visible by the naked human eye, and the possibility of a Bell Experiment with humans playing the role of detectors.

  14. The Cloning of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Judith E.; Dobson, Russell L.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes that the U.S. school system purports to prize human variability, but many educators are engaged in activities that seek to homogenize students. Describes these activities, including diagnosis, labeling, ability grouping, and positive reinforcement. Presents suggestions for counselors to combat sources of cloning and self-validation. (RC)

  15. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  16. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  17. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  18. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  19. A receptor-based switch that regulates anthrax toxin pore formation.

    PubMed

    Pilpa, Rosemarie M; Bayrhuber, Monika; Marlett, John M; Riek, Roland; Young, John A T

    2011-12-01

    Cellular receptors can act as molecular switches, regulating the sensitivity of microbial proteins to conformational changes that promote cellular entry. The activities of these receptor-based switches are only partially understood. In this paper, we sought to understand the mechanism that underlies the activity of the ANTXR2 anthrax toxin receptor-based switch that binds to domains 2 and 4 of the protective antigen (PA) toxin subunit. Receptor-binding restricts structural changes within the heptameric PA prepore that are required for pore conversion to an acidic endosomal compartment. The transfer cross-saturation (TCS) NMR approach was used to monitor changes in the heptameric PA-receptor contacts at different steps during prepore-to-pore conversion. These studies demonstrated that receptor contact with PA domain 2 is weakened prior to pore conversion, defining a novel intermediate in this pathway. Importantly, ANTXR2 remained bound to PA domain 4 following pore conversion, suggesting that the bound receptor might influence the structure and/or function of the newly formed pore. These studies provide new insights into the function of a receptor-based molecular switch that controls anthrax toxin entry into cells.

  20. The Effect of the Pore Entrance on Particle Motion in Slit Pores: Implications for Ultrathin Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Delavari, Armin; Baltus, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Membrane rejection models generally neglect the effect of the pore entrance on intrapore particle transport. However, entrance effects are expected to be particularly important with ultrathin membranes, where membrane thickness is typically comparable to pore size. In this work, a 2D model was developed to simulate particle motion for spherical particles moving at small Re and infinite Pe from the reservoir outside the pore into a slit pore. Using a finite element method, particles were tracked as they accelerated across the pore entrance until they reached a steady velocity in the pore. The axial position in the pore where particle motion becomes steady is defined as the particle entrance length (PEL). PELs were found to be comparable to the fluid entrance length, larger than the pore size and larger than the thickness typical of many ultrathin membranes. Results also show that, in the absence of particle diffusion, hydrodynamic particle–membrane interactions at the pore mouth result in particle “funneling” in the pore, yielding cross-pore particle concentration profiles focused at the pore centerline. The implications of these phenomena on rejection from ultrathin membranes are examined. PMID:28796197

  1. The Effect of the Pore Entrance on Particle Motion in Slit Pores: Implications for Ultrathin Membranes.

    PubMed

    Delavari, Armin; Baltus, Ruth

    2017-08-10

    Membrane rejection models generally neglect the effect of the pore entrance on intrapore particle transport. However, entrance effects are expected to be particularly important with ultrathin membranes, where membrane thickness is typically comparable to pore size. In this work, a 2D model was developed to simulate particle motion for spherical particles moving at small Re and infinite Pe from the reservoir outside the pore into a slit pore. Using a finite element method, particles were tracked as they accelerated across the pore entrance until they reached a steady velocity in the pore. The axial position in the pore where particle motion becomes steady is defined as the particle entrance length (PEL). PELs were found to be comparable to the fluid entrance length, larger than the pore size and larger than the thickness typical of many ultrathin membranes. Results also show that, in the absence of particle diffusion, hydrodynamic particle-membrane interactions at the pore mouth result in particle "funneling" in the pore, yielding cross-pore particle concentration profiles focused at the pore centerline. The implications of these phenomena on rejection from ultrathin membranes are examined.

  2. Biogenesis of the pore architecture of a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Christine; Dagcan, Alper; Roux, Benoit; Deutsch, Carol

    2011-02-22

    The pore domain of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels consists of transmembrane helices S5 and S6, the turret, the pore helix, the selectivity filter, and the loop preceding S6, with a tertiary reentrant structure between S5 and S6. Using biogenic intermediates, mass tagging (pegylation), and a molecular tape measure, we explored the possibility that the first stages of pore formation occur prior to oligomerization of the transmembrane core. Pegylation of introduced cysteines shows that the pore helix, but not the turret, forms a compact secondary structure in the terminal 20 Å of the ribosomal tunnel. We assessed the tertiary fold of the pore loop in monomeric constructs by determining the relative accessibilities of select cysteines using the kinetics of pegylation. Turret residues are accessible at the extracellular surface. In contrast, pore helix residues are less accessible. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of a single Kv monomer in a solvated lipid membrane indicate that secondary and tertiary folds are stable over 650 ns. These results are consistent with acquisition of a tertiary reentrant pore architecture at the monomer stage of Kv biogenesis and begin to define a plausible sequence of folding events in the formation of Kv channels.

  3. Structure of Staphylococcal α-Hemolysin, a Heptameric Transmembrane Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Langzhou; Hobaugh, Michael R.; Shustak, Christopher; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan; Gouaux, J. Eric

    1996-12-01

    The structure of the Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin pore has been determined to 1.9 overset{circ}{mathrm A} resolution. Contained within the mushroom-shaped homo-oligomeric heptamer is a solvent-filled channel, 100 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in length, that runs along the sevenfold axis and ranges from 14 overset{circ}{mathrm A} to 46 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in diameter. The lytic, transmembrane domain comprises the lower half of a 14-strand antiparallel β barrel, to which each protomer contributes two β strands, each 65 overset{circ}{mathrm A} long. The interior of the β barrel is primarily hydrophilic, and the exterior has a hydrophobic belt 28 overset{circ}{mathrm A} wide. The structure proves the heptameric subunit stoichiometry of the α-hemolysin oligomer, shows that a glycine-rich and solvent-exposed region of a water-soluble protein can self-assemble to form a transmembrane pore of defined structure, and provides insight into the principles of membrane interaction and transport activity of β barrel pore-forming toxins.

  4. Fluctuation of surface charge in membrane pores.

    PubMed Central

    Bashford, C Lindsay; Alder, Glenn M; Pasternak, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    Surface charge in track-etched polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes with narrow pores has been probed with a fluorescent cationic dye (3,3'-diethyloxacarbocyanine iodide (diO-C2-(3))) using confocal microscopy. Staining of negatively charged PET membranes with diO-C2-(3) is a useful measure of surface charge for the following reasons: 1) the dye inhibits K(+) currents through the pores and reduces their selectivity for cations; 2) it inhibits [3H]-choline+ transport and promotes 36Cl- transport across the membrane in a pH- and ionic-strength-dependent fashion; and 3) staining of pores by diO-C2-(3) is reduced by low pH and by the presence of divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Zn2+. Measurement of the time dependence of cyanine staining of pores shows fluctuations of fluorescence intensity that occur on the same time scale as do fluctuations of ionic current in such pores. These data support our earlier proposal that fluctuations in ionic current across pores in synthetic and biological membranes reflect fluctuations in the surface charge of the pore walls in addition to molecular changes in pore proteins. PMID:11916860

  5. On seismically induced pore pressure and settlement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Albert T.F.

    1988-01-01

    Two different approaches are used to estimate pore pressures and settlement in a 50-ft (15.2-m) sand deposit subjected to a variety of earthquake loadings. Although the two approaches seem consistent in predicting the occurrence of liquefaction, the results show that they are quite divergent in estimating pore-pressure build-ups and magnitude of ground settlement.

  6. Cavitation and pore blocking in nanoporous glasses.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, C; Kalies, G; Enke, D; Klank, D

    2011-09-06

    In gas adsorption studies, porous glasses are frequently referred to as model materials for highly disordered mesopore systems. Numerous works suggest that an accurate interpretation of physisorption isotherms requires a complete understanding of network effects upon adsorption and desorption, respectively. The present article deals with nitrogen and argon adsorption at different temperatures (77 and 87 K) performed on a series of novel nanoporous glasses (NPG) with different mean pore widths. NPG samples contain smaller mesopores and significantly higher microporosity than porous Vycor glass or controlled pore glass. Since the mean pore width of NPG can be tuned sensitively, the evolution of adsorption characteristics with respect to a broadening pore network can be investigated starting from the narrowest nanopore width. With an increasing mean pore width, a H2-type hysteresis develops gradually which finally transforms into a H1-type. In this connection, a transition from a cavitation-induced desorption toward desorption controlled by pore blocking can be observed. Furthermore, we find concrete hints for a pore size dependence of the relative pressure of cavitation in highly disordered pore systems. By comparing nitrogen and argon adsorption, a comprehensive insight into adsorption mechanisms in novel disordered materials is provided.

  7. A New Path through the Nuclear Pore.

    PubMed

    Gozalo, Alejandro; Capelson, Maya

    2016-11-17

    Knowing the configuration of the nuclear pore is essential for appreciating the underlying mechanisms of nucleo-cytoplasmic communication. Now, Fernandez-Martinez et al. present a high-resolution structure of the cytoplasmic nuclear pore-mRNA export holo-complex, challenging our textbook depiction of this massive membrane-embedded complex.

  8. Cloning Components of Human Telomerase.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    nuclear factor NF90 homolog. (5 clones). RNA binding protein. Poorly understood. 3. FRG1 . Poorly understood. 4. DEK. Weak homology to Tetrahymena p95...least some of the clones for poorly understood genes (e.g. Hax-1, FRG1 , NF90, NF45, KIAA0098, KIAA0026, BAC397c4). Aim II. Functional Cloning of the

  9. Water relations of populus clones

    SciTech Connect

    Pallardy, S.G.; Kozlowski, T.T.

    1981-02-01

    Stomatal aperture and water balance in the field of eight Populus clones varying in growth rate were closely related to environmental factors and clonal differences were clearly expressed. Leaf water potential (psi) was influenced by solar radiation, leaf conductance, evaporative demand, and soil moisture content. The effects of soil moisture on psi were greatly modified by atmospheric conditions and stomatal conductance. Several slow-growing clones exhibited extended periods of psi below that of rapidly growing clones, despite high evaporative demand and the much greater transpiring surfaces of the fast-growing clones. Stomata of all clones responded to changes in light intensity and vapor pressure gradient (VPG). Pronounced stomatal sensitivity to VPG of two rapidly growing clones of common parentage, and the resultant capacity of these clones to moderate water deficits under high evaporative demand, were associated with drought resistance in one of the parents. Seasonal maximum leaf conductance was positively related to growth in several clones, suggesting that rapidly growing clones possess the capacity to carry on higher rates of gas exchange under favorable conditions. Analysis of changes in psi with changes in transpirational flux density (TFD) showed that for four clones, psi change per unit change in TFD decreased as TFD increased, indicating plant adaptation for prevention of damaging psi even at high TFD. More rapidly growing clones exhibited a larger initial rate of decline in psi with TFD, but reduced the rate of decline more than slow-growing clones as TFD increased. (Refs. 41).

  10. Molecular mechanisms of action of sphingomyelin-specific pore-forming toxin, lysenin.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Neval; Yamaji-Hasegawa, Akiko; Hullin-Matsuda, Françoise; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2017-07-24

    Lysenin, which is an earthworm toxin, strongly binds to sphingomyelin (SM). Lysenin oligomerizes on SM-rich domains and can induce cell death by forming pores in the membrane. In this review, the assembly of lysenin on SM-containing membranes is discussed mostly on the basis of the information gained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM data show that lysenin assembles into a hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure by rapid reorganization of its oligomers on an SM/cholesterol membrane. In case of a phase-separated membrane of SM, lysenin induces phase mixing as a result of pore formation in SM-rich domains, and consequently its hcp assembly covers the entire membrane. Besides the lytic action, lysenin is important as an SM marker and its pore has the potential to be used as a biosensor in the future. These points are also highlighted in this review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recombinational Cloning Using Gateway and In-Fusion Cloning Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Throop, Andrea L.; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The comprehensive study of protein structure and function, or proteomics, depends on the obtainability of full-length cDNAs in species-specific expression vectors and subsequent functional analysis of the expressed protein. Recombinational cloning is a universal cloning technique based on site-specific recombination that is independent of the insert DNA sequence of interest, which differentiates this method from the classical restriction enzyme-based cloning methods. Recombinational cloning enables rapid and efficient parallel transfer of DNA inserts into multiple expression systems. This unit summarizes strategies for generating expression-ready clones using the most popular recombinational cloning technologies, including the commercially available Gateway® (Life Technologies) and In-Fusion® (Clontech) cloning technologies. PMID:25827088

  12. Transport Selectivity of Nuclear Pores, Phase Separation, and Membraneless Organelles.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H Broder; Görlich, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) provide a selective passageway for receptor-mediated active transport between nucleus and cytoplasm, while maintaining the distinct molecular compositions of both compartments at large. In this review we discuss how NPCs gain a remarkable sorting selectivity from non-globular FG domains and their phase separation into dense polymer meshworks. The resulting sieve-like FG hydrogels are effective barriers to normal macromolecules but are at the same time highly permeable to shuttling nuclear transport receptors, which bind to FG motifs as well as to their designated cargoes. Phase separation driven by disordered protein domains was recently also recognized as being pivotal to the formation of membraneless organelles, making it an important emerging principle in cell biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Three concepts of cloning in human beings.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ke-Hui

    2005-07-01

    Human cloning, organ cloning and tissue cloning are various types of cloning that occur at different levels with different methodologies. According to three standards of terminology for an embryo (fertilization through germ cells, development in the uterus and having the potential to produce a human life), tissue cloning and type I organ cloning will not produce an embryo. In contrast, human cloning and type II organ cloning will produce an embryo. Thus, only non-germinal tissue cloning and type I organ cloning are beyond the ethical question and will not change human beings as a species. Using cloned tissues to make new tissues or organs is promising for the future of medicine.

  14. Mammalian cloning: advances and limitations.

    PubMed

    Solter, D

    2000-12-01

    For many years, researchers cloning mammals experienced little success, but recent advances have led to the successful cloning of several mammalian species. However, cloning by the transfer of nuclei from adult cells is still a hit-and-miss procedure, and it is not clear what technical and biological factors underlie this. Our understanding of the molecular basis of reprogramming remains extremely limited and affects experimental approaches towards increasing the success rate of cloning. Given the future practical benefits that cloning can offer, the time has come to address what should be done to resolve this problem.

  15. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between Heterogeneously Distributed Probes: Application to Lipid Nanodomains and Pores

    PubMed Central

    Šachl, Radek; Johansson, Lennart B.-Å.; Hof, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The formation of membrane heterogeneities, e.g., lipid domains and pores, leads to a redistribution of donor (D) and acceptor (A) molecules according to their affinity to the structures formed and the remaining bilayer. If such changes sufficiently influence the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency, these changes can be further analyzed in terms of nanodomain/pore size. This paper is a continuation of previous work on this theme. In particular, it is demonstrated how FRET experiments should be planned and how data should be analyzed in order to achieve the best possible resolution. The limiting resolution of domains and pores are discussed simultaneously, in order to enable direct comparison. It appears that choice of suitable donor/acceptor pairs is the most crucial step in the design of experiments. For instance, it is recommended to use DA pairs, which exhibit an increased affinity to pores (i.e., partition coefficients KD,A > 10) for the determination of pore sizes with radii comparable to the Förster radius R0. On the other hand, donors and acceptors exhibiting a high affinity to different phases are better suited for the determination of domain sizes. The experimental setup where donors and acceptors are excluded from the domains/pores should be avoided. PMID:23203189

  16. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  17. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  18. Ethical issues in livestock cloning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P B

    1999-01-01

    Although cloning may eventually become an important technology for livestock production, four ethical issues must be addressed before the practice becomes widespread. First, researchers must establish that the procedure is not detrimental to the health or well-being of affected animals. Second, animal research institutions should evaluate the net social benefits to livestock producers by weighing the benefits to producers against the opportunity cost of research capacity lost to biomedical projects. Third, scientists should consider the indirect effects of cloning research on the larger ethical issues surrounding human cloning. Finally, the market structure for products of cloned animals should protect individual choice, and should recognize that many individuals find the prospect of cloning (or consuming cloned animals) repugnant. Analysis of these four issues is complicated by spurious arguments alleging that cloning will have a negative impact on environment and genetic diversity.

  19. Probabilistic cloning of equidistant states

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, O.; Roa, Luis; Delgado, A.

    2010-08-15

    We study the probabilistic cloning of equidistant states. These states are such that the inner product between them is a complex constant or its conjugate. Thereby, it is possible to study their cloning in a simple way. In particular, we are interested in the behavior of the cloning probability as a function of the phase of the overlap among the involved states. We show that for certain families of equidistant states Duan and Guo's cloning machine leads to cloning probabilities lower than the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability of equidistant states. We propose an alternative cloning machine whose cloning probability is higher than or equal to the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability for any family of equidistant states. Both machines achieve the same probability for equidistant states whose inner product is a positive real number.

  20. Unlocking the Physiochemical Controls on Organic Carbon Dynamics from the Soil Pore- to Core-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. P.; Tfaily, M. M.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Todd-Brown, K. E.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    The physical organization of soil includes pore networks of varying size and connectivity. These networks control microbial access to soil organic carbon (C) by spatially separating microorganisms and C by both distance and size exclusion. The extent to which this spatially isolated C is vulnerable to microbial transformation under hydrologically dynamic conditions is unknown, and limits our ability to predict the source and sink capacity of soils. We investigated the effects of shifting hydrologic connectivity and soil structure on greenhouse gas C emissions from surface soils collected from the Disney Wilderness Preserve (Florida, USA). We subjected intact soil cores and re-packed homogenized soil cores to simulated groundwater rise or precipitation, monitoring their CO2 and CH4 emissions over 24 hours. Soil pore water was then extracted from each core using different suctions to sample water retained by pore throats of different sizes and then characterized by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Greater respiration rates were observed from homogenized cores compared to intact cores, and from soils wet from below, in which the wetting front is driven by capillary forces, filling fine pores first. This suggests that C located in fine pores may turn over via diffusion processes that lead to the colocation of this C with other resources and microorganisms. Both the complexity and concentration of soluble-C increased with decreasing pore size domains. Pore water extracted from homogenized cores had greater C concentrations than from intact cores, with the greatest concentrations in pore waters sampled from very fine pores, highlighting the importance of soil structure in physically protecting C. These results suggest that the spatial separation of decomposers from C is a key mechanism stabilizing C in these soils. Further research is ongoing to accurately represent this protection mechanism, and the conditions under which it breaks

  1. Determining the mechanism of membrane permeabilizing peptides: Identification of potent, equilibrium pore-formers

    PubMed Central

    Krauson, Aram J.; He, Jing

    2012-01-01

    To enable selection and characterization of highly potent pore-forming peptides, we developed a set of novel assays to probe 1) the potency of peptide pores at very low peptide concentration; 2) the presence or absence of pores in membranes after equilibration; 3) the interbilayer exchangeability of pore-forming peptides; and 4) the degree to which pore-forming peptides disrupt the bilayer organization at equilibrium. Here, we use these assays to characterize, in parallel, six membrane-permeabilizing peptides belonging to multiple classes. We tested the antimicrobial peptides LL37 and dermaseptin S1, the well-known natural lytic peptides melittin and alamethicin, and the very potent lentivirus lytic peptides LLP1 and LLP2 from the cytoplasmic domain of HIV GP41. The assays verified that that the antimicrobial peptides are not potent pore formers, and form only transient permeabilization pathways in bilayers which are not detectable at equilibrium. The other peptides are far more potent and form pores that are still detectable in vesicles after many hours. Among the peptides studies, alamethicin is unique in that it is very potent, readily exchanges between vesicles and disturbs the local bilayer structure even at very low concentration. The equally potent LLP peptides do not exchange readily and do not perturb the bilayer at equilibrium. Comparison of these classes of pore forming peptides in parallel using the set of assays we developed demonstrates our ability to detect differences in their mechanism of action. Importantly, these assays will be very useful in high-throughput screening where highly potent pore-forming peptides can be selected based on their mechanism of action. PMID:22365969

  2. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Lee, Elizabeth; Kallam, Alekhya; Majumdar, Partha; Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J.; Celina, Mathias C.; Bahr, James; Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  3. High temperature ion channels and pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Xiaofeng (Inventor); Gu, Li Qun (Inventor); Cheley, Stephen (Inventor); Bayley, Hagan (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention includes an apparatus, system and method for stochastic sensing of an analyte to a protein pore. The protein pore may be an engineer protein pore, such as an ion channel at temperatures above 55.degree. C. and even as high as near 100.degree. C. The analyte may be any reactive analyte, including chemical weapons, environmental toxins and pharmaceuticals. The analyte covalently bonds to the sensor element to produce a detectable electrical current signal. Possible signals include change in electrical current. Detection of the signal allows identification of the analyte and determination of its concentration in a sample solution. Multiple analytes present in the same solution may also be detected.

  4. To clone or not to clone--a Jewish perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Lipschutz, J H

    1999-01-01

    Many new reproductive methods such as artificial insemination, in vitro fertilisation, freezing of human embryos, and surrogate motherhood were at first widely condemned but are now seen in Western society as not just ethically and morally acceptable, but beneficial in that they allow otherwise infertile couples to have children. The idea of human cloning was also quickly condemned but debate is now emerging. This article examines cloning from a Jewish perspective and finds evidence to support the view that there is nothing inherently wrong with the idea of human cloning. A hypothesis is also advanced suggesting that even if a body was cloned, the brain, which is the essence of humanity, would remain unique. This author suggests that the debate should be changed from "Is cloning wrong?" to "When is cloning wrong?". PMID:10226913

  5. Ethical issues in animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Fiester, Autumn

    2005-01-01

    The issue of human reproductive cloning has recently received a great deal attention in public discourse. Bioethicists, policy makers, and the media have been quick to identify the key ethical issues involved in human reproductive cloning and to argue, almost unanimously, for an international ban on such attempts. Meanwhile, scientists have proceeded with extensive research agendas in the cloning of animals. Despite this research, there has been little public discussion of the ethical issues raised by animal cloning projects. Polling data show that the public is decidedly against the cloning of animals. To understand the public's reaction and fill the void of reasoned debate about the issue, we need to review the possible objections to animal cloning and assess the merits of the anti-animal cloning stance. Some objections to animal cloning (e.g., the impact of cloning on the population of unwanted animals) can be easily addressed, while others (e.g., the health of cloned animals) require more serious attention by the public and policy makers.

  6. Pore network extraction from pore space images of various porous media systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhixing; Lin, Mian; Jiang, Wenbin; Zhang, Zhaobin; Li, Haishan; Gao, Jian

    2017-04-01

    Pore network extraction, which is defined as the transformation from irregular pore space to a simplified network in the form of pores connected by throats, is significant to microstructure analysis and network modeling. A physically realistic pore network is not only a representation of the pore space in the sense of topology and morphology, but also a good tool for predicting transport properties accurately. We present a method to extract pore network by employing the centrally located medial axis to guide the construction of maximal-balls-like skeleton where the pores and throats are defined and parameterized. To validate our method, various rock samples including sand pack, sandstones, and carbonates were used to extract pore networks. The pore structures were compared quantitatively with the structures extracted by medial axis method or maximal ball method. The predicted absolute permeability and formation factor were verified against the theoretical solutions obtained by lattice Boltzmann method and finite volume method, respectively. The two-phase flow was simulated through the networks extracted from homogeneous sandstones, and the generated relative permeability curves were compared with the data obtained from experimental method and other numerical models. The results show that the accuracy of our network is higher than that of other networks for predicting transport properties, so the presented method is more reliable for extracting physically realistic pore network.

  7. Disentangling the roles of cholesterol and CD59 in intermedilysin pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Courtney M.; Parsons, Edward S.; Smith, Richard A. G.; Seddon, John M.; Ces, Oscar; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane provides an essential barrier, shielding a cell from the pressures of its external environment. Pore-forming proteins, deployed by both hosts and pathogens alike, breach this barrier to lyse target cells. Intermedilysin is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin that requires the human immune receptor CD59, in addition to cholesterol, to form giant β-barrel pores in host membranes. Here we integrate biochemical assays with electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to distinguish the roles of these two receptors in mediating structural transitions of pore formation. CD59 is required for the specific coordination of intermedilysin (ILY) monomers and for triggering collapse of an oligomeric prepore. Movement of Domain 2 with respect to Domain 3 of ILY is essential for forming a late prepore intermediate that releases CD59, while the role of cholesterol may be limited to insertion of the transmembrane segments. Together these data define a structural timeline for ILY pore formation and suggest a mechanism that is relevant to understanding other pore-forming toxins that also require CD59. PMID:27910935

  8. Pore dynamics in a liquid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepomnyashchy, Alexander; Volpert, Vladimir

    2014-11-01

    It is known that vesicles formed from lipid bilayer membranes are used for transportation of a toxic drug to a target, where the drug is released by pore creation. The pores in a membrane show a rather nontrivial dynamics, which thus far has been studied by means of simplified models. In the present talk, we describe the pore dynamics in a stretched membrane, which is considered as a two-dimensional viscous or viscoelastic liquid medium surrounded by a three-dimensional ambient viscous liquid. In the case of a viscoelastic membrane, a Lagrangian approach, which allows to account for large displacements, is applied. A closed equation for the pore radius is derived and investigated. The work has been partially supported by the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation (Grant No. 2008122).

  9. Block copolymer structures in nano-pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Marco; Guo, Xiaohu; Zvelindovsky, Andrei

    2010-03-01

    We present results of coarse-grained computer modelling of block copolymer systems in cylindrical and spherical nanopores on Cell Dynamics Simulation. We study both cylindrical and spherical pores and systematically investigate structures formed by lamellar, cylinders and spherical block copolymer systems for various pore radii and affinity of block copolymer blocks to the pore walls. The obtained structures include: standing lamellae and cylinders, ``onions,'' cylinder ``knitting balls,'' ``golf-ball,'' layered spherical, ``virus''-like and mixed morphologies with T-junctions and U-type defects [1]. Kinetics of the structure formation and the differences with planar films are discussed. Our simulations suggest that novel porous nano-containers can be formed by confining block copolymers in pores of different geometries [1,2]. [4pt] [1] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, Polymer 49, 2797 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 214902 (2009).

  10. OBSERVATIONS OF SAUSAGE MODES IN MAGNETIC PORES

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R. J.; Erdelyi, R.; Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M. E-mail: Robertus@sheffield.ac.uk

    2011-03-10

    We present here evidence for the observation of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) sausage modes in magnetic pores in the solar photosphere. Further evidence for the omnipresent nature of acoustic global modes is also found. The empirical decomposition method of wave analysis is used to identify the oscillations detected through a 4170 A 'blue continuum' filter observed with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) instrument. Out of phase, periodic behavior in pore size and intensity is used as an indicator of the presence of magnetoacoustic sausage oscillations. Multiple signatures of the magnetoacoustic sausage mode are found in a number of pores. The periods range from as short as 30 s up to 450 s. A number of the magnetoacoustic sausage mode oscillations found have periods of 3 and 5 minutes, similar to the acoustic global modes of the solar interior. It is proposed that these global oscillations could be the driver of the sausage-type magnetoacoustic MHD wave modes in pores.

  11. To clone or not to clone--whither the law?

    PubMed

    Lupton, M L

    1999-01-01

    The cloning of Dolly the lamb from adult cells by scientists at the Roslin Laboratories near Edinburgh in February 1997 has startled the world because it now opens the way to clone adult human beings. The reaction to Ian Wilmut's breakthrough has been instant and largely negative. Bills were rushed into both the US Senate and House of Representatives aimed at banning the cloning of human beings. Human cloning is premature at this stage, but there are many positive spin-offs of cloning in the field of genetic engineering, such as the production of human proteins such as blood clotting factors which aid in healing wounds. Progress by means of cloning can also be made into devising a cure for Parkinson's Disease amongst others. No lesser ethicist than John C. Fletcher of the University of Virginia foresees circumstances in which human cloning is acceptable e.g. to enable a couple to replace a dying child, to enable a couple, one of whom is infertile, to clone a child from either partner. Extensive regulation of cloning by the law is inevitable but, in doing so, the legislation should be careful not to outlaw research in this area which could be beneficial to mankind.

  12. A Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae FG Nucleoporin Mutant Collection for Use in Nuclear Pore Complex Functional Experiments.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rebecca L; Terry, Laura J; Wente, Susan R

    2015-11-03

    FG nucleoporins (Nups) are the class of proteins that both generate the permeability barrier and mediate selective transport through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). The FG Nup family has 11 members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the study of mutants lacking different FG domains has been instrumental in testing transport models. To continue analyzing the distinct functional roles of FG Nups in vivo, additional robust genetic tools are required. Here, we describe a novel collection of S. cerevisiae mutant strains in which the FG domains of different groups of Nups are absent (Δ) in the greatest number documented to date. Using this plasmid-based ΔFG strategy, we find that a GLFG domain-only pore is sufficient for viability. The resulting extensive plasmid and strain resources are available to the scientific community for future in-depth in vivo studies of NPC transport. Copyright © 2016 Adams et al.

  13. Impact of NAPL architecture on interphase mass transfer: A pore network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaoglu, Berken; Scheytt, Traugott; Copty, Nadim K.

    2016-09-01

    Interphase mass transfer in porous media is commonly modeled using Sherwood number expressions that are developed in terms of fluid and porous medium properties averaged over some representative elementary volume (REV). In this work the influence of sub-grid scale properties on interphase mass transfer was investigated using a two-dimensional pore network model. The focus was on assessing the impact of (i) NAPL saturation, (ii) interfacial area (iii) NAPL spatial distribution at the pore scale, (iv) grain size heterogeneity, (v) REV or domain size and (vi) pore scale heterogeneity of the porous media on interphase mass transfer. Variability of both the mass transfer coefficient that explicitly accounts for the interfacial area and the mass transfer coefficient that lumps the interfacial area was examined. It was shown that pore scale NAPL distribution and its orientation relative to the flow direction have significant impact on flow bypassing and the interphase mass transfer coefficient. This results in a complex non-linear relationship between interfacial area and the REV-based interphase mass transfer rate. Hence, explicitly accounting for the interfacial area does not eliminate the uncertainty of the mass transfer coefficient. It was also shown that, even for explicitly defined flow patterns, changing the domain size over which the mass transfer process is defined influences the extent of NAPL bypassing and dilution and, consequently, the interphase mass transfer. It was also demonstrated that the spatial variability of pore scale parameters such as pore throat diameters may result in different rates of interphase mass transfer even for the same pore size distribution index.

  14. Single-molecule conductance measurements of biomolecule translocation across biomimetic nuclear pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Cees

    2012-02-01

    After a brief overview of our recent work on solid-state nanopores, I will present single-molecule transport data across biomimetic nanopores that contain the key regulating parts of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). The mechanism for the remarkable selectivity of NPCs has remained unclear in a large part due to difficulties in designing experiments that can probe the transport at the relevant length and time scales. Building and measuring on biomimetic NPCs provides new opportunities to address this long-standing problem. covalently tether the natively unfolded Phe-Gly rich domains (FG-domains) of human nuclear binding proteins to a solid-state nanopore (a 10-100 nm sized hole in a SiN membrane). Ionic current measurements provide a probe to monitor single molecules that traverse the pore. Translocation events are observed for transport receptors (Impβ), whereas transport of passive molecules (BSA) is found to be blocked. Interestingly, a single type of nuclear pore proteins appears already sufficient to form a selective barrier for transport. A translocation time of about 2.5 ms is measured for Impβ. This time is found to be similar for transport across Nup153 and Nup98 coated pores, although the observed ionic conductance differs between these two types of pores. We compare two simple models for the pore conductance and find, for both Nups, that the data fits best to a model with an open central channel and a condensed layer along the outer circumference of the pore. reproducing the key features of the NPC, our biomimetic approach opens the way to study a wide variety of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport processes at the single-molecule level in vitro.

  15. Pore-Scale and Multiscale Numerical Simulation of Flow and Transport in a Laboratory-Scale Column

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; McKinley, Matthey I.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Serkowski, John A.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-02-01

    Pore-scale models are useful for studying relationships between fundamental processes and phenomena at larger (i.e., Darcy) scales. However, the size of domains that can be simulated with explicit pore-scale resolution is limited by computational and observational constraints. Direct numerical simulation of pore-scale flow and transport is typically performed on millimeter-scale volumes at which X-ray computed tomography (XCT), often used to characterize pore geometry, can achieve micrometer resolution. In contrast, the scale at which a continuum approximation of a porous medium is valid is usually larger, on the order of centimeters to decimeters. Furthermore, laboratory experiments that measure continuum properties are typically performed on decimeter-scale columns. At this scale, XCT resolution is coarse (tens to hundreds of micrometers) and prohibits characterization of small pores and grains. We performed simulations of pore-scale processes over a decimeter-scale volume of natural porous media with a wide range of grain sizes, and compared to results of column experiments using the same sample. Simulations were conducted using high-performance codes executed on a supercomputer. Two approaches to XCT image segmentation were evaluated, a binary (pores and solids) segmentation and a ternary segmentation that resolved a third category (porous solids with pores smaller than the imaged resolution). We used a mixed Stokes-Darcy simulation method to simulate the combination of Stokes flow in large open pores and Darcy-like flow in porous solid regions. Simulations based on the ternary segmentation provided results that were consistent with experimental observations, demonstrating our ability to successfully model pore-scale flow over a column-scale domain.

  16. Adsorption hysteresis in ink-bottle pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Tateishi, Noriko

    2003-07-01

    To examine the mechanism of the adsorption hysteresis in ink-bottle pores, we measured the temperature dependence of the adsorption-desorption isotherms of argon, oxygen, and carbon dioxide onto SBA-16 ordered mesoporous material with cagelike pores. The hysteresis loop always shrank with increasing temperature and eventually disappeared at a hysteresis temperature (Th), well below the bulk critical temperature (Tc). When the relative pressures p/p0 of the capillary condensation and evaporation are plotted as a function of reduced temperature T/Tc, all the data including the transition pressures for nitrogen reported previously are represented by a common curve. We also calculated the temperature dependence of the capillary condensation and evaporation pressures of nitrogen under the assumption that adsorption and desorption in an ink-bottle pore may be regarded as the process of the disappearance and formation of a gas bubble in a liquid droplet confined to the pore. A fit between the observed and calculated transition pressures in a wide temperature range was reasonable in light of several assumptions and approximations used. This clearly indicates that the energy barrier for the formation and disappearance of vapor bubbles in the liquid confined to the pores is responsible for the appearance of the adsorption hysteresis and the hysteresis temperature is not concerned with the so-called capillary criticality. At temperatures higher than Th, the reversible capillary condensation takes place, because the energy barrier between a full liquid pore and the vapor coexisting with the liquid film becomes surmountable.

  17. Polymer Melt Diffusion inside Nanoscale Cylindrical Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, Karen

    Polymers in composites and inside porous media are frequently confined to spaces that are comparable to or even smaller than their mean end-to-end distances in the unconfined bulk state. Understanding the impact of nanoscale confinement on both polymer structure and dynamics is critical during processing and in applications. Anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes with uniform cylindrical pores (diameters 18, 35, 55 or 80 nm) were filled with polystyrene (200 kDa) and then a thin layer of deuterated polystyrene was deposited on top. After annealing the concentration profile of the deuterated polymer was measured using elastic recoil detection and the center-of-mass polymer diffusion coefficient was determined. Melt diffusion is faster in AAO membranes with smaller pore diameters. This experimental finding is corroborated by coarse grain simulations with neutral interactions with the pore walls, although the increase is more pronounced in the simulations. Our simulations previously found that chain conformations slightly elongated parallel to the cylinder axis and compressed perpendicular to the cylinder and the number of entanglements per chain decreases as the cylinder diameter decreases. It is primarily the reduction in polymer entanglements that allows polymers to diffuse faster when the pore diameter is smaller in an athermal or weakly interacting system. Segmental dynamics have been measured using quasielastic neutron scattering. Polymer diffusion is cylindrical pores is now being studied at a fixed pore diameter as a function of molecular weight.

  18. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  19. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Therapeutic cloning and reproductive liberty.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2009-04-01

    Concern for "reproductive liberty" suggests that decisions about embryos should normally be made by the persons who would be the genetic parents of the child that would be brought into existence if the embryo were brought to term. Therapeutic cloning would involve creating and destroying an embryo, which, if brought to term, would be the offspring of the genetic parents of the person undergoing therapy. I argue that central arguments in debates about parenthood and genetics therefore suggest that therapeutic cloning would be prima facie unethical unless it occurred with the consent of the parents of the person being cloned. Alternatively, if therapeutic cloning is thought to be legitimate, this undermines the case for some uses of reproductive cloning by implying that the genetic relation it establishes between clones and DNA donors does not carry the same moral weight as it does in cases of normal reproduction.

  1. Pore-scale controls on calcite dissolution rates from flow-through laboratory and numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Molins, Sergi; Trebotich, David; Yang, Li; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B; Ligocki, Terry J; Shen, Chaopeng; Steefel, Carl I

    2014-07-01

    A combination of experimental, imaging, and modeling techniques were applied to investigate the pore-scale transport and surface reaction controls on calcite dissolution under elevated pCO2 conditions. The laboratory experiment consisted of the injection of a solution at 4 bar pCO2 into a capillary tube packed with crushed calcite. A high resolution pore-scale numerical model was used to simulate the experiment based on a computational domain consisting of reactive calcite, pore space, and the capillary wall constructed from volumetric X-ray microtomography images. Simulated pore-scale effluent concentrations were higher than those measured by a factor of 1.8, with the largest component of the discrepancy related to uncertainties in the reaction rate model and its parameters. However, part of the discrepancy was apparently due to mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, which were most pronounced near the inlet where larger diffusive boundary layers formed around grains and in slow-flowing pore spaces that exchanged mass by diffusion with fast flow paths. Although minor, the difference between pore- and continuum-scale results due to transport controls was discernible with the highly accurate methods employed and is expected to be more significant where heterogeneity is greater, as in natural subsurface materials.

  2. More Than a Pore: The Interplay of Pore-Forming Proteins and Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ros, Uris; García-Sáez, Ana J

    2015-06-01

    Pore-forming proteins (PFPs) punch holes in their target cell membrane to alter their permeability. Permeabilization of lipid membranes by PFPs has received special attention to study the basic molecular mechanisms of protein insertion into membranes and the development of biotechnological tools. PFPs act through a general multi-step mechanism that involves (i) membrane partitioning, (ii) insertion into the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, (iii) oligomerization, and (iv) pore formation. Interestingly, PFPs and membranes show a dynamic interplay. As PFPs are usually produced as soluble proteins, they require a large conformational change for membrane insertion. Moreover, membrane structure is modified upon PFPs insertion. In this context, the toroidal pore model has been proposed to describe a pore architecture in which not only protein molecules but also lipids are directly involved in the structure. Here, we discuss how PFPs and lipids cooperate and remodel each other to achieve pore formation, and explore new evidences of protein-lipid pore structures.

  3. Molecular cloning of chicken aggrecan. Structural analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, L; Tanzer, M L

    1992-01-01

    The large, aggregating chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan of cartilage, aggrecan, has served as a generic model of proteoglycan structure. Molecular cloning of aggrecans has further defined their amino acid sequences and domain structures. In this study, we have obtained the complete coding sequence of chicken sternal cartilage aggrecan by a combination of cDNA and genomic DNA sequencing. The composite sequence is 6117 bp in length, encoding 1951 amino acids. Comparison of chicken aggrecan protein primary structure with rat, human and bovine aggrecans has disclosed both similarities and differences. The domains which are most highly conserved at 70-80% identity are the N-terminal domains G1 and G2 and the C-terminal domain G3. The chondroitin sulphate domain of chicken aggrecan is smaller than that of rat and human aggrecans and has very distinctive repeat sequences. It has two separate sections, one comprising 12 consecutive Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 20 amino acids each, adjacent to the other which has 23 discontinuous Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 10 amino acids each; this latter region, N-terminal to the former one, appears to be unique to chicken aggrecan. The two regions contain a total of 94 potential chondroitin sulphate attachment sites. Genomic comparison shows that, although chicken exons 11-14 are identical in size to the rat and human exons, chicken exon 10 is the smallest of the three species. This is also reflected in the size of its chondroitin sulphate coding region and in the total number of Ser-Gly pairs. The putative keratan sulphate domain shows 31-45% identity with the other species and lacks the repetitive sequences seen in the others. In summary, while the linear arrangement of specific domains of chicken aggrecan is identical to that in the aggrecans of other species, and while there is considerable identity of three separate domains, chicken aggrecan demonstrates unique features, notably in its chondroitin sulphate domain and its keratan sulphate

  4. Equine cloning: applications and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vanderwall, Dirk K; Woods, Gordon L; Roser, Janet F; Schlafer, Donald H; Sellon, Debra C; Tester, David F; White, Kenneth L

    2006-01-01

    Cloning is one of several new assisted reproductive techniques being developed for clinical use in the equine industry. Potential uses of equine cloning include: (1) the preservation of genetics from individual animals that would otherwise not be able to reproduce, such as geldings; (2) the preservation of genetic material of endangered and/or exotic species, such as the Mongolian wild horse (Przewalski's horse); and (3) because of the companion animal role that horses fill for some individuals, it is likely that some horse owners will have individual animals cloned for emotional fulfillment. Although equine cloning has been successful, like other species, it remains a very inefficient process (<3% success). In most species, the inefficiency of cloning results from a high incidence of embryonic, fetal and/or placental developmental abnormalities that contribute to extremely high rates of embryonic loss, abortion and stillbirths throughout gestation and compromised neonatal health after birth. The present review describes some of the ultrasonographic, endocrinological and histopathological characteristics of successful (produced viable offspring) and unsuccessful (resulted in pregnancy failure) cloned equine (mule and horse) pregnancies we have produced. A total of 21 cloned mule pregnancies were established using fetal fibroblast cells, whereas a total of seven cloned horse pregnancies were established using adult cumulus cells. Three of the cloned mule conceptuses were carried to term, resulting in the birth of three healthy clones. This information adds to an accumulating body of knowledge about the outcome of cloned equine pregnancies, which will help to establish when, and perhaps why, many cloned equine pregnancies fail.

  5. Guide to molecular cloning techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, S.L.; Kimmel, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book includes the following selections: requirements for a molecular biology laboratory; general methods for isolating and characterizing nucleic acids; enzymatic techniques and recombinant DNA technology; restriction enzymes; growth and maintenance of bacteria; genetic cloning, preparation and characterization of RNA; preparation of cDNA and the generation of cDNA libraries; selections of clones from libraries; and identification and characterization of specific clones.

  6. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Gene A.; Kostellow, Adele B.

    2016-01-01

    Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb); neuroglobin (Ngb); myoglobin (Mb); hemoglobin (Hb) subunits Hba(α); and Hbb(β)] contain either a transmembrane (TM) helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol- binding (CRAC/CARC) domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba) and pore-lining region (Hbb). The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues, and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, “band 3,” which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions). The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane “band 3” attachment site. “Band 3” contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO) movement within the large internal cavities and

  7. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B

    2016-01-01

    Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb); neuroglobin (Ngb); myoglobin (Mb); hemoglobin (Hb) subunits Hba(α); and Hbb(β)] contain either a transmembrane (TM) helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol- binding (CRAC/CARC) domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba) and pore-lining region (Hbb). The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues, and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, "band 3," which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions). The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane "band 3" attachment site. "Band 3" contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO) movement within the large internal cavities and channels of the

  8. Therapeutic cloning: The ethical limits

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, Peter A. . E-mail: p.whittaker@lancaster.ac.uk

    2005-09-01

    A brief outline of stem cells, stem cell therapy and therapeutic cloning is given. The position of therapeutic cloning with regard to other embryonic manipulations - IVF-based reproduction, embryonic stem formation from IVF embryos and reproductive cloning - is indicated. The main ethically challenging stages in therapeutic cloning are considered to be the nuclear transfer process including the source of eggs for this and the destruction of an embryo to provide stem cells for therapeutic use. The extremely polarised nature of the debate regarding the status of an early human embryo is noted, and some potential alternative strategies for preparing immunocompatible pluripotent stem cells are indicated.

  9. Cloning to reproduce desired genotypes.

    PubMed

    Westhusin, M E; Long, C R; Shin, T; Hill, J R; Looney, C R; Pryor, J H; Piedrahita, J A

    2001-01-01

    Cloned sheep, cattle, goats, pigs and mice have now been produced using somatic cells for nuclear transplantation. Animal cloning is still very inefficient with on average less than 10% of the cloned embryos transferred resulting in a live offspring. However successful cloning of a variety of different species and by a number of different laboratory groups has generated tremendous interest in reproducing desired genotypes. Some of these specific genotypes represent animal cell lines that have been genetically modified. In other cases there is a significant demand for cloning animals characterized by their inherent genetic value, for example prize livestock, household pets and rare or endangered species. A number of different variables may influence the ability to reproduce a specific genotype by cloning. These include species, source of recipient ova, cell type of nuclei donor, treatment of donor cells prior to nuclear transfer, and the techniques employed for nuclear transfer. At present, there is no solid evidence that suggests cloning will be limited to only a few specific animals, and in fact, most data collected to date suggests cloning will be applicable to a wide variety of different animals. The ability to reproduce any desired genotype by cloning will ultimately depend on the amount of time and resources invested in research.

  10. Human cloning and child welfare.

    PubMed Central

    Burley, J; Harris, J

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an objection to human cloning which appeals to the welfare of the child. This objection varies according to the sort of harm it is expected the clone will suffer. The three formulations of it that we will consider are: 1. Clones will be harmed by the fearful or prejudicial attitudes people may have about or towards them (H1); 2. Clones will be harmed by the demands and expectations of parents or genotype donors (H2); 3. Clones will be harmed by their own awareness of their origins, for example the knowledge that the genetic donor is a stranger (H3). We will show why these three versions of the child welfare objection do not necessarily supply compelling reasons to ban human reproductive cloning. The claim that we will develop and defend in the course of our discussion is that even if it is the case that a cloned child will suffer harms of the type H1-H3, it is none the less permissible to conceive by cloning so long as these cloning-induced welfare deficits are not such as to blight the existence of the resultant child, whoever this may be. PMID:10226914

  11. Probing the nucleoporin FG repeat network defines structural and functional features of the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Stelter, Philipp; Kunze, Ruth; Fischer, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Unraveling the organization of the FG repeat meshwork that forms the active transport channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is key to understanding the mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport. In this paper, we develop a tool to probe the FG repeat network in living cells by modifying FG nucleoporins (Nups) with a binding motif (engineered dynein light chain–interacting domain) that can drag several copies of an interfering protein, Dyn2, into the FG network to plug the pore and stop nucleocytoplasmic transport. Our method allows us to specifically probe FG Nups in vivo, which provides insight into the organization and function of the NPC transport channel. PMID:21987633

  12. Probing the nucleoporin FG repeat network defines structural and functional features of the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Stelter, Philipp; Kunze, Ruth; Fischer, Jessica; Hurt, Ed

    2011-10-17

    Unraveling the organization of the FG repeat meshwork that forms the active transport channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is key to understanding the mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport. In this paper, we develop a tool to probe the FG repeat network in living cells by modifying FG nucleoporins (Nups) with a binding motif (engineered dynein light chain-interacting domain) that can drag several copies of an interfering protein, Dyn2, into the FG network to plug the pore and stop nucleocytoplasmic transport. Our method allows us to specifically probe FG Nups in vivo, which provides insight into the organization and function of the NPC transport channel.

  13. Pore REconstruction and Segmentation (PORES) method for improved porosity quantification of nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Van Eyndhoven, G; Kurttepeli, M; Van Oers, C J; Cool, P; Bals, S; Batenburg, K J; Sijbers, J

    2015-01-01

    Electron tomography is currently a versatile tool to investigate the connection between the structure and properties of nanomaterials. However, a quantitative interpretation of electron tomography results is still far from straightforward. Especially accurate quantification of pore-space is hampered by artifacts introduced in all steps of the processing chain, i.e., acquisition, reconstruction, segmentation and quantification. Furthermore, most common approaches require subjective manual user input. In this paper, the PORES algorithm "POre REconstruction and Segmentation" is introduced; it is a tailor-made, integral approach, for the reconstruction, segmentation, and quantification of porous nanomaterials. The PORES processing chain starts by calculating a reconstruction with a nanoporous-specific reconstruction algorithm: the Simultaneous Update of Pore Pixels by iterative REconstruction and Simple Segmentation algorithm (SUPPRESS). It classifies the interior region to the pores during reconstruction, while reconstructing the remaining region by reducing the error with respect to the acquired electron microscopy data. The SUPPRESS reconstruction can be directly plugged into the remaining processing chain of the PORES algorithm, resulting in accurate individual pore quantification and full sample pore statistics. The proposed approach was extensively validated on both simulated and experimental data, indicating its ability to generate accurate statistics of nanoporous materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanical properties, pore size distribution, and pore solution of fly ash-belite cement mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, A.; Goni, S.; Macias, A.; Luxan, M.P.

    1999-11-01

    The mechanical properties, pore size distribution, and extracted pore solution of fly ash-belite cement (FABC) mortars were studied for a period of 200 days. The influence of the calcination temperature, which ranged from 700 to 900 C, of the fly ash-belite cement was discussed. The evolution with hydration time of the pore size distribution was followed by mercury intrusion porosimetry, and the results correlated with those of flexural and compressive strength. The pore solution was expressed and analyzed at different times of hydration.

  15. Pore pressure embrittlement in a volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael J.; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry; Varley, Nick R.

    2016-01-01

    The failure mode of porous rock in compression—dilatant or compactant—is largely governed by the overlying lithostatic pressure and the pressure of pore fluids within the rock (Wong, Solid Earth 102:3009-3025, 1997), both of which are subject to change in space and time within a volcanic edifice. While lithostatic pressure will tend to increase monotonously with depth due to the progressive accumulation of erupted products, pore pressures are prone to fluctuations (during periods of volcanic unrest, for example). An increase in pore fluid pressure can result in rock fracture, even at depths where the lithostatic pressure would otherwise preclude such dilatant behaviour—a process termed pore fluid-induced embrittlement. We explore this phenomenon through a series of targeted triaxial experiments on typical edifice-forming andesites (from Volcán de Colima, Mexico). We first show that increasing pore pressure over a range of timescales (on the order of 1 min to 1 day) can culminate in brittle failure of otherwise intact rock. Irrespective of the pore pressure increase rate, we record comparable accelerations in acoustic emission and strain prior to macroscopic failure. We further show that oscillating pore fluid pressures can cause iterative and cumulative damage, ultimately resulting in brittle failure under relatively low effective mean stress conditions. We find that macroscopic failure occurs once a critical threshold of damage is surpassed, suggesting that only small increases in pore pressure may be necessary to trigger failure in previously damaged rocks. Finally, we observe that inelastic compaction of volcanic rock (as we may expect in much of the deep edifice) can be overprinted by shear fractures due to this mechanism of embrittlement. Pore fluid-induced embrittlement of edifice rock during volcanic unrest is anticipated to be highest closer to the conduit and, as a result, may assist in the development of a fractured halo zone surrounding the

  16. Adaptive Multi-Scale Pore Network Method for Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. W.; Khayrat, K.; Jenny, P.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic pore network simulators are important tools in studying macroscopic quantities in two-phase flow through porous media. However, these simulators have a time complexity of order N2 for N pore bodies, which limits their usage to small domains. Quasi-static pore network simulators, which assume capillary dominated flow, are more efficient with a time complexity of order N log(N), but are unable to capture phenomena caused by viscous effects such as viscous fingering and stable displacement. It has been experimentally observed that, in several flow scenarios, capillary forces are dominant at the pore scale and viscous forces at larger scales. In order to take advantage of this behaviour and to reduce the time complexity of existing dynamic pore network simulators, we propose a multi-scale pore-network method for two phase flow. In our solution algorithm, the pore network is first divided into smaller subnetworks. The algorithm to advance the fluid interfaces within each subnetwork consists of three steps: 1) The saturation rate of each subnetwork is obtained by solving a two-phase meso-scale mass balance equation over the domain of subnetworks. Here, a multi-point flux scheme is used. 2) Depending on the local capillary number computed in the subnetwork, either an invasion percolation algorithm or a dynamic network algorithm is used to locally advance the fluid-fluid interfaces within each subnetwork until a new saturation value is matched. 3) The transmissibilities for the meso-scale equation are updated based on the updated fluid configurations in each subnetwork. For this purpose the methodoloy of the existing multi-scale finite volume (MSFV) method is employed. An important feature of the multi-scale pore-network method is that it maintains consistency of both fluid occupancy and fluxes at subnetwork interfaces. Viscous effects such as viscous fingering (see figure) can be captured at a decreased computational cost compared to dynamic pore network

  17. Clostridium difficile toxins A and B: Receptors, pores, and translocation into cells.

    PubMed

    Orrell, Kathleen E; Zhang, Zhifen; Sugiman-Marangos, Seiji N; Melnyk, Roman A

    2017-08-01

    The most potent toxins secreted by pathogenic bacteria contain enzymatic moieties that must reach the cytosol of target cells to exert their full toxicity. Toxins such as anthrax, diphtheria, and botulinum toxin all use three well-defined functional domains to intoxicate cells: a receptor-binding moiety that triggers endocytosis into acidified vesicles by binding to a specific host-cell receptor, a translocation domain that forms pores across the endosomal membrane in response to acidic pH, and an enzyme that translocates through these pores to catalytically inactivate an essential host cytosolic substrate. The homologous toxins A (TcdA) and Toxin B (TcdB) secreted by Clostridium difficile are large enzyme-containing toxins that for many years have eluded characterization. The cell-surface receptors for these toxins, the non-classical nature of the pores that they form in membranes, and mechanism of translocation have remained undefined, exacerbated, in part, by the lack of any structural information for the central ∼1000 amino acid translocation domain. Recent advances in the identification of receptors for TcdB, high-resolution structural information for the translocation domain, and a model for the pore have begun to shed light on the mode-of-action of these toxins. Here, we will review TcdA/TcdB uptake and entry into mammalian cells, with focus on receptor binding, endocytosis, pore formation, and translocation. We will highlight how these toxins diverge from classical models of translocating toxins, and offer our perspective on key unanswered questions for TcdA/TcdB binding and entry into mammalian cells.

  18. Low pore connectivity in natural rock.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO(2) and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air-water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  19. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO₂ and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  20. Soil pore structure and substrate C mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleutel, Steven; Maenhout, Peter; Vanhoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle; De Neve, Stefaan

    2014-05-01

    Our aim was to investigate the complex interactions between soil pore structure, soil biota and decomposition of added OM substrates. We report on a lab incubation experiment in which CO2 respiration from soil cores was monitored (headspace GC analysis) and an X-ray CT approach yielded soil pore size distributions. Such combined use of X-ray CT with soil incubation studies was obstructed, until now, by many practical constraints such as CT-volume quality, limited resolution, scanning time and complex soil pore network quantification, which have largely been overcome in this study. We incubated a sandy loam soil (with application of ground grass or sawdust) in 18 small aluminium rings (Ø 1 cm, h 1 cm). Bulk density was adjusted to 1.1 or 1.3 Mg m-3 (compaction) and 6 rings were filled at a coarser Coarse Sand:Fine Sand:Silt+Clay ratio. While compaction induced a strong reduction in the cumulative C mineralization for both grass and sawdust substrates, artificial change to a coarser soil texture only reduced net C mineralization from the added sawdust. There thus appears to be a strong interaction effect between soil pore structure and substrate type on substrate decomposition. Correlation coefficients between the C mineralization rates and volumes of 7 pore size classes (from the X-ray CT data) also showed an increasing positive correlation with increasing pore size. Since any particulate organic matter initially present in the soil was removed prior to the experiment (sieving, ashing the >53µm fraction and recombining with the <53µm fraction), the added OM can be localized by means of X-ray CT. Through on-going image analysis the surrounding porosity of the added grass or sawdust particles is being quantified to further study the interaction between the soil pore structure and substrate decomposition.

  1. Deposition Nucleation or Pore Condensation and Freezing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Robert O.; Mahrt, Fabian; Marcolli, Claudia; Fahrni, Jonas; Brühwiler, Dominik; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2017-04-01

    Ice nucleation plays an important role in moderating Earth's climate and precipitation formation. Over the last century of research, several mechanisms for the nucleation of ice have been identified. Of the known mechanisms for ice nucleation, only deposition nucleation occurs below water saturation. Deposition nucleation is defined as the formation of ice from supersaturated water vapor on an insoluble particle without the prior formation of liquid. However, recent work has found that the efficiency of so-called deposition nucleation shows a dependence on the homogeneous freezing temperature of water even though no liquid phase is presumed to be present. Additionally, the ability of certain particles to nucleate ice more efficiently after being pre-cooled (pre-activation) raises questions on the true mechanism when ice nucleation occurs below water saturation. In an attempt to explain the dependence of the efficiency of so-called deposition nucleation on the onset of homogeneous freezing of liquid water, pore condensation and freezing has been proposed. Pore condensation and freezing suggests that the liquid phase can exist under sub-saturated conditions with respect to liquid in narrow confinements or pores due to the inverse Kelvin effect. Once the liquid-phase condenses, it is capable of nucleating ice either homogeneously or heterogeneously. The role of pore condensation and freezing is assessed in the Zurich Ice Nucleation Chamber, a continuous flow diffusion chamber, using spherical nonporous and mesoporous silica particles. The mesoporous silica particles have a well-defined particle size range of 400 to 600nm with discreet pore sizes of 2.5, 2.8, 3.5 and 3.8nm. Experiments conducted between 218K and 238K show that so-called deposition nucleation only occurs below the homogenous freezing temperature of water and is highly dependent on the presence of pores and their size. The results strongly support pore condensation and freezing, questioning the role of

  2. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  3. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  4. Hydrochromic Approaches to Mapping Human Sweat Pores.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Hoon; Park, Bum Jun; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-06-21

    Hydrochromic materials, which undergo changes in their light absorption and/or emission properties in response to water, have been extensively investigated as humidity sensors. Recent advances in the design of these materials have led to novel applications, including monitoring the water content of organic solvents, water-jet-based rewritable printing on paper, and hydrochromic mapping of human sweat pores. Our interest in this area has focused on the design of hydrochromic materials for human sweat pore mapping. We recognized that materials appropriate for this purpose must have balanced sensitivities to water. Specifically, while they should not undergo light absorption and/or emission transitions under ambient moisture conditions, the materials must have sufficiently high hydrochromic sensitivities that they display responses to water secreted from human sweat pores. In this Account, we describe investigations that we have carried out to develop hydrochromic substances that are suitable for human sweat pore mapping. Polydiacetylenes (PDAs) have been extensively investigated as sensor matrices because of their stimulus-responsive color change property. We found that incorporation of headgroups composed of hygroscopic ions such as cesium or rubidium and carboxylate counterions enables PDAs to undergo a blue-to-red colorimetric transition as well as a fluorescence turn-on response to water. Very intriguingly, the small quantities of water secreted from human sweat pores were found to be sufficient to trigger fluorescence turn-on responses of the hydrochromic PDAs, allowing precise mapping of human sweat pores. Since the hygroscopic ion-containing PDAs developed in the initial stage display a colorimetric transition under ambient conditions that exist during humid summer periods, a new system was designed. A PDA containing an imidazolium ion was found to be stable under all ambient conditions and showed temperature-dependent hydrochromism corresponding to a

  5. Simple rules for passive diffusion through the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Timney, Benjamin L; Raveh, Barak; Mironska, Roxana; Trivedi, Jill M; Kim, Seung Joong; Russel, Daniel; Wente, Susan R; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P

    2016-10-10

    Passive macromolecular diffusion through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) is thought to decrease dramatically beyond a 30-60-kD size threshold. Using thousands of independent time-resolved fluorescence microscopy measurements in vivo, we show that the NPC lacks such a firm size threshold; instead, it forms a soft barrier to passive diffusion that intensifies gradually with increasing molecular mass in both the wild-type and mutant strains with various subsets of phenylalanine-glycine (FG) domains and different levels of baseline passive permeability. Brownian dynamics simulations replicate these findings and indicate that the soft barrier results from the highly dynamic FG repeat domains and the diffusing macromolecules mutually constraining and competing for available volume in the interior of the NPC, setting up entropic repulsion forces. We found that FG domains with exceptionally high net charge and low hydropathy near the cytoplasmic end of the central channel contribute more strongly to obstruction of passive diffusion than to facilitated transport, revealing a compartmentalized functional arrangement within the NPC. © 2016 Timney et al.

  6. Simple rules for passive diffusion through the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Mironska, Roxana; Kim, Seung Joong

    2016-01-01

    Passive macromolecular diffusion through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) is thought to decrease dramatically beyond a 30–60-kD size threshold. Using thousands of independent time-resolved fluorescence microscopy measurements in vivo, we show that the NPC lacks such a firm size threshold; instead, it forms a soft barrier to passive diffusion that intensifies gradually with increasing molecular mass in both the wild-type and mutant strains with various subsets of phenylalanine-glycine (FG) domains and different levels of baseline passive permeability. Brownian dynamics simulations replicate these findings and indicate that the soft barrier results from the highly dynamic FG repeat domains and the diffusing macromolecules mutually constraining and competing for available volume in the interior of the NPC, setting up entropic repulsion forces. We found that FG domains with exceptionally high net charge and low hydropathy near the cytoplasmic end of the central channel contribute more strongly to obstruction of passive diffusion than to facilitated transport, revealing a compartmentalized functional arrangement within the NPC. PMID:27697925

  7. Modeling branching pore structures in membrane filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Cummings, Linda J.

    2016-11-01

    Membrane filters are in widespread industrial use, and mathematical models to predict their efficacy are potentially very useful, as such models can suggest design modifications to improve filter performance and lifetime. Many models have been proposed to describe particle capture by membrane filters and the associated fluid dynamics, but most such models are based on a very simple structure in which the pores of the membrane are assumed to be simple circularly-cylindrical tubes spanning the depth of the membrane. Real membranes used in applications usually have much more complex geometry, with interconnected pores which may branch and bifurcate. Pores are also typically larger on the upstream side of the membrane than on the downstream side. We present an idealized mathematical model, in which a membrane consists of a series of bifurcating pores, which decrease in size as the membrane is traversed. Feed solution is forced through the membrane by applied pressure, and particles are removed from the feed either by sieving, or by particle adsorption within pores (which shrinks them). Thus the membrane's permeability decreases as the filtration progresses, ultimately falling to zero. We discuss how filtration efficiency depends on the characteristics of the branching structure. Partial support from NSF DMS 1261596 is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Modeling tissue growth within nonwoven scaffolds pores.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Sharon L; Church, Jeffrey S; Alexander, David L J; Russell, Stephen J; Ingham, Eileen; Ramshaw, John A M; Werkmeister, Jerome A

    2011-02-01

    In this study we present a novel approach for predicting tissue growth within the pores of fibrous tissue engineering scaffolds. Thin nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate scaffolds were prepared to characterize tissue growth within scaffold pores, by mouse NR6 fibroblast cells. On the basis of measurements of tissue lengths at fiber crossovers and along fiber segments, mathematical models were determined during the proliferative phase of cell growth. Tissue growth at fiber crossovers decreased with increasing interfiber angle, with exponential relationships determined on day 6 and 10 of culture. Analysis of tissue growth along fiber segments determined two growth profiles, one with enhanced growth as a result of increased tissue lengths near the fiber crossover, achieved in the latter stage of culture. Derived mathematical models were used in the development of a software program to visualize predicted tissue growth within a pore. This study identifies key pore parameters that contribute toward tissue growth, and suggests models for predicting this growth, based on fibroblast cells. Such models may be used in aiding scaffold design, for optimum pore infiltration during the tissue engineering process.

  9. Analysis of a spatially deconvolved solar pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.; Ruiz Cobo, B.; Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ichimoto, K.

    2016-08-01

    Solar pores are active regions with large magnetic field strengths and apparent simple magnetic configurations. Their properties resemble the ones found for the sunspot umbra although pores do not show penumbra. Therefore, solar pores present themselves as an intriguing phenomenon that is not completely understood. We examine in this work a solar pore observed with Hinode/SP using two state of the art techniques. The first one is the spatial deconvolution of the spectropolarimetric data that allows removing the stray light contamination induced by the spatial point spread function of the telescope. The second one is the inversion of the Stokes profiles assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium that let us to infer the atmospheric physical parameters. After applying these techniques, we found that the spatial deconvolution method does not introduce artefacts, even at the edges of the magnetic structure, where large horizontal gradients are detected on the atmospheric parameters. Moreover, we also describe the physical properties of the magnetic structure at different heights finding that, in the inner part of the solar pore, the temperature is lower than outside, the magnetic field strength is larger than 2 kG and unipolar, and the line-of-sight velocity is almost null. At neighbouring pixels, we found low magnetic field strengths of same polarity and strong downward motions that only occur at the low photosphere, below the continuum optical depth log τ = -1. Finally, we studied the spatial relation between different atmospheric parameters at different heights corroborating the physical properties described before.

  10. Performance of Small Pore Microchannel Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Ravinett, T.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Edgar, M.

    1995-01-01

    Small pore size microchannel plates (MCP's) are needed to satisfy the requirements for future high resolution small and large format detectors for astronomy. MCP's with pore sizes in the range 5 micron to 8 micron are now being manufactured, but they are of limited availability and are of small size. We have obtained sets of Galileo 8 micron and 6.5 micron MCP's, and Philips 6 micron and 7 micron pore MCP's, and compared them to our larger pore MCP Z stacks. We have tested back to back MCP stacks of four of these MCP's and achieved gains greater than 2 x 1O(exp 7) with pulse height distributions of less than 40% FWHM, and background rates of less than 0.3 events sec(exp -1) cm(exp -2). Local counting rates up to approx. 100 events/pore/sec have been attained with little drop of the MCP gain. The bare MCP quantum efficiencies are somewhat lower than those expected, however. Flat field images are characterized by an absence of MCP fixed pattern noise.

  11. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Henstock, Peter V.; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  12. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow.

  13. [The discrete horror of cloning].

    PubMed

    Guibourg, Ricardo A

    2009-01-01

    The author raises the topic of cloning after the decision of the Argentine government, which concerned for the "dignity of the human person", passed a decree of need and urgency, No. 200/97 (Annex), prohibiting cloning experiments with human beings. Therefore, considering that the topic is so terribly urgent and necessary, the author feels it is timely to consider it.

  14. PCR Cloning of Partial "nbs" Sequences from Grape ("Vitis aestivalis" Michx)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ming-Mei; DiGennaro, Peter; Macula, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Plants defend themselves against pathogens via the expressions of disease resistance (R) genes. Many plant R gene products contain the characteristic nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. There are highly conserved motifs within the NBS domain which could be targeted for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) cloning of R…

  15. PCR Cloning of Partial "nbs" Sequences from Grape ("Vitis aestivalis" Michx)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ming-Mei; DiGennaro, Peter; Macula, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Plants defend themselves against pathogens via the expressions of disease resistance (R) genes. Many plant R gene products contain the characteristic nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. There are highly conserved motifs within the NBS domain which could be targeted for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) cloning of R…

  16. Interaction between Functional Domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Crystal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rang, Cécile; Vachon, Vincent; de Maagd, Ruud A.; Villalon, Mario; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Bosch, Dirk; Frutos, Roger; Laprade, Raynald

    1999-01-01

    Interactions among the three structural domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins were investigated by functional analysis of chimeric proteins. Hybrid genes were prepared by exchanging the regions coding for either domain I or domain III among Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1C, and Cry1E. The activity of the purified trypsin-activated chimeric toxins was evaluated by testing their effects on the viability and plasma membrane permeability of Sf9 cells. Among the parental toxins, only Cry1C was active against these cells and only chimeras possessing domain II from Cry1C were functional. Combination of domain I from Cry1E with domains II and III from Cry1C, however, resulted in an inactive toxin, indicating that domain II from an active toxin is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity. Pores formed by chimeric toxins in which domain I was from Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac were slightly smaller than those formed by toxins in which domain I was from Cry1C. The properties of the pores formed by the chimeras are therefore likely to result from an interaction between domain I and domain II or III. Domain III appears to modulate the activity of the chimeric toxins: combination of domain III from Cry1Ab with domains I and II of Cry1C gave a protein which was more strongly active than Cry1C. PMID:10388684

  17. Chromatographic performance of large-pore versus small-pore columns in micellar liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Timothy J; Foley, Joe P; Lloyd, David K

    2003-02-25

    Micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) is useful in bioanalysis because proteinaceous biofluids can be directly injected onto the column. The technique has been limited in part because of the apparently weak eluting power of micellar mobile phases. It has recently been shown [Anal. Chem. 72 (2000) 294] that this may be overcome by the use of large pore size stationary phases. In this work, large-pore (1000 A) C(18) stationary phases were evaluated relative to conventional small-pore (100 A) C(18) stationary phases for the direct sample injection of drugs in plasma. Furthermore, the difference between the large and small pore phases in gradient elution separations of mixtures of widely varying hydrophobicities was investigated. Large-pore stationary phases were found to be very effective for eluting moderately to highly hydrophobic compounds such as ibuprofen, crotamiton, propranolol, and dodecanophenone, which were highly retained on the small-pore stationary phases typically used in MLC. The advantages of direct introduction of biological samples (drugs in plasma) and rapid column re-equilibration after gradient elution in MLC were maintained with large-pore phases. Finally, recoveries, precision, linearity, and detection limits for the determination of quinidine and DPC 961 in spiked bovine plasma were somewhat better using MLC with wide pore phases.

  18. Modeling of N2 adsorption in MCM-41 materials: hexagonal pores versus cylindrical pores.

    PubMed

    Ustinov, Eugene A

    2009-07-07

    Low-temperature nitrogen adsorption in hexagonal pores and equivalent cylindrical pores is analyzed using nonlocal density functional theory extended to amorphous solids (NLDFT-AS). It is found that, despite significant difference of the density distribution over the cross-section of the pore, the capillary condensation/evaporation pressure is not considerably affected by the pore shape being slightly lower in the case of hexagonal geometry. However, the condensation/evaporation step in the hexagonal pore is slightly larger than that in the equivalent cylindrical pore because in the latter case the pore wall surface area and, hence, the amount adsorbed at pressures below the evaporation pressure are underestimated by 5%. We show that a dimensionless parameter defined as the ratio of the condensation/evaporation step and the upper value of the amount adsorbed at the condensation/evaporation pressure can be used as an additional criterion of the correct choice of the gas-solid molecular parameters along with the dependence of condensation/evaporation pressure on the pore diameter. Application of the criteria to experimental data on nitrogen adsorption on a series of MCM-41 silica at 77 K corroborates some evidence that the capillary condensation occurs at equilibrium conditions.

  19. Biochemical characterization of nuclear pore complex protein gp210 oligomers.

    PubMed

    Favreau, C; Bastos, R; Cartaud, J; Courvalin, J C; Mustonen, P

    2001-07-01

    The membrane-spanning glycoprotein gp210 is a major component of the nuclear pore complex. This nucleoporin contains a large cisternal N-terminal domain, a short C-terminal cytoplasmic tail, and a single transmembrane segment. We show here that dimers of native gp210 can be isolated from cell extracts by immunoprecipitation, and from purified rat liver nuclear envelopes by velocity sedimentation and gel filtration. Cross-linking of proteins in isolated membranes prior to solubilization dramatically increases the proportion of dimers. The dimers are SDS-resistant, as previously observed for some integral membrane proteins of cis-Golgi and plasma membrane proteins, including glycophorin A. Larger oligomers of gp210 can also be obtained by gel filtration and denaturing electrophoresis, but unlike the dimers are dissociated by reduction and heating in the presence of SDS. We propose that gp210 is organized into the pore membrane as a large array of gp210 dimers that may constitute a luminal submembranous protein skeleton.

  20. Therapeutic cloning: promises and issues

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Advances in biotechnology necessitate both an understanding of scientific principles and ethical implications to be clinically applicable in medicine. In this regard, therapeutic cloning offers significant potential in regenerative medicine by circumventing immunorejection, and in the cure of genetic disorders when used in conjunction with gene therapy. Therapeutic cloning in the context of cell replacement therapy holds a huge potential for de novo organogenesis and the permanent treatment of Parkinson’s disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and diabetes mellitus as shown by in vivo studies. Scientific roadblocks impeding advancement in therapeutic cloning are tumorigenicity, epigenetic reprogramming, mitochondrial heteroplasmy, interspecies pathogen transfer, low oocyte availability. Therapeutic cloning is also often tied to ethical considerations concerning the source, destruction and moral status of IVF embryos based on the argument of potential. Legislative and funding issues are also addressed. Future considerations would include a distinction between therapeutic and reproductive cloning in legislative formulations. PMID:18523539

  1. [Scientific ethics of human cloning].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Carlos Y

    2005-01-01

    True cloning is fission, budding or other types of asexual reproduction. In humans it occurs in monozygote twinning. This type of cloning is ethically and religiously good. Human cloning can be performed by twinning (TWClo) or nuclear transfer (NTClo). Both methods need a zygote or a nuclear transferred cell, obtained in vitro (IVTec). They are under the IVTec ethics. IVTecs use humans (zygotes, embryos) as drugs or things; increase the risk of malformations; increase development and size of abnormalities and may cause long-term changes. Cloning for preserving extinct (or almost extinct) animals or humans when sexual reproduction is not possible is ethically valid. The previous selection of a phenotype in human cloning violates some ethical principles. NTClo for reproductive or therapeutic purposes is dangerous since it increases the risk for nucleotide or chromosome mutations, de-programming or re-programming errors, aging or malignancy of the embryo cells thus obtained.

  2. Animal cloning: problems and prospects.

    PubMed

    Wells, D N

    2005-04-01

    An efficient animal cloning technology would provide many new opportunities for livestock agriculture, human medicine, and animal conservation. Nuclear cloning involves the production of animals that are genetically identical to the donor cells used in a technique known as nuclear transfer (NT). However, at present it is an inefficient process: in cattle, only around 6% of the embryos transferred to the reproductive tracts of recipient cows result in healthy, longterm surviving clones. Of concern are the high losses throughout gestation, during birth and in the post-natal period through to adulthood. Many of the pregnancy losses relate to failure of the placenta to develop and function correctly. Placental dysfunction may also have an adverse influence on postnatal health. These anomalies are probably due to incorrect epigenetic reprogramming of the donor genome following NT, leading to inappropriate patterns of gene expression during the development of clones. Whilst some physiological tests on surviving clones suggest normality, other reports indicate a variety of post-natal clone-associated abnormalities. This variability in outcome may reflect species-specific and/or cloning methodological differences. Importantly, to date it appears that these clone-associated phenotypes are not transmitted to offspring following sexual reproduction. This indicates that they represent epigenetic errors, rather than genetic errors, which are corrected during gametogenesis. Whilst this needs confirmation at the molecular level, it provides initial confidence in the first application of NT in agriculture, namely, the production of small numbers of cloned sires from genetically elite bulls, for natural mating, to effectively disseminate genetic gain. In addition to the animal welfare concerns with the technology, the underlying health of the animals and the consequential effect on food safety are critical aspects that require investigation to gain regulatory and consumer

  3. Pore-forming toxins in Cnidaria.

    PubMed

    Podobnik, Marjetka; Anderluh, Gregor

    2017-07-24

    The ancient phylum of Cnidaria contains many aquatic species with peculiar lifestyle. In order to survive, these organisms have evolved attack and defense mechanisms that are enabled by specialized cells and highly developed venoms. Pore-forming toxins are an important part of their venomous arsenal. Along some other types, the most representative are examples of four protein families that are commonly found in other kingdoms of life: actinoporins, Cry-like proteins, aerolysin-like toxins and MACPF/CDC toxins. Some of the homologues of pore-forming toxins may serve other functions, such as in food digestion, development and response against pathogenic organisms. Due to their interesting physico-chemical properties, the cnidarian pore-forming toxins may also serve as tools in medical research and nanobiotechnological applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Moving Magnetic Features around a Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaithakkal, A. J.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.; Lagg, A.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; vanNoort, M.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Schmidt, W.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Knölker, M.

    2017-03-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations from Sunrise/IMaX, obtained in 2013 June, are used for a statistical analysis to determine the physical properties of moving magnetic features (MMFs) observed near a pore. MMFs of the same and opposite polarity, with respect to the pore, are found to stream from its border at an average speed of 1.3 km s-1 and 1.2 km s-1, respectively, with mainly same-polarity MMFs found further away from the pore. MMFs of both polarities are found to harbor rather weak, inclined magnetic fields. Opposite-polarity MMFs are blueshifted, whereas same-polarity MMFs do not show any preference for up- or downflows. Most of the MMFs are found to be of sub-arcsecond size and carry a mean flux of ˜1.2 × 1017 Mx.

  5. Foam invasion through a single pore.

    PubMed

    Delbos, Aline; Pitois, Olivier

    2011-07-01

    We investigate experimentally the behavior of liquid foams pumped at a given flow rate through a single pore, in the situation where the pore diameter is smaller than the bubble diameter. Results reveal that foam invasion can be observed only within a restricted range of values for the dimensionless flow rate and the foam liquid fraction. Within this foam invasion regime, the liquid content of invading foams is measured to be three times higher than the initial liquid content. Outside this regime, both gas alone and liquid alone invasion regimes can be observed. The gas invasion regime results from the rupture of foam films during local T1, during bubble rearrangements events induced by foam flow, whereas the liquid invasion regime is allowed by the formation of a stable cluster of jammed bubbles at the pore's opening.

  6. Unplugging the callose plug from sieve pores.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bo; Hong, Zonglie

    2011-04-01

    The presence of callose in sieve plates has been known for a long time, but how this polysaccharide plug is synthesized has remained unsolved. Two independent laboratories have recently reported the identification of callose synthase 7 (CalS7), also known as glucan synthase-like 7 (GSL7), as the enzyme responsible for callose deposition in sieve plates. Mutant plants defective in this enzyme failed to synthesize callose in developing sieve plates during phloem formation and were unable to accumulate callose in sieve pores in response to stress treatments. The mutant plants developed less open pores per sieve plate and the pores were smaller in diameter. As a result, phloem conductivity was reduced significantly and the mutant plants were shorter and set fewer seeds.

  7. Unplugging the callose plug from sieve pores

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of callose in sieve plates has been known for a long time, but how this polysaccharide plug is synthesized has remained unsolved. Two independent laboratories have recently reported the identification of callose synthase 7 (CalS7), also known as glucan synthase-like 7 (GSL7), as the enzyme responsible for callose deposition in sieve plates. Mutant plants defective in this enzyme failed to synthesize callose in developing sieve plates during phloem formation and were unable to accumulate callose in sieve pores in response to stress treatments. The mutant plants developed less open pores per sieve plate and the pores were smaller in diameter. As a result, phloem conductivity was reduced significantly and the mutant plants were shorter and set fewer seeds. PMID:21386663

  8. Structure and gating of the nuclear pore complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibauer, Matthias; Pellanda, Mauro; Turgay, Yagmur; Dubrovsky, Anna; Wild, Annik; Medalia, Ohad

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) perforate the nuclear envelope and allow the exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. To acquire a deeper understanding of this transport mechanism, we analyse the structure of the NPC scaffold and permeability barrier, by reconstructing the Xenopus laevis oocyte NPC from native nuclear envelopes up to 20 Å resolution by cryo-electron tomography in conjunction with subtomogram averaging. In addition to resolving individual protein domains of the NPC constituents, we propose a model for the architecture of the molecular gate at its central channel. Furthermore, we compare and contrast this native NPC structure to one that exhibits reduced transport activity and unveil the spatial properties of the NPC gate.

  9. Structure of the translocator domain of a bacterial autotransporter

    PubMed Central

    Oomen, Clasien J; van Ulsen, Peter; Van Gelder, Patrick; Feijen, Maya; Tommassen, Jan; Gros, Piet

    2004-01-01

    Autotransporters are virulence-related proteins of Gram-negative bacteria that are secreted via an outer-membrane-based C-terminal extension, the translocator domain. This domain supposedly is sufficient for the transport of the N-terminal passenger domain across the outer membrane. We present here the crystal structure of the in vitro-folded translocator domain of the autotransporter NalP from Neisseria meningitidis, which reveals a 12-stranded β-barrel with a hydrophilic pore of 10 × 12.5 Å that is filled by an N-terminal α-helix. The domain has pore activity in vivo and in vitro. Our data are consistent with the model of passenger-domain transport through the hydrophilic channel within the β-barrel, and inconsistent with a model for transport through a central channel formed by an oligomer of translocator domains. However, the dimensions of the pore imply translocation of the secreted domain in an unfolded form. An alternative model, possibly covering the transport of folded domains, is that passenger-domain transport involves the Omp85 complex, the machinery required for membrane insertion of outer-membrane proteins, on which autotransporters are dependent. PMID:15014442

  10. Assessing Coating Reliability Through Pore Architecture Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.

    2010-06-01

    Plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) exhibit many interlamellar pores, voids, and microcracks. These microstructural features are primarily responsible for the low global stiffness and the low thermal conductivity commonly exhibited by such coatings. The pore architecture thus has an important influence on such thermophysical properties. In the present work, the effect of heat treatment (at temperatures up to 1400 °C, for times of up to 20 h) on the pore architecture of detached YSZ top coats with different impurity levels have been characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry and gas-sorption techniques. Stiffness and thermal conductivity were also monitored to assess the effect of change in pore architecture on properties. While the overall porosity level remained relatively unaffected (at around 10-12%) after the heat treatments concerned, there were substantial changes in the pore size distribution and the (surface-connected) specific surface area. Fine pores (<~50 nm) rapidly disappeared, while the specific surface area dropped dramatically, particularly at high-treatment temperatures (~1400 °C). These changes are thought to be associated with intrasplat microcrack healing, improved intersplat bonding and increased contact area, leading to disappearance of much of the fine porosity. These microstructural changes are reflected in sharply increased stiffness and thermal conductivity. Increase in thermal conductivity and stiffness were found to be more pronounced for coatings with higher impurity content (particularly alumina and silica). Reliability issues surrounding such increase in thermal conductivity and stiffness are discussed along with a brief note on the effect of impurities on TBC life.

  11. [Cloning and analysis of the resistance gene fragments from silverleaf sunflower Helianthus agrophyllus].

    PubMed

    Danilova, T V; Kuklev, M Iu; Andeeva, G N; Shevelukha, V S; Karlov, G I

    2007-04-01

    Using a combination of degenerate primers designed from the NBS domains of the resistance genes, amplification and subsequent cloning of the resistance gene fragments from sunflower (Helianthus agrophyllus) was conducted. Sequences of cloned PCR products differed from one another and displayed homology to NBS domain fragments of the already known plant resistance genes, as well as to the analogous genes from different classes. The highest homology was shown to the NBS domain regions of cultivated sunflower and the other members of the family Compositae. Two cloned fragments had open reading frames, while the other sequences carried stop codons and seemed to belong to pseudogenes. Amino acid sequences of Helianthus agrophyllus analyzed contained conservative regions typical of NBS domains of the resistance gene products.

  12. Active Polymer Translocation through Flickering Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Jack A.; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Golestanian, Ramin

    2011-12-01

    Single file translocation of a homopolymer through an active channel under the presence of a driving force is studied using Langevin dynamics simulation. It is shown that a channel with sticky walls and oscillating width could lead to significantly more efficient translocation as compared to a static channel that has a width equal to the mean width of the oscillating pore. The gain in translocation exhibits a strong dependence on the stickiness of the pore, which could allow the polymer translocation process to be highly selective.

  13. Membrane injury by pore-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Bischofberger, Mirko; Gonzalez, Manuel R; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2009-08-01

    The plasma membrane defines the boundary of every living cell, and its integrity is essential for life. The plasma membrane may, however, be challenged by mechanical stress or pore-forming proteins produced by the organism itself or invading pathogens. We will here review recent findings about pore-forming proteins from different organisms, highlighting their structural and functional similarities, and describe the mechanisms that lead to membrane repair, since remarkably, cells can repair breaches in their plasma membrane of up to 10,000 microm(2).

  14. Characterization, phylogenetic analysis and cDNA cloning of natterin-like gene from the blood of lamprey, Lampetra japonica.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhuang; Liu, Xin; Pang, Yue; Yu, Tao; Xiao, Rong; Jin, Minli; Han, Yinglun; Su, Peng; Wang, Jihong; Lv, Li; Wu, Fenfang; Li, Qingwei

    2012-01-01

    Lamprey as a "living fossil" of immunological origin and "rich treasure" of biological pharmaceutical development has caused attention of scholars. The cDNA library construction and EST sequencing of blood had been done previously in our lab, and bioinformatics analysis provided a gene fragment which is highly homologous with natterin family, named natterin-like. To elucidate the characterization and phylogeny of natterin-like genes in early evolution, we cloned the full-length cDNA of natterin-like gene from the blood of Lampetra japonica. The open reading frame of this sequence contained 942bp and encoded 313 amino acids, including a lectin-like domain and a pore-forming toxin-like domain. Using reverse transcription PCR, natterin-like mRNA was also detected in lamprey blood, kidney, heart, liver, medullary, gonad, but absent in lamprey intestine and gill. Our results suggested that in lampreys and most of other species, there might be only one natterin-like gene, which was fused by certain sequences during evolution and encoded proteins with more functions. It is similar between C terminal of natterin-like protein and Aerolysin in space structure and the lectin-like domain of natterin-like equivalent to glycoprotein binding motif of Aerolysin in function. We also propose that the defense mechanism against specific predators in historical evolution of lamprey. Our findings may provide insights into the function and characterization of natterin-like genes as well as other gene families in vertebrates and provide a foundation for identification and structural, functional, and evolutionary analyses of more natterin-like genes and other gene families.

  15. A Multiblock Approach to Pore-Scale Modeling of Reactive Transport with Applications to Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    mehmani, Y.; Sun, T.; Balhoff, M.; Bryant, S. L.; Eichhubl, P.

    2012-12-01

    In order to safely store CO2 in depleted reservoirs and deep saline aquifers, a better understanding of the storage mechanisms of CO2 is required. Reaction of CO2 with minerals to form precipitate in the subsurface helps to securely store CO2 over geologic time periods, but a concern is the formation of localized channels through which CO2 could travel at large, localized rates. Pore-scale network modeling is an attractive option for modeling and understanding this inherently pore-level process, but the relatively small domains of network models may prevent capturing of any such "emergent phenomena" and more importantly their study. Here, we develop a transient, single-phase, reactive pore-network model that includes reduction of throat conductivity as a result of precipitation. The novelty of this work is the implementation of a new Mortar/Transport method for coupling pore networks together at model interfaces that ensure continuity of pressures, species concentrations, and fluxes. Coupled sub-domains are solved separately in parallel and information is effectively communicated between them via the coupling process. The multiscale method can be further applied to modeling of multi-species/multiphase transport phenomena in highly heterogeneous media arising in various subsurface applications, and may potentially be applied to the seamless inclusion of pore-scale models in continuum simulators. The coupling allows for modeling at larger scales which may lead to more accurate upscaling approaches. Here, we couple pore-scale models with large variation in permeability and porosity which results initial preferential pathways for flow. Our simulation results suggest that the preferential pathways close in time due to precipitation, but are not redirected at late times.

  16. Optimal cloning of pure states, testing single clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyl, M.; Werner, R. F.

    1999-07-01

    We consider quantum devices for turning a finite number N of d-level quantum systems in the same unknown pure state σ into M>N systems of the same kind, in an approximation of the M-fold tensor product of the state σ. In a previous paper it was shown that this problem has a unique optimal solution, when the quality of the output is judged by arbitrary measurements, involving also the correlations between the clones. We show in this paper, that if the quality judgment is based solely on measurements of single output clones, there is again a unique optimal cloning device, which coincides with the one found previously.

  17. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    PubMed

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe?

  18. Hemolytic lectin CEL-III heptamerizes via a large structural transition from α-helices to a β-barrel during the transmembrane pore formation process.

    PubMed

    Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2014-05-02

    CEL-III is a hemolytic lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-binding domains (domains 1 and 2) and one oligomerization domain (domain 3). After binding to the cell surface carbohydrate chains through domains 1 and 2, domain 3 self-associates to form transmembrane pores, leading to cell lysis or death, which resembles other pore-forming toxins of diverse organisms. To elucidate the pore formation mechanism of CEL-III, the crystal structure of the CEL-III oligomer was determined. The CEL-III oligomer has a heptameric structure with a long β-barrel as a transmembrane pore. This β-barrel is composed of 14 β-strands resulting from a large structural transition of α-helices accommodated in the interface between domains 1 and 2 and domain 3 in the monomeric structure, suggesting that the dissociation of these α-helices triggered their structural transition into a β-barrel. After heptamerization, domains 1 and 2 form a flat ring, in which all carbohydrate-binding sites remain bound to cell surface carbohydrate chains, stabilizing the transmembrane β-barrel in a position perpendicular to the plane of the lipid bilayer.

  19. Pore-scale modeling of pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zizhen; Wang, Ruihe; Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks.

  20. Pore-Scale Modeling of Pore Structure Effects on P-Wave Scattering Attenuation in Dry Rocks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks. PMID:25961729

  1. Limitations on cloning in classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenyes, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we show that a result precisely analogous to the traditional quantum no-cloning theorem holds in classical mechanics. This classical no-cloning theorem does not prohibit classical cloning, we argue, because it is based on a too-restrictive definition of cloning. Using a less popular, more inclusive definition of cloning, we give examples of classical cloning processes. We also prove that a cloning machine must be at least as complicated as the object it is supposed to clone.

  2. Structural model of FeoB, the iron transporter from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, predicts a cysteine lined, GTP-gated pore

    PubMed Central

    Seyedmohammad, Saeed; Fuentealba, Natalia Alveal; Marriott, Robert A.J.; Goetze, Tom A.; Edwardson, J. Michael; Barrera, Nelson P.; Venter, Henrietta

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for the survival and virulence of pathogenic bacteria. The FeoB transporter allows the bacterial cell to acquire ferrous iron from its environment, making it an excellent drug target in intractable pathogens. The protein consists of an N-terminal GTP-binding domain and a C-terminal membrane domain. Despite the availability of X-ray crystal structures of the N-terminal domain, many aspects of the structure and function of FeoB remain unclear, such as the structure of the membrane domain, the oligomeric state of the protein, the molecular mechanism of iron transport, and how this is coupled to GTP hydrolysis at the N-terminal domain. In the present study, we describe the first homology model of FeoB. Due to the lack of sequence homology between FeoB and other transporters, the structures of four different proteins were used as templates to generate the homology model of full-length FeoB, which predicts a trimeric structure. We confirmed this trimeric structure by both blue-native-PAGE (BN-PAGE) and AFM. According to our model, the membrane domain of the trimeric protein forms a central pore lined by highly conserved cysteine residues. This pore aligns with a central pore in the N-terminal GTPase domain (G-domain) lined by aspartate residues. Biochemical analysis of FeoB from Pseudomonas aeruginosa further reveals a putative iron sensor domain that could connect GTP binding/hydrolysis to the opening of the pore. These results indicate that FeoB might not act as a transporter, but rather as a GTP-gated channel. PMID:26934982

  3. Wildlife conservation and reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Holt, William V; Pickard, Amanda R; Prather, Randall S

    2004-03-01

    Reproductive cloning, or the production of offspring by nuclear transfer, is often regarded as having potential for conserving endangered species of wildlife. Currently, however, low success rates for reproductive cloning limit the practical application of this technique to experimental use and proof of principle investigations. In this review, we consider how cloning may contribute to wildlife conservation strategies. The cloning of endangered mammals presents practical problems, many of which stem from the paucity of knowledge about their basic reproductive biology. However, situations may arise where resources could be targeted at recovering lost or under-represented genetic lines; these could then contribute to the future fitness of the population. Approaches of this type would be preferable to the indiscriminate generation of large numbers of identical individuals. Applying cloning technology to non-mammalian vertebrates may be more practical than attempting to use conventional reproductive technologies. As the scientific background to cloning technology was pioneered using amphibians, it may be possible to breed imminently threatened amphibians, or even restore extinct amphibian species, by the use of cloning. In this respect species with external embryonic development may have an advantage over mammals as developmental abnormalities associated with inappropriate embryonic reprogramming would not be relevant.

  4. Cloning operator and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voicu, Liviu I.; Myler, Harley R.; Toma, Cristian E.

    1998-03-01

    A novel genetic operator called cloning is introduced and tested in different applications of genetic algorithms. Essentially, the cloning monotonically increases the lengths of the chromosomes during the evolution. It is argued that, under these circumstances, the cloning operator can accommodate a multiresolution search strategy, where the search starts at coarser scales and is subsequently mapped to finer scales upon achieving some in-scale performance criteria. Although the practical implementation of cloning is application dependent, a few general requirements are stated. In the remainder of the paper, different implementations of the cloning operator are introduced and employed in distinct applications, namely, function optimization, object support reconstruction from the support of its autocorrelation and the shortest path problem in planar graphs. The first two cases present typical multiresolution approaches to search problems and their results show consistent improvements in convergence speed with respect to classical genetic algorithms. In the last problem, a cloning operator is incorporated in an evolutionary algorithm that builds a set of valid paths in a planar graph. It is demonstrated that cloning can enhance the ability of a genetic algorithm to explore the search space efficiently in some applications.

  5. Anthrax toxin receptor 2 determinants that dictate the pH threshold of toxin pore formation.

    PubMed

    Scobie, Heather M; Marlett, John M; Rainey, G Jonah A; Lacy, D Borden; Collier, R John; Young, John A T

    2007-03-28

    The anthrax toxin receptors, ANTXR1 and ANTXR2, act as molecular clamps to prevent the protective antigen (PA) toxin subunit from forming pores until exposure to low pH. PA forms pores at pH approximately 6.0 or below when it is bound to ANTXR1, but only at pH approximately 5.0 or below when it is bound to ANTXR2. Here, structure-based mutagenesis was used to identify non-conserved ANTXR2 residues responsible for this striking 1.0 pH unit difference in pH threshold. Residues conserved between ANTXR2 and ANTXR1 that influence the ANTXR2-associated pH threshold of pore formation were also identified. All of these residues contact either PA domain 2 or the neighboring edge of PA domain 4. These results provide genetic evidence for receptor release of these regions of PA as being necessary for the protein rearrangements that accompany anthrax toxin pore formation.

  6. Impact of Porous Media and NAPL Spatial Variability at the Pore Scale on Interphase Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copty, N. K.; Agaoglu, B.; Scheytt, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sherwood number expressions are often used to model NAPL dissolution in porous media. Such expressions are generally derived from meso-scale experiments and expressed in terms of fluid and porous medium properties averaged over some representative volume. In this work a pore network model is used to examine the influence of porous media and NAPL pore scale variability on interphase mass transfer. The focus was on assessing the impact of (i) NAPL saturation, (ii) interfacial area (iii) NAPL spatial distribution at the pore scale, (iv) grain size heterogeneity and (v) REV or domain size on the apparent interphase mass transfer. Variability of both the mass transfer coefficient that explicitly accounts for the interfacial area and the mass transfer coefficient that lumps the interfacial area was examined. It was shown that pore scale NAPL distribution and its orientation relative to the flow direction have significant impact on flow bypassing and the interphase mass transfer coefficient. This results in a complex non-linear relationship between interfacial area and the REV-based interphase mass transfer rate. In other words, explicitly accounting for the interfacial area does not eliminate the variability of the mass transfer coefficient. Moreover, grain size heterogeneity can also lead to a decrease in the interphase mass transfer. It was also shown that, even for explicitly defined flow patterns, changing the domain size over which the mass transfer process is average influences the extent of NAPL bypassing and dilution and, consequently, the interphase mass transfer.

  7. Insights into the Mechanism of Pore Opening of Acid-sensing Ion Channel 1A*

    PubMed Central

    Tolino, Lindsey A.; Okumura, Sora; Kashlan, Ossama B.; Carattino, Marcelo D.

    2011-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are trimeric cation channels that undergo activation and desensitization in response to extracellular acidification. The underlying mechanism coupling proton binding in the extracellular region to pore gating is unknown. Here we probed the reactivity toward methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents of channels with cysteine-substituted residues in the outer vestibule of the pore of ASIC1a. We found that positively-charged MTS reagents trigger pore opening of G428C. Scanning mutagenesis of residues in the region preceding the second transmembrane spanning domain indicated that the MTSET-modified side chain of Cys at position 428 interacts with Tyr-424. This interaction was confirmed by double-mutant cycle analysis. Strikingly, Y424C-G428C monomers were associated by intersubunit disulfide bonds and were insensitive to MTSET. Despite the spatial constraints introduced by these intersubunit disulfide bonds in the outer vestibule of the pore, Y424C-G428C transitions between the resting, open, and desensitized states in response to extracellular acidification. This finding suggests that the opening of the ion conductive pathway involves coordinated rotation of the second transmembrane-spanning domains. PMID:21388961

  8. Influence of pore pressure and production-induced changes in pore pressure on in situ stress

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L.W.

    1996-02-01

    Knowledge of in situ stress and how stress changes with reservoir depletion and pore pressure drawdown is important in a multi-disciplinary approach to reservoir characterization, reservoir management, and improved oil recovery projects. This report summarizes a compilation of in situ stress data from six fields showing the effects of pore pressure and production-induced changes in pore pressure on the minimum horizontal stress. The in situ stress data and corresponding pore pressure data were obtained from field records of the operating companies and published reports. Horizontal stress was determined from closure pressure data of hydraulic fractures and leak-off tests. The stress measurements clearly demonstrate that the total minimum-horizontal stress is dependent on pore pressure. A decrease in pore pressure either by geologic processes or production of a reservoir will result in a decrease in the total minimum-horizontal stress. The magnitude of changes in stress state with net changes in pore pressure is dependent on local field conditions and cannot be accurately predicted by the uniaxial strain model that is commonly used by the petroleum industry.

  9. Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract (SLiCE) cloning method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) is a novel cloning method that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (15-52 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost-effective and demonstrates the versatility as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. We established a DH10B-derived E. coli strain expressing an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system, termed PPY, which facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies.

  10. Contribution of peat soil structure to biogeochemical processes: A physical understanding of pore distribution and solute transport characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanezhad, Fereidoun; Kleimeier, Christian; Milojevic, Tatjana; Liu, Haojie; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Lennartz, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands are a valuable but environmentally vulnerable resource. They represent a globally-significant carbon and energy reservoir and play major roles in water and biogeochemical cycles. Peat soils are highly complex porous media with unique physical and hydraulic properties. In peat soils, the unique complex dual-porosity structure with mobile-immobile pore fractions controls water flow and solute migration, which, in turn, affect reactive transport processes and biogeochemical functions. In this presentation, we start with an introduction of key physical and hydraulic properties related to the structure of peat soils and discuss their implications for water storage, flow and the migration of solutes. Then, we present the results of two experiments to understand the effect of pore fractions on the denitrification process in a peat depth profile, with the main objective to show how this process is controlled by pore-scale mass transfer and exchange of nitrate between mobile and immobile pores. In these experiments, bromide and nitrate breakthrough curves were used to constrain transport parameters and steady-state nitrate reduction rates in the depth profile. The vertical distribution of potential denitrification rates were compared with depth distributions of partitioning mobile-immobile pores and the exchange coefficient between the pores. The results showed that an increase of immobile pore fractions with depth increases the common interface surface area between mobile and immobile pores which leads to a more pronounced exchange between the two transport domains and enhances the denitrification activities. Furthermore, the physical non-equilibrium approaches were linked to reactive geochemical transformation processes by comparing the different transport characteristics using the pore distribution analyses between degraded and un-degraded peats and their effects on denitrification activities. The conclusion was that in addition to a reducing condition

  11. Gating the glutamate gate of CLC-2 chloride channel by pore occupancy.

    PubMed

    De Jesús-Pérez, José J; Castro-Chong, Alejandra; Shieh, Ru-Chi; Hernández-Carballo, Carmen Y; De Santiago-Castillo, José A; Arreola, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    CLC-2 channels are dimeric double-barreled chloride channels that open in response to hyperpolarization. Hyperpolarization activates protopore gates that independently regulate the permeability of the pore in each subunit and the common gate that affects the permeability through both pores. CLC-2 channels lack classic transmembrane voltage-sensing domains; instead, their protopore gates (residing within the pore and each formed by the side chain of a glutamate residue) open under repulsion by permeant intracellular anions or protonation by extracellular H(+). Here, we show that voltage-dependent gating of CLC-2: (a) is facilitated when permeant anions (Cl(-), Br(-), SCN(-), and I(-)) are present in the cytosolic side; (b) happens with poorly permeant anions fluoride, glutamate, gluconate, and methanesulfonate present in the cytosolic side; (c) depends on pore occupancy by permeant and poorly permeant anions; (d) is strongly facilitated by multi-ion occupancy; (e) is absent under likely protonation conditions (pHe = 5.5 or 6.5) in cells dialyzed with acetate (an impermeant anion); and (f) was the same at intracellular pH 7.3 and 4.2; and (g) is observed in both whole-cell and inside-out patches exposed to increasing [Cl(-)]i under unlikely protonation conditions (pHe = 10). Thus, based on our results we propose that hyperpolarization activates CLC-2 mainly by driving intracellular anions into the channel pores, and that protonation by extracellular H(+) plays a minor role in dislodging the glutamate gate.

  12. CryoEM structures of membrane pore and prepore complex reveal cytolytic mechanism of Pneumolysin.

    PubMed

    van Pee, Katharina; Neuhaus, Alexander; D'Imprima, Edoardo; Mills, Deryck J; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Yildiz, Özkan

    2017-03-21

    Many pathogenic bacteria produce pore-forming toxins to attack and kill human cells. We have determined the 4.5 Å structure of the ~2.2 MDa pore complex of pneumolysin, the main virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae, by cryoEM. The pneumolysin pore is a 400 Å ring of 42 membrane-inserted monomers. Domain 3 of the soluble toxin refolds into two ~85 Å β-hairpins that traverse the lipid bilayer and assemble into a 168-strand β-barrel. The pore complex is stabilized by salt bridges between β-hairpins of adjacent subunits and an internal α-barrel. The apolar outer barrel surface with large sidechains is immersed in the lipid bilayer, while the inner barrel surface is highly charged. Comparison of the cryoEM pore complex to the prepore structure obtained by electron cryo-tomography and the x-ray structure of the soluble form reveals the detailed mechanisms by which the toxin monomers insert into the lipid bilayer to perforate the target membrane.

  13. CryoEM structures of membrane pore and prepore complex reveal cytolytic mechanism of Pneumolysin

    PubMed Central

    van Pee, Katharina; Neuhaus, Alexander; D'Imprima, Edoardo; Mills, Deryck J; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Yildiz, Özkan

    2017-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria produce pore-forming toxins to attack and kill human cells. We have determined the 4.5 Å structure of the ~2.2 MDa pore complex of pneumolysin, the main virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae, by cryoEM. The pneumolysin pore is a 400 Å ring of 42 membrane-inserted monomers. Domain 3 of the soluble toxin refolds into two ~85 Å β-hairpins that traverse the lipid bilayer and assemble into a 168-strand β-barrel. The pore complex is stabilized by salt bridges between β-hairpins of adjacent subunits and an internal α-barrel. The apolar outer barrel surface with large sidechains is immersed in the lipid bilayer, while the inner barrel surface is highly charged. Comparison of the cryoEM pore complex to the prepore structure obtained by electron cryo-tomography and the x-ray structure of the soluble form reveals the detailed mechanisms by which the toxin monomers insert into the lipid bilayer to perforate the target membrane. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23644.001 PMID:28323617

  14. Organization of the mitochondrial apoptotic BAK pore: oligomerization of the BAK homodimers.

    PubMed

    Aluvila, Sreevidya; Mandal, Tirtha; Hustedt, Eric; Fajer, Peter; Choe, Jun Yong; Oh, Kyoung Joon

    2014-01-31

    The multidomain pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins BAK and BAX are believed to form large oligomeric pores in the mitochondrial outer membrane during apoptosis. Formation of these pores results in the release of apoptotic factors including cytochrome c from the intermembrane space into the cytoplasm, where they initiate the cascade of events that lead to cell death. Using the site-directed spin labeling method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we have determined the conformational changes that occur in BAK when the protein targets to the membrane and forms pores. The data showed that helices α1 and α6 disengage from the rest of the domain, leaving helices α2-α5 as a folded unit. Helices α2-α5 were shown to form a dimeric structure, which is structurally homologous to the recently reported BAX "BH3-in-groove homodimer." Furthermore, the EPR data and a chemical cross-linking study demonstrated the existence of a hitherto unknown interface between BAK BH3-in-groove homodimers in the oligomeric BAK. This novel interface involves the C termini of α3 and α5 helices. The results provide further insights into the organization of the BAK oligomeric pores by the BAK homodimers during mitochondrial apoptosis, enabling the proposal of a BAK-induced lipidic pore with the topography of a "worm hole."

  15. Gating the glutamate gate of CLC-2 chloride channel by pore occupancy

    PubMed Central

    De Jesús-Pérez, José J.; Castro-Chong, Alejandra; Shieh, Ru-Chi; Hernández-Carballo, Carmen Y.; De Santiago-Castillo, José A.

    2016-01-01

    CLC-2 channels are dimeric double-barreled chloride channels that open in response to hyperpolarization. Hyperpolarization activates protopore gates that independently regulate the permeability of the pore in each subunit and the common gate that affects the permeability through both pores. CLC-2 channels lack classic transmembrane voltage–sensing domains; instead, their protopore gates (residing within the pore and each formed by the side chain of a glutamate residue) open under repulsion by permeant intracellular anions or protonation by extracellular H+. Here, we show that voltage-dependent gating of CLC-2: (a) is facilitated when permeant anions (Cl−, Br−, SCN−, and I−) are present in the cytosolic side; (b) happens with poorly permeant anions fluoride, glutamate, gluconate, and methanesulfonate present in the cytosolic side; (c) depends on pore occupancy by permeant and poorly permeant anions; (d) is strongly facilitated by multi-ion occupancy; (e) is absent under likely protonation conditions (pHe = 5.5 or 6.5) in cells dialyzed with acetate (an impermeant anion); and (f) was the same at intracellular pH 7.3 and 4.2; and (g) is observed in both whole-cell and inside-out patches exposed to increasing [Cl−]i under unlikely protonation conditions (pHe = 10). Thus, based on our results we propose that hyperpolarization activates CLC-2 mainly by driving intracellular anions into the channel pores, and that protonation by extracellular H+ plays a minor role in dislodging the glutamate gate. PMID:26666914

  16. A level set method for materials with texturally equilibrated pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarzadeh, Soheil; Hesse, Marc A.; Prodanović, Maša

    2015-09-01

    Textural equilibrium controls the distribution of the liquid phase in many naturally occurring porous materials such as partially molten rocks and alloys, salt-brine and ice-water systems. In these materials, pore geometry evolves to minimize the solid-liquid interfacial energy while maintaining a constant dihedral angle, θ, at solid-liquid contact lines. We present a level set method to compute an implicit representation of the liquid-solid interface in textural equilibrium with space-filling tessellations of multiple solid grains in three dimensions. Each grain is represented by a separate level set function and interfacial energy minimization is achieved by evolving the solid-liquid interface under surface diffusion to constant mean curvature surface. The liquid volume and dihedral angle constraints are added to the formulation using virtual convective and normal velocity terms. This results in an initial value problem for a system of non-linear coupled PDEs governing the evolution of the level sets for each grain, using the implicit representation of the solid grains as initial condition. A domain decomposition scheme is devised to restrict the computational domain of each grain to few grid points around the grain. The coupling between the interfaces is achieved in a higher level on the original computational domain. The spatial resolution of the discretization is improved through high-order spatial differentiation schemes and localization of computations through domain composition. Examples of three-dimensional solutions are also obtained for different grain distributions networks that illustrate the geometric flexibility of the method.

  17. Biomimetic Cloning of Quantum Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U.; Sanz, M.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2014-05-01

    We propose a bio-inspired sequential quantum protocol for the cloning and preservation of the statistics associated to quantum observables of a given system. It combines the cloning of a set of commuting observables, permitted by the no-cloning and no-broadcasting theorems, with a controllable propagation of the initial state coherences to the subsequent generations. The protocol mimics the scenario in which an individual in an unknown quantum state copies and propagates its quantum information into an environment of blank qubits. Finally, we propose a realistic experimental implementation of this protocol in trapped ions.

  18. Therapeutic cloning in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mombaerts, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear transfer technology can be applied to produce autologous differentiated cells for therapeutic purposes, a concept termed therapeutic cloning. Countless articles have been published on the ethics and politics of human therapeutic cloning, reflecting the high expectations from this new opportunity for rejuvenation of the aging or diseased body. Yet the research literature on therapeutic cloning, strictly speaking, is comprised of only four articles, all in the mouse. The efficiency of derivation of embryonic stem cell lines via nuclear transfer is remarkably consistent among these reports. However, the efficiency is so low that, in its present form, the concept is unlikely to become widespread in clinical practice. PMID:12949262

  19. Biomimetic Cloning of Quantum Observables

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U.; Sanz, M.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a bio-inspired sequential quantum protocol for the cloning and preservation of the statistics associated to quantum observables of a given system. It combines the cloning of a set of commuting observables, permitted by the no-cloning and no-broadcasting theorems, with a controllable propagation of the initial state coherences to the subsequent generations. The protocol mimics the scenario in which an individual in an unknown quantum state copies and propagates its quantum information into an environment of blank qubits. Finally, we propose a realistic experimental implementation of this protocol in trapped ions. PMID:24809937

  20. Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-08

    AD-RIB5 458 NOLECULNA CLONING OF AOENOSINEDXPNOSPHORIBOSyL 1/1 TRNSFERASEMU CAILIFORNIA UNIV SRN FRANCISCO E KUN US SEP 8? WFOSR-TR-87-0982 SWFOSR-B5...ACCESSION NO.D,. 03261102F 2312 A~5 11. TITLE (include Securqt Classification) 0 Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 12. PERSONAL...I’:- AFOSR.Tlt. 8 7 - 0 9 8,2 0IL * pi AFOSR- 85 -0377 PROGRESS REPORT Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 5." Period of

  1. Pore-Forming Toxins Trigger the Purge.

    PubMed

    Bonfini, Alessandro; Buchon, Nicolas

    2016-12-14

    The intestinal epithelium responds to pathogens by coordinating microbial elimination with tissue repair, both required to survive an infection. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Lee et al. (2016) discover a rapid and evolutionarily conserved response to pore-forming toxins in the gut, involving cytoplasm ejection and enterocyte regrowth.

  2. Molecular Sensing with an Artificial Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Omar A.

    2002-03-01

    While microfluidic systems are routinely integrated with optical schemes to measure biological macromolecules, there are relatively few examples of experiments in which electronic techniques are used. There are, however, good reasons to perform electronic measurements- macromolecules do not need to be fluorescently tagged, and different parameters of the analyte can be investigated. To begin to take advantage of these differences, we have developed a chip-based device that uses resistive sensing of a micro-fabricated pore to characterize solutions of particles. The device can perform size-based differentiation of polydisperse solutions of colloids with a precision of 10 nm in diameter^*. This level of precision could be utilized to perform simple binding or immuno-assays whereby the attachment of the appropriate ligand to a receptor immobilized on the colloid surface causes a detectable increase in the colloid’s diameter. Furthermore, the relatively simple design can easily be scaled up to create arrays of pores on a single chip, thus adding the capability to perform multiple assays in parallel. Finally, reductions in pore size have allowed us to detect successfully single molecules of lambda-phage DNA passing through the pore. This particular achievement represents a first step towards a host of bio-molecular sensing applications. ^*O. A. Saleh and L. L. Sohn, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 4449 (2001)

  3. Drainage Studies Using Pore-Scale Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, E. B.; Reed, A. H.; Hilpert, M.

    2007-12-01

    The process of drainage has wide spread applications in soil hydrology, irrigation, and the remediation of contaminants in the subsurface. In this paper, we present the comparison of experimental and pore-scale modeling results for drainage. Using a HD-500 microCT system, X-ray tomographic images (21 micron voxels) of saturation during a drainage experiment were obtained in a porous medium consisting of 20/30 mesh (590- 840 microns) Accusand. Utilizing the segmented microtomographic images of the pore space, we modeled drainage using two pore-scale approaches: (1) the pore-morphology-based simulator (PMBS) developed by Hilpert and Miller (2001), and (2) a Lattice Boltzmann (LB) model. Invasion pathways and pressure-saturation relations obtained from both the PMBS and the LB model were compared with those obtained from experiments. The results of PMBS modeling displayed good agreement with experimental observations, except at high suction and low water saturation values, where both CT resolution and model assumptions become an issue. The LB model is currently being refined, and the results of these simulations will also be presented.

  4. Human therapeutic cloning (NTSC): applying research from mammalian reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    French, Andrew J; Wood, Samuel H; Trounson, Alan O

    2006-01-01

    Human therapeutic cloning or nuclear transfer stem cells (NTSC) to produce patient-specific stem cells, holds considerable promise in the field of regenerative medicine. The recent withdrawal of the only scientific publications claiming the successful generation of NTSC lines afford an opportunity to review the available research in mammalian reproductive somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with the goal of progressing human NTSC. The process of SCNT is prone to epigenetic abnormalities that contribute to very low success rates. Although there are high mortality rates in some species of cloned animals, most surviving clones have been shown to have normal phenotypic and physiological characteristics and to produce healthy offspring. This technology has been applied to an increasing number of mammals for utility in research, agriculture, conservation, and biomedicine. In contrast, attempts at SCNT to produce human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been disappointing. Only one group has published reliable evidence of success in deriving a cloned human blastocyst, using an undifferentiated hESC donor cell, and it failed to develop into a hESC line. When optimal conditions are present, it appears that in vitro development of cloned and parthenogenetic embryos, both of which may be utilized to produce hESCs, may be similar to in vitro fertilized embryos. The derivation of ESC lines from cloned embryos is substantially more efficient than the production of viable offspring. This review summarizes developments in mammalian reproductive cloning, cell-to-cell fusion alternatives, and strategies for oocyte procurement that may provide important clues facilitating progress in human therapeutic cloning leading to the successful application of cell-based therapies utilizing autologous hESC lines.

  5. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Richard S.; Allen, Larry N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host and in a C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host to the C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C.sub.1 -utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C.sub.1 -utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C.sub.1 -utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C.sub.1 -utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C.sub.1 gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields.

  6. [Cloning of four members of giant panda Dmrt genes].

    PubMed

    Shui, Yi; Yu, Hong-Shi; Xia, Lai-Xin; Guo, Yi-Qing; Cheng, Han-Hua; Zhou, Rong-Jia

    2004-05-01

    Sex determining genes Mab-3 of C. elegans and Doublesex of Drosophila contain a common DNA binding motif called DM (Doublesex and Mab-3) domain, both of which regulate similar aspects of sexual development. Human Doublesex-related gene DMRT1 has been identified, which also contains the conserved DM-related DNA-binding domain and plays an essential role in gonadal differentiation. We amplified genomic DNA of the giant panda using the DM degenerate primers and detected two bands, approximately 140 bp and 250 bp. After cloned into T-easy vector and sequenced, four sequences showed high homology with the DM domain. Amino acid sequence of the first clone is 100% identical with the Dmrt1 of human, mouse and pig, hence we named it as pDmrt1. The second clone is 96% identical with human DMRTB1, and the third one 100% with the Dmrt3 of mouse and medaka, which were named as pDmrtb1 and pDmrt3 respectively. The last sequence contains an intron of 116 bp within the DM domain, which encodes an amino acid sequence 100% identical with human DMRTC2, accordingly we named it as pDmrtc2. Based on similarities of amino acid sequences of the DM domain, Dmrt protein sequences from human, mouse and giant panda were included in a phylogenetic tree. They revealed seven distinct subgroups: Dmrt1, Dmrt2, Dmrt3, Dmrt4 (DMRTA1), Dmrt5 (DMRTA2), Dmrt6 (DMRTB1) and Dmrt7 (DMRTC2). Our results further reveal the unexpected complexity and the evolutionary conservation of the DM domain gene family in both invertebrates and vertebrates.

  7. A hydrophobic barrier deep within the inner pore of the TWIK-1 K2P potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Prafulla; Abd-Wahab, Firdaus; Bucci, Giovanna; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Tucker, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent X-ray crystal structures of the two-pore domain (K2P) family of potassium channels have revealed a unique structural architecture at the point where the cytoplasmic bundle-crossing gate is found in most other tetrameric K+ channels. However, despite the apparently open nature of the inner pore in the TWIK-1 (K2P1/KCNK1) crystal structure, the reasons underlying its low levels of functional activity remain unclear. In this study, we use a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and functional validation to demonstrate that TWIK-1 possesses a hydrophobic barrier deep within the inner pore, and that stochastic dewetting of this hydrophobic constriction acts as a major barrier to ion conduction. These results not only provide an important insight into the mechanisms which control TWIK-1 channel activity, but also have important implications for our understanding of how ion permeation may be controlled in similar ion channels and pores. PMID:25001086

  8. A hydrophobic barrier deep within the inner pore of the TWIK-1 K2P potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Prafulla; Abd-Wahab, Firdaus; Bucci, Giovanna; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Tucker, Stephen J.

    2014-07-01

    Recent X-ray crystal structures of the two-pore domain (K2P) family of potassium channels have revealed a unique structural architecture at the point where the cytoplasmic bundle-crossing gate is found in most other tetrameric K+ channels. However, despite the apparently open nature of the inner pore in the TWIK-1 (K2P1/KCNK1) crystal structure, the reasons underlying its low levels of functional activity remain unclear. In this study, we use a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and functional validation to demonstrate that TWIK-1 possesses a hydrophobic barrier deep within the inner pore, and that stochastic dewetting of this hydrophobic constriction acts as a major barrier to ion conduction. These results not only provide an important insight into the mechanisms which control TWIK-1 channel activity, but also have important implications for our understanding of how ion permeation may be controlled in similar ion channels and pores.

  9. Common molecular mechanism of amyloid pore formation by Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide and α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Boutemeur, Sonia; Flores, Alessandra; Rodriguez, Léa; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-06-29

    Calcium-permeable pores formed by small oligomers of amyloid proteins are the primary pathologic species in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these toxic oligomers in the plasma membrane of brain cells remain unclear. Here we have analyzed and compared the pore-forming capability of a large panel of amyloid proteins including wild-type, variant and truncated forms, as well as synthetic peptides derived from specific domains of Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. We show that amyloid pore formation involves two membrane lipids, ganglioside and cholesterol, that physically interact with amyloid proteins through specific structural motifs. Mutation or deletion of these motifs abolished pore formation. Moreover, α-synuclein (Parkinson) and Aβ peptide (Alzheimer) did no longer form Ca(2+)-permeable pores in presence of drugs that target either cholesterol or ganglioside or both membrane lipids. These results indicate that gangliosides and cholesterol cooperate to favor the formation of amyloid pores through a common molecular mechanism that can be jammed at two different steps, suggesting the possibility of a universal therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. Finally we present the first successful evaluation of such a new therapeutic approach (coined "membrane therapy") targeting amyloid pores formed by Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein.

  10. Common molecular mechanism of amyloid pore formation by Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide and α-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Boutemeur, Sonia; Flores, Alessandra; Rodriguez, Léa; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-permeable pores formed by small oligomers of amyloid proteins are the primary pathologic species in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these toxic oligomers in the plasma membrane of brain cells remain unclear. Here we have analyzed and compared the pore-forming capability of a large panel of amyloid proteins including wild-type, variant and truncated forms, as well as synthetic peptides derived from specific domains of Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. We show that amyloid pore formation involves two membrane lipids, ganglioside and cholesterol, that physically interact with amyloid proteins through specific structural motifs. Mutation or deletion of these motifs abolished pore formation. Moreover, α-synuclein (Parkinson) and Aβ peptide (Alzheimer) did no longer form Ca2+-permeable pores in presence of drugs that target either cholesterol or ganglioside or both membrane lipids. These results indicate that gangliosides and cholesterol cooperate to favor the formation of amyloid pores through a common molecular mechanism that can be jammed at two different steps, suggesting the possibility of a universal therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. Finally we present the first successful evaluation of such a new therapeutic approach (coined “membrane therapy”) targeting amyloid pores formed by Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. PMID:27352802

  11. Multi-scale fractal analysis of pores in shale rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kouqi; Ostadhassan, Mehdi

    2017-05-01

    Pore structures is a very critical parameter that affects the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of the reservoir rock. Pore shapes and pore size distributions can impact the transport and storage capacity of the reservoir rocks. This necessitates the adequate knowledge of the pore structures of the rocks. In this paper, we characterized and quantified the pore structures of rock samples from the Bakken Formation which is a typical unconventional shale oil reservoir. Samples of Upper and Middle Bakken were collected and studied based on the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images. First, the threshold of each image was determined from overflow criteria and then the related pores were extracted from the corresponding image. In the next step, the pore microstructures such as pore size, pore shape distributions of different samples were calculated and compared. Finally, we used fractal theory to describe the pore structures of the shale formation and investigated the relationship between fractal dimension and pore structures. The results showed that pores with various sizes and shapes were widely distributed in the shale samples. Compared with samples from Middle Bakken, samples from Upper Bakken Formation with higher clay content showed higher fractal dimension and more complex pore structures. Finally, the fractal dimension was used to quantify the impact of the magnification on the pore structures.

  12. Human Cloning: Let's Discuss It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taras, Loretta; Stavroulakis, Anthea M.; Ortiz, Mary T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes experiences with holding discussions on cloning at a variety of levels in undergraduate biology courses. Discusses teaching methods used and student reactions to the discussions. Contains 12 references. (WRM)

  13. A Clone of Your Own.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilodeau, Kirsten

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity used at the Washington Park Arboretum that helps students understand cloning through plant propagation. Students also learn how to make a pot from recycled newspapers and how to make soil that is appropriate for the plants. (DDR)

  14. Cloning of a quantum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Sedlak, Michal

    2011-10-15

    We analyze quantum algorithms for cloning of a quantum measurement. Our aim is to mimic two uses of a device performing an unknown von Neumann measurement with a single use of the device. When the unknown device has to be used before the bipartite state to be measured is available we talk about 1{yields}2 learning of the measurement, otherwise the task is called 1{yields}2 cloning of a measurement. We perform the optimization for both learning and cloning for arbitrary dimension d of the Hilbert space. For 1{yields}2 cloning we also propose a simple quantum network that achieves the optimal fidelity. The optimal fidelity for 1{yields}2 learning just slightly outperforms the estimate and prepare strategy in which one first estimates the unknown measurement and depending on the result suitably prepares the duplicate.

  15. Are cloned quantum states macroscopic?

    PubMed

    Fröwis, F; Dür, W

    2012-10-26

    We study quantum states produced by optimal phase covariant quantum cloners. We argue that cloned quantum superpositions are not macroscopic superpositions in the spirit of Schrödinger's cat, despite their large particle number. This is indicated by calculating several measures for macroscopic superpositions from the literature, as well as by investigating the distinguishability of the two superposed cloned states. The latter rapidly diminishes when considering imperfect detectors or noisy states and does not increase with the system size. In contrast, we find that cloned quantum states themselves are macroscopic, in the sense of both proposed measures and their usefulness in quantum metrology with an optimal scaling in system size. We investigate the applicability of cloned states for parameter estimation in the presence of different kinds of noise.

  16. A Clone of Your Own.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilodeau, Kirsten

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity used at the Washington Park Arboretum that helps students understand cloning through plant propagation. Students also learn how to make a pot from recycled newspapers and how to make soil that is appropriate for the plants. (DDR)

  17. Human cloning and 'posthuman' society.

    PubMed

    Blackford, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Since early 1997, when the creation of Dolly the sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer was announced in Nature, numerous government reports, essays, articles and books have considered the ethical problems and policy issues surrounding human reproductive cloning. In this article, I consider what response a modern liberal society should give to the prospect of human cloning, if it became safe and practical. Some opponents of human cloning have argued that permitting it would place us on a slippery slope to a repugnant future society, comparable to that portrayed in Aldous Huxley's novel, Brave New World. I conclude that, leaving aside concerns about safety, none of the psychological or social considerations discussed in this article provides an adequate policy justification for invoking the state's coercive powers to prevent human cloning.

  18. Animal Cloning and Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Animal Cloning and Food Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... safe to eat as food from conventionally bred animals. This conclusion stems from an extensive study of ...

  19. Human Cloning: Let's Discuss It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taras, Loretta; Stavroulakis, Anthea M.; Ortiz, Mary T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes experiences with holding discussions on cloning at a variety of levels in undergraduate biology courses. Discusses teaching methods used and student reactions to the discussions. Contains 12 references. (WRM)

  20. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, R.S.; Allen, L.N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host and in a C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host to the C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C[sub 1]-utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C[sub 1]-utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C[sub 1]-utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C[sub 1]-utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C[sub 1] gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields. 3 figs.

  1. Artificial cloning of domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Keefer, Carol L

    2015-07-21

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research.

  2. Cloning goes to the movies.

    PubMed

    Cormick, Craig

    2006-10-01

    Public attitude research conducted by Biotechnology Australia shows that one of the major sources of information on human reproductive cloning is movies. Traditionally, understanding of new and emerging technologies has come through the mass media but human cloning, being so widely addressed through the popular culture of movies, is more effectively defined by Hollywood than the news media or science media. But how well are the science and social issues of cloning portrayed in box office hits such as The Island, Multiplicity, Star Wars: Attack of the Clones and Jurassic Park? These movies have enormous reach and undoubted influence, and are therefore worth analyzing in some detail. This study looks at 33 movies made between 1971 and 2005 that address human reproductive cloning, and it categorizes the films based on their genre and potential influence. Yet rather than simply rating the quality of the science portrayed, the study compares the key messages in these movies with public attitudes towards cloning, to examine the correlations.

  3. Artificial cloning of domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    Keefer, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research. PMID:26195770

  4. Islamic perspectives on human cloning.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    The present paper seeks to assess various views from Islamic jurists relating to human cloning, which is one of the controversial topics in the recent past. Taking Islamic jurisprudence principles, such as the rule of necessity for self preservation and respect for human beings, the rule of la darar wa la dirar ('the necessity to refrain from causing harm to oneself and others') and the rule of usr wa haraj, one may indicate that if human cloning could not be prohibited, as such, it could still be opposed because it gives way to various harmful consequences, which include family disorder, chaos in the clone's family relationships, physical and mental diseases for clones and suffering of egg donors and surrogate mothers. However with due attention to the fact that the reasons behind the prohibition of abortion only restrict the destruction of human embryos in their post-implantation stages, human cloning for biomedical research and exploitation of stem cells from cloned embryos at the blastocyst stage for therapeutic purposes would be acceptable.

  5. Perforin-2/Mpeg1 and other pore-forming proteins throughout evolution

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Ryan; Podack, Eckhard R.

    2015-01-01

    Development of the ancient innate immune system required not only a mechanism to recognize foreign organisms from self but also to destroy them. Pore-forming proteins containing the membrane attack complex Perforin domain were one of the first triumphs of an innate immune system needing to eliminate microbes and virally infected cells. Membrane attack complex of complement and Perforin domain proteins is unique from other immune effector molecules in that the mechanism of attack is strictly physical and unspecific. The large water-filled holes created by membrane attack complex of complement and Perforin domain pore formation allow access for additional effectors to complete the destruction of the foreign organism via chemical or enzymatic attack. Perforin-2/macrophage-expressed protein 1 is one of the oldest membrane attack complexes of complement and Perforin domain protein involved in immune defense, and it is still functional today in vertebrates. Here, we trace the impact of Perforin-2/macrophage-expressed protein 1 from the earliest multicellular organisms to modern vertebrates, as well as review the development of other membrane attack complexes of complement and Perforin domain member proteins. PMID:26307549

  6. Nuclear mRNA export requires specific FG nucleoporins for translocation through the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Terry, Laura J; Wente, Susan R

    2007-09-24

    Trafficking of nucleic acids and large proteins through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) requires interactions with NPC proteins that harbor FG (phenylalanine-glycine) repeat domains. Specialized transport receptors that recognize cargo and bind FG domains facilitate these interactions. Whether different transport receptors utilize preferential FG domains in intact NPCs is not fully resolved. In this study, we use a large-scale deletion strategy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to generate a new set of more minimal pore (mmp) mutants that lack specific FG domains. A comparison of messenger RNA (mRNA) export versus protein import reveals unique subsets of mmp mutants with functional defects in specific transport receptors. Thus, multiple functionally independent NPC translocation routes exist for different transport receptors. Our global analysis of the FG domain requirements in mRNA export also finds a requirement for two NPC substructures-one on the nuclear NPC face and one in the NPC central core. These results pinpoint distinct steps in the mRNA export mechanism that regulate NPC translocation efficiency.

  7. Cloning of a Membrane Protein that Induces a Slow Voltage-Gated Potassium Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takumi, Toru; Ohkubo, Hiroaki; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    1988-11-01

    A rat kidney messenger RNA that induces a slowly activating, voltage-dependent potassium current on its expression in Xenopus oocytes was identified by combining molecular cloning with an electrophysiological assay. The cloned complementary DNA encodes a novel membrane protein that consists of 130 amino acids with a single putative transmembrane domain. This protein differs from the known ion channel proteins but is involved in the induction of selective permeation of potassium ions by membrane depolarization.

  8. [Cloning of vertebrates: successes and problems].

    PubMed

    Koniukhov, B V

    1997-12-01

    Cloning of vertebrates, in particular, amphibians and mammals, i