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Sample records for pore size distributions

  1. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga`s mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  2. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga's mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  3. Pore-size distributions of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Walther, D.H.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M. |

    1993-11-01

    Pore-size distributions have been measured for N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) hydrogels at 25 and 32{degrees}C with swelling capacities 11.3 and 6.0 g swollen gel per g dry gel. The mixed-solute-exclusion method (introduced by Kuga) was used to obtain the experimental solute-exclusion curve which represents the amount of imbibed liquid inside the gel inaccessible for a solute of radius r. The pore-size distributions were obtained by using Casassa`s Brownian-motion model and numerically solving the Fredholm integral equation. The pore-size distributions of temperature-sensitive NIPA hydrogels are strongly dependent on temperature which determines swelling capacity. With increasing swelling capacity (from 6.0 to 11.3), the pore-size distribution shifts to higher mode values (27.3 to 50.6 {angstrom}) and to higher variance (1.07{center_dot}10{sup 3} to 3.58{center_dot}10{sup 3} {angstrom}{sup 2}).

  4. Pore size distribution in an uncompacted equilibrated ordinary chondrite

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, J.M.; Macke, R.J.; Wignarajah, D.P.; Rivers, M.L.; Britt, D.T.; Ebel, D.S.

    2008-05-30

    The extraordinarily uncompacted nature of the ordinary L chondrite fall Baszkowka gives a unique opportunity to investigate the potentially pre-compaction pore size distribution in an equilibrated ordinary chondrite. Using X-ray microtomography and helium pycnometry on two samples of Baszkowka, we have found that on average, two-thirds of the 19.0% porosity resides in inter- and intra-granular voids with volumes between {approx}3 x10{sup 05} and 3 mm{sup 3}. We show the cumulative number density of pore volumes observable by X-ray microtomography obeys a power law distribution function in this equilibrated ordinary chondrite. We foresee these data adding to our understanding of the impact processing of chondrites and their parent asteroids, where porosity and pore size play significant roles in the parameterization of impact events.

  5. Polyester scaffolds with bimodal pore size distribution for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sosnowski, Stanislaw; Woźniak, Piotr; Lewandowska-Szumieł, Małgorzata

    2006-06-16

    This paper presents a method for the preparation of porous poly(L-lactide)/poly[(L-lactide)-co-glycolide] scaffolds for tissue engineering. Scaffolds were prepared by a mold pressing-salt leaching technique from structured microparticles. The total porosity was in the range 70-85%. The pore size distribution was bimodal. Large pores, susceptible for osteoblasts growth and proliferation had the dimensions 50-400 microm. Small pores, dedicated to the diffusion of nutrients or/and metabolites of bone forming cells, as well as the products of hydrolysis of polyesters from the walls of the scaffold, had sizes in the range 2 nm-5 microm. The scaffolds had good mechanical strength (compressive modulus equal to 41 MPa and a strength of 1.64 MPa for 74% porosity). Scaffolds were tested in vitro with human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63). It was found that the viability of cells seeded within the scaffolds obtained using the mold pressing-salt leaching technique from structured microparticles was better when compared to cells cultured in scaffolds obtained by traditional methods. After 34 d of culture, cells within the tested scaffolds were organized in a tissue-like structure. Photos of section of macro- and mesoporous PLLA/PLGA scaffold containing 50 wt.-% of PLGA microspheres after 34 d of culture. Dark spots mark MG-63 cells, white areas belong to the scaffold. The specimen was stained with haematoxylin/eosin. Bar = 100 microm.

  6. Catalytic reforming catalyst with modified pore size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Unmuth, E.E.; Fleming, B.A.

    1987-10-27

    In a naphtha reforming catalyst having at least one catalytic metal deposited on a porous solid catalyst support, an improvement is described which comprises the catalyst having the following in combination: (A) a surface area above about 250M/sup 2//gram of catalyst; (B) A pore volume above about 0.4 cc/gram of catalyst in pores having diameters of from about 30 angstroms to about 38,000 angstroms; and (C) A pore volume distribution wherein about 70 percent or less of the pore volume is in pores having diameters of from about 30 angstroms to about 400 angstroms, and 30 percent or more of the pore volume is in pores having diameters of from about 400 angstroms to about 38,000 angstroms.

  7. A theoretical analysis and prediction of pore size and pore size distribution in electrospun multilayer nanofibrous materials.

    PubMed

    Bagherzadeh, Roohollah; Najar, Saeed Shaikhzadeh; Latifi, Masoud; Tehran, Mohammad Amani; Kong, Lingxue

    2013-07-01

    Electrospinning process can fabricate nanomaterials with unique nanostructures for potential biomedical and environmental applications. However, the prediction and, consequently, the control of the porous structure of these materials has been impractical due to the complexity of the electrospinning process. In this research, a theoretical model for characterizing the porous structure of the electrospun nanofibrous network has been developed by combining the stochastic and stereological probability approaches. From consideration of number of fiber-to-fiber contacts in an electrospun nanofibrous assembly, geometrical and statistical theory relating morphological and structural parameters of the network to the characteristic dimensions of interfibers pores is provided. It has been shown that these properties are strongly influenced by the fiber diameter, porosity, and thickness of assembly. It is also demonstrated that at a given network porosity, increasing fiber diameter and thickness of the network reduces the characteristic dimensions of pores. It is also discussed that the role of fiber diameter and number of the layer in the assembly is dominant in controlling the pore size distribution of the networks. The theory has been validated experimentally and results compared with the existing theory to predict the pore size distribution of nanofiber mats. It is believed that the presented theory for estimation of pore size distribution is more realistic and useful for further studies of multilayer random nanofibrous assemblies.

  8. Using radial NMR profiles to characterize pore size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deriche, Rachid; Treilhard, John

    2012-02-01

    Extracting information about axon diameter distributions in the brain is a challenging task which provides useful information for medical purposes; for example, the ability to characterize and monitor axon diameters would be useful in diagnosing and investigating diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)1 or autism.2 Three families of operators are defined by Ozarslan,3 whose action upon an NMR attenuation signal extracts the moments of the pore size distribution of the ensemble under consideration; also a numerical method is proposed to continuously reconstruct a discretely sampled attenuation profile using the eigenfunctions of the simple harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian: the SHORE basis. The work presented here extends Ozarlan's method to other bases that can offer a better description of attenuation signal behaviour; in particular, we propose the use of the radial Spherical Polar Fourier (SPF) basis. Testing is performed to contrast the efficacy of the radial SPF basis and SHORE basis in practical attenuation signal reconstruction. The robustness of the method to additive noise is tested and analysed. We demonstrate that a low-order attenuation signal reconstruction outperforms a higher-order reconstruction in subsequent moment estimation under noisy conditions. We propose the simulated annealing algorithm for basis function scale parameter estimation. Finally, analytic expressions are derived and presented for the action of the operators on the radial SPF basis (obviating the need for numerical integration, thus avoiding a spectrum of possible sources of error).

  9. Effect of pore size distribution on enzyme immobilization in porous supports

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.J.; Wu, T.C. ); Chiang, C.L. )

    1989-09-01

    The objective of this study is to improve Clark's model by incorporating a pore size distribution into the pore central core restricted diffusion model. By using a refined equation for the void cross-sectional area of pore, the authors recalculate the amount of enzyme immobilized vs. time on stream. In addition, a real pore size distribution of silica supports is measured to investigate the deviation of the loaded amount of enzyme predicted by Clark's model.

  10. Prediction of Hydraulic Conductivity as Related to Pore Size Distribution in Unsaturated Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil pore volume as well as pore size, shape, type (i.e. biopore versus crack), continuity, and distribution in soil affect soil water and gas exchange. Vertical and lateral drainage of water by gravitational forces occurs through large, non-capillary soil pores, but redistribution and upward moveme...

  11. Unified method for the total pore volume and pore size distribution of hierarchical zeolites from argon adsorption and mercury intrusion.

    PubMed

    Kenvin, Jeffrey; Jagiello, Jacek; Mitchell, Sharon; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-02-03

    A generalized approach to determine the complete distribution of macropores, mesopores, and micropores from argon adsorption and mercury porosimetry is developed and validated for advanced zeolite catalysts with hierarchically structured pore systems in powder and shaped forms. Rather than using a fragmented approach of simple overlays from individual techniques, a unified approach that utilizes a kernel constructed from model isotherms and model intrusion curves is used to calculate the complete pore size distribution and the total pore volume of the material. An added benefit of a single full-range pore size distribution is that the cumulative pore area and the area distribution are also obtained without the need for additional modeling. The resulting complete pore size distribution and the kernel accurately model both the adsorption isotherm and the mercury porosimetry. By bridging the data analysis of two primary characterization tools, this methodology fills an existing gap in the library of familiar methods for porosity assessment in the design of materials with multilevel porosity for novel technological applications.

  12. Idealized Shale Sorption Isotherm Measurements to Determine Pore Volume, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, R.; Wang, B.; Aljama, H.; Rupp, E.; Wilcox, J.

    2014-12-01

    One method for mitigating the impacts of anthropogenic CO2-related climate change is the sequestration of CO2 in depleted gas and oil reservoirs, including shale. The accurate characterization of the heterogeneous material properties of shale, including pore volume, surface area, pore size distributions (PSDs) and composition is needed to understand the interaction of CO2 with shale. Idealized powdered shale sorption isotherms were created by varying incremental amounts of four essential components by weight. The first two components, organic carbon and clay, have been shown to be the most important components for CO2 uptake in shales. Organic carbon was represented by kerogen isolated from a Silurian shale, and clay groups were represented by illite from the Green River shale formation. The rest of the idealized shale was composed of equal parts by weight of SiO2 to represent quartz and CaCO3 to represent carbonate components. Baltic, Eagle Ford, and Barnett shale sorption measurements were used to validate the idealized samples. The idealized and validation shale sorption isotherms were measured volumetrically using low pressure N2 (77K) and CO2 (273K) adsorbates on a Quantachrome Autosorb IQ2. Gravimetric isotherms were also produced for a subset of these samples using CO2 and CH4adsorbates under subsurface temperature and pressure conditions using a Rubotherm magnetic suspension balance. Preliminary analyses were inconclusive in validating the idealized samples. This could be a result of conflicting reports of total organic carbon (TOC) content in each sample, a problem stemming from the heterogeneity of the samples and different techniques used for measuring TOC content. The TOC content of the validation samples (Eagle Ford and Barnett) was measured by Rock-Eval pyrolysis at Weatherford Laboratories, while the TOC content in the Baltic validation samples was determined by LECO TOC. Development of a uniform process for measuring TOC in the validation samples is

  13. Pore-size distribution in loamy soils: A comparison between microtomographic and capillarimetric determination methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shein, E. V.; Skvortsova, E. B.; Dembovetskii, A. V.; Abrosimov, K. N.; Il'in, L. I.; Shnyrev, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    Pore-size distribution in a soddy-podzolic silt loamy soil developing from mantle loesslike loam (Eutric Albic Retisol (Loamic, Cutanic)) was calculated from the water retention curve according to Jurin's equation and directly determined in microtomographic experiments. Rounded macropores with the diameter of their sections from 75 to 1000 μm predominate in horizontal sections if the studied soil samples. A larger part of the soil pores (>30-35%) belongs to micro- and nanopores, and they cannot be quantitatively determined by the tomographic method, because their sizes are smaller than the detection limit of the applied X-ray microtomography (8.75 μm per pixel). This leads to a significantly larger pore volume determined from the water retention curve in comparison with the "tomographic" pore volume. A comparative analysis of pore-size distribution curves obtained by these methods shows that the major regularities of the pore-size distribution in the range from 30 to 5000 μm are similar in both cases. Fine macropores and, partly, mesopores predominate. Common characteristics of the pore-size distribution curves obtained by these methods, including the coincidence of the peaks, attest to the validity of classical approaches, according to which the hydrology of soil pore space can be perceived as a physical model of cylindrical capillaries of different sizes with capillary-sorbed water.

  14. Pore invasion dynamics during fluid front displacement in porous media determine functional pore size distribution and phase entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, F.; Or, D.

    2012-12-01

    Dynamics of fluid fronts in porous media shape transport properties of the unsaturated zone and affect management of petroleum reservoirs and their storage properties. What appears macroscopically as smooth and continuous motion of a displacement fluid front may involve numerous rapid interfacial jumps often resembling avalanches of invasion events. Direct observations using high-speed camera and pressure sensors in sintered glass micro-models provide new insights on the influence of flow rates, pore size, and gravity on invasion events and on burst size distribution. Fundamental differences emerge between geometrically-defined pores and "functional" pores invaded during a single burst (invasion event). The waiting times distribution of individual invasion events and decay times of inertial oscillations (following a rapid interfacial jump) are characteristics of different displacement regimes. An invasion percolation model with gradients and including the role of inertia provide a framework for linking flow regimes with invasion sequences and phase entrapment. Model results were compared with measurements and with early studies on invasion burst sizes and waiting times distribution during slow drainage processes by Måløy et al. [1992]. The study provides new insights into the discrete invasion events and their weak links with geometrically-deduced pore geometry. Results highlight factors controlling pore invasion events that exert strong influence on macroscopic phenomena such as front morphology and residual phase entrapment shaping hydraulic properties after the passage of a fluid front.

  15. Pore size distribution, strength, and microstructure of portland cement paste containing metal hydroxide waste

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, Z.A.; Mahmud, H.; Shaaban, M.G.

    1996-12-31

    Stabilization/solidification of hazardous wastes is used to convert hazardous metal hydroxide waste sludge into a solid mass with better handling properties. This study investigated the pore size development of ordinary portland cement pastes containing metal hydroxide waste sludge and rice husk ash using mercury intrusion porosimetry. The effects of acre and the addition of rice husk ash on pore size development and strength were studied. It was found that the pore structures of mixes changed significantly with curing acre. The pore size shifted from 1,204 to 324 {angstrom} for 3-day old cement paste, and from 956 to 263 {angstrom} for a 7-day old sample. A reduction in pore size distribution for different curing ages was also observed in the other mixtures. From this limited study, no conclusion could be made as to any correlation between strength development and porosity. 10 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Direct correlation of internal gradients and pore size distributions with low field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients Gint, which arise from the magnetic susceptibility difference Δχ between solid matrix and fluid in porous media relate to the pore geometry. However, this relationship is complex and not well understood. Here we correlate internal-gradient distributions to pore-size distributions directly to examine internal gradients in detail at low field NMR. The pore-size distributions were obtained by the method of Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF), and the internal-gradient distributions were measured with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) method. The internal-gradient-pore-size distributions correlation maps were obtained for water in packs of glass beads with different diameter and in a sandstone sample. The relationship between internal gradients and pore structure is analyzed in detail by considering the restricted diffusion of fluids in porous samples. For each case diffusion regimes are assigned by plotting normalized CPMG data and comparing the diffusion lengths, the dephasing lengths and pore diameters. In the free-diffusion limit, the correlation maps reveal the true relationship between pore structure and internal gradients so that Δχ can be approximated from the correlation maps. This limit is met most easily at low field. It provides information about porous media, which is expected to benefit the oil industry, in particular NMR well logging.

  17. Effect of pore size distribution on the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Grethlein, H.E.

    1985-02-01

    Hard and softwoods were pretreated by mild acid hydrolysis and their pore size distribution determined. Regardless of the substrate, the initial rate of hydrolysis using cellulase from Trichoderma reesei is linearly correlated with the pore volume of the substrate accessible to a nominal diameter of 51 Angstroms representative of the size of the cellulase. In contrast, crystallinity index has no relationship to the rate of hydrolysis. 21 references.

  18. Pore size distribution, survival probability, and relaxation time in random and ordered arrays of fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomadakis, Manolis M.; Robertson, Teri J.

    2003-07-01

    We present a random walk based investigation of the pore size probability distribution and its moments, the survival probability and mean survival time, and the principal relaxation time, for random and ordered arrays of cylindrical fibers of various orientation distributions. The dimensionless mean survival time, principal relaxation time, mean pore size, and mean square pore size are found to increase with porosity, remain practically independent of the directionality of random fiber beds, and attain lower values for ordered arrays. Wide pore size distributions are obtained for random fiber structures and relatively narrow for ordered square arrays, all in very good agreement with theoretically predicted limiting values. Analytical results derived for the pore size probability and its lower moments for square arrays of fibers practically coincide with the corresponding simulation results. Earlier variational bounds on the mean survival time and principal relaxation time are obeyed by our numerical results in all cases, and are found to be quite sharp up to very high porosities. Dimensionless groups representing the deviation of such bounds from our simulation results vary in practically the same range as the corresponding values reported earlier for beds of spherical particles. A universal scaling expression of the literature relating the mean survival time to the mean pore size [S. Torquato and C. L. Y. Yeong, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8814 (1997)] agrees very well with our results for all types of fiber structures, thus validated for the first time for anisotropic porous media.

  19. Flow rate through microfilters: Influence of the pore size distribution, hydrodynamic interactions, wall slip, and inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kaare H.; Valente, André X. C. N.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-05-01

    We examine the fluid mechanics of viscous flow through filters consisting of perforated thin plates. We classify the effects that contribute to the hydraulic resistance of the filter. Classical analyses assume a single pore size and account only for filter thickness. We extend these results to obtain an analytical formula for the pressure drop across the microfilter versus the flow rate that accounts for the non-uniform distribution of pore sizes, the hydrodynamic interactions between the pores given their layout pattern, and wall slip. Further, we discuss inertial effects and their order of scaling.

  20. A thermal porosimetry method to estimate pore size distribution in highly porous insulating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, V.; Jannot, Y.; Degiovanni, A.

    2012-05-15

    Standard pore size determination methods such as mercury porosimetry, nitrogen sorption, microscopy, or x-ray tomography are not always applicable to highly porous, low density, and thus very fragile materials. For this kind of materials, a method based on thermal characterization is proposed. Indeed, the thermal conductivity of a highly porous and insulating medium is significantly dependent on the thermal conductivity of the interstitial gas that depends on both gas pressure and size of the considered pore (Knudsen effect). It is also possible to link the pore size with the thermal conductivity of the medium. Thermal conductivity measurements are realized on specimens placed in an enclosure where the air pressure is successively set to different values varying from 10{sup -1} to 10{sup 5} Pa. Knowing the global porosity ratio, an effective thermal conductivity model for a two-phase air-solid material based on a combined serial-parallel model is established. Pore size distribution can be identified by minimizing the sum of the quadratic differences between measured values and modeled ones. The results of the estimation process are the volume fractions of the chosen ranges of pore size. In order to validate the method, measurements done on insulating materials are presented. The results are discussed and show that pore size distribution estimated by the proposed method is coherent.

  1. New general pore size distribution model by classical thermodynamics application: Activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lordgooei, M.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2001-01-01

    A model is developed using classical thermodynamics to characterize pore size distributions (PSDs) of materials containing micropores and mesopores. The thermal equation of equilibrium adsorption (TEEA) is used to provide thermodynamic properties and relate the relative pore filling pressure of vapors to the characteristic pore energies of the adsorbent/adsorbate system for micropore sizes. Pore characteristic energies are calculated by averaging of interaction energies between adsorbate molecules and adsorbent pore walls as well as considering adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. A modified Kelvin equation is used to characterize mesopore sizes by considering variation of the adsorbate surface tension and by excluding the adsorbed film layer for the pore size. The modified-Kelvin equation provides similar pore filling pressures as predicted by density functional theory. Combination of these models provides a complete PSD of the adsorbent for the micropores and mesopores. The resulting PSD is compared with the PSDs from Jaroniec and Choma and Horvath and Kawazoe models as well as a first-order approximation model using Polanyi theory. The major importance of this model is its basis on classical thermodynamic properties, less simplifying assumptions in its derivation compared to other methods, and ease of use.

  2. The effect of magnetic particles on pore size distribution in soft polyurethane foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schümann, M.; Günther, S.; Odenbach, S.

    2014-07-01

    The combination of elastomeric matrices with magnetic particles to obtain magnetically controllable hybrid materials is an actual field of intense research. An important aspect in this context is the stiffness of the matrix, which determines the effectiveness of the magnetically driven changes in the material properties. In this paper an approach has been undertaken to use soft polyurethane foams as matrix material. By means of x-ray computed microtomography and digital image processing the pore size distribution has been determined to get information on how this distribution is affected by the introduction of magnetic microparticles. To do so, 20 000 to 40 000 pores per foam sample were evaluated. As a result, it could be proven that the pore sizes of the analysed foams clearly obey the Weibull distribution. Increasing the carbonyl iron particle concentrations leads to a decrement of the shape parameter of the distribution. Based on known particle stabilization mechanisms, an approach to explain the experimental results is proposed.

  3. Direct correlation of diffusion and pore size distributions with low field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2016-08-01

    The time-dependent diffusion coefficient (D) is a powerful tool to probe microstructure in porous media, and can be obtained by the NMR method. In a real porous sample, molecular diffusion is very complex. Here we present a new method which directly measures the relationship between effective diffusion coefficients and pore size distributions without knowing surface relaxivity. This method is used to extract structural information and explore the relationship between D and a in porous media having broad pore size distributions. The diffusion information is encoded by the Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) method and the pore size distributions are acquired by the Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF) method. Two model samples were measured to verify this method. Restricted diffusion was analyzed, and shows that most fluid molecules experience pore wall. The D(a) curves obtained from correlation maps were fitted to the Padé approximant equation and a good agreement was found between the fitting lines and the measured data. Then a sandstone sample with unknown structure was measured. The state of confined fluids was analyzed and structural information, such as pore size distributions, were extracted. The D - T1 correlation maps were also obtained using the same method, which yielded surface relaxivities for different samples. All the experiments were conducted on 2 MHz NMR equipment to obtain accurate diffusion information, where internal gradients can be neglected. This method is expected to have useful applications in the oil industry, particularly for NMR logging in the future.

  4. Strategies for Tailoring the Pore-Size Distribution of Virus Retention Filter Papers.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Simon; Mihranyan, Albert

    2016-06-08

    The goal of this work is to demonstrate how the pore-size distribution of the nanocellulose-based virus-retentive filter can be tailored. The filter paper was produced using cellulose nanofibers derived from Cladophora sp. green algae using the hot-press drying at varying drying temperatures. The produced filters were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and N2 gas sorption analysis. Further, hydraulic permeability and retention efficiency toward surrogate 20 nm model particles (fluorescent carboxylate-modified polystyrene spheres) were assessed. It was shown that by controlling the rate of water evaporation during hot-press drying the pore-size distribution can be precisely tailored in the region between 10 and 25 nm. The mechanism of pore formation and critical parameters are discussed in detail. The results are highly valuable for development of advanced separation media, especially for virus-retentive size-exclusion filtration.

  5. Investigation of pore size and energy distributions by statistical physics formalism applied to agriculture products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouaini, Fatma; Knani, Salah; Yahia, Manel Ben; Bahloul, Neila; Ben Lamine, Abdelmottaleb; Kechaou, Nabil

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new investigation that allows determining the pore size distribution (PSD) in a porous medium. This PSD is achieved by using the desorption isotherms of four varieties of olive leaves. This is by the means of statistical physics formalism and Kelvin's law. The results are compared with those obtained with scanning electron microscopy. The effect of temperature on the distribution function of pores has been studied. The influence of each parameter on the PSD is interpreted. A similar function of adsorption energy distribution, AED, is deduced from the PSD.

  6. Investigations of surface acidities and pore size distributions of selected pillared layered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Odom, M.A.; Wade, K.L.; Morgan, D.M.; White, J.L.; Schroeder, N.C.

    1996-10-01

    Pillared Layered Materials (PLMs) are being designed for a variety of applications. Currently, PLMs are being prepared in this laboratory for the selective sorption of radionuclides from liquid-nuclear wastes. It is important to have a good understanding of characteristics, such as pore size distributions and surface acidities, in order to tailor there sizes and environments are manipulated by varying the layered materials and pillaring species used for preparing the PLM. A variety of techniques have been employed to study these characteristics. For this study the pore size distributions were derived by determining the sorption of hydrocarbons of various sizes and shapes into the PLMs. The surface acidities were probed by sorbing basic species, such as ammonia and pyridine, and assessing the interactions with the acid sites using FTIR spectroscopy.

  7. Pore size distributions in polyelectrolyte multilayers determined by nuclear magnetic resonance cryoporometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaca Chávez, Fabián; Schönhoff, Monika

    2007-03-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) are thin films, which are assembled one molecular layer at a time, by alternatingly adsorbing polycations and polyanions making use of their attractive electrostatic interaction. Since the porosity of PEMs is one of the properties of major interest, in the current work the first pore size distribution of PEMs in samples consisting of silica particles coated with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) is presented. To this end, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) cryoporometry technique was applied. The proton NMR signal of liquid water is analyzed assuming a log normal distribution of motional correlation times. From the results, it is possible to determine the size of water sites in the layers to around 1nm. In addition, a slight variation with the number of layers is found. The average pore size agrees with cutoff sizes found in permeation experiments.

  8. Survival and relaxation time, pore size distribution moments, and viscous permeability in random unidirectional fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomadakis, Manolis M.; Robertson, Teri J.

    2005-03-01

    Computer simulation results are presented for the mean survival time, principal relaxation time, mean pore size, and mean square pore size, for random porous structures consisting of parallel nonoverlapping or partially overlapping fibers. The numerical procedure is based on a discrete step-by-step random walk mechanism simulating the Brownian diffusion trajectories of molecules in the porous media. Numerical results on the viscous permeability of these structures are computed with a method based on electrical conduction principles and compared to a variational bound derived from the mean survival time. The results show that nonoverlapping fiber structures exhibit lower values of the dimensionless mean survival time, principal relaxation time, mean pore size, and mean square pore size than randomly overlapping fiber structures of the same porosity, while partially overlapping fiber structures show behavior intermediate to those of the two extreme cases. The mean square pore size (second moment of the pore size distribution) is found to be a very good predictor of the mean survival time for non-, partially, and randomly overlapping fiber structures. Dimensionless groups representing the deviation of variational bounds from our simulation results vary in practically the same range as the corresponding values reported earlier for beds of spherical particles. A universal scaling expression of the literature relating the mean survival time to structural properties [S. Torquato and C. L. Y. Yeong, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8814 (1997)] agrees very well with our results for all examined fiber structures, thus validated for the first time for porous media formed by partially overlapping particles. The permeability behavior of partially overlapping fiber structures resembles that of nonoverlapping fiber structures for flow parallel to the fibers, but not for transverse flow, where percolation phenomena prevail. The permeability results for beds of unidirectional partially

  9. Survival and relaxation time, pore size distribution moments, and viscous permeability in random unidirectional fiber structures.

    PubMed

    Tomadakis, Manolis M; Robertson, Teri J

    2005-03-01

    Computer simulation results are presented for the mean survival time, principal relaxation time, mean pore size, and mean square pore size, for random porous structures consisting of parallel nonoverlapping or partially overlapping fibers. The numerical procedure is based on a discrete step-by-step random walk mechanism simulating the Brownian diffusion trajectories of molecules in the porous media. Numerical results on the viscous permeability of these structures are computed with a method based on electrical conduction principles and compared to a variational bound derived from the mean survival time. The results show that nonoverlapping fiber structures exhibit lower values of the dimensionless mean survival time, principal relaxation time, mean pore size, and mean square pore size than randomly overlapping fiber structures of the same porosity, while partially overlapping fiber structures show behavior intermediate to those of the two extreme cases. The mean square pore size (second moment of the pore size distribution) is found to be a very good predictor of the mean survival time for non-, partially, and randomly overlapping fiber structures. Dimensionless groups representing the deviation of variational bounds from our simulation results vary in practically the same range as the corresponding values reported earlier for beds of spherical particles. A universal scaling expression of the literature relating the mean survival time to structural properties [S. Torquato and C. L. Y. Yeong, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8814 (1997)] agrees very well with our results for all examined fiber structures, thus validated for the first time for porous media formed by partially overlapping particles. The permeability behavior of partially overlapping fiber structures resembles that of nonoverlapping fiber structures for flow parallel to the fibers, but not for transverse flow, where percolation phenomena prevail. The permeability results for beds of unidirectional partially

  10. A facile method to determine pore size distribution in porous scaffold by using image processing.

    PubMed

    Lo Re, G; Lopresti, F; Petrucci, G; Scaffaro, R

    2015-09-01

    Image processing permits scientists to investigate morphological properties of three-dimensional structures starting from their bi-dimensional gray-scale representation. In many cases porous structure with complex architecture has to be designed in order to attempt specific properties such in the case of scaffold for tissue engineering. Traditional morphological characterization, like scanning electron microscopy, should be coupled with quantitative information such as pore size distribution (PSD) in order to get a deeper understanding of the influence of the porous structure on tissue regeneration processes and on other related applications, it is remarkable to study a quantitative analysis of porosity and of pores dimension. In this work it was developed as a software able to accomplish the segmentation of images containing pores of any geometry in a semi-automatic way with the aim to measure the PSD. Case study constituted by PLA porous scaffolds with different pore size was adopted. Results indicate that image processing methods well fit the pore size features of PLA scaffolds, overcoming the limits of the more invasive porosimetry techniques.

  11. A solid with a hierarchical tetramodal micro-meso-macro pore size distribution

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yu; Ma, Zhen; Morris, Russell E.; Liu, Zheng; Jiao, Feng; Dai, Sheng; Bruce, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Porous solids have an important role in addressing some of the major energy-related problems facing society. Here we describe a porous solid, α-MnO2, with a hierarchical tetramodal pore size distribution spanning the micro-, meso- and macro pore range, centred at 0.48, 4.0, 18 and 70 nm. The hierarchical tetramodal structure is generated by the presence of potassium ions in the precursor solution within the channels of the porous silica template; the size of the potassium ion templates the microporosity of α-MnO2, whereas their reactivity with silica leads to larger mesopores and macroporosity, without destroying the mesostructure of the template. The hierarchical tetramodal pore size distribution influences the properties of α-MnO2 as a cathode in lithium batteries and as a catalyst, changing the behaviour, compared with its counterparts with only micropores or bimodal micro/mesopores. The approach has been extended to the preparation of LiMn2O4 with a hierarchical pore structure. PMID:23764887

  12. Nanofiltration Membranes with Narrow Pore Size Distribution via Contra-Diffusion-Induced Mussel-Inspired Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Qiu, Wen-Ze; Lv, Yan; Wu, Jian; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2016-11-02

    Nanofiltration membranes (NFMs) are widely used in saline water desalination, wastewater treatment, and chemical product purification. However, conventional NFMs suffer from broad pore size distribution, which limits their applications for fine separation, especially in complete separation of molecules with slight differences in molecular size. Herein, defect-free composite NFMs with narrow pore size distribution are fabricated using a contra-diffusion method, with dopamine/polyethylenimine solution on the skin side and ammonium persulfate solution on the other side of the ultrafiltration substrate. Persulfate ions can diffuse through the ultrafiltration substrate into the other side and in situ trigger dopamine to form a codeposited coating with polyethylenimine. The codeposition is hindered on those sites completely covered by the polydopamine/polyethylenimine coating, although it is promoted at the defects or highly permeable regions because it is induced by the diffused persulfate ions. Such a "self-completion" process results in NFMs with highly uniform structures and narrow pore size distribution, as determined by their rejection of neutral solutes. These near electrically neutral NFMs show a high rejection of divalent ions with a low rejection of monovalent ions (MgCl2 rejection = 96%, NaCl rejection = 23%), majorly based on a steric hindrance effect. The as-prepared NFMs can be applied in molecular separation such as isolating cellulose hydrogenation products.

  13. Importance of Pore Size Distribution of Fine-grained Sediments on Gas Hydrate Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, T. H.; Kim, H. S.; Cho, G. C.; Park, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Gas hydrates have been considered as a new source of natural gases. For the gas hydrate production, the gas hydrate reservoir should be depressurized below the equilibrium pressure of gas hydrates. Therefore, it is important to predict the equilibrium of gas hydrates in the reservoir conditions because it can be affected by the pore size of the host sediments due to the capillary effect. In this study, gas hydrates were synthesized in fine-grained sediment samples including a pure silt sample and a natural clayey silt sample cored from a hydrate occurrence region in Ulleung Basin, East Sea, offshore Korea. Pore size distributions of the samples were obtained by the nitrogen adsorption and desorption test and the mercury intrusion porosimetry. The equilibrium curve of gas hydrates in the fine-grained sediments were found to be significantly influenced by the clay fraction and the corresponding small pores (>50 nm in diameter). For the clayey silt sample, the equilibrium pressure was higher by ~1.4 MPa than the bulk equilibrium pressure. In most cases of oceanic gas hydrate reservoirs, sandy layers are found interbedded with fine-grained sediment layers while gas hydrates are intensively accumulated in the sandy layers. Our experiment results reveal the inhibition effect of fine-grained sediments against gas hydrate formation, in which greater driving forces (e.g., higher pressure or lower temperature) are required during natural gas migration. Therefore, gas hydrate distribution in interbedded layers of sandy and fine-grained sediments can be explained by such capillary effect induced by the pore size distribution of host sediments.

  14. Permeability-Selectivity Analysis of Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Membranes: Effect of Pore Size and Shape Distribution and Membrane Stretching.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Usama; Arif, Abul Fazal Muhammad; Bashmal, Salem

    2016-08-06

    We present a modeling approach to determine the permeability-selectivity tradeoff for microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes with a distribution of pore sizes and pore shapes. Using the formulated permeability-selectivity model, the effect of pore aspect ratio and pore size distribution on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of the membrane is analyzed. A finite element model is developed to study the effect of membrane stretching on the distribution of pore sizes and shapes in the stretched membrane. The effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of membranes is also analyzed. The results show that increasing pore aspect ratio improves membrane performance while increasing the width of pore size distribution deteriorates the performance. It was also found that the effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff is greatly affected by the uniformity of pore distribution in the membrane. Stretching showed a positive shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve of membranes with well-dispersed pores while in the case of pore clustering, a negative shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve was observed.

  15. Permeability-Selectivity Analysis of Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Membranes: Effect of Pore Size and Shape Distribution and Membrane Stretching

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Usama; Arif, Abul Fazal Muhammad; Bashmal, Salem

    2016-01-01

    We present a modeling approach to determine the permeability-selectivity tradeoff for microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes with a distribution of pore sizes and pore shapes. Using the formulated permeability-selectivity model, the effect of pore aspect ratio and pore size distribution on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of the membrane is analyzed. A finite element model is developed to study the effect of membrane stretching on the distribution of pore sizes and shapes in the stretched membrane. The effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of membranes is also analyzed. The results show that increasing pore aspect ratio improves membrane performance while increasing the width of pore size distribution deteriorates the performance. It was also found that the effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff is greatly affected by the uniformity of pore distribution in the membrane. Stretching showed a positive shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve of membranes with well-dispersed pores while in the case of pore clustering, a negative shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve was observed. PMID:27509528

  16. Multiscale characterization of pore size distributions using mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Tarquis, A. M.; Miranda, J. G. V.; Vidal Vázquez, E.

    2009-04-01

    The soil pore space is a continuum extremely variable in size, including structures smaller than nanometres and as large as macropores or cracks with millimetres or even centimetres size. Pore size distributions (PSDs) affects important soil functions, such as those related with transmission and storage of water, and root growth. Direct and indirect measurements of PSDs are becoming increasingly used to characterize soil structure. Mercury injection porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption isotherms are techniques commonly employed for assessing equivalent pore size diameters in the range from about 50 nm to 100 m and 2 to 500 nm, respectively. The multifractal formalism was used to describe Hg injection curves and N2 adsorption isotherms from two series of a Mollisol cultivated under no tillage and minimum tillage. Soil samples were taken from 0-10, 10-20 and 20-30 cm depths in two experimental fields located in the north of Buenos Aires and South of Santa Fe provinces, Argentina. All the data sets analyzed from the two studied soil attributes showed remarkably good scaling trends as assessed by singularity spectrum and generalized dimension spectrum. Both, experimental Hg injection curves and N2 adsorption isotherms could be fitted reasonably well with multifractal models. A wide variety of singularity and generalized dimension spectra was found for the variables. The capacity dimensions, D0, for both Hg injection and N2 adsorption data were not significantly different from the Euclidean dimension. However, the entropy dimension, D1, and correlation dimension, D2, obtained from mercury injection and nitrogen adsorption data showed significant differences. So, D1 values were on average 0.868 and varied from 0.787 to 0.925 for Hg intrusion curves. Entropy dimension, D1, values for N2 adsorption isotherms were on average 0.582 significantly lower than those obtained when using the former technique. Twenty-three out of twenty-four N2 isotherms had D1 values in a

  17. Pore-size distributions of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels varying in initial monomer concentration and cross-linker/monomer ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Pothmann, E.; Roessler, T.; Baker, J.; Yee, A.; Blanch, H.; Prausnitz, J.M. )

    1994-05-23

    Pore-size distributions have been measured for cationic acrylamide-based hydrogels. The authors use the experimental mixed-solute-exclusion method, MSE (introduced by Kuga), to obtain the solute-exclusion curve representing the amount of imbibed liquid inside the gel inaccessible for a solute of radius r. The authors use the Brownian motion model (developed by Cassasa) to convert the size-exclusion curve into the pore-size distribution, which gives the frequency of pore radius R as a function of R. This theoretically-based interpretation of MSE data leads to the Fredholm integral equation that they solve numerically. Results are reported for a series of hydrogels containing acrylamide and 3% MAPTAC; the hydrogels differed in extent of cross-linking and/or initial concentration of monomer. Pore-size distributions shift to lower pore sizes with rising initial monomer concentration and with rising cross-linker-to-monomer ratio.

  18. Pore Size Distributions Inferred from Modified Inversion Percolation Modeling of Drainage Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dralus, D. E.; Wang, H. F.; Strand, T. E.; Glass, R. J.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    Experiments have been conducted of drainage in sand packs. At equilibrium, the interface between the fluids forms a saturation transition fringe where the saturation decreases monotonically with height. This behavior was observed in a 1-inch thick pack of 20-30 sand contained front and back within two thin, 12-inch-by-24-inch glass plates. The translucent chamber was illuminated from behind by a bank of fluorescent bulbs. Acquired data were in the form of images captured by a CCD camera with resolution on the grain scale. The measured intensity of the transmitted light was used to calculate the average saturation at each point in the chamber. This study used a modified invasion percolation (MIP) model to simulate the drainage experiments to evaluate the relationship between the saturation-versus-height curve at equilibrium and the pore size distribution associated with the granular medium. The simplest interpretation of a drainage curve is in terms of a distribution of capillary tubes whose radii reproduce the the observed distribution of rise heights. However, this apparent radius distribution obtained from direct inversion of the saturation profile did not yield the assumed radius distribution. Further investigation demonstrated that the equilibrium height distribution is controlled primarily by the Bond number (ratio of gravity to capillary forces) with some influence from the width of the pore radius distribution. The width of the equilibrium fringe is quantified in terms of the ratio of Bond number to the standard deviation of the pore throat distribution. The normalized saturation-vs-height curves exhibit a power-law scaling behavior consistent with both Brooks-Corey and Van Genuchten type curves. Fundamental tenets of percolation theory were used to quantify the relationship between the apparent and actual radius distributions as a function of the mean coordination number and of the ratio of Bond number to standard deviation, which was supported by both MIP

  19. Jointly deriving NMR surface relaxivity and pore size distributions by NMR relaxation experiments on partially desaturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Hughes, B.

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is a geophysical method widely used in borehole and laboratory applications to nondestructively infer transport and storage properties of rocks and soils as it is directly sensitive to the water/oil content and pore sizes. However, for inferring pore sizes, NMR relaxometry data need to be calibrated with respect to a surface interaction parameter, surface relaxivity, which depends on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock. This study introduces an inexpensive and quick alternative to the classical calibration methods, e.g., mercury injection, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR, or grain size analysis, which allows for jointly estimating NMR surface relaxivity and pore size distributions using NMR relaxometry data from partially desaturated rocks. Hereby, NMR relaxation experiments are performed on the fully saturated sample and on a sample partially drained at a known differential pressure. Based on these data, the (capillary) pore radius distribution and surface relaxivity are derived by joint optimization of the Brownstein-Tarr and the Young-Laplace equation assuming parallel capillaries. Moreover, the resulting pore size distributions can be used to predict water retention curves. This inverse modeling approach—tested and validated using NMR relaxometry data measured on synthetic porous borosilicate samples with known petrophysical properties (i.e., permeability, porosity, inner surfaces, pore size distributions)—yields consistent and reproducible estimates of surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions. Also, subsequently calculated water retention curves generally correlate well with measured water retention curves.

  20. Pore Size Distribution and Methane Equilibrium Conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihani, A. D.; Daigle, H.; Cook, A.; Glosser, D.; Shushtarian, A.

    2015-12-01

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  1. Pore size distribution and methane equilibrium conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bihani, Abhishek; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann; Glosser, Deborah; Shushtarian, Arash

    2015-12-15

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  2. Catalytic reforming catalyst with modified pore size distribution and a process using the same

    SciTech Connect

    Unmuth, E.E.; Fleming, B.A.

    1987-05-12

    This patent describes a catalytic reforming process for conversion of a naptha hydrocarbon at reforming conditions using a catalyst comprising at least one catalytic metal and alumina. The improvement comprises using a catalyst having the following properties in combination: a surface area above about 250 M/sup 2//gram of catalyst; a pore volume above about 0.44 cc/gram of catalyst in pores having diameters of from about 30 angstroms to about 38,000 angstroms; and a pore volume distribution wherein about 70 percent or less of the pore volume is in pores having diameters of from about 30 angstroms to about 400 angstroms. About 30 percent or more pore volume is in pores having diameters of from about 400 angstroms to about 38,000 angstroms.

  3. Pore size distribution of a deeply excavated Oxisol after 19 years reclamation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos Batista Bonini, Carolina; de Cássia Marchini, Débora; Alves, Marlene Cristina; García de Arruda, Otton; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    Digging of the local soil and using it as a raw material for construction purposes has been identified as a non-negligible source of land degradation. Techniques aimed at soil profile reconstruction and ecological restoration of soils truncated by mechanical excavation using heavy machinery have been investigated Both, total soil porosity and pore size distribution are important properties for soil management as well as for assessing the recovery of soil function after land degradation. In this way, macropores are responsible for aeration, whereas water storage depends on soil meso- and micropores in the soil and the optimal pore-size distribution is also an indicator of soil quality. We investigated the changes in the pore size distribution of a soil that was beheaded to extract raw materials after a 19 year period of reclamation, which involved the use of green manures, gypsum and pasture for the purpose of profile recovery. The studied area is located in Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brzil. A field trial was performed following a completely randomized experimental design with seven treatments and four replications. Starting 1992, the initial treatments were: 1) control (tilled bare soil), 2)Stizolobium aterrium, 3)Cajanus cajan, 4)lime+S. aterrimum, 5) lime+C. cajan, 6) lime + gypsum + S. aterrimum, 7) lime + gypsum+C. cajan. In 1994, all treatments with C. cajan were replaced by Canavalia ensiformis and in 1999, Brachiaria decumbens was implanted in all the experimental plots. Data from vegetated treatments were compared with bare soil (control) and native vegetation (Savannah). Soil samples were collected in 2011 at the 0.00-0.10, 0.10-0.20, and 0.20-0.40 m depths. Treatment differences were assessed by analysis of variance, following the Scott-Knott test (5%) of probability to compare averages. Macroporosity of the 0.00-0.10 m top layer was above the 0.10 m3m-3 threshold considered as critical for plant growth. On the 0.10-0.20 m layer only treatments with C

  4. Pore size distribution analysis of activated carbons prepared from coconut shell using methane adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadpour, A.; Okhovat, A.; Darabi Mahboub, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    The application of Stoeckli theory to determine pore size distribution (PSD) of activated carbons using high pressure methane adsorption data is explored. Coconut shell was used as a raw material for the preparation of 16 different activated carbon samples. Four samples with higher methane adsorption were selected and nitrogen adsorption on these adsorbents was also investigated. Some differences are found between the PSD obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms and their PSD resulting from the same analysis using methane adsorption data. It is suggested that these differences may arise from the specific interactions between nitrogen molecules and activated carbon surfaces; therefore caution is required in the interpretation of PSD obtained from the nitrogen isotherm data.

  5. Effect of mica content on pore-size distribution and porosity of sandy sediment using proton nuclear magnetic resonance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.

    2015-12-01

    As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we performed a study on effect of mica content on pore size distribution and porosity of sandy sediment. This study used proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to measure the pore-size distribution and porosity of specimen to investigate mica content effect in sandy sediment. A mixture of silica sand No. 7 and mica (mica of 0 wt. %, 5 wt. % and 20 wt. %) was used in this study. The median D50 by laser diffraction method was obtained as 215.7 μm of silica sand No. 7 and 278.9 μm of mica. Pore-size distributions of specimens by the distribution of transverse magnetic relaxation time (T2) measurement by NMR were performed for the water-saturated sample under effective confining pressure of 1.0 MPa. The peaks of pore-size distribution curves decreased and showed finer shifts with increasing of mica content. The porosity of silica sand No. 7 specimen was 46.3%, and that of mica 5% and 20 % were 45.9% and 42.2%m, respectively. A change in pore-size distribution and porosity were observed with an increasing ratio of mica.

  6. Critical assessment of the pore size distribution in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappia, F.; Pizzocri, D.; Schubert, A.; Van Uffelen, P.; Paperini, G.; Pellottiero, D.; Macián-Juan, R.; Rondinella, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    A new methodology is introduced to analyse porosity data in the high burnup structure. Image analysis is coupled with the adaptive kernel density estimator to obtain a detailed characterisation of the pore size distribution, without a-priori assumption on the functional form of the distribution. Subsequently, stereological analysis is carried out. The method shows advantages compared to the classical approach based on the histogram in terms of detail in the description and accuracy within the experimental limits. Results are compared to the approximation of a log-normal distribution. In the investigated local burnup range (80-200 GWd/tHM), the agreement of the two approaches is satisfactory. From the obtained total pore density and mean pore diameter as a function of local burnup, pore coarsening is observed starting from ≈100 GWd/tHM, in agreement with a previous investigation.

  7. Application of SAXS and SANS in evaluation of porosity, pore size distribution and surface area of coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radlinski, A.P.; Mastalerz, Maria; Hinde, A.L.; Hainbuchner, M.; Rauch, H.; Baron, M.; Lin, J.S.; Fan, L.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the applicability of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques for determining the porosity, pore size distribution and internal specific surface area in coals. The method is noninvasive, fast, inexpensive and does not require complex sample preparation. It uses coal grains of about 0.8 mm size mounted in standard pellets as used for petrographic studies. Assuming spherical pore geometry, the scattering data are converted into the pore size distribution in the size range 1 nm (10 A??) to 20 ??m (200,000 A??) in diameter, accounting for both open and closed pores. FTIR as well as SAXS and SANS data for seven samples of oriented whole coals and corresponding pellets with vitrinite reflectance (Ro) values in the range 0.55% to 5.15% are presented and analyzed. Our results demonstrate that pellets adequately represent the average microstructure of coal samples. The scattering data have been used to calculate the maximum surface area available for methane adsorption. Total porosity as percentage of sample volume is calculated and compared with worldwide trends. By demonstrating the applicability of SAXS and SANS techniques to determine the porosity, pore size distribution and surface area in coals, we provide a new and efficient tool, which can be used for any type of coal sample, from a thin slice to a representative sample of a thick seam. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Statistical physics studies of multilayer adsorption isotherm in food materials and pore size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouaini, F.; Knani, S.; Ben Yahia, M.; Ben Lamine, A.

    2015-08-01

    Water sorption isotherms of foodstuffs are very important in different areas of food science engineering such as for design, modeling and optimization of many processes. The equilibrium moisture content is an important parameter in models used to predict changes in the moisture content of a product during storage. A formulation of multilayer model with two energy levels was based on statistical physics and theoretical considerations. Thanks to the grand canonical ensemble in statistical physics. Some physicochemical parameters related to the adsorption process were introduced in the analytical model expression. The data tabulated in literature of water adsorption at different temperatures on: chickpea seeds, lentil seeds, potato and on green peppers were described applying the most popular models applied in food science. We also extend the study to the newest proposed model. It is concluded that among studied models the proposed model seems to be the best for description of data in the whole range of relative humidity. By using our model, we were able to determine the thermodynamic functions. The measurement of desorption isotherms, in particular a gas over a solid porous, allows access to the distribution of pore size PSD.

  9. In-situ method for determining pore size distribution, capillary pressure and permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1987-02-17

    A method is described for determining the pore sizes entered by the oil phase in an oil-bearing formation, comprising: logging the formation of interest with an induced polarization logging tool having at least one source electrode; computing from the induced polarization measurements obtained by the logging tool a normalized induced polarization response function; obtaining core material from the formation of interest; extracting the water and hydrocarbons from the core material; resaturating the core material with formation brine; measuring the normalized induced polarization response function for the core material; and determining the pore sizes containing oil in the formation by comparing the normalized induced polarization response function from the formation with the normalized induced polarization response function of the core.

  10. A pore-hindered diffusion and reaction model can help explain the importance of pore size distribution in enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass.

    PubMed

    Luterbacher, Jeremy S; Parlange, Jean-Yves; Walker, Larry P

    2013-01-01

    Until now, most efforts to improve monosaccharide production from biomass through pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis have used empirical optimization rather than employing a rational design process guided by a theory-based modeling framework. For such an approach to be successful a modeling framework that captures the key mechanisms governing the relationship between pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis must be developed. In this study, we propose a pore-hindered diffusion and kinetic model for enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass. When compared to data available in the literature, this model accurately predicts the well-known dependence of initial cellulose hydrolysis rates on surface area available to a cellulase-size molecule. Modeling results suggest that, for particles smaller than 5 × 10(-3) cm, a key rate-limiting step is the exposure of previously unexposed cellulose occurring after cellulose on the surface has hydrolyzed, rather than binding or diffusion. However, for larger particles, according to the model, diffusion plays a more significant role. Therefore, the proposed model can be used to design experiments that produce results that are either affected or unaffected by diffusion. Finally, by using pore size distribution data to predict the biomass fraction that is accessible to degradation, this model can be used to predict cellulose hydrolysis with time using only pore size distribution and initial composition data.

  11. Impact of matric potential and pore size distribution on growth dynamics of filamentous and non-filamentous soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Alexandra B; Vos, Michiel; de Boer, Wietse; Kowalchuk, George A

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous growth form is an important strategy for soil microbes to bridge air-filled pores in unsaturated soils. In particular, fungi perform better than bacteria in soils during drought, a property that has been ascribed to the hyphal growth form of fungi. However, it is unknown if, and to what extent, filamentous bacteria may also display similar advantages over non-filamentous bacteria in soils with low hydraulic connectivity. In addition to allowing for microbial interactions and competition across connected micro-sites, water films also facilitate the motility of non-filamentous bacteria. To examine these issues, we constructed and characterized a series of quartz sand microcosms differing in matric potential and pore size distribution and, consequently, in connection of micro-habitats via water films. Our sand microcosms were used to examine the individual and competitive responses of a filamentous bacterium (Streptomyces atratus) and a motile rod-shaped bacterium (Bacillus weihenstephanensis) to differences in pore sizes and matric potential. The Bacillus strain had an initial advantage in all sand microcosms, which could be attributed to its faster growth rate. At later stages of the incubation, Streptomyces became dominant in microcosms with low connectivity (coarse pores and dry conditions). These data, combined with information on bacterial motility (expansion potential) across a range of pore-size and moisture conditions, suggest that, like their much larger fungal counterparts, filamentous bacteria also use this growth form to facilitate growth and expansion under conditions of low hydraulic conductivity. The sand microcosm system developed and used in this study allowed for precise manipulation of hydraulic properties and pore size distribution, thereby providing a useful approach for future examinations of how these properties influence the composition, diversity and function of soil-borne microbial communities.

  12. Determination of pore size distributions in capillary-channeled polymer fiber stationary phases by inverse size-exclusion chromatography and implications for fast protein separations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengxin; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2014-07-18

    Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers have been utilized as liquid chromatography stationary phases, primarily for biomacromolecule separations on the analytical and preparative scales. The collinear packing of the eight-channeled C-CP fibers provides for very efficient flow, allowing operation at high linear velocity (u>100mm s(-1)) and low backpressure (<2000psi) in analytical-scale separations. To take advantage of these fluid transport properties, there must not be mass transfer limitations as would be imposed by having an appreciably porous phase, wherein solute diffusion limits the overall mass transport rates. To better understand the physical nano-/micro- structure of C-CP fibers, inverse size exclusion chromatography (iSEC) has been employed to determine the pore size distribution (PSD) within C-CP fibers. A diversity of test species (from metal ions to large proteins) was used as probes under non-retaining conditions to obtain a response curve reflecting the apparent partition coefficient (Kd) versus hydrodynamic radii (rm). A mean pore radius (rp) of 4.2nm with standard deviation (sp) of ±1.1nm was calculated by fitting the Kd versus rm data to model equations with a Gaussian pore size distribution, and a pore radius of 4.0±0.1nm was calculated based on a log-normal distribution. The derived mean pore radius is much smaller than traditional support materials, with the standard deviation showing a relatively uniform pore distribution. van Deemter plots were analyzed to provide practical confirmation of the structural implications. Large molecules (e.g., proteins) that are fully excluded from pores have no significant C-terms in the van Deemter plots whereas small molecules that can access the pore volumes display appreciable C-terms, as expected. Fitting of retention data to the Knox equation suggests that the columns operate with a characteristic particle diameter (dp) of ∼53μm.

  13. Isolating the effect of pore size distribution on electrochemical double-layer capacitance using activated fluid coke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuliani, Jocelyn E.; Tong, Shitang; Kirk, Donald W.; Jia, Charles Q.

    2015-12-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) use physical ion adsorption in the capacitive electrical double layer of high specific surface area (SSA) materials to store electrical energy. Previous work shows that the SSA-normalized capacitance increases when pore diameters are less than 1 nm. However, there still remains uncertainty about the charge storage mechanism since the enhanced SSA-normalized capacitance is not observed in all microporous materials. In previous studies, the total specific surface area and the chemical composition of the electrode materials were not controlled. The current work is the first reported study that systematically compares the performance of activated carbon prepared from the same raw material, with similar chemical composition and specific surface area, but different pore size distributions. Preparing samples with similar SSAs, but different pores sizes is not straightforward since increasing pore diameters results in decreasing the SSA. This study observes that the microporous activated carbon has a higher SSA-normalized capacitance, 14.1 μF cm-2, compared to the mesoporous material, 12.4 μF cm-2. However, this enhanced SSA-normalized capacitance is only observed above a threshold operating voltage. Therefore, it can be concluded that a minimum applied voltage is required to induce ion adsorption in these sub-nanometer micropores, which increases the capacitance.

  14. Pore size distribution of soil near saturation as affected by soil type, land use, and soil amendments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, A. I.; Wagner, L. E.; Levy, G. J.

    2008-12-01

    Storage and flow of water in soil voids, which are related to the size and geometry of the voids and flow rate are usually controlled by the void of the smallest size. Another reason for the complexity of water flow in soils is the intricate nature and change of the soil pores due to the modification of soil structure under different agricultural management and climatic conditions. Shrinking and swelling stresses enhance breakdown of aggregates and to subsequent collapse of pores, thus adversely affecting the movement of water and solutes in the soil. Our objective was to study the role of soil type, nature of cultivation, waste and soil stabilizers application, and soil condition on disturbed soil pore-size distribution, drainable porosity and water holding capacity at near saturation (infiltration porosity) using the high energy moisture characteristic method. In this method, the wetting process of the aggregates is accurately controlled, and the energy of hydration and entrapped air are the main forces responsible for aggregate breakdown. We studied a large number (> 300) of soil samples from different climatic regions varying (i) in their inherent properties (clay mineralogy, dispersion potential, texture, organic matter, Fe and Al oxides content), and; (ii) the conditions prevailing in the soil (water quality, salinity, sodicity, redox potential, type of tillage); and finally that were subjected to the addition of different soil amendments (polymers, gypsum, manure, sludge). The results showed that structural stability and pore size distribution strongly depended on soil type, conditions prevailing in the soil and the type of amendment used. Detailed analyses of the results provided valuable information on inter- and intra- aggregate porosities that may have vital bearing on the understanding of (i) solution transport processes in different soil types under different treatments or with different solute concentration, and (ii) down-profile transport of soil

  15. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Lee, Elizabeth; Kallam, Alekhya; Majumdar, Partha; Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J.; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James; Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  16. Dynamic adsorption of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins in passive sampling relates to pore size distribution of aromatic adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifeng; Ma, Feifei; Song, Xiuli; Yu, Rencheng

    2011-03-18

    Solid-phase adsorption toxin tracking (SPATT) technology was developed as an effective passive sampling method for dissolved diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins in seawater. HP20 and SP700 resins have been reported as preferred adsorption substrates for lipophilic algal toxins and are recommended for use in SPATT testing. However, information on the mechanism of passive adsorption by these polymeric resins is still limited. Described herein is a study on the adsorption of OA and DTX1 toxins extracted from Prorocentrum lima algae by HP20 and SP700 resins. The pore size distribution of the adsorbents was characterized by a nitrogen adsorption method to determine the relationship between adsorption and resin porosity. The Freundlich equation constant showed that the difference in adsorption capacity for OA and DTX1 toxins was not determined by specific surface area, but by the pore size distribution in particular, with micropores playing an especially important role. Additionally, it was found that differences in affinity between OA and DTX1 for aromatic resins were as a result of polarity discrepancies due to DTX1 having an additional methyl moiety.

  17. Experimental Study of Porosity Changes in Shale Caprocks Exposed to CO2-Saturated Brines I: Evolution of Mineralogy, Pore Connectivity, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    DOE PAGES

    Mouzakis, Katherine M.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Rother, Gernot; ...

    2016-07-18

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage, one proposed method of reducing anthropogenic emissions of CO2, relies on low permeability formations, such as shales, above injection formations to prevent upward migration of the injected CO2. Porosity in caprocks evaluated for sealing capacity before injection can be altered by geochemical reactions induced by dissolution of injected CO2 into pore fluids, impacting long-term sealing capacity. Therefore, long-term performance of CO2 sequestration sites may be dependent on both initial distribution and connectivity of pores in caprocks, and on changes induced by geochemical reaction after injection of CO2, which are currently poorly understood. This paper presentsmore » results from an experimental study of changes to caprock porosity and pore network geometry in two caprock formations under conditions relevant to CO2 sequestration. Pore connectivity and total porosity increased in the Gothic Shale; while total porosity increased but pore connectivity decreased in the Marine Tuscaloosa. Gothic Shale is a carbonate mudstone that contains volumetrically more carbonate minerals than Marine Tuscaloosa. Carbonate minerals dissolved to a greater extent than silicate minerals in Gothic Shale under high CO2 conditions, leading to increased porosity at length scales <~200 nm that contributed to increased pore connectivity. In contrast, silicate minerals dissolved to a greater extent than carbonate minerals in Marine Tuscaloosa leading to increased porosity at all length scales, and specifically an increase in the number of pores >~1 μm. Mineral reactions also contributed to a decrease in pore connectivity, possibly as a result of precipitation in pore throats or hydration of the high percentage of clays. Finally, this study highlights the role that mineralogy of the caprock can play in geochemical response to CO2 injection and resulting changes in sealing capacity in long-term CO2 storage projects.« less

  18. Multi-scale analysis in carbonates by X-ray microtomography: Characterization of the porosity and pore size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Jaquiel S.; Nagata, Rodrigo; Moreira, Anderson C.; Fernandes, Celso P.; Appoloni, Carlos R.

    2013-05-01

    The porous systems of reservoir rocks present a complex geometry, involving aspects of shape of pores (morphology) and connectivity between the pores (topology). The macroscopic physical properties of these materials are strongly dependent of their microstructures. Based on these aspects, the present study has as main objective the characterization of the porous system geometry and computational determination of petrophysics properties of carbonate reservoir rocks through the X-ray microtomography methodology. Samples were microtomographed with the microtomographs Skyscan model 1172, installed at the PETROBRAS Research and Development Center (CENPES), Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil and model 1173, installed at Sedimentary Geology Laboratory (LAGESD) in the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). Two samples of carbonates were measured, Travertine and Dolomite, with spatial resolutions of 7 μm and 9.8 μm and 1.3 μm, 7 μm and 17 μm, respectively for the travertine and dolomite. With the data collected in the acquisitions, 900 transversal sections were reconstructed for each one of the referred resolutions. For the sample of dolomite, the average porosity found was 21.64%, 20.92% and 15.97% for resolutions of 1.3 μm, 7 μm and 17 μm, respectively. For the sample of travertine, the average porosity was 7.80 % and 7.52 % for resolutions of 7 μm and 9.8 μm, respectively. For the sample of dolomite, the pore size distribution showed that 50 % of the porous phase has pores with radius up to 37.6 μm, 84.6 μm and 84.4 μm, for the spatial resolutions of 1.3 μm, 7 μm and 17 μm, respectively. For the sample of travertine, 50 % of the pores have radius up to 148.1 μm and 158.1 μm, for the spatial resolutions of 7 μm and 9.8 μm.

  19. Non-linear behaviour of electrical parameters in porous, water-saturated rocks: a model to predict pore size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallbauer-Zadorozhnaya, Valeriya; Santarato, Giovanni; Abu Zeid, Nasser

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, two separate but related goals are tackled. The first one is to demonstrate that in some saturated rock textures the non-linear behaviour of induced polarization (IP) and the violation of Ohm's law not only are real phenomena, but they can also be satisfactorily predicted by a suitable physical-mathematical model, which is our second goal. This model is based on Fick's second law. As the model links the specific dependence of resistivity and chargeability of a laboratory sample to the injected current and this in turn to its pore size distribution, it is able to predict pore size distribution from laboratory measurements, in good agreement with mercury injection capillary pressure test results. This fact opens up the possibility for hydrogeophysical applications on a macro scale. Mathematical modelling shows that the chargeability acquired in the field under normal conditions, that is at low current, will always be very small and approximately proportional to the applied current. A suitable field test site for demonstrating the possible reliance of both resistivity and chargeability on current was selected and a specific measuring strategy was established. Two data sets were acquired using different injected current strengths, while keeping the charging time constant. Observed variations of resistivity and chargeability are in agreement with those predicted by the mathematical model. These field test data should however be considered preliminary. If confirmed by further evidence, these facts may lead to changing the procedure of acquiring field measurements in future, and perhaps may encourage the design and building of a new specific geo-resistivity meter. This paper also shows that the well-known Marshall and Madden's equations based on Fick's law cannot be solved without specific boundary conditions.

  20. Pore size distribution of soil near saturation as affected by soil type, land use, and soil amendments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage and flow of water in soil voids, which are related to the size and geometry of the voids and flow rate are usually controlled by the void of the smallest size. Another reason for the complexity of water flow in soils is the intricate nature and change of the soil pores due to the modificatio...

  1. Effect of rock composition and texture on pore size distributions in shales: Applications in low field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidian, Milad

    There are various methods to assess the pore size distribution (PSD) of porous materials; amongst all, NMR is the only technique that can be utilized for subsurface applications. The key parameter to transform NMR time domain response to PSD size domain data is surface relaxivity. The common practice is to consider a constant surface relaxivity throughout a well, formation or rock type regardless of the variations in rock compositions; this results in inaccurate PSD estimation using NMR log data. In this thesis I established a methodology to calculate the surface relaxivity in shales considering the rock composition and texture. I present the steps to achieve this goal in three steps: (a) Understanding the challenges of NMR acquisition, analysis and interpretation in shales, (b) Measuring the porosity, PSD and surface area and providing a practice to check the reliability of these measurements in shales, (c) Developing a methodology to calculate the surface relaxivity honoring the variations paramagnetic mineral content, susceptibility, distribution and texture. Application of NMR in unconventional rocks requires adjustment of NMR data acquisition and analysis to the unique properties of these rocks such as high level of heterogeneity, complex pore structure, fine grains, and presence of nano-scale pores. Identifying these challenges improves our understanding of NMR response in shales and increases the quality of the acquired and analyzed data. Calculation of surface relaxivity, as a measure of how fluids and rock surfaces react, requires reliable measurement of different petrophysical properties of the rock such as porosity, total specific surface area, and PSD using other techniques. I studied the reliability of different techniques to measure these petrophysical properties for shales by performing a thorough comparative study of porosity and PSD for different shale formations. The result of my study showed that clay type and content, total organic carbon (TOC

  2. Nonlinear Effect of Moisture Content on Effective Thermal Conductivity of Building Materials with Different Pore Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanfeng; Ma, Chao; Wang, Dengjia; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Jiaping

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the quantitative relationship between the effective thermal conductivity and the moisture content of a material is required to accurately calculate the envelope heat and mass transfer and, subsequently, the building energy consumption. We experimentally analyzed the pore size distributions and porosities of common building materials and the influence of the moisture content on the effective thermal conductivity of building materials. We determined the quantitative relationship between the effective thermal conductivity and moisture content of building materials. The results showed that a larger porosity led to a more significant effect of the moisture content on the effective thermal conductivity. When the volumetric moisture content reached 10 %, the thermal conductivities of foam concrete and aerated concrete increased by approximately 200 % and 100 %, respectively. The effective thermal conductivity increased rapidly in the low moisture content range and increased slowly in the high moisture content range. The effective thermal conductivity is related to the moisture content of the materials through an approximate power function. As the moisture content in the walls of a new building stabilizes, the effective thermal conductivity of normal concrete varies only slightly, whereas that of aerated concrete varies more significantly. The effective thermal conductivity of the material is proportional to the relative humidity of the environment. This trend is most noticeable when the wall material is aerated concrete.

  3. Ovariectomized rats' femur treated with fibrates and statins. Assessment of pore-size distribution by ¹H-NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Şipoş, Remus Sebastian; Fechete, Radu; Chelcea, Ramona Ioana; Moldovan, Dumitriţa; Pap, Zsuzsánna; Pávai, Zoltán; Demco, Dan Eugen

    2015-01-01

    The effects of two wonder drugs, simvastatins and fenofibrates on the proximal part of the femoris of a series of ovariectomized and non-ovariectomized Wistar albino rats was estimated qualitatively and semi-quantitatively by the modern method of 1D 1H-NMR T2-distribution. The 72 rats subjected to this study were divided in six groups and were sacrificed at two, four, six and eight weeks after ovariectomy and the proximal part of femoris was harvested. The CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) echoes train curves were measured for the bones fully saturated with water during two months after two months of natural drying. These decays were analyzed by Laplace inversion and an average of normalized T2-distributions was considered for all rat's groups. The 1D averaged T2-distributions present four peaks, which were associated with protons in four major environments, from which the free water protons are used as spy molecules to explore the boundaries of cavities. In the approximation of spherical pores, the averaged T2-distributions were transformed in distributions of pores diameters. These were found in the range from 2 μm up to 2 mm. The relative amplitudes, widths and position of deconvoluted distributions of small, medium and large cavities are used for a qualitatively analysis of the effect of our lipid-lowering drugs. For a semi-quantitatively analysis, we chose the diameter d of proximal part of femoris' trabecular cavities. We show that the positive or negative effects of treatments with simvastatins and fenofibrates are strongly dependent on the duration of treatment. Moreover, the treatment of healthy bone is generally counter-indicated.

  4. Pore size engineering applied to starved electrochemical cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbey, K. M.; Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    To maximize performance in starved, multiplate cells, the cell design should rely on techniques which widen the volume tolerance characteristics. These involve engineering capillary pressure differences between the components of an electrochemical cell and using these forces to promote redistribution of electrolyte to the desired optimum values. This can be implemented in practice by prescribing pore size distributions for porous back-up plates, reservoirs, and electrodes. In addition, electrolyte volume management can be controlled by incorporating different pore size distributions into the separator. In a nickel/hydrogen cell, the separator must contain pores similar in size to the small pores of both the nickel and hydrogen electrodes in order to maintain an optimum conductive path for the electrolyte. The pore size distributions of all components should overlap in such a way as to prevent drying of the separator and/or flooding of the hydrogen electrode.

  5. Effects of coarse grain size distribution and fine particle content on pore fluid pressure and shear behavior in experimental debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitna, Roland; Palucis, Marisa C.; Yohannes, Bereket; Hill, Kimberly M.; Dietrich, William E.

    2016-02-01

    Debris flows are typically a saturated mixture of poorly sorted particles and interstitial fluid, whose density and flow properties depend strongly on the presence of suspended fine sediment. Recent research suggests that grain size distribution (GSD) influences excess pore pressures (i.e., pressure in excess of predicted hydrostatic pressure), which in turn plays a governing role in debris flow behaviors. We report a series of controlled laboratory experiments in a 4 m diameter vertically rotating drum where the coarse particle size distribution and the content of fine particles were varied independently. We measured basal pore fluid pressures, pore fluid pressure profiles (using novel sensor probes), velocity profiles, and longitudinal profiles of the flow height. Excess pore fluid pressure was significant for mixtures with high fines fraction. Such flows exhibited lower values for their bulk flow resistance (as measured by surface slope of the flow), had damped fluctuations of normalized fluid pressure and normal stress, and had velocity profiles where the shear was concentrated at the base of the flow. These effects were most pronounced in flows with a wide coarse GSD distribution. Sustained excess fluid pressure occurred during flow and after cessation of motion. Various mechanisms may cause dilation and contraction of the flows, and we propose that the sustained excess fluid pressures during flow and once the flow has stopped may arise from hindered particle settling and yield strength of the fluid, resulting in transfer of particle weight to the fluid. Thus, debris flow behavior may be strongly influenced by sustained excess fluid pressures controlled by particle settling rates.

  6. The role of fine material and grain size distribution on excess pore pressure dissipation and particle support mechanisms in granular deposits based in large-scale physical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palucis, M. C.; Kaitna, R.; Tewoldebrhan, B.; Hill, K. M.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    The dominant mechanisms behind sustained mobilization in granular debris flows are poorly understood, and experiments are needed to determine the conditions under which the fluid can fully support the coarse fraction. However, field-scale studies are difficult to instrument and constrain and laboratory studies suffer from scaling issues. A 4-m rotating drum located at UC Berkeley's Richmond Field Station allowed us to perform reproducible experiments with materials similar to those in the field to explore mechanisms relevant to slow pore fluid pressure dissipation. Specifically, we performed a series of experiments to assess the role of fines and grain size distribution on the rate of pore fluid pressure dissipation upon deposition of a granular mass. For each experiment we kept the total mass of the gravel particles constant and varied the amount of fines (from no fines to amounts found in an actual debris flow deposit) and the gravel particle size distribution (from a single grain size to a range found in natural flows). We first rotated each mixture in the drum, during which we monitored fluid pressures at the base of the flows (near the wall of the drum and at the center). Then we stopped the drum and continued to monitor the fluid pressures. Immediately upon stopping, the pore fluid pressure was nearly hydrostatic for the gravel-water flows, and any elevated pore pressure quickly dissipated. On the other hand, the mixtures with fines contents close to those found in actual debris flows had elevated pore pressures indicating they were almost fully liquefied. Furthermore, the rate of pore pressure dissipation was an order of magnitude slower than when no fines were present; the grain size distribution of the coarse fraction did not strongly influence the dissipation rates in either case. We also placed a cobble upon a fines-rich mixture after cessation of motion above the center pressure sensor, and observed that the pore fluid pressure rose instantly, bearing

  7. Comparative DNA isolation behaviours of silica and polymer based sorbents in batch fashion: monodisperse silica microspheres with bimodal pore size distribution as a new sorbent for DNA isolation.

    PubMed

    Günal, Gülçin; Kip, Çiğdem; Eda Öğüt, S; İlhan, Hasan; Kibar, Güneş; Tuncel, Ali

    2017-03-22

    Monodisperse silica microspheres with bimodal pore-size distribution were proposed as a high performance sorbent for DNA isolation in batch fashion under equilibrium conditions. The proposed sorbent including both macroporous and mesoporous compartments was synthesized 5.1 μm in-size, by a "staged shape templated hydrolysis and condensation method". Hydrophilic polymer based sorbents were also obtained in the form of monodisperse-macroporous microspheres ca 5.5 μm in size, with different functionalities, by a developed "multi-stage microsuspension copolymerization" technique. The batch DNA isolation performance of proposed material was comparatively investigated using polymer based sorbents with similar morphologies. Among all sorbents tried, the best DNA isolation performance was achieved with the monodisperse silica microspheres with bimodal pore size distribution. The collocation of interconnected mesoporous and macroporous compartments within the monodisperse silica microspheres provided a high surface area and reduced the intraparticular mass transfer resistance and made easier both the adsorption and desorption of DNA. Among the polymer based sorbents, higher DNA isolation yields were achieved with the monodisperse-macroporous polymer microspheres carrying trimethoxysilyl and quaternary ammonium functionalities. However, batch DNA isolation performances of polymer based sorbents were significantly lower with respect to the silica microspheres.

  8. Metal oxide porous ceramic membranes with small pore sizes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Xu, Qunyin

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of metal oxide ceramic membranes of very small pore size. The process is particularly useful in the creation of titanium and other transition metal oxide membranes. The method utilizes a sol-gel process in which the rate of particle formation is controlled by substituting a relatively large alcohol in the metal alkoxide and by limiting the available water. Stable, transparent metal oxide ceramic membranes are created having a narrow distribution of pore size, with the pore diameter being manipulable in the range of 5 to 40 Angstroms.

  9. Metal oxide porous ceramic membranes with small pore sizes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Xu, Qunyin

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of metal oxide ceramic membranes of very small pore size. The process is particularly useful in the creation of titanium and other transition metal oxide membranes. The method utilizes a sol-gel process in which the rate of particle formation is controlled by substituting a relatively large alcohol in the metal alkoxide and by limiting the available water. Stable, transparent metal oxide ceramic membranes are created having a narrow distribution of pore size, with the pore diameter being manipulable in the range of 5 to 40 Angstroms.

  10. Effect of seawater salinity on pore-size distribution on a poly(styrene)-based HP20 resin and its adsorption of diarrhetic shellfish toxins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin; Sun, Geng; Qiu, Jiangbing; Ma, Qimin; Hess, Philipp; Li, Aifeng

    2014-12-19

    In the present study, okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX1) were spiked into artificial seawater at low, medium and high estuarine salinities (9‰, 13.5‰ and 27‰). Passive samplers (HP20 resin) used for solid phase adsorption toxin tracking (SPATT) technology were exposed in these seawaters for 12-h periods. Adsorption curves well fitted a pseudo-secondary kinetics model. The highest initial sorption rates of both toxins occurred in the seawater of medium salinity, followed by seawater of low and high estuarine salinity. Pore volumes of micropores (<2 nm) and small mesopores (2 nmsize) in seawaters of high and low salinity. More toxin or other matrix agglomerates were displayed on the surface of resin deployed in the seawater of medium salinity. Taking into consideration the pore-size distribution and surface images, it appears that intra-particle diffusion governs toxin adsorption in seawater at high salinity while film diffusion mainly controls the adsorption process in seawater at medium salinity. This is the first study to confirm that molecules of OA and DTX1 are able to enter into micropores (<2nm) and small mesopores (2-10nm) of HP20 resin in estuarine seawater with high salinity (∼27‰).

  11. Tailoring the pore size of hypercrosslinked polymer foams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Mitchell, M.A.; Apen, P.G.

    1996-12-31

    Organic analogues to inorganic zeolites would be a significant step forward in engineered porous materials and would provide advantages in range, selectivity, tailorability and processing. Rigid molecular foams or organic zeolites would not be crystalline materials and could be tailored over a broader range of pore sizes and volumes. A novel process for preparing hypercrosslinked polymeric foams has been developed via a Friedel-Crafts polycondensation reaction. A series of rigid hypercrosslinked foams have been prepared using simple rigid polyaromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, biphenyl, m-terphenyl, diphenylmethane, and polystyrene, with p-dichloroxylene (DCX) or divinylbenzene (DVB) as the crosslinking agent. Transparent gels are formed suggesting a very small pore size. After drying the foams are robust and rigid. Densities of the resulting foams can range from 0.15 g/cc to 0.75 g/cc. Nitrogen adsorption studies have shown that by judiciously selecting monomers and crosslinking agent along with the level of crosslinking and the cure time of the resulting gel, the pore size, pore size distribution, and the total surface area of the foam can be tailored. Surface areas range from 160 to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g with pore sizes ranging from 6{angstrom} to 2,000{angstrom}. Further evidence of the uniformity of the foams and their pore sizes has been confirmed by high resolution TEM.

  12. Pore size of agarose gels by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, N; Maaloum, M; Tinland, B

    1997-01-01

    The pore size of agarose gel in water at different concentrations was directly measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experiment was specially designed to work under aqueous conditions and allows direct observation of the "unperturbed" gel without invasive treatment. The pore size a as a function of gel concentration C shows a power law dependence a approximately C-gamma, where gamma lies between the prediction of the Ogston model for a random array of straight chains, 0.5, and the value predicted by De Gennes for a network of flexible chains, 0.75. We confirm that gels present a wide pore size distribution and show that it narrows as the concentration increases.

  13. Experimental Study of Porosity Changes in Shale Caprocks Exposed to CO2-Saturated Brines I: Evolution of Mineralogy, Pore Connectivity, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    SciTech Connect

    Mouzakis, Katherine M.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Rother, Gernot; Bañuelos, José Leobardo; Wang, Xiuyu; Kaszuba, John P.; Heath, Jason E.; Miller, Quin R. S.; Alvarado, Vladimir; McCray, John E.

    2016-07-18

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage, one proposed method of reducing anthropogenic emissions of CO2, relies on low permeability formations, such as shales, above injection formations to prevent upward migration of the injected CO2. Porosity in caprocks evaluated for sealing capacity before injection can be altered by geochemical reactions induced by dissolution of injected CO2 into pore fluids, impacting long-term sealing capacity. Therefore, long-term performance of CO2 sequestration sites may be dependent on both initial distribution and connectivity of pores in caprocks, and on changes induced by geochemical reaction after injection of CO2, which are currently poorly understood. This paper presents results from an experimental study of changes to caprock porosity and pore network geometry in two caprock formations under conditions relevant to CO2 sequestration. Pore connectivity and total porosity increased in the Gothic Shale; while total porosity increased but pore connectivity decreased in the Marine Tuscaloosa. Gothic Shale is a carbonate mudstone that contains volumetrically more carbonate minerals than Marine Tuscaloosa. Carbonate minerals dissolved to a greater extent than silicate minerals in Gothic Shale under high CO2 conditions, leading to increased porosity at length scales <~200 nm that contributed to increased pore connectivity. In contrast, silicate minerals dissolved to a greater extent than carbonate minerals in Marine Tuscaloosa leading to increased porosity at all length scales, and specifically an increase in the number of pores >~1 μm. Mineral reactions also contributed to a decrease in pore connectivity, possibly as a result of precipitation in pore throats or hydration of the high percentage of clays. Finally, this study highlights the role that mineralogy of the caprock can play in geochemical response to CO2 injection and resulting changes in

  14. Differences in soluble organic carbon chemistry in pore waters sampled from different pore size domains

    DOE PAGES

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Smith, A. P.; Tfaily, Malak; ...

    2017-01-11

    Spatial isolation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in different sized pores may be a mechanism by which otherwise labile carbon (C) could be protected in soils. When soil water content increases, the hydrologic connectivity of soil pores also increases, allowing greater transport of SOC and other resources from protected locations, to microbially colonized locations more favorable to decomposition. The heterogeneous distribution of specialized decomposers, C, and other resources throughout the soil indicates that the metabolism or persistence of soil C compounds is highly dependent on short-distance transport processes. The objective of this research was to characterize the complexity of Cmore » in pore waters held at weak and strong water tensions (effectively soil solution held behind coarse- and fine-pore throats, respectively) and evaluate the microbial decomposability of these pore waters. We saturated intact soil cores and extracted pore waters with increasing suction pressures to sequentially sample pore waters from increasingly fine pore domains. Ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry of the SOC was used to profile the major biochemical classes (i.e., lipids, proteins, lignin, carbohydrates, and condensed aromatics) of compounds present in the pore waters; some of these samples were then used as substrates for growth of Cellvibrio japonicus (DSMZ 16018), Streptomyces cellulosae (ATCC® 25439™), and Trichoderma reseei (QM6a) in 7 day incubations. The soluble C in finer pores was more complex than the soluble C in coarser pores, and the incubations revealed that the more complex C in these fine pores is not recalcitrant. The decomposition of this complex C led to greater losses of C through respiration than the simpler C from coarser pore waters. Our research suggests that soils that experience repeated cycles of drying and wetting may be accompanied by repeated cycles of increased CO2 fluxes that are driven by i) the transport of C from protected pools into

  15. Nanoporous carbide-derived carbon with tunable pore size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogotsi, Yury; Nikitin, Alexei; Ye, Haihui; Zhou, Wei; Fischer, John E.; Yi, Bo; Foley, Henry C.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2003-09-01

    Porous solids are of great technological importance due to their ability to interact with gases and liquids not only at the surface, but throughout their bulk. Although large pores can be produced and well controlled in a variety of materials, nanopores in the range of 2 nm and below (micropores, according to IUPAC classification) are usually achieved only in carbons or zeolites. To date, major efforts in the field of porous materials have been directed towards control of the size, shape and uniformity of the pores. Here we demonstrate that porosity of carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) can be tuned with subångström accuracy in a wide range by controlling the chlorination temperature. CDC produced from Ti3SiC2 has a narrower pore-size distribution than single-wall carbon nanotubes or activated carbons; its pore-size distribution is comparable to that of zeolites. CDCs are produced at temperatures from 200-1,200 °C as a powder, a coating, a membrane or parts with near-final shapes, with or without mesopores. They can find applications in molecular sieves, gas storage, catalysts, adsorbents, battery electrodes, supercapacitors, water/air filters and medical devices.

  16. Nanoporous carbide-derived carbon with tunable pore size.

    PubMed

    Gogotsi, Yury; Nikitin, Alexei; Ye, Haihui; Zhou, Wei; Fischer, John E; Yi, Bo; Foley, Henry C; Barsoum, Michel W

    2003-09-01

    Porous solids are of great technological importance due to their ability to interact with gases and liquids not only at the surface, but throughout their bulk. Although large pores can be produced and well controlled in a variety of materials, nanopores in the range of 2 nm and below (micropores, according to IUPAC classification) are usually achieved only in carbons or zeolites. To date, major efforts in the field of porous materials have been directed towards control of the size, shape and uniformity of the pores. Here we demonstrate that porosity of carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) can be tuned with subångström accuracy in a wide range by controlling the chlorination temperature. CDC produced from Ti3SiC2 has a narrower pore-size distribution than single-wall carbon nanotubes or activated carbons; its pore-size distribution is comparable to that of zeolites. CDCs are produced at temperatures from 200-1,200 degrees C as a powder, a coating, a membrane or parts with near-final shapes, with or without mesopores. They can find applications in molecular sieves, gas storage, catalysts, adsorbents, battery electrodes, supercapacitors, water/air filters and medical devices.

  17. Relation between the ion size and pore size for an electric double-layer capacitor.

    PubMed

    Largeot, Celine; Portet, Cristelle; Chmiola, John; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Gogotsi, Yury; Simon, Patrice

    2008-03-05

    The research on electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLC), also known as supercapacitors or ultracapacitors, is quickly expanding because their power delivery performance fills the gap between dielectric capacitors and traditional batteries. However, many fundamental questions, such as the relations between the pore size of carbon electrodes, ion size of the electrolyte, and the capacitance have not yet been fully answered. We show that the pore size leading to the maximum double-layer capacitance of a TiC-derived carbon electrode in a solvent-free ethyl-methylimmidazolium-bis(trifluoro-methane-sulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI) ionic liquid is roughly equal to the ion size (approximately 0.7 nm). The capacitance values of TiC-CDC produced at 500 degrees C are more than 160 F/g and 85 F/cm(3) at 60 degrees C, while standard activated carbons with larger pores and a broader pore size distribution present capacitance values lower than 100 F/g and 50 F/cm(3) in ionic liquids. A significant drop in capacitance has been observed in pores that were larger or smaller than the ion size by just an angstrom, suggesting that the pore size must be tuned with sub-angstrom accuracy when selecting a carbon/ion couple. This work suggests a general approach to EDLC design leading to the maximum energy density, which has been now proved for both solvated organic salts and solvent-free liquid electrolytes.

  18. Study on pore characteristics and microstructure of sandstones with different grain sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huigui; Li, Huamin; Gao, Baobin; Wang, Wen; Liu, Chuang

    2017-01-01

    The grain sizes have a pronounced influence on the pore characteristics and microstructure of sandstone. This work examined the pore structure and characteristics of three kinds of sandstones with different grain sizes using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods and analyzed their grain size distributions, pore size distributions, T2-distributions, and porosity variations. The experimental results showed that sandstones with different grain sizes have significant differences in the microstructures grain size distribution, pore size distribution, T2-distribution, and porosity variation. The results show that coarse, medium and fine sandstones have two peaks in T2-distributions, mean grain size of 398.5, 145.1 and 25.1 μm, respectively, mean pore size of 46.3, 25.9, and 8.4 μm, respectively, porosity of 7.52%, 5.88% and 1.55%, respectively, indicating that both coarse and medium sandstones contain big pores, while fine sandstone contains small pores. This study is of significance for understanding of water migration characteristics in aquifers and gas in coal seams after the working face exploitation.

  19. Preparation of mesoporous cadmium sulfide nanoparticles with moderate pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Han Zhaohui Zhu, Huaiyong; Shi, Jeffrey; Parkinson, Gordon; Lu, G.Q.

    2007-03-15

    The preparation of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles that have a moderate pore size is reported. This preparation method involves a hydrothermal process that produces a precursor mixture and a following acid treatment of the precursor to get the porous material. The majority of the particles have a pore size close to 20nm, which complements and fills in the gap between the existing cadmium sulfide materials, which usually have a pore size either less than 10nm or are well above 100nm.

  20. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakage assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.

  1. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; ...

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakagemore » assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.« less

  2. Distributed pore model for bio-molecule chromatography.

    PubMed

    Coquebert de Neuville, Bertrand; Tarafder, Abhijit; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-07-12

    One of the main peculiarities in protein chromatography is that the adsorbing proteins and the adsorbent pores have comparable sizes. This has the consequence that the pore accessibility depends not only on the solute size but also on the loading conditions of the adsorbent because protein adsorption significantly reduces the size of the pores. A model that accounts for the pore size distribution of the stationary phase and for the pore shrinkage due to protein adsorption has been developed to describe mass transport and adsorption in the porous particles. This model has been shown to be equivalent to the general rate model (GRM) in the case of processes under highly diluted conditions with little adsorption. This implies that the model parameters determination follows the same procedure as for the classical GRM. The new pore model has been applied and compared to the GRM for the simulation of lysozyme breakthrough experiments and for the prediction of 5% dynamic binding capacity values solely based on static capacity measurements.

  3. Effect of pore size on the performance of immobilised enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Lauren; Ulijn, Rein V; Halling, Peter J

    2013-12-07

    Porous materials are widely employed as supports in the immobilisation of enzymes. Traditionally macroporous materials with pore diameters >50 nm were believed to be the most suitable support material, ensuring no spatial restrictions upon enzyme molecules entering such large pores. In recent years however, there has been growing emphasis in the use of mesoporous supports with pore diameters ranging between 2 and 50 nm. It is thought this smaller pore range may offer enhanced conformational stability to immobilised enzymes while not being so small as to restrict enzyme access. Despite their increasing popularity, many argue that mesoporous materials have not yet proven superior to traditional macroporous supports for enzyme immobilisation. Through the design and application of a unique confidence rating system we were able to accurately compare data and establish trends between pore characteristics and protein loading. By analysing published data (182 experiments in total) and extracting pore characteristics and protein loading values, we have described three categories of pore diameters in which correlations between pore characteristics and protein loading are noted. With pore diameters less than 10 nm we see a general decrease in protein loading as the enzymes find physical restrictions in accessing the high surface offered in this pore diameter range. At pore sizes greater than 100 nm, protein loading generally decreases due to a concomitant reduction in available surface area. In the pore range of 10-100 nm there it is expected to see a decrease in protein loading level with increasing pore diameter. In fact protein loading in this range remains largely constant, suggesting some degree of protein-protein interaction blocking pores and restricting access to the increasing surface area available at decreasing pore diameters. No trends were established between pore characteristics and retention of activity.

  4. Study into the correlation of dominant pore throat size and SIP relaxation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschwitz, Sabine; Prinz, Carsten; Zimathies, Annett

    2016-12-01

    There is currently a debate within the SIP community about the characteristic textural length scale controlling relaxation time of consolidated porous media. One idea is that the relaxation time is dominated by the pore throat size distribution or more specifically the modal pore throat size as determined in mercury intrusion capillary pressure tests. Recently new studies on inverting pore size distributions from SIP data were published implying that the relaxation mechanisms and controlling length scale are well understood. In contrast new analytical model studies based on the Marshall-Madden membrane polarization theory suggested that two relaxation processes might compete: the one along the short narrow pore (the throat) with one across the wider pore in case the narrow pores become relatively long. This paper presents a first systematically focused study into the relationship of pore throat sizes and SIP relaxation times. The generality of predicted trends is investigated across a wide range of materials differing considerably in chemical composition, specific surface and pore space characteristics. Three different groups of relaxation behaviors can be clearly distinguished. The different behaviors are related to clay content and type, carbonate content, size of the grains and the wide pores in the samples.

  5. Immobilization of nanobeads on a surface to control the size, shape and distribution of pores in electrochemically generated sol-gel films

    PubMed Central

    Ciabocco, Michela; Berrettoni, Mario; Zamponi, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemically assisted deposition of an ormosil film at a potential where hydrogen ion is generated as the catalyst yields insulating films on electrodes. When the base electrode is modified with 20-nm poly(styrene sulfonate), PSS, beads bound to the surface with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and using (CH3)3SiOCH3 as the precursor, the resulting film of organically modified silica (ormosil) has cylindrical channels that reflect both the diameter of the PSS and the distribution of the APTES-PSS on the electrode. At an electrode modified by a 20-min immersion in 0.5 mmol dm-3 APTES followed by a 30-s immersion in PSS, a 20-min electrolysis at 1.5 V in acidified (CH3)3SiOCH3 resulted in an ormosil film with 20-nm pores separated by 100 nm. Cyclic voltammetry of Ru(CN)64- at scan rates above 5 mVs-1 yielded currents controlled primarily by linear diffusion. Below 5 mVs-1, convection rather than the expected factor, radial diffusion, apparently limited the current. PMID:26167128

  6. Size of diffusion pore of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, J; Nakae, T

    1988-01-01

    The diffusion pore of the outer membrane of Alcaligenes faecalis was shown to be substantially smaller than the Escherichia coli porin pore. In experiments with intact cells, pentoses and hexoses penetrated into the NaCl-expanded periplasm, whereas saccharides of Mr greater than 342 did not. Cells treated with 0.5 M saccharides of Mr greater than 342 weighed 33 to 38% less than cells treated with isotonic solution, suggesting that these saccharides do not permeate through the outer membrane. The diffusion rates of various solutes through the liposome membranes reconstituted from the Mr-43,000 outer membrane protein showed the following characteristics. (i) The relative diffusion rates of pentoses, hexoses, and methylhexoses appeared to be about 1.0, 0.6, and negligibly small, respectively. (ii) The diffusion rate of glucose appeared to be about 1/10th that with the E. coli B porin. (iii) The diffusion rate of gluconic acid was five to seven times higher than that of glucose. (iv) The diffusion rates of beta-lactam antibiotics appeared to be 40 to less than 10% of those with the E. coli B porin. Images PMID:2835003

  7. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, David; Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías; Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K(+) channels discriminate K(+) over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K(+) channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K(+) channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K(+) channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance.

  8. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance

    PubMed Central

    Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K+ channels discriminate K+ over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K+ channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K+ channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K+ channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance. PMID:27619418

  9. Fabrication of polymeric scaffolds with a controlled distribution of pores.

    PubMed

    Capes, J S; Ando, H Y; Cameron, R E

    2005-12-01

    The design of tissue engineering scaffolds must take into account many factors including successful vascularisation and the growth of cells. Research has looked at refining scaffold architecture to promote more directed growth of tissues through well-defined anisotropy in the pore structure. In many cases it is also desirable to incorporate therapeutic ingredients, such as growth factors, into the scaffold so that their release occurs as the scaffold degrades. Therefore, scaffold fabrication techniques must be found to precisely control, not only the overall porosity of scaffolds, but also the pore size, shape and spatial distribution. This work describes the use of a regularly shaped porogen, sugar spheres, to manufacture polymeric scaffolds. Results show that pre-assembling the spheres created scaffolds with a constant porosity of 60%, but with varying pores sizes from 200-800 microm, leading to a variation in the surface area and likely degradation rate of the scaffolds. Employing different polymer impregnation techniques tailored the number of pores present with a diameter of less than 100 microm to suit different functions, and altering the packing structure of the sugar spheres created scaffolds with novel layered porosity. Replacing sugar spheres with sugar strands formed scaffolds with pores aligned in one direction.

  10. Porous Boron Nitride with Tunable Pore Size.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jun; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-01-16

    On the basis of a global structural search and first-principles calculations, we predict two types of porous boron-nitride (BN) networks that can be built up with zigzag BN nanoribbons (BNNRs). The BNNRs are either directly connected with puckered B (N) atoms at the edge (type I) or connected with sp(3)-bonded BN chains (type II). Besides mechanical stability, these materials are predicted to be thermally stable at 1000 K. The porous BN materials entail large surface areas, ranging from 2800 to 4800 m(2)/g. In particular, type-II BN material with relatively large pores is highly favorable for hydrogen storage because the computed hydrogen adsorption energy (-0.18 eV) is very close to the optimal adsorption energy (-0.15 eV) suggested for reversible hydrogen storage at room temperature. Moreover, the type-II materials are semiconductors with width-dependent direct bandgaps, rendering the type-II BN materials promising not only for hydrogen storage but also for optoelectronic and photonic applications.

  11. EFFECT OF PORE SIZE ON TRAPPING ZINC VAPORS

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2010-12-17

    A series of experiments were conducted to determine the effect of pore size on pumping efficiency and zinc vapor trapping efficiency. A simple pumping efficiency test was conducted for all five pore diameters where it was observed that evacuation times were adversely affected by reducing the pore size below 5 {micro}m. Common test conditions for the zinc trapping efficiency experiments were used. These conditions resulted in some variability, to ascribe different efficiencies to the filter media. However, the data suggest that there is no significant difference in trapping efficiency for filter media with pores from 0.2 to 20 {micro}m with a thickness of 0.065-inch. Consequently, the 20 {micro}m pore filter media that is currently used at SRS is a suitable filter material for to utilize for future extractions. There is evidence that smaller pore filter will adversely affect the pumping times for the TEF and little evidence to suggest that a smaller pore diameters have significant impact on the trapping efficiency.

  12. Method of making metal oxide ceramic membranes with small pore sizes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Xu, Qunyin

    1992-01-01

    A method for the production of metal oxide ceramic membranes is composed of very small pore size. The process is particularly useful in the creation of titanium and other transition metal oxide membranes. The method utilizes a sol-gel process in which the rate of particle formation is controlled by substituting a relatively large alcohol in the metal alkoxide and by limiting the available water. Stable, transparent metal oxide ceramic membranes are created having a narrow distribution of pore size, with the pore diameter being manipulable in the range of 5 to 40 Angstroms.

  13. Distributed Pore Chemistry in Porous Organic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclosed. The sub-strate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphorylcholine groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic region, and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  14. Distributed Pore Chemistry in Porous Organic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclosed. The substrate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphorylcholine groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge. wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  15. Pore-throat sizes in sandstones, tight sandstones, and shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    2009-01-01

    Pore-throat sizes in silidclastic rocks form a continuum from the submillimeter to the nanometer scale. That continuum is documented in this article using previously published data on the pore and pore-throat sizes of conventional reservoir rocks, tight-gas sandstones, and shales. For measures of central tendency (mean, mode, median), pore-throat sizes (diameters) are generally greater than 2 μm in conventional reservoir rocks, range from about 2 to 0.03 μm in tight-gas sandstones, and range from 0.1 to 0.005 μm in shales. Hydrocarbon molecules, asphaltenes, ring structures, paraffins, and methane, form another continuum, ranging from 100 Å (0.01 μm for asphaltenes to 3.8 A (0.00038 μm) for methane. The pore-throat size continuum provides a useful perspective for considering (1) the emplacement of petroleum in consolidated siliciclastics and (2) fluid flow through fine-grained source rocks now being exploited as reservoirs.

  16. Neutrons measure phase behavior in pores at Angstrom size

    SciTech Connect

    Bardoel, Agatha A; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have measured the phase behavior of green house gases in pores at the Angstrom-level, using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor. Yuri Melnichenko, an instrument scientist on the General Purpose Small Angle Neutron Scattering (GP SANS) Diffractometer at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor, his postdoctoral associate Lilin He and collaborators Nidia Gallego and Cristian Contescu from the Material Sciences Division (ORNL) were engaged in the work. They were studying nanoporous carbons to assess their attractiveness as storage media for hydrogen, with a view to potential use for on-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications. Nanoporous carbons can also serve as electrode material for supercapacitors and batteries. The researchers successfully determined that the most efficiently condensing pore size in a carbon nanoporous material for hydrogen storage is less than one nanometer. In a paper recently published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the collaborators used small angle neutron scattering to study how hydrogen condenses in small pores at ambient temperature. They discovered that the surface-molecule interactions create internal pressures in pores that may exceed the external gas pressure by a factor of up to 50. 'This is an exciting result,' Melnichenko said, 'as you achieve extreme densification in pores 'for free', i.e. without spending any energy. These results can be used to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored to maximize hydrogen storage capacities.' Another important factor that defines the adsorption capacity of sub-nanometer pores is their shape. In order to get accurate structural information and maximize sorption capacity, it is important that pores are small and of approximately uniform size. In collaboration with Drexel University's Yury Gogotsi who supplied the samples, Melnichenko and his collaborators used the GP SANS

  17. Size effects of pore density and solute size on water osmosis through nanoporous membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kuiwen; Wu, Huiying

    2012-11-15

    Understanding the behavior of osmotic transport across nanoporous membranes at molecular level is critical to their design and applications, and it is also beneficial to the comprehension of the mechanism of biological transmembrane transport processes. Pore density is an important parameter for nanoporous membranes. To better understand the influence of pore density on osmotic transport, we have performed systematic molecular dynamics simulations on water osmosis across nanoporous membranes with different pore densities (i.e., number of pores per unit area of membrane). The simulation results reveal that significant size effects occur when the pore density is so high that the center-to-center distance between neighboring nanopores is comparable to the solute size. The size effects are independent of the pore diameter and solute concentration. A simple quantitative correlation between pore density, solute size, and osmotic flux has been established. The results are excellently consistent with the theoretical predictions. It is also shown that solute hydration plays an important role in real osmotic processes. Solute hydration strengthens the size effects of pore density on osmotic processes due to the enlarged effective solute size induced by hydration. The influence of pore density, solute size, and solute hydration on water osmosis through nanoporous membranes can be introduced to eliminate the deviations of real osmotic processes from ideal behavior.

  18. Flux theory for Poisson distributed pores with Gaussian permeability.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Dino G

    2016-01-01

    The mean of the solute flux through membrane pores depends on the random distribution and permeability of the pores. Mathematical models including such randomness factors make it possible to obtain statistical parameters for pore characterization. Here, assuming that pores follow a Poisson distribution in the lipid phase and that their permeabilities follow a Gaussian distribution, a mathematical model for solute dynamics is obtained by applying a general result from a previous work regarding any number of different kinds of randomly distributed pores. The new proposed theory is studied using experimental parameters obtained elsewhere, and a method for finding the mean single pore flux rate from liposome flux assays is suggested. This method is useful for pores without requiring studies by patch-clamp in single cells or single-channel recordings. However, it does not apply in the case of ion-selective channels, in which a more complex flux law combining the concentration and electrical gradient is required.

  19. Influence of the pore size of reversed phase materials on peptide purification processes.

    PubMed

    Gétaz, David; Dogan, Nihan; Forrer, Nicola; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2011-05-20

    The influence of the pore size of a chromatographic reversed phase material on the adsorption equilibria and diffusion of two industrially relevant peptides (i.e. a small synthetic peptide and insulin) has been studied using seven different reversed phase HPLC materials having pore sizes ranging from 90 Å to 300 Å. The stationary phase pore size distribution was obtained by inverse size exclusion measurement (iSEC). The effect of the pore size on the mass transfer properties of the materials was evaluated from Van Deemter experiments. It has been shown that the lumped mass transfer coefficient increases linearly with the average pore size. The Henry coefficient and the impurity selectivity were determined in diluted conditions. The saturation capacity of the main peptides was determined in overloaded conditions using the inverse method (i.e. peak fitting). It was shown that the adsorption equilibria of the peptides on the seven materials is well described by a surface-specific adsorption isotherm. Based on this a lumped kinetic model has been developed to model the elution profile of the two peptides in overloaded conditions and to simulate the purification of the peptide from its crude mixture. It has been found that the separation of insulin from its main impurity (i.e. desamido-insulin) was not affected by the pore size. On the other hand, in the case of the synthetic peptide, it was found that the adsorption of the most significant impurity decreases with the pore size. This decrease is probably due to an increase in silanol activity with decreasing pore size.

  20. Aromatization of Ethanol Over Desilicated ZSM-5 Zeolites: Effect of Pore Size in the Mesoporous Region.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jong Won; Hasan, Zubair; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Soon-Yong; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2016-05-01

    Mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolites were obtained from microporous ZSM-5 by desilication using aqueous NaOH solutions, and their catalytic activity in the aromatization of ethanol was investigated in order to understand the effects of pore size, in the mesoporous region, on the product distribution and stability of the catalysts. Mesopores generally enhanced the selectivities towards aromatics and stability for aromatization. Mesopores with a maximum pore diameter of around 13 nm were the most effective in the aromatization process (especially for benzene and toluene), suggesting that pore-diameter optimization is necessary for efficient catalysis such as aromatization.

  1. Pore distributions in nanocrystalline metals from small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, P.G.; Weertman, J.R.; Eastman, J.A.

    1998-07-24

    Recent upgrades in inert-gas condensation processing equipment have produced nanocrystalline metal samples with high densities and low-impurity levels. Typical Cu and Pd samples have densities {ge}98% of theoretical and oxygen and hydrogen impurity concentrations {le}0.5 at. %. Lower porosity and impurity levels may make it difficult to produce and maintain samples with the smallest nanocrystalline grain sizes. These improved samples were studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to determine the volume fraction and size distribution of pores. Excellent correlation was obtained between the total volume fraction of pores and the Archimedes density for Pd, signifying that most of the pores were relatively small and in the detectability range of SANS ({approx}1--100 nm). Nanocrystalline Cu is shown to exhibit a wider pore size distribution. For Pd, the average pore sizes were slightly smaller than the average grain size, while for Cu the pore size and grain size were about the same. Both materials exhibited a trend of increasing pore size with increasing grain size. In terms of processing prerequisites, the principal condition for the production of high-density nanocrystalline Cu is an exceptionally clean synthesis environment, while nanocrystalline Pd requires compaction at elevated temperatures. These differences are the result of Cu having both a lower melting point and a greater susceptibility to contamination by gaseous impurities such as oxygen.

  2. Anomalous or regular capacitance? The influence of pore size dispersity on double-layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäckel, N.; Rodner, M.; Schreiber, A.; Jeongwook, J.; Zeiger, M.; Aslan, M.; Weingarth, D.; Presser, V.

    2016-09-01

    The energy storage mechanism of electric double-layer capacitors is governed by ion electrosorption at the electrode surface. This process requires high surface area electrodes, typically highly porous carbons. In common organic electrolytes, bare ion sizes are below one nanometer but they are larger when we consider their solvation shell. In contrast, ionic liquid electrolytes are free of solvent molecules, but cation-anion coordination requires special consideration. By matching pore size and ion size, two seemingly conflicting views have emerged: either an increase in specific capacitance with smaller pore size or a constant capacitance contribution of all micro- and mesopores. In our work, we revisit this issue by using a comprehensive set of electrochemical data and a pore size incremental analysis to identify the influence of certain ranges in the pore size distribution to the ion electrosorption capacity. We see a difference in solvation of ions in organic electrolytes depending on the applied voltage and a cation-anion interaction of ionic liquids in nanometer sized pores.

  3. Effect of pore size and surface area of carbide derived carbons on specific capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmiola, J.; Yushin, G.; Dash, R.; Gogotsi, Y.

    This work presents a systematic study on how pore size and specific surface area (SSA) of carbon effect specific capacitance and frequency response behavior. Carbide derived carbons (CDC) produced by leaching metals from TiC and ZrC at temperatures from 600 to 1200 °C have highly tailorable microstructure and porosity, allowing them to serve as excellent model systems for porous carbons in general. BET SSA and average pore size increased with synthesis temperature and was 600-2000 m 2 g -1 and 0.7-1.85 nm, respectively. Maximum specific capacitance in 1 M H 2SO 4 was found to occur at an intermediate synthesis temperature, 800 °C, for both ZrC and TiC derived carbons and was 190 and 150 F g -1, respectively. Volumetric capacitance for TiC and ZrC derived carbons was maximum at 140 and 110 F cm -3. These results contradict an oft-reported axiom that increasing pore size and SSA, all other things being held constant, increases specific capacitance. A correlation between specific capacitance and SSA of micropores (less than 2 nm in diameter) has been shown. As expected, increasing pore size was found to improve the frequency response. However, CDCs with similar pore size distributions but obtained from different starting materials showed noticeable differences in impedance behavior. This highlights the importance of not only the pore size and specific surface area measured using gas sorption techniques, but also the pore shape or tortuousity, which is non-trivial to characterize, on energy storage.

  4. Simulation of porosity decrease with protein adsorption using the distributed pore model.

    PubMed

    Coquebert de Neuville, Bertrand; Thomas, Helen; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-11-01

    Chromatographic stationary phases such as Fractogel EMD SO3 (M) have a pore size distribution that is close to the size of proteins. The accessible porosity and the mass transfer inside the particles are therefore strongly affected by the pore to solute size ratio. This effect was simulated using the distributed pore model for three media: Base Fractogel SO3, Fractogel EMD SO3 (M) and (S). This model was extended so as to be able to account for the effect of pore shrinkage due to protein loading on the chromatographic behavior of other proteins. Pulse chromatographic experiments using dextrans of various sizes on column pre-loaded with antibodies have been conducted to test the model reliability.

  5. Induced polarization of volcanic rocks. 2. Influence of pore size and permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Breton, M. Le; Niu, Q.; Wallin, E.; Haskins, E.; Thomas, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the relationship between complex conductivity spectra and both permeability and pore mean size and distribution of 22 core samples (21 volcanic rocks and 1 clayey sandstone). The volcanic core samples were extracted from a wellbore drilled for the Humu`ula Groundwater Research Project in the Humu`ula saddle region between Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa volcanoes (Hawaii). The quadrature conductivity spectra of volcanic rocks exhibit a subtle, but generally detectable, relaxation frequency in the range 0.3 Hz to 45 kHz similar to the relaxation frequency observed for clayey sandstones. We find a fair relationship between this relaxation frequency and the pore size determined by mercury porosimetry. Combined with the intrinsic formation factor of the core samples, the relaxation frequency can be used as an indicator of the permeability of the material. The predicted values of the permeability are grossly consistent with the permeability values to air (in the range 0.001-100 mD) within two orders of magnitude. The measured permeability values are highly correlated to the peak of the pore size distribution determined from mercury porosimetry divided by the intrinsic formation factor. By fitting the complex conductivity spectra with the pore size distribution, we obtain the normalized chargeability of the core samples, which is, in turn, highly correlated to the measured cation exchange capacity.

  6. Induced polarization of volcanic rocks. 2. Influence of pore size and permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Breton, M. Le; Niu, Q.; Wallin, E.; Haskins, E.; Thomas, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between complex conductivity spectra and both permeability and pore mean size and distribution of 22 core samples (21 volcanic rocks and one clayey sandstone). The volcanic core samples were extracted from a wellbore drilled for the Humu´ula Groundwater Research Project in the Humu´ula saddle region between Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa volcanoes (Hawaii). The quadrature conductivity spectra of volcanic rocks exhibit a subtle, but generally detectable, relaxation frequency in the range 0.3 Hz to 45 kHz similar to the relaxation frequency observed for clayey sandstones. We find a fair relationship between this relaxation frequency and the pore size determined by mercury porosimetry. Combined with the intrinsic formation factor of the core samples, the relaxation frequency can be used as an indicator of the permeability of the material. The predicted values of the permeability are grossly consistent with the permeability values to air (in the range 0.001-100 mD) within two orders of magnitude. The measured permeability values are highly correlated to the peak of the pore size distribution determined from mercury porosimetry divided by the intrinsic formation factor. By fitting the complex conductivity spectra with the pore size distribution, we obtain the normalized chargeability of the core samples, which is, in turn, highly correlated to the measured cation exchange capacity (CEC).

  7. Effects of Pore Distributions on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) Magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility. The results in this study show that the ductility monotonically decreases as the pore volume fraction increases and that the effect of ‘skin region’ on the ductility is noticeable under the condition of same local pore volume fraction in the center region of the sample and its existence can be beneficial for the improvement of ductility. The further synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element analyses are planned to investigate the effects of pore size and pore size distribution.

  8. Pore Size Determination Using Frequency-Dependent Electro-Osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, P. M.; Morgan, F. D.

    2001-12-01

    Frequency-dependent electro-osmosis has the potential for use as an alternative method for determining the average pore size of porous media. It has been previously shown for the frequency-dependent streaming potential case that the frequency response of the streaming potential coupling coefficient is directly related to the pore size of the rock. However, a drawback to using frequency-dependent streaming potentials is that it is difficult to generate sufficient pressures at intermediate frequencies where both mechanical and piezoelectric devices are not efficient. Frequency-dependent electro-osmosis does not have this problem since the driving electric field can efficiently be applied in the frequency range of interest. Although the underlying physics of both the frequency-dependent electro-osmosis and frequency-dependent streaming potential cases are similar, there are differences in their frequency responses. Similar to the frequency-dependent streaming potential case, it is shown that the electro-osmosis frequency-dependent coupling coefficient is constant with increasing frequency until the critical frequency is reached, at which time the coupling coefficient starts to decrease with increasing frequency. The frequency response of the electro-osmosis coupling coefficient is dependent on the capillary radius. As the capillary radius decreases, the rollover frequency increases. The theory is developed that demonstrates the rollover frequency for the electro-osmosis frequency response is higher than that for the related streaming potential frequency response for the same size capillary. It is shown that this higher rollover frequency is due to the presence of velocity zeros within the bulk fluid of the capillary which serve to reduce the effective radius of the capillary. Data is presented for a 0.127 mm capillary that supports the theoretical findings. Frequency-dependent electro-osmosis can be used for the laboratory determination of average pore sizes of rocks

  9. Silica mesostructures: control of pore size and surface area using a surfactant-templated hydrothermal process.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Aparna; Ahmad, Tokeer; Ganguli, Ashok K

    2010-09-21

    The cooperative self-assembly of the silica precursor, tetraethyl ortho silicate (TEOS), with the surfactant molecule followed by the basic hydrolysis led to the formation of mesoporous silica with varying pore sizes. The pores are formed by the removal of the intermediate assemblies of the charged surfactant molecules. In the absence of formation of such assemblies of surfactants (example in the case of nonionic surfactants), the resulting mesostructures have very small pores, giving low surface area mesostructures. This study outlines the precise control of pore size in a wide size distribution (3.4-22 nm) by the systematic variation of the surfactant. The addition of polyethylene glycol (in situ) while carrying out the hydrolysis of TEOS results in the formation of large-sized cavities (∼40 nm). Uniform spherical particles with pores (different from the cavities) as large as 22 nm and surface areas of ∼1100 m(2)/g have been obtained by the combined effect of the hydrothermal conditions on the cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide-templated synthesis.

  10. An undulation theory for condensation in open end slit pores: critical hysteresis temperature & critical hysteresis pore size.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunyan; Zeng, Yonghong; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2014-06-28

    A new theory of condensation in an open end slit pore, based on the concept of temperature dependent undulation, at the interface separating the adsorbed phase and the gas-like region, is presented. The theory, describes, for the first time, the microscopic origin of the critical hysteresis temperature and the critical hysteresis pore size, properties which are not accessible to any classical theories.

  11. Pore size engineering applied to the design of separators for nickel-hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbey, K. M.; Britton, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Pore size engineering in starved alkaline multiplate cells involves adopting techniques to widen the volume tolerance of individual cells. Separators with appropriate pore size distributions and wettability characteristics (capillary pressure considerations) to have wider volume tolerances and an ability to resist dimensional changes in the electrodes were designed. The separators studied for potential use in nickel-hydrogen cells consist of polymeric membranes as well as inorganic microporous mats. In addition to standard measurements, the resistance and distribution of electrolyte as a function of total cell electrolyte content were determined. New composite separators consisting of fibers, particles and/or binders deposited on Zircar cloth were developed in order to engineer the proper capillary pressure characteristics in the separator. These asymmetric separators were prepared from a variety of fibers, particles and binders.

  12. First Synthesis of Continuous Mesoporous Copper Films with Uniformly Sized Pores by Electrochemical Soft Templating.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiling; Jiang, Bo; Wang, Zhongli; Li, Yunqi; Hossain, Md Shahriar A; Kim, Jung Ho; Takei, Toshiaki; Henzie, Joel; Dag, Ömer; Bando, Yoshio; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-10-04

    Although mesoporous metals have been synthesized by electrochemical methods, the possible compositions have been limited to noble metals (e.g., palladium, platinum, gold) and their alloys. Herein we describe the first fabrication of continuously mesoporous Cu films using polymeric micelles as soft templates to control the growth of Cu under sophisticated electrochemical conditions. Uniformly sized mesopores are evenly distributed over the entire film, and the pore walls are composed of highly crystalized Cu.

  13. Pore-throat sizes in sandstones, siltstones, and shales: Reply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    2011-01-01

    In his discussion of my article (Nelson, 2009), W. K. Camp takes issue with the concept that buoyancy is not the dominant force in forming and maintaining the distribution of gas in tight-gas accumulations (Camp, 2011). I will restrict my response to the issues he raised regarding buoyant versus nonbuoyant drive and to a few comments regarding water saturation and production. I claim that the pressure generated in petroleum source rocks (Pg), instead of the buoyancy pressure (Pb), provides the energy to charge most tight sandstones with gas. The arguments are fourfold: (1) buoyant columns of sufficient height seldom exist in low-permeability sand-shale sequences, (2) tight-gas systems display a pressure profile that declines instead of increases upward, (3) gas is pervasive in overpressured systems, and (4) source rocks can generate pore pressures sufficiently high to charge tight sandstones.

  14. Determining the dynamic range of MCPs based on pore size and strip current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, C.; Adrian, M. L.; Herrero, F.; James, P.; Jones, H. H.; Rodriguez, M.; Roman, P.; Shappirio, M.

    2010-12-01

    Micro-Channel Plates (MCPs) are used as detectors for almost all detectors measuring particles (both ions, electrons and neutrals) below 30 keV. Recent advances in the manufacturing technology of the MCPs have increased the number of options one has when selecting plates for an instrument. But it is not clear how many of these options affect the performance of the MCPs. In particular the dynamic range is not a clear cut calculation to make from the strip current. There is also some evidence that pore size and coating play a role. We measured the dynamic range and pulse height distribution of MCPs detector chevron stacks with a wide variety of strip currents from the low “normal” range in the EDR range. We also looked at the effects of varying the pore size from 25 microns to 10 microns, partial plating of the MCP surface and coating one surface on each MCP with gold rather than the standard zinc chromium. We will show how the dynamic range and pulse height distributions vary vs. strip current, pore size, and surface plating configurations.

  15. Pore size and pore throat types in a heterogeneous dolostone reservoir, Devonian Grosmont formation, western Canada sedimentary basin

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, P.; Machel, H. G.

    1995-11-01

    The Devonian Grosmont Formation in northeastern Alberta, Canada, is a giant heavy-oil reservoir. The main reservoir rocks are dolomitized and karstified platform and ramp carbonates, and the best reservoir facies occur in the upper Grosmont (UGM) units 3 and 2. In these units, reservoir properties are highly heterogeneous. Hand specimen, thin section, UV, and SEM petrography, as well as grading scales, mercury capillary pressure curve analysis, and statistics, have been used to characterize reservoir heterogeneity. Our investigation led to a new pore size classification for carbonate reservoirs; this new classification has four pore sizes: microporosity (pore diameters <1 {mu}m), mesoporosity (pore diameters 1-1000 {mu}m), macroporosity (pore diameters 1-256 mm), and megaporosity (pore diameters >256 mm). A combination of microscopic observations and capillary pressure curve characteristics led to the recognition of four pore throat texture types on the microporosity scale, and to five types on the mesoporosity scale. Microporosity pore types include (1) intracrystal dissolution porosity, (2) pervasive intercrystal and intracrystal dissolution porosity, (3) intergranular and/or intercrystal porosity in grainstones, and (4) primary or solution microporosity in mud matrix (only in limestones). Mesoporosity pore types include (1) intercrystal porosity, (2) solution-enhanced intercrystal porosity, (3) oversized porosity, (4) intragranular solution porosity, and (5) intergranular solution porosity. Some of these types are homogeneous (e.g., non-fabric selective dissolution porosity and intercrystal primary porosity), whereas others are heterogeneous. Generally, hydrocarbon recovery efficiency is good in the homogeneous pore throat types, but poor in the heterogeneous types.

  16. 3D Scaffold of Electrosprayed Fibers with Large Pore Size for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jong Kyu; Madihally, Sundararajan V.

    2010-01-01

    Regeneration of tissues using biodegradable porous scaffolds has been an intensely investigated area. Since electrospinning can produce scaffolds mimicking nanofibrous architecture found in the body, it recently has gained widespread attention. However, a major problem is the lack of pore size necessary for infiltration of cells into the layers below the surface, restricting cell colonization to the surfaces only. This study describes a novel twist to the traditional electrospinning technology. In particular, collector plates are designed which allows forming very thin layers with pore sizes suitable for cell infiltration. Thin samples can be handled without mechanically damaging the structure and can be transferred into cell culture. These thin layers were stacked by layer-by-layer assembly to develop thick structures. Thirty day cultures of fibroblasts show attachment and spreading of cells in every layer. This concept is useful in regenerating thick tissues with uniformly distributed cells and others in vitro cell culture. PMID:20620245

  17. Pore distribution effect of activated carbon in adsorbing organic micropollutants from natural water.

    PubMed

    Ebie, K; Li, F; Azuma, Y; Yuasa, A; Hagishita, T

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption isotherms of organic micropollutants in coexistence with natural organic matter (NOM) were analyzed to evaluate the impacts of pore size distribution of activated carbon (AC) on the competition effects of the NOM. Single solute adsorption experiments and simultaneous adsorption experiments with NOM contained in a coagulation-pretreated surface water were performed for four agricultural chemicals and three coal-based activated carbons (ACs) having different pore distributions. The results showed that, for all the carbons used, the adsorption capacity of the chemicals was reduced distinctly in the presence of NOM. Such a reduction was more apparent for AC with a larger portion of small pores suitable for the adsorption of small organic molecules and for the agricultural chemicals with a more hydrophilic nature. Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) incorporated with the Freundlich isotherm expression (IAST-Freundlich model) could not interpret the impact of NOM on the adsorption capacity of the chemicals unless a pore blockage effect caused by the adsorption of NOM was also considered. By taking into account this effect, the adsorption isotherm of the chemicals in the presence of NOM was well described, and the capacity reduction caused by the NOM was quantitatively assessed from the viewpoints of the site competition and the pore blockage. Analytical results clearly indicated that pore blockage was an important competition mechanism that contributed to 10-99% of the total capacity reductions of the chemicals, the level depended greatly on the ACs, the chemicals and the equilibrium concentrations, and could possibly be alleviated by broadening the pore size distributions of the ACs to provide a large volume percentage for pores with sizes above 30 A.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance pore size determination for unconsolidated sediments with strong internal gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duschl, M.; Pohlmeier, A. J.; Galvosas, P.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Water distribution and flow within porous media are mainly controlled by the pore space structure. Well established methods for the determination of pore sizes like multistep outflow and gas adsorption isotherms (BET) are often time consuming, expensive, or produce toxic waste. As an alternative fast and non-destructive technique, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used because it probes hydrogen and therefore the dynamics and interactions of water. Pore space is most easily characterized by NMR relaxometry where the total relaxation rate is controlled by the surface relaxivity ρ of the porous medium in combination with the surface-to-volume ratio (S/V) [1]. Furthermore, there are contributions of molecular diffusion through local magnetic field gradients which are created by susceptibility differences between solid and liquid phases [2] as well as by paramagnetic impurities [3]. Hence, surface to volume ratios and surface relaxivities of porous media cannot be measured individually with NMR relaxometry. Therefore, NMR diffusion measurements are applied to probe the S/V of pores without other contributions. In this study, we demonstrate that NMR diffusion measurements are feasible to determine the S/V ratio of the pore space of quartz sand coated with goethite (α-FeOOH) as paramagnetic impurity. Our findings were compared to BET measurements and we found no dependence of the S/V on the coating density with NMR diffusion and a clear dependence between coating density and S/V with krypton BET measurements. Possible explanations are the different characteristic length scales on which the pore space is probed, and the intrinsic fractal nature of porous media [4] together with the roughness of the pore surface on a nm-scale due to the coating process. After isolating the additional contribution of the paramagnetic impurities to the NMR relaxation and the calibration of the NMR relaxation signal for each coating density it was possible to use fast relaxometry

  19. Accurate relations between pore size and the pressure of capillary condensation and the evaporation of nitrogen in cylindrical pores.

    PubMed

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Tateishi, Masayoshi

    2006-04-25

    To examine the theoretical and semiempirical relations between pore size and the pressure of capillary condensation or evaporation proposed so far, we constructed an accurate relation between the pore radius and the capillary condensation and evaporation pressure of nitrogen at 77 K for the cylindrical pores of the ordered mesoporous MCM-41 and SBA-15 silicas. Here, the pore size was determined from a comparison between the experimental and calculated X-ray diffraction patterns due to X-ray structural modeling recently developed. Among the many theoretical relations that differ from each other in the degree of theoretical improvements, a macroscopic thermodynamic approach based on Broekhoff-de Boer equations was found to be in fair agreement with the experimental relation obtained in the present study.

  20. Modelling the influence of pore size on the response of materials to infrared lasers An application to human enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila Verde, A.; Ramos, Marta M. D.

    2005-07-01

    We present an analytical model for a ceramic material (hydroxyapatite, HA) containing nanometre-scale water pores, and use it to estimate the pressure at the pore as a function of temperature at the end of a single 0.35 μs laser pulse by Er:YAG (2.94 μm) and CO 2 (10.6 μm) lasers. Our results suggest that the pressure at the pore is directly related to pore temperature, and that very high pressures can be generated simply by the thermal expansion of liquid water. Since the temperature reached in the pores at the end of the laser pulse is a strong function of pore size for Er:YAG lasers, but is independent of pore size for CO 2 lasers, our present results provide a possible explanation for the fact that human dental enamel threshold ablation fluences vary more for Er:YAG lasers than for CO 2 lasers. This suggests that experimentalists should analyse their results accounting for factors, like age or type of tooth, that may change the pore size distribution in their samples.

  1. Pore space analysis of NAPL distribution in sand-clay media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matmon, D.; Hayden, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces a conceptual model of clays and non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) at the pore scale that has been developed from a mathematical unit cell model, and direct micromodel observation and measurement of clay-containing porous media. The mathematical model uses a unit cell concept with uniform spherical grains for simulating the sand in the sand-clay matrix (???10% clay). Micromodels made with glass slides and including different clay-containing porous media were used to investigate the two clays (kaolinite and montmorillonite) and NAPL distribution within the pore space. The results were used to understand the distribution of NAPL advancing into initially saturated sand and sand-clay media, and provided a detailed analysis of the pore-scale geometry, pore size distribution, NAPL entry pressures, and the effect of clay on this geometry. Interesting NAPL saturation profiles were observed as a result of the complexity of the pore space geometry with the different packing angles and the presence of clays. The unit cell approach has applications for enhancing the mechanistic understanding and conceptualization, both visually and mathematically, of pore-scale processes such as NAPL and clay distribution. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comprehensive pore structure characterization of silica monoliths with controlled mesopore size and macropore size by nitrogen sorption, mercury porosimetry, transmission electron microscopy and inverse size exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lubda, Dieter; Lindner, Wolfgang; Quaglia, Milene; du Fresne von Hohenesche, Cedric; Unger, Klaus K

    2005-08-12

    The porosity of monolithic silica columns is measured by using different analytical methods. Two sets of monoliths were prepared with a given mesopore diameter of 10 and 25 nm, respectively and with gradated macropore diameters between 1.8 and 7.5 microm. After preparing the two sets of monolithic silica columns with different macro- and mesopores the internal, external and total porosity of these columns are determined by inverse size-exclusion chromatography (ISEC) using polystyrene samples of narrow molecular size distribution and known average molecular weight. The ISEC data from the 4.6 mm analytical monolithic silica columns are used to determine the structural properties of monolithic silica capillaries (100 microm I.D.) prepared as a third set of samples. The ISEC results illustrate a multimodal mesopore structure (mesopores are pores with stagnant zones) of the monoliths. It is found by ISEC that the ratio of the different types of pores is dependent on the change in diameter of the macropores (serve as flow-through pores). The porosity data achieved from the mercury penetration measurement and nitrogen adsorption as well of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) pictures are correlated with the results we calculated from the ISEC measurements. The ISEC results, namely the multimodal pore structure of the monoliths, reported in several publications, are not confirmed analyzing the pore structures of the different silica monoliths using all other analytical methods.

  3. Direct Measurement of the Critical Pore Size in a Model Membrane.

    PubMed

    Ilton, Mark; DiMaria, Christian; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2016-12-16

    We study pore nucleation in a model membrane system, a freestanding polymer film. Nucleated pores smaller than a critical size close, while pores larger than the critical size grow. Holes of varying size were purposefully prepared in liquid polymer films, and their evolution in time was monitored using optical and atomic force microscopy to extract a critical radius. The critical radius scales linearly with film thickness for a homopolymer film. The results agree with a simple model which takes into account the energy cost due to surface area at the edge of the pore. The energy cost at the edge of the pore is experimentally varied by using a lamellar-forming diblock copolymer membrane. The underlying molecular architecture causes increased frustration at the pore edge resulting in an enhanced cost of pore formation.

  4. Direct Measurement of the Critical Pore Size in a Model Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilton, Mark; DiMaria, Christian; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2016-12-01

    We study pore nucleation in a model membrane system, a freestanding polymer film. Nucleated pores smaller than a critical size close, while pores larger than the critical size grow. Holes of varying size were purposefully prepared in liquid polymer films, and their evolution in time was monitored using optical and atomic force microscopy to extract a critical radius. The critical radius scales linearly with film thickness for a homopolymer film. The results agree with a simple model which takes into account the energy cost due to surface area at the edge of the pore. The energy cost at the edge of the pore is experimentally varied by using a lamellar-forming diblock copolymer membrane. The underlying molecular architecture causes increased frustration at the pore edge resulting in an enhanced cost of pore formation.

  5. Two micron pore size MCP-based image intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, John; Estrera, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Image intensifiers (I2) have many advantages as detectors. They offer single photon sensitivity in an imaging format, they're light in weight and analog I2 systems can operate for hours on a single AA battery. Their light output is such as to exploit the peak in color sensitivity of the human eye. Until recent developments in CMOS sensors, they also were one of the highest resolution sensors available. The closest all solid state solution, the Texas Instruments Impactron chip, comes in a 1 megapixel format. Depending on the level of integration, an Impactron based system can consume 20 to 40 watts in a system configuration. In further investing in I2 technology, L-3 EOS determined that increasing I2 resolution merited a high priority. Increased I2 resolution offers the system user two desirable options: 1) increased detection and identification ranges while maintaining field-of-view (FOV) or 2) increasing FOV while maintaining the original system resolution. One of the areas where an investment in resolution is being made is in the microchannel plate (MCP). Incorporation of a 2 micron MCP into an image tube has the potential of increasing the system resolution of currently fielded systems. Both inverting and non-inverting configurations are being evaluated. Inverting tubes are being characterized in night vision goggle (NVG) and sights. The non-inverting 2 micron tube is being characterized for high resolution I2CMOS camera applications. Preliminary measurements show an increase in the MTF over a standard 5 micron pore size, 6 micron pitch plate. Current results will be presented.

  6. Laser scanning confocal microscopy characterization of water repellent distribution in a sandstone pore network.

    PubMed

    Zoghlami, Karima; Gómez-Gras, David; Corbella, Mercè; Darragi, Fadila

    2008-11-01

    In the present work, we propose the use of the Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) to determine the effect of water repellents on rock's pore-network configuration and interconnection. The rocks studied are sandstones of Miocene age, a building material that is commonly found in the architectural heritage of Tunisia. The porosity quantitative data of treated and untreated samples, obtained by mercury porosimetry tests, were compared. The results show a slight decrease in total porosity with the water repellent treatment, which reduced both microporosity and macroporosity. This reduction produced a modification in pore size distribution and a shift of the pore access size mode interval toward smaller pore diameters (from the 30-40 microm to the 20-30 microm intervals). The water repellent was observed in SEM images as a continuous film coating grain surfaces; moreover, it was easily visualized in LSCM, by staining the water repellent with Epodye fluorochrome, and the coating thickness was straightforwardly measured (1.5-2 microm). In fact, the combination of mercury intrusion porosimetry data and LSCM observations suggests that the porosity reduction and the shift of the pore diameter mode were mainly due to the general reduction of pore diameters, but also to the plugging of the smallest pores (less than 3-4 microm in diameter) by the water repellent film. Finally, the LSCM technique enabled the reconstruction of 3D views of the water repellent coating film in the pore network, indicating that its distribution was uniform and continuous over the 100 microm thick sample. The LSCM imaging facilitates the integration and interpretation of mercury porosimetry and SEM data.

  7. Processing and Characterization of Porous Ti2AlC with Controlled Porosity and Pore Size

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-11

    fabricated by spark plasma sintering , were also characterized. The effects of porosity and/or pore size on the room temperature elastic moduli...pressureless- sintered without NaCl pore former, or fabricated by spark plasma sintering , were also characterized. The effects of porosity and/or pore size...as well as several samples sintered using spark plasma sintering (SPS). Furthermore, we demon- strate that the developed methodology can be implemented

  8. A general diagram for estimating pore size of ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarbolouki, M. N.

    1982-01-01

    A slit sieve model has been used to develop a general correlation between the average pore size of the upstream surface of a membrane and the molecular weight of the solute which it retains by better than 80%. The pore size is determined by means of the correlation using the high retention data from an ultrafiltration (UF) or a reverse osmosis (RO) experiment. The pore population density can also be calculated from the flux data via appropriate equations.

  9. Discontinuous pore fluid distribution under microgravity--KC-135 flight investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddi, Lakshmi N.; Xiao, Ming; Steinberg, Susan L.

    2005-01-01

    Designing a reliable plant growth system for crop production in space requires the understanding of pore fluid distribution in porous media under microgravity. The objective of this experimental investigation, which was conducted aboard NASA KC-135 reduced gravity flight, is to study possible particle separation and the distribution of discontinuous wetting fluid in porous media under microgravity. KC-135 aircraft provided gravity conditions of 1, 1.8, and 10(-2) g. Glass beads of a known size distribution were used as porous media; and Hexadecane, a petroleum compound immiscible with and lighter than water, was used as wetting fluid at residual saturation. Nitrogen freezer was used to solidify the discontinuous Hexadecane ganglia in glass beads to preserve the ganglia size changes during different gravity conditions, so that the blob-size distributions (BSDs) could be measured after flight. It was concluded from this study that microgravity has little effect on the size distribution of pore fluid blobs corresponding to residual saturation of wetting fluids in porous media. The blobs showed no noticeable breakup or coalescence during microgravity. However, based on the increase in bulk volume of samples due to particle separation under microgravity, groups of particles, within which pore fluid blobs were encapsulated, appeared to have rearranged themselves under microgravity.

  10. Determination of the pore size of woven structures through image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents an experimental procedure developed for determination of the pore size, shape and distribution in a single layer woven fabric, for the construction of a virtual model to be incorporated in a future CFD software package. The procedure is based on non-destructive observation and analysis of woven samples. 14 different samples of gray fabrics of 100 % cotton in plain and twill weaves are investigated. The results obtained allow the creation of reality more realistic virtual model of the woven structure, and theoretical investigation of its porosity and permeability through computer simulation.

  11. Microporous polyphenylenes with tunable pore size for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shengwen; Dorney, Brian; White, Desiree; Kirklin, Scott; Zapol, Peter; Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia

    2010-07-07

    A series of highly porous polymers with similar BET surface areas of higher than 1000 m(2) g(-1) but tunable pore ranging from 0.7 nm to 0.9 nm were synthesized through facile ethynyl trimerization reaction to demonstrate the surface property-hydrogen adsorption relationship.

  12. Slow Desorption of Phenanthrene from Silica Particles: Influence of Pore Size, Pore Water, and Aging Time

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Fortman, Timothy J.; Riley, Robert G.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Wang, Zheming; Truex, Michael J.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2006-01-16

    When micro-porous and meso-porous silica particles were exposed to aqueous phenanthrene solutions for various durations it was observed that sorbed-phase phenanthrene concentrations increased with aging time only for meso-porous but not micro-porous silicas. Desorption equilibrium was reached almost instantaneously for the micro-porous particles while both the rate and extent of desorption decreased with increasing aging time for the meso-porous silicas. These findings indicate that phenanthrene can be sequestered within the internal pore-space of meso-porous silicas while the internal surfaces of micro-porous silicas are not accessible to phenanthrene sorption, possibly due to the presence of physi- or chemi-sorbed water that may sterically hinder the diffusion of phenanthrene inside water-filled micro-pores. By contrast, the internal surfaces of these micro-porous silicas are accessible to phenanthrene when aging methods are employed which assure that pores are devoid of physi-sorbed water. Consequently, when phenanthrene was incorporated into these particles using either supercritical CO2 or via solvent soaking, the aqueous desorption kinetics were extremely slow indicating effective sequestration of phenanthrene inside micro-porous particles. Finally, a two-compartment conceptual model is used to interpret the experimental findings.

  13. Effect on the Pore-Size Dependence of an Organic Electrolyte Supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Deen; Jin, Zhehui; Henderson, Douglous; Wu, Jianzhong

    2012-01-01

    Organic electrolytes such as tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate dissolved in acetonitrile (TEA-BF{sub 4}/ACN) are widely used in commercial supercapacitors and academic research, but conflicting experimental results have been reported regarding the dependence of surface-area-normalized capacitance on the pore size. Here we show from a classical density functional theory the dependence of capacitance on the pore size from 0.5 to 3.0 nm for a model TEA-BF{sub 4}/ACN electrolyte. We find that the capacitance-pore size curve becomes roughly flat after the first peak around the ion diameter, and the peak capacitance is not significantly higher than the large-pore average. We attribute the invariance of capacitance with the pore size to the formation of an electric double-layer structure that consists of counterions and highly organized solvent molecules. This work highlights the role of the solvent molecules in modulating the capacitance and reconciles apparently conflicting experimental reports.

  14. A direct and quantitative three-dimensional reconstruction of the internal structure of disordered mesoporous carbon with tailored pore size.

    PubMed

    Balach, Juan; Soldera, Flavio; Acevedo, Diego F; Mücklich, Frank; Barbero, César A

    2013-06-01

    A new technique that allows direct three-dimensional (3D) investigations of mesopores in carbon materials and quantitative characterization of their physical properties is reported. Focused ion beam nanotomography (FIB-nt) is performed by a serial sectioning procedure with a dual beam FIB-scanning electron microscopy instrument. Mesoporous carbons (MPCs) with tailored mesopore size are produced by carbonization of resorcinol-formaldehyde gels in the presence of a cationic surfactant as a pore stabilizer. A visual 3D morphology representation of disordered porous carbon is shown. Pore size distribution of MPCs is determined by the FIB-nt technique and nitrogen sorption isotherm methods to compare both results. The obtained MPCs exhibit pore sizes of 4.7, 7.2, and 18.3 nm, and a specific surface area of ca. 560 m(2)/g.

  15. Impact of pore size variability and network coupling on electrokinetic transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Shima; Bazant, Martin Z.; Mani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    We have developed and validated an efficient and robust computational model to study the coupled fluid and ion transport through electrokinetic porous media, which are exposed to external gradients of pressure, electric potential, and concentration. In our approach a porous media is modeled as a network of many pores through which the transport is described by the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes equations. When the pore sizes are random, the interactions between various modes of transport may provoke complexities such as concentration polarization shocks and internal flow circulations. These phenomena impact mixing and transport in various systems including deionization and filtration systems, supercapacitors, and lab-on-a-chip devices. In this work, we present simulations of massive networks of pores and we demonstrate the impact of pore size variation, and pore-pore coupling on the overall electrokinetic transport in porous media.

  16. Quantifying pore size and density for membranes in the Knudsen and transitional-flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Richard; Purri, Matthew; Hernandez, Erick; Shan, Jerry; Bui, Ngoc; Chen, Chiati; Meshot, Eric; Fornasiero, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Membranes with well-controlled nanoscale pores have interest for applications as diverse as chemical separations, water purification, and "green" power generation. For instance, membranes incorporating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as through-pores have been shown to pass fluids orders-of-magnitude faster than predicted by theory. However, the efficient characterization of the pore size and density of membranes is an important area of focus, particularly for membranes fabricated from bulk nanotubes. Here, we report on a new technique to identify the pore size (d) and number of open pores (N) in membranes. A nanoporous membrane is characterized with a combination of pressure-driven gas flow, and electrical-conductance measurements in aqueous solution. For the conductance measurements, the electrical current passing through the membrane scales as d2 N . For pressurized gas flow, the scaling with molecular weight (M) and gas viscosity (μ) identifies the flow as either Poiseuille or Knudsen, scaling as either d4N/ μ or d3 N /M 1 / 2 , respectively. With this combination of measurements, the pore size and number of pores in the membrane can be calculated. We validate this technique using track-etched polycarbonate membranes and CNT membranes with known pores, and show that it can be used to count open pores and identify defects in CNT membranes. We would like to acknowledge DTRA for their funding and support of our research.

  17. Estimation of pore size in a microstructure phantom using the optimised gradient waveform diffusion weighted NMR sequence.

    PubMed

    Siow, Bernard; Drobnjak, Ivana; Chatterjee, Aritrick; Lythgoe, Mark F; Alexander, Daniel C

    2012-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques that are sensitive to diffusion of molecules containing NMR visible nuclei for the estimation of microstructure parameters. A microstructure parameter of particular interest is pore radius distribution. A recent in silico study optimised the shape of the gradient waveform in diffusion weighted spin-echo experiments for estimating pore size. The study demonstrated that optimised gradient waveform (GEN) protocols improve pore radius estimates compared to optimised pulse gradient spin-echo (PGSE) protocols, particularly at shorter length scales. This study assesses the feasibility of implementing GEN protocols on a small bore 9.4 T scanner and verifies their additional sensitivity to pore radius. We implement GEN and PGSE protocols optimised for pore radii of 1, 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10 μm and constrained to maximum gradient strengths of 40, 80, 200 mT m(-1). We construct microstructure phantoms, which have a single pore radius for each phantom, using microcapillary fibres. The measured signal shows good agreement with simulated signal, strongly indicating that the GEN waveforms can be implemented on a 9.4 T system. We also demonstrate that GEN protocols provide improved sensitivity to the smaller pore radii when compared to optimised PGSE protocols, particularly at the lower gradient amplitudes investigated in this study. Our results suggest that this improved sensitivity of GEN protocols would be reflected in clinical scenarios.

  18. Analysis and Visualization of 2D and 3D Grain and Pore Size ofFontainebleau Sandstone Using Digital Rock Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latief, FDE

    2016-08-01

    Fontainebleau sandstone is sandstone found in one of the cities in France. This sandstone has unique characteristics, which is a clean-fme sandstone, composed of 99% quartz, virtually devoid of clay, with the grain size of about 200 μm. Fontainebleau sandstone is widely used as a reference in the study of rock microstructure analysis and modelling. In this work analysis regarding the grain and pore size of Fontainebleau is presented. Calculation of 2D pore size and grain size distribution were done on the 299 slice of digital image of the Fontainebleau sandstone using Feret's diameters, equivalent diameters (d = 4A/P), and by means of local thickness/separation using plate model. For the 3D grain and pore size distribution, calculation of local thickness and local separation of the structure were used. Two dimensional analysis by means of Feret's diameter and equivalent diameter reveal that both grain and pore size distributions are in the form of reverse-J shaped (right skewed) while the local thickness/separation approach produces almost similar to symmetric Gaussian distribution. Three dimensional analysis produces fairly symmetric Gaussian distribution for both the grain and pore size. Further image processing were conducted and were succeed in producing three dimensional visual of the colour coded structure thickness (grain related) and structure separation (pore related).

  19. Centaur size distribution with DECam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, Cesar; Trilling, David E.; Schlichting, Hilke

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of the 2014 centaur search campaign on the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) in Tololo, Chile. This is the largest debiased Centaur survey to date, measuring for the first time the size distribution of small Centaurs (1-10km) and the first time the sizes of planetesimals from which the entire Solar System formed are directly detected.The theoretical model for the coagulation and collisional evolution of the outer solar system proposed in Schlichting et al. 2013 predicts a steep rise in the size distribution of TNOs smaller than 10km. These objects are below the detection limit of current TNO surveys but feasible for the Centaur population. By constraining the number of Centaurs and this feature in their size distribution we can confirm the collisional evolution of the Solar System and estimate the rate at which material is being transferred from the outer to the inner Solar System. If the shallow power law behavior from the TNO size distribution at ~40km can be extrapolated to 1km, the size of the Jupiter Family of Comets (JFC), there would not be enough small TNOs to supply the JFC population (Volk & Malhotra, 2008), debunking the link between TNOs and JFCs.We also obtain the colors of small Centaurs and TNOs, providing a signature of collisional evolution by measuring if there is in fact a relationship between color and size. If objects smaller than the break in the TNO size distribution are being ground down by collisions then their surfaces should be fresh, and then appear bluer in the optical than larger TNOs that are not experiencing collisions.

  20. Pore Distribution and Water Uptake in a Cenosphere-Cement Paste Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronins, J.; Setina, J.; Sahmenko, G.; Lagzdina, S.; Shishkin, A.

    2015-11-01

    Alumina silicate cenospheres (CS) is a significant waste material from power plants that use a coal. Use CS as Portland cement replacement material gives opportunity to control physical and mechanical properties and makes a product lighter and more cost-effective. In the frame of this study, Portland cement paste samples were produced by adding CS in the concentration range from 0 to 40 volume %. Water uptake of hardened samples was checked and pore size distribution by using the mercury porosimetry was determined. In a cold climate where the temperature often falls below 0 °C, it is important to avoid the amount of micrometer sized pores in the final structure and to decrease water absorption capacity of material. In winter conditions, water fills such pores and causes additional stresses to their walls by expansion while freezing. It was found that generally water uptake capacity for cement paste samples decreased up to 20% by increasing the concentration of CS up to 40 volume %, at the same time, the volume of micrometer sized opened pores increases.

  1. Interactive effects of pore size control and carbonization temperatures on supercapacitive behaviors of porous carbon/carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Il; Rhee, Kyong-Yop; Park, Soo-Jin

    2012-07-01

    Porous carbon-based electrodes were prepared by carbonization with poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)/carbon nanotube (CNT) composites to further increase the specific capacitance for supercapacitors. The specific capacitance, pore size distribution, and surface area of the PVDF/CNT composites were measured, and the effect of the carbonization temperatures was examined. The electrochemical properties were examined by cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge performance using a two-electrode system in TEABF(4) (tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate)/acetonitrile as a non-aqueous electrolyte. The highest specific capacitance of ∼101 Fg(-1) was obtained for the samples carbonized at 600 °C. The pore size of the samples could be controlled to below 7 nm through the carbonization process. This suggests that micropores make a significant contribution to the specific capacitance due to improved charge transfer between the pores of the electrode materials and the electrolyte.

  2. Pore-size dependent effects on structure and vibrations of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate in nanoporous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thürmer, Stephan; Kobayashi, Yoshikazu; Ohba, Tomonori; Kanoh, Hirofumi

    2015-09-01

    We report XRD and IR measurements of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMI-BF4) adsorbed in activated carbons, molecular sieving carbon, and single wall carbon nanohorn, where we specifically chose a wide range of pore sizes from 0.5 nm to 2.5 nm. Electron radial distribution function analysis reveals denser packing upon adsorption in two steps, for pore widths larger and comparable to the ion size. Average ion-distance was decreased by 0.05 nm in the latter case. With support of DFT calculations we identify a suppression of specific vibrational modes, which are interpreted as constrainment by the pore walls. Possible consequences for supercapacitor application are discussed.

  3. Fabrication of Aluminum Foams with Small Pore Size by Melt Foaming Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ying; Li, Yanxiang; Chen, Xiang; Shi, Tong; Liu, Zhiyong; Wang, Ningzhen

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces an improvement to the fabrication of aluminum foams with small pore size by melt foaming method. Before added to the melt, the foaming agent (titanium hydride) was pretreated in two steps. It firstly went through the traditional pre-oxidation treatment, which delayed the decomposition of titanium hydride and made sure the dispersion stage was controllable. Then such pre-oxidized titanium hydride powder was mixed with copper powder in a planetary ball mill. This treatment can not only increase the number of foaming agent particles and make them easier to disperse in the melt, which helps to increase the number of pores, but also reduce the amount of hydrogen released in the foaming stage. Therefore, the pore size could be decreased. Using such a ball-milled foaming agent in melt foaming method, aluminum foams with small pore size (average size of 1.6 mm) were successfully fabricated.

  4. Fabrication of Aluminum Foams with Small Pore Size by Melt Foaming Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ying; Li, Yanxiang; Chen, Xiang; Shi, Tong; Liu, Zhiyong; Wang, Ningzhen

    2017-04-01

    This article introduces an improvement to the fabrication of aluminum foams with small pore size by melt foaming method. Before added to the melt, the foaming agent (titanium hydride) was pretreated in two steps. It firstly went through the traditional pre-oxidation treatment, which delayed the decomposition of titanium hydride and made sure the dispersion stage was controllable. Then such pre-oxidized titanium hydride powder was mixed with copper powder in a planetary ball mill. This treatment can not only increase the number of foaming agent particles and make them easier to disperse in the melt, which helps to increase the number of pores, but also reduce the amount of hydrogen released in the foaming stage. Therefore, the pore size could be decreased. Using such a ball-milled foaming agent in melt foaming method, aluminum foams with small pore size (average size of 1.6 mm) were successfully fabricated.

  5. Pore scale heterogeneity in the mineral distribution and reactive surface area of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P. E.; Krevor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    There are long-standing challenges in characterizing reactive transport in porous media at scales larger than individual pores. This hampers the prediction of the field-scale impact of geochemical processes on fluid flow [1]. This is a source of uncertainty for CO2 injection, which results in a reactive fluid-rock system, particularly in carbonate rock reservoirs. A potential cause is the inability of the continuum approach to incorporate the impact of heterogeneity in pore-scale reaction rates. This results in part from pore-scale heterogeneities in surface area of reactive minerals [2,3]. In this study we have created μm resolution 3D images of 3 sandstone and 4 carbonate rocks using x-ray microtomography. Using in-house image processing techniques and auxiliary characterisation with thin section, electron microscope and spectroscopic techniques we quantified the surface area of each mineral phase in the x-ray CT images. This quantification was validated against N2 BET surface area and He porosity measurements of the imaged samples. Distributions in reactive surface area for each mineral phase were constructed by calculating surface areas in thousands of randomly selected subvolume images of the total sample, each normalized to the pore volume in that image. In all samples, there is little correlation between the reactive surface area fraction and the volumetric fraction of a mineral in a bulk rock. Berea sandstone was far less heterogeneous and has a characteristic pore size at which a surface area distribution may be used to quantify heterogeneity. In carbonates, heterogeneity is more complex and surface area must be characterized at multiple length scales for an accurate description of reactive transport. [1] Maher, Steefel, Depaolo and Vianni (2006) Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 70, 337-363 [2] Landrot, Ajo-Franklin, Yang, Cabrini and Steefel (2012) Chemical Geology 318-319, 113-125 [3] Li, Peters and Celia (2007) American Journal of Science 307, 1146

  6. Effects of calcination temperature on the pore size and wall crystalline structure of mesoporous alumina.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhong-Xi; Zheng, Ting-Ting; Bo, Qi-Bing; Du, Miao; Forsling, Willis

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, mesoporous alumina with different pore sizes and wall crystalline structures was synthesized at calcination temperatures over 550 degrees C. The characterization of the samples calcined at 550, 800, 1100, and 1300 degrees C, respectively, was performed using TEM, XRD, FTIR, TG/DTA, and N2 adsorption/desorption techniques. The correlation between pore size and wall crystalline structure on calcination temperature was systematically investigated.

  7. Pore distribution and material properties of bone cement cured at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Matthew H; Lau, Abe C B; Smitham, Peter J; Nielsen, Gary; Walsh, William R

    2010-03-01

    Implant heating has been advocated as a means to alter the porosity of the bone cement/implant interface; however, little is known about the influence on cement properties. This study investigates the mechanical properties and pore distribution of 10 commercially available cements cured in molds at 20, 37, 40 and 50 degrees Celsius. Although each cement reacted differently to the curing environments, the most prevalent trend was increased mechanical properties when cured at 50 degrees Celsius vs. room temperature. Pores were shown to gather near the surface of cooler molds and near the center in warmer molds for all cement brands. Pore size was also influenced. Small pores were more often present in cements cured at cooler temperatures, with higher-temperature molds producing more large pores. The mechanical properties of all cements were above the minimum regulatory standards. This work shows the influence of curing temperature on cement properties and porosity characteristics, and supports the practice of heating cemented implants to influence interfacial porosity.

  8. IMPACT OF COMPOSITION AND HEAT TREATMENT ON PORE SIZE IN POROUS WALLED HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Raszewski, F; Erich Hansen, E; Ray Schumacher, R; David Peeler, D

    2007-12-04

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a new geometric form: hollow glass microspheres (HGMs), with unique porous walls. The new geometric form combines the existing technology of HGMs with basic glass science knowledge in the realm of glass-in-glass phase separation. Conceptually, the development of a HGM with porous walls (referred to as a PWHGM) provides a unique system in which various media or filling agents can be incorporated into the PWHGM (via transport through the porous walls) and ultimately has the capacity to serve as a functional delivery system in various industrial applications. Applications of these types of systems could range from hydrogen storage, molecular sieves, drug and bioactive delivery systems, to environmental, chemical and biological indicators, relevant to Energy, Environmental Processing and Homeland Security fields. As a specific example, previous studies at SRNL have introduced materials capable of hydrogen storage (as well as other materials) into the interior of the PWHGMs. The goal of this project was to determine if the microstructure (i.e., pore size and pore size distribution) of a PWHGM could be altered or tailored by varying composition and/or heat treatment (time and/or temperature) conditions. The ability to tailor the microstructure through composition or heat treatments could provide the opportunity to design the PWHGM system to accommodate different additives or fill agents. To meet this objective, HGMs of various alkali borosilicate compositions were fabricated using a flame forming apparatus installed at the Aiken County Technical Laboratory (ACTL). HGMs were treated under various heat treatment conditions to induce and/or enhance glass in glass phase separation. Heat treatment temperatures ranged from 580 C to 620 C, while heat treatment times were either 8 or 24 hours. Of the two primary variables assessed in this study, heat treatment temperature was determined to be most effective in changing the

  9. A Facile and Eco-friendly Route to Fabricate Poly(Lactic Acid) Scaffolds with Graded Pore Size.

    PubMed

    Scaffaro, Roberto; Lopresti, Francesco; Botta, Luigi; Maio, Andrea; Sutera, Fiorenza; Mistretta, Maria Chiara; La Mantia, Francesco Paolo

    2016-10-17

    Over the recent years, functionally graded scaffolds (FGS) gaineda crucial role for manufacturing of devices for tissue engineering. The importance of this new field of biomaterials research is due to the necessity to develop implants capable of mimicking the complex functionality of the various tissues, including a continuous change from one structure or composition to another. In this latter context, one topic of main interest concerns the design of appropriate scaffolds for bone-cartilage interface tissue. In this study, three-layered scaffolds with graded pore size were achieved by melt mixing poly(lactic acid) (PLA), sodium chloride (NaCl) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). Pore size distributions were controlled by NaCl granulometry and PEG solvation. Scaffolds were characterized from a morphological and mechanical point of view. A correlation between the preparation method, the pore architecture and compressive mechanical behavior was found. The interface adhesion strength was quantitatively evaluated by using a custom-designed interfacial strength test. Furthermore, in order to imitate the human physiology, mechanical tests were also performed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution at 37 °C. The method herein presented provides a high control of porosity, pore size distribution and mechanical performance, thus offering the possibility to fabricate three-layered scaffolds with tailored properties by following a simple and eco-friendly route.

  10. Relation Between Pore Size and the Compressibility of a Confined Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Gor, Gennady Y.; Siderius, Daniel W.; Rasmussen, Christopher J.; Krekelberg, William P.; Shen, Vincent K.; Bernstein, Noam

    2015-01-01

    When a fluid is confined to a nanopore, its thermodynamic properties differ from the properties of a bulk fluid, so measuring such properties of the confined fluid can provide information about the pore sizes. Here we report a simple relation between the pore size and isothermal compressibility of argon confined in these pores. Compressibility is calculated from the fluctuations of the number of particles in the grand canonical ensemble using two different simulation techniques: conventional grand-canonical Monte Carlo and grand-canonical ensemble transition-matrix Monte Carlo. Our results provide a theoretical framework for extracting the information on the pore sizes of fluid-saturated samples by measuring the compressibility from ultrasonic experiments. PMID:26590541

  11. Relation between pore size and the compressibility of a confined fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Gor, Gennady Y.; Siderius, Daniel W.; Krekelberg, William P.; Shen, Vincent K.; Rasmussen, Christopher J.; Bernstein, Noam

    2015-11-21

    When a fluid is confined to a nanopore, its thermodynamic properties differ from the properties of a bulk fluid, so measuring such properties of the confined fluid can provide information about the pore sizes. Here, we report a simple relation between the pore size and isothermal compressibility of argon confined in such pores. Compressibility is calculated from the fluctuations of the number of particles in the grand canonical ensemble using two different simulation techniques: conventional grand-canonical Monte Carlo and grand-canonical ensemble transition-matrix Monte Carlo. Our results provide a theoretical framework for extracting the information on the pore sizes of fluid-saturated samples by measuring the compressibility from ultrasonic experiments.

  12. Origin and heterogeneity of pore sizes in the Mount Simon Sandstone and Eau Claire Formation: Implications for multiphase fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mozley, Peter S.; Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The Mount Simon Sandstone and Eau Claire Formation represent a principal reservoir - caprock system for wastewater disposal, geologic CO2 storage, and compressed air energy storage (CAES) in the Midwestern United States. Of primary concern to site performance is heterogeneity in flow properties that could lead to non-ideal injectivity and distribution of injected fluids (e.g., poor sweep efficiency). Using core samples from the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, we investigate pore structure that governs flow properties of major lithofacies of these formations. Methods include gas porosimetry and permeametry, mercury intrusion porosimetry, thin section petrography, and X-ray diffraction. The lithofacies exhibit highly variable intra- and inter-informational distributions of pore throat and body sizes. Based on pore-throat size, samples fall into four distinct groups. Micropore-throat dominated samples are from the Eau Claire Formation, whereas the macropore-, mesopore-, and uniform-dominated samples are from the Mount Simon Sandstone. Complex paragenesis governs the high degree of pore and pore-throat size heterogeneity, due to an interplay of precipitation, non-uniform compaction, and later dissolution of cements. Furthermore, the cement dissolution event probably accounts for much of the current porosity in the unit. The unusually heterogeneous nature of the pore networks in the Mount Simon Sandstone indicates that there is a greater-than-normal opportunity for reservoir capillary trapping of non-wetting fluids — as quantified by CO2 and air column heights — which should be taken into account when assessing the potential of the reservoir-caprock system for CO2 storage and CAES.

  13. Origin and heterogeneity of pore sizes in the Mount Simon Sandstone and Eau Claire Formation: Implications for multiphase fluid flow

    DOE PAGES

    Mozley, Peter S.; Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; ...

    2016-01-01

    The Mount Simon Sandstone and Eau Claire Formation represent a principal reservoir - caprock system for wastewater disposal, geologic CO2 storage, and compressed air energy storage (CAES) in the Midwestern United States. Of primary concern to site performance is heterogeneity in flow properties that could lead to non-ideal injectivity and distribution of injected fluids (e.g., poor sweep efficiency). Using core samples from the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, we investigate pore structure that governs flow properties of major lithofacies of these formations. Methods include gas porosimetry and permeametry, mercury intrusion porosimetry, thin section petrography, and X-ray diffraction. The lithofacies exhibit highlymore » variable intra- and inter-informational distributions of pore throat and body sizes. Based on pore-throat size, samples fall into four distinct groups. Micropore-throat dominated samples are from the Eau Claire Formation, whereas the macropore-, mesopore-, and uniform-dominated samples are from the Mount Simon Sandstone. Complex paragenesis governs the high degree of pore and pore-throat size heterogeneity, due to an interplay of precipitation, non-uniform compaction, and later dissolution of cements. Furthermore, the cement dissolution event probably accounts for much of the current porosity in the unit. The unusually heterogeneous nature of the pore networks in the Mount Simon Sandstone indicates that there is a greater-than-normal opportunity for reservoir capillary trapping of non-wetting fluids — as quantified by CO2 and air column heights — which should be taken into account when assessing the potential of the reservoir-caprock system for CO2 storage and CAES.« less

  14. Protein adsorption on DEAE ion-exchange resins with different ligand densities and pore sizes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui-Li; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Zhu, Mi-Mi; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2012-11-01

    Ion exchange chromatography (IEC) is a common and powerful technique for the purification of proteins. The ligand density and pore properties of ion-exchange resins have significant effects on the separation behaviors of protein, however, the understandings are quite limited. In the present work, the adsorption isotherms of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated systematically with series of diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) ion-exchange resins, which have different ligand densities and pore sizes. The Langmuir equation was used to fit the experimental data and the influences of ligand density and pore size on the saturated adsorption capacity and the dissociation constant were discussed. The zeta potentials and hydrodynamic diameters of proteins at different pHs were also measured, and the surface charge characteristics of proteins and the adsorption mechanism were discussed. The results demonstrated that the ligand density, pore size, and protein properties affect the protein adsorption capacities in an integrative way. An integrative parameter was introduced to describe the complicated effects of ligand density and pore size on the protein adsorption. For a given protein, the ligand density and pore size should be optimized for improving the protein adsorption.

  15. Role of pore size and morphology in musculo-skeletal tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Perez, Roman A; Mestres, Gemma

    2016-04-01

    Biomaterials in the form of scaffolds hold great promise in the regeneration of diseased tissues. The scaffolds stimulate cellular adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. While the scaffold composition will dictate their biocompatibility, their porosity plays a key role in allowing proper cell penetration, nutrient diffusion as well as bone ingrowth. Porous scaffolds are processed with the help of a wide variety of techniques. Designing scaffolds with the appropriate porosity is a complex issue since this may jeopardize other physico-chemical properties. From a macroscopic point of view, parameters such as the overall architecture, pore morphology, interconnectivity and pore size distribution, have unique roles in allowing bone ingrowth to take place. From a microscopic perspective, the adsorption and retention of proteins in the microporosities of the material will dictate the subsequent cell adhesion. Therefore, the microstructure of the substrate can determine cell proliferation as well as the expression of specific osteogenic genes. This review aims at discussing the effect of micro- and macroporosity on the physico-chemical and biological properties of scaffolds for musculo-skeletal tissue regeneration.

  16. New and conventional pore size tests in virus-removing membranes.

    PubMed

    Duek, Aviv; Arkhangelsky, Elizabeth; Krush, Ronit; Brenner, Asher; Gitis, Vitaly

    2012-05-15

    Microorganisms are retained by ultrafiltration (UF) membranes mainly due to size exclusion. The sizes of viruses and membrane pores are close to each other and retention of viruses can be guaranteed only if the precise pore diameter is known. Unfortunately and rather surprisingly, there is no direct method to determine the membrane pore size. As a result, the UF membranes are not trusted to remove the viruses, and the treatment plants are required to enhance viral disinfection. Here we propose a new, simple and effective method for UF pore size determination using aquasols of gold and silver nanoparticles. We synthesized highly monodispersed suspensions ranging in diameter from 3 to 50 nm, which were later transferred through polymer and ceramic UF membranes. The retention percentage was plotted against the particle diameter to determine the pore size for which a membrane has a retention capability of 50, 90 and 100%. The d(50), d(90) and d(100) values were compared with data obtained from conventional transmembrane flux, polyethylene glycol, and dextran tests, and with the retention of phi X 174 and MS2 bacteriophages. The absolute pore size, d(100), for the majority of tested UF membranes is within 40-50 nm, and can only be detected with the new tests. The average 1.2 log retention of hydrophilic phi X 174 was predicted accurately by models based on the virus hydrodynamic radii and d(100) pore size. The 2.5 log MS2 retention suggests hydrophobic interactions in addition to simple ball-through-cylinder geometry.

  17. Synthesis of mesoporous carbon nanoparticles with large and tunable pore sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Yu, Meihua; Li, Yang; Li, Jiansheng; Wang, Jing; Yu, Chengzhong; Wang, Lianjun

    2015-07-01

    Mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCNs) with large and adjustable pores have been synthesized by using poly(ethylene oxide)-b-polystyrene (PEO-b-PS) as a template and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) as a carbon precursor. The resulting MCNs possess small diameters (100-126 nm) and high BET surface areas (up to 646 m2 g-1). By using home-designed block copolymers, the pore size of MCNs can be tuned in the range of 13-32 nm. Importantly, the pore size of 32 nm is the largest among the MCNs prepared by the soft-templating route. The formation mechanism and structure evolution of MCNs were studied by TEM and DLS measurements, based on which a soft-templating/sphere packing mechanism was proposed. Because of the large pores and small particle sizes, the resulting MCNs were excellent nano-carriers to deliver biomolecules into cancer cells. MCNs were further demonstrated with negligible toxicity. It is anticipated that this carbon material with large pores and small particle sizes may have excellent potential in drug/gene delivery.Mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCNs) with large and adjustable pores have been synthesized by using poly(ethylene oxide)-b-polystyrene (PEO-b-PS) as a template and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) as a carbon precursor. The resulting MCNs possess small diameters (100-126 nm) and high BET surface areas (up to 646 m2 g-1). By using home-designed block copolymers, the pore size of MCNs can be tuned in the range of 13-32 nm. Importantly, the pore size of 32 nm is the largest among the MCNs prepared by the soft-templating route. The formation mechanism and structure evolution of MCNs were studied by TEM and DLS measurements, based on which a soft-templating/sphere packing mechanism was proposed. Because of the large pores and small particle sizes, the resulting MCNs were excellent nano-carriers to deliver biomolecules into cancer cells. MCNs were further demonstrated with negligible toxicity. It is anticipated that this carbon material with large pores and

  18. Passive permeability and effective pore size of HeLa cell nuclear membranes.

    PubMed

    Samudram, Arunkarthick; Mangalassery, Bijeesh M; Kowshik, Meenal; Patincharath, Nandakumar; Varier, Geetha K

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear pore complexes in the nuclear membrane act as the sole gateway of transport of molecules from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and vice versa. Studies on biomolecular transport through nuclear membranes provide vital data on the nuclear pore complexes. In this work, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran molecules as a model system and study the passive nuclear import of biomolecules through nuclear pore complexes in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells. Experiments are carried out under transient conditions in the time lapse imaging scheme using an in-house constructed confocal laser scanning microscope. Transport rates of dextran molecules having molecular weights of 4-70 kDa corresponding to Stokes radius of 1.4-6 nm are determined. Analyzing the permeability of the nuclear membrane for different sizes the effective pore radius of HeLa cell nuclear membrane is determined to be 5.3 nm, much larger than the value reported earlier using proteins as probe molecules. The range of values reported for the nuclear pore radius suggest that they may not be rigid structures and it is quite probable that the effective pore size of nuclear pore complexes is critically dependent on the probe molecules and on the environmental factors.

  19. Probing the SecYEG translocation pore size with preproteins conjugated with sizable rigid spherical molecules.

    PubMed

    Bonardi, Francesco; Halza, Erik; Walko, Martin; Du Plessis, François; Nouwen, Nico; Feringa, Ben L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2011-05-10

    Protein translocation in Escherichia coli is mediated by the translocase that in its minimal form consists of the protein-conducting channel SecYEG, and the motor protein, SecA. SecYEG forms a narrow pore in the membrane that allows passage of unfolded proteins only. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the maximal width of the central pore of SecYEG is limited to . To access the functional size of the SecYEG pore, the precursor of outer membrane protein A was modified with rigid spherical tetraarylmethane derivatives of different diameters at a unique cysteine residue. SecYEG allowed the unrestricted passage of the precursor of outer membrane protein A conjugates carrying tetraarylmethanes with diameters up to , whereas a sized molecule blocked the translocation pore. Translocation of the protein-organic molecule hybrids was strictly proton motive force-dependent and occurred at a single pore. With an average diameter of an unfolded polypeptide chain of , the pore accommodates structures of at least , which is vastly larger than the predicted maximal width of a single pore by molecular dynamics simulations.

  20. Physiologic upper limits of pore size of different blood capillary types and another perspective on the dual pore theory of microvascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Much of our current understanding of microvascular permeability is based on the findings of classic experimental studies of blood capillary permeability to various-sized lipid-insoluble endogenous and non-endogenous macromolecules. According to the classic small pore theory of microvascular permeability, which was formulated on the basis of the findings of studies on the transcapillary flow rates of various-sized systemically or regionally perfused endogenous macromolecules, transcapillary exchange across the capillary wall takes place through a single population of small pores that are approximately 6 nm in diameter; whereas, according to the dual pore theory of microvascular permeability, which was formulated on the basis of the findings of studies on the accumulation of various-sized systemically or regionally perfused non-endogenous macromolecules in the locoregional tissue lymphatic drainages, transcapillary exchange across the capillary wall also takes place through a separate population of large pores, or capillary leaks, that are between 24 and 60 nm in diameter. The classification of blood capillary types on the basis of differences in the physiologic upper limits of pore size to transvascular flow highlights the differences in the transcapillary exchange routes for the transvascular transport of endogenous and non-endogenous macromolecules across the capillary walls of different blood capillary types. Methods The findings and published data of studies on capillary wall ultrastructure and capillary microvascular permeability to lipid-insoluble endogenous and non-endogenous molecules from the 1950s to date were reviewed. In this study, the blood capillary types in different tissues and organs were classified on the basis of the physiologic upper limits of pore size to the transvascular flow of lipid-insoluble molecules. Blood capillaries were classified as non-sinusoidal or sinusoidal on the basis of capillary wall basement membrane layer

  1. Large pore size nanoporous materials from the self-assembly of asymmetric bottlebrush block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Justin; Bailey, Travis S; Rzayev, Javid

    2011-03-09

    Asymmetric polystyrene-polylactide (PS-PLA) bottlebrush block copolymers have been shown to self-assemble into a cylindrical morphology with large domain spacings. PLA cylinders can be selectively etched out of the shear-aligned polymer monoliths to generate nanoporous materials with an average cylindrical pore diameter of 55 nm. The remaining bottlebrush backbone provides a functional, hydrophilic coating inside the nanopores. This methodology significantly expands the range of pore sizes attainable in block copolymer based nanoporous materials.

  2. Controlling the Pore Size of Mesoporous Carbon Thin Films through Thermal and Solvent Annealing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengping; Liu, Guoliang

    2017-02-02

    Herein an approach to controlling the pore size of mesoporous carbon thin films from metal-free polyacrylonitrile-containing block copolymers is described. A high-molecular-weight poly(acrylonitrile-block-methyl methacrylate) (PAN-b-PMMA) is synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The authors systematically investigate the self-assembly behavior of PAN-b-PMMA thin films during thermal and solvent annealing, as well as the pore size of mesoporous carbon thin films after pyrolysis. The as-spin-coated PAN-b-PMMA is microphase-separated into uniformly spaced globular nanostructures, and these globular nanostructures evolve into various morphologies after thermal or solvent annealing. Surprisingly, through thermal annealing and subsequent pyrolysis of PAN-b-PMMA into mesoporous carbon thin films, the pore size and center-to-center spacing increase significantly with thermal annealing temperature, different from most block copolymers. In addition, the choice of solvent in solvent annealing strongly influences the block copolymer nanostructure and the pore size of mesoporous carbon thin films. The discoveries herein provide a simple strategy to control the pore size of mesoporous carbon thin films by tuning thermal or solvent annealing conditions, instead of synthesizing a series of block copolymers of various molecular weights and compositions.

  3. Size distribution of ring polymers

    PubMed Central

    Medalion, Shlomi; Aghion, Erez; Meirovitch, Hagai; Barkai, Eli; Kessler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an exact solution for the distribution of sample averaged monomer to monomer distance of ring polymers. For non-interacting and local-interaction models these distributions correspond to the distribution of the area under the reflected Bessel bridge and the Bessel excursion respectively, and are shown to be identical in dimension d ≥ 2, albeit with pronounced finite size effects at the critical dimension, d = 2. A symmetry of the problem reveals that dimension d and 4 − d are equivalent, thus the celebrated Airy distribution describing the areal distribution of the d = 1 Brownian excursion describes also a polymer in three dimensions. For a self-avoiding polymer in dimension d we find numerically that the fluctuations of the scaled averaged distance are nearly identical in dimension d = 2, 3 and are well described to a first approximation by the non-interacting excursion model in dimension 5. PMID:27302596

  4. Pore size assessment during corneal endothelial cells permeabilization by femtosecond laser activated carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumelle, C.; Mauclair, C.; Houzet, J.; Bernard, A.; He, Z.; Piselli, S.; Perrache, C.; Egaud, G.; Baubeau, E.; Gain, P.; Thuret, G.

    2015-07-01

    Corneal therapeutic molecules delivery represents a promising solution to maintain human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) viability, but the difficulty is transport across cell membrane. A new delivery method published recently consists in ephemerally permeabilizing cell membranes using a photo-acoustic reaction produced by carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) and femtosecond laser (FsL). The aim of this work is to investigate the size of pores formed at cell membrane by this technique. To induce cell permeabilization, HCECs were put in contact with CNPs and irradiated with a 500 μm diameter Ti:Sa FsL focalized spot. Four sizes of marker molecules were delivered into HCECs to investigate pore sizes: calcein (1.2 nm), FITC-Dextran 4kDa (2.8 nm) and FITC-Dextran 70kDa (12 nm) and FITC-Dextran 2MDa (50 nm). Delivery of each molecule was assessed by flow cytometry, a technique able to measure their presence into cells. We showed that the delivery rate was dependent of their size. Calcein was delivered in 56.1±8.2% of HCECs, FITC-Dextran 4kDa in 42.2±3.5%, FITC-Dextran 70 kDa in 21.5±2.7% and finally FITC-Dextran 2MDa in 12.9±2.0%. It means that a large number of pores in the size ranging from 1.2 to 2.8 nm were formed. However, 12 nm and larger pores were almost half more infrequent. Pore sizes formed at cell membrane by the technique of cell permeabilization by FsL activated CNPs was investigated. The results indicated that the pore sizes are large enough for the efficient delivery of small, medium and big therapeutics molecules on HCECs by this technique.

  5. Tricontinuous Cubic Nanostructure and Pore Size Patterning in Mesostructured Silica Films Templated with Glycerol Monooleate.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Darren R; Garcia, Fred L; Kaehr, Bryan; Khripin, Constantine Y; Collord, Andrew D; Baca, Helen K; Tate, Michael P; Hillhouse, Hugh W; Strzalka, Joseph W; Jiang, Zhang; Wang, Jin; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2011-04-26

    The fabrication of nanostructured films possessing tricontinuous minimal surface mesophases with well-defined framework and pore connectivity remains a difficult task. As a new route to these structures, we introduce glycerol monooleate (GMO) as a template for evaporation-induced self-assembly. As deposited, a nanostructured double gyroid phase is formed, as indicated by analysis of grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering data. Removal of GMO by UV/O(3) treatment or acid extraction induces a phase change to a nanoporous body-centered structure which we tentatively identify as based on the IW-P surface. To improve film quality, we add a co-surfactant to the GMO in a mass ratio of 1:10; when this co-surfactant is cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we find an unusually large pore size (8-12 nm) in acid extracted films, while UV/O(3) treated films yield pores of only ca. 4 nm. Using this pore size dependence on film processing procedure, we create a simple method for patterning pore size in nanoporous films, demonstrating spatially-defined size-selective molecular adsorption.

  6. Characterizing pore sizes and water structure in stimuli-responsive hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A.S.; Antonsen, K.P.; Ashida, T.; Bohnert, J.L.; Dong, L.C.; Nabeshima, Y.; Nagamatsu, S.; Park, T.G.; Sheu, M.S.; Wu, X.S.; Yan, Q.

    1993-12-31

    Hydrogels have been extensively investigated as potential matrices for drug delivery. In particular, hydrogels responsive to pH and temperature changes have been of greatest interest most recently. Proteins and peptide drugs are especially relevant for delivery from such hydrogel matrices due to the relatively {open_quotes}passive{close_quotes} and biocompatible microenvironment which should exist within the hydrogel aqueous pores. The large molecular size of many proteins requires an interconnected large pore structure. Furthermore, the gel pore {open_quotes}walls{close_quotes} should not provide hydrophobic sites for strong interactions with proteins. In the special case of ion exchange release the protein would be attracted by opposite charges on the polymer backbones. Therefore, it is important both to control and to characterize the pore structure and the water character within a hydrogel to be used or protein or peptide drug delivery. This talk will critically review techniques for estimating these two key parameters in hydrogels.

  7. Strong pore-size dependence of the optical properties in porous alumina membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, C. H.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Han, J. K.; Choi, Y. C.; Bu, S. D.; Shin, H. Y.; Yoon, S.

    2013-11-01

    We report on the strong pore-size-dependent optical properties of porous alumina membranes (PAMs) by using the photoluminescence and the optical spectroscopic techniques. The pore diameters of our PAMs varied from 60 to 420 nm. All samples showed a sizable violet/blue emission with a strong temperature dependence. We found that the peak position of the emission shifted to higher energies with increasing pore diameter, which was in accord with the smaller binding energy extracted from the temperature dependence of the emission intensity. From the transmission spectra, we found that the effective bandgap of the PAMs shifted significantly to lower energies with increasing pore diameter, which indicated that the impurity states within the bandgap was affected strongly by the geometry of the PAM.

  8. Pore-size dependent THz absorption of nano-confined water.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chi-Kuang; You, Borwen; Huang, Yu-Ru; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Sato, Shusaku; Irisawa, Akiyoshi; Imamura, Motoki; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-06-15

    We performed a THz absorption spectroscopy study on liquid water confined in mesoporous silica materials, MCM-41-S-18 and MCM-41-S-21, of two different pore sizes at room temperatures. We found that stronger confinement with a smaller pore size causes reduced THz absorption, indicating reduced water mobility due to confinement. Combined with recent theoretical studies showing that the microscopic structure of water inside the nanopores can be separated into a core water region and an interfacial water region, our spectroscopy analysis further reveals a bulk-water-like THz absorption behavior in the core water region and a solid-like THz absorption behavior in the interfacial water region.

  9. Pore Size Control of Ultra-thin Silicon Membranes by Rapid Thermal Carbonization

    PubMed Central

    Fang, David Z.; Striemer, Christopher C.; Gaborski, Thomas R.; McGrath, James L.; Fauchet, Philippe M.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid thermal carbonization in a dilute acetylene (C2H2) atmosphere has been used to chemically modify and precisely tune the pore size of ultrathin porous nanocrystalline silicon (pnc-Si). The magnitude of size reduction was controlled by varying the process temperature and time. Under certain conditions, the carbon coating displayed atomic ordering indicative of graphene layer formation conformal to the pore walls. Initial experiments show that carbonized membranes follow theoretical predictions for hydraulic permeability and retain the precise separation capabilities of untreated membranes. PMID:20839831

  10. Pore-size dependence and characteristics of water diffusion in slitlike micropores

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, S. O.

    2015-07-16

    The temperature dependence of the dynamics of water inside microporous activated carbon fibers (ACF) is investigated by means of incoherent elastic and quasielastic neutron-scattering techniques. The aim is to evaluate the effect of increasing pore size on the water dynamics in these primarily hydrophobic slit-shaped channels. Using two different micropore sizes (similar to 12 and 18 angstrom, denoted, respectively, ACF-10 and ACF-20), a clear suppression of the mobility of the water molecules is observed as the pore gap or temperature decreases. Suppression, we found, is accompanied by a systematic dependence of the average translational diffusion coefficient D-r and relaxation time [tau(0)] of the restricted water on pore size and temperature. We observed D-r values and tested against a proposed scaling law, in which the translational diffusion coefficient D-r of water within a porous matrix was found to depend solely on two single parameters, a temperature-independent translational diffusion coefficient D-c associated with the water bound to the pore walls and the ratio theta of this strictly confined water to the total water inside the pore, yielding unique characteristic parameters for water transport in these carbon channels across the investigated temperature range.

  11. Pore-size dependence and characteristics of water diffusion in slitlike micropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, S. O.

    2015-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the dynamics of water inside microporous activated carbon fibers (ACF) is investigated by means of incoherent elastic and quasielastic neutron-scattering techniques. The aim is to evaluate the effect of increasing pore size on the water dynamics in these primarily hydrophobic slit-shaped channels. Using two different micropore sizes (˜12 and 18 Å, denoted, respectively, ACF-10 and ACF-20), a clear suppression of the mobility of the water molecules is observed as the pore gap or temperature decreases. This suppression is accompanied by a systematic dependence of the average translational diffusion coefficient Dr and relaxation time <τ0> of the restricted water on pore size and temperature. The observed Dr values are tested against a proposed scaling law, in which the translational diffusion coefficient Dr of water within a porous matrix was found to depend solely on two single parameters, a temperature-independent translational diffusion coefficient Dc associated with the water bound to the pore walls and the ratio θ of this strictly confined water to the total water inside the pore, yielding unique characteristic parameters for water transport in these carbon channels across the investigated temperature range.

  12. Pore-size dependence and characteristics of water diffusion in slitlike micropores

    DOE PAGES

    Diallo, S. O.

    2015-07-16

    The temperature dependence of the dynamics of water inside microporous activated carbon fibers (ACF) is investigated by means of incoherent elastic and quasielastic neutron-scattering techniques. The aim is to evaluate the effect of increasing pore size on the water dynamics in these primarily hydrophobic slit-shaped channels. Using two different micropore sizes (similar to 12 and 18 angstrom, denoted, respectively, ACF-10 and ACF-20), a clear suppression of the mobility of the water molecules is observed as the pore gap or temperature decreases. Suppression, we found, is accompanied by a systematic dependence of the average translational diffusion coefficient D-r and relaxation timemore » [tau(0)] of the restricted water on pore size and temperature. We observed D-r values and tested against a proposed scaling law, in which the translational diffusion coefficient D-r of water within a porous matrix was found to depend solely on two single parameters, a temperature-independent translational diffusion coefficient D-c associated with the water bound to the pore walls and the ratio theta of this strictly confined water to the total water inside the pore, yielding unique characteristic parameters for water transport in these carbon channels across the investigated temperature range.« less

  13. Development of gelatin-chitosan-hydroxyapatite based bioactive bone scaffold with controlled pore size and mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Maji, Kanchan; Dasgupta, Sudip; Kundu, Biswanath; Bissoyi, Akalabya

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite-chitosan/gelatin (HA:Chi:Gel) nanocomposite scaffold has potential to serve as a template matrix to regenerate extra cellular matrix of human bone. Scaffolds with varying composition of hydroxyapatite, chitosan, and gelatin were prepared using lyophilization technique where glutaraldehyde (GTA) acted as a cross-linking agent for biopolymers. First, phase pure hydroxyapatite-chitosan nanocrystals were in situ synthesized by coprecipitation method using a solution of 2% acetic acid dissolved chitosan and aqueous solution of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate [Ca(NO3)2,4H2O] and diammonium hydrogen phosphate [(NH4)2H PO4]. Keeping solid loading constant at 30 wt% and changing the composition of the original slurry of gelatin, HA-chitosan allowed control of the pore size, its distribution, and mechanical properties of the scaffolds. Microstructural investigation by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a well interconnected porous scaffold with a pore size in the range of 35-150 μm. The HA granules were uniformly dispersed in the gelatin-chitosan network. An optimal composition in terms of pore size and mechanical properties was obtained from the scaffold with an HA:Chi:Gel ratio of 21:49:30. The composite scaffold having 70% porosity with pore size distribution of 35-150 μm exhibited a compressive strength of 3.3-3.5 MPa, which is within the range of that exhibited by cancellous bone. The bioactivity of the scaffold was evaluated after conducting mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) - materials interaction and MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay using MSCs. The scaffold found to be conducive to MSC's adhesion as evident from lamellipodia, filopodia extensions from cell cytoskeleton, proliferation, and differentiation up to 14 days of cell culture.

  14. Pore size regulates operating stomatal conductance, while stomatal densities drive the partitioning of conductance between leaf sides

    PubMed Central

    Fanourakis, Dimitrios; Giday, Habtamu; Milla, Rubén; Pieruschka, Roland; Kjaer, Katrine H.; Bolger, Marie; Vasilevski, Aleksandar; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fiorani, Fabio; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf gas exchange is influenced by stomatal size, density, distribution between the leaf adaxial and abaxial sides, as well as by pore dimensions. This study aims to quantify which of these traits mainly underlie genetic differences in operating stomatal conductance (gs) and addresses possible links between anatomical traits and regulation of pore width. Methods Stomatal responsiveness to desiccation, gs-related anatomical traits of each leaf side and estimated gs (based on these traits) were determined for 54 introgression lines (ILs) generated by introgressing segments of Solanum pennelli into the S. lycopersicum ‘M82’. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis for stomatal traits was also performed. Key Results A wide genetic variation in stomatal responsiveness to desiccation was observed, a large part of which was explained by stomatal length. Operating gs ranged over a factor of five between ILs. The pore area per stomatal area varied 8-fold among ILs (2–16 %), and was the main determinant of differences in operating gs between ILs. Operating gs was primarily positioned on the abaxial surface (60–83 %), due to higher abaxial stomatal density and, secondarily, to larger abaxial pore area. An analysis revealed 64 QTLs for stomatal traits in the ILs, most of which were in the direction of S. pennellii. Conclusions The data indicate that operating and maximum gs of non-stressed leaves maintained under stable conditions deviate considerably (by 45–91 %), because stomatal size inadequately reflects operating pore area (R2 = 0·46). Furthermore, it was found that variation between ILs in both stomatal sensitivity to desiccation and operating gs is associated with features of individual stoma. In contrast, genotypic variation in gs partitioning depends on the distribution of stomata between the leaf adaxial and abaxial epidermis. PMID:25538116

  15. Development of hierarchical, tunable pore size polymer foams for ICF targets

    DOE PAGES

    Hamilton, Christopher E.; Lee, Matthew Nicholson; Parra-Vasquez, A. Nicholas Gerardo

    2016-08-01

    In this study, one of the great challenges of inertial confinement fusion experiments is poor understanding of the effects of reactant heterogeneity on fusion reactions. The Marble campaign, conceived at Los Alamos National Laboratory, aims to gather new insights into this issue by utilizing target capsules containing polymer foams of variable pore sizes, tunable over an order of magnitude. Here, we describe recent and ongoing progress in the development of CH and CH/CD polymer foams in support of Marble. Hierarchical and tunable pore sizes have been achieved by utilizing a sacrificial porogen template within an open-celled poly(divinylbenzene) or poly(divinylbenzene-co-styrene) aerogelmore » matrix, resulting in low-density foams (~30 mg/ml) with continuous multimodal pore networks.« less

  16. Development of hierarchical, tunable pore size polymer foams for ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Christopher E.; Lee, Matthew Nicholson; Parra-Vasquez, A. Nicholas Gerardo

    2016-08-01

    In this study, one of the great challenges of inertial confinement fusion experiments is poor understanding of the effects of reactant heterogeneity on fusion reactions. The Marble campaign, conceived at Los Alamos National Laboratory, aims to gather new insights into this issue by utilizing target capsules containing polymer foams of variable pore sizes, tunable over an order of magnitude. Here, we describe recent and ongoing progress in the development of CH and CH/CD polymer foams in support of Marble. Hierarchical and tunable pore sizes have been achieved by utilizing a sacrificial porogen template within an open-celled poly(divinylbenzene) or poly(divinylbenzene-co-styrene) aerogel matrix, resulting in low-density foams (~30 mg/ml) with continuous multimodal pore networks.

  17. Amine-modified ordered mesoporous silica: The effect of pore size on CO2 capture performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Yao, Manli; Hu, Xin; Hu, Gengshen; Lu, Jiqing; Luo, Mengfei; Fan, Maohong

    2015-01-01

    The objective of current research is to investigate the effect of pore size of mesoporous silica supports on the CO2 capture performance of solid amine sorbents. Two ordered mesoporous silicas (OMS) with different pore sizes (5.6 nm and 7.6 nm) were synthesized as tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) supports. A serious of techniques, such as physical adsorption, infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis were used to characterize the solid amine sorbents. The CO2 capture performances of the sorbents were evaluated using breakthrough method with a fixed-bed reactor equipped with an online mass spectrometer. The experimental results indicate that the pore size has significant influence on CO2 capture performance. Larger pore size could decrease the mass transfer resistance and increase the interaction between CO2 and TEPA. Therefore, OMS-7.6 is better than OMS-5.6 as amine support. The highest CO2 sorption capacities achieved with OMS-7.6 with 50 wt% TEPA loading (OMS-7.6-50) in the absence and presence of moisture are 3.45 mmol/g and 4.28 mmol/g, respectively, under the conditions of 10.0% CO2/N2 mixture at 75 °C. Cyclic CO2 adsorption-desorption experiments indicate that the solid amine sorbents are fairly stable and regenerable.

  18. Effects of pore size and dissolved organic matters on diffusion of arsenate in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulong; Wang, Shaofeng; Wang, Xin; Jia, Yongfeng

    2017-02-01

    Presented here is the influence of membrane pore size and dissolved organic matters on the diffusion coefficient (D) of aqueous arsenate, investigated by the diffusion cell method for the first time. The pH-dependent diffusion coefficient of arsenate was determined and compared with values from previous studies; the coefficient was found to decrease with increasing pH, showing the validity of our novel diffusion cell method. The D value increased dramatically as a function of membrane pore size at small pore sizes, and then increased slowly at pore sizes larger than 2.0μm. Using the ExpAssoc model, the maximum D value was determined to be 11.2565×10(-6)cm(2)/sec. The presence of dissolved organic matters led to a dramatic increase of the D of arsenate, which could be attributed to electrostatic effects and ionic effects of salts. These results improve the understanding of the diffusion behavior of arsenate, especially the important role of various environmental parameters in the study and prediction of the migration of arsenate in aquatic water systems.

  19. Size Control of Porous Silicon-Based Nanoparticles via Pore-Wall Thinning.

    PubMed

    Secret, Emilie; Leonard, Camille; Kelly, Stefan J; Uhl, Amanda; Cozzan, Clayton; Andrew, Jennifer S

    2016-02-02

    Photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals are very attractive for biomedical and electronic applications. Here a new process is presented to synthesize photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals with diameters smaller than 6 nm from a porous silicon template. These nanoparticles are formed using a pore-wall thinning approach, where the as-etched porous silicon layer is partially oxidized to silica, which is dissolved by a hydrofluoric acid solution, decreasing the pore-wall thickness. This decrease in pore-wall thickness leads to a corresponding decrease in the size of the nanocrystals that make up the pore walls, resulting in the formation of smaller nanoparticles during sonication of the porous silicon. Particle diameters were measured using dynamic light scattering, and these values were compared with the nanocrystallite size within the pore wall as determined from X-ray diffraction. Additionally, an increase in the quantum confinement effect is observed for these particles through an increase in the photoluminescence intensity of the nanoparticles compared with the as-etched nanoparticles, without the need for a further activation step by oxidation after synthesis.

  20. Mouthpart conduit sizes of fluid-feeding insects determine the ability to feed from pores

    DOE PAGES

    Lehnert, Matthew S.; Bennett, Andrew; Reiter, Kristen E.; ...

    2017-01-04

    Fluid-feeding insects, such as butterflies, moths, and flies (20% of all animal species), are faced with the common selection pressure of having to remove and feed on trace amounts of fluids from porous surfaces. Insects able to acquire fluids that are confined to pores during drought conditions would have an adaptive advantage and increased fitness over other individuals. Here we performed feeding trials using solutions with magnetic nanoparticles to show that butterflies and flies have mouthparts adapted to pull liquids from porous surfaces using capillary action as the governing principle. In addition, the ability to feed on the liquids collectedmore » from pores depends on a relationship between the diameter of the mouthpart conduits and substrate pore size diameter; insects with mouthpart conduit diameters larger than the pores cannot successfully feed, thus there is a limiting substrate pore size from which each species can acquire liquids for fluid uptake. In conclusion, given that natural selection independently favored mouthpart architectures that support these methods of fluid uptake (Diptera and Lepidoptera share a common ancestor 280 mya that had chewing mouthparts), we suggest that the convergence of this mechanism advocates this as an optimal strategy for pulling trace amounts of fluids from porous surfaces.« less

  1. Estimation of the pore size of the large-conductance mechanosensitive ion channel of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshank, C C; Minchin, R F; Le Dain, A C; Martinac, B

    1997-01-01

    The open channel diameter of Escherichia coli recombinant large-conductance mechanosensitive ion channels (MscL) was estimated using the model of Hille (Hille, B. 1968. Pharmacological modifications of the sodium channels of frog nerve. J. Gen. Physiol. 51:199-219) that relates the pore size to conductance. Based on the MscL conductance of 3.8 nS, and assumed pore lengths, a channel diameter of 34 to 46 A was calculated. To estimate the pore size experimentally, the effect of large organic ions on the conductance of MscL was examined. Poly-L-lysines (PLLs) with a diameter of 37 A or larger significantly reduced channel conductance, whereas spermine (approximately 15 A), PLL19 (approximately 25 A) and 1,1'-bis-(3-(1'-methyl-(4,4'-bipyridinium)-1-yl)-propyl)-4,4'-b ipyridinium (approximately 30 A) had no effect. The smaller organic ions putrescine, cadaverine, spermine, and succinate all permeated the channel. We conclude that the open pore diameter of the MscL is approximately 40 A, indicating that the MscL has one of the largest channel pores yet described. This channel diameter is consistent with the proposed homohexameric model of the MscL. PMID:9336188

  2. Metal electrode integration on macroporous silicon: pore distribution and morphology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a new approach for the one-step integration of interdigitated electrodes on macroporous silicon substrates is presented. Titanium/gold interdigitated electrodes are used to pattern p-type silicon substrates prior the anodization in an organic electrolyte. The electrolyte characteristics, conductivity, and pH have been found to affect the adherence of the metal layer on the silicon surface during the electrochemical etching. The impact of the metal pattern on size distribution and morphology of the resulting macroporous silicon layer is analyzed. A formation mechanism supported by finite element simulation is proposed. PMID:22799456

  3. Pore scale heterogeneity in the mineral distribution and surface area of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Peter; Moulton, Kevin; Krevor, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    There are long-standing challenges in characterizing reactive transport in porous media at scales larger than individual pores. This hampers the prediction of the field-scale impact of geochemical processes on fluid flow [1]. This is a source of uncertainty for carbon dioxide injection, which results in a reactive fluid-rock system, particularly in carbonate rock reservoirs. A potential cause is the inability of the continuum approach to incorporate the impact of heterogeneity in pore-scale reaction rates. This results in part from pore-scale heterogeneities in surface area of reactive minerals [2,3]. The objective of this study was to quantify heterogeneity in reactive surface and observe the extent of its non-normal character. In this study we describe our work in using micron-scale x-ray imaging and other spectroscopic techniques for the purpose of describing the statistical distribution of reactive surface area within a porous medium, and identifying specific mineral phases and their distribution in 3-dimensions. Using in-house image processing techniques and auxilary charactersation with thin section, electron microscope and spectroscopic techniques we quantified the surface area of each mineral phase in the x-ray CT images. This quantification was validated against nitrogen BET surface area and backscattered electron imaging measurements of the CT-imaged samples. Distributions in reactive surface area for each mineral phase were constructed by calculating surface areas in thousands of randomly selected subvolume images of the total sample, each normalized to the pore volume in that image. In all samples, there is little correlation between the reactive surface area fraction and the volumetric fraction of a mineral in a bulk rock. Berea sandstone was far less heterogeneous and has a characteristic pore size at which a surface area distribution may be used to quantify heterogeneity. In carbonates, heterogeneity is more complex and surface area must be

  4. Three-Dimensional Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications: Role of Porosity and Pore Size

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Qiu Li

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering applications commonly encompass the use of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds to provide a suitable microenvironment for the incorporation of cells or growth factors to regenerate damaged tissues or organs. These scaffolds serve to mimic the actual in vivo microenvironment where cells interact and behave according to the mechanical cues obtained from the surrounding 3D environment. Hence, the material properties of the scaffolds are vital in determining cellular response and fate. These 3D scaffolds are generally highly porous with interconnected pore networks to facilitate nutrient and oxygen diffusion and waste removal. This review focuses on the various fabrication techniques (e.g., conventional and rapid prototyping methods) that have been employed to fabricate 3D scaffolds of different pore sizes and porosity. The different pore size and porosity measurement methods will also be discussed. Scaffolds with graded porosity have also been studied for their ability to better represent the actual in vivo situation where cells are exposed to layers of different tissues with varying properties. In addition, the ability of pore size and porosity of scaffolds to direct cellular responses and alter the mechanical properties of scaffolds will be reviewed, followed by a look at nature's own scaffold, the extracellular matrix. Overall, the limitations of current scaffold fabrication approaches for tissue engineering applications and some novel and promising alternatives will be highlighted. PMID:23672709

  5. Virus-sized colloid transport in a single pore: model development and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Seetha, N; Mohan Kumar, M S; Majid Hassanizadeh, S; Raoof, Amir

    2014-08-01

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate the transport and deposition of virus-sized colloids in a cylindrical pore throat considering various processes such as advection, diffusion, colloid-collector surface interactions and hydrodynamic wall effects. The pore space is divided into three different regions, namely, bulk, diffusion and potential regions, based on the dominant processes acting in each of these regions. In the bulk region, colloid transport is governed by advection and diffusion whereas in the diffusion region, colloid mobility due to diffusion is retarded by hydrodynamic wall effects. Colloid-collector interaction forces dominate the transport in the potential region where colloid deposition occurs. The governing equations are non-dimensionalized and solved numerically. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the virus-sized colloid transport and deposition is significantly affected by various pore-scale parameters such as the surface potentials on colloid and collector, ionic strength of the solution, flow velocity, pore size and colloid size. The adsorbed concentration and hence, the favorability of the surface for adsorption increases with: (i) decreasing magnitude and ratio of surface potentials on colloid and collector, (ii) increasing ionic strength and (iii) increasing pore radius. The adsorbed concentration increases with increasing Pe, reaching a maximum value at Pe=0.1 and then decreases thereafter. Also, the colloid size significantly affects particle deposition with the adsorbed concentration increasing with increasing particle radius, reaching a maximum value at a particle radius of 100nm and then decreasing with increasing radius. System hydrodynamics is found to have a greater effect on larger particles than on smaller ones. The secondary minimum contribution to particle deposition has been found to increase as the favorability of the surface for adsorption decreases. The sensitivity of the model to a given parameter will be high if

  6. A general approach to crystalline and monomodal pore size mesoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, Altug S; Kuo, Chung-Hao; Biswas, Sourav; King'ondu, Cecil K; Suib, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous oxides attract a great deal of interest in many fields, including energy, catalysis and separation, because of their tunable structural properties such as surface area, pore volume and size, and nanocrystalline walls. Here we report thermally stable, crystalline, thermally controlled monomodal pore size mesoporous materials. Generation of such materials involves the use of inverse micelles, elimination of solvent effects, minimizing the effect of water content and controlling the condensation of inorganic frameworks by NO(x) decomposition. Nanosize particles are formed in inverse micelles and are randomly packed to a mesoporous structure. The mesopores are created by interconnected intraparticle voids and can be tuned from 1.2 to 25 nm by controlling the nanoparticle size. Such phenomena allow the preparation of multiple phases of the same metal oxide and syntheses of materials having compositions throughout much of the periodic table, with different structures and thermal stabilities as high as 800 °C.

  7. Fabrication of Cell-Laden Macroporous Biodegradable Hydrogels with Tunable Porosities and Pore Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Kasper, F. Kurtis

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigated a cytocompatible particulate leaching method for the fabrication of cell-laden macroporous hydrogels. We used dehydrated and uncrosslinked gelatin microspheres as leachable porogens to create macroporous oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels. Varying gelatin content and size resulted in a wide range of porosities and pore sizes, respectively. Encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibited high viability immediately following the fabrication process, and culture of cell-laden hydrogels revealed improved cell viability with increasing porosity. Additionally, the osteogenic potential of the encapsulated MSCs was evaluated over 16 days. Overall, this study presents a robust method for the preparation of cell-laden macroporous hydrogels with desired porosity and pore size for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25156274

  8. Effective porosity and pore-throat sizes of Conasauga Group mudrock: Application, test and evaluation of petrophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsch, J.; Katsube, T.J.; Sanford, W.E. |; Dugan, B.E.; Tourkow, L.M.

    1996-04-01

    Effective porosity (specifically referring to the interconnected pore space) was recently recognized as being essential in determining the effectiveness and extent of matrix diffusion as a transport mechanism within fractured low-permeability rock formations. The research presented in this report was performed to test the applicability of several petrophysical techniques for the determination of effective porosity of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks. In addition, the aim was to gather quantitative data on the effective porosity of Conasauga Group mudrock from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The quantitative data reported here include not only effective porosities based on diverse measurement techniques, but also data on the sizes of pore throats and their distribution, and specimen bulk and grain densities. The petrophysical techniques employed include the immersion-saturation method, mercury and helium porosimetry, and the radial diffusion-cell method.

  9. Tuning Pore Size in Square-Lattice Coordination Networks for Size-Selective Sieving of CO2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai-Jie; Madden, David G; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A; Kumar, Amrit; Yang, Qing-Yuan; Xue, Wei; Space, Brian; Perry, John J; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2016-08-22

    Porous materials capable of selectively capturing CO2 from flue-gases or natural gas are of interest in terms of rising atmospheric CO2 levels and methane purification. Size-exclusive sieving of CO2 over CH4 and N2 has rarely been achieved. Herein we show that a crystal engineering approach to tuning of pore-size in a coordination network, [Cu(quinoline-5-carboxyate)2 ]n (Qc-5-Cu) ena+bles ultra-high selectivity for CO2 over N2 (SCN ≈40 000) and CH4 (SCM ≈3300). Qc-5-Cu-sql-β, a narrow pore polymorph of the square lattice (sql) coordination network Qc-5-Cu-sql-α, adsorbs CO2 while excluding both CH4 and N2 . Experimental measurements and molecular modeling validate and explain the performance. Qc-5-Cu-sql-β is stable to moisture and its separation performance is unaffected by humidity.

  10. Imaging calcium carbonate distribution in human sweat pore in vivo using nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueqin; Gasecka, Alicja; Formanek, Florian; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Rigneault, Hervé

    2015-03-01

    Nonlinear microscopies, including two-photon excited autofluorescence (TPEF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), were used to study individual human sweat pore morphology and topically applied antiperspirant salt penetration inside sweat pore, in vivo on human palms. Sweat pore inner morphology in vivo was imaged up to the depth of 100 μm by TPEF microscopy. The 3D penetration and distribution of "in situ calcium carbonate" (isCC), an antiperspirant salt model, was investigated using CARS microscopy.

  11. Isoreticular Expansion of Metal-Organic Frameworks with Multiple Functionalities and Controlled Pore Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hexiang

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are made by linking organic and inorganic molecular building blocks into extended structures through strong bonds. With a judicious choice of inorganic joints and various functional groups available in organic links, a large number of MOFs have been synthesized in the past decade. Along with the fast expansion of the family of MOFs, important applications emerge including hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide capture, both of which address the most pressing societal demand for clean and sustainable energy resources. Although numerous MOFs are now known and they have found widespread applications, the introduction of more than one kind of building block into their crystal structures remains challenging. One of the main objectives of this study is to demonstrate the successful incorporating of multiple functional groups into MOFs. Here, a new strategy has been developed to achieve the synthesis of a series of eighteen multivariate MOFs (MTV-MOFs) containing up to eight distinct functional groups, while their parent topologies were fully preserved. The backbone of these MTV-MOFs was found to be ordered, while the orientation, number, relative position and ratio of the functionalities along the backbone could be controlled by virtue of the unchanged length of the link and its unaltered connectivity. This strategy allows us to endow the pores of these MOFs with a new level of complexity which far exceeds any held by that of the original mono-functional MOFs---an aspect that makes it possible to fine-tune the pore environment of a porous crystal with favorable implications. Indeed, one member of these MTV-MOFs has already shown an 87% improvement of the hydrogen uptake while another member demonstrated a 400% increase in CO2 selectivity comparing to their mono-functional counterparts. Another goal of this study has been to maximize MOF porosity and pore size. There were three major obstacles against expanding the pore size of porous crystals

  12. Ion-track membranes of fluoropolymers: Toward controlling the pore size and shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaki, T.; Nuryanthi, N.; Koshikawa, H.; Asano, M.; Sawada, S.; Hakoda, T.; Maekawa, Y.; Voss, K.-O.; Severin, D.; Seidl, T.; Trautmann, C.; Neumann, R.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of varying the beam parameters and applying the effect of a pre-etching treatment for poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) ion-track membranes was investigated with the goal of achieving enhanced track etching for effective control of the pore size and shape. Commercially available 25 μm-thick PVDF films were irradiated at room temperature with swift heavy ions from the JAEA's TIARA cyclotron and GSI's UNILAC linear accelerator. Irradiation with a higher linear energy transfer (LET) beam gave faster track etching and larger pores, suggesting that the LET could be the most crucial factor determining the pore size. In-situ infra-red absorption and residual gas analyses shed light on the detailed chemistry of not only the ion-induced degradation, but also post-irradiation reactions. The pre-etching treatment effect involved oxidation of the unsaturated bonds within the latent track, which accelerated the chemical dissolution for efficient pore evolution. In other words, exposure to a gaseous oxidant, i.e., ozone, shortened the breakthrough time.

  13. Fast two-dimensional bubble analysis of biopolymer filamentous networks pore size from confocal microscopy thin data stacks.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Matteo; Magatti, Davide; Cardinali, Barbara; Rocco, Mattia; Ferri, Fabio

    2013-03-05

    The average pore size ξ0 of filamentous networks assembled from biological macromolecules is one of the most important physical parameters affecting their biological functions. Modern optical methods, such as confocal microscopy, can noninvasively image such networks, but extracting a quantitative estimate of ξ0 is a nontrivial task. We present here a fast and simple method based on a two-dimensional bubble approach, which works by analyzing one by one the (thresholded) images of a series of three-dimensional thin data stacks. No skeletonization or reconstruction of the full geometry of the entire network is required. The method was validated by using many isotropic in silico generated networks of different structures, morphologies, and concentrations. For each type of network, the method provides accurate estimates (a few percent) of the average and the standard deviation of the three-dimensional distribution of the pore sizes, defined as the diameters of the largest spheres that can be fit into the pore zones of the entire gel volume. When applied to the analysis of real confocal microscopy images taken on fibrin gels, the method provides an estimate of ξ0 consistent with results from elastic light scattering data.

  14. Control of both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium alloy powders

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Christopher G.; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Stavila, Vitalie; Robinson, David B.

    2014-07-15

    Energy storage materials often involve chemical reactions with bulk solids. Porosity within the solids can enhance reaction rates. The porosity can be either within or between individual particles of the material. Greater control of the size and uniformity of both types of pore should lead to enhancements of charging and discharging rates in energy storage systems. Furthermore, to control both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium (Pd)-based hydrogen storage materials, first we created uniformly sized copper particles of about 1 μm diameter by the reduction of copper sulfate with ascorbic acid. In turn, these were used as reducing agents for tetrachloropalladate in the presence of a block copolymer surfactant. The copper reductant particles are geometrically self-limiting, so the resulting Pd particles are of similar size. The surfactant induces formation of 10 nm-scale pores within the particles. Some residual copper is alloyed with the Pd, reducing hydrogen storage capacity; use of a more reactive Pd salt can mitigate this. The reaction is conveniently performed in gram-scale batches.

  15. Control of both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium alloy powders

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, Christopher G.; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Stavila, Vitalie; ...

    2014-07-15

    Energy storage materials often involve chemical reactions with bulk solids. Porosity within the solids can enhance reaction rates. The porosity can be either within or between individual particles of the material. Greater control of the size and uniformity of both types of pore should lead to enhancements of charging and discharging rates in energy storage systems. Furthermore, to control both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium (Pd)-based hydrogen storage materials, first we created uniformly sized copper particles of about 1 μm diameter by the reduction of copper sulfate with ascorbic acid. In turn, these were used as reducing agentsmore » for tetrachloropalladate in the presence of a block copolymer surfactant. The copper reductant particles are geometrically self-limiting, so the resulting Pd particles are of similar size. The surfactant induces formation of 10 nm-scale pores within the particles. Some residual copper is alloyed with the Pd, reducing hydrogen storage capacity; use of a more reactive Pd salt can mitigate this. The reaction is conveniently performed in gram-scale batches.« less

  16. Improvement of the Kruk-Jaroniec-Sayari method for pore size analysis of ordered silicas with cylindrical mesopores.

    PubMed

    Jaroniec, Mietek; Solovyov, Leonid A

    2006-08-01

    In this work, the X-ray diffraction structure modeling was employed for analysis of hexagonally ordered large-pore silicas, SBA-15, to determine their pore width independently of adsorption measurements. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to evaluate the relative pressure of capillary condensation in cylindrical mesopores of these materials. This approach allowed us to extend the original Kruk-Jaroniec-Sayari (KJS) relation (Langmuir 1997, 13, 6267) between the pore width and capillary condensation pressure up to 10 nm instead of previously established range from 2 to 6.5 nm for a series of MCM-41 and to improve the KJS pore size analysis of large pore silicas.

  17. Water Desalination Using Nanoporous Single-Layer Graphene with Tunable Pore Size

    SciTech Connect

    Surwade, Sumedh P.; Smirnov, Sergei N.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng; Mahurin, Shannon Mark

    2015-03-23

    Graphene has great potential to serve as a separation membrane due to its unique properties such as chemical and mechanical stability, flexibility and most importantly its one-atom thickness. In this study, we demonstrate first experimental evidence of the use of single-layer porous graphene as a desalination membrane. Nanometer-sized pores are introduced into single layer graphene using a convenient oxygen plasma etching process that permits tuning of the pore size. The resulting porous graphene membrane exhibited high rejection of salt ions and rapid water transport, thus functioning as an efficient water desalination membrane. Salt rejection selectivity of nearly 100% and exceptionally high water fluxes exceeding 105 g m-2 s-1 at 40 C were measured using saturated water vapor as a driving force.

  18. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Yu, Conrad M.; Raley, Norman F.

    1999-01-01

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gasses in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters.

  19. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M.A.; Yu, C.M.; Raley, N.F.

    1999-03-16

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gases in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters. 9 figs.

  20. Water Desalination Using Nanoporous Single-Layer Graphene with Tunable Pore Size

    DOE PAGES

    Surwade, Sumedh P.; Smirnov, Sergei N.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; ...

    2015-03-23

    Graphene has great potential to serve as a separation membrane due to its unique properties such as chemical and mechanical stability, flexibility and most importantly its one-atom thickness. In this study, we demonstrate first experimental evidence of the use of single-layer porous graphene as a desalination membrane. Nanometer-sized pores are introduced into single layer graphene using a convenient oxygen plasma etching process that permits tuning of the pore size. The resulting porous graphene membrane exhibited high rejection of salt ions and rapid water transport, thus functioning as an efficient water desalination membrane. Salt rejection selectivity of nearly 100% and exceptionallymore » high water fluxes exceeding 105 g m-2 s-1 at 40 C were measured using saturated water vapor as a driving force.« less

  1. Pore Pressure Distribution and Flank Instability in Hydrothermally Altered Stratovolcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. L.; Taron, J.; Hurwitz, S.; Reid, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Field and geophysical investigations of stratovolcanoes with long-lived hydrothermal systems commonly reveal that initially permeable regions (such as brecciated layers of pyroclastic material) can become both altered and water-bearing. Hydrothermal alteration in these regions, including clay formation, can turn them into low-permeability barriers to fluid flow, which could increase pore fluid pressures resulting in flank slope instability. We examined elevated pore pressure conditions using numerical models of hydrothermal flow in stratovolcanoes, informed by geophysical data about internal structures and deposits. Idealized radially symmetric meshes were developed based on cross-sectional profiles and alteration/permeability structures of Cascade Range stratovolcanoes. We used the OpenGeoSys model to simulate variably saturated conditions in volcanoes heated only by regional heat fluxes, as well as 650°C intrusions at two km depth below the surface. Meteoric recharge was estimated from precipitation rates in the Cascade Range. Preliminary results indicate zones of elevated pore pressures form: 1) where slopes are underlain by continuous low-permeability altered layers, or 2) when the edifice has an altered core with saturated, less permeable limbs. The first scenario might control shallow collapses on the slopes above the altered layers. The second could promote deeper flank collapses that are initially limited to the summit and upper slopes, but could progress to the core of an edifice. In both scenarios, pore pressures can be further elevated by shallow intrusions, or evolve over longer time scales under forcing from regional heat flux. Geometries without confining low-permeability layers do not show these pressure effects. Our initial scenarios use radially symmetric models, but we are also simulating hydrothermal flow under real 3D geometries with asymmetric subsurface structures (Mount Adams). Simulation results will be used to inform 3D slope

  2. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Johan; Atefyekta, Saba; Andersson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding-diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments.

  3. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Johan; Atefyekta, Saba; Andersson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding–diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments. PMID:26185444

  4. Impact of pore size on the sorption of uranyl under seawater conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Mayes, Richard T.; Gorka, Joanna; Dai, Sheng

    2016-04-05

    The extraction of uranium from seawater has received significant interest recently, because of the possibility of a near-limitless supply of uranium to fuel the nuclear power industry. While sorbent development has focused primarily on polymeric sorbents, nanomaterials represent a new area that has the potential to surpass the current polymeric sorbents, because of the high surface areas that are possible. Mesoporous carbon materials are a stable, high-surface-area material capable of extracting various chemical species from a variety of environments. Herein, we report the use of a dual templating process to understand the effect of pore size on the adsorption ofmore » uranyl ions from a uranyl brine consisting of seawater-relevant sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate ions. It was found that pore size played a more significant role in the effective use of the grafted polymer, leading to higher uranium capacities than the surface area. Furthermore, the pore size must be tailored to meet the demands of the extraction medium and analyte metal to achieve efficacy as an adsorbent.« less

  5. Pore size dependent molecular adsorption of cationic dye in biomass derived hierarchically porous carbon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Ji, Tuo; Mu, Liwen; Shi, Yijun; Wang, Huaiyuan; Zhu, Jiahua

    2017-03-08

    Hierarchically porous carbon adsorbents were successfully fabricated from different biomass resources (softwood, hardwood, bamboo and cotton) by a facile two-step process, i.e. carbonization in nitrogen and thermal oxidation in air. Without involving any toxic/corrosive chemicals, large surface area of up to 890 m(2)/g was achieved, which is comparable to commercial activated carbon. The porous carbons with various surface area and pore size were used as adsorbents to investigate the pore size dependent adsorption phenomenon. Based on the density functional theory, effective (E-SSA) and ineffective surface area (InE-SSA) was calculated considering the geometry of used probing adsorbate. It was demonstrated that the adsorption capacity strongly depends on E-SSA instead of total surface area. Moreover, a regression model was developed to quantify the adsorption capacities contributed from E-SSA and InE-SSA, respectively. The applicability of this model has been verified by satisfactory prediction results on porous carbons prepared in this work as well as commercial activated carbon. Revealing the pore size dependent adsorption behavior in these biomass derived porous carbon adsorbents will help to design more effective materials (either from biomass or other carbon resources) targeting to specific adsorption applications.

  6. Control of porosity and pore size of metal reinforced carbon nanotube membranes.

    PubMed

    Dumee, Ludovic; Velleman, Leonora; Sears, Kallista; Hill, Matthew; Schutz, Jurg; Finn, Niall; Duke, Mikel; Gray, Stephen

    2010-12-21

    Membranes are crucial in modern industry and both new technologies and materials need to be designed to achieve higher selectivity and performance. Exotic materials such as nanoparticles offer promising perspectives, and combining both their very high specific surface area and the possibility to incorporate them into macrostructures have already shown to substantially increase the membrane performance. In this paper we report on the fabrication and engineering of metal-reinforced carbon nanotube (CNT) Bucky-Paper (BP) composites with tuneable porosity and surface pore size. A BP is an entangled mesh non-woven like structure of nanotubes. Pure CNT BPs present both very high porosity (>90%) and specific surface area (>400 m2/g). Furthermore, their pore size is generally between 20-50 nm making them promising candidates for various membrane and separation applications. Both electro-plating and electroless plating techniques were used to plate different series of BPs and offered various degrees of success. Here we will report mainly on electroless plated gold/CNT composites. The benefit of this method resides in the versatility of the plating and the opportunity to tune both average pore size and porosity of the structure with a high degree of reproducibility. The CNT BPs were first oxidized by short UV/O3 treatment, followed by successive immersion in different plating solutions. The morphology and properties of these samples has been investigated and their performance in air permeation and gas adsorption will be reported.

  7. Impact of pore size on the sorption of uranyl under seawater conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Richard T.; Gorka, Joanna; Dai, Sheng

    2016-04-05

    The extraction of uranium from seawater has received significant interest recently, because of the possibility of a near-limitless supply of uranium to fuel the nuclear power industry. While sorbent development has focused primarily on polymeric sorbents, nanomaterials represent a new area that has the potential to surpass the current polymeric sorbents, because of the high surface areas that are possible. Mesoporous carbon materials are a stable, high-surface-area material capable of extracting various chemical species from a variety of environments. Herein, we report the use of a dual templating process to understand the effect of pore size on the adsorption of uranyl ions from a uranyl brine consisting of seawater-relevant sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate ions. It was found that pore size played a more significant role in the effective use of the grafted polymer, leading to higher uranium capacities than the surface area. Furthermore, the pore size must be tailored to meet the demands of the extraction medium and analyte metal to achieve efficacy as an adsorbent.

  8. Control of Porosity and Pore Size of Metal Reinforced Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Dumee, Ludovic; Velleman, Leonora; Sears, Kallista; Hill, Matthew; Schutz, Jurg; Finn, Niall; Duke, Mikel; Gray, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Membranes are crucial in modern industry and both new technologies and materials need to be designed to achieve higher selectivity and performance. Exotic materials such as nanoparticles offer promising perspectives, and combining both their very high specific surface area and the possibility to incorporate them into macrostructures have already shown to substantially increase the membrane performance. In this paper we report on the fabrication and engineering of metal-reinforced carbon nanotube (CNT) Bucky-Paper (BP) composites with tuneable porosity and surface pore size. A BP is an entangled mesh non-woven like structure of nanotubes. Pure CNT BPs present both very high porosity (>90%) and specific surface area (>400 m2/g). Furthermore, their pore size is generally between 20–50 nm making them promising candidates for various membrane and separation applications. Both electro-plating and electroless plating techniques were used to plate different series of BPs and offered various degrees of success. Here we will report mainly on electroless plated gold/CNT composites. The benefit of this method resides in the versatility of the plating and the opportunity to tune both average pore size and porosity of the structure with a high degree of reproducibility. The CNT BPs were first oxidized by short UV/O3 treatment, followed by successive immersion in different plating solutions. The morphology and properties of these samples has been investigated and their performance in air permeation and gas adsorption will be reported. PMID:24957493

  9. Quantitative sizing of nano/microparticles with a tunable elastomeric pore sensor.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Robert; Willmott, Geoff; Kozak, Darby; Roberts, G Seth; Anderson, Will; Groenewegen, Linda; Glossop, Ben; Barnett, Anne; Turner, Ali; Trau, Matt

    2011-05-01

    The use of a "size-tunable" polyurethane resistive pulse sensor for quantitative sizing of nano- and microparticles is presented. A linear relationship, as first suggested by Maxwell, between particle volume and change in electric resistance across the pore was observed. Particle sizes were quantified for a given size-tunable membrane, by first creating a linear calibration curve to a series of monodisperse carboxylated polystyrene particles of various diameters and then applying this curve to calculate the size of "unknown" nanoparticles. The diameters of a selection of synthetic and biological particles, being PMMA and nonfunctionalized polystyrene particles, along with biological nanoparticles (adenovirus) were calculated using this methodology. Calculated particle diameters and coefficients of variation were shown to be in good agreement with both transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering results.

  10. Hydrophobic polymers modification of mesoporous silica with large pore size for drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Di; Yang, Na

    2009-04-01

    Mesostructure cellular foam (MCF) materials were modified with hydrophobic polyisoprene (PI) through free radical polymerization in the pores network, and the resulting materials (MCF-PI) were investigated as matrices for drug storage. The successful synthesis of PI inside MCF was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. It was interesting to find the resultant system held a relatively large pore size (19.5 nm) and pore volume (1.02 cm3 g-1), which would benefit for drug storage. Ibuprofen (IBU) and vancomycin were selected as model drugs and loaded onto unmodified MCF and modified MCF (MCF-PI). The adsorption capacities of these model drugs on MCF-PI were observed increase as compared to that of on pure MCF, due to the trap effects induced by polyisoprene chains inside the pores. The delivery system of MCF-PI was found to be more favorable for the adsorption of IBU (31 wt%, IBU/silica), possibly attributing to the hydrophobic interaction between IBU and PI formed on the internal surface of MCF matrix. The release of drug through the porous network was investigated by measuring uptake and release of IBU.

  11. On dependence of mechanical properties of brittle material on partial concentrations of different sized pores in its structure in a wide range of porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, Igor S.; Smolin, Alexey Yu.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2015-10-01

    2D and 3D models of mechanical behavior of brittle porous material under uniaxial compression loading were developed in the framework of the movable cellular automaton method. The considered material was characterized by pore size distribution function having two maxima. On the basis of simulation results the dependence of the strength properties of brittle porous material on its total porosity and partial porosities corresponding to pores with different size was revealed. The change in internal structure of material in a wide range of mentioned parameters was analyzed. The main structural factors influencing compression strength of the material at various combinations of values of porosity parameters were identified.

  12. Flare Size Distributions and Active Region Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Taeil

    2007-05-01

    Size distributions of solar flares measured by various size indicators follow a power law with a negative index of about 1.8. On the basis of general appearance of power-law distributions, Lu and his collegues proposed an avalenche model. According to this model, the power-law index should be independent of active region size, but the cutoff size above which the size distribution steepens rapidly is expected to depend on the active region size. I have analyzed the size distribution of flares, using GOES soft X-ray observations for 2004 and 2005. For flares observed by GOES during these years, their locations are almost completely identified even for C-class flares. This enable us to study the dependence of size distribution on active region type. Comparing the power-law portion of size distributions below the high-end cutoff, I have found that the size distribution index depends on active region type. Flares from prolific active regions exhibit a flatter distribution, while flares from non-prolific active regions exhibit a steeper distribution. I plan to discuss a plausible mechanism for such behavior.

  13. Microtomography and pore-scale modeling of two-phase Fluid Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, D.; Tomutsa, L.; Benson, S.; Patzek, T.

    2010-10-19

    Synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography (micro CT) at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) line 8.3.2 at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory produces three-dimensional micron-scale-resolution digital images of the pore space of the reservoir rock along with the spacial distribution of the fluids. Pore-scale visualization of carbon dioxide flooding experiments performed at a reservoir pressure demonstrates that the injected gas fills some pores and pore clusters, and entirely bypasses the others. Using 3D digital images of the pore space as input data, the method of maximal inscribed spheres (MIS) predicts two-phase fluid distribution in capillary equilibrium. Verification against the tomography images shows a good agreement between the computed fluid distribution in the pores and the experimental data. The model-predicted capillary pressure curves and tomography-based porosimetry distributions compared favorably with the mercury injection data. Thus, micro CT in combination with modeling based on the MIS is a viable approach to study the pore-scale mechanisms of CO{sub 2} injection into an aquifer, as well as more general multi-phase flows.

  14. Reversible control of pore size and surface chemistry of mesoporous silica through dynamic covalent chemistry: philicity mediated catalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Pavan Kumar, B V V S; Eswaramoorthy, M

    2015-08-28

    Here, we report the synthesis of adaptive hybrid mesoporous silica having the ability to reconfigure its pore properties such as pore size and philicity in response to the external environment. Decyl chains were reversibly appended to the pore walls of silica through imine motifs as dynamic covalent modules to switch the pore size and philicity in response to pH. This switching of pore properties was used to gate the access of reactants to the gold nanoparticles immobilized inside the nanopores, thus enabling us to turn-on/turn-off the catalytic reaction. The use of such dynamic covalent modules to govern pore properties would enable the realization of intelligent hybrids capable of controlling many such chemical processes in response to stimuli.

  15. Variations of sediment size and size distribution along a river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, C. D.; Tsai, Y. C.; Yang, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment material of a river bed is an important factor for river morphodynamics. Typically, alluvial rivers construct their own geometries based on the sediment size and its distribution that affect the sediment transport capacity in river channel networks, involving the issues of watershed sediment yield, flood controls and the evolution of flood plain, habitats, deltas and adjacent coastline. Hence, investigating grain size and size distribution of sediment materials on riverbeds is important for practical river management and assessment of landscape evolution. In this study, we collected total 43 sediment samplings along the Koaping River in southern Taiwan to analyze the grain size and its distribution along the river. Spatial distributions of different representative grain sizes, such as D50 and D90, and the size corresponding Manning's n values are analyzed and discussed in this paper. An exponential grain size distribution (GSD) formula is used to explore the relation between the frequency and size of riverbed sediment. Results show that the grain size has a wide range distribution in the river upstream but displays a narrow-range variation in the river downstream. For example, the sediment medium size D50 ranges from 1.25 mm to 391.27 mm with an average of 49.36 mm in the upstream while it ranges from 0.135 mm to 0.625 mm with an average of 0.338 mm in the downstream. The best fitting curves of GSD with exponential scaling are analyzed with an empirical parameter Dc that is used to normalize the sediment grain size. This study finds that the empirical parameter Dc could be replaced by the sediment resentative size D65 (65% of sediment smaller than it). The results obtained herein could be useful not only in analyzing sediment transport of a river but also in river management.

  16. Porous carbon with defined pore size as anode of microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofen; Cui, Dan; Wang, Xiaojun; Wang, Xianshu; Li, Weishan

    2015-07-15

    This paper reported a novel anode material, porous carbon with a defined pore size (DPC) matching bacteria, for microbial fuel cell (MFC). The DPC was prepared by using silica spheres as templates and sucrose as carbon precursor. The structure and morphology of the as-prepared DPC were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and its performance as anode of MFC based on Escherichia coli (E. coli) was evaluated with chronoamperometry, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and polarization curve measurement. The result from SEM demonstrates that pores in the as-prepared DPC are well defined with an average diameter of 400nm, which is a little larger than that of E. coli, and the polarization curve measurement shows that the as-prepared DPC exhibits superior performance as anode material loaded on carbon felt, delivering a power output of 1606mWm(-2), compared to the 402mWm(-2) of naked carbon felt anode, in the solution containing 2g/L glucose. The excellent performance of the as-prepared DPC is attributed to its suitable pore size for accommodating E. coli strain, which facilitates the formation of bacterial biofilm and the electron transfer between bacteria and anode.

  17. Estimating the number and size of phloem sieve plate pores using longitudinal views and geometric reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bussières, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Because it is difficult to obtain transverse views of the plant phloem sieve plate pores, which are short tubes, to estimate their number and diameters, a method based on longitudinal views is proposed. This method uses recent methods to estimate the number and the sizes of approximately circular objects from their images, given by slices perpendicular to the objects. Moreover, because such longitudinal views are obtained from slices that are rather close to the plate centres whereas the pore size may vary with the pore distance from the plate edge, a sieve plate reconstruction model was developed and incorporated in the method to consider this bias. The method was successfully tested with published longitudinal views of phloem of Soybean and an exceptional entire transverse view from the same tissue. The method was also validated with simulated slices in two sieve plates from Cucurbita and Phaseolus. This method will likely be useful to estimate and to model the hydraulic conductivity and the architecture of the plant phloem, and it could have applications for other materials with approximately cylindrical structures. PMID:24816291

  18. Estimating the number and size of phloem sieve plate pores using longitudinal views and geometric reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bussières, Philippe

    2014-05-12

    Because it is difficult to obtain transverse views of the plant phloem sieve plate pores, which are short tubes, to estimate their number and diameters, a method based on longitudinal views is proposed. This method uses recent methods to estimate the number and the sizes of approximately circular objects from their images, given by slices perpendicular to the objects. Moreover, because such longitudinal views are obtained from slices that are rather close to the plate centres whereas the pore size may vary with the pore distance from the plate edge, a sieve plate reconstruction model was developed and incorporated in the method to consider this bias. The method was successfully tested with published longitudinal views of phloem of Soybean and an exceptional entire transverse view from the same tissue. The method was also validated with simulated slices in two sieve plates from Cucurbita and Phaseolus. This method will likely be useful to estimate and to model the hydraulic conductivity and the architecture of the plant phloem, and it could have applications for other materials with approximately cylindrical structures.

  19. Influence of the pore size in multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the hydrogen storage behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seul-Yi; Park, Soo-Jin

    2012-10-15

    Activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (A-MWCNTs) were prepared using a chemical activation method to obtain well-developed pore structures for use as hydrogen storage materials. The microstructure and crystallinity of the A-MWCNTs were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. The textural properties of the A-MWCNTs were investigated by nitrogen gas sorption analysis at 77 K. The hydrogen storage capacity of the A-MWCNTs was evaluated at 77 K and 1 bar. The results showed that the specific surface area of the MWCNTs increased from 327 to 495 m{sup 2}/g as the activation temperature was increased. The highest hydrogen storage capacity was observed in the A-MWCNTs sample activated at 900 Degree-Sign C (0.54 wt%). This was attributed to it having the narrowest microporosity, which is a factor closely related to the hydrogen storage capacity. This shows that the hydrogen storage behaviors depend on the pore volume. Although a high pore volume is desirable for hydrogen storage, it is also severely affected if the pore size in the A-MWCNTs for the hydrogen molecules is suitable for creating the activation process. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AT-800 and AT-900 samples were prepared by a chemical activation method at activation temperature of 800 and 900 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AT-900 sample has the narrowest peak in comparison with the AT-800 sample, resulting from the overlap of the two peaks (Peak I and Peak II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This overlapping effect is due to the newly created micropores or shrinkages of pores in Peak II. So, these determining characteristics are essential for designing materials that are suitable for molecular hydrogen storage.

  20. Porosity, Pore Size, and Permeability of Sediments from Site C0002, IODP Expedition 338

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, B.; Huepers, A.; Song, I.; Kitajima, H.; Esteban, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) measurements were made on cuttings and core samples from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site C0002 to evaluate porosity, pore throat size, and permeability of mud(stone) at the centerpiece drill site of the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE). Core samples from 221-464 meters below sea floor (mbsf) in the Kumano forearc basin have MICP-determined porosities from 40-56%, median pore radii from 0.077-0.205 microns, and permeability from 3.3x10-10 - 2.0x10-9 m2. The porosity of these core samples is similar to shipboard porosity determined from moisture and density (MAD) analyses. During IODP Expedition 338 cuttings samples were recovered from ~865-2005 mbsf during riser drilling at Site C0002F. MICP analyses of cuttings samples, greater than 4 mm size fraction, from 928-1980 mbsf in the inner wedge of the accretionary prism constrain porosities from 21-44%, median pore radii from 0.021-0.032 microns, and permeability from 1.2x10-11 - 1.6x10-10 m2. The porosity of these cuttings samples is consistently lower than the MAD-determined porosity on cuttings from the >4mm size fraction, however the values are consistent with core-based, MAD-derived porosity from Hole C0002B above 1057 mbsf and with cuttings-based, MAD-derived porosity on select samples from 1700-2000 mbsf that were determined to be intact formation and not influenced by drilling disturbance. These results suggest that select formation cuttings or MICP-analyses can help define in situ porosity. Additional post-expedition research will be used to better understand the ability of MICP data to define mudstone permeability and to constrain permeability-porosity and permeability-grain size-pore throat relations for sediments at Site C0002. A detailed model of permeability and porosity behavior will inform modeling studies of pore pressure generation and fluid and heat transport.

  1. Reversible control of pore size and surface chemistry of mesoporous silica through dynamic covalent chemistry: philicity mediated catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Pavan Kumar, B. V. V. S.; Eswaramoorthy, M.

    2015-08-01

    Here, we report the synthesis of adaptive hybrid mesoporous silica having the ability to reconfigure its pore properties such as pore size and philicity in response to the external environment. Decyl chains were reversibly appended to the pore walls of silica through imine motifs as dynamic covalent modules to switch the pore size and philicity in response to pH. This switching of pore properties was used to gate the access of reactants to the gold nanoparticles immobilized inside the nanopores, thus enabling us to turn-on/turn-off the catalytic reaction. The use of such dynamic covalent modules to govern pore properties would enable the realization of intelligent hybrids capable of controlling many such chemical processes in response to stimuli.Here, we report the synthesis of adaptive hybrid mesoporous silica having the ability to reconfigure its pore properties such as pore size and philicity in response to the external environment. Decyl chains were reversibly appended to the pore walls of silica through imine motifs as dynamic covalent modules to switch the pore size and philicity in response to pH. This switching of pore properties was used to gate the access of reactants to the gold nanoparticles immobilized inside the nanopores, thus enabling us to turn-on/turn-off the catalytic reaction. The use of such dynamic covalent modules to govern pore properties would enable the realization of intelligent hybrids capable of controlling many such chemical processes in response to stimuli. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02959g

  2. Cumulative frequency fit for particle size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhuyun; Gautam, Mridul; Mehta, Sandeep

    2002-08-01

    A cumulative frequency distribution fit method is presented for analyzing particle size distributions by minimizing the summation of the square of cumulative frequency errors. Compared to the frequency fit method, the cumulative frequency fit method yields a more accurate solution. Based upon this, a spreadsheet was developed for analyzing multi-modal particle size distribution. The motivation for the work presented in this article was the current interest in ultra-fine and nano-sized particle exhaust emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines. The new spreadsheet provides a quick and convenient way to conduct particle size distribution analysis.

  3. Novel magnetic Fe onion-like fullerene micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snovski, Ron; Grinblat, Judith; Margel, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic polydivinylbenzene (PDVB)/magnetite micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution were prepared by entrapping Fe(CO)5 within the pores of uniform porous PDVB particles, followed by the thermal decomposition of the encapsulated Fe(CO)5 at 300 °C in a sealed cell under inert atmosphere. Magnetic Fe onion-like fullerene micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution have been prepared by the thermal decomposition of the PDVB/magnetite magnetic microspheres at 1100 °C under inert atmosphere. The graphitic coating protects the elemental iron particles from oxidation and thereby preserves their very high magnetic moment for at least a year. Characterization of these unique magnetic carbon graphitic particles was also performed.

  4. Laboratory air bubble generation of various size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Puleo, Jack A.; Johnson, Rex V.; Kooney, Tim N.

    2004-11-01

    Air bubble size in aqueous environments is an important factor governing natural processes ranging from fluid/atmosphere gas transfer to noise production. Bubbles are also known to affect various scientific instruments. In this study we investigate the production capability of eight inexpensive bubble generators using optical imaging techniques. Specific emphasis is directed towards determining bubble size and distribution for a given device, flow conditions, and type of water used (fresh vs salt). In almost all cases tested here, bubbles produced in salt water were more numerous, and smaller than for the same bubbler and conditions in fresh water. For porous media, the finer the pore size, the smaller the bubble produced with some variation depending on thickness of material containing the pore and water type. While no single generator tested was capable of spanning all the bubble sizes observed (100 to 6000 microns), the data contained herein will enable proper choice of bubbler or combinations thereof for future studies depending on the size and distribution of bubbles required.

  5. Pore Scale Heterogeneity in the Mineral Distribution, Surface Area and Adsorption in Porous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P. E. P.; Krevor, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of heterogeneity in chemical transport and reaction is not understood in continuum (Darcy/Fickian) models of reactive transport. This is manifested in well-known problems such as scale dependent dispersion and discrepancies in reaction rate observations made at laboratory and field scales [1]. Additionally, this is a source of uncertainty for carbon dioxide injection, which produces a reactive fluid-rock system particularly in carbonate rock reservoirs. A potential cause is the inability of the continuum approach to incorporate the impact of heterogeneity in pore-scale reaction rates. This results in part from pore-scale heterogeneities in surface area of reactive minerals [2, 3]. We use x-ray micro tomography to describe the non-normal 3-dimensional distribution of reactive surface area within a porous medium according to distinct mineral groups. Using in-house image processing techniques, thin sections, nitrogen BET surface area, backscattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectroscopy, we compare the surface area of each mineral phase to those obtained from x-ray CT imagery. In all samples, there is little correlation between the reactive surface area fraction and the volumetric fraction of a mineral in a bulk rock. Berea sandstone was far less heterogeneous and has a characteristic pore size at which a surface area distribution may be used to quantify heterogeneity. In carbonates, heterogeneity is more complex and surface area must be characterized at multiple length scales for an accurate description of reactive transport. We combine the mineral specific surface area characterisation to dynamic tomography, imaging the flow of water and solutes, to observe flow dependent and mineral specific adsorption. The observations may contribute to the incorporation of experimentally based statistical descriptions of pore scale heterogeneity in reactive transport into upscaled models, moving it closer to predictive capabilities for field scale

  6. An integrated approach for determination of pore-type distribution in carbonate-siliciclastic Asmari Reservoir, Cheshmeh-Khosh Oilfield, SW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharechelou, Sajjad; Amini, Abdolhossein; Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi, Ali; Moradi, Babak

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an integrated pore type study at microscopic (core data), mesoscopic (well logs) and megascopic scales (3D seismic data) in the mixed carbonate-siliciclastic Asmari Reservoir of the Cheshmeh-Khosh Oilfield, SW Iran. Firstly, pore types are determined in a microscopic scale based on petrographic studies of thin sections. Well logs and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log data are employed for pore type determination based on a velocity deviation log (mesoscopic scale). For each pore type subclass, a suite of physical rock properties including average poroperm values, T2 distribution, capillary pressure, pore size distribution and depositional texture are calculated. For this purpose, the NMR log, mercury injection capillary pressure data and core descriptions are interpreted in an integrated approach. Capillary pressure and pore size distribution in each pore type class are determined by mercury injection capillary pressure tests and synthesis of a continuous capillary pressure log from the NMR log (pseudo Pc curves). For dynamic behavior examination of the reservoir, the pore types are analysed in the framework of hydraulic flow units. Finally, 3D post-stacked seismic data are converted to a cube of pore types based on acoustic impedance inversion and seismic attributes. The methodology of this study is accomplished by using core and log data from three key wells and a 3D post-stack seismic data from the studied field. Lastly, a map of pore type distribution is established to provide a clue on the high and low permeable zones of the field. The presented methodology signifies reservoir anatomy on micro to mega scales.

  7. Body size distribution of the dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, Eoin J; Hone, David W E

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of species body size is critically important for determining resource use within a group or clade. It is widely known that non-avian dinosaurs were the largest creatures to roam the Earth. There is, however, little understanding of how maximum species body size was distributed among the dinosaurs. Do they share a similar distribution to modern day vertebrate groups in spite of their large size, or did they exhibit fundamentally different distributions due to unique evolutionary pressures and adaptations? Here, we address this question by comparing the distribution of maximum species body size for dinosaurs to an extensive set of extant and extinct vertebrate groups. We also examine the body size distribution of dinosaurs by various sub-groups, time periods and formations. We find that dinosaurs exhibit a strong skew towards larger species, in direct contrast to modern day vertebrates. This pattern is not solely an artefact of bias in the fossil record, as demonstrated by contrasting distributions in two major extinct groups and supports the hypothesis that dinosaurs exhibited a fundamentally different life history strategy to other terrestrial vertebrates. A disparity in the size distribution of the herbivorous Ornithischia and Sauropodomorpha and the largely carnivorous Theropoda suggests that this pattern may have been a product of a divergence in evolutionary strategies: herbivorous dinosaurs rapidly evolved large size to escape predation by carnivores and maximise digestive efficiency; carnivores had sufficient resources among juvenile dinosaurs and non-dinosaurian prey to achieve optimal success at smaller body size.

  8. Body Size Distribution of the Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    O’Gorman, Eoin J.; Hone, David W. E.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of species body size is critically important for determining resource use within a group or clade. It is widely known that non-avian dinosaurs were the largest creatures to roam the Earth. There is, however, little understanding of how maximum species body size was distributed among the dinosaurs. Do they share a similar distribution to modern day vertebrate groups in spite of their large size, or did they exhibit fundamentally different distributions due to unique evolutionary pressures and adaptations? Here, we address this question by comparing the distribution of maximum species body size for dinosaurs to an extensive set of extant and extinct vertebrate groups. We also examine the body size distribution of dinosaurs by various sub-groups, time periods and formations. We find that dinosaurs exhibit a strong skew towards larger species, in direct contrast to modern day vertebrates. This pattern is not solely an artefact of bias in the fossil record, as demonstrated by contrasting distributions in two major extinct groups and supports the hypothesis that dinosaurs exhibited a fundamentally different life history strategy to other terrestrial vertebrates. A disparity in the size distribution of the herbivorous Ornithischia and Sauropodomorpha and the largely carnivorous Theropoda suggests that this pattern may have been a product of a divergence in evolutionary strategies: herbivorous dinosaurs rapidly evolved large size to escape predation by carnivores and maximise digestive efficiency; carnivores had sufficient resources among juvenile dinosaurs and non-dinosaurian prey to achieve optimal success at smaller body size. PMID:23284818

  9. Biotemplating pores with size and shape diversity for Li-oxygen Battery Cathodes

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dahyun; Ozgit-Akgun, Çagla; Akca, Esin; Thompson, Leslie E.; Tadesse, Loza F.; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Demirci, Gökhan; Miller, Robert D.; Maune, Hareem

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic porogens provide an easy way to create porous structures, but their usage is limited due to synthetic difficulties, process complexities and prohibitive costs. Here we investigate the use of bacteria, sustainable and naturally abundant materials, as a pore template. The bacteria require no chemical synthesis, come in variable sizes and shapes, degrade easier and are approximately a million times cheaper than conventional porogens. We fabricate free standing porous multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films using cultured, harmless bacteria as porogens, and demonstrate substantial Li-oxygen battery performance improvement by porosity control. Pore volume as well as shape in the cathodes were easily tuned to improve oxygen evolution efficiency by 30% and double the full discharge capacity in repeated cycles compared to the compact MWCNT electrode films. The interconnected pores produced by the templates greatly improve the accessibility of reactants allowing the achievement of 4,942 W/kg (8,649 Wh/kg) at 2 A/ge (1.7 mA/cm2). PMID:28374862

  10. Optimization of protein fractionation by skim milk microfiltration: Choice of ceramic membrane pore size and filtration temperature.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Camilla Elise; Abrahamsen, Roger K; Rukke, Elling-Olav; Johansen, Anne-Grethe; Schüller, Reidar B; Skeie, Siv B

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how ceramic membrane pore size and filtration temperature influence the protein fractionation of skim milk by cross flow microfiltration (MF). Microfiltration was performed at a uniform transmembrane pressure with constant permeate flux to a volume concentration factor of 2.5. Three different membrane pore sizes, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20µm, were used at a filtration temperature of 50°C. Furthermore, at pore size 0.10µm, 2 different filtration temperatures were investigated: 50 and 60°C. The transmission of proteins increased with increasing pore size, giving the permeate from MF with the 0.20-µm membrane a significantly higher concentration of native whey proteins compared with the permeates from the 0.05- and 0.10-µm membranes (0.50, 0.24, and 0.39%, respectively). Significant amounts of caseins permeated the 0.20-µm membrane (1.4%), giving a permeate with a whitish appearance and a casein distribution (αS2-CN: αS1-CN: κ-CN: β-CN) similar to that of skim milk. The 0.05- and 0.10-µm membranes were able to retain all caseins (only negligible amounts were detected). A permeate free from casein is beneficial in the production of native whey protein concentrates and in applications where transparency is an important functional characteristic. Microfiltration of skim milk at 50°C with the 0.10-µm membrane resulted in a permeate containing significantly more native whey proteins than the permeate from MF at 60°C. The more rapid increase in transmembrane pressure and the significantly lower concentration of caseins in the retentate at 60°C indicated that a higher concentration of caseins deposited on the membrane, and consequently reduced the native whey protein transmission. Optimal protein fractionation of skim milk into a casein-rich retentate and a permeate with native whey proteins were obtained by 0.10-µm MF at 50°C.

  11. Micro and nano-size pores of clay minerals in shale reservoirs: Implication for the accumulation of shale gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shangbin; Han, Yufu; Fu, Changqin; Zhang, han; Zhu, Yanming; Zuo, Zhaoxi

    2016-08-01

    A pore is an essential component of shale gas reservoirs. Clay minerals are the adsorption carrier second only to organic matter. This paper uses the organic maturity test, Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to study the structure and effect of clay minerals on storing gas in shales. Results show the depositional environment and organic maturity influence the content and types of clay minerals as well as their structure in the three types of sedimentary facies in China. Clay minerals develop multi-size pores which shrink to micro- and nano-size by close compaction during diagenesis. Micro- and nano-pores can be divided into six types: 1) interlayer, 2) intergranular, 3) pore and fracture in contact with organic matter, 4) pore and fracture in contact with other types of minerals, 5) dissolved and, 6) micro-cracks. The contribution of clay minerals to the presence of pores in shale is evident and the clay plane porosity can even reach 16%, close to the contribution of organic matter. The amount of clay minerals and pores displays a positive correlation. Clay minerals possess a strong adsorption which is affected by moisture and reservoir maturity. Different pore levels of clay minerals are mutually arranged, thus essentially producing distinct reservoir adsorption effects. Understanding the structural characteristics of micro- and nano-pores in clay minerals can provide a tool for the exploration and development of shale gas reservoirs.

  12. Effective pore size and radius of capture for K+ ions in K-channels

    PubMed Central

    Moldenhauer, Hans; Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio; González-Nilo, Fernando; Naranjo, David

    2016-01-01

    Reconciling protein functional data with crystal structure is arduous because rare conformations or crystallization artifacts occur. Here we present a tool to validate the dimensions of open pore structures of potassium-selective ion channels. We used freely available algorithms to calculate the molecular contour of the pore to determine the effective internal pore radius (rE) in several K-channel crystal structures. rE was operationally defined as the radius of the biggest sphere able to enter the pore from the cytosolic side. We obtained consistent rE estimates for MthK and Kv1.2/2.1 structures, with rE = 5.3–5.9 Å and rE = 4.5–5.2 Å, respectively. We compared these structural estimates with functional assessments of the internal mouth radii of capture (rC) for two electrophysiological counterparts, the large conductance calcium activated K-channel (rC = 2.2 Å) and the Shaker Kv-channel (rC = 0.8 Å), for MthK and Kv1.2/2.1 structures, respectively. Calculating the difference between rE and rC, produced consistent size radii of 3.1–3.7 Å and 3.6–4.4 Å for hydrated K+ ions. These hydrated K+ estimates harmonize with others obtained with diverse experimental and theoretical methods. Thus, these findings validate MthK and the Kv1.2/2.1 structures as templates for open BK and Kv-channels, respectively. PMID:26831782

  13. Experimental determination of size distributions: analyzing proper sample sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffo, A.; Alopaeus, V.

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of various particle size distributions is a crucial aspect for many applications in the process industry. Size distribution is often related to the final product quality, as in crystallization or polymerization. In other cases it is related to the correct evaluation of heat and mass transfer, as well as reaction rates, depending on the interfacial area between the different phases or to the assessment of yield stresses of polycrystalline metals/alloys samples. The experimental determination of such distributions often involves laborious sampling procedures and the statistical significance of the outcome is rarely investigated. In this work, we propose a novel rigorous tool, based on inferential statistics, to determine the number of samples needed to obtain reliable measurements of size distribution, according to specific requirements defined a priori. Such methodology can be adopted regardless of the measurement technique used.

  14. Size distributions of solar energetic particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E.; Reames, D.; Kahler, S.; Cane, H.

    1991-01-01

    NASA particle detectors on the IMP-8 are employed to determine the size distributions of the peak fluxes of events related to solar-energetic particles including protons and electrons. The energetic proton events show a flatter size distribution which suggests that not all flares are proton flares. Both the electron and proton events are classified as either 'impulsive' or 'gradual', and the impulsive events tend to have a steeper power-law distribution.

  15. Asteroid Size-Frequency Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    2001-01-01

    A total of six deep exposures (using AOT CAM01 with a 6 inch PFOV) through the ISOCAM LW10 filter (IRAS Band 1, i.e. 12 micron) were obtained on an approximately 15 arcminute square field centered on the ecliptic plane. Point sources were extracted using the technique described. Two known asteroids appear in these frames and 20 sources moving with velocities appropriate for main belt asteroids are present. Most of the asteroids detected have flux densities less than 1 mJy, i,e., between 150 and 350 times fainter than any of the asteroids observed by IRAS. These data provide the first direct measurement of the 12 pm sky-plane density for asteroids on the ecliptic equator. The median zodiacal foreground, as measured by ISOCAM during this survey, is found to be 22.1 +/- 1.5 mJy per pixel, i.e., 26.2 +/- 1.7 MJy/sr. The results presented here imply that the actual number of kilometer-sized asteroids is significantly greater than previously believed and in reasonable agreement with the Statistical Asteroid Model.

  16. Anodic aluminum oxide with fine pore size control for selective and effective particulate matter filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Su; Wang, Yang; Tan, Yingling; Zhu, Jianfeng; Liu, Kai; Zhu, Jia

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution is widely considered as one of the most pressing environmental health issues. Particularly, atmospheric particulate matters (PM), a complex mixture of solid or liquid matter suspended in the atmosphere, are a harmful form of air pollution due to its ability to penetrate deep into the lungs and blood streams, causing permanent damages such as DNA mutations and premature death. Therefore, porous materials which can effectively filter out particulate matters are highly desirable. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate that anodic aluminum oxide with fine pore size control fabricated through a scalable process can serve as effective and selective filtering materials for different types of particulate matters (such as PM2.5, PM10). Combining selective and dramatic filtering effect, fine pore size control and a scalable process, this type of anodic aluminum oxide templates can potentially serve as a novel selective filter for different kinds of particulate matters, and a promising and complementary solution to tackle this serious environmental issue.

  17. Size and ability do matter! Influence of acidity and pore size on the synthesis of hindered halogenated meso-phenyl porphyrins catalysed by porous solid oxides.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mónica; Fernandes, Auguste; Bebiano, Suse S; Calvete, Mário J F; Ribeiro, M Filipa; Burrows, Hugh D; Pereira, Mariette M

    2014-06-25

    The rationalisation of the influence of acidity and pore size of several solid oxides so that they selectively act as supports for preparation of encapsulated porphyrin hybrid materials or as catalysts for synthesis of porphyrins in solution is discussed. Encapsulated porphyrin yields are dependent on both the acidity and the material pore size, Al-MCM-41 being the best fitting solid, with Lewis acidity of 120 μmol Py per g and a pore size 30 Å. On the other hand, when the goal is the synthesis of hindered mesoarylporphyrins in solution, the best solid porous catalyst is NaY, with Lewis acidity of 510 μmol Py per g and a pore size 14 Å. This method provides an appealing efficient, reusable and scalable catalyst alternative for one-pot synthesis of meso-arylporphyrins in high yields.

  18. The effect of pore size on tissue ingrowth and neovascularization in porous bioceramics of controlled architecture in vivo.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bai; Jinkang, Zhang; Zhen, Wang; Jianxi, Lu; Jiang, Chang; Jian, Liu; Guolin, Meng; Xin, Dong

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of pore size on tissue ingrowth and neovascularization in porous bioceramics under the accurate control of the pore parameters. For that purpose, β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cylinders with four different macropore sizes (300-400, 400-500, 500-600 and 600-700 µm) but the same interconnection size (120 µm) and unchangeable porosity were implanted into fascia lumbodorsalis in rabbits. The fibrous tissues and blood vessels formed in scaffolds were observed histologically and histomorphometrically. The vascularization of the porous bioceramics was analyzed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). It is found that pore size as an important parameter of a porous structure plays an important role in tissue infiltration into porous biomaterial scaffolds. The amount of fibrous tissue ingrowth increases with the decrease of the pore size. In four kinds of scaffolds with different macropore sizes (300-400, 400-500, 500-600 and 600-700 µm) and a constant interconnection size of 120 µm, the areas of fibrous tissue (%) were 60.5%, 52.2%, 41.3% and 37.3%, respectively, representing a significant decrease at 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The pore size of a scaffold is closely related to neovascularization of macroporous biomaterials implanted in vivo. A large pore size is beneficial for the growth of blood vessels, and the diameter of a pore smaller than 400 µm limits the growth of blood vessels and results in a smaller blood vessel diameter.

  19. Pore size controls on the base of the methane hydrate stability zone in the Kumano Basin, offshore Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Dugan, Brandon

    2014-11-01

    The base of the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ) in the Kumano Basin, offshore Japan, is marked by a bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) on seismic data. At Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site C0002, which penetrates this BSR, the in situ temperature profile combined with bulk seawater methane equilibrium conditions suggest that the base of the MHSZ is 428 m below seafloor (bsf), which is 28 m deeper than the observed BSR (400 m bsf). We found that submicron pore sizes determined by mercury injection capillary pressure are sufficiently small to cause 64% of the observed uplift of the base of the MHSZ by the Gibbs-Thomson effect. This is the most thorough characterization of pore sizes within the MHSZ performed to date and illustrates the extent to which pore size can influence MHSZ thickness. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering lithology and pore structure when assessing methane hydrate stability conditions in marine sediments.

  20. Understanding Animal Group-Size Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Griesser, Michael; Ma, Qi; Webber, Simone; Bowgen, Katharine; Sumpter, David J. T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most striking aspects of animal groups is their remarkable variation in size, both within and between species. While a number of mechanistic models have been proposed to explain this variation, there are few comprehensive datasets against which these models have been tested. In particular, we only vaguely understand how environmental factors and behavioral activities affect group-size distributions. Here we use observations of House sparrows (Passer domesticus) to investigate the factors determining group-size distribution. Over a wide range of conditions, we observed that animal group sizes followed a single parameter distribution known as the logarithmic distribution. This single parameter is the mean group size experienced by a randomly chosen individual (including the individual itself). For sparrows, the experienced mean group size, and hence the distribution, was affected by four factors: morning temperature, place, behavior and the degree of food spillage. Our results further indicate that the sparrows regulate the mean group size they experience, either by groups splitting more or merging less when local densities are high. We suggest that the mean experienced group size provides a simple but general tool for assessing the ecology and evolution of grouping. PMID:21912596

  1. Analytic modeling of aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepack, A.; Box, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical functions commonly used for representing aerosol size distributions are studied parametrically. Methods for obtaining best fit estimates of the parameters are described. A catalog of graphical plots depicting the parametric behavior of the functions is presented along with procedures for obtaining analytical representations of size distribution data by visual matching of the data with one of the plots. Examples of fitting the same data with equal accuracy by more than one analytic model are also given.

  2. Soil signature simulation of complex mixtures and particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Tyler; Bachmann, Charles M.; Salvaggio, Carl

    2015-09-01

    Soil reflectance signatures were modeled using the digital imaging and remote sensing image generation model and Blender three-dimensional (3-D) graphic design software. Using these tools, the geometry, radiometry, and chemistry of quartz and magnetite were exploited to model the presence of particle size and porosity effects in the visible and the shortwave infrared spectrum. Using the physics engines within the Blender 3-D graphic design software, physical representations of granular soil scenes were created. Each scene characterized a specific particle distribution and density. Chemical and optical properties of pure quartz and magnetite were assigned to particles in the scene based on particle size. This work presents a model to describe an observed phase-angle dependence of beach sand density. Bidirectional reflectance signatures were simulated for targets of varying size distribution and density. This model provides validation for a phenomenological trade space between density and particle size distribution in complex, heterogeneous soil mixtures. It also confirms the suggestion that directional reflectance signatures can be defined by intimate mixtures that depend on pore spacing. The study demonstrated that by combining realistic target geometry and spectral measurements of pure quartz and magnetite, effects of soil particle size and density could be modeled without functional data fitting or rigorous analysis of material dynamics. This research does not use traditional function-based models for simulation. The combination of realistic geometry, physically viable particle structure, and first-principles ray-tracing enables the ability to represent signature changes that have been observed in experimental observations.

  3. Microbubble Size Distributions Data Collection and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    Blank TM 841204 INTRODUCTION Properties of micron-sized bubble aggregates in sea water were investigated to determine their influence on the...problem during this study. This paper will discuss bubble size and size distribution measurements in sea water while underway. A technique to detect...plugged in. The internal gear mechanism cycles the strobe and film advance approximately every 5 seconds. The camera continually sampled until the

  4. Adjustable virtual pore-size filter for automated sample preparation using acoustic radiation force

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K; Mariella, R

    2008-05-22

    We present a rapid and robust size-based separation method for high throughput microfluidic devices using acoustic radiation force. We developed a finite element modeling tool to predict the two-dimensional acoustic radiation force field perpendicular to the flow direction in microfluidic devices. Here we compare the results from this model with experimental parametric studies including variations of the PZT driving frequencies and voltages as well as various particle sizes and compressidensities. These experimental parametric studies also provide insight into the development of an adjustable 'virtual' pore-size filter as well as optimal operating conditions for various microparticle sizes. We demonstrated the separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and MS2 bacteriophage using acoustic focusing. The acoustic radiation force did not affect the MS2 viruses, and their concentration profile remained unchanged. With optimized design of our microfluidic flow system we were able to achieve yields of > 90% for the MS2 with > 80% of the S. cerevisiae being removed in this continuous-flow sample preparation device.

  5. A family of zeolites with controlled pore size prepared using a top-down method.

    PubMed

    Roth, Wieslaw J; Nachtigall, Petr; Morris, Russell E; Wheatley, Paul S; Seymour, Valerie R; Ashbrook, Sharon E; Chlubná, Pavla; Grajciar, Lukáš; Položij, Miroslav; Zukal, Arnošt; Shvets, Oleksiy; Cejka, Jiří

    2013-07-01

    The properties of zeolites, and thus their suitability for different applications, are intimately connected with their structures. Synthesizing specific architectures is therefore important, but has remained challenging. Here we report a top-down strategy that involves the disassembly of a parent zeolite, UTL, and its reassembly into two zeolites with targeted topologies, IPC-2 and IPC-4. The three zeolites are closely related as they adopt the same layered structure, and they differ only in how the layers are connected. Choosing different linkers gives rise to different pore sizes, enabling the synthesis of materials with predetermined pore architectures. The structures of the resulting zeolites were characterized by interpreting the X-ray powder-diffraction patterns through models using computational methods; IPC-2 exhibits orthogonal 12- and ten-ring channels, and IPC-4 is a more complex zeolite that comprises orthogonal ten- and eight-ring channels. We describe how this method enables the preparation of functional materials and discuss its potential for targeting other new zeolites.

  6. Evaluation of borate bioactive glass scaffolds with different pore sizes in a rat subcutaneous implantation model.

    PubMed

    Deliormanli, Aylin M; Liu, Xin; Rahaman, Mohamed N

    2014-01-01

    Borate bioactive glass has been shown to convert faster and more completely to hydroxyapatite and enhance new bone formation in vivo when compared to silicate bioactive glass (such as 45S5 and 13-93 bioactive glass). In this work, the effects of the borate glass microstructure on its conversion to hydroxyapatite (HA) in vitro and its ability to support tissue ingrowth in a rat subcutaneous implantation model were investigated. Bioactive borate glass scaffolds, designated 13-93B3, with a grid-like microstructure and pore widths of 300, 600, and 900 µm were prepared by a robocasting technique. The scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously for 4 weeks in Sprague Dawley rats. Silicate 13-93 glass scaffolds with the same microstructure were used as the control. The conversion of the scaffolds to HA was studied as a function of immersion time in a simulated body fluid. Histology and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate conversion of the bioactive glass implants to hydroxyapatite, as well as tissue ingrowth and blood vessel formation in the implants. The pore size of the scaffolds was found to have little effect on tissue infiltration and angiogenesis after the 4-week implantation.

  7. A family of zeolites with controlled pore size prepared using a top-down method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Wieslaw J.; Nachtigall, Petr; Morris, Russell E.; Wheatley, Paul S.; Seymour, Valerie R.; Ashbrook, Sharon E.; Chlubná, Pavla; Grajciar, Lukáš; Položij, Miroslav; Zukal, Arnošt; Shvets, Oleksiy; Čejka, Jiří

    2013-07-01

    The properties of zeolites, and thus their suitability for different applications, are intimately connected with their structures. Synthesizing specific architectures is therefore important, but has remained challenging. Here we report a top-down strategy that involves the disassembly of a parent zeolite, UTL, and its reassembly into two zeolites with targeted topologies, IPC-2 and IPC-4. The three zeolites are closely related as they adopt the same layered structure, and they differ only in how the layers are connected. Choosing different linkers gives rise to different pore sizes, enabling the synthesis of materials with predetermined pore architectures. The structures of the resulting zeolites were characterized by interpreting the X-ray powder-diffraction patterns through models using computational methods; IPC-2 exhibits orthogonal 12- and ten-ring channels, and IPC-4 is a more complex zeolite that comprises orthogonal ten- and eight-ring channels. We describe how this method enables the preparation of functional materials and discuss its potential for targeting other new zeolites.

  8. Single molecule FRET reveals pore size and opening mechanism of a mechano-sensitive ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Yanxin; DeBerg, Hannah A; Nomura, Takeshi; Hoffman, Melinda Tonks; Rohde, Paul R; Schulten, Klaus; Martinac, Boris; Selvin, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    The mechanosensitive channel of large conductance, which serves as a model system for mechanosensitive channels, has previously been crystallized in the closed form, but not in the open form. Ensemble measurements and electrophysiological sieving experiments show that the open-diameter of the channel pore is >25 Å, but the exact size and whether the conformational change follows a helix-tilt or barrel-stave model are unclear. Here we report measurements of the distance changes on liposome-reconstituted MscL transmembrane α-helices, using a ‘virtual sorting’ single-molecule fluorescence energy transfer. We observed directly that the channel opens via the helix-tilt model and the open pore reaches 2.8 nm in diameter. In addition, based on the measurements, we developed a molecular dynamics model of the channel structure in the open state which confirms our direct observations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01834.001 PMID:24550255

  9. Predicting Stress vs. Strain Behaviors of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die Cast Magnesium Alloy with Actual Pore Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Barker, Erin; Cheng, Guang; Sun, Xin; Forsmark, Joy; Li, Mei

    2016-01-06

    In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) microstructure-based finite element modeling method (i.e., extrinsic modeling method) is developed, which can be used in examining the effects of porosity on the ductility/fracture of Mg castings. For this purpose, AM60 Mg tensile samples were generated under high-pressure die-casting in a specially-designed mold. Before the tensile test, the samples were CT-scanned to obtain the pore distributions within the samples. 3D microstructure-based finite element models were then developed based on the obtained actual pore distributions of the gauge area. The input properties for the matrix material were determined by fitting the simulation result to the experimental result of a selected sample, and then used for all the other samples’ simulation. The results show that the ductility and fracture locations predicted from simulations agree well with the experimental results. This indicates that the developed 3D extrinsic modeling method may be used to examine the influence of various aspects of pore sizes/distributions as well as intrinsic properties (i.e., matrix properties) on the ductility/fracture of Mg castings.

  10. Quantitative multi-scale analysis of mineral distributions and fractal pore structures for a heterogeneous Junger Basin shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. D.; Liu, K. Y.; Yang, Y. S.; Ren, Y. Q.; Hu, T.; Deng, B.; Xiao, T. Q.

    2016-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) characterization of shales has recently attracted wide attentions in relation to the growing importance of shale oil and gas. Obtaining a complete 3D compositional distribution of shale has proven to be challenging due to its multi-scale characteristics. A combined multi-energy X-ray micro-CT technique and data-constrained modelling (DCM) approach has been used to quantitatively investigate the multi-scale mineral and porosity distributions of a heterogeneous shale from the Junger Basin, northwestern China by sub-sampling. The 3D sub-resolution structures of minerals and pores in the samples are quantitatively obtained as the partial volume fraction distributions, with colours representing compositions. The shale sub-samples from two areas have different physical structures for minerals and pores, with the dominant minerals being feldspar and dolomite, respectively. Significant heterogeneities have been observed in the analysis. The sub-voxel sized pores form large interconnected clusters with fractal structures. The fractal dimensions of the largest clusters for both sub-samples were quantitatively calculated and found to be 2.34 and 2.86, respectively. The results are relevant in quantitative modelling of gas transport in shale reservoirs.

  11. Particle Size Distributions in Atmospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paoli, Roberto; Shariff, Karim

    2003-01-01

    In this note, we derive a transport equation for a spatially integrated distribution function of particles size that is suitable for sparse particle systems, such as in atmospheric clouds. This is done by integrating a Boltzmann equation for a (local) distribution function over an arbitrary but finite volume. A methodology for evolving the moments of the integrated distribution is presented. These moments can be either tracked for a finite number of discrete populations ('clusters') or treated as continuum variables.

  12. Exponential Size Distribution of von Willebrand Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lippok, Svenja; Obser, Tobias; Müller, Jochen P.; Stierle, Valentin K.; Benoit, Martin; Budde, Ulrich; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2013-01-01

    Von Willebrand Factor (VWF) is a multimeric protein crucial for hemostasis. Under shear flow, it acts as a mechanosensor responding with a size-dependent globule-stretch transition to increasing shear rates. Here, we quantify for the first time, to our knowledge, the size distribution of recombinant VWF and VWF-eGFP using a multilateral approach that involves quantitative gel analysis, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We find an exponentially decaying size distribution of multimers for recombinant VWF as well as for VWF derived from blood samples in accordance with the notion of a step-growth polymerization process during VWF biosynthesis. The distribution is solely described by the extent of polymerization, which was found to be reduced in the case of the pathologically relevant mutant VWF-IIC. The VWF-specific protease ADAMTS13 systematically shifts the VWF size distribution toward smaller sizes. This dynamic evolution is monitored using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and compared to a computer simulation of a random cleavage process relating ADAMTS13 concentration to the degree of VWF breakdown. Quantitative assessment of VWF size distribution in terms of an exponential might prove to be useful both as a valuable biophysical characterization and as a possible disease indicator for clinical applications. PMID:24010664

  13. Seismic velocity deviation log: An effective method for evaluating spatial distribution of reservoir pore types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirmohamadi, Mohamad; Kadkhodaie, Ali; Rahimpour-Bonab, Hossain; Faraji, Mohammad Ali

    2017-04-01

    Velocity deviation log (VDL) is a synthetic log used to determine pore types in reservoir rocks based on a combination of the sonic log with neutron-density logs. The current study proposes a two step approach to create a map of porosity and pore types by integrating the results of petrographic studies, well logs and seismic data. In the first step, velocity deviation log was created from the combination of the sonic log with the neutron-density log. The results allowed identifying negative, zero and positive deviations based on the created synthetic velocity log. Negative velocity deviations (below - 500 m/s) indicate connected or interconnected pores and fractures, while positive deviations (above + 500 m/s) are related to isolated pores. Zero deviations in the range of [- 500 m/s, + 500 m/s] are in good agreement with intercrystalline and microporosities. The results of petrographic studies were used to validate the main pore type derived from velocity deviation log. In the next step, velocity deviation log was estimated from seismic data by using a probabilistic neural network model. For this purpose, the inverted acoustic impedance along with the amplitude based seismic attributes were formulated to VDL. The methodology is illustrated by performing a case study from the Hendijan oilfield, northwestern Persian Gulf. The results of this study show that integration of petrographic, well logs and seismic attributes is an instrumental way for understanding the spatial distribution of main reservoir pore types.

  14. Pore size dependent behavior of hydrated Ag+ ions confined in mesoporous MCM-41 materials under synchrotron X-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kanae; Yoshida, Koji; Kittaka, Shigeharu; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of hydrated Ag+ ions in a 1.5 mol dm(-3) AgNO3 aqueous solution confined in mesoporous silica MCM-41 with different pore sizes was characterized by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The hydrated Ag+ ions are stabilized in 4-fold coordination down to 195 K in the pores (21 Å in diameter), whereas in the larger pores (28 Å) the hydrated Ag+ ions are reduced to Ag0 to form nano clusters with the Ag-Ag interactions of 2.80 Å.

  15. Single-Crystalline, Nanoporous Gallium Nitride Films With Fine Tuning of Pore Size for Stem Cell Engineering.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin; Zhou, Jing; Sun, Yubing; Zhang, Yu; Han, Jung; Fu, Jianping; Fan, Rong

    2014-11-01

    Single-crystalline nanoporous gallium nitride (GaN) thin films were fabricated with the pore size readily tunable in 20-100 nm. Uniform adhesion and spreading of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on these thin films peak on the surface with pore size of 30 nm. Substantial cell elongation emerges as pore size increases to ∼80 nm. The osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs occurs preferentially on the films with 30 nm sized nanopores, which is correlated with the optimum condition for cell spreading, which suggests that adhesion, spreading, and stem cell differentiation are interlinked and might be coregulated by nanotopography.

  16. Quasi-elastic light scattering determination of the size distribution of extruded vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kölchens, S; Ramaswami, V; Birgenheier, J; Nett, L; O'Brien, D F

    1993-04-01

    The size distribution of phospholipid vesicles prepared by the freeze thaw-extrusion method were determined by the non-perturbing technique of quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and compared to latex particles of known size. Multiangle QELS experiments were performed to avoid errors due to the angular dependence of the scattering function of the particles. The experimentally determined autocorrelation function was analyzed by multiple mathematical procedures, i.e. single exponential, CUMULANT, exponential sampling, non-negatively constrained least square and CONTIN, in order to select suitable models for vesicle characterization. The most consistent results were obtained with CUMULANT, non-negatively constrained least square and CONTIN. In many instances single exponential analysis gave comparable results to these procedures, which indicates the vesicles have a narrow distribution of sizes. The influence of filter pore size, extrusion pressure and lipid concentration on the size and size distribution of extruded vesicles was determined. Extrusion through 100-, 200- and 400-nm pore size filters produced a unimodal distribution of vesicles, with somewhat smaller diameters as the extrusion pressure increased. The larger the filter pore size, the more dependent the vesicle size was on applied pressure. The observed vesicle size was independent of the lipid concentration between 0.1 and 10 mg ml-1.

  17. Particle size and surface area distributions of pharmaceutical powders by microcomputerized mercury porosimetry.

    PubMed

    Carli, F; Motta, A

    1984-02-01

    The Mayer-Stowe theory was applied to derive the particle size distribution of powders of pharmaceutical interest using mercury porosimetry. Particle size data obtained by this approach are fairly comparable with data derived by other, more popular, techniques such as the electrical sensing zone or the air jet sieving methods provided that the experimental value of the mercury-powder contact angle and the state of aggregation of the powder are carefully studied. Furthermore, by applying the Rootare-Prenzlow method a surface area distribution can also be derived from the same porosimetry data used to obtain the particle size distribution. All experiments were carried out with a microcomputerized mercury porosimeter, which allows storage of data during the analysis and a subsequent fast elaboration at the end of the run, with fully printed data on pore size, pore volume, surface area, and particle size of the powder sample.

  18. Temperature and pore pressure distribution in a concrete slab during the microwave decontamination process

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Ebadian, M.A.; White, T.L.; Grubb, R.G.; Foster, D. Jr.

    1994-10-01

    As an application of microwave engineering, the new technology of concrete decontamination and decommissioning using microwave energy has been recently developed. The temperature and pore pressure within the concrete are studied theoretically in this paper. The heat and mass transfer within the porous concrete, coupled with temperature dependent dielectric property are investigated. The effects of microwave frequency (f), microwave power intensity (Q{sub 0,ave}), concrete porosity ({phi}) on the temperature and pore pressure distributions and their variations are fully discussed. The effects of the variation of complex dielectric permittivity ({epsilon}) and presentation of different steel reinforcements are also illustrated.

  19. A macromolecular crowding study of RNA folding and activity: polymer pore size matters! (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Richard; Fiorini, Erica; Paudel, Bishnu; Rueda, David; Sigel, Roland K. O.

    2016-03-01

    Catalytic RNAs, like the group IIB intron ribozyme of S. cerevesiae, require a high magnesium(II) concentration to show folding and function in vitro [1]. In contrast, in vivo conditions are characterized by a highly crowded cellular environment and much lower ion concentration. Molecular crowding agents are a widespread tool to mimic cellular crowding [2]. However, particular physical/chemical properties explaining the crowders influence are mostly not understood. In this study, we gain new insights on how polymer properties like viscosity, pore size etc. influence the activity and folding of a large RNA. We combined bulk activity assays and single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer experiments, screening the PEG volume fraction (%) and molecular weight (MW). Our results revealed that upon the influence of crowding agents, a compaction of the underlying structure depends on the PEG % and the presence of different PEG MW and % unveiled an optimal pore size in terms of catalytic activity. In summary, an increasing density of the crowding environment shifts the RNA towards the most compact state, but the ribozyme is only active if the crowders network matches its size [4]. We interpret the most compact state as necessary, but not sufficient, to keep the ribozyme active. Financial support from the European Research Council (MIRNA N° 259092, to RKOS), the Swiss National Fund (SNF), and the Forschungskredit Grant of the University of Zürich (FK-14-096 and 15-092 to RB) are gratefully acknowledged. [1] Swisher J.F., Su L.J., Brenowitz M., Anderson V.E., Pyle A.M., J. Mol. Bio., 315, 297-310 (2002). [2] Kilburn D., Roh J.H., Guo L., Briber R.M., Woodson S.A., JACS, 132, 8690-6 (2010). [3] Steiner M., Karunatilaka K.S., Sigel R.K.O., Rueda D., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.,105, 13853-8 (2008). [4] aBörner R, Fiorini E, Sigel R.K.O., Chimia, 69, 207-212 (2015).; bFiorini E., Paudel B., Börner R., Rueda D., Sigel R.K.O., submitted. [5] König S.L.B., Hadzic M

  20. Effect of membrane polymeric materials on relationship between surface pore size and membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Taro; Yuasa, Kotaku; Ishigami, Toru; Rajabzadeh, Saeid; Kamio, Eiji; Ohmukai, Yoshikage; Saeki, Daisuke; Ni, Jinren; Matsuyama, Hideto

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of different membrane polymeric materials on the relationship between membrane pore size and development of membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Membranes with different pore sizes were prepared using three different polymeric materials, cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), polyvinyl butyral (PVB), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and the development of membrane fouling in each membrane was evaluated by batch filtration tests using a mixed liquor suspension obtained from a laboratory-scale MBR. The results revealed that the optimal membrane pore size to mitigate membrane fouling differed depending on membrane polymeric material. For PVDF membranes, the degree of membrane fouling decreased as membrane pore size increased. In contrast, CAB membranes with smaller pores had less fouling propensity than those with larger ones. Such difference can be attributed to the difference in major membrane foulants in each membrane; in PVDF, they were small colloids or dissolved organics in which proteins are abundant, and in CAB, microbial flocs. The results obtained in this study strongly suggested that optimum operating conditions of MBRs differ depending on the characteristics of the used membrane.

  1. Activity size distribution of some natural radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Mohery, M; Abdallah, A M; Al-Amoudi, Z M; Baz, S S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the results concerning the activity size distribution of the long-lived ((210)Pb) radon decay product aerosols and the thoron decay product aerosols ((212)Pb) and ((7)Be) of the outdoor atmosphere are presented. Also, the mass size distribution of the aerosol particles is determined. The low-pressure Berner cascade impactor Model 20/0.015 was used as a sampling device. The activity size distribution of these radionuclides was determined by one log-normal distribution (accumulation mode) whereas the mass size distribution was by two log-normal distributions (accumulation and coarse mode). The activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of (212)Pb was found to be 305 nm with a geometric standard deviation (σg) of 2.41. The specific air activity concentration of (212)Pb was found to be 0.14 ± 0.012 Bq m(-3). An AMAD of (210)Pb of 610 nm with σg of 1.8 was determined, whereas that of 550 nm with σg of 1.97 was determined for (7)Be. The specific air activity concentration of (210)Pb and (7)Be was found to be 0.0016±2.5×10(-4) and 0.00348 ± 4×10(-4) Bq m(-3), respectively. Using a dosimetric model, the total deposition fraction as well as the total equivalent dose has been evaluated considering the observed parameters of the activity size distribution of (212)Pb. At a total deposition fraction of ∼21 %, the total equivalent dose was found to be 0.41 µSv.

  2. Comparison of drop size distributions from two droplet sizing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, John R.; Ide, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison between the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and the combined measurements from Particle Measuring Systems' Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe and the Optical Array Probe was conducted in an icing wind tunnel using NASA Icing Research Tunnel spray nozzles to produce the supercooled water droplet cloud. Clouds having a range of volume median diameters from 10 to greater than 50 microns were used for the instrument comparisons. A volume median diameter was calculated from combining the droplet distributions of the Optical Array Probe and the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe. A comparison of the combined volume median diameters and the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer volume median diameters showed agreement from 10 microns up to 30 microns. Typical drop size distributions from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer, the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe, and Optical Array Probe are presented for several median volume diameters. A comparison of the distributions illustrates regions of the distributions where there is good agreement and other regions where there are discrepancies between the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and the Particle Measuring Systems' droplet size instruments.

  3. Martian crater size distributions and terrain age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, N. G.; Strom, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The crater size/frequency distributions of large ( 8 km) craters on the Moon and terrestrial planets display two very different curves representing two crater populations. The heavily cratered regions of the Moon, Mercury, and Mars show the same highly structured curve which cannot be represented by a single slope distribution function. In contrast, the lunar post mare crater population has a size/frequency distribution which differs significantly from that in the highlands over the same diameter range, and can be represented by a single-slope distribution function of -2.8 differential. On areas of martian lightly cratered northern plains, the crater population is essentially identical to that of the post mare population. This indicates that the same two families of impacting objects were responsible for the cratering records on both Moon and Mars. The thickness of mantling material varies among the various plains units, and can be calculated from the depth/diameter scaling relations for martian craters.

  4. Acoustical properties of air-saturated porous material with periodically distributed dead-end pores.

    PubMed

    Leclaire, P; Umnova, O; Dupont, T; Panneton, R

    2015-04-01

    A theoretical and numerical study of the sound propagation in air-saturated porous media with straight main pores bearing lateral cavities (dead-ends) is presented. The lateral cavities are located at "nodes" periodically spaced along each main pore. The effect of periodicity in the distribution of the lateral cavities is studied, and the low frequency limit valid for the closely spaced dead-ends is considered separately. It is shown that the absorption coefficient and transmission loss are influenced by the viscous and thermal losses in the main pores as well as their perforation rate. The presence of long or short dead-ends significantly alters the acoustical properties of the material and can increase significantly the absorption at low frequencies (a few hundred hertz). These depend strongly on the geometry (diameter and length) of the dead-ends, on their number per node, and on the periodicity along the propagation axis. These effects are primarily due to low sound speed in the main pores and to thermal losses in the dead-end pores. The model predictions are compared with experimental results. Possible designs of materials of a few cm thicknesses displaying enhanced low frequency absorption at a few hundred hertz are proposed.

  5. Size distributions in two porous chondritic micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1993-06-01

    Quantitative size measurements of granular units (GUs), and nm-sized minerals in these units, in two porous chondritic micrometeorites are investigated. The matrix of these micrometeorites consist of loosely packed, 0.1 micron-sized, GUs. These objects were a major component of the solar nebula dust that accreted into protoplanets. The matrix in micrometeorite W7010*A2 has a fractal dimension with a small coefficient that supports efficient sticking of carbon-rich GUs during accretion. The fractal nature of the matrix provides a way to calculate the density using the aggregate size. The resulting very low density for porous chondritic micrometeorites is 0.08-0.14 g/cu cm, which supports the view that they are the solid debris from unconsolidated solar system bodies. Chondritic GUs contain ultrafine olivines, pyroxenes, and sulfides, embedded in hydrocarbons and amorphous carbons. Nanocrystals in the micrometeorites W7010*A2 and U2015*B show log normal size distributions. The high incidence of disk-shaped grains, a changeover from disk-shaped to euhedral grains, the unevolved nature of the size distributions, and multiple populations for grains less than 127 nm in size, are consistent with continuous postaccretion nucleation and growth in amorphous GUs, including coarsening via Ostwald ripening.

  6. Distribution of carbon nanotube sizes from adsorption measurements and computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Hołyst, Robert; Tanaka, Hideki; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2005-08-04

    The method for the evaluation of the distribution of carbon nanotube sizes from the static adsorption measurements and computer simulation of nitrogen at 77 K is developed. We obtain the condensation/evaporation pressure as a function of pore size of a cylindrical carbon tube using Gauge Cell Monte Carlo Simulation (Gauge Cell MC). To obtain the analytical form of the relationships mentioned above we use Derjaguin-Broekhoff-deBoer theory. Finally, the pore size distribution (PSD) of the single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) is determined from a single nitrogen adsorption isotherm measured at 77 K. We neglect the conical part of an isolated SWNH tube and assume a structureless wall of a carbon nanotube. We find that the distribution of SWNH sizes is broad (internal pore radii varied in the range 1.0-3.6 nm with the maximum at 1.3 nm). Our method can be used for the determination of the pore size distribution of the other tubular carbon materials, like, for example, multiwalled or double-walled carbon nanotubes. Besides the applicable aspect of the current work the deep insight into the problem of capillary condensation/evaporation in confined carbon cylindrical geometry is presented. As a result, the critical pore radius in structureless single-walled carbon tubes is determined as being equal to three nitrogen collision diameters. Below that size the adsorption-desorption isotherm is reversible (i.e., supercritical in nature). We show that the classical static adsorption measurements combined with the proper modeling of the capillary condensation/evaporation phenomena is a powerful method that can be applied for the determination of the distribution of nanotube sizes.

  7. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR AN OFFICE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the effect of percent outdoor air supplied and occupation level on the particle size distributions and mass concentrations for a typical office building. (NOTE: As attention has become focused on indoor air pollution control, it has become i...

  8. Pore size is a critical parameter for obtaining sustained protein release from electrochemically synthesized mesoporous silicon microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Ester L.; Reguera-Nuñez, Elaine; Matveeva, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous silicon has become a material of high interest for drug delivery due to its outstanding internal surface area and inherent biodegradability. We have previously reported the preparation of mesoporous silicon microparticles (MS-MPs) synthesized by an advantageous electrochemical method, and showed that due to their inner structure they can adsorb proteins in amounts exceeding the mass of the carrier itself. Protein release from these MS-MPs showed low burst effect and fast delivery kinetics with complete release in a few hours. In this work, we explored if tailoring the size of the inner pores of the particles would retard the protein release process. To address this hypothesis, three new MS-MPs prototypes were prepared by electrochemical synthesis, and the resulting carriers were characterized for morphology, particle size, and pore structure. All MS-MP prototypes had 90 µm mean particle size, but depending on the current density applied for synthesis, pore size changed between 5 and 13 nm. The model protein α-chymotrypsinogen was loaded into MS-MPs by adsorption and solvent evaporation. In the subsequent release experiments, no burst release of the protein was detected for any prototype. However, prototypes with larger pores (>10 nm) reached 100% release in 24–48 h, whereas prototypes with small mesopores (<6 nm) still retained most of their cargo after 96 h. MS-MPs with ∼6 nm pores were loaded with the osteogenic factor BMP7, and sustained release of this protein for up to two weeks was achieved. In conclusion, our results confirm that tailoring pore size can modify protein release from MS-MPs, and that prototypes with potential therapeutic utility for regional delivery of osteogenic factors can be prepared by convenient techniques. PMID:26557423

  9. Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Bashor, Paul G.; Habib, Emad; Kasparis, Takis

    2008-01-01

    Characteristics of the raindrop size distribution in seven tropical cyclones have been studied through impact-type disdrometer measurements at three different sites during the 2004-06 Atlantic hurricane seasons. One of the cyclones has been observed at two different sites. High concentrations of small and/or midsize drops were observed in the presence or absence of large drops. Even in the presence of large drops, the maximum drop diameter rarely exceeded 4 mm. These characteristics of raindrop size distribution were observed in all stages of tropical cyclones, unless the storm was in the extratropical stage where the tropical cyclone and a midlatitude frontal system had merged. The presence of relatively high concentrations of large drops in extratropical cyclones resembled the size distribution in continental thunderstorms. The integral rain parameters of drop concentration, liquid water content, and rain rate at fixed reflectivity were therefore lower in extratropical cyclones than in tropical cyclones. In tropical cyclones, at a disdrometercalculated reflectivity of 40 dBZ, the number concentration was 700 plus or minus 100 drops m(sup -3), while the liquid water content and rain rate were 0.90 plus or minus 0.05 g m(sup -3) and 18.5 plus or minus 0.5 mm h(sup -1), respectively. The mean mass diameter, on the other hand, was 1.67 plus or minus 0.3 mm. The comparison of raindrop size distributions between Atlantic tropical cyclones and storms that occurred in the central tropical Pacific island of Roi-Namur revealed that the number density is slightly shifted toward smaller drops, resulting in higher-integral rain parameters and lower mean mass and maximum drop diameters at the latter site. Considering parameterization of the raindrop size distribution in tropical cyclones, characteristics of the normalized gamma distribution parameters were examined with respect to reflectivity. The mean mass diameter increased rapidly with reflectivity, while the normalized

  10. Furthering Chemical and Geophysical Computations: Analysis of SACROC SEM and CT images to obtain pore percentage, size, and connectivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mur, A. J.; Purcell, C. C.; Harbert, W. P.; Soong, Y.; Kutchko, B. G.; Kennedy, S.; McIntryre, D.

    2009-12-01

    methods to calculate porosity giving us a large range (13% - 45%). The high average can be attributed to a percentage of small lighter colored calcite crystals and polygons that share sides yet are connected pores. This increases the average pore perimeter. The lower estimate was formulated by using the maximum pore perimeter as the average pore size. By using the 13% porosity model and assuming spherical pores, we calculated that a 1cm3 sample of SACROC limestone would have a surface area of 6.7838 cm2. Along with the permeability measurements found through CT imagery, this new method of SEM analysis with ArcMap will be helpful in formulating a rate of reaction estimate for a planned experiment that will emulate underground time exposure of CO2 to limestone. As more images are analyzed and compared to lab measurements of porosity, this method could potentially be used as a faster, cheaper way to obtain pore information from SEM images.

  11. Facile synthesis of diverse graphene nanomeshes based on simultaneous regulation of pore size and surface structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia; Song, Huaibing; Zeng, Dawen; Wang, Hao; Qin, Ziyu; Xu, Keng; Pang, Aimin; Xie, Changsheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently, graphene nanomesh (GNM) has attracted great attentions due to its unique porous structure, abundant active sites, finite band gap and possesses potential applications in the fields of electronics, gas sensor/storage, catalysis, etc. Therefore, diverse GNMs with different physical and chemical properties are required urgently to meet different applications. Herein we demonstrate a facile synthetic method based on the famous Fenton reaction to prepare GNM, by using economically fabricated graphene oxide (GO) as a starting material. By precisely controlling the reaction time, simultaneous regulation of pore size from 2.9 to 11.1 nm and surface structure can be realized. Ultimately, diverse GNMs with tunable band gap and work function can be obtained. Specially, the band gap decreases from 4.5–2.3 eV for GO, which is an insulator, to 3.9–1.24 eV for GNM-5 h, which approaches to a semiconductor. The dual nature of electrophilic addition and oxidizability of HO• is responsible for this controllable synthesis. This efficient, low-cost, inherently scalable synthetic method is suitable for provide diverse and optional GNMs, and may be generalized to a universal technique. PMID:27561350

  12. Improvement of Methane-Framework Interaction by Controlling Pore Size and Functionality of Pillared MOFs.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Sayed Ali Akbar; Masoomi, Mohammad Yaser; Islamoglu, Timur; Morsali, Ali; Xu, Yan; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K; Wang, Jun; Junk, Peter C

    2017-03-06

    The rational design of functionalized porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for gas adsorption applications has been applied using three spacer ligands H2DPT (3,6-di(pyridin-4-yl)-1,4-dihydro-1,2,4,5-tetrazine), DPT (3,6-di(pyridin-4-yl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine), and BPDH (2,5-bis(4-pyridyl)-3,4-diaza-2,4-hexadiene) to synthesize TMU-34, [Zn(OBA)(H2DPT)0.5]n·DMF, TMU-34(-2H), [Zn(OBA)(DPT)0.5]n·DMF, and TMU-5, [Zn(OBA)(BPDH)0.5]n·1.5DMF, respectively. By controlling the pore size and chemical functionality of these three MOFs, we can improve the interactions between CO2 and especially CH4 with the frameworks. Calculated Qst(CH4) for TMU-5, TMU-34, and TMU-34(-2H) are 27, 23, and 22 kJ mol(-1), respectively. These Qst values are among the highest for CH4-framework interactions. For systematic comparison, two reported frameworks, TMU-4 and TMU-5, have been compared with TMU-34 and TMU-34(-2H) in CO2 adsorption.

  13. Facile synthesis of diverse graphene nanomeshes based on simultaneous regulation of pore size and surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Song, Huaibing; Zeng, Dawen; Wang, Hao; Qin, Ziyu; Xu, Keng; Pang, Aimin; Xie, Changsheng

    2016-08-01

    Recently, graphene nanomesh (GNM) has attracted great attentions due to its unique porous structure, abundant active sites, finite band gap and possesses potential applications in the fields of electronics, gas sensor/storage, catalysis, etc. Therefore, diverse GNMs with different physical and chemical properties are required urgently to meet different applications. Herein we demonstrate a facile synthetic method based on the famous Fenton reaction to prepare GNM, by using economically fabricated graphene oxide (GO) as a starting material. By precisely controlling the reaction time, simultaneous regulation of pore size from 2.9 to 11.1 nm and surface structure can be realized. Ultimately, diverse GNMs with tunable band gap and work function can be obtained. Specially, the band gap decreases from 4.5–2.3 eV for GO, which is an insulator, to 3.9–1.24 eV for GNM-5 h, which approaches to a semiconductor. The dual nature of electrophilic addition and oxidizability of HO• is responsible for this controllable synthesis. This efficient, low-cost, inherently scalable synthetic method is suitable for provide diverse and optional GNMs, and may be generalized to a universal technique.

  14. Determination of filter pore size for use in HB line phase II production of plutonium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Shehee, T.; Crowder, M.; Rudisill, T.

    2014-08-01

    H-Canyon and HB-Line are tasked with the production of plutonium oxide (PuO2) from a feed of plutonium (Pu) metal. The PuO2 will provide feed material for the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. After dissolution of the Pu metal in H-Canyon, plans are to transfer the solution to HB-Line for purification by anion exchange. Anion exchange will be followed by plutonium(IV) oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination to form PuO2. The filtrate solutions, remaining after precipitation, contain low levels of Pu ions, oxalate ions, and may include solids. These solutions are transferred to H-Canyon for disposition. To mitigate the criticality concern of Pu solids in a Canyon tank, past processes have used oxalate destruction or have pre-filled the Canyon tank with a neutron poison. The installation of a filter on the process lines from the HB-Line filtrate tanks to H-Canyon Tank 9.6 is proposed to remove plutonium oxalate solids. This report describes SRNL’s efforts to determine the appropriate pore size for the filters needed to perform this function. Information provided in this report aids in developing the control strategies for solids in the process.

  15. Effect of pore size on bone ingrowth into porous titanium implants fabricated by additive manufacturing: An in vivo experiment.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Naoya; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Kiyoyuki; Otsuki, Bungo; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-02-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing technique with the ability to produce metallic scaffolds with accurately controlled pore size, porosity, and interconnectivity for orthopedic applications. However, the optimal pore structure of porous titanium manufactured by SLM remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the effect of pore size with constant porosity on in vivo bone ingrowth in rabbits into porous titanium implants manufactured by SLM. Three porous titanium implants (with an intended porosity of 65% and pore sizes of 300, 600, and 900μm, designated the P300, P600, and P900 implants, respectively) were manufactured by SLM. A diamond lattice was adapted as the basic structure. Their porous structures were evaluated and verified using microfocus X-ray computed tomography. Their bone-implant fixation ability was evaluated by their implantation as porous-surfaced titanium plates into the cortical bone of the rabbit tibia. Bone ingrowth was evaluated by their implantation as cylindrical porous titanium implants into the cancellous bone of the rabbit femur for 2, 4, and 8weeks. The average pore sizes of the P300, P600, and P900 implants were 309, 632, and 956μm, respectively. The P600 implant demonstrated a significantly higher fixation ability at 2weeks than the other implants. After 4weeks, all models had sufficiently high fixation ability in a detaching test. Bone ingrowth into the P300 implant was lower than into the other implants at 4weeks. Because of its appropriate mechanical strength, high fixation ability, and rapid bone ingrowth, our results indicate that the pore structure of the P600 implant is a suitable porous structure for orthopedic implants manufactured by SLM.

  16. Size Dependent Pore Formation in Germanium Nanowires Undergoing Reversible Delithiation Observed by In Situ TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaotang; He, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chong-min; Korgel, Brian A.

    2016-12-22

    Germanium (Ge) nanowires coated with an amorphous silicon (Si) shell undergoing lithiation and delithiation were studied using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Delithiation creates pores in nanowires with diameters larger than ~25 nm, but not in smaller diameter nanowires. The formation of pores in Ge nanowires undergoing delithiation has been observed before in in situ TEM experiments, but there has been no indication that a critical diameter exists below which pores do not form. Pore formation occurs as a result of fast lithium diffusion compared to vacancy migration. We propose that a short diffusion path for vacancies to the nanowire surface plays a role in limiting pore formation even when lithium diffusion is fast.

  17. Tailoring Pore Size of Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Carbon Nanospheres for Confi ning Sulfur in Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Weidong; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Quiglin; Abruna, Hector D.; He, Yang; Wang, Jiangwei; Mao, Scott X.; Xiao, Xingcheng

    2015-08-19

    Three types of nitrogen-doped hollow carbon spheres with different pore sized porous shells are prepared to investigate the performance of sulfur confinement. The reason that why no sulfur is observed in previous research is determined and it is successfully demonstrated that the sulfur/polysulfide will overflow the porous carbon during the lithiation process.

  18. Comparison of polytetrafluoroethylene flat-sheet membranes with different pore sizes in application to submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Nittami, Tadashi; Hitomi, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Kanji; Nakamura, Kazuho; Ikeda, Takaharu; Setoguchi, Yoshihiro; Motoori, Manabu

    2012-06-01

    This study focused on phase separation of activated sludge mixed liquor by flat-sheet membranes of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). A 20 liter working volume lab-scale MBR incorporating immersed PTFE flat-sheet membrane modules with different pore sizes (0.3, 0.5 and 1.0 μm) was operated for 19 days treating a synthetic wastewater. The experiment was interrupted twice at days 5 and 13 when the modules were removed and cleaned physically and chemically in sequence. The pure water permeate flux of each membrane module was measured before and after each cleaning step to calculate membrane resistances. Results showed that fouling of membrane modules with 0.3 μm pore size was more rapid than other membrane modules with different pore sizes (0.5 and 1.0 μm). On the other hand, it was not clear whether fouling of the 0.5 μm membrane module was more severe than that of the 1.0 μm membrane module. This was partly because of the membrane condition after chemical cleaning, which seemed to determine the fouling of those modules over the next period. When irreversible resistance (Ri) i.e., differences in membrane resistance before use and after chemical cleaning was high, the transmembrane pressure increased quickly during the next period irrespective of membrane pore size.

  19. Pore-scale dynamics of salt transport and distribution in drying porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many natural and engineering applications such as durability of building materials and preservation of monuments, water quality, and mineral-fluid interactions. We applied synchrotron x-ray micro-tomography to investigate the pore-scale dynamics of dissolved salt distribution in a three dimensional drying saline porous media using a cylindrical plastic column (15 mm in height and 8 mm in diameter) packed with sand particles saturated with CaI2 solution (5% concentration by mass) with a spatial and temporal resolution of 12 μm and 30 min, respectively. Every time the drying sand column was set to be imaged, two different images were recorded using distinct synchrotron x-rays energies immediately above and below the K-edge value of Iodine. Taking the difference between pixel gray values enabled us to delineate the spatial and temporal distribution of CaI2 concentration at pore scale. Results indicate that during early stages of evaporation, air preferentially invades large pores at the surface while finer pores remain saturated and connected to the wet zone at bottom via capillary-induced liquid flow acting as evaporating spots. Consequently, the salt concentration increases preferentially in finer pores where evaporation occurs. Higher salt concentration was observed close to the evaporating surface indicating a convection-driven process. The obtained salt profiles were used to evaluate the numerical solution of the convection-diffusion equation (CDE). Results show that the macro-scale CDE could capture the overall trend of the measured salt profiles but fail to produce the exact slope of the profiles. Our results shed new insight on the physics of salt transport and its complex dynamics in drying porous media and establish synchrotron x-ray tomography as an effective tool to investigate the dynamics of salt transport in porous media at high spatial and temporal resolution.

  20. Pore-scale dynamics of salt transport and distribution in drying porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Shokri, Nima

    2014-01-15

    Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many natural and engineering applications such as durability of building materials and preservation of monuments, water quality, and mineral-fluid interactions. We applied synchrotron x-ray micro-tomography to investigate the pore-scale dynamics of dissolved salt distribution in a three dimensional drying saline porous media using a cylindrical plastic column (15 mm in height and 8 mm in diameter) packed with sand particles saturated with CaI{sub 2} solution (5% concentration by mass) with a spatial and temporal resolution of 12 μm and 30 min, respectively. Every time the drying sand column was set to be imaged, two different images were recorded using distinct synchrotron x-rays energies immediately above and below the K-edge value of Iodine. Taking the difference between pixel gray values enabled us to delineate the spatial and temporal distribution of CaI{sub 2} concentration at pore scale. Results indicate that during early stages of evaporation, air preferentially invades large pores at the surface while finer pores remain saturated and connected to the wet zone at bottom via capillary-induced liquid flow acting as evaporating spots. Consequently, the salt concentration increases preferentially in finer pores where evaporation occurs. Higher salt concentration was observed close to the evaporating surface indicating a convection-driven process. The obtained salt profiles were used to evaluate the numerical solution of the convection-diffusion equation (CDE). Results show that the macro-scale CDE could capture the overall trend of the measured salt profiles but fail to produce the exact slope of the profiles. Our results shed new insight on the physics of salt transport and its complex dynamics in drying porous media and establish synchrotron x-ray tomography as an effective tool to investigate the dynamics of salt transport in porous media at high spatial and temporal

  1. Molecular valves for controlling gas phase transport made from discrete ångström-sized pores in graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luda; Drahushuk, Lee W; Cantley, Lauren; Koenig, Steven P; Liu, Xinghui; Pellegrino, John; Strano, Michael S; Bunch, J Scott

    2015-09-01

    An ability to precisely regulate the quantity and location of molecular flux is of value in applications such as nanoscale three-dimensional printing, catalysis and sensor design. Barrier materials containing pores with molecular dimensions have previously been used to manipulate molecular compositions in the gas phase, but have so far been unable to offer controlled gas transport through individual pores. Here, we show that gas flux through discrete ångström-sized pores in monolayer graphene can be detected and then controlled using nanometre-sized gold clusters, which are formed on the surface of the graphene and can migrate and partially block a pore. In samples without gold clusters, we observe stochastic switching of the magnitude of the gas permeance, which we attribute to molecular rearrangements of the pore. Our molecular valves could be used, for example, to develop unique approaches to molecular synthesis that are based on the controllable switching of a molecular gas flux, reminiscent of ion channels in biological cell membranes and solid-state nanopores.

  2. Company size distribution in different countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsden, J. J.; Kiss-Haypál, Gy.

    2000-03-01

    The distribution of companies in a country, ranked in order of size (annual net revenue) s, follows the simplified canonical law s r∼(r+ρ) -1/θ remarkably well, where r is the rank, and θ and ρ are the parameters of the distribution. These parameters have been determined for 20 countries in America, Asia and Europe. Significant differences between countries are found. Neither θ nor ρ appears to correlate well with traditional economic indicators; indeed some countries often thought to be economically and politically, but not necessarily socially, similar show surprising differences, suggesting that wealth and prosperity are influenced by hidden layers hitherto inaccessible through standard economic theory.

  3. Particle Size Distributions in Atmospheric Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Center for Turbulence Research 39 Annual Research Briefs 2003 Particle size distributions in atmospheric clouds By Roberto Paoli & Karim...atmospheric turbulence is an important, though complex, problem in cloud physics ( Shaw 2003). From a computational point of view, two major factors...contribute to this complexity. First is the very high turbulence Reynolds number and the large range of spatial scales (Vaillancourt & Yau 2000; Shaw 2003

  4. Size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivácsy, Z.; Molnár, Á.

    The aim of this paper is to present data about the concentration and size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosol under slightly polluted urban conditions in Hungary. Concentration of inorganic cations (ammonium, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium), inorganic anions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, carbonate) and organic acids (oxalic, malonic, succinic, formic and acetic acid) for 8 particle size range between 0.0625 and 16 μm were determined. As was the case for ammonium, sulfate and nitrate, the organic acids were mostly found in the fine particle size range. Potassium and chloride were rather uniformly distributed between fine and coarse particles. Sodium, calcium, magnesium and carbonate were practically observed in the coarse mode. The results obtained for the summer and the winter half-year were also compared. The mass concentrations were recalculated in equivalents, and the ion balance was found to be reasonable in most cases. Measurement of the pH of the aerosol extracts indicates that the aerosol is acidic in the fine mode, but alkaline in the coarse particle size range.

  5. Novel method for stratum corneum pore size determination using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yoshiaki; Shimazu, Akira; Sadzuka, Yasuyuki; Sonobe, Takashi; Itai, Shigeru

    2008-06-24

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is a powerful tool for the investigation of microstructure. Three main classes of materials, metals, semiconductors and polymers, have been studied by using this technique. But, relatively few investigations have been performed in the biological sciences. PALS provides important information on pore properties and free volume at the molecular level. Our PALS study showed that Yucatan miniature pig stratum corneum separated with heat and trypsin digestion had a longer positron annihilation lifetime than cyclodextrins. This indicates that the stratum corneum has larger pores and/or free volume than cyclodextrins, whose pores have a diameter of 0.5-0.8 nm and a torus height of 0.79 nm. Positron annihilation spectroscopy may be developed as a new technique for the detection of nano-pore properties and free volume in the biological sciences.

  6. Beer Clarification by Novel Ceramic Hollow-Fiber Membranes: Effect of Pore Size on Product Quality.

    PubMed

    Cimini, Alessio; Moresi, Mauro

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the crossflow microfiltration performance of rough beer samples was assessed using ceramic hollow-fiber (HF) membrane modules with a nominal pore size ranging from 0.2 to 1.4 μm. Under constant operating conditions (that is, transmembrane pressure difference, TMP = 2.35 bar; feed superficial velocity, vS = 2.5 m/s; temperature, T = 10 °C), quite small steady-state permeation fluxes (J(*) ) of 32 or 37 L/m(2) /h were achieved using the 0.2- or 0.5-μm symmetric membrane modules. Both permeates exhibited turbidity <1 EBC unit, but a significant reduction in density, viscosity, color, extract, and foam half-life with respect to their corresponding retentates. The 0.8-μm asymmetric membrane module might be selected, its corresponding permeate having quite a good turbidity and medium reduction in the aforementioned beer quality parameters. Moreover, it exhibited J(*) values of the same order of magnitude of those claimed for the polyethersulfone HF membrane modules currently commercialized. The 1.4-μm asymmetric membrane module yielded quite a high steady-state permeation flux (196 ± 38 L/m(2) /h), and a minimum decline in permeate quality parameters, except for the high levels of turbidity at room temperature and chill haze. In the circumstances, such a membrane module might be regarded as a real valid alternative to conventional powder filters on condition that the resulting permeate were submitted to a final finishing step using 0.45- or 0.65-μm microbially rated membrane cartridges prior to aseptic bottling. A novel combined beer clarification process was thus outlined.

  7. Atomic-Sized Pores Enhanced Electrocatalysis of TaS2 Nanosheets for Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Tan, Yongwen; Liu, Pan; Guo, Chenguang; Luo, Min; Han, Jiuhui; Lin, Tianquan; Huang, Fuqiang; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-10-01

    A plasma oxidation method is developed to fabricate atomic-scale pores in the basal planes of electrochemically inert TaS2 nanosheets to functionalize the 2D crystals with high electrocatalysis for hydrogen evolution reaction. Quantitative measurements of under-coordinated atoms at edges of the pores by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy reveal the intrinsic correlation between the defective atomic sites and electrocatalytic activities of 2D TaS2 .

  8. The invariances of power law size distributions.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Size varies. Small things are typically more frequent than large things. The logarithm of frequency often declines linearly with the logarithm of size. That power law relation forms one of the common patterns of nature. Why does the complexity of nature reduce to such a simple pattern? Why do things as different as tree size and enzyme rate follow similarly simple patterns? Here I analyze such patterns by their invariant properties. For example, a common pattern should not change when adding a constant value to all observations. That shift is essentially the renumbering of the points on a ruler without changing the metric information provided by the ruler. A ruler is shift invariant only when its scale is properly calibrated to the pattern being measured. Stretch invariance corresponds to the conservation of the total amount of something, such as the total biomass and consequently the average size. Rotational invariance corresponds to pattern that does not depend on the order in which underlying processes occur, for example, a scale that additively combines the component processes leading to observed values. I use tree size as an example to illustrate how the key invariances shape pattern. A simple interpretation of common pattern follows. That simple interpretation connects the normal distribution to a wide variety of other common patterns through the transformations of scale set by the fundamental invariances.

  9. The invariances of power law size distributions

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Size varies. Small things are typically more frequent than large things. The logarithm of frequency often declines linearly with the logarithm of size. That power law relation forms one of the common patterns of nature. Why does the complexity of nature reduce to such a simple pattern? Why do things as different as tree size and enzyme rate follow similarly simple patterns? Here I analyze such patterns by their invariant properties. For example, a common pattern should not change when adding a constant value to all observations. That shift is essentially the renumbering of the points on a ruler without changing the metric information provided by the ruler. A ruler is shift invariant only when its scale is properly calibrated to the pattern being measured. Stretch invariance corresponds to the conservation of the total amount of something, such as the total biomass and consequently the average size. Rotational invariance corresponds to pattern that does not depend on the order in which underlying processes occur, for example, a scale that additively combines the component processes leading to observed values. I use tree size as an example to illustrate how the key invariances shape pattern. A simple interpretation of common pattern follows. That simple interpretation connects the normal distribution to a wide variety of other common patterns through the transformations of scale set by the fundamental invariances. PMID:27928497

  10. Pore-scale simulations of drainage in granular materials: Finite size effects and the representative elementary volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chao; Chareyre, Bruno; Darve, Félix

    2016-09-01

    A pore-scale model is introduced for two-phase flow in dense packings of polydisperse spheres. The model is developed as a component of a more general hydromechanical coupling framework based on the discrete element method, which will be elaborated in future papers and will apply to various processes of interest in soil science, in geomechanics and in oil and gas production. Here the emphasis is on the generation of a network of pores mapping the void space between spherical grains, and the definition of local criteria governing the primary drainage process. The pore space is decomposed by Regular Triangulation, from which a set of pores connected by throats are identified. A local entry capillary pressure is evaluated for each throat, based on the balance of capillary pressure and surface tension at equilibrium. The model reflects the possible entrapment of disconnected patches of the receding wetting phase. It is validated by a comparison with drainage experiments. In the last part of the paper, a series of simulations are reported to illustrate size and boundary effects, key questions when studying small samples made of spherical particles be it in simulations or experiments. Repeated tests on samples of different sizes give evolution of water content which are not only scattered but also strongly biased for small sample sizes. More than 20,000 spheres are needed to reduce the bias on saturation below 0.02. Additional statistics are generated by subsampling a large sample of 64,000 spheres. They suggest that the minimal sampling volume for evaluating saturation is one hundred times greater that the sampling volume needed for measuring porosity with the same accuracy. This requirement in terms of sample size induces a need for efficient computer codes. The method described herein has a low algorithmic complexity in order to satisfy this requirement. It will be well suited to further developments toward coupled flow-deformation problems in which evolution of the

  11. Remote Laser Diffraction Particle Size Distribution Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2001-03-01

    In support of a radioactive slurry sampling and physical characterization task, an “off-the-shelf” laser diffraction (classical light scattering) particle size analyzer was utilized for remote particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. Spent nuclear fuel was previously reprocessed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC—formerly recognized as the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) which is on DOE’s INEEL site. The acidic, radioactive aqueous raffinate streams from these processes were transferred to 300,000 gallon stainless steel storage vessels located in the INTEC Tank Farm area. Due to the transfer piping configuration in these vessels, complete removal of the liquid can not be achieved. Consequently, a “heel” slurry remains at the bottom of an “emptied” vessel. Particle size distribution characterization of the settled solids in this remaining heel slurry, as well as suspended solids in the tank liquid, is the goal of this remote PSD analyzer task. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model LA-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a “hot cell” (gamma radiation) environment. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not previously achievable—making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  12. Magnetic-resonance pore imaging of nonsymmetric microscopic pore shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Stefan Andreas; Wang, Xindi; Hosking, Peter; Simpson, M. Cather; Hunter, Mark; Galvosas, Petrik

    2015-07-01

    Imaging of the microstructure of porous media such as biological tissue or porous solids is of high interest in health science and technology, engineering and material science. Magnetic resonance pore imaging (MRPI) is a recent technique based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which allows us to acquire images of the average pore shape in a given sample. Here we provide details on the experimental design, challenges, and requirements of MRPI, including its calibration procedures. Utilizing a laser-machined phantom sample, we present images of microscopic pores with a hemiequilateral triangular shape even in the presence of NMR relaxation effects at the pore walls. We therefore show that MRPI is applicable to porous samples without a priori knowledge about their pore shape and symmetry. Furthermore, we introduce "MRPI mapping," which combines MRPI with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This enables one to resolve microscopic pore sizes and shapes spatially, thus expanding the application of MRPI to samples with heterogeneous distributions of pores.

  13. Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokay, A.; Bashor, P. G.; Habib, E.; Kasparis, T. C.

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of the raindrop size distribution (RSD) have been collected in tropical cyclones and hurricanes with an impact type disdrometer during the past three Atlantic hurricane seasons. The measurements were taken at Wallops Island, Virginia, Lafayette, Louisiana, and Orlando, Florida. The RSDs from the remnants of tropical cyclones or hurricanes at 40 dBZ agreed well with each other where the mean mass diameter was 1.65-1.7 mm, and the total concentration had a range of 600 to 800 drops/m3. Assuming the normalized gamma size distribution, the shape parameter will be 5-8 to satisfy the observed rain rate of 18-20 mm/hr. If the observations were taken during the extratropical phase of the storm where the tropical cyclone merges with a frontal system, the composite spectra at 40 dBZ include more large drops and less small to mid-size drops, typical for continental thunderstorms. Thus, the mean mass diameter was larger, while total concentration, and rain rate was less in extratropical cyclones than in tropical cyclones.

  14. Particle size distribution of indoor aerosol sources

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.B.

    1990-10-24

    As concern about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has grown in recent years, it has become necessary to determine the nature of particles produced by different indoor aerosol sources and the typical concentration that these sources tend to produce. These data are important in predicting the dose of particles to people exposed to these sources and it will also enable us to take effective mitigation procedures. Further, it will also help in designing appropriate air cleaners. A new state of the art technique, DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) System is used to determine the particle size distributions of a number of sources. This system employs the electrical mobility characteristics of these particles and is very effective in the 0.01--1.0 {mu}m size range. A modified system that can measure particle sizes in the lower size range down to 3 nm was also used. Experimental results for various aerosol sources is presented in the ensuing chapters. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Preparation, characterization, and silanization of 3D microporous PDMS structure with properly sized pores for endothelial cell culture.

    PubMed

    Zargar, Reyhaneh; Nourmohammadi, Jhamak; Amoabediny, Ghassem

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, application of porous polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) structure in biomedical is becoming widespread, and many methods have been established to create such structure. Although the pores created through these methods are mostly developed on the outer surface of PDMS membrane, this study offers a simple and cost-efficient technique for creating three-dimensional (3D) microporous PDMS structure with appropriate pore size for endothelial cell culture. In this study, combination of gas foaming and particulate leaching methods, with NaHCO3 as effervescent salt and NaCl as progen are used to form a 3D PDMS sponge. The in situ chemical reaction between NaHCO3 and HCl resulted in the formation of small pores and channels. Moreover, soaking the samples in HCl solution temporarily improved the hydrophilicity of PDMS, which then facilitated the penetration of water for further leaching of NaCl. The surface chemical modification process was performed by (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane to culture endothelial cells on porous PDMS matrix. The results are an indication of positive response of endothelial cells to the fabricated PDMS sponge. Because of simplicity and practicality of this method for preparing PDMS sponge with appropriate pore size and biological properties, the fabricated matrix can perfectly be applied to future studies in blood-contacting devices.

  16. Electronic cigarette aerosol particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Ingebrethsen, Bradley J; Cole, Stephen K; Alderman, Steven L

    2012-12-01

    The particle size distribution of aerosols produced by electronic cigarettes was measured in an undiluted state by a spectral transmission procedure and after high dilution with an electrical mobility analyzer. The undiluted e-cigarette aerosols were found to have particle diameters of average mass in the 250-450 nm range and particle number concentrations in the 10(9) particles/cm(3) range. These measurements are comparable to those observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke in prior studies and also measured in the current study with the spectral transmission method and with the electrical mobility procedure. Total particulate mass for the e-cigarettes calculated from the size distribution parameters measured by spectral transmission were in good agreement with replicate determinations of total particulate mass by gravimetric filter collection. In contrast, average particle diameters determined for e-cigarettes by the electrical mobility method are in the 50 nm range and total particulate masses calculated based on the suggested diameters are orders of magnitude smaller than those determined gravimetrically. This latter discrepancy, and the very small particle diameters observed, are believed to result from almost complete e-cigarette aerosol particle evaporation at the dilution levels and conditions of the electrical mobility analysis. A much smaller degree, ~20% by mass, of apparent particle evaporation was observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke. The spectral transmission method is validated in the current study against measurements on tobacco burning cigarette smoke, which has been well characterized in prior studies, and is supported as yielding an accurate characterization of the e-cigarette aerosol particle size distribution.

  17. Particle Size Distribution in Aluminum Manufacturing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sa; Noth, Elizabeth M.; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Eisen, Ellen A.; Cullen, Mark R.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2015-01-01

    As part of exposure assessment for an ongoing epidemiologic study of heart disease and fine particle exposures in aluminum industry, area particle samples were collected in production facilities to assess instrument reliability and particle size distribution at different process areas. Personal modular impactors (PMI) and Minimicro-orifice uniform deposition impactors (MiniMOUDI) were used. The coefficient of variation (CV) of co-located samples was used to evaluate the reproducibility of the samplers. PM2.5 measured by PMI was compared to PM2.5 calculated from MiniMOUDI data. Mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and concentrations of sub-micrometer (PM1.0) and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.56) particles were evaluated to characterize particle size distribution. Most of CVs were less than 30%. The slope of the linear regression of PMI_PM2.5 versus MiniMOUDI_PM2.5 was 1.03 mg/m3 per mg/m3 (± 0.05), with correlation coefficient of 0.97 (± 0.01). Particle size distribution varied substantively in smelters, whereas it was less variable in fabrication units with significantly smaller MMADs (arithmetic mean of MMADs: 2.59 μm in smelters vs. 1.31 μm in fabrication units, p = 0.001). Although the total particle concentration was more than two times higher in the smelters than in the fabrication units, the fraction of PM10 which was PM1.0 or PM0.56 was significantly lower in the smelters than in the fabrication units (p < 0.001). Consequently, the concentrations of sub-micrometer and quasi-ultrafine particles were similar in these two types of facilities. It would appear, studies evaluating ultrafine particle exposure in aluminum industry should focus on not only the smelters, but also the fabrication facilities. PMID:26478760

  18. Measurement of nonvolatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the nonvolatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a nonvolatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol (OA; 40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a nonvolatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type of OA

  19. Landslide size distribution in seismic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valagussa, Andrea; Frattini, Paolo; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2015-04-01

    In seismic areas, the analysis of the landslides size distribution with the distance from the seismic source is very important for hazard zoning and land planning. From numerical modelling (Bourdeau et al., 2004), it has been observed that the area of the sliding mass tends to increase with the ground-motion amplitude up to a certain threshold input acceleration. This has been also observed empirically for the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake (Keefer and Manson, 1998) and 1999 Chi Chi earthquake (Khazai and Sitar, 2003). Based on this, it possible to assume that the landslide size decreases with the increase of the distance from the seismic source. In this research, we analysed six earthquakes-induced landslides inventories (Papua New Guinea Earthquake, 1993; Northridge Earthquake, 1994; Niigata-Chuetsu Earthquake 2004; Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake, 2008; Wenchuan Earthquake, 2008; Tohoku Earthquake, 2011) with a magnitude ranging between 6.6 and 9.0 Mw. For each earthquake, we first analysed the size of landslides as a function of different factors such as the lithology, the PGA, the relief, the distance from the seismic sources (both fault and epicentre). Then, we analysed the magnitude frequency curves for different distances from the source area and for each lithology. We found that a clear relationship between the size distribution and the distance from the seismic source is not evident, probably due to the combined effect of the different influencing factors and to the non-linear relationship between the ground-motion intensity and the distance from the seismic source.

  20. Aerosol Size Distribution in the marine regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuszewski, Piotr; Petelski, Tomasz; Zielinski, Tymon; Pakszys, Paulina; Strzalkowska, Agata; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Kowalczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    We would like to present the data obtained during the regular research cruises of the S/Y Oceania over a period of time between 2009 - 2012. The Baltic Sea is a very interesting polygon for aerosol measurements, however, also difficult due to the fact that mostly cases of a mixture of continental and marine aerosols are observed. It is possible to measure clear marine aerosol, but also advections of dust from southern Europe or even Africa. This variability of data allows to compare different conditions. The data is also compared with our measurements from the Arctic Seas, which have been made during the ARctic EXperiment (AREX). The Arctic Seas are very suitable for marine aerosol investigations since continental advections of aerosols are far less frequent than in other European sea regions. The aerosol size distribution was measured using the TSI Laser Aerosol Spectrometer model 3340 (99 channels, measurement range 0.09 μm to 7 μm), condensation particle counter (range 0.01 μm to 3 μm) and laser particle counter PMS CSASP-100-HV-SP (range 0.5 μm to 47 μm in 45 channels). Studies of marine aerosol production and transport are important for many Earth sciences such as cloud physics, atmospheric optics, environmental pollution studies and interaction between ocean and atmosphere. All equipment was placed on one of the masts of S/Y Oceania. Measurements using the laser aerosol spectrometer and condensation particle counter were made on one level (8 meters above sea level). Measurements with the laser particle counter were performed at five different levels above the sea level (8, 11, 14, 17 and 20 m). Based on aerosol size distribution the parameterizations with a Log-Normal and a Power-Law distributions were made. The aerosol source functions, characteristic for the region were also determined. Additionally, poor precision of the sea spray emission determination was confirmed while using only the aerosol concentration data. The emission of sea spray depends

  1. Daptomycin forms cation- and size-selective pores in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, TianHua; Muraih, Jawad K; MacCormick, Ben; Silverman, Jared; Palmer, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic that is used clinically to treat severe infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Its bactericidal action involves the calcium-dependent binding to membranes containing phosphatidylglycerol, followed by the formation of membrane-associated oligomers. Bacterial cells exposed to daptomycin undergo membrane depolarization, suggesting the formation of channels or pores in the target membranes. We here used a liposome model to detect and characterize the permeability properties of the daptomycin pores. The pores are selective for cations, with permeabilities being highest for Na(+), K(+), and other alkali metal ions. The permeability is approximately twice lower for Mg(++), and lower again for the organic cations choline and hexamethonium. Anions are excluded, as is the zwitterion cysteine. These observations account for the observed depolarization of bacterial cells by daptomycin and suggest that under typical in vivo conditions depolarization is mainly due to sodium influx.

  2. The Seasonal Evolution of Sea Ice Floe Size Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. “The Seasonal Evolution of Sea Ice Floe Size Distribution...region. OBJECTIVES The objective of this work is to determine the seasonal evolution of the floe size distribution (Figure 1), paying particular...framework for the floe size distribution. 2. Calculate the evolution of floe size distribution during spring and summer. 3. Determine the floe

  3. Modeling The Size Distribution Of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Nicole; Esposito, L. W.

    2007-10-01

    Spatial structures such as density and bending waves, self-gravity and moonlet wakes are among the better known pieces in the puzzle of the formation and evolution of Saturn's main rings. But also the actual sizes of ring particles are very important to understand the long-term behavior or the system. The Cassini mission is continuing to provide a wealth of new observations. Among those are the transient features, bright clumps, and brightness fluctuations in the rather mysterious F ring that are partially attributed to a population of moonlets hidden well within the bright core of the structure. Detections of opaque features during stellar occultations of the UVIS and VIMS instruments strongly support this idea. Further, the discovery of embedded moonlets in Saturn's A ring raises questions about the origin of these objects; not to forget about the km-sized moons, Pan and Daphnis, orbiting within the A ring. Are they remnants of a shattered moon or is it possible to accrete these objects from the surrounding ring material? Currently, the theory still lags behind the observations. Here, we employ a generalized kinetic approach aiming at the long-term evolution of the size distribution that cannot be achieved by current N-body simulations and discuss its implications for the evolution and origin of Saturn's rings.

  4. Model of the radial distribution function of pores in a layer of porous aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkas, N. L.; Cherkas, S. L.

    2016-03-01

    An empirical formula is derived to describe the quasi-periodic structure of a layer of porous aluminum oxide obtained by anodization. The formula accounts for two mechanisms of the transition from the ordered state (2D crystal) to the amorphous state. The first mechanism infers that vacancy-type defects arise, but the crystal lattice remains undestroyed. The second mechanism describes the lattice destruction. The radial distribution function of the pores in porous aluminum oxide is obtained using the Bessel transform. Comparison with a real sample is performed.

  5. Effect of Pore Size and Porosity on the Biomechanical Properties and Cytocompatibility of Porous NiTi Alloys.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yu-Tao; Yang, Yue; Tian, Tian; Stanford, Clark; Zhang, Xin-Ping; Zhao, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Five types of porous Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) alloy samples of different porosities and pore sizes were fabricated. According to compressive and fracture strengths, three groups of porous NiTi alloy samples underwent further cytocompatibility experiments. Porous NiTi alloys exhibited a lower Young's modulus (2.0 GPa ~ 0.8 GPa). Both compressive strength (108.8 MPa ~ 56.2 MPa) and fracture strength (64.6 MPa ~ 41.6 MPa) decreased gradually with increasing mean pore size (MPS). Cells grew and spread well on all porous NiTi alloy samples. Cells attached more strongly on control group and blank group than on all porous NiTi alloy samples (p < 0.05). Cell adhesion on porous NiTi alloys was correlated negatively to MPS (277.2 μm ~ 566.5 μm; p < 0.05). More cells proliferated on control group and blank group than on all porous NiTi alloy samples (p < 0.05). Cellular ALP activity on all porous NiTi alloy samples was higher than on control group and blank group (p < 0.05). The porous NiTi alloys with optimized pore size could be a potential orthopedic material.

  6. The Size Distribution of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, P. R.; Lowry, S. C.

    2001-11-01

    We are conducting a program of ground-based CCD photometry of distant cometary nuclei, in order to estimate their sizes, shapes, rotation periods and axial ratios. We have combined our data with that reported in the literature by other observers to obtain an estimate of the size distribution of observed Jupiter-family and Halley-type comets. The catalog consists of 79 measurements of 52 JF and HT comets using a variety of techniques, including CCD photometry, IR photometry, and HST imaging. The data has been normalized to an assumed albedo of 0.04 except in cases where the albedo was directly measured. We find that the cumulative number of comets at or larger than a given radius can be described by a power law function with a slope of --1.40 +/- 0.03. This corresponds to a slope of --0.28 +/- 0.01 for the cumulative luminosity function, close to the slope of --0.32 +/- 0.02 found by Lowry (2001), derived from a homogeneously reduced CCD survey of distant JF comets. Both values are considerably less than the slope of --0.53 +/- 0.05 found by Fernández et al. (1999). This inconsistency is most likely attributed to the inhomogeneous nature of the Fernández et al. dataset, and the inclusion of active comets within their sample. Typical values of the CLF slope for Kuiper belt objects are --0.64 to --0.69 (Gladman et al. 2001; Trujillo et al. 2001). The shallower slope of the JF and HT comets, which are considerably smaller than the measured Kuiper belt objects, may be due to intrinsic differences in the KBO size distribution at the different size ranges (Weissman & Levison 1998) or to the physical evolution of JF and HT comets as they lose mass through sublimation and fragmentation (Lowry 2001). This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy and Planetary Geology & Geophysics Programs. Support from the National Research Council is also gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Exploitation of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica as a carrier for a poorly water soluble drug: influence of pore size on release rate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenquan; Wan, Long; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Yikun; Zheng, Xin; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the present work were to explore the potential application of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica (FMS) with pore size of 16.0nm as a delivery system for poorly soluble drugs and investigate the effect of pore size on the dissolution rate. FMS with different pore sizes (16.0, 6.9 and 3.7nm) was successfully synthesized by using Pluronic block co-polymer F127 as a template and adjusting the reaction temperatures. Celecoxib (CEL), which is a BCS class II drug, was used as a model drug and loaded into FMS with different pore sizes by the solvent deposition method at a drug-silica ratio of 1:4. Characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to systematically investigate the drug loading process. The results obtained showed that CEL was in a non-crystalline state after incorporation of CEL into the pores of FMS-15 with pore size of 16.0nm. In vitro dissolution was carried out to demonstrate the effects of FMS with different pore sizes on the release of CEL. The results obtained indicated that the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS-15 was significantly enhanced compared with pure CEL. This could be explained by supposing that CEL encountered less diffusion resistance and its crystallinity decreased due to the large pore size of 16.0nm and the nanopore channels of FMS-15. Moreover, drug loading and pore size both play an important role in enhancing the dissolution properties for the poorly water-soluble drugs. As the pore size between 3.7 and 16.0nm increased, the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS gradually increased.

  8. Aggregate size distribution of the soil loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Judit Alexandra; Jakab, Gergely; Szabó, Boglárka; Józsa, Sándor; Szalai, Zoltán; Centeri, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    aggregate size distribution which is led to nutrient and organic matter redistribution is one of a key questions to improve erosion estimation. G. Jakab was supported by the János Bolyai fellowship of the HAS.

  9. Estimation of the pore pressure distribution from three dimensional groundwater flow model at mine sites in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sangsoo; Jang, Myounghwan; Kim, Gyoungman; Kim, Donghui; Kim, Daehoon; Baek, Hwanjo

    2016-04-01

    Mining activities continually change the groundwater flow and associated pore pressure distributions within the rockmass around the mine openings or the open-pit bench during the operational periods. As the pore pressure distributions may substantially affect the mechanical behaviour or stability of the rockmass, it is important to monitor the variation of pore pressure incurred by mining operation. The pore pressure distributions within the rockmass can be derived using a two- or three-dimensional finite element groundwater flow model, adopted to simulate the groundwater flow. While the groundwater inflow at mines has generally been dealt with respect to the working environment, detailed case studies on the distribution of pore water pressure related to the stability analysis of mine openings have been relatively rare in Korea. Recently, however, as the health and safety problems are emerged for sustainable mining practice, these issues are of the major concerns for the mining industries. This study aims to establish a three dimensional groundwater flow model to estimate the pore pressure distributions in order to employ as an input parameter for numerical codes such as the FLAC 3D. Also, the groundwater flow simulated can be used for de-watering design at a mine site. The MINEDW code, a groundwater flow model code specifically developed to simulate the complicated hydro-geologic conditions related to mining, has mainly been used in this study. Based on the data collected from field surveys and literature reviews, a conceptual model was established and sensitivity analysis was performed.

  10. Power laws, discontinuities and regional city size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garmestani, A.S.; Allen, C.R.; Gallagher, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Urban systems are manifestations of human adaptation to the natural environment. City size distributions are the expression of hierarchical processes acting upon urban systems. In this paper, we test the entire city size distributions for the southeastern and southwestern United States (1990), as well as the size classes in these regions for power law behavior. We interpret the differences in the size of the regional city size distributions as the manifestation of variable growth dynamics dependent upon city size. Size classes in the city size distributions are snapshots of stable states within urban systems in flux. ?? 2008.

  11. Size-Dependent Filling Behavior of UV-Curable Di(meth)acrylate Resins into Carbon-Coated Anodic Aluminum Oxide Pores of around 20 nm.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaru; Nakaya, Akifumi; Hoshikawa, Yasuto; Ito, Shunya; Hiroshiba, Nobuya; Kyotani, Takashi

    2016-11-09

    Ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprint lithography is a promising nanofabrication technology with cost efficiency and high throughput for sub-20 nm size semiconductor, data storage, and optical devices. To test formability of organic resist mask patterns, we investigated whether the type of polymerizable di(meth)acrylate monomer affected the fabrication of cured resin nanopillars by UV nanoimprinting using molds with pores of around 20 nm. We used carbon-coated, porous, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) films prepared by electrochemical oxidation and thermal chemical vapor deposition as molds, because the pore diameter distribution in the range of 10-40 nm was suitable for combinatorial testing to investigate whether UV-curable resins comprising each monomer were filled into the mold recesses in UV nanoimprinting. Although the UV-curable resins, except for a bisphenol A-based one, detached from the molds without pull-out defects after radical photopolymerization under UV light, the number of cured resin nanopillars was independent of the viscosity of the monomer(s) in each resin. The number of resin nanopillars increased and their diameter decreased as the number of hydroxy groups in the aliphatic diacrylate monomers increased. It was concluded that the filling of the carbon-coated pores having diameters of around 20 nm with UV-curable resins was promoted by the presence of hydroxy groups in the aliphatic di(meth)acrylate monomers.

  12. Pore-scale investigation on stress-dependent characteristics of granular packs and the impact of pore deformation on fluid distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Klise, Katherine A.; Torrealba, Victor A.; Karpyn, Zuleima T.; Crandall, D.

    2015-05-25

    Understanding the effect of changing stress conditions on multiphase flow in porous media is of fundamental importance for many subsurface activities including enhanced oil recovery, water drawdown from aquifers, soil confinement, and geologic carbon storage. Geomechanical properties of complex porous systems are dynamically linked to flow conditions, but their feedback relationship is often oversimplified due to the difficulty of representing pore-scale stress deformation and multiphase flow characteristics in high fidelity. In this work, we performed pore-scale experiments of single- and multiphase flow through bead packs at different confining pressure conditions to elucidate compaction-dependent characteristics of granular packs and their impact on fluid flow. A series of drainage and imbibition cycles were conducted on a water-wet, soda-lime glass bead pack under varying confining stress conditions. Simultaneously, X-ray micro-CT was used to visualize and quantify the degree of deformation and fluid distribution corresponding with each stress condition and injection cycle. Micro-CT images were segmented using a gradient-based method to identify fluids (e.g., oil and water), and solid phase redistribution throughout the different experimental stages. Changes in porosity, tortuosity, and specific surface area were quantified as a function of applied confining pressure. Results demonstrate varying degrees of sensitivity of these properties to confining pressure, which suggests that caution must be taken when considering scalability of these properties for practical modeling purposes. Changes in capillary number with confining pressure are attributed to the increase in pore velocity as a result of pore contraction. Furthermore, this increase in pore velocity was found to have a marginal impact on average phase trapping at different confining pressures.

  13. Pore-scale investigation on stress-dependent characteristics of granular packs and the impact of pore deformation on fluid distribution

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Klise, Katherine A.; Torrealba, Victor A.; ...

    2015-05-25

    Understanding the effect of changing stress conditions on multiphase flow in porous media is of fundamental importance for many subsurface activities including enhanced oil recovery, water drawdown from aquifers, soil confinement, and geologic carbon storage. Geomechanical properties of complex porous systems are dynamically linked to flow conditions, but their feedback relationship is often oversimplified due to the difficulty of representing pore-scale stress deformation and multiphase flow characteristics in high fidelity. In this work, we performed pore-scale experiments of single- and multiphase flow through bead packs at different confining pressure conditions to elucidate compaction-dependent characteristics of granular packs and their impactmore » on fluid flow. A series of drainage and imbibition cycles were conducted on a water-wet, soda-lime glass bead pack under varying confining stress conditions. Simultaneously, X-ray micro-CT was used to visualize and quantify the degree of deformation and fluid distribution corresponding with each stress condition and injection cycle. Micro-CT images were segmented using a gradient-based method to identify fluids (e.g., oil and water), and solid phase redistribution throughout the different experimental stages. Changes in porosity, tortuosity, and specific surface area were quantified as a function of applied confining pressure. Results demonstrate varying degrees of sensitivity of these properties to confining pressure, which suggests that caution must be taken when considering scalability of these properties for practical modeling purposes. Changes in capillary number with confining pressure are attributed to the increase in pore velocity as a result of pore contraction. Furthermore, this increase in pore velocity was found to have a marginal impact on average phase trapping at different confining pressures.« less

  14. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice

  15. [Vegetation influence on nutrients distribution in pore water of salt marsh sediment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Wei; Li, Dao-Ji; Gao, Lei

    2009-11-01

    The variations of nutrients in pore water of salt marsh sediment were surveyed in the middle intertidal zone of Chongming Dongtan during August 2007 to May 2008 to identify plant impact on nutrients distribution. The results show that NH4(+) -N and PO4(3-) -P concentrations are lower in pore water of Spartina alterniflora and Phragmites australis zones than in bare flat, and specially, NH4(+) -N concentrations in summer and autumn decrease by one more orders of magnitude. Compared to winter, nutrients concentrations are obviously higher during the period of plant growth, and plant biomass is clearly correlative to nitrogen and phosphorus. Vegetation growth influences nitrogen content intensively. NH4(-) -N concentrations in Spartina alterniflora and Phragmites australis zones are 44.21 and 74.38 micromol x L(-1) respectively, distinctly lower than that in bare flat and Scirpus mariquete zone (340.14 and 291.87 micromol x L(-1) respectively). Moreover, NO(x)(-) -N concentration is one to two order(s) of magnitude lower than NH4(+) -N, and its highest value exists in Phragmites australis zone (5.94 micromol x L(-1)). The results of molecule diffusive flux of nutrients in the surface sediment-overlying water interface indicate that marsh sediment is the source for SiO3(2-) -Si, NH4(+) -N and PO4(3-) -P, and the rank for NO(x)(-) -N (NO3(-) -N + NO2(-) -N), and NO(x)(-) -N flux from overlying water to sediment [16.23 micromol x (m2 x h)(-1)] is higher than NH4(+) -N flux from sediment to overlying water [15.53 micromol x (m2 x h)(-1)]. Vegetation growth accommodates nutrient structure of the estuarine ecosystem by affecting sediment-water interface mass flux and nutrient ratios in pore water and overlying water.

  16. Differences in purinergic amplification of osmotic cell lysis by the pore-forming RTX toxins Bordetella pertussis CyaA and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae ApxIA: the role of pore size.

    PubMed

    Masin, Jiri; Fiser, Radovan; Linhartova, Irena; Osicka, Radim; Bumba, Ladislav; Hewlett, Erik L; Benz, Roland; Sebo, Peter

    2013-12-01

    A large subgroup of the repeat in toxin (RTX) family of leukotoxins of Gram-negative pathogens consists of pore-forming hemolysins. These can permeabilize mammalian erythrocytes (RBCs) and provoke their colloid osmotic lysis (hemolytic activity). Recently, ATP leakage through pannexin channels and P2X receptor-mediated opening of cellular calcium and potassium channels were implicated in cell permeabilization by pore-forming toxins. In the study described here, we examined the role played by purinergic signaling in the cytolytic action of two RTX toxins that form pores of different sizes. The cytolytic potency of ApxIA hemolysin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, which forms pores about 2.4 nm wide, was clearly reduced in the presence of P2X7 receptor antagonists or an ATP scavenger, such as pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS), Brilliant Blue G, ATP oxidized sodium salt, or hexokinase. In contrast, antagonists of purinergic signaling had no impact on the hemolytic potency of the adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA) of Bordetella pertussis, which forms pores of 0.6 to 0.8 nm in diameter. Moreover, the conductance of pores formed by ApxIA increased with the toxin concentration, while the conductance of the CyaA single pore units was constant at various toxin concentrations. However, the P2X7 receptor antagonist PPADS inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the exacerbated hemolytic activity of a CyaA-ΔN489 construct (lacking 489 N-terminal residues of CyaA), which exhibited a strongly enhanced pore-forming propensity (>20-fold) and also formed severalfold larger conductance units in planar lipid bilayers than intact CyaA. These results point to a pore size threshold of purinergic amplification involvement in cell permeabilization by pore-forming RTX toxins.

  17. Antimicrobial performance of mesoporous titania thin films: role of pore size, hydrophobicity, and antibiotic release

    PubMed Central

    Atefyekta, Saba; Ercan, Batur; Karlsson, Johan; Taylor, Erik; Chung, Stanley; Webster, Thomas J; Andersson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Implant-associated infections are undesirable complications that might arise after implant surgery. If the infection is not prevented, it can lead to tremendous cost, trauma, and even life threatening conditions for the patient. Development of an implant coating loaded with antimicrobial substances would be an effective way to improve the success rate of implants. In this study, the in vitro efficacy of mesoporous titania thin films used as a novel antimicrobial release coating was evaluated. Mesoporous titania thin films with pore diameters of 4, 6, and 7 nm were synthesized using the evaporation-induced self-assembly method. The films were characterized and loaded with antimicrobial agents, including vancomycin, gentamicin, and daptomycin. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used to evaluate their effectiveness toward inhibiting bacterial colonization. Drug loading and delivery were studied using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, which showed successful loading and release of the antibiotics from the surfaces. Results from counting bacterial colony-forming units showed reduced bacterial adhesion on the drug-loaded films. Interestingly, the presence of the pores alone had a desired effect on bacterial colonization, which can be attributed to the documented nanotopographical effect. In summary, this study provides significant promise for the use of mesoporous titania thin films for reducing implant infections. PMID:27022263

  18. Antimicrobial performance of mesoporous titania thin films: role of pore size, hydrophobicity, and antibiotic release.

    PubMed

    Atefyekta, Saba; Ercan, Batur; Karlsson, Johan; Taylor, Erik; Chung, Stanley; Webster, Thomas J; Andersson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Implant-associated infections are undesirable complications that might arise after implant surgery. If the infection is not prevented, it can lead to tremendous cost, trauma, and even life threatening conditions for the patient. Development of an implant coating loaded with antimicrobial substances would be an effective way to improve the success rate of implants. In this study, the in vitro efficacy of mesoporous titania thin films used as a novel antimicrobial release coating was evaluated. Mesoporous titania thin films with pore diameters of 4, 6, and 7 nm were synthesized using the evaporation-induced self-assembly method. The films were characterized and loaded with antimicrobial agents, including vancomycin, gentamicin, and daptomycin. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used to evaluate their effectiveness toward inhibiting bacterial colonization. Drug loading and delivery were studied using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, which showed successful loading and release of the antibiotics from the surfaces. Results from counting bacterial colony-forming units showed reduced bacterial adhesion on the drug-loaded films. Interestingly, the presence of the pores alone had a desired effect on bacterial colonization, which can be attributed to the documented nanotopographical effect. In summary, this study provides significant promise for the use of mesoporous titania thin films for reducing implant infections.

  19. Gradients in pore size enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells in three-dimensional scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Di Luca, Andrea; Ostrowska, Barbara; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Lepedda, Antonio; Swieszkowski, Wojcech; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Small fractures in bone tissue can heal by themselves, but in case of larger defects current therapies are not completely successful due to several drawbacks. A possible strategy relies on the combination of additive manufactured polymeric scaffolds and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). The architecture of bone tissue is characterized by a structural gradient. Long bones display a structural gradient in the radial direction, while flat bones in the axial direction. Such gradient presents a variation in bone density from the cancellous bone to the cortical bone. Therefore, scaffolds presenting a gradient in porosity could be ideal candidates to improve bone tissue regeneration. In this study, we present a construct with a discrete gradient in pore size and characterize its ability to further support the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Furthermore, we studied the behaviour of hMSCs within the different compartments of the gradient scaffolds, showing a correlation between osteogenic differentiation and ECM mineralization, and pore dimensions. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content increased with increasing pore dimensions. Our results indicate that designing structural porosity gradients may be an appealing strategy to support gradual osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells. PMID:26961859

  20. Gradients in pore size enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells in three-dimensional scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Luca, Andrea; Ostrowska, Barbara; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Lepedda, Antonio; Swieszkowski, Wojcech; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Small fractures in bone tissue can heal by themselves, but in case of larger defects current therapies are not completely successful due to several drawbacks. A possible strategy relies on the combination of additive manufactured polymeric scaffolds and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). The architecture of bone tissue is characterized by a structural gradient. Long bones display a structural gradient in the radial direction, while flat bones in the axial direction. Such gradient presents a variation in bone density from the cancellous bone to the cortical bone. Therefore, scaffolds presenting a gradient in porosity could be ideal candidates to improve bone tissue regeneration. In this study, we present a construct with a discrete gradient in pore size and characterize its ability to further support the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Furthermore, we studied the behaviour of hMSCs within the different compartments of the gradient scaffolds, showing a correlation between osteogenic differentiation and ECM mineralization, and pore dimensions. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content increased with increasing pore dimensions. Our results indicate that designing structural porosity gradients may be an appealing strategy to support gradual osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells.

  1. Thermal Investigations of Periodically Nanoporous Si Films -- The Impact of Structure Sizes and Pore-Edge Amorphization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongchao; Zhao, Hongbo; Hao, Qing

    In recent years, nanoporous Si films have been intensively studied as promising thermoelectric materials, which mainly benefits from their dramatically reduced lattice thermal conductivity kL and bulk-like electrical properties.1,2 Despite many encouraging results, challenges still exist in the theoretical explanation of the observed low kL.3 Existing studies mainly attribute the low kL to 1) phonon bandstructure modification by coherent phonon processes in a periodic structure (phononic effects), and/or 2) pore-edge defects. In this work, temperature-dependent kL is measured for nanoporous Si films with different pore sizes and spacing to compare with model predictions. For systematic studies, two fabrication techniques are used to drill the nanopores: 1) reactive ion etching, and 2) a focus ion beam to introduce more pore-edge defects. The results from this work will provide guidance for phonon engineering in general materials with periodic interfaces or boundaries. References: 1. Tang et al., Nano Letters 10, 4279-4283 (2010). 2. Yu et al., Nature Nanotechnology 5, 718-721 (2010). 3. Cahill et al., Applied Physics Reviews 1, 011305/1-45 (2014) Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003-2012.

  2. A fractal-based approach to lake size-distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seekell, David A.; Pace, Michael L.; Tranvik, Lars J.; Verpoorter, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The abundance and size distribution of lakes is critical to assessing the role of lakes in regional and global biogeochemical processes. Lakes are fractal but do not always conform to the power law size-distribution typically associated with fractal geographical features. Here, we evaluate the fractal geometry of lakes with the goal of explaining apparently inconsistent observations of power law and non-power law lake size-distributions. The power law size-distribution is a special case for lakes near the mean elevation. Lakes in flat regions are power law distributed, while lakes in mountainous regions deviate from power law distributions. Empirical analyses of lake size data sets from the Adirondack Mountains in New York and the flat island of Gotland in Sweden support this finding. Our approach provides a unifying framework for lake size-distributions, indicates that small lakes cannot dominate total lake surface area, and underscores the importance of regional hypsometry in influencing lake size-distributions.

  3. Effects of particle size and forming pressure on pore properties of Fe-Cr-Al porous metal by pressureless sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Uk; Yi, Yujeong; Lee, Minjeong; Kim, Byoung-Kee

    2017-03-01

    With increased hydrogen consumption in ammonia production, refining and synthesis, fuel cells and vehicle industries, development of the material components related to hydrogen production is becoming an important factor in industry growth. Porous metals for fabrication of hydrogen are commonly known for their relative excellence in terms of large area, lightness, lower heat capacity, high toughness, and permeability. Fe-Cr-Al alloys not only have high corrosion resistance, heat resistance, and chemical stability but also ductility, excellent mechanical properties. In order to control powder size and sintering temperature effects of Fe-Cr-Al porous metal fabrication, Fe-Cr-Al powder was classified into 25-35 μm, 35-45 μm, 45-75 μm using an auto shaking sieve machine and then classified Fe-Cr-Al powders were pressed into disk shapes using a uniaxial press machine and CIP. The pelletized Fe-Cr-Al specimens were sintered at various temperatures in high vacuum. Properties such as pore size, porosity, and air permeability were evaluated using perm-porosimetry. Microstructure and phase changes were observed with SEM and XRD. Porosity and relative density were proportionated to increasing sintering temperature. With sufficient sintering at increasing temperatures, the pore size is expected to be gradually reduced. Porosity decreased with increasing sintering temperature and gradually increased necking of the powder.

  4. Distributed Pore Chemistry in Porous Organic Polymers in Tissue Culture Flasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclose. The substrate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphorylcholine groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions, and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  5. Metal(loid) speciation and size fractionation in sediment pore water depth profiles examined with a new meso profiling system.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Henning; Fabricius, Anne-Lena; Ecker, Dennis; Ternes, Thomas A; Duester, Lars

    2017-03-23

    In an exemplary incubation study with an anaerobic sediment sampled at an oxbow of the river Lahn in Germany (50°18'56.87″N; 7°37'41.25″E) and contaminated by former mining activity, a novel meso profiling and sampling system (messy) is presented. Messy enables a low invasive, automated sampling of pore water profiles across the sediment water interface (SWI), down to ∼20 cm depth with a spacial resolution of 1 cm. In parallel to the pore water sampling it measures physicochemical sediment parameters such as redox potential and pH value. In an incubation experiment of 151 days the ability of the setup was proven to address several different aspects relevant for fresh water and marine sediment studies: (i) The influence of mechanical disturbance and oxygen induced acidification on the mobility of 13 metals and metalloids (Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sb, U, V, Zn) was quantified based on 11 profiles. The analytes were quantified by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Three groups of elements were identified with respect to the release into the pore water and the overlying water under different experimental conditions. (ii) The capability to investigate the impacts of changing physicochemical sediment properties on arsenic and antimony (III/V) speciation is shown. (iii) An approach to obtain information on size fractionation effects and to address the colloidal pore water fractions (0.45 μm-16 μm) was successfully conducted for the elements Ag, As, Cu, Fe and Mn.

  6. Atmospheric Ion Clusters: Properties and Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    2002-12-01

    Ions are continuously generated in the atmosphere by the action of galactic cosmic radiation. Measured charge concentrations are of the order of 103 ~ {cm-3} throughout the troposphere, increasing to about 5 x 103 ~ {cm-3} in the lower stratosphere [Cole and Pierce, 1965; Paltridge, 1965, 1966]. The lifetimes of these ions are sufficient to allow substantial clustering with common trace constituents in air, including water, nitric and sulfuric acids, ammonia, and a variety of organic compounds [e.g., D'Auria and Turco, 2001 and references cited therein]. The populations of the resulting charged molecular clusters represent a pre-nucleation phase of particle formation, and in this regard comprise a key segment of the over-all nucleation size spectrum [e.g., Castleman and Tang, 1972]. It has been suggested that these clusters may catalyze certain heterogeneous reactions, and given their characteristic crystal-like structures may act as freezing nuclei for supercooled droplets. To investigate these possibilities, basic information on cluster thermodynamic properties and chemical kinetics is needed. Here, we present new results for several relevant atmospheric ion cluster families. In particular, predictions based on quantum mechanical simulations of cluster structure, and related thermodynamic parameters, are compared against laboratory data. We also describe a hybrid approach for modeling cluster sequences that combines laboratory measurements and quantum predictions with the classical liquid droplet (Thomson) model to treat a wider range of cluster sizes. Calculations of cluster mass distributions based on this hybrid model are illustrated, and the advantages and limitations of such an analysis are summarized. References: Castelman, A. W., Jr., and I. N. Tang, Role of small clusters in nucleation about ions, J. Chem. Phys., 57, 3629-3638, 1972. Cole, R. K., and E. T. Pierce, Electrification in the Earth's atmosphere for altitudes between 0 and 100 kilometers, J

  7. The effects of salt, particle and pore size on the process of carbon dioxide hydrate formation: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, Hosein; Ayoub, Muhammad; Bhat, A. H.; Mahmood, Syed Mohammad; Akbari, Saeed; Murshid, Ghulam

    2016-11-01

    Hydration is an alternative method for CO2 capture. In doing so, some researchers use porous media on an experimental scale. This paper tries to gather the researches on the formation of CO2 hydrate in different types of porous media such as silica sand, quartz sand, Toyoura, pumice, and fire hardened red clay. This review has attempted to examine the effects of salt and particle sizes as two major factors on the induction time, water to hydrate conversion, gas uptake (or gas consumption), and the rate of CO2 hydrate formation. By performing a critical assessment of previous research works, it was observed that the figure for the gas uptake (or gas consumption) and water to hydrate conversion in porous media was decreased by increasing the particle size provided that the pore size was constant. Although, salt can play a role in hydrate formation as the thermodynamic inhibitor, the results show that salt can be regarded as the kinetic growth inhibitor and kinetic promoter. Because of the fact that the gas uptake in seawater is lower than pure water at the end of experiment, the salt can act as a kinetic growth inhibitor. However, since gas uptake (after the nucleation period and for a short period) and the initial rate of hydrate formation in saline water were more than that of pure water, salt can play a promoter role in the kinetic reaction, too. Besides these, in the case of pure water and within a certain particle size, the amount of the hydrate formation rate has been seen to be greater in smaller particles (provided that the pore size is constant), however this has not been observed for seawater.

  8. Effects of particle size distribution in thick film conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of particle size distribution in thick film conductors are discussed. The distribution of particle sizes does have an effect on fired film density but the effect is not always positive. A proper distribution of sizes is necessary, and while the theoretical models can serve as guides to selecting this proper distribution, improved densities can be achieved by empirical variations from the predictions of the models.

  9. Topical application of a cleanser containing extracts of Diospyros kaki folium, Polygonum cuspidatum and Castanea crenata var. dulcis reduces skin oil content and pore size in human skin

    PubMed Central

    LEE, BO MI; AN, SUNGKWAN; KIM, SOO-YEON; HAN, HYUN JOO; JEONG, YU-JIN; LEE, KYOUNG-ROK; ROH, NAM KYUNG; AHN, KYU JOONG; AN, IN-SOOK; CHA, HWA JUN

    2015-01-01

    The effects of skin pores on skin topographic features can be reduced by decreasing excessive production and accumulation of sebum and elimination of comedones. Therefore, a cosmetic cleanser that regulates sebum homeostasis is required. In the present study, the effects of a cosmetic cleanser that contained Diospyros kaki folium, Polygonum cuspidatum and Castanea crenata var. dulcis (DPC) was examined on the removal of sebum and on skin pore size. Healthy volunteers (n=23) aged 20–50 years were asked to apply the test materials to the face. Skin oil content, pore size, pore number and extracted sebum surface area were measured using various measurement methods. All the measurements were performed at pre- and post-application of the test materials. When the cosmetic cleanser containing DPC was applied to the skin, the oil content decreased by 77.3%, from 6.19 to 1.40. The number of skin pores decreased by 24.83%, from 125.39 to 94.23. Skin pore size decreased from 0.07 to 0.02 µm3 (71.43% decrease). The amount of extracted sebum increased by 335% when the DPC cleanser was used. Compared to the control cleanser, skin oil content was significantly decreased when the cleanser that contained DPC was used. The cleanser containing DPC also decreased pore size and number. Finally, the DPC cleanser easily removed solidified sebum from the skin. PMID:26137233

  10. Uranium distribution in the coastal waters and pore waters of Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Baskaran, M.

    2006-01-01

    The geochemical reactivity of uranium (238U) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Fe, Mn, Ba, and V was investigated in the water column, pore waters, and across a river/estuarine mixing zone in Tampa Bay, Florida. This large estuary is impacted both by diverse anthropogenic activity and by extensive U-rich phosphatic deposits. Thus, the estuarine behavior of uranium may be examined relative to such known U enrichments and anthropogenic perturbations. Dissolved (< 0.45??m) uranium exhibited both removal and enrichment processes across the Alafia River/estuarine mixing zone relative to conservative mixing. Such non-conservative U behavior may be attributed to: i) physical mixing processes within the river; ii) U carrier phase reactivity; and/or iii) fluid exchange processes across sediment/water interface. In the bay proper, U concentrations were ?????2 to 3 times greater than those reported for other estuarine systems and are likely a result of erosional inputs from the extensive, underlying U-rich phosphatic deposits. Whereas dissolved U concentrations generally did not approach seawater values (13.6??nM) along the Alafia River salinity transect, water column U concentrations exceeded 16??nM in select regions of the bay. Within the hydrogeological framework of the bay, such enriched U may also be derived from advective fluid transport processes across the sediment/water interface, such as submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) or hyporheic exchange within coastal rivers. Pore water profiles of U in Tampa Bay show both a flux into and out of bottom sediments, and average, diffusive U pore water fluxes (Jdiff) ranged from - 82.0 to 116.6??mol d- 1. It is likely that negative U fluxes imply seawater entrainment or infiltration (i.e., submarine groundwater recharge), which may contribute to the removal of water column uranium. For comparison, a bay-wide, Ra-derived submarine groundwater discharge estimate for Tampa Bay (8??L m- 2 d- 1) yielded an average, advective

  11. Finite-size effects in the microscopic structure of a hard-sphere fluid in a narrow cylindrical pore.

    PubMed

    Román, F L; White, J A; González, A; Velasco, S

    2006-04-21

    We examine the microscopic structure of a hard-sphere fluid confined to a small cylindrical pore by means of Monte Carlo simulation. In order to analyze finite-size effects, the simulations are carried out in the framework of different statistical mechanics ensembles. We find that the size effects are specially relevant in the canonical ensemble where noticeable differences are found with the results in the grand canonical ensemble (GCE) and the isothermal isobaric ensemble (IIE) which, in most situations, remain very close to the infinite system results. A customary series expansion in terms of fluctuations of either the number of particles (GCE) or the inverse volume (IIE) allows us to connect with the results of the canonical ensemble.

  12. Terahertz time-domain spectra of aromatic carboxylic acids incorporated in nano-sized pores of mesoporous silicate.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yuko; Ajito, Katsuhiro

    2007-07-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is used to study the intra- and intermolecular vibrational modes of aromatic carboxylic acids, for example, o-phthalic acid, benzoic acid, and salicylic acid, which form either intra- or intermolecular hydrogen bond(s) in different ways. Incorporating the target molecules in nano-sized spaces in mesoporous silicate (SBA-16) is found to be effective for the separate detection of intramolecular hydrogen bonding modes and intermolecular modes. The results are supported by an analysis of the differences in the peak shifts, which depend on temperature, caused by the different nature of the THz absorption. Raman spectra revealed that incorporating the molecules in the nano-sized pores of SBA-16 slightly changes the molecular structures. In the future, THz-TDS using nanoporous materials will be used to analyze the intra- and intermolecular vibrational modes of molecules with larger hydrogen bonding networks such as proteins or DNA.

  13. Linking basin-scale and pore-scale gas hydrate distribution patterns in diffusion-dominated marine hydrate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann E.; Hillman, Jess I. T.; Malinverno, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study is to computationally determine the potential distribution patterns of diffusion-driven methane hydrate accumulations in coarse-grained marine sediments. Diffusion of dissolved methane in marine gas hydrate systems has been proposed as a potential transport mechanism through which large concentrations of hydrate can preferentially accumulate in coarse-grained sediments over geologic time. Using one-dimensional compositional reservoir simulations, we examine hydrate distribution patterns at the scale of individual sand layers (1-20 m thick) that are deposited between microbially active fine-grained material buried through the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). We then extrapolate to two-dimensional and basin-scale three-dimensional simulations, where we model dipping sands and multilayered systems. We find that properties of a sand layer including pore size distribution, layer thickness, dip, and proximity to other layers in multilayered systems all exert control on diffusive methane fluxes toward and within a sand, which in turn impact the distribution of hydrate throughout a sand unit. In all of these simulations, we incorporate data on physical properties and sand layer geometries from the Terrebonne Basin gas hydrate system in the Gulf of Mexico. We demonstrate that diffusion can generate high hydrate saturations (upward of 90%) at the edges of thin sands at shallow depths within the GHSZ, but that it is ineffective at producing high hydrate saturations throughout thick (greater than 10 m) sands buried deep within the GHSZ. Furthermore, we find that hydrate in fine-grained material can preserve high hydrate saturations in nearby thin sands with burial.Plain Language SummaryThis study combines one-, two-, and three-dimensional simulations to explore one potential process by which methane dissolved in water beneath the seafloor can be converted into solid methane hydrate. This work specifically</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H31E1229T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H31E1229T"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pore</span>-Scale Investigation on Stress-Dependent Characteristics of Granular Packs and Their Impact on Multiphase Fluid <span class="hlt">Distribution</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Torrealba, V.; Karpyn, Z.; Yoon, H.; Hart, D. B.; Klise, K. A.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">pore</span>-scale dynamics that govern multiphase flow under variable stress conditions are not well understood. This lack of fundamental understanding limits our ability to quantitatively predict multiphase flow and fluid <span class="hlt">distributions</span> in natural geologic systems. In this research, we focus on <span class="hlt">pore</span>-scale, single and multiphase flow properties that impact displacement mechanisms and residual trapping of non-wetting phase under varying stress conditions. X-ray micro-tomography is used to image <span class="hlt">pore</span> structures and <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of wetting and non-wetting fluids in water-wet synthetic granular packs, under dynamic load. Micro-tomography images are also used to determine structural features such as medial axis, surface area, and <span class="hlt">pore</span> body and throat <span class="hlt">distribution</span>; while the corresponding transport properties are determined from Lattice-Boltzmann simulations performed on lattice replicas of the imaged specimens. Results are used to investigate how inter-granular deformation mechanisms affect fluid displacement and residual trapping at the <span class="hlt">pore</span>-scale. This will improve our understanding of the dynamic interaction of mechanical deformation and fluid flow during enhanced oil recovery and geologic CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15330426','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15330426"><span id="translatedtitle">[The fractal characteristics of particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and conservation relationship].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jin, Peng-kang; Wang, Xiao-chang</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Using a microscopic technique, the characteristics of particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of Al-humic flocs were studied. The results showed that Al-humic floc <span class="hlt">size</span> followed a lognormal <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. By introducing the lognormal <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and fractal dimension into the fundamental kinetic equation of flocculation, a conservation relationship was obtained between the total number of particles, average floc volume and standard deviation of floc <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. Significance of the relation can greatly simplify the complicated procedure of kinetic analysis and enable a more accurate evaluation of floc <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720014625&hterms=pigment&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dpigment','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720014625&hterms=pigment&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dpigment"><span id="translatedtitle">The determination and optimization of (rutile) pigment particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Richards, L. W.</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>A light scattering particle <span class="hlt">size</span> test which can be used with materials having a broad particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is described. This test is useful for pigments. The relation between the particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of a rutile pigment and its optical performance in a gray tint test at low pigment concentration is calculated and compared with experimental data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApSS..360..684S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApSS..360..684S"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">sizes</span> and oxygen-containing functional groups on desulfurization activity of Fe/NAC prepared by ultrasonic-assisted impregnation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shu, Song; Guo, Jia-Xiu; Liu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Yin, Hua-Qiang; Luo, De-Ming</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A series of Fe-loaded activated carbons treated by HNO3 (Fe/NAC) were prepared by incipient impregnation method with or without ultrasonic assistance and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy with energy disperse spectroscope (SEM-EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N2 adsorption/desorption. The desulfurization activities were evaluated at a fixed bed reactor under a mixed gas simulated from flue gas. The results showed that desulfurization activity from excellent to poor is as follows: Fe/NAC-60 > Fe/NAC-80 > Fe/NAC-30 > Fe/NAC-15 > Fe/NAC-0 > Fe/NAC-100 > NAC. Fe/NAC-60 exhibits the best desulfurization activity and has breakthrough sulfur capacity of 319 mg/g and breakthrough time of 540 min. The introduction of ultrasonic oscillation does not change the form of Fe oxides on activated carbon but can change the dispersion and relative contents of Fe3O4. The types of oxygen-containing functional groups have no obvious change for all samples but the texture properties show some differences when they are oscillated for different times. The fresh Fe/NAC-60 has a surface area of 1045 m2/g and total <span class="hlt">pore</span> volume of 0.961 cm3/g with micropore volume of 0.437 cm3/g and is larger than Fe/NAC-0 (823 m2/g, 0.733 and 0.342 cm3/g). After desulfurization, surface area and <span class="hlt">pore</span> volume of all samples decrease significantly, and those of the exhausted Fe/NAC-60 decrease to 233 m2/g and 0.481 cm3/g, indicating that some byproducts deposit on surface to cover <span class="hlt">pores</span>. <span class="hlt">Pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> influences SO2 adsorption, and fresh Fe/NAC-60 has more <span class="hlt">pore</span> widths centralized at about 0.7 nm and 1.0⿿2.0 nm and corresponds to an excellent desulfurization activity, showing that micropore is conducive to the removal of SO2.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1343742-linking-basin-scale-pore-scale-gas-hydrate-distribution-patterns-diffusion-dominated-marine-hydrate-systems','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1343742-linking-basin-scale-pore-scale-gas-hydrate-distribution-patterns-diffusion-dominated-marine-hydrate-systems"><span id="translatedtitle">Linking basin-scale and <span class="hlt">pore</span>-scale gas hydrate <span class="hlt">distribution</span> patterns in diffusion-dominated marine hydrate systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann E.; ...</p> <p>2017-02-07</p> <p>The goal of this study is to computationally determine the potential <span class="hlt">distribution</span> patterns of diffusion-driven methane hydrate accumulations in coarse-grained marine sediments. Diffusion of dissolved methane in marine gas hydrate systems has been proposed as a potential transport mechanism through which large concentrations of hydrate can preferentially accumulate in coarse-grained sediments over geologic time. Using one-dimensional compositional reservoir simulations, we examine hydrate <span class="hlt">distribution</span> patterns at the scale of individual sand layers (1 to 20 m thick) that are deposited between microbially active fine-grained material buried through the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). We then extrapolate to two- dimensional and basin-scalemore » three-dimensional simulations, where we model dipping sands and multilayered systems. We find that properties of a sand layer including <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, layer thickness, dip, and proximity to other layers in multilayered systems all exert control on diffusive methane fluxes toward and within a sand, which in turn impact the <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of hydrate throughout a sand unit. In all of these simulations, we incorporate data on physical properties and sand layer geometries from the Terrebonne Basin gas hydrate system in the Gulf of Mexico. We demonstrate that diffusion can generate high hydrate saturations (upward of 90%) at the edges of thin sands at shallow depths within the GHSZ, but that it is ineffective at producing high hydrate saturations throughout thick (greater than 10 m) sands buried deep within the GHSZ. As a result, we find that hydrate in fine-grained material can preserve high hydrate saturations in nearby thin sands with burial.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sampling+AND+distribution&id=EJ851900','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sampling+AND+distribution&id=EJ851900"><span id="translatedtitle">How Sample <span class="hlt">Size</span> Affects a Sampling <span class="hlt">Distribution</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mulekar, Madhuri S.; Siegel, Murray H.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>If students are to understand inferential statistics successfully, they must have a profound understanding of the nature of the sampling <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. Specifically, they must comprehend the determination of the expected value and standard error of a sampling <span class="hlt">distribution</span> as well as the meaning of the central limit theorem. Many students in a high…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28256792','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28256792"><span id="translatedtitle">The effect of increasing the <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of nanofibrous scaffolds on the osteogenic cell culture using a combination of sacrificial agent electrospinning and ultrasonication.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aghajanpoor, Mahdiyeh; Hashemi-Najafabadi, Sameereh; Baghaban-Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza; Bagheri, Fatemeh; Mohammad Mousavi, Seyyed; Azam Sayyahpour, Foruogh</p> <p>2017-03-03</p> <p>One of the major problems associated with the electrospun scaffolds is their small <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span>, which limits the cellular infiltration for bone tissue engineering. In this study, the effect of increasing the <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> on cellular infiltration was studied in poly/nanohydroxyapatite electrospun scaffolds, which were modified using ultrasonication, co-electrospinning with poly (ethylene oxide), and a combination of both. Ultrasonic process was optimized by central composite design. The ultrasonic output power and time of the process were considered as the effective parameters. The <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of the scaffolds was evaluated by scanning electron microscope. The optimum conditions, according to the <span class="hlt">pore</span> area and mechanical properties of the scaffolds were selected, and finally the groups that had the highest <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and mechanical strength were selected for the combined method. Increasing the <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> enhanced the cellular proliferation, extension and infiltration, as well as the osteodifferentiation of stem cells. At the optimum condition, the average cellular infiltration was 36.51 µm compared to the control group with no cellular infiltration. In addition, alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of osteocalcin and collagen I (COL I) were, respectively, 1.86, 2.54, and 2.16 fold compared to the control group on day 14. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2017.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/963914','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/963914"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> effect on the dynamics of excimer formation for chemically attached pyrene on various silica surfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dabestani, Reza T; Kidder, Michelle; Buchanan III, A C</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Excimer formation by pyrene is a well-known process in solution and on solid surfaces. In solution, excimer formation is highly dependent on the concentration of pyrene. When adsorbed on solid surfaces (i.e., silica surfaces), pyrene has been shown to form ground-state pairs which lead to static excimer emission even at very low surface coverages as a result of a solvent pooling effect induced during solvent removal from the surface. Ground-state pairing on silica surfaces results from a {pi}-{pi} interaction between two adjacent pyrene molecules and can not be avoided even by slow evaporation of the solvent from the surface as the molecules diffuse toward one another during the process. One possible method to alleviate the pairing of pyrene molecules and hence the formation of excimer is to chemically attach pyrene molecules to the silica surface. Chemical attachment, however, does not allow effective control over the spacing between the pyrene molecules to avoid ground-state pairing. To circumvent this, spacer molecules can be incorporated onto the surface by chemical attachment to control the spacing between two adjacent pyrene molecules. Furthermore, by using surfaces that provide various <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">sizes</span>, it is possible to control the number of pyrene molecules that can be grafted onto and confined to the <span class="hlt">pore</span> surface, as well as the steric environment in which the molecules can rotate. Cabosil (fumed silica with no <span class="hlt">pores</span>) and mesoporous silica surfaces with various <span class="hlt">pore</span> diameters (i.e., MCM-41) are ideal candidates to examine the feasibility of controlling the spacing between pyrene molecules on a flat surface and confined inside the <span class="hlt">pores</span> using a cografted spacer molecule (i.e., biphenyl). We have now used such an approach to examine the extent of excimer formation as the ratio of spacer/pyrene molecules is varied on nonporous silica surfaces as well as mesoporous silica surfaces with various <span class="hlt">pore</span> diameters. Our results show that a decrease in the ratio of spacer</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25965160','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25965160"><span id="translatedtitle">Soil-<span class="hlt">pore</span> water <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of silver and gold engineered nanoparticles in undisturbed soils under unsaturated conditions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tavares, D S; Rodrigues, S M; Cruz, N; Carvalho, C; Teixeira, T; Carvalho, L; Duarte, A C; Trindade, T; Pereira, E; Römkens, P F A M</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Release of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to soil is well documented but little is known on the subsequent soil-<span class="hlt">pore</span> water <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of ENPs once present in soil. In this study, the availability and mobility of silver (Ag) and gold (Au) ENPs added to agricultural soils were assessed in two separate pot experiments. <span class="hlt">Pore</span> water samples collected from pots from day 1 to 45 using porous (<0.17 μm) membrane samplers suggest that both Ag and Au are retained almost completely within 24 h with less than 13% of the total added amount present in <span class="hlt">pore</span> water on day 1. UV-Vis and TEM results showed that AuENPs in <span class="hlt">pore</span> water were present as both homoaggregates and heteroaggregates until day 3 after which the concentration in <span class="hlt">pore</span> water was too low to detect the presence of aggregates. A close relation between the concentration of Au and Fe in <span class="hlt">pore</span> water suggests that the short term solubility of Au is partly controlled by natural soil colloids. Results suggest that under normal aerated soil conditions the actual availability of Ag and AuENPs is low which is relevant in view of risk assessment even though the impact of environmental conditions and soil properties on the reactivity of ENPs (and/or large ENPs aggregates) retained in the solid matrix need to be addressed further.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T13A2355V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T13A2355V"><span id="translatedtitle">Slip-weakening zone <span class="hlt">sizes</span> at nucleation of catastrophic subaerial and submarine landslides by gradually increasing <span class="hlt">pore</span> pressure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Viesca, R. C.; Rice, J. R.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>We address the nucleation of dynamic landslide rupture in response to gradual <span class="hlt">pore</span> pressure increases. Nucleation marks the onset of acceleration of the overlying slope mass due to the suddenly rapid enlargement of a sub-surface zone of shear failure, previously deforming quasi-statically. We model that zone as a planar surface undergoing initially linear slip-weakening frictional failure within a bordering linear-elastic medium. The results are also relevant to earthquake nucleation. The sub-surface rupture zone considered runs parallel to the free surface of a uniform slope, under a 2D plane-strain deformation state. We show results for ruptures with friction coefficients following linear slip weakening (i.e., the residual friction is not yet reached). For spatially broad increases in <span class="hlt">pore</span> pressure, the nucleation length depends on a ratio of depth to a cohesive zone length scale. In the very broad-increase limit, a direct numerical solution for nucleation lengths compares well with solutions to a corresponding eigenvalue problem (similar to Uenishi and Rice [JGR '03]), in which spatial variations in normal stress are neglected. We estimate nucleation lengths for subaerial and submarine conditions using data [e.g., Bishop et al., Géotech. '71; Stark et al., JGGE '05] from ring-shear tests on sediments (peak friction fp = 0.5, frictional slip-weakening rate within the range w = -df/d(slip) = 0.1/cm-1/cm). We assume that only pre-stresses, and not material properties, vary with depth. With such fp and w, we find for a range of subsurface depths and shear moduli μ that nucleation lengths are typically several hundred meters long for shallow undersea slopes, and up to an order of magnitude less for steeper slopes on the Earth's surface. In the submarine case, this puts nucleation lengths in a <span class="hlt">size</span> range comparable to observed <span class="hlt">pore</span>-pressure-generated seafloor disturbances as pockmarks [e.g., Gay et al., MG '06].</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4183526','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4183526"><span id="translatedtitle">Dip TIPS as a Facile and Versatile Method for Fabrication of Polymer Foams with Controlled Shape, <span class="hlt">Size</span> and <span class="hlt">Pore</span> Architecture for Bioengineering Applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kasoju, Naresh; Kubies, Dana; Kumorek, Marta M.; Kříž, Jan; Fábryová, Eva; Machová, Lud'ka; Kovářová, Jana; Rypáček, František</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The porous polymer foams act as a template for neotissuegenesis in tissue engineering, and, as a reservoir for cell transplants such as pancreatic islets while simultaneously providing a functional interface with the host body. The fabrication of foams with the controlled shape, <span class="hlt">size</span> and <span class="hlt">pore</span> structure is of prime importance in various bioengineering applications. To this end, here we demonstrate a thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) based facile process for the fabrication of polymer foams with a controlled architecture. The setup comprises of a metallic template bar (T), a metallic conducting block (C) and a non-metallic reservoir tube (R), connected in sequence T-C-R. The process hereinafter termed as Dip TIPS, involves the dipping of the T-bar into a polymer solution, followed by filling of the R-tube with a freezing mixture to induce the phase separation of a polymer solution in the immediate vicinity of T-bar; Subsequent free-drying or freeze-extraction steps produced the polymer foams. An easy exchange of the T-bar of a spherical or rectangular shape allowed the fabrication of tubular, open- capsular and flat-sheet shaped foams. A mere change in the quenching time produced the foams with a thickness ranging from hundreds of microns to several millimeters. And, the <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> was conveniently controlled by varying either the polymer concentration or the quenching temperature. Subsequent in vivo studies in brown Norway rats for 4-weeks demonstrated the guided cell infiltration and homogenous cell <span class="hlt">distribution</span> through the polymer matrix, without any fibrous capsule and necrotic core. In conclusion, the results show the “Dip TIPS” as a facile and adaptable process for the fabrication of anisotropic channeled porous polymer foams of various shapes and <span class="hlt">sizes</span> for potential applications in tissue engineering, cell transplantation and other related fields. PMID:25275373</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5514237','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5514237"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span>, zinc penetration, and zinc diffusion studies on PPQ/CA separators. Research and development report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Angres, I.; Parkhurst, W.</p> <p>1981-02-02</p> <p>Studies were performed of some properties of co-polymeric polyphenylquinoxaline/cellulose acetate (PPQ/CA-60/40) membranes that are candidate separator materials for secondary alkaline batteries. <span class="hlt">Pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> measurements were obtained by bubble pressure, mercury porosimetry and electron microscopy methods. Zinc penetration measurements and measurements of zinc ion diffusion through the membrane were obtained in aqueous potassium hydroxide media using standardized electrolysis methods. For comparison purposes, dendrite penetration and zinc diffusion measurements were also obtained for two conventional cellulosic separator materials. It was concluded that the methods chosen are valid and useful for assessing the quality of separator materials. It was also concluded that PPQ/CA-60/40 membranes compare favorably with conventional separator materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..465..573L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..465..573L"><span id="translatedtitle">Pareto tails and lognormal body of US cities <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Luckstead, Jeff; Devadoss, Stephen</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We consider a <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, which consists of lower tail Pareto, lognormal body, and upper tail Pareto, to estimate the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of all US cities. This <span class="hlt">distribution</span> fits the data more accurately than a <span class="hlt">distribution</span> that comprises of only lognormal and the upper tail Pareto.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008EPJB...63..295S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008EPJB...63..295S"><span id="translatedtitle">Hierarchy, cities <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and Zipf's law</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Semboloni, F.</p> <p>2008-06-01</p> <p>We show that a hierarchical cities structure can be generated by a self-organized process which grows with a bottom-up mechanism, and that the resulting <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is power law. First we analytically prove that the power law <span class="hlt">distribution</span> satisfies the balance between the offer of the city and the demand of its basin of attraction, and that the exponent in the Zipf's law corresponds to the multiplier linking the population of the central city to the population of its basin of attraction. Moreover, the corresponding hierarchical structure shows a variable spanning factor, and the population of the cities linked to the same city up in the hierarchy is variable as well. Second a stochastic dynamic spatial model is proposed, whose numerical results confirm the analytical findings. In this model, inhabitants minimize the transportation cost, so that the greater the importance of this cost, the more stable is the system in its microscopic aspect. After a comparison with the existent methods for the generation of a power law <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, conclusions are drawn on the connection of hierarchical structure, and power law <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, with the functioning of the system of cities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.461.3361L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.461.3361L"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of bubble <span class="hlt">sizes</span> during reionization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lin, Yin; Oh, S. Peng; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Sutter, P. M.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>A key physical quantity during reionization is the <span class="hlt">size</span> of H II regions. Previous studies found a characteristic bubble <span class="hlt">size</span> which increases rapidly during reionization, with apparent agreement between simulations and analytic excursion set theory. Using four different methods, we critically examine this claim. In particular, we introduce the use of the watershed algorithm - widely used for void finding in galaxy surveys - which we show to be an unbiased method with the lowest dispersion and best performance on Monte Carlo realizations of a known bubble <span class="hlt">size</span> probability density function (PDF). We find that a friends-of-friends algorithm declares most of the ionized volume to be occupied by a network of volume-filling regions connected by narrow tunnels. For methods tuned to detect the volume-filling regions, previous apparent agreement between simulations and theory is spurious, and due to a failure to correctly account for the window function of measurement schemes. The discrepancy is already obvious from visual inspection. Instead, H II regions in simulations are significantly larger (by factors of 10-1000 in volume) than analytic predictions. The <span class="hlt">size</span> PDF is narrower, and evolves more slowly with time, than predicted. It becomes more sharply peaked as reionization progresses. These effects are likely caused by bubble mergers, which are inadequately modelled by analytic theory. Our results have important consequences for high-redshift 21 cm observations, the mean free path of ionizing photons, and the visibility of Lyα emitters, and point to a fundamental failure in our understanding of the characteristic scales of the reionization process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28344074','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28344074"><span id="translatedtitle">Aberrant <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of nuclear <span class="hlt">pore</span> complex proteins in ALS mice and ALS patients.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shang, Jingwei; Yamashita, Toru; Nakano, Yumiko; Morihara, Ryuta; Li, Xianghong; Feng, Tian; Liu, Xia; Huang, Yong; Fukui, Yusuke; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Abe, Koji</p> <p>2017-03-24</p> <p>Nuclear <span class="hlt">pore</span> complexes (NPCs) play important roles in traffic of molecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm, aberrant <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of components of NPCs were demonstrated in C9orf72 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (C9-ALS) patients, but it is elusive whether such abnormities are also the case with other cause of ALS disease. In the present study, we investigated the spatiotemporal <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of RanGAP1 and 4 representative nucleoporins (GP210, NUP205, NUP107 and NUP50) of NPCs in human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase-1 mutation transgenic (SOD1-Tg) mice and sporadic ALS patients. Compared with wild type (WT), these proteins displayed age-dependent and progressive nuclear precipitations, and cytoplasmic aberrant expressions in motor neurons of lumbar cord in SOD1-Tg mice from 10 to 18weeks (W). Double immunofluorescent analysis showed abnormal nuclear retention and apparent co-localizations of RanGAPl with NUP205 and NUP205 with NUPl07, meanwhile, GP210 with NUP205 mainly co-localized in the nuclear envelope (NE) of motor neurons. Furthermore, RanGAP1, GP210 and NUP50 showed similarly abnormal nuclear precipitations and cytoplasmic upregulations in SOD1-Tg mice and ALS patients, moreover, aberrant co-localizations of RanGAP1 with TDP-43 and NUP205 with TDP-43 were also observed in motor neurons. The present study indicated that the mislocalization of these proteins of NPCs may underlie the pathogenesis of ALS both in SOD1-Tg mice and human sporadic ALS patients, and these dysfunctions may be a fundamental pathway for ALS that is not specific only in C9-ALS but also in SOD1-ALS, which may be amenable to pharmacotherapeutic intervention.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24192056','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24192056"><span id="translatedtitle">The first systematic analysis of 3D rapid prototyped poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds manufactured through BioCell printing: the effect of <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and geometry on compressive mechanical behaviour and in vitro hMSC viability.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Domingos, M; Intranuovo, F; Russo, T; De Santis, R; Gloria, A; Ambrosio, L; Ciurana, J; Bartolo, P</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Novel additive manufacturing processes are increasingly recognized as ideal techniques to produce 3D biodegradable structures with optimal <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and spatial <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, providing an adequate mechanical support for tissue regeneration while shaping in-growing tissues. With regard to the mechanical and biological performances of 3D scaffolds, <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and geometry play a crucial role. In this study, a novel integrated automated system for the production and in vitro culture of 3D constructs, known as BioCell Printing, was used only to manufacture poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds for tissue engineering; the influence of <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and shape on their mechanical and biological performances was investigated. Imposing a single lay-down pattern of 0°/90° and varying the filament distance, it was possible to produce scaffolds with square interconnected <span class="hlt">pores</span> with channel <span class="hlt">sizes</span> falling in the range of 245-433 µm, porosity 49-57% and a constant road width. Three different lay-down patterns were also adopted (0°/90°, 0°/60/120° and 0°/45°/90°/135°), thus resulting in scaffolds with quadrangular, triangular and complex internal geometries, respectively. Mechanical compression tests revealed a decrease of scaffold stiffness with the increasing porosity and number of deposition angles (from 0°/90° to 0°/45°/90°/135°). Results from biological analysis, carried out using human mesenchymal stem cells, suggest a strong influence of <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and geometry on cell viability. On the other hand, after 21 days of in vitro static culture, it was not possible to detect any significant variation in terms of cell morphology promoted by scaffold topology. As a first systematic analysis, the obtained results clearly demonstrate the potential of the BioCell Printing process to produce 3D scaffolds with reproducible well organized architectures and tailored mechanical properties.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28406469','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28406469"><span id="translatedtitle">Easy-to-Fabricate and High-Sensitivity LSPR Type Specific Protein Detection Sensor Using AAO Nano-<span class="hlt">Pore</span> <span class="hlt">Size</span> Control.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, Sae-Wan; Lee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sang-Won; Kang, Byoung-Ho; Kwon, Jin-Beom; Kim, Ok-Sik; Kim, Ju-Seong; Kim, Eung-Soo; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Won</p> <p>2017-04-13</p> <p>In this study, we developed a <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size/pore</span> area-controlled optical biosensor-based anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanostructure. As the <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of AAO increases, the unit cell of AAO increases, which also increases the non-<span class="hlt">pore</span> area to which the antibody binds. The increase in the number of antibodies immobilized on the surface of the AAO enables effective detection of trace amounts of antigen, because increased antigen-antibody bonding results in a larger surface refractive index change. High sensitivity was thus achieved through amplification of the interference wave of two vertically-incident reflected waves through the localized surface plasmon resonance phenomenon. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was evaluated by measuring the change in wavelength with the change in the refractive index of the device surface, and sensitivity was increased with increasing <span class="hlt">pore-size</span> and non-<span class="hlt">pore</span> area. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was improved and up to 11.8 ag/mL serum amyloid A1 antigen was detected. In addition, the selectivity of the fabricated sensor was confirmed through a reaction with a heterogeneous substance, C-reactive protein antigen. By using hard anodization during fabrication of the AAO, the fabrication time of the device was reduced and the AAO chip was fabricated quickly and easily.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70010289','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70010289"><span id="translatedtitle">Lunar soil: <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and mineralogical constituents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Duke, M.B.; Woo, C.C.; Bird, M.L.; Sellers, G.A.; Finkelman, R.B.</p> <p>1970-01-01</p> <p>The lunar soil collected by Apollo 11 consists primarily of submillimeter material and is finer in grain <span class="hlt">size</span> than soil previously recorded photographically by Surveyor experiments. The main constituents are fine-grained to glassy rocks of basaltic affinity and coherent breccia of undetermined origin. Dark glass, containing abundant nickel-iron spheres, coats many rocks, mineral, and breccia fragments. Several types of homogeneous glass occur as fragments and spheres. Colorless spheres, probably an exotic component, are abundant in the fraction finer than 20 microns.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.456L..59S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.456L..59S"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of inhabited planets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Simpson, Fergus</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Earth-like planets are expected to provide the greatest opportunity for the detection of life beyond the Solar system. However, our planet cannot be considered a fair sample, especially if intelligent life exists elsewhere. Just as a person's country of origin is a biased sample among countries, so too their planet of origin may be a biased sample among planets. The magnitude of this effect can be substantial: over 98 per cent of the world's population live in a country larger than the median. In the context of a simple model where the mean population density is invariant to planet <span class="hlt">size</span>, we infer that a given inhabited planet (such as our nearest neighbour) has a radius r < 1.2r⊕ (95 per cent confidence bound). We show that this result is likely to hold not only for planets hosting advanced life, but also for those which harbour primitive life forms. Further, inferences may be drawn for any variable which influences population <span class="hlt">size</span>. For example, since population density is widely observed to decline with increasing body mass, we conclude that most intelligent species are expected to exceed 300 kg.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27593533','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27593533"><span id="translatedtitle">Interpretation of <span class="hlt">size</span>-exclusion chromatography for the determination of molecular-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of human immunoglobulins.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Christians, S; Schluender, S; van Treel, N D; Behr-Gross, M-E</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Molecular-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> by <span class="hlt">size</span>-exclusion chromatography (SEC) [1] is used for the quantification of unwanted aggregated forms in therapeutic polyclonal antibodies, referred to as human immunoglobulins (Ig) in the European Pharmacopoeia. Considering not only the requirements of the monographs for human normal Ig (0338, 0918 and 2788) [2-4], but also the general chapter on chromatographic techniques (2.2.46) [5], several chromatographic column types are allowed for performing this test. Although the EDQM knowledge database gives only 2 examples of suitable columns as a guide for the user, these monographs permit the use of columns with different lengths and diameters, and do not prescribe either particle <span class="hlt">size</span> or <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span>, which are considered key characteristics of SEC columns. Therefore, the columns used may differ significantly from each other with regard to peak resolution, potentially resulting in ambiguous peak identity assignment. In some cases, this may even lead to situations where the manufacturer and the Official Medicines Control Laboratory (OMCL) in charge of Official Control Authority Batch Release (OCABR) have differing molecular-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> profiles for aggregates of the same batch of Ig, even though both laboratories follow the requirements of the relevant monograph. In the present study, several formally acceptable columns and the peak integration results obtained therewith were compared. A standard <span class="hlt">size</span>-exclusion column with a length of 60 cm and a particle <span class="hlt">size</span> of 10 µm typically detects only 3 Ig fractions, namely monomers, dimers and polymers. This column type was among the first reliable HPLC columns on the market for this test and very rapidly became the standard for many pharmaceutical manufacturers and OMCLs for batch release testing. Consequently, the <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of monomers, dimers and polymers was established as the basis for the interpretation of the results of the molecular-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> test in the relevant monographs</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/984792','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/984792"><span id="translatedtitle">Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bitra, V.S.P.; Womac, A.R.; Yang, Y.T.; Igathinathane, C.; Miu, P.I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>Biomass particle <span class="hlt">size</span> impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen <span class="hlt">sizes</span> from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle <span class="hlt">distributions</span> were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span> in the <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen <span class="hlt">size</span>, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen <span class="hlt">size</span> largely determined particle <span class="hlt">size</span> of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle <span class="hlt">size</span>, though to a lesser degree than screen <span class="hlt">size</span>. The Rosin Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> data with an R2 > 0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span>. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced strongly fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 12.7 25.4 mm screens and fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span> can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular <span class="hlt">size</span> of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle <span class="hlt">distributions</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19559601','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19559601"><span id="translatedtitle">Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bitra, Venkata S P; Womac, Alvin R; Yang, Yuechuan T; Igathinathane, C; Miu, Petre I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahab</p> <p>2009-11-01</p> <p>Biomass particle <span class="hlt">size</span> impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen <span class="hlt">sizes</span> from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle <span class="hlt">distributions</span> were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span> in the <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen <span class="hlt">size</span>, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen <span class="hlt">size</span> largely determined particle <span class="hlt">size</span> of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle <span class="hlt">size</span>, though to a lesser degree than screen <span class="hlt">size</span>. The Rosin-Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> data with an R(2)>0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span>. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced 'strongly fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 12.7-25.4 mm screens and 'fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span> can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular <span class="hlt">size</span> of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle <span class="hlt">distributions</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1328833','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1328833"><span id="translatedtitle">The equilibrium <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of rouleaux.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Perelson, A S; Wiegel, F W</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Rouleaux are formed by the aggregation of red blood cells in the presence of macromolecules that bridge the membranes of adherent erythrocytes. We compute the <span class="hlt">size</span> and degree of branching of rouleaux for macroscopic systems in thermal equilibrium in the absence of fluid flow. Using techniques from statistical mechanics, analytical expressions are derived for (a) the average number of rouleaux consisting of n cells and having m branch points; (b) the average number of cells per rouleau; (c) the average number of branch points per rouleau; and (d) the number of rouleaux with n cells, n = 1, 2, ..., in a system containing a total of N cells. We also present the results of numerical evaluations to establish the validity of asymptotic expressions that simplify our formal analytic results. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7059653</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20125881','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20125881"><span id="translatedtitle">Optical heterodyne measurement of cloud droplet <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gollub, J P; Chabay, L; Flygare, W H</p> <p>1973-12-01</p> <p>Optical heterodyne spectra of laser light quasi-elastically scattered by falling water droplets (1-10-micro radius) in a diffusion cloud chamber were used to determine the droplet <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. The rate of fall depends on radius in a known way, thus yielding a heterodyne spectrum manifesting a <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of Doppler shifts. This spectrum, in conjunction with the calculated Mie scattering intensity as a function of droplet radius, provides a direct measure of the droplet <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> for droplets large enough that Brownian motion is negligible. The experiments described in this paper demonstrate the technique and establish the potential for further more quantitative studies of <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985JOM....37h..22R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985JOM....37h..22R"><span id="translatedtitle">Powder <span class="hlt">Size</span> and <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> in Ultrasonic Gas Atomization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rai, G.; Lavernia, E.; Grant, N. J.</p> <p>1985-08-01</p> <p>Ultrasonic gas atomization (USGA) produces powder <span class="hlt">sizes</span> dependent on the ratio of the nozzle jet diameter to the distance of spread dt/R, Powder <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is attributed to the spread of atomizing gas jets during travel from the nozzle exit to the metal stream. The spread diminishes at higher gas atomization pressures. In this paper, calculated powder <span class="hlt">sizes</span> and <span class="hlt">distribution</span> are compared with experimentally determined values.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFM.T32E0914M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFM.T32E0914M"><span id="translatedtitle">Dynamics of Particle <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> in Slide-Hold Tests on Laboratory Gouge Zones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Muhuri, S. K.; Dewers, T. A.; Scott, T. E.</p> <p>2001-12-01</p> <p>Slide-hold tests using triaxially-loaded precut forcing blocks and artificial gouge examine contrasts in gouge particle <span class="hlt">size</span> dynamics during frictional sliding and annealing or healing stages. A series of room-dry sliding experiments were conducted to various shear strains using dry gypsum gouge in between precut steel forcing members. A separate series of experiments saturated with distilled water was conducted at a <span class="hlt">pore</span> pressure of 6.9 MPa (effective pressure of 13.8 MPa identical to the dry tests). The latter experiments were taken to a constant shear strain but were held under shear loading for various lengths of time (0.01-10 hours) after slip. <span class="hlt">Pore</span>-volume change was monitored during hold periods. Particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> (PSD) of gouge was measured using a laser particle <span class="hlt">size</span> analyzer with a measurement range of 0.4-2000 microns. Stress-strain behavior for both dry and wet tests revealed multiple stress drops or stick-slip events and were similar suggesting no marked strengthening or weakening effect due to presence of water over the time scale of sliding. Gouge PSD's were fit to a log-normal <span class="hlt">distribution</span> function and then analyzed in terms of the moments of mass-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. The best log-normal fits were obtained in the coarser fraction of the gouge (larger than peak <span class="hlt">size</span>). PSD means decreased with shear while higher moments such as skewness increased with shear. Particle number-<span class="hlt">size</span> relationships computed from the mass-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> revealed a fractal nature of the gouge with excellent fits obtained for fine and intermediate fractions (smaller than peak <span class="hlt">size</span>). A fractal dimension (D) around 2.6 consistent with previous work on both natural and experimental fault gouge was obtained. There appears to be a correlation between D and the amount of shear strain and an inverse relationship between D and the maximum particle <span class="hlt">size</span>. Empirical <span class="hlt">distributions</span> such as the Weibull, Rosin-Rammler <span class="hlt">distribution</span> functions and others provide good approximations</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4655366','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4655366"><span id="translatedtitle">Mesoporous Silica Gel–Based Mixed Matrix Membranes for Improving Mass Transfer in Forward Osmosis: Effect of <span class="hlt">Pore</span> <span class="hlt">Size</span> of Filler</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lee, Jian-Yuan; Wang, Yining; Tang, Chuyang Y.; Huo, Fengwei</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The efficiency of forward osmosis (FO) process is generally limited by the internal concentration polarization (ICP) of solutes inside its porous substrate. In this study, mesoporous silica gel (SG) with nominal <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> ranging from 4–30 nm was used as fillers to prepare SG-based mixed matrix substrates. The resulting mixed matrix membranes had significantly reduced structural parameter and enhanced membrane water permeability as a result of the improved surface porosity of the substrates. An optimal filler <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of ~9 nm was observed. This is in direct contrast to the case of thin film nanocomposite membranes, where microporous nanoparticle fillers are loaded to the membrane rejection layer and are designed in such a way that these fillers are able to retain solutes while allowing water to permeate through them. In the current study, the mesoporous fillers are designed as channels to both water and solute molecules. FO performance was enhanced at increasing filler <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> up to 9 nm due to the lower hydraulic resistance of the fillers. Nevertheless, further increasing filler <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> to 30 nm was accompanied with reduced FO efficiency, which can be attributed to the intrusion of polymer dope into the filler <span class="hlt">pores</span>. PMID:26592565</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NatSR...516808L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NatSR...516808L"><span id="translatedtitle">Mesoporous Silica Gel-Based Mixed Matrix Membranes for Improving Mass Transfer in Forward Osmosis: Effect of <span class="hlt">Pore</span> <span class="hlt">Size</span> of Filler</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, Jian-Yuan; Wang, Yining; Tang, Chuyang Y.; Huo, Fengwei</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The efficiency of forward osmosis (FO) process is generally limited by the internal concentration polarization (ICP) of solutes inside its porous substrate. In this study, mesoporous silica gel (SG) with nominal <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> ranging from 4-30 nm was used as fillers to prepare SG-based mixed matrix substrates. The resulting mixed matrix membranes had significantly reduced structural parameter and enhanced membrane water permeability as a result of the improved surface porosity of the substrates. An optimal filler <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of ~9 nm was observed. This is in direct contrast to the case of thin film nanocomposite membranes, where microporous nanoparticle fillers are loaded to the membrane rejection layer and are designed in such a way that these fillers are able to retain solutes while allowing water to permeate through them. In the current study, the mesoporous fillers are designed as channels to both water and solute molecules. FO performance was enhanced at increasing filler <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> up to 9 nm due to the lower hydraulic resistance of the fillers. Nevertheless, further increasing filler <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> to 30 nm was accompanied with reduced FO efficiency, which can be attributed to the intrusion of polymer dope into the filler <span class="hlt">pores</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70012085','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70012085"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of Amazon River bed sediment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Nordin, C.F.; Meade, R.H.; Curtis, W.F.; Bosio, N.J.; Landim, P.M.B.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The first recorded observations of bed material of the Amazon River were made in 1843 by Lt William Lewis Herndon of the US Navy, when he travelled the river from its headwaters to its mouth, sounding its depths, and noting the nature of particles caught in a heavy grease smeared to the bottom of his sounding weight1. He reported the bed material of the river to be mostly sand and fine gravel. Oltman and Ames took samples at a few locations in 1963 and 1964, and reported the bed material at O??bidos, Brazil, to be fine sands, with median diameters ranging from 0.15 to 0.25 mm (ref. 2). We present here a summary of particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> analyses of samples of streambed material collected from the Amazon River and its major tributaries along a reach of the river from Iquitos in Peru, ???3,500 km above Macapa?? Brazil, to a point 220 km above Macapa??3. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4125281','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4125281"><span id="translatedtitle">Capsid Protein VP4 of Human Rhinovirus Induces Membrane Permeability by the Formation of a <span class="hlt">Size</span>-Selective Multimeric <span class="hlt">Pore</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Panjwani, Anusha; Strauss, Mike; Gold, Sarah; Wenham, Hannah; Jackson, Terry; Chou, James J.; Rowlands, David J.; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Hogle, James M.; Tuthill, Tobias J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Non-enveloped viruses must deliver their viral genome across a cell membrane without the advantage of membrane fusion. The mechanisms used to achieve this remain poorly understood. Human rhinovirus, a frequent cause of the common cold, is a non-enveloped virus of the picornavirus family, which includes other significant pathogens such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus. During picornavirus cell entry, the small myristoylated capsid protein VP4 is released from the virus, interacts with the cell membrane and is implicated in the delivery of the viral RNA genome into the cytoplasm to initiate replication. In this study, we have produced recombinant C-terminal histidine-tagged human rhinovirus VP4 and shown it can induce membrane permeability in liposome model membranes. Dextran <span class="hlt">size</span>-exclusion studies, chemical crosslinking and electron microscopy demonstrated that VP4 forms a multimeric membrane <span class="hlt">pore</span>, with a channel <span class="hlt">size</span> consistent with transfer of the single-stranded RNA genome. The membrane permeability induced by recombinant VP4 was influenced by pH and was comparable to permeability induced by infectious virions. These findings present a molecular mechanism for the involvement of VP4 in cell entry and provide a model system which will facilitate exploration of VP4 as a novel antiviral target for the picornavirus family. PMID:25102288</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/171532','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/171532"><span id="translatedtitle">Initial <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> and hygroscopicity of indoor combustion aerosol particles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Li, W.; Hopke, P.K.</p> <p>1993-10-01</p> <p>Cigarette smoke, incense smoke, natural gas flames, propane fuel flames, and candle flames are contributors of indoor aerosol particles. To provide a quantitative basis for the modeling of inhaled aerosol deposition pattern, the hygroscopic growth of particles from these five sources as well as the source <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> were measured. Because the experiments were performed on the bases of particles of single <span class="hlt">size</span>, it provided not only the averaged particle`s hygroscopic growth of each source, but also the detailed <span class="hlt">size</span> change for particles of different <span class="hlt">sizes</span> within the whole <span class="hlt">size</span> spectrum. The source particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> measurements found that cigarette smoke and incense smoke contained particles in the <span class="hlt">size</span> range of 100-700 nm, while the natural gas, propane, and candle flames generated particles between 10 and 100 nm. The hygroscopic growth experiments showed that these combustion aerosol particles could grow 10% to 120%, depending on the particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span> and origins. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4356665','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4356665"><span id="translatedtitle">Mesoporous calcium–silicon xerogels with mesopore <span class="hlt">size</span> and <span class="hlt">pore</span> volume influence hMSC behaviors by load and sustained release of rhBMP-2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Song, Wenhua; Li, Xiangde; Qian, Jun; Lv, Guoyu; Yan, Yonggang; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Mesoporous calcium–silicon xerogels with a <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of 15 nm (MCS-15) and <span class="hlt">pore</span> volume of 1.43 cm3/g were synthesized by using 1,3,5-mesitylene (TMB) as the <span class="hlt">pore</span>-expanding agent. The MCS-15 exhibited good degradability with the weight loss of 50 wt% after soaking in Tris-HCl solution for 56 days, which was higher than the 30 wt% loss shown by mesoporous calcium–silicon xerogels with a <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of 4 nm (MCS-4). The <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and <span class="hlt">pore</span> volume of MCS-15 had significant influences on load and release of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). The MCS-15 had a higher capacity to encapsulate a large amount of rhBMP-2; it could adsorb 45 mg/g of rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered saline after 24 hours, which was more than twice that with MCS-4 (20 mg/g). Moreover, the MCS-15 system exhibited sustained release of rhBMP-2 as compared with MCS-4 system (showing a burst release). The MCS-15/rhBMP-2 system could promote the proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, showing good cytocompatibility and bioactivity. The results indicated that MCS-15, with larger mesopore <span class="hlt">size</span> and higher <span class="hlt">pore</span> volume, might be a promising carrier for loading and sustained release of rhBMP-2, which could be used as bone repair material with built-in osteoinduction function in bone reconstruction. PMID:25784801</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AMTD....811513P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AMTD....811513P"><span id="translatedtitle">Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle <span class="hlt">size</span> spectrometers (APS 3321): uncertainties in particle <span class="hlt">sizing</span> and number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pfeifer, S.; Müller, T.; Weinhold, K.; Zikova, N.; Santos, S.; Marinoni, A.; Bischof, O. F.; Kykal, C.; Ries, L.; Meinhardt, F.; Aalto, P.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Wiedensohler, A.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Aerodynamic particle <span class="hlt">size</span> spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network), 15 aerodynamic particle <span class="hlt">size</span> spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) were compared with a focus on flow rates accuracy, particle <span class="hlt">sizing</span>, and unit-to-unit variability of the particle number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent), while the <span class="hlt">sizing</span> accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL) reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> during this study was within 10-20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 μm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> data for particles smaller than 0.9 μm in aerodynamic diameter should be only used with caution. For particles larger than 3 μm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient <span class="hlt">sizing</span> accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. This uncertainty of the particle number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> has especially to be considered if higher moments of the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the <span class="hlt">size</span> range 0.5-3 </p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AMT.....9.1545P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AMT.....9.1545P"><span id="translatedtitle">Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle <span class="hlt">size</span> spectrometers (APS 3321): uncertainties in particle <span class="hlt">sizing</span> and number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pfeifer, Sascha; Müller, Thomas; Weinhold, Kay; Zikova, Nadezda; Martins dos Santos, Sebastiao; Marinoni, Angela; Bischof, Oliver F.; Kykal, Carsten; Ries, Ludwig; Meinhardt, Frank; Aalto, Pasi; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Wiedensohler, Alfred</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Aerodynamic particle <span class="hlt">size</span> spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network), 15 aerodynamic particle <span class="hlt">size</span> spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) were compared with a focus on flow rates, particle <span class="hlt">sizing</span>, and the unit-to-unit variability of the particle number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent), while the <span class="hlt">sizing</span> accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL) reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> during this study was within 10 % to 20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 µm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> data for particles smaller than 0.9 µm in aerodynamic diameter should only be used with caution. For particles larger than 3 µm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient <span class="hlt">sizing</span> accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. Particularly this uncertainty of the particle number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> must be considered if higher moments of the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the <span class="hlt">size</span> range 0.5-3 µm</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20568877','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20568877"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of quantum islands on stepped substrates.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liang, S; Zhu, H L; Wang, W</p> <p>2009-10-21</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of self-assembled quantum islands on stepped substrates are studied using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the energy barrier E(SW) between the step and the terrace region is the key factor in affecting the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of islands. With small E(SW) (< or = 0.1 eV), lines of uniform islands can be obtained at relative low surface coverage. As the surface coverage is increased, wirelike islands can be obtained. Scaling behavior is obeyed for the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of the wirelike islands. When the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> are separated into their width and length components, however, scaling is only observed in the length <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of the wirelike islands. With larger E(SW), the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of islands shows a clear bimodal <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and anomalous growth temperature dependent island <span class="hlt">size</span> evolutions are observed. The simulation results reproduce qualitatively the phenomena observed in the cases of InAs islands grown on stepped GaAs substrates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24247816','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24247816"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> modulation in electrochemically etched macroporous p-type silicon monitored by FFT impedance spectroscopy and Raman scattering.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Quiroga-González, Enrique; Carstensen, Jürgen; Glynn, Colm; O'Dwyer, Colm; Föll, Helmut</p> <p>2014-01-07</p> <p>The understanding of the mechanisms of macropore formation in p-type Si with respect to modulation of the <span class="hlt">pore</span> diameter is still in its infancy. In the present work, macropores with significantly modulated diameters have been produced electrochemically in p-type Si. The effect of the current density and the amount of surfactant in the etching solution are shown to influence the modulation in <span class="hlt">pore</span> diameter and morphology. Data obtained during the etching process by in situ FFT impedance spectroscopy correlate the <span class="hlt">pore</span> diameter variation with certain time constants found in the kinetics of the dissolution process. Raman scattering and electron microscopy confirm the mesoscopic structure and roughening of the <span class="hlt">pore</span> walls. Spectroscopic and microscopic methods confirm that the <span class="hlt">pore</span> wall morphology is correlated with the conditions of <span class="hlt">pore</span> modulation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21378218','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21378218"><span id="translatedtitle">THE COLLISIONAL DIVOT IN THE KUIPER BELT <span class="hlt">SIZE</span> <span class="hlt">DISTRIBUTION</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fraser, Wesley C.</p> <p>2009-11-20</p> <p>This paper presents the results of collisional evolution calculations for the Kuiper Belt starting from an initial <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> similar to that produced by accretion simulations of that region-a steep power-law large object <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> that breaks to a shallower slope at r approx 1-2 km, with collisional equilibrium achieved for objects r approx< 0.5 km. We find that the break from the steep large object power law causes a divot, or depletion of objects at r approx 10-20 km, which, in turn, greatly reduces the disruption rate of objects with r approx> 25-50 km, preserving the steep power-law behavior for objects at this <span class="hlt">size</span>. Our calculations demonstrate that the roll-over observed in the Kuiper Belt <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is naturally explained as an edge of a divot in the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>; the radius at which the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> transitions away from the power law, and the shape of the divot from our simulations are consistent with the <span class="hlt">size</span> of the observed roll-over, and <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> for smaller bodies. Both the kink radius and the radius of the divot center depend on the strength scaling law in the gravity regime for Kuiper Belt objects. These simulations suggest that the sky density of r approx 1 km objects is approx10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} objects per square degree. A detection of the divot in the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> would provide a measure of the strength of large Kuiper Belt objects, and constrain the shape of the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> at the end of accretion in the Kuiper Belt.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030110858&hterms=family&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dfamily','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030110858&hterms=family&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dfamily"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> of Jupiter-Family Cometary Nuclei</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Weissman, Paul R.; Lowry, Stephen C.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Introduction: We are continuing our program to determine the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of cometary nuclei. We have compiled a catalog of 105 measurements of 57 cometary nuclei, drawn from the general literature, from our own program of CCD photometry of distant cometary nuclei (Lowry and Weissman), and from unpublished observations by colleagues. We model the cumulative <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of the nuclei as a power law. Previous determinations of the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> slope do not agree. Fernandez et al. found a slope of alpha = 2.65+/-0.25 whereas Lowry et al. and Weissman and Lowry each found a slope of alpha = 1.60+/-0.10.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20006201','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20006201"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of non-graminaceous plant cell walls is rapidly decreased by borate ester cross-linking of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fleischer, A.; O'Neill, M.A.; Ehwald, R.</p> <p>1999-11-01</p> <p>The walls of suspension-cultured Chenopodium album L. cells grown continually for more than 1 year on B-deficient medium contained monomeric rhamnogalacturonan (mRG-II) but not the borate ester cross-linked RG II dimer (dRG-II-B). The walls of these cells had an increased <span class="hlt">size</span> limit for dextran permeation, which is a measure of wall <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span>. Adding boric acid to growing B-deficient cells resulted in B binding to the wall, the formation of dRG-II-B from mRG-II, and a reduction in wall <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> within 10 min. The wall <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of denatured B-grown cells was increased by treatment at pH {le} 2.0 or by treatment with Ca{sup 2+}-chelating agents. The acid-mediated increase in wall <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> was prevented by boric acid alone at pH 2.0 and by boric acid together with Ca{sup 2+}, but not by Na{sup +} or Mg{sup 2+} ions at pH 1.5. The Ca{sup 2+}-chelator-mediated increase in <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> was partially reduced by boric acid. Their results suggest that B-mediated cross-linking of RG-II in the walls of living plant cells generates a pectin network with a decreased <span class="hlt">size</span> exclusion limit for polymers. The formation, stability, and possible functions of a borate ester cross-linked pectic network in the primary walls of nongraminaceous plant cells are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22730207E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22730207E"><span id="translatedtitle">What We Can Learn From Supernova Remnant <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distributions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Elwood, Benjamin; Murphy, Jeremiah; Diaz, Mariangelly</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Previous literature regarding <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of supernova remnants generally discuss a uniform <span class="hlt">distribution</span> for the radius, occasionally considering a Gaussian alternative. We indeed show that these <span class="hlt">distributions</span> are consistent with log-normal, which can be considered a natural consequence of the Central Limit Theorem and Sedov expansion. Modeling explosion energy, remnant age, and ambient density as independent, random <span class="hlt">distributions</span>, we show, using simple Monte Carlo simulations, that the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is indistinguishable from log-normal when the SNR sample <span class="hlt">size</span> is of order three hundred. This implies that these SNR <span class="hlt">distributions</span> provide only information on the mean and variance, yielding additional information only when the sample <span class="hlt">size</span> grows large. We then proceed to Bayesian statistical inference to characterize the information provided by the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. In particular, we use the mean and variance of <span class="hlt">sizes</span> and explosion energies to subsequently estimate the mean and variance of the ambient medium surrounding SNR progenitors. This in turn allows us to characterize potential bias in studies involving samples of supernova remnants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017BGeo...14..353G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017BGeo...14..353G"><span id="translatedtitle">Environmental control of natural gap <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in tropical forests</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Goulamoussène, Youven; Bedeau, Caroline; Descroix, Laurent; Linguet, Laurent; Hérault, Bruno</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Natural disturbances are the dominant form of forest regeneration and dynamics in unmanaged tropical forests. Monitoring the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of treefall gaps is important to better understand and predict the carbon budget in response to land use and other global changes. In this study, we model the <span class="hlt">size</span> frequency <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of natural canopy gaps with a discrete power law <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. We use a Bayesian framework to introduce and test, using Monte Carlo Markov chain and Kuo-Mallick algorithms, the effect of local physical environment on gap <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. We apply our methodological framework to an original light detecting and ranging dataset in which natural forest gaps were delineated over 30 000 ha of unmanaged forest. We highlight strong links between gap <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and environment, primarily hydrological conditions and topography, with large gaps being more frequent on floodplains and in wind-exposed areas. In the future, we plan to apply our methodological framework on a larger scale using satellite data. Additionally, although gap <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> variation is clearly under environmental control, variation in gap <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in time should be tested against climate variability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H21C0753N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H21C0753N"><span id="translatedtitle">4D Imaging of Salt Precipitation during Evaporation from Saline Porous Media Influenced by the Particle <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Norouzi Rad, M.; Shokri, N.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many processes such as evaporation from porous media, vegetation, plant growth, biodiversity in soil, and durability of building materials. To investigate the effect of particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> on the dynamics of salt precipitation in saline porous media during evaporation, we applied X-ray micro-tomography technique. Six samples of quartz sand with different grain <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> were used in the present study enabling us to constrain the effects of particle and <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">sizes</span> on salt precipitation patterns and dynamics. The <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> were computed using the <span class="hlt">pore</span>-scale X-ray images. The packed beds were saturated with NaCl solution of 3 Molal and the X-ray imaging was continued for one day with temporal resolution of 30 min resulting in <span class="hlt">pore</span> scale information about the evaporation and precipitation dynamics. Our results show more precipitation at the early stage of the evaporation in the case of sand with the larger particle <span class="hlt">size</span> due to the presence of fewer evaporation sites at the surface. The presence of more preferential evaporation sites at the surface of finer sands significantly modified the patterns and thickness of the salt crust deposited on the surface such that a thinner salt crust was formed in the case of sand with smaller particle <span class="hlt">size</span> covering larger area at the surface as opposed to the thicker patchy crusts in samples with larger particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span>. Our results provide new insights regarding the physics of salt precipitation in porous media during evaporation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22016225','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22016225"><span id="translatedtitle">SELF-CONSISTENT <span class="hlt">SIZE</span> AND VELOCITY <span class="hlt">DISTRIBUTIONS</span> OF COLLISIONAL CASCADES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pan, Margaret; Schlichting, Hilke E. E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu</p> <p>2012-03-10</p> <p>The standard theoretical treatment of collisional cascades derives a steady-state <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> assuming a single constant velocity dispersion for all bodies regardless of <span class="hlt">size</span>. Here we relax this assumption and solve self-consistently for the bodies' steady-state <span class="hlt">size</span> and <span class="hlt">size</span>-dependent velocity <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. Specifically, we account for viscous stirring, dynamical friction, and collisional damping of the bodies' random velocities in addition to the mass conservation requirement typically applied to find the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in a steady-state cascade. The resulting <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> are significantly steeper than those derived without velocity evolution. For example, accounting self-consistently for the velocities can change the standard q = 3.5 power-law index of the Dohnanyi differential <span class="hlt">size</span> spectrum to an index as large as q = 4. Similarly, for bodies held together by their own gravity, the corresponding power-law index range 2.88 < q < 3.14 of Pan and Sari can steepen to values as large as q = 3.26. Our velocity results allow quantitative predictions of the bodies' scale heights as a function of <span class="hlt">size</span>. Together with our predictions, observations of the scale heights for different-<span class="hlt">sized</span> bodies for the Kuiper belt, the asteroid belt, and extrasolar debris disks may constrain the mass and number of large bodies stirring the cascade as well as the colliding bodies' internal strengths.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22122892','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22122892"><span id="translatedtitle">INITIAL PLANETESIMAL <span class="hlt">SIZES</span> AND THE <span class="hlt">SIZE</span> <span class="hlt">DISTRIBUTION</span> OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Schlichting, Hilke E.; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E.</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>The Kuiper Belt is a remnant from the early solar system and its <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> contains many important constraints that can be used to test models of planet formation and collisional evolution. We show, by comparing observations with theoretical models, that the observed Kuiper Belt <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is well matched by coagulation models, which start with an initial planetesimal population with radii of about 1 km, and subsequent collisional evolution. We find that the observed <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> above R {approx} 30 km is primordial, i.e., it has not been modified by collisional evolution over the age of the solar system, and that the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> below R {approx} 30 km has been modified by collisions and that its slope is well matched by collisional evolution models that use published strength laws. We investigate in detail the resulting <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of bodies ranging from 0.01 km to 30 km and find that its slope changes several times as a function of radius before approaching the expected value for an equilibrium collisional cascade of material strength dominated bodies for R {approx}< 0.1 km. Compared to a single power-law <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> that would span the whole range from 0.01 km to 30 km, we find in general a strong deficit of bodies around R {approx} 10 km and a strong excess of bodies around 2 km in radius. This deficit and excess of bodies are caused by the planetesimal <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> left over from the runaway growth phase, which left most of the initial mass in small planetesimals while only a small fraction of the total mass is converted into large protoplanets. This excess mass in small planetesimals leaves a permanent signature in the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of small bodies that is not erased after 4.5 Gyr of collisional evolution. Observations of the small Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> can therefore test if large KBOs grew as a result of runaway growth and constrained the initial planetesimal <span class="hlt">sizes</span>. We find that results from</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25757414','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25757414"><span id="translatedtitle">The best nanoparticle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> for minimum thermal conductivity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Hang; Minnich, Austin J</p> <p>2015-03-11</p> <p>Which <span class="hlt">sizes</span> of nanoparticles embedded in a crystalline solid yield the lowest thermal conductivity? Nanoparticles have long been demonstrated to reduce the thermal conductivity of crystals by scattering phonons, but most previous works assumed the nanoparticles to have a single <span class="hlt">size</span>. Here, we use optimization methods to show that the best nanoparticle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> to scatter the broad thermal phonon spectrum is not a similarly broad <span class="hlt">distribution</span> but rather several discrete peaks at well-chosen nanoparticle radii. For SiGe, the best <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> yields a thermal conductivity below that of amorphous silicon. Further, we demonstrate that a simplified <span class="hlt">distribution</span> yields nearly the same low thermal conductivity and can be readily fabricated. Our work provides important insights into how to manipulate the full spectrum of phonons and will guide the design of more efficient thermoelectric materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015LPICo1856.5258V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015LPICo1856.5258V"><span id="translatedtitle">Grain <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> in the Matrix of Primitive Meteorites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vaccaro, E.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.; Russell, S. S.</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>We describe the abundances and <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of discrete grains of different phases observed within the matrix of: Acfer 094, ALHA77307, MIL 07687 and QUE 99177 and discuss how the observed differences may be evidence of parent body processes.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9979E..0VR','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9979E..0VR"><span id="translatedtitle">A model for predicting fog aerosol <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rudiger, Joshua J.; Book, Kevin; Baker, Brooke; deGrassie, John Stephen; Hammel, Stephen</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>An accurate model and parameterization of fog is needed to increase the reliability and usefulness of electro-optical systems in all relevant environments. Current models vary widely in their ability to accurately predict the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and subsequent optical properties of fog. The Advanced Navy Aerosol Model (ANAM), developed to model the <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of aerosols in the maritime environment, does not currently include a model for fog. One of the more prevalent methods for modeling particle <span class="hlt">size</span> spectra consists of fitting a modified gamma function to fog measurement data. This limits the fog <span class="hlt">distribution</span> to a single mode. Here we establish an empirical model for predicting complicated multimodal fog droplet <span class="hlt">size</span> spectra using machine learning techniques. This is accomplished through careful measurements of fog in a controlled laboratory environment and measuring fog particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> during outdoor fog events.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4355732','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4355732"><span id="translatedtitle">The best nanoparticle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> for minimum thermal conductivity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zhang, Hang; Minnich, Austin J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Which <span class="hlt">sizes</span> of nanoparticles embedded in a crystalline solid yield the lowest thermal conductivity? Nanoparticles have long been demonstrated to reduce the thermal conductivity of crystals by scattering phonons, but most previous works assumed the nanoparticles to have a single <span class="hlt">size</span>. Here, we use optimization methods to show that the best nanoparticle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> to scatter the broad thermal phonon spectrum is not a similarly broad <span class="hlt">distribution</span> but rather several discrete peaks at well-chosen nanoparticle radii. For SiGe, the best <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> yields a thermal conductivity below that of amorphous silicon. Further, we demonstrate that a simplified <span class="hlt">distribution</span> yields nearly the same low thermal conductivity and can be readily fabricated. Our work provides important insights into how to manipulate the full spectrum of phonons and will guide the design of more efficient thermoelectric materials. PMID:25757414</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.epa.gov/risk/appendix-b-summary-tem-particle-size-distribution-datasets','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://www.epa.gov/risk/appendix-b-summary-tem-particle-size-distribution-datasets"><span id="translatedtitle">Appendix B: Summary of TEM Particle <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> Datasets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>As discussed in the main text (see Section 5.3.2), calculation of the concentration of asbestos fibers in each of the bins of potential interest requires particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> data derived using transmission electron microscopy (TEM).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3108135','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3108135"><span id="translatedtitle">Temporal and Spatial <span class="hlt">Pore</span> Water Pressure <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> Surrounding a Vertical Landfill Leachate Recirculation Well</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G.; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in <span class="hlt">pore</span> water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill <span class="hlt">pore</span> water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured <span class="hlt">pore</span> pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured <span class="hlt">pore</span> pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth. PMID:21655145</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12060748','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12060748"><span id="translatedtitle">Simulations of beta-hairpin folding confined to spherical <span class="hlt">pores</span> using <span class="hlt">distributed</span> computing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Klimov, D K; Newfield, D; Thirumalai, D</p> <p>2002-06-11</p> <p>We report the thermodynamics and kinetics of an off-lattice Go model beta-hairpin from Ig-binding protein confined to an inert spherical <span class="hlt">pore</span>. Confinement enhances the stability of the hairpin due to the decrease in the entropy of the unfolded state. Compared with their values in the bulk, the rates of hairpin formation increase in the spherical <span class="hlt">pore</span>. Surprisingly, the dependence of the rates on the <span class="hlt">pore</span> radius, R(s), is nonmonotonic. The rates reach a maximum at R(s)/R(g,N)(b) approximately equal to 1.5, where R(g,N)(b) is the radius of gyration of the folded beta-hairpin in the bulk. The denatured state ensemble of the encapsulated beta-hairpin is highly structured even at substantially elevated temperatures. Remarkably, a profound effect of confinement is evident even when the beta-hairpin occupies less than a 10th of the sphere volume. Our calculations show that the emergence of substantial structure in the denatured state of proteins in inert <span class="hlt">pores</span> is a consequence of confinement. In contrast, the structure of the bulk denatured state ensemble depends dramatically on the extent of denaturation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApSS..263..247C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApSS..263..247C"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of pretreatment on the surface chemistry and <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> properties of nitrogen functionalized and alkylated granular activated carbon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Jiajun; Zhai, Yunbo; Chen, Hongmei; Li, Caiting; Zeng, Guangming; Pang, Daoxiong; Lu, Pei</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>In this paper, granular activated carbon (GAC) from coconut shell was pretreated by HNO3, H2O2 and urea-formaldehyde resin, respectively. Then the obtained materials were functionalized in the same way for nitrogen group, and then alkylated. Effects of pretreatment on the surface chemistry and <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of modified GACs were studied. Surface area and micropore volume of modified GAC which pretreated by HNO3 were 723.88 m2/g and 0.229 cm3/g, respectively, while virgin GAC were 742.34 m2/g and 0.276 cm3/g. Surface area and micropore volume decrease of the modified GACs which pretreated by the others two methods were more drastically. The types of groups presented were analyzed by electrophoresis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Nsbnd CH3 group and Cdbnd N group were detected on the surfaces of these three kinds of modified GACs. Results of XPS showed that the nitrogen functions of modified GAC which pretreated by H2O2 was 4.07%, it was more than that of the others two pretreatment methods. However, the modified GAC which pretreated by urea-formaldehyde resin was fixed more pyridine structure, which structure percentage was 45.88%, in addition, there were more basic groups or charge on the surface than the others.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27547596','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27547596"><span id="translatedtitle">Laboratory investigation of the factors impact on bubble <span class="hlt">size</span>, <span class="hlt">pore</span> blocking and enhanced oil recovery with aqueous Colloidal Gas Aphron.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shi, Shenglong; Wang, Yefei; Li, Zhongpeng; Chen, Qingguo; Zhao, Zenghao</p> <p></p> <p>Colloidal Gas Aphron as a mobility control in enhanced oil recovery is becoming attractive; it is also designed to block porous media with micro-bubbles. In this paper, the effects of surfactant concentration, polymer concentration, temperature and salinity on the bubble <span class="hlt">size</span> of the Colloidal Gas Aphron were studied. Effects of injection rates, Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid composition, heterogeneity of reservoir on the resistance to the flow of Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid through porous media were investigated. Effects of Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid composition and temperature on residual oil recovery were also studied. The results showed that bubble growth rate decreased with increasing surfactant concentration, polymer concentration, and decreasing temperature, while it decreased and then increased slightly with increasing salinity. The obvious increase of injection pressure was observed as more Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid was injected, indicating that Colloidal Gas Aphron could block the <span class="hlt">pore</span> media effectively. The effectiveness of the best blend obtained through homogeneous sandpack flood tests was modestly improved in the heterogeneous sandpack. The tertiary oil recovery increased 26.8 % by Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid as compared to 20.3 % by XG solution when chemical solution of 1 PV was injected into the sandpack. The maximum injected pressure of Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid was about three times that of the XG solution. As the temperature increased, the Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid became less stable; the maximum injection pressure and tertiary oil recovery of Colloidal Gas Aphron fluid decreased.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..MARD34014J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..MARD34014J"><span id="translatedtitle">Visible-light absorption in 2D covalent triazine framework: enhanced by interlayer coupling and <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> increasing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jiang, Xue; Zhao, Jijun; Dalian University of Technology Collaboration</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Compared with traditional bulk materials, two-dimensional (2D) crystals have some intrinsic advantages as photocatalysis owing to the limited thickness and large surface area. So far, many monolayer materials have been shown to be potential photocatalysis for water splitting from both theoretical calculations and experiments; while most of them are inorganic materials. In contrast, g-carbon nitride, as a starting successful case, motivates us to explore 2D organic semiconductors, which have not yet well investigated. Using first principles calculations, we predicted a family of 2D covalent triazine framework (CTF) as a promising visible-light-driven photocatalyst by studying their electronic structures, work function, CBM/VBM position, and optical absorption spectra. Moreover, we found that multilayer CTF have much better visible-light adsorption than a single layer induced by the interlayer coupling. In addition, controlled construction of such CTF from suitable organic subunit pave the way for connection between the optical energy gap of CTF and <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span>. The insights from our study not only enrich the family of organic semiconductor photocatalyst, but also are very helpful in designing and assembling CTF subunits for optimal performance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23410583','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23410583"><span id="translatedtitle">Protein sieving characteristics of sub-20-nm <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> filters at varying ionic strength during nanofiltration of Coagulation Factor IX.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Winkler, Clint J; Jorba, Nuria; Shitanishi, Kenneth T; Herring, Steven W</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>Nanofiltration assures that protein therapeutics are free of adventitious agents such as viruses. Nanofilter <span class="hlt">pores</span> must allow passage of protein drugs but be small enough to retain viruses. Five nanofilters have been evaluated to identify those that can be used interchangeably to yield a high purity Coagulation Factor IX product. When product preparations prior to nanofiltration were analyzed using electrophoresis, Western blot, liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry and <span class="hlt">size</span> exclusion HPLC, factor IX, inter - α - trypsin inhibitor and C4b binding protein (C4BP) were observed. C4BP was removed from product by all five nanofilters when nanofiltration was performed at physiological ionic strength. However, at high ionic strength, C4BP was removed by only two nanofilters. HPLC indicated that the Stokes radius of C4BP was larger at low ionic strength than at high ionic strength. The results suggest that C4BP exists in an open conformation at physiological ionic strength and is removed by nanofiltration whereas, at high ionic strength, the protein collapses to an extent that allows passage through some nanofilters. Manufacturers should be aware that protein contaminants in other nanofiltered protein drugs could behave similarly and conditions of nanofiltration must be evaluated to ensure consistent product purity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70029150','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70029150"><span id="translatedtitle">A statistical approach to estimate the 3D <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of spheres from 2D <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Kong, M.; Bhattacharya, R.N.; James, C.; Basu, A.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of rigidly embedded spheres in a groundmass is usually determined from measurements of the radii of the two-dimensional (2D) circular cross sections of the spheres in random flat planes of a sample, such as in thin sections or polished slabs. Several methods have been devised to find a simple factor to convert the mean of such 2D <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> to the actual 3D mean <span class="hlt">size</span> of the spheres without a consensus. We derive an entirely theoretical solution based on well-established probability laws and not constrained by limitations of absolute <span class="hlt">size</span>, which indicates that the ratio of the means of measured 2D and estimated 3D grain <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> should be r/4 (=.785). Actual 2D <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of the radii of submicron <span class="hlt">sized</span>, pure Fe0 globules in lunar agglutinitic glass, determined from backscattered electron images, is tested to fit the gamma <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> model better than the log-normal model. Numerical analysis of 2D <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of Fe0 globules in 9 lunar soils shows that the average mean of 2D/3D ratio is 0.84, which is very close to the theoretical value. These results converge with the ratio 0.8 that Hughes (1978) determined for millimeter-<span class="hlt">sized</span> chondrules from empirical measurements. We recommend that a factor of 1.273 (reciprocal of 0.785) be used to convert the determined 2D mean <span class="hlt">size</span> (radius or diameter) of a population of spheres to estimate their actual 3D <span class="hlt">size</span>. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840017073','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840017073"><span id="translatedtitle">Remote sensing of floe <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and surface topography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rothrock, D. A.; Thorndike, A. S.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Floe <span class="hlt">size</span> can be measured by several properties p- for instance, area or mean caliper diameter. Two definitions of floe <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> seem particularly useful. F(p), the fraction of area covered by floes no smaller than p; and N(p), the number of floes per unit area no smaller than p. Several summertime <span class="hlt">distributions</span> measured are a graph, their slopes range from -1.7 to -2.5. The variance of an estimate is also calculated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Nanos...720593V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Nanos...720593V"><span id="translatedtitle">Nanocrystal <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> analysis from transmission electron microscopy images</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van Sebille, Martijn; van der Maaten, Laurens J. P.; Xie, Ling; Jarolimek, Karol; Santbergen, Rudi; van Swaaij, René A. C. M. M.; Leifer, Klaus; Zeman, Miro</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We propose a method, with minimal bias caused by user input, to quickly detect and measure the nanocrystal <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images using a combination of Laplacian of Gaussian filters and non-maximum suppression. We demonstrate the proposed method on bright-field TEM images of an a-SiC:H sample containing embedded silicon nanocrystals with varying magnifications and we compare the accuracy and speed with <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> obtained by manual measurements, a thresholding method and PEBBLES. Finally, we analytically consider the error induced by slicing nanocrystals during TEM sample preparation on the measured nanocrystal <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and formulate an equation to correct this effect.We propose a method, with minimal bias caused by user input, to quickly detect and measure the nanocrystal <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images using a combination of Laplacian of Gaussian filters and non-maximum suppression. We demonstrate the proposed method on bright-field TEM images of an a-SiC:H sample containing embedded silicon nanocrystals with varying magnifications and we compare the accuracy and speed with <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> obtained by manual measurements, a thresholding method and PEBBLES. Finally, we analytically consider the error induced by slicing nanocrystals during TEM sample preparation on the measured nanocrystal <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and formulate an equation to correct this effect. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06292f</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.5156R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.5156R"><span id="translatedtitle">Modelling complete particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> from operator estimates of particle-<span class="hlt">size</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Roberson, Sam; Weltje, Gert Jan</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Estimates of particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> made by operators in the field and laboratory represent a vast and relatively untapped data archive. The wide spatial <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> estimates makes them ideal for constructing geological models and soil maps. This study uses a large data set from the Netherlands (n = 4837) containing both operator estimates of particle <span class="hlt">size</span> and complete particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> measured by laser granulometry. This study introduces a logit-based constrained-cubic-spline (CCS) algorithm to interpolate complete particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> from operator estimates. The CCS model is compared to four other models: (i) a linear interpolation; (ii) a log-hyperbolic interpolation; (iii) an empirical logistic function; and (iv) an empirical arctan function. Operator estimates were found to be both inaccurate and imprecise; only 14% of samples were successfully classified using the Dutch classification scheme for fine sediment. Operator estimates of sediment particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> encompass the same range of values as particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> measured by laser analysis. However, the <span class="hlt">distributions</span> measured by laser analysis show that most of the sand percentage values lie between zero and one, so the majority of the variability in the data is lost because operator estimates are made to the nearest 1% at best, and more frequently to the nearest 5%. A method for constructing complete particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> from operator estimates of sediment texture using a logit constrained cubit spline (CCS) interpolation algorithm is presented. This model and four other previously published methods are compared to establish the best approach to modelling particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. The logit-CCS model is the most accurate method, although both logit-linear and log-linear interpolation models provide reasonable alternatives. Models based on empirical <span class="hlt">distribution</span> functions are less accurate than interpolation algorithms for modelling particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28380658','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28380658"><span id="translatedtitle">Cationic osteogenic peptide P15-CSP coatings promote 3-D osteogenesis in poly(epsilon-caprolactone) scaffolds of distinct <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Xian; Mehr, Nima Ghavidel; Guzmán-Morales, Jessica; Favis, Basil D; De Crescenzo, Gregory; Yakandawala, Nanda; Hoemann, Caroline D</p> <p>2017-04-05</p> <p>P15-CSP is a biomimetic cationic fusion peptide that stimulates osteogenesis and inhibits bacterial biofilm formation when coated on 2-D surfaces. This study tested the hypothesis that P15-CSP coatings enhance 3-D osteogenesis in a porous but otherwise hydrophobic poly-(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold. Scaffolds of 84 µm and 141 µm average <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> were coated or not with Layer-by-Layer polyelectrolytes followed by P15-CSP, seeded with adult primary human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and cultured 10 days in proliferation medium, then 21 days in osteogenic medium. Atomic analyses showed that P15-CSP was successfully captured by LbL. After 2 days of culture, MSCs adhered and spread more on P15-CSP coated <span class="hlt">pores</span> than PCL-only. At day 10, all constructs contained non-mineralized tissue. At day 31, all constructs became enveloped in a "skin" of tissue that, like 2-D cultures, underwent sporadic mineralization in areas of high cell density that extended into some 141 µm edge <span class="hlt">pores</span>. By quantitative histomorphometry, 2.5-fold more tissue and biomineral accumulated in edge <span class="hlt">pores</span> versus inner <span class="hlt">pores</span>. P15-CSP specifically promoted tissue-scaffold integration, 4-fold higher overall biomineralization, and more mineral deposits in the outer 84 µm and inner 141 µm <span class="hlt">pores</span> than PCL-only (p<0.05). 3-D Micro-CT revealed asymmetric mineral deposition consistent with histological calcium staining. This study provides proof-of-concept that P15-CSP coatings are osteoconductive in PCL <span class="hlt">pore</span> surfaces with 3-D topography. Biomineralization deeper than 150 µm from the scaffold edge was optimally attained with the larger 141 µm peptide-coated <span class="hlt">pores</span>. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoRL..4311253I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoRL..4311253I"><span id="translatedtitle">The scaling exponent of residual nonwetting phase cluster <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> in porous media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Iglauer, Stefan; Wülling, Wolfgang</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>During an imbibition process in two-phase subsurface flow the imbibing phase can displace the nonwetting phase up to an endpoint at which a residual saturation is reached (which cannot be reduced further by additional wetting phase flow due to the complex <span class="hlt">pore</span> network of the rock and associated strong capillary forces which trap the nonwetting phase). The residual nonwetting phase is split into many disconnected clusters of different <span class="hlt">sizes</span>. This <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is of key importance, for instance, in the context of hydrocarbon recovery, contaminant transport, or CO2 geostorage; and it is well established that this <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> follows a power law. However, there is significant uncertainty associated with the exact value of the <span class="hlt">distribution</span> exponent τ, which mathematically describes the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. To reduce this uncertainty and to better constrain τ, we analyzed a representative experimental data set with mathematically rigorous methods, and we demonstrate that τ is substantially smaller (≈1.1) than previously suggested. This raises increasing doubt that simple percolation models can accurately predict subsurface fluid flow behavior; and this has serious consequences for subsurface flow processes: hydrocarbon recovery is easier than predicted, but CO2 geostorage dissolution trapping capacities are significantly reduced and potential remobilization of residual CO2 is more likely than previously believed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA624919','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA624919"><span id="translatedtitle">Improved Root Normal <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distributions</span> for Liquid Atomization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Distribution</span> for Coagulation by Brownian Motion, Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 22, 126–32, 1966 H. G. Houghton in J. H. Perry, Editor...Undergoing Brownian Coagulation, Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 242, 314- 318, 2001 Li, X. and Tankin, R. S., Droplet <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span>: A</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........45D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........45D"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pore</span>-Scale Controls on Permeability, Fluid Flow, and Methane Hydrate <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> in Fine-Grained Sediments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Daigle, Hugh Callahan</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Permeability in fine-grained sediments is governed by the surface area exposed to fluid flow and tortuosity of the <span class="hlt">pore</span> network. I modify an existing technique of computing permeability from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data to extend its applicability beyond reservoir-quality rocks to the fine-grained sediments that comprise the majority of the sedimentary column. This modification involves correcting the NMR data to account for the large surface areas and disparate mineralogies typically exhibited by fine-grained sediments. Through measurements on resedimented samples composed of controlled mineralogies, I show that this modified NMR permeability algorithm accurately predicts permeability over 5 orders of magnitude. This work highlights the importance of <span class="hlt">pore</span> system surface area and geometry in determining transport properties of porous media. I use these insights to probe the <span class="hlt">pore</span>-scale controls on methane hydrate <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and hydraulic fracturing behavior, both of which are controlled by flux and permeability. To do this I employ coupled poromechanical models of hydrate formation in marine sediments. Fracture-hosted methane hydrate deposits are found at many sites worldwide, and I investigate whether <span class="hlt">pore</span> occlusion and permeability reduction due to hydrate formation can drive port fluid pressures to the point at which the sediments fracture hydraulically. I find that hydraulic fractures may form in systems with high flux and/or low permeability; that low-permeability layers can influence the location of fracture initiation if they are thicker than a critical value that is a function of flux and layer permeability; that capillary-driven depression of the triple point of methane in fine-gained sediments causes hydrate to form preferentially in coarse-grained layers; that the relative fluxes of gas and water in multiphase systems controls hydrate <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and the location of fracture initiation; and that methane hydrate systems are dynamic systems in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD1013712','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD1013712"><span id="translatedtitle">The Seasonal Evolution of Sea Ice Floe <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-09-30</p> <p>1 <span class="hlt">DISTRIBUTION</span> STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is unlimited. “The Seasonal Evolution of Sea Ice Floe <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span>...occur in the appearance and morphology of the Arctic sea ice cover over and annual cycle. These photos were taken over the pack ice near SHEBA in May...element model [Hopkins et al., 2004], using morphological conditions derived from the analyzed satellite imagery, confirms that breaking occurs along</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28213987','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28213987"><span id="translatedtitle">Superficially porous particles with 1000Å <span class="hlt">pores</span> for large biomolecule high performance liquid chromatography and polymer <span class="hlt">size</span> exclusion chromatography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wagner, Brian M; Schuster, Stephanie A; Boyes, Barry E; Shields, Taylor J; Miles, William L; Haynes, Mark J; Moran, Robert E; Kirkland, Joseph J; Schure, Mark R</p> <p>2017-03-17</p> <p>To facilitate mass transport and column efficiency, solutes must have free access to particle <span class="hlt">pores</span> to facilitate interactions with the stationary phase. To ensure this feature, particles should be used for HPLC separations which have <span class="hlt">pores</span> sufficiently large to accommodate the solute without restricted diffusion. This paper describes the design and properties of superficially porous (also called Fused-Core(®), core shell or porous shell) particles with very large (1000Å) <span class="hlt">pores</span> specifically developed for separating very large biomolecules and polymers. Separations of DNA fragments, monoclonal antibodies, large proteins and large polystyrene standards are used to illustrate the utility of these particles for efficient, high-resolution applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/826400','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/826400"><span id="translatedtitle">Airborne Particle <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> Measurements at USDOE Fernald</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Harley, N.H.; Chittaporn, P.; Heikkinen, M.; Medora, R.; Merrill, R.</p> <p>2003-03-27</p> <p>There are no long term measurements of the particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and concentration of airborne radionuclides at any USDOE facility except Fernald. Yet the determinant of lung dose is the particle <span class="hlt">size</span>, determining the airway and lower lung deposition. Beginning in 2000, continuous (6 to 8 weeks) measurements of the aerosol particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> have been made with a miniature sampler developed under EMSP. Radon gas decays to a chain of four short lived solid radionuclides that attach immediately to the resident atmospheric aerosol. These in turn decay to long lived polonium 210. Alpha emitting polonium is a tracer for any atmospheric aerosol. Six samplers at Fernald and four at QC sites in New Jersey show a difference in both polonium concentration and <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> with the winter measurements being higher/larger than summer by almost a factor of two at all locations. EMSP USDOE Contract DE FG07 97ER62522.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1236828','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1236828"><span id="translatedtitle">Particle <span class="hlt">size</span> and shape <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of hammer milled pine</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Westover, Tyler Lott; Matthews, Austin Colter; Williams, Christopher Luke; Ryan, John Chadron Benjamin</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Particle <span class="hlt">size</span> and shape <span class="hlt">distributions</span> impact particle heating rates and diffusion of volatized gases out of particles during fast pyrolysis conversion, and consequently must be modeled accurately in order for computational pyrolysis models to produce reliable results for bulk solid materials. For this milestone, lodge pole pine chips were ground using a Thomas-Wiley #4 mill using two screen <span class="hlt">sizes</span> in order to produce two representative materials that are suitable for fast pyrolysis. For the first material, a 6 mm screen was employed in the mill and for the second material, a 3 mm screen was employed in the mill. Both materials were subjected to RoTap sieve analysis, and the <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of the particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span> and shapes were determined using digital image analysis. The results of the physical analysis will be fed into computational pyrolysis simulations to create models of materials with realistic particle <span class="hlt">size</span> and shape <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. This milestone was met on schedule.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23642496','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23642496"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of microbubbles as a function of shell composition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dicker, Stephen; Mleczko, Michał; Schmitz, Georg; Wrenn, Steven P</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>The effect of modifying the shell composition of a population of microbubbles on their <span class="hlt">size</span> demonstrated through experiment. Specifically, these variations include altering both the mole fraction and molecular weight of functionalized polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the microbubble phospholipid monolayer shell (1-15 mol% PEG, and 1000-5000 g/mole, respectively). The <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is measured with an unbiased image segmentation program written in MATLAB which identifies and <span class="hlt">sizes</span> bubbles from micrographs. For a population of microbubbles with a shell composition of 5 mol% PEG2000, the mean diameter is 1.42 μm with a variance of 0.244 μm. For the remainder of the shell compositions studied herein, we find that the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> do not show a statistically significant correlation to either PEG molecular weight or mole fraction. All the measured <span class="hlt">distributions</span> are nearly Gaussian in shape and have a monomodal peak.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70021540','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70021540"><span id="translatedtitle">Dissolved sulfide <span class="hlt">distributions</span> in the water column and sediment <span class="hlt">pore</span> waters of the Santa Barbara Basin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Kuwabara, J.S.; VanGeen, A.; McCorkle, D.C.; Bernhard, J.M.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Dissolved sulfide concentrations in the water column and in sediment <span class="hlt">pore</span> waters were measured by square-wave voltammetry (nanomolar detection limit) during three cruises to the Santa Barbara Basin in February 1995, November-December 1995, and April 1997. In the water column, sulfide concentrations measured outside the basin averaged 3 ?? 1 nM (n = 28) in the 0 to 600 m depth range. Inside the basin, dissolved sulfides increased to reach values of up to 15 nM at depths >400 m. A suite of box cores and multicores collected at four sites along the northeastern flank of the basin showed considerable range in surficial (400 ??M at 10 cm. Decreases in water-column nitrate below the sill depth indicate nitrate consumption (-55 to -137 ??mole m-2 h-1) similar to nearby Santa Monica Basin. Peaks in <span class="hlt">pore</span>-water iron concentrations were generally observed between 2 and 5 cm depth with shallowest peaks at the 590 m site. These observations, including observations of the benthic microfauna, suggest that the extent to which the sulfide flux, sustained by elevated <span class="hlt">pore</span>-water concentrations, reaches the water column may be modulated by the abundance of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria in addition to iron redox and precipitation reactions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvE..89e2211B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvE..89e2211B"><span id="translatedtitle">Packing fraction of particles with lognormal <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Brouwers, H. J. H.</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>This paper addresses the packing and void fraction of polydisperse particles with a lognormal <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. It is demonstrated that a binomial particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> can be transformed into a continuous particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of the lognormal type. Furthermore, an original and exact expression is derived that predicts the packing fraction of mixtures of particles with a lognormal <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, which is governed by the standard deviation, mode of packing, and particle shape only. For a number of particle shapes and their packing modes (close, loose) the applicable values are given. This closed-form analytical expression governing the packing fraction is thoroughly compared with empirical and computational data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5105851','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5105851"><span id="translatedtitle">Inferring Past Effective Population <span class="hlt">Size</span> from <span class="hlt">Distributions</span> of Coalescent Times</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gattepaille, Lucie; Günther, Torsten; Jakobsson, Mattias</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Inferring and understanding changes in effective population <span class="hlt">size</span> over time is a major challenge for population genetics. Here we investigate some theoretical properties of random-mating populations with varying <span class="hlt">size</span> over time. In particular, we present an exact solution to compute the population <span class="hlt">size</span> as a function of time, Ne(t), based on <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of coalescent times of samples of any <span class="hlt">size</span>. This result reduces the problem of population <span class="hlt">size</span> inference to a problem of estimating coalescent time <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. To illustrate the analytic results, we design a heuristic method using a tree-inference algorithm and investigate simulated and empirical population-genetic data. We investigate the effects of a range of conditions associated with empirical data, for instance number of loci, sample <span class="hlt">size</span>, mutation rate, and cryptic recombination. We show that our approach performs well with genomic data (≥ 10,000 loci) and that increasing the sample <span class="hlt">size</span> from 2 to 10 greatly improves the inference of Ne(t) whereas further increase in sample <span class="hlt">size</span> results in modest improvements, even under a scenario of exponential growth. We also investigate the impact of recombination and characterize the potential biases in inference of Ne(t). The approach can handle large sample <span class="hlt">sizes</span> and the computations are fast. We apply our method to human genomes from four populations and reconstruct population <span class="hlt">size</span> profiles that are coherent with previous finds, including the Out-of-Africa bottleneck. Additionally, we uncover a potential difference in population <span class="hlt">size</span> between African and non-African populations as early as 400 KYA. In summary, we provide an analytic relationship between <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of coalescent times and Ne(t), which can be incorporated into powerful approaches for inferring past population <span class="hlt">sizes</span> from population-genomic data. PMID:27638421</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28330988','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28330988"><span id="translatedtitle">Cell-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in epithelial tissue formation and homeostasis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Puliafito, Alberto; Primo, Luca; Celani, Antonio</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>How cell growth and proliferation are orchestrated in living tissues to achieve a given biological function is a central problem in biology. During development, tissue regeneration and homeostasis, cell proliferation must be coordinated by spatial cues in order for cells to attain the correct <span class="hlt">size</span> and shape. Biological tissues also feature a notable homogeneity of cell <span class="hlt">size</span>, which, in specific cases, represents a physiological need. Here, we study the temporal evolution of the cell-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> by applying the theory of kinetic fragmentation to tissue development and homeostasis. Our theory predicts self-similar probability density function (PDF) of cell <span class="hlt">size</span> and explains how division times and redistribution ensure cell <span class="hlt">size</span> homogeneity across the tissue. Theoretical predictions and numerical simulations of confluent non-homeostatic tissue cultures show that cell <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is self-similar. Our experimental data confirm predictions and reveal that, as assumed in the theory, cell division times scale like a power-law of the cell <span class="hlt">size</span>. We find that in homeostatic conditions there is a stationary <span class="hlt">distribution</span> with lognormal tails, consistently with our experimental data. Our theoretical predictions and numerical simulations show that the shape of the PDF depends on how the space inherited by apoptotic cells is redistributed and that apoptotic cell rates might also depend on <span class="hlt">size</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.8599J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.8599J"><span id="translatedtitle">Three-Dimensional <span class="hlt">pore</span> space and strain localization <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in Majella limestone.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ji, Yuntao; Hall, Stephen; Baud, Patrick; Wond, Teng-fong</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Brittle-ductile transition in porous rock is a topic of importance in many geological applications. Traditionally <span class="hlt">pore</span> space in rock is characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). Advances in 3-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) and laser scanning confocal microscopy have furnished enhanced perspective on <span class="hlt">pore</span> geometry complexity. In particular, X-ray CT has been used widely for characterizing porous clastic rocks such as sandstone, whose void space is dominated by relatively equant <span class="hlt">pores</span> connected by throats that are sufficiently large for direct imaging by X-ray microCT. However, standard techniques for CT imaging are not directly applicable to a carbonate rock because of the geometric complexity of its <span class="hlt">pore</span> space. In this study, we first characterized the <span class="hlt">pore</span> structure in Majella limestone. MicroCT data was partitioned into three distinct domains: macropores, solid grains and an intermediate domain made up of voxels of solid embedded with micropores below the resolution. A morphological analysis of the microCT images shows that both the solid and intermediate domains in Majella limestone are interconnected as it has been previously reported in a less porous limestone. We however show that the macroporosity in Majella limestone is fundamentally different, in that it has a percolative backbone which may contribute to significant enhancement of its permeability. We then present the first application of 3D-volumetric Digital Image Correlation (DIC) to a very porous limestone. If images of a rock sample are acquired before and after deformation, then DIC can be used to infer the displacement and strain fields. In our study, four Majella limestone samples were triaxially compressed at confining pressures ranging from 5 MPa to 25 MPa and another under hydrostatic conditions up to 60 MPa. For each of these five samples, two CT images were acquired before and after the deformation. We then used the Tomo</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28009860','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28009860"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and concentration effect of mesoporous silica nanoparticles on the coefficient of thermal expansion and optical transparency of poly(ether sulfone) films.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vo, Nhat Tri; Patra, Astam K; Kim, Dukjoon</p> <p>2017-01-18</p> <p>Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with uniform <span class="hlt">size</span> (<50 nm) yet with different <span class="hlt">pore</span> diameters were synthesized, and used as fillers in poly(ether sulfone) (PES) films in order to decrease their coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) without sacrificing optical transparency. Here, both CTE and optical transparency of the MSN/PES nanocomposite films gradually decreased with increasing MSN concentration. The PES films containing MSNs with larger <span class="hlt">pores</span> showed the best performance in CTE and optical transparency. While the CTE decreased by 32.3% with increasing MSN content up to 0.5 wt%, the optical transparency decreased by only less than 6.9% because of the small and uniform particle <span class="hlt">size</span> of less than 50 nm, which minimizes light scattering. This <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> effect is more clearly observed via an annealing process, which enables the polymer chains to slowly move and fill in the free volume in the <span class="hlt">pores</span> of the MSN, and thus restricts the thermal motion. The effect of the silica nanoparticles was investigated not only on the thermal stability but also on the mechanical stability. We expect the MSNs synthesized in this study to be used as a promising filler to enhance the thermal and mechanical stability of the PES substrate without sacrificing its optical transparency.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EPJD...70...43M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EPJD...70...43M"><span id="translatedtitle">Charge <span class="hlt">distribution</span> over dust particles configured with <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in a complex plasma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Misra, Shikha; Mishra, Sanjay K.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>A theoretical kinetic model describing the <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of charge on the dust particles configured with generalized Kappa <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in a complex plasma has been developed. The formulation is based on the manifestation of uniform potential theory with an analytical solution of the master differential equation for the probability density function of dust charge; the number and energy balance of the plasma constituents are utilized in writing the kinetic equations. A parametric study to determine the steady state plasma parameters and the charge <span class="hlt">distribution</span> corresponding to a <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of dust grains in the complex plasma has been made; the numerical results are presented graphically. The charge <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is seen sensitive to the population of small grains in the particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and thus in contrast to symmetrical <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of charge around a mean value for uniform <span class="hlt">sized</span> grains, the charge <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in the present case peaks around lower charge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMOS21A1608H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMOS21A1608H"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pore</span> scale <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of gas hydrates in sediments by micro X-ray Computed Tomography (X-CT)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hu, G.; Li, C.; Ye, Y.; Liu, C.; Best, A. I.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>A dedicated apparatus was developed to observe in-situ <span class="hlt">pore</span> scale <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of gas hydrate directly during hydrate formation in artificial cores. The high-resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (type: GE Sensing & Inspection Technologies GmbH Phoenix x-ray V/tomex/s) was used and the effective resolution for observing gas hydrate bearing sediments can up to about 18μm. Methane gas hydrate was formed in 0.425-0.85mm sands under a pressure of 6MPa and a temperature of 3°C. During the process, CT scanning was conducted if there's a pressure drop (the scanning time is 66 minutes each time), so that the hydrate morphology could be detected. As a result, five scanning CT images of the same section during gas hydrate formation (i.e. hydrate saturation at 3.9%, 24.6%, 35.0%, 51.4% and 97.0%) were obtained. The result shows that at each hydrate saturation level, hydrate morphology models are complicated. The occurrence of 'floating model' (i.e. hydrate floats in <span class="hlt">pore</span> fluid), 'contact model' (i.e. hydrate contact with the sediment particle), and the 'cementing model' (i.e. hydrates cement the sediment particles) can be found at the same time (Fig. 1). However, it shows that at different hydrate formation stages, the dominant hydrate morphology are not the same. For instance, at the first stage of hydrate formation, although there are some hydrates floating in the <span class="hlt">pore</span> fluid, most hydrates connect the sediment particles. Consequently, the hydrate morphology at this moment can be described as a cementing model. With this method, it can be obtained that at the higher level of saturation (e.g., hydrate saturation at 24.6% and 35.0%), hydrates are mainly grow as a floating model. As hydrate saturation is much higher (e.g. after hydrate saturation is more than 51.4%), however, the floating hydrates coalesce with each other and the hydrates cement the sediment particle again. The direct observed hydrate morphology presented here may have significant impact on investigating</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1711785W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1711785W"><span id="translatedtitle">Crater <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> on Ganymede and Callisto: fundamental issues</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wagner, Roland; Schmedemann, Nico; Werner, Stefanie; Ivanov, Boris; Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Crater <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> on the two largest Jovian satellites Ganymede and Callisto and the origin of impactors are subject of intense and controversial debates. In this paper, we reinvestigate crater <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> measured in surface units derived from a recently published global geologic map, based on Voyager and Galileo SSI images at a scale of 1 km/pxl (Collins G. C. et al. (2013), U. S. Geol. Surv., Sci. Inv. Map 3237). These units are used as a context to units mapped in more detail at higher resolution in Galileo SSI images. We focus on the following fundamental issues: (1) Similarity between shapes of crater <span class="hlt">distributions</span> on the Galilean satellites and on inner solar system bodies; (2) production versus equilibrium <span class="hlt">distributions</span>; (3) apex/antapex variations in crater <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. First, our results show a strong similarity in shape between the crater <span class="hlt">distributions</span> on the most densely cratered regions on Ganymede and Callisto with those in the lunar highlands. We conclude that the shape of the crater <span class="hlt">distributions</span> on these two Jovian satellites implies the craters were preferentially formed from members of a collisionally evolved projectile family, derived either from Main Belt asteroids as candidates of impactors on the Jovian satellites, or from projectiles stemming from the outer solar system which have undergone collisional evolution, resulting in a <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> similar to those of Main Belt asteroids. Second, the complex shape of the crater <span class="hlt">distributions</span> on Ganymede and Callisto indicates they are mostly production <span class="hlt">distributions</span> and can be used to infer the underlying shape of the projectile <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. Locally, equilibrium <span class="hlt">distributions</span> occur, especially at smaller sub-kilometer diameters. Third, the most densely cratered regions on both satellites do not show apex-antapex variations in crater frequency, as inferred for bodies from heliocentric orbits (e.g., Zahnle K. et al. (2003), Icarus 163, 263-289). This indicates that these</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvE..95a2901C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvE..95a2901C"><span id="translatedtitle">Extension of discrete tribocharging models to continuous <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Carter, Dylan; Hartzell, Christine</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Triboelectric charging, the phenomenon by which electrical charge is exchanged during contact between two surfaces, has been known to cause significant charge separation in granular mixtures, even between chemically identical grains. This charging is a stochastic <span class="hlt">size</span>-dependent process resulting from random collisions between grains. The prevailing models and experimental results suggest that, in most cases, larger grains in a mixture of dielectric grains acquire a positive charge, while smaller grains charge negatively. These models are typically restricted to mixtures of two discrete grain <span class="hlt">sizes</span>, which are not representative of most naturally occurring granular mixtures, and neglect the effect of grain <span class="hlt">size</span> on individual charging events. We have developed a model that predicts the average charge <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in a granular mixture, for any continuous <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of dielectric grains of a single material. Expanding to continuous <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> enables the prediction of charge separation in many natural granular phenomena, including terrestrial dust storms and industrial powder handling operations. The expanded model makes predictions about the charge <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, including specific conditions under which the usual <span class="hlt">size</span>-dependent polarity is reversed such that larger grains charge negatively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SoPh..291.3685M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SoPh..291.3685M"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distributions</span> of Solar Proton Events: Methodological and Physical Restrictions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Miroshnichenko, L. I.; Yanke, V. G.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Based on the new catalogue of solar proton events (SPEs) for the period of 1997 - 2009 (Solar Cycle 23) we revisit the long-studied problem of the event-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> in the context of those constructed for other solar-flare parameters. Recent results on the problem of <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of solar flares and proton events are briefly reviewed. Even a cursory acquaintance with this research field reveals a rather mixed and controversial picture. We concentrate on three main issues: i) SPE <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> for {>} 10 MeV protons in Solar Cycle 23; ii) <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of {>} 1 GV proton events in 1942 - 2014; iii) variations of annual numbers for {>} 10 MeV proton events on long time scales (1955 - 2015). Different results are critically compared; most of the studies in this field are shown to suffer from vastly different input datasets as well as from insufficient knowledge of underlying physical processes in the SPEs under consideration. New studies in this field should be made on more distinct physical and methodological bases. It is important to note the evident similarity in <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of solar flares and superflares in Sun-like stars.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5358381','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5358381"><span id="translatedtitle">Formation and <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of self-assembled vesicles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Huang, Changjin; Quinn, David; Suresh, Subra</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>When detergents and phospholipid membranes are dispersed in aqueous solutions, they tend to self-assemble into vesicles of various shapes and <span class="hlt">sizes</span> by virtue of their hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. A clearer understanding of such vesiculation processes holds promise for better elucidation of human physiology and disease, and paves the way to improved diagnostics, drug development, and drug delivery. Here we present a detailed analysis of the energetics and thermodynamics of vesiculation by recourse to nonlinear elasticity, taking into account large deformation that may arise during the vesiculation process. The effects of membrane <span class="hlt">size</span>, spontaneous curvature, and membrane stiffness on vesiculation and vesicle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> were investigated, and the critical <span class="hlt">size</span> for vesicle formation was determined and found to compare favorably with available experimental evidence. Our analysis also showed that the critical membrane <span class="hlt">size</span> for spontaneous vesiculation was correlated with membrane thickness, and further illustrated how the combined effects of membrane thickness and physical properties influenced the <span class="hlt">size</span>, shape, and <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of vesicles. These findings shed light on the formation of physiological extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes. The findings also suggest pathways for manipulating the <span class="hlt">size</span>, shape, <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, and physical properties of synthetic vesicles, with potential applications in vesicle physiology, the pathobiology of cancer and other diseases, diagnostics using in vivo liquid biopsy, and drug delivery methods. PMID:28265065</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApJ...814...19A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApJ...814...19A"><span id="translatedtitle">Thresholded Power law <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distributions</span> of Instabilities in Astrophysics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aschwanden, Markus J.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Power-law-like <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> are ubiquitous in astrophysical instabilities. There are at least four natural effects that cause deviations from ideal power law <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span>, which we model here in a generalized way: (1) a physical threshold of an instability; (2) incomplete sampling of the smallest events below a threshold x0; (3) contamination by an event-unrelated background xb; and (4) truncation effects at the largest events due to a finite system <span class="hlt">size</span>. These effects can be modeled in the simplest terms with a “thresholded power law” <span class="hlt">distribution</span> function (also called generalized Pareto [type II] or Lomax <span class="hlt">distribution</span>), N(x){dx}\\propto {(x+{x}0)}-a{dx}, where x0 > 0 is positive for a threshold effect, while x0 < 0 is negative for background contamination. We analytically derive the functional shape of this thresholded power law <span class="hlt">distribution</span> function from an exponential growth evolution model, which produces avalanches only when a disturbance exceeds a critical threshold x0. We apply the thresholded power law <span class="hlt">distribution</span> function to terrestrial, solar (HXRBS, BATSE, RHESSI), and stellar flare (Kepler) data sets. We find that the thresholded power law model provides an adequate fit to most of the observed data. Major advantages of this model are the automated choice of the power law fitting range, diagnostics of background contamination, physical instability thresholds, instrumental detection thresholds, and finite system <span class="hlt">size</span> limits. When testing self-organized criticality models that predict ideal power laws, we suggest including these natural truncation effects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26573312','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26573312"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Distributions</span>, fluxes, and toxicities of heavy metals in sediment <span class="hlt">pore</span> water from tributaries of the Ziya River system, northern China.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhu, Xiaolei; Shan, Baoqing; Tang, Wenzhong; Li, Shanshan; Rong, Nan</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">distributions</span> and mobilities of metals in <span class="hlt">pore</span> water strongly influence the biogeochemical processes and bioavailabilities of metals at sediment-water interfaces. Heavy metal concentrations were measured in <span class="hlt">pore</span> water samples from the Shaocun River (SR), the Wangyang River (WR), and the Xiao River (XR), tributaries of the Ziya River system, northern China. The aim was to assess heavy metal contamination in the system and the associated environmental risks. The mean Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations in all three tributaries were 0.373, 57.1, 37.7, 20.4, 14.0, and 90.6 μg/L, respectively. The calculated Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn diffusion fluxes in the rivers were -0.427 to 0.469, -71.8 to 42.5, 3.16 to 86.6, 5.29 to 14.0, 7.24 to 19.0, and -204 to 21.9 μg/(m(2) day), respectively, showing that the <span class="hlt">pore</span> water was a source of most of the metals to the water column. Only Cu and Pb in the XR and Cu in the WR exceeded the final chronic value recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency, but the metals in the WR sediment could have caused toxic effects. These results are likely to be useful to the authorities responsible for sustainable river management.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002APS..MARJ22002L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002APS..MARJ22002L"><span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic Scaling of Island-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> on Anisotropic Surfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Maozhi; Wang, E. G.; Liu, Banggui; Zhang, Zhenyu</p> <p>2002-03-01</p> <p>Dynamic scaling of island-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> on isotropic and anisotropic surfaces in submonolayer growth is systematically studied using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the island-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in anisotropic submonolayer growth exhibits a general dynamic scaling behavior. An analytic expression is proposed for the scaling function, and is compared with the simulation results. This scaling function not only improves previous results for the isotropic growth (1), but also describes the scaling behavior of the island-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in anisotropic submonolayer growth very well (2). 1. J. G. Amar and F. Family, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2066 (1995). 2. M. Z. Li, E. G. Wang, B. G. Liu, and Z. Y. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. (submitted).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017M%26PS...52..532C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017M%26PS...52..532C"><span id="translatedtitle">Recovering 3D particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> from 2D sections</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Olson, Daniel M.</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>We discuss different ways to convert observed, apparent particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> from 2D sections (thin sections, SEM maps on planar surfaces, etc.) into true 3D particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. We give a simple, flexible, and practical method to do this; show which of these techniques gives the most faithful conversions; and provide (online) short computer codes to calculate both 2D-3D recoveries and simulations of 2D observations by random sectioning. The most important systematic bias of 2D sectioning, from the standpoint of most chondrite studies, is an overestimate of the abundance of the larger particles. We show that fairly good recoveries can be achieved from observed <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> containing 100-300 individual measurements of apparent particle diameter.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910070242&hterms=coaxial&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dcoaxial','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910070242&hterms=coaxial&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dcoaxial"><span id="translatedtitle">Initial drop <span class="hlt">size</span> and velocity <span class="hlt">distributions</span> for airblast coaxial atomizers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Eroglu, H.; Chigier, N.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Phase Doppler measurements were used to determine initial drop <span class="hlt">size</span> and velocity <span class="hlt">distributions</span> after a complete disintegration of coaxial liquid jets. The Sauter mean diameter (SMD) <span class="hlt">distribution</span> was found to be strongly affected by the structure and behavior of the preceding liquid intact jet. The axial measurement stations were determined from the photographs of the coaxial liquid jet at very short distances (1-2 mm) downstream of the observed break-up locations. Minimum droplet mean velocities were found at the center, and maximum velocities were near the spray boundary. <span class="hlt">Size</span>-velocity correlations show that the velocity of larger drops did not change with drop <span class="hlt">size</span>. Drop rms velocity <span class="hlt">distributions</span> have double peaks whose radial positions coincide with the maximum mean velocity gradients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AtmRe.107...42B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AtmRe.107...42B"><span id="translatedtitle">Aerosol <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> at Nansen Ice Sheet Antarctica</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Belosi, F.; Contini, D.; Donateo, A.; Santachiara, G.; Prodi, F.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>During austral summer 2006, in the framework of the XXII Italian Antarctic expedition of PNRA (Italian National Program for Research in Antarctica), aerosol particle number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> measurements were performed in the 10-500 range nm over the Nansen Ice Sheet glacier (NIS, 74°30' S, 163°27' E; 85 m a.s.l), a permanently iced branch of the Ross Sea. Observed total particle number concentrations varied between 169 and 1385 cm- 3. A monomodal number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, peaking at about 70 nm with no variation during the day, was observed for continental air mass, high wind speed and low relative humidity. Trimodal number <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> were also observed, in agreement with measurements performed at Aboa station, which is located on the opposite side of the Antarctic continent to the NIS. In this case new particle formation, with subsequent particle growth up to about 30 nm, was observed even if not associated with maritime air masses.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhyA..387.3209M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhyA..387.3209M"><span id="translatedtitle">Production, depreciation and the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of firms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ma, Qi; Chen, Yongwang; Tong, Hui; Di, Zengru</p> <p>2008-05-01</p> <p>Many empirical researches indicate that firm <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> in different industries or countries exhibit some similar characters. Among them the fact that many firm <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> obey power-law especially for the upper end has been mostly discussed. Here we present an agent-based model to describe the evolution of manufacturing firms. Some basic economic behaviors are taken into account, which are production with decreasing marginal returns, preferential allocation of investments, and stochastic depreciation. The model gives a steady <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of firms which obey power-law. The effect of parameters on the power exponent is analyzed. The theoretical results are given based on both the Fokker-Planck equation and the Kesten process. They are well consistent with the numerical results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120014315','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120014315"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Size</span> Frequency <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> of Small Main-Belt Asteroids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Burt, Brian J.; Trilling, David E.; Hines, Dean C.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Hulsebus, Alan</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The asteroid <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> informs us about the formation and composition of the Solar System. We build on our previous work in which we harvest serendipitously observed data of the Taurus region and measure the brightness and <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of Main-belt asteroids. This is accomplished with the highly sensitive MIPS 24 micron channel. We expect to catalog 104 asteroids, giving us a statistically significant data set. Results from this investigation will allow us to characterize the total population of small, Main-belt asteroids. Here we will present new results on the completeness of our study; on the presence of <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> variations with inclination and radial distance in the belt; and early result on other archival fields.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18300081','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18300081"><span id="translatedtitle">Particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and particle <span class="hlt">size</span>-related crystalline silica content in granite quarry dust.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sirianni, Greg; Hosgood, Howard Dean; Slade, Martin D; Borak, Jonathan</p> <p>2008-05-01</p> <p>Previous studies indicate that the relationship between empirically derived particle counts, particle mass determinations, and particle <span class="hlt">size</span>-related silica content are not constant within mines or across mine work tasks. To better understand the variability of particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> and variations in silica content by particle <span class="hlt">size</span> in a granite quarry, exposure surveys were conducted with side-by-side arrays of four closed face cassettes, four cyclones, four personal environmental monitors, and a real-time particle counter. In general, the proportion of silica increased as collected particulate <span class="hlt">size</span> increased, but samples varied in an inconstant way. Significant differences in particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> were seen depending on the extent of ventilation and the nature and activity of work performed. Such variability raises concerns about the adequacy of silica exposure assessments based on only limited numbers of samples or short-term samples.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1978523','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1978523"><span id="translatedtitle">Global Patterns of City <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distributions</span> and Their Fundamental Drivers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Decker, Ethan H.; Kerkhoff, Andrew J.; Moses, Melanie E.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Urban areas and their voracious appetites are increasingly dominating the flows of energy and materials around the globe. Understanding the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and dynamics of urban areas is vital if we are to manage their growth and mitigate their negative impacts on global ecosystems. For over 50 years, city <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> have been assumed to universally follow a power function, and many theories have been put forth to explain what has become known as Zipf's law (the instance where the exponent of the power function equals unity). Most previous studies, however, only include the largest cities that comprise the tail of the <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. Here we show that national, regional and continental city <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span>, whether based on census data or inferred from cluster areas of remotely-sensed nighttime lights, are in fact lognormally <span class="hlt">distributed</span> through the majority of cities and only approach power functions for the largest cities in the <span class="hlt">distribution</span> tails. To explore generating processes, we use a simple model incorporating only two basic human dynamics, migration and reproduction, that nonetheless generates <span class="hlt">distributions</span> very similar to those found empirically. Our results suggest that macroscopic patterns of human settlements may be far more constrained by fundamental ecological principles than more fine-scale socioeconomic factors. PMID:17895975</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009cosc.conf.2222D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009cosc.conf.2222D"><span id="translatedtitle">Rank-<span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> of Notes in Harmonic Music: Hierarchic Shuffling of <span class="hlt">Distributions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Del Río, Manuel Beltrán; Cocho, Germinal</p> <p></p> <p>We trace the rank <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of notes in harmonic music, which on previous works we suggested was much better represented by the Two-parameter, first class Beta <span class="hlt">distribution</span> than the customary power law, to the ranked mixing of <span class="hlt">distributions</span> dictated by the harmonic and instrumental nature of the piece. The same representation is shown to arise in other fields by the same type of ranked shuffling of <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. We include the codon content of intergenic DNA sequences and the ranked <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of <span class="hlt">sizes</span> of trees in a determined area as examples. We show that the fittings proposed increase their accuracy with the number of <span class="hlt">distributions</span> that are mixed and ranked.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830035308&hterms=sampling+distribution&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dsampling%2Bdistribution','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830035308&hterms=sampling+distribution&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dsampling%2Bdistribution"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of multidroplet <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> on icing collection efficiency</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chang, H.-P.; Kimble, K. R.; Frost, W.; Shaw, R. J.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Calculation of collection efficiencies of two-dimensional airfoils for a monodispersed droplet icing cloud and a multidispersed droplet is carried out. Comparison is made with the experimental results reported in the NACA Technical Note series. The results of the study show considerably improved agreement with experiment when multidroplet <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> are employed. The study then investigates the effect of collection efficiency on airborne particle droplet <span class="hlt">size</span> sampling instruments. The biased effect introduced due to sampling from different collection volumes is predicted.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720026862&hterms=1057&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3D%2526%25231057','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720026862&hterms=1057&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3D%2526%25231057"><span id="translatedtitle">Three optical methods for remotely measuring aerosol <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Reagan, J. A.; Herman, B. M.</p> <p>1971-01-01</p> <p>Three optical probing methods for remotely measuring atmospheric aerosol <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> are discussed and contrasted. The particular detection methods which are considered make use of monostatic lidar (laser radar), bistatic lidar, and solar radiometer sensing techniques. The theory of each of these measurement techniques is discussed briefly, and the necessary constraints which must be applied to obtain aerosol <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> information from such measurements are pointed out. Theoretical and/or experimental results are also presented which demonstrate the utility of the three proposed probing methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..458..342P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyA..458..342P"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of Portuguese firms between 2006 and 2012</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pascoal, Rui; Augusto, Mário; Monteiro, A. M.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>This study aims to describe the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of Portuguese firms, as measured by annual sales and total assets, between 2006 and 2012, giving an economic interpretation for the evolution of the <span class="hlt">distribution</span> along the time. Three <span class="hlt">distributions</span> are fitted to data: the lognormal, the Pareto (and as a particular case Zipf) and the Simplified Canonical Law (SCL). We present the main arguments found in literature to justify the use of <span class="hlt">distributions</span> and emphasize the interpretation of SCL coefficients. Methods of estimation include Maximum Likelihood, modified Ordinary Least Squares in log-log scale and Nonlinear Least Squares considering the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. When applying these approaches to Portuguese's firms data, we analyze if the evolution of estimated parameters in both lognormal power and SCL is in accordance with the known existence of a recession period after 2008. This is confirmed for sales but not for assets, leading to the conclusion that the first variable is a best proxy for firm <span class="hlt">size</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860001974','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860001974"><span id="translatedtitle">Particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of several commonly used seeding aerosols</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Crosswy, F. L.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>During the course of experimentation, no solid particle powder could be found which produced an aerosol with a narrow particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> when fluidization was the only flow process used in producing the aerosol. The complication of adding particle <span class="hlt">size</span> fractionation processes to the aerosol generation effort appears to be avoidable. In this regard, a simple sonic orifice is found to be effective in reducing the percentage of agglomerates in the several metal oxide powders tested. Marginally beneficial results are obtained for a 0.5/99.5 percent by weight mixture of the flow agent and metal oxide powder. However, agglomeration is observed to be enhanced when the flow agent percentage is increased to 5 percent. Liquid atomization using the Collison nebulizer as well as a version of the Laskin nozzle resulted in polydispersed aerosols with particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> heavily weighted by the small particle end of the <span class="hlt">size</span> spectrum. The aerosol particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> produced by the vaporization/condensation seeder are closer to the ideal monodispersed aerosol than any of the other aerosols tested. In addition, this seeding approach affords a measure of control over particle <span class="hlt">size</span> and particle production rate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMED41A3429K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMED41A3429K"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Size</span> Evolution and Stochastic Models: Explaining Ostracod <span class="hlt">Size</span> through Probabilistic <span class="hlt">Distributions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krawczyk, M.; Decker, S.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The biovolume of animals has functioned as an important benchmark for measuring evolution throughout geologic time. In our project, we examined the observed average body <span class="hlt">size</span> of ostracods over time in order to understand the mechanism of <span class="hlt">size</span> evolution in these marine organisms. The body <span class="hlt">size</span> of ostracods has varied since the beginning of the Ordovician, where the first true ostracods appeared. We created a stochastic branching model to create possible evolutionary trees of ostracod <span class="hlt">size</span>. Using stratigraphic ranges for ostracods compiled from over 750 genera in the Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, we calculated overall speciation and extinction rates for our model. At each timestep in our model, new lineages can evolve or existing lineages can become extinct. Newly evolved lineages are assigned <span class="hlt">sizes</span> based on their parent genera. We parameterized our model to generate neutral and directional changes in ostracod <span class="hlt">size</span> to compare with the observed data. New <span class="hlt">sizes</span> were chosen via a normal <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, and the neutral model selected new <span class="hlt">sizes</span> differentials centered on zero, allowing for an equal chance of larger or smaller ostracods at each speciation. Conversely, the directional model centered the <span class="hlt">distribution</span> on a negative value, giving a larger chance of smaller ostracods. Our data strongly suggests that the overall direction of ostracod evolution has been following a model that directionally pushes mean ostracod <span class="hlt">size</span> down, shying away from a neutral model. Our model was able to match the magnitude of <span class="hlt">size</span> decrease. Our models had a constant linear decrease while the actual data had a much more rapid initial rate followed by a constant <span class="hlt">size</span>. The nuance of the observed trends ultimately suggests a more complex method of <span class="hlt">size</span> evolution. In conclusion, probabilistic methods can provide valuable insight into possible evolutionary mechanisms determining <span class="hlt">size</span> evolution in ostracods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2832268','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2832268"><span id="translatedtitle">Cell Wall-Degrading Enzymes Enlarge the <span class="hlt">Pore</span> <span class="hlt">Size</span> of Intervessel Pit Membranes in Healthy and Xylella fastidiosa-Infected Grapevines1[C][W][OA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pérez-Donoso, Alonso G.; Sun, Qiang; Roper, M. Caroline; Greve, L. Carl; Kirkpatrick, Bruce; Labavitch, John M.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The pit membrane (PM) is a primary cell wall barrier that separates adjacent xylem water conduits, limiting the spread of xylem-localized pathogens and air embolisms from one conduit to the next. This paper provides a characterization of the <span class="hlt">size</span> of the <span class="hlt">pores</span> in the PMs of grapevine (Vitis vinifera). The PM porosity (PMP) of stems infected with the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was compared with the PMP of healthy stems. Stems were infused with pressurized water and flow rates were determined; gold particles of known <span class="hlt">size</span> were introduced with the water to assist in determining the <span class="hlt">size</span> of PM <span class="hlt">pores</span>. The effect of introducing trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (CDTA), oligogalacturonides, and polygalacturonic acid into stems on water flux via the xylem was also measured. The possibility that cell wall-degrading enzymes could alter the <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">sizes</span>, thus facilitating the ability of X. fastidiosa to cross the PMs, was tested. Two cell wall-degrading enzymes likely to be produced by X. fastidiosa (polygalactuoronase and endo-1,4- β -glucanase) were infused into stems, and particle passage tests were performed to check for changes in PMP. Scanning electron microscopy of control and enzyme-infused stem segments revealed that the combination of enzymes opened holes in PMs, probably explaining enzyme impacts on PMP and how a small X. fastidiosa population, introduced into grapevines by insect vectors, can multiply and spread throughout the vine and cause Pierce's disease. PMID:20107028</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24517509','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24517509"><span id="translatedtitle">Mesoporous TiO₂ thin films exhibiting enhanced thermal stability and controllable <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span>: preparation and photocatalyzed destruction of cationic dyes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Jinshu; Li, Hui; Li, Hongyi; Zou, Chen; Wang, Hong; Li, Dasheng</p> <p>2014-02-12</p> <p>Ordered mesostructured TiO2 thin films were constructed through a method that combined sol-gel with evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA). It was found that the calcination temperature, as well as the type of block copolymer, could vary the TiO2 mesoporous structure. Based on tension stress calculated by the surface energy of crystallites and the compression calculated by interface energy between the crystallites, the thermodynamic study for the sample had been carried out and the critical crystallite <span class="hlt">size</span> expression of the mesoporous film was presented for the prediction of the thermal stability of the mesoporous structure at high temperature. It was also found that varying the mass ratio of templating agent to inorganic precursor could adjust the <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of mesoporous TiO2. The <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> regulating mechanism had been discussed. The sample calcined at 450-500 °C, which had a higher specific surface area and larger <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span>, exhibited higher photocatalyzed destruction capability of Methylene Blue.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20107028','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20107028"><span id="translatedtitle">Cell wall-degrading enzymes enlarge the <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of intervessel pit membranes in healthy and Xylella fastidiosa-infected grapevines.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pérez-Donoso, Alonso G; Sun, Qiang; Roper, M Caroline; Greve, L Carl; Kirkpatrick, Bruce; Labavitch, John M</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>The pit membrane (PM) is a primary cell wall barrier that separates adjacent xylem water conduits, limiting the spread of xylem-localized pathogens and air embolisms from one conduit to the next. This paper provides a characterization of the <span class="hlt">size</span> of the <span class="hlt">pores</span> in the PMs of grapevine (Vitis vinifera). The PM porosity (PMP) of stems infected with the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was compared with the PMP of healthy stems. Stems were infused with pressurized water and flow rates were determined; gold particles of known <span class="hlt">size</span> were introduced with the water to assist in determining the <span class="hlt">size</span> of PM <span class="hlt">pores</span>. The effect of introducing trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (CDTA), oligogalacturonides, and polygalacturonic acid into stems on water flux via the xylem was also measured. The possibility that cell wall-degrading enzymes could alter the <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">sizes</span>, thus facilitating the ability of X. fastidiosa to cross the PMs, was tested. Two cell wall-degrading enzymes likely to be produced by X. fastidiosa (polygalactuoronase and endo-1,4- beta -glucanase) were infused into stems, and particle passage tests were performed to check for changes in PMP. Scanning electron microscopy of control and enzyme-infused stem segments revealed that the combination of enzymes opened holes in PMs, probably explaining enzyme impacts on PMP and how a small X. fastidiosa population, introduced into grapevines by insect vectors, can multiply and spread throughout the vine and cause Pierce's disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24485037','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24485037"><span id="translatedtitle">Improving stability of virus-like particles by ion-exchange chromatographic supports with large <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span>: advantages of gigaporous media beyond enhanced binding capacity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yu, Mengran; Li, Yan; Zhang, Songping; Li, Xiunan; Yang, Yanli; Chen, Yi; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo</p> <p>2014-02-28</p> <p>Limited binding capacity and low recovery of large <span class="hlt">size</span> multi-subunits virus-like particles (VLPs) in conventional agarose-gel based chromatographic supports with small <span class="hlt">pores</span> have long been a bottleneck limiting the large scale purification and application of VLPs. In this study, four anion exchange media including DEAE-Sepharose FF (DEAE-FF), DEAE-Capto, gigaporous DEAE-AP-120nm and DEAE-AP-280nm with average <span class="hlt">pore</span> diameters of 32nm, 20nm, 120nm and 280nm, respectively, were applied for purification of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) VLPs. <span class="hlt">Pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> effects of media on the VLPs adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, dynamic binding capacity (DBC), and recovery were investigated in detail. According to the confocal laser scanning microscopy observation, adsorption of the VLPs in DEAE-FF and DEAE-Capto was mostly confined to a thin shell on the outer surface of the beads, leaving the underlying <span class="hlt">pore</span> space and the binding sites inaccessibly, while the large <span class="hlt">pores</span> in gigaporous media enabled the VLPs to access to the interior <span class="hlt">pore</span> spaces by diffusion transport efficiently. Compared to the most widely used DEAE-FF, gigaporous media DEAE-AP-280nm gained about 12.9 times increase in static adsorption capacity, 8.0 times increase in DBC, and 11.4 times increase in effective <span class="hlt">pore</span> diffusivity. Beyond increasing the binding capacity and enhancing the mass transfer, the gigaporous structure also significantly improved the stability of the VLPs during intensive adsorption-desorption process by lowing the multi-point interaction between the VLPs and binding sites in the <span class="hlt">pores</span>. At 2.0mg/mL-media loading quantity, about 85.5% VLPs were correctly self-assembled after the chromatography with DEAE-AP-280nm media; oppositely about 85.2% VLPs lost their normal assembly with DEAE-FF due to irreversible disassembly. Comparative investigation was made to study the purifying performance of these four chromatographic media for actual VLPs purification from recombinant</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19890566','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19890566"><span id="translatedtitle">Application of bag sampling technique for particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> measurements.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mazaheri, M; Johnson, G R; Morawska, L</p> <p>2009-11-01</p> <p>Bag sampling techniques can be used to temporarily store the aerosol and therefore provide sufficient time to utilize sensitive but slow instrumental techniques for recording detailed particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. Laboratory based assessment of the method was conducted to examine <span class="hlt">size</span> dependant deposition loss coefficients for aerosols held in Velostat bags conforming to a horizontal cylindrical geometry. Deposition losses of NaCl particles in the range of 10 nm to 160 nm were analysed in relation to the bag <span class="hlt">size</span>, storage time, and sampling flow rate. Results of this study suggest that the bag sampling method is most useful for moderately short sampling periods of about 5 minutes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/755617','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/755617"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of gold nanoclusters studied by liquid chromatography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>WILCOXON,JESS P.; MARTIN,JAMES E.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.</p> <p>2000-05-23</p> <p>The authors report high pressure liquid chromatography, (HPLC), and transmission electron microscopy, (TEM), studies of the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of nanosize gold clusters dispersed in organic solvents. These metal clusters are synthesized in inverse micelles at room temperature and those investigated range in diameter from 1--10 nm. HPLC is sensitive enough to discern changes in hydrodynamic volume corresponding to only 2 carbon atoms of the passivating agent or metal core <span class="hlt">size</span> changes of less than 4 {angstrom}. The authors have determined for the first time how the total cluster volume (metal core + passivating organic shell) changes with the <span class="hlt">size</span> of the passivating agent.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4937396','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4937396"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">size-distribution</span> of Earth’s lakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cael, B. B.; Seekell, D. A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Globally, there are millions of small lakes, but a small number of large lakes. Most key ecosystem patterns and processes scale with lake <span class="hlt">size</span>, thus this asymmetry between area and abundance is a fundamental constraint on broad-scale patterns in lake ecology. Nonetheless, descriptions of lake <span class="hlt">size-distributions</span> are scarce and empirical <span class="hlt">distributions</span> are rarely evaluated relative to theoretical predictions. Here we develop expectations for Earth’s lake area-<span class="hlt">distribution</span> based on percolation theory and evaluate these expectations with data from a global lake census. Lake surface areas ≥8.5 km2 are power-law <span class="hlt">distributed</span> with a tail exponent (τ = 1.97) and fractal dimension (d = 1.38), similar to theoretical expectations (τ = 2.05; d = 4/3). Lakes <8.5 km2 are not power-law <span class="hlt">distributed</span>. An independently developed regional lake census exhibits a similar transition and consistency with theoretical predictions. Small lakes deviate from the power-law <span class="hlt">distribution</span> because smaller lakes are more susceptible to dynamical change and topographic behavior at sub-kilometer scales is not self-similar. Our results provide a robust characterization and theoretical explanation for the lake <span class="hlt">size</span>-abundance relationship, and form a fundamental basis for understanding and predicting patterns in lake ecology at broad scales. PMID:27388607</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1264415','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1264415"><span id="translatedtitle">Aerosol mobility imaging for rapid <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wang, Jian; Hering, Susanne Vera; Spielman, Steven Russel; Kuang, Chongai</p> <p>2016-07-19</p> <p>A parallel plate dimensional electrical mobility separator and laminar flow water condensation provide rapid, mobility-based particle <span class="hlt">sizing</span> at concentrations typical of the remote atmosphere. Particles are separated spatially within the electrical mobility separator, enlarged through water condensation, and imaged onto a CCD array. The mobility separation <span class="hlt">distributes</span> particles in accordance with their <span class="hlt">size</span>. The condensation enlarges <span class="hlt">size</span>-separated particles by water condensation while they are still within the gap of the mobility drift tube. Once enlarged the particles are illuminated by a laser. At a pre-selected frequency, typically 10 Hz, the position of all of the individual particles illuminated by the laser are captured by CCD camera. This instantly records the particle number concentration at each position. Because the position is directly related to the particle <span class="hlt">size</span> (or mobility), the particle <span class="hlt">size</span> spectra is derived from the images recorded by the CCD.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012DPS....4450103M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012DPS....4450103M"><span id="translatedtitle">Particle <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> in Saturn’s Ring C</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Marouf, Essam A.; Wong, K.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>Information about particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span> in Saturn’s rings is provided by two complementary types of Cassini radio occultation measurements. The first is differential extinction of three coherent sinusoidal signals transmitted by Cassini through the rings back to Earth (wavelength = 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm, respectively). The differential measurements strongly constraint three parameters of an assumed power-law <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> n(a) = n0 (a/a0)q, amin ≤ a ≤ amax: namely, the power law index q, the minimum radius amin, and reference abundance n0 at reference radius a0. The differential measurements are particularly sensitive to radii in the range 0.1 mm < a < 1 m. Complementing this capability, is a second type of measurements that is particularly sensitive to the larger radii 1 m < a < 20 m and their abundance. Signature of the collective near-forward scattering by these particles is captured in power spectrum measurements as broadened component of width, shape, and strength that depend on ring particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span>, their spatial <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, and observation geometry. Contributions of ring features of width as small several hundred kilometers can be identified and isolated in the measured spectra for a small subset of Cassini orbits of favorable geometry. We use three inverse scattering algorithms (Bayes, constrained linear inversion, generalized singular-value-decomposition) to recover the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of particles of resolved ring features over the <span class="hlt">size</span> range 1 m < a < 20 m without assuming an explicit <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> model. We also investigate consistency of the results with a single power-law model extending over 0.1 mm < a < 20 m and implications to the spatial <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of ring particles normal to the ring plane (vertical ring thickness). We present example results for selected features across Saturn’s Ring C where little evidence for gravitational wakes is present, hence the approaches above are applicable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22313304H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22313304H"><span id="translatedtitle">THE <span class="hlt">SIZE</span>-LUMINOSITY <span class="hlt">DISTRIBUTIONS</span> OF LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huang, Kuang-Han; CANDELS Collaboration</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) comprise the largest sample of star-forming galaxies at z>3 and are crucial to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Their luminosity functions allow us to calculate the cosmic star formation history, and their <span class="hlt">sizes</span> also provide valuable information about the angular momentum content of the galaxies and dark matter halos. However, due to surface brightness dimming effects, galaxies at high redshifts are especially susceptible to selection effects; it is important to understand the selection effects before we can draw conclusions from the statistics of LBG properties. In this work we will investigate the <span class="hlt">size</span>--luminosity <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of LBGs between 3 and 6 with careful modeling of selection effects and measurement errors of <span class="hlt">size</span> and magnitude. Our modeling is more careful than previous studies because it is performed in the two-dimensional <span class="hlt">size</span>--magnitude space. The results of this work show that (1) the effective radii of star-forming galaxies likely evolve as H(z)^{-2/3} at a fixed luminosity, (2) the widths of the LBG <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> are larger than expected from the spin parameter <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of dark matter halos, and (3) the <span class="hlt">size</span>--luminosity relation slopes of LBGs are similar to those for late-type disk galaxies in the local universe. These results favor the disk formation theory put forward by Fall & Efstathiou (1980) if the majority of LBGs are disks, but more observational evidence is needed to confirm the kinematical structure of LBGs as well as to explain the widths of the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMOS31A1963W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMOS31A1963W"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Distributional</span> shifts in <span class="hlt">size</span> structure of phytoplankton community</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Waga, H.; Hirawake, T.; Fujiwara, A.; Nishino, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Suzuki, K.; Takao, S.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Increased understanding on how marine species shift their <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is required for effective conservation of fishery resources under climate change. Previous studies have often predicted <span class="hlt">distributional</span> shifts of fish using satellite derived sea surface temperature (SST). However, SST may not fully represent the changes in species <span class="hlt">distribution</span> through food web structure and as such this remains an open issue due to lack of ecological perspective on energy transfer process in the earlier studies. One of the most important factors in ecosystem is composition of phytoplankton community, and its <span class="hlt">size</span> structure determines energy flow efficiency from base to higher trophic levels. To elucidate spatiotemporal variation in phytoplankton <span class="hlt">size</span> structure, chlorophyll-a <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> (CSD) algorithm was developed using spectral variance of phytoplankton absorption coefficient through principal component analysis. Slope of CSD (CSD slope) indicates <span class="hlt">size</span> structure of phytoplankton community where, strong and weak magnitudes of CSD slope indicate smaller and larger phytoplankton structure, respectively. Shifts in CSD slope and SST were derived as the ratio of temporal trend over the 12-year period (2003-2014) to 2-dimensional spatial gradient and the resulting global median velocity of CSD slope and SST were 0.361 and 0.733 km year-1, respectively. In addition, the velocity of CSD slope monotonically increases with increasing latitude, while relatively complex latitudinal pattern for SST emerged. Moreover, angle of shifts suggest that species are required to shift their <span class="hlt">distribution</span> toward not limited to simple pole-ward migration, and some regions exhibit opposite direction between the velocity of CSD slope and SST. These findings further imply that combined phytoplankton <span class="hlt">size</span> structure and SST may contribute for more accurate prediction of species <span class="hlt">distribution</span> shifts relative to existing studies which only considering variations in thermal niches.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHyd..541..778B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHyd..541..778B"><span id="translatedtitle">Selecting series <span class="hlt">size</span> where the generalized Pareto <span class="hlt">distribution</span> best fits</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ben-Zvi, Arie</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Rates of arrival and magnitudes of hydrologic variables are frequently described by the Poisson and the generalized Pareto (GP) <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. Variations of their goodness-of-fit to nested series are studied here. The variable employed is depth of rainfall events at five stations of the Israel Meteorological Service. Series <span class="hlt">sizes</span> range from about 50 (number of years on records) to about 1000 (total number of recorded events). The goodness-of-fit is assessed by the Anderson-Darling test. Three versions of this test are applied here. These are the regular two-sided test (of which the statistic is designated here by A2), the upper one-sided test (UA2) and the adaptation to the Poisson <span class="hlt">distribution</span> (PA2). Very good fits, with rejection significance levels higher than 0.5 for A2 and higher than 0.25 for PA2, are found for many series of different <span class="hlt">sizes</span>. Values of the shape parameter of the GP <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and of the predicted rainfall depths widely vary with series <span class="hlt">size</span>. Small coefficients of variation are found, at each station, for the 100-year rainfall depths, predicted through the series with very good fit of the GP <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. Therefore, predictions through series of very good fit appear more consistent than through other selections of series <span class="hlt">size</span>. Variations of UA2, with series <span class="hlt">size</span>, are found narrower than those of A2. Therefore, it is advisable to predict through the series of low UA2. Very good fits of the Poisson <span class="hlt">distribution</span> to arrival rates are found for series with low UA2. But, a reversed relation is not found here. Thus, the model of Poissonian arrival rates and GP <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of magnitudes suits here series with low UA2. It is recommended to predict through the series, to which the lowest UA2 is obtained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=129154&keyword=material+AND+handling&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=85837485&CFTOKEN=33195936','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=129154&keyword=material+AND+handling&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=85837485&CFTOKEN=33195936"><span id="translatedtitle">EFFECTS OF LEACHING ON <span class="hlt">PORE</span> <span class="hlt">SIZE</span> <span class="hlt">DISTRIBUTION</span> OF SOLIDIFIED/STABILIZED WASTES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Chemical solidification/stabilization processes are commonly used to immobilize metals in fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludges and to convert these wastes into monolithic or granular materials with better handling properties and reduced permeabilities. his study eva...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3892876','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3892876"><span id="translatedtitle">Embedded NMR Sensor to Monitor Compressive Strength Development and <span class="hlt">Pore</span> <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> in Hydrating Concrete</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Díaz-Díaz, Floriberto; de J. Cano-Barrita, Prisciliano F.; Balcom, Bruce J.; Solís-Nájera, Sergio E.; Rodríguez, Alfredo O.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In cement-based materials porosity plays an important role in determining their mechanical and transport properties. This paper describes an improved low–cost embeddable miniature NMR sensor capable of non-destructively measuring evaporable water loss and porosity refinement in low and high water-to-cement ratio cement-based materials. The sensor consists of two NdFeB magnets having their North and South poles facing each other, separated by 7 mm to allow space for a Faraday cage containing a Teflon tube and an ellipsoidal RF coil. To account for magnetic field changes due to temperature variations, and/or the presence of steel rebars, or frequency variation due to sample impedance, an external tuning circuit was employed. The sensor performance was evaluated by analyzing the transverse magnetization decay obtained with a CPMG measurement from different materials, such as a polymer phantom, fresh white and grey cement pastes with different w/c ratios and concrete with low (0.30) and high (0.6) w/c ratios. The results indicated that the sensor is capable of detecting changes in water content in fresh cement pastes and porosity refinement caused by cement hydration in hardened materials, even if they are prepared with a low w/c ratio (w/c = 0.30). The short lifetime component of the transverse relaxation rate is directly proportional to the compressive strength of concrete determined by destructive testing. The r2 (0.97) from the linear relationship observed is similar to that obtained using T2 data from a commercial Oxford Instruments 12.9 MHz spectrometer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760007558','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760007558"><span id="translatedtitle">Elemental composition and <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of particulates in Cleveland, Ohio</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.; Leibecki, H. F.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>Measurements were made of the elemental particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> at five contrasting urban environments with different source-type <span class="hlt">distributions</span> in Cleveland, Ohio. Air quality conditions ranged from normal to air pollution alert levels. A parallel network of high-volume cascade impactors (5-state) were used for simultaneous sampling on glass fiber surfaces for mass determinations and on Whatman-41 surfaces for elemental analysis by neutron activation for 25 elements. The elemental data are assessed in terms of <span class="hlt">distribution</span> functions and interrelationships and are compared between locations as a function of resultant wind direction in an attempt to relate the findings to sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26087961','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26087961"><span id="translatedtitle">Designing a Highly Active Metal-Free Oxygen Reduction Catalyst in Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Alkaline Fuel Cells: Effects of <span class="hlt">Pore</span> <span class="hlt">Size</span> and Doping-Site Position.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Seonggyu; Choun, Myounghoon; Ye, Youngjin; Lee, Jaeyoung; Mun, Yeongdong; Kang, Eunae; Hwang, Jongkook; Lee, Young-Ho; Shin, Chae-Ho; Moon, Seung-Hyeon; Kim, Soo-Kil; Lee, Eunsung; Lee, Jinwoo</p> <p>2015-08-03</p> <p>To promote the oxygen reduction reaction of metal-free catalysts, the introduction of porous structure is considered as a desirable approach because the structure can enhance mass transport and host many catalytic active sites. However, most of the previous studies reported only half-cell characterization; therefore, studies on membrane electrode assembly (MEA) are still insufficient. Furthermore, the effect of doping-site position in the structure has not been investigated. Here, we report the synthesis of highly active metal-free catalysts in MEAs by controlling <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and doping-site position. Both influence the accessibility of reactants to doping sites, which affects utilization of doping sites and mass-transport properties. Finally, an N,P-codoped ordered mesoporous carbon with a large <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and precisely controlled doping-site position showed a remarkable on-set potential and produced 70% of the maximum power density obtained using Pt/C.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26817778','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26817778"><span id="translatedtitle">Asymmetric competition causes multimodal <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> in spatially structured populations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Velázquez, Jorge; Allen, Robert B; Coomes, David A; Eichhorn, Markus P</p> <p>2016-01-27</p> <p>Plant <span class="hlt">sizes</span> within populations often exhibit multimodal <span class="hlt">distributions</span>, even when all individuals are the same age and have experienced identical conditions. To establish the causes of this, we created an individual-based model simulating the growth of trees in a spatially explicit framework, which was parametrized using data from a long-term study of forest stands in New Zealand. First, we demonstrate that asymmetric resource competition is a necessary condition for the formation of multimodal <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> within cohorts. By contrast, the legacy of small-scale clustering during recruitment is transient and quickly overwhelmed by density-dependent mortality. Complex multi-layered <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> are generated when established individuals are restricted in the spatial domain within which they can capture resources. The number of modes reveals the effective number of direct competitors, while the separation and spread of modes are influenced by distances among established individuals. Asymmetric competition within local neighbourhoods can therefore generate a range of complex <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> within even-aged cohorts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=274016','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=274016"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Size</span> and moisture <span class="hlt">distribution</span> characteristics of walnuts and their components</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The objective of this study was to determine the <span class="hlt">size</span> characteristics and moisture content (MC) <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of individual walnuts and their components, including hulls, shells and kernels under different harvest conditions. Measurements were carried out for three walnut varieties, Tulare, Howard a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4795024','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4795024"><span id="translatedtitle">Asymmetric competition causes multimodal <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> in spatially structured populations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Velázquez, Jorge; Allen, Robert B.; Coomes, David A.; Eichhorn, Markus P.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Plant <span class="hlt">sizes</span> within populations often exhibit multimodal <span class="hlt">distributions</span>, even when all individuals are the same age and have experienced identical conditions. To establish the causes of this, we created an individual-based model simulating the growth of trees in a spatially explicit framework, which was parametrized using data from a long-term study of forest stands in New Zealand. First, we demonstrate that asymmetric resource competition is a necessary condition for the formation of multimodal <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> within cohorts. By contrast, the legacy of small-scale clustering during recruitment is transient and quickly overwhelmed by density-dependent mortality. Complex multi-layered <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> are generated when established individuals are restricted in the spatial domain within which they can capture resources. The number of modes reveals the effective number of direct competitors, while the separation and spread of modes are influenced by distances among established individuals. Asymmetric competition within local neighbourhoods can therefore generate a range of complex <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> within even-aged cohorts. PMID:26817778</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4843649','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4843649"><span id="translatedtitle">Factors influencing the effect <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of adaptive substitutions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Oakley, Christopher G.; Gould, Billie A.; Schemske, Douglas W.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of effect <span class="hlt">sizes</span> of adaptive substitutions has been central to evolutionary biology since the modern synthesis. Early theory proposed that because large-effect mutations have negative pleiotropic consequences, only small-effect mutations contribute to adaptation. More recent theory suggested instead that large-effect mutations could be favoured when populations are far from their adaptive peak. Here we suggest that the <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of effect <span class="hlt">sizes</span> are expected to differ among study systems, reflecting the wide variation in evolutionary forces and ecological conditions experienced in nature. These include selection, mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and other factors such as the degree of pleiotropy, the distance to the phenotypic optimum, whether the optimum is stable or moving, and whether new mutation or standing genetic variation provides the source of adaptive alleles. Our goal is to review how these factors might affect the <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of effect <span class="hlt">sizes</span> and to identify new research directions. Until more theory and empirical work is available, we feel that it is premature to make broad generalizations about the effect <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of adaptive substitutions important in nature. PMID:27053750</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED336411.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED336411.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Sample <span class="hlt">Size</span> Tables, "t" Test, and a Prevalent Psychometric <span class="hlt">Distribution</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sawilowsky, Shlomo S.; Hillman, Stephen B.</p> <p></p> <p>Psychology studies often have low statistical power. Sample <span class="hlt">size</span> tables, as given by J. Cohen (1988), may be used to increase power, but they are based on Monte Carlo studies of relatively "tame" mathematical <span class="hlt">distributions</span>, as compared to psychology data sets. In this study, Monte Carlo methods were used to investigate Type I and Type II…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=methods+AND+soil+AND+analysis&pg=4&id=EJ339422','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=methods+AND+soil+AND+analysis&pg=4&id=EJ339422"><span id="translatedtitle">Tracing Particle <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> Curves Using an Analogue Circuit.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bisschop, F. De; Segaert, O.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Proposes an analog circuit for use in sedimentation analysis of finely divided solid materials. Discusses a method of particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> analysis and provides schematics of the circuit with list of components as well as a discussion about the operation of the circuit. (JM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4752185','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4752185"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of Flocs and Floc <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distributions</span> Using Image Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sun, Siwei; Weber-Shirk, Monroe; Lion, Leonard W.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Abstract A nonintrusive digital imaging process was developed to study particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> created through flocculation and sedimentation. Quantification of particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> under different operating conditions can be of use in the understanding of aggregation mechanisms. This process was calibrated by measuring standardized polystyrene particles of known <span class="hlt">size</span> and was utilized to count and measure individual kaolin clay particles as well as aggregates formed by coagulation with polyaluminum chloride and flocculation. Identification of out-of-focus flocs was automated with LabVIEW and used to remove them from the database that was analyzed. The particle diameter of the test suspension of kaolinite clay was measured to be 7.7 ± 3.8 μm and a linear relationship was obtained between turbidity and the concentration of clay particles determined by imaging. The analysis technique was applied to characterize flocs and floc particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> as a function of coagulant dose. Removal of flocs by sedimentation was characterized by imaging, and the negative logarithm of the fraction of turbidity remaining after settling had a linear relationship with the logarithm of aluminum dose. The maximum floc <span class="hlt">size</span> observed in the settled water was less than 120 μm, which was in accordance with the value predicted by a model for the capture velocity of the experimental tube settler of 0.21 mm/s. PMID:26909006</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26909006','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26909006"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of Flocs and Floc <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distributions</span> Using Image Analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sun, Siwei; Weber-Shirk, Monroe; Lion, Leonard W</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A nonintrusive digital imaging process was developed to study particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> created through flocculation and sedimentation. Quantification of particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> under different operating conditions can be of use in the understanding of aggregation mechanisms. This process was calibrated by measuring standardized polystyrene particles of known <span class="hlt">size</span> and was utilized to count and measure individual kaolin clay particles as well as aggregates formed by coagulation with polyaluminum chloride and flocculation. Identification of out-of-focus flocs was automated with LabVIEW and used to remove them from the database that was analyzed. The particle diameter of the test suspension of kaolinite clay was measured to be 7.7 ± 3.8 μm and a linear relationship was obtained between turbidity and the concentration of clay particles determined by imaging. The analysis technique was applied to characterize flocs and floc particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> as a function of coagulant dose. Removal of flocs by sedimentation was characterized by imaging, and the negative logarithm of the fraction of turbidity remaining after settling had a linear relationship with the logarithm of aluminum dose. The maximum floc <span class="hlt">size</span> observed in the settled water was less than 120 μm, which was in accordance with the value predicted by a model for the capture velocity of the experimental tube settler of 0.21 mm/s.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14641903','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14641903"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Distribution</span> of arsenic and copper in sediment <span class="hlt">pore</span> water: an ecological risk assessment case study for offshore drilling waste discharges.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sadiq, Rehan; Husain, Tahir; Veitch, Brian; Bose, Neil</p> <p>2003-12-01</p> <p>Due to the hydrophobic nature of synthetic based fluids (SBFs), drilling cuttings are not very dispersive in the water column and settle down close to the disposal site. Arsenic and copper are two important toxic heavy metals, among others, found in the drilling waste. In this article, the concentrations of heavy metals are determined using a steady state "aquivalence-based" fate model in a probabilistic mode. Monte Carlo simulations are employed to determine <span class="hlt">pore</span> water concentrations. A hypothetical case study is used to determine the water quality impacts for two discharge options: 4% and 10% attached SBFs, which correspond to the best available technology option and the current discharge practice in the U.S. offshore. The exposure concentration (CE) is a predicted environmental concentration, which is adjusted for exposure probability and bioavailable fraction of heavy metals. The response of the ecosystem (RE) is defined by developing an empirical <span class="hlt">distribution</span> function of predicted no-effect concentration. The pollutants' <span class="hlt">pore</span> water concentrations within the radius of 750 m are estimated and cumulative <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of risk quotient (RQ=CE/RE) are developed to determine the probability of RQ greater than 1.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989PhDT........62R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989PhDT........62R"><span id="translatedtitle">The Detection and Measurement of the Activity <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distributions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ramamurthi, Mukund</p> <p></p> <p>The infiltration of radon into the indoor environment may cause the exposure of the public to excessive amounts of radioactivity and has spurred renewed research interest over the past several years into the occurrence and properties of radon and its decay products in indoor air. The public health risks posed by the inhalation and subsequent lung deposition of the decay products of Rn-222 have particularly warranted the study of their diffusivity and attachment to molecular cluster aerosols in the ultrafine particle <span class="hlt">size</span> range (0.5-5 nm) and to accumulation mode aerosols. In this research, a system for the detection and measurement of the activity <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> and concentration levels of radon decay products in indoor environments has been developed. The system is microcomputer-controlled and involves a combination of multiple wire screen sampler -detector units operated in parallel. The detection of the radioactivity attached to the aerosol sampled in these units permits the determination of the radon daughter activity -weighted <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> and concentration levels in indoor air on a semi-continuous basis. The development of the system involved the design of the detection and measurement system, its experimental characterization and testing in a radon-aerosol chamber, and numerical studies for the optimization of the design and operating parameters of the system. Several concepts of utility to aerosol <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> measurement methods sampling the ultrafine cluster <span class="hlt">size</span> range evolved from this study, and are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The optimized multiple wire screen (Graded Screen Array) system described in this dissertation is based on these concepts. The principal facet of the system is its ability to make unattended measurements of activity <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> and concentration levels of radon decay products on a semi-continuous basis. Thus, the capability of monitoring changes in the activity concentrations and <span class="hlt">size</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18956036','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18956036"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular tectonics: control of <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and polarity in 3-D hexagonal coordination networks based on porphyrins and a zinc cation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kühn, Elisabeth; Bulach, Véronique; Hosseini, Mir Wais</p> <p>2008-11-07</p> <p>In the crystalline phase, porphyrin derivatives based on two 4-pyridyl units at the 5 and 15 meso positions and two 4-aryl moieties bearing various groups (CN, OMe, OH and CF(3)) at the 10 and 20 meso positions lead, in the presence of a zinc dication, to the formation of robust 3-D networks presenting hexagonal channels: both the <span class="hlt">size</span> and the polarity of the <span class="hlt">pores</span> were tuned by the nature of the substituents attached to the two aryl groups.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1175467','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1175467"><span id="translatedtitle">Isoreticular metal-organic frameworks, process for forming the same, and systematic design of <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and functionality therein, with application for gas storage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Yaghi, Omar M.; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Li, Hailian; Kim, Jaheon; Rosi, Nathaniel</p> <p>2005-08-16</p> <p>An isoreticular metal-organic framework (IRMOF) and method for systematically forming the same. The method comprises the steps of dissolving at least one source of metal cations and at least one organic linking compound in a solvent to form a solution; and crystallizing the solution under predetermined conditions to form a predetermined IRMOF. At least one of functionality, dimension, <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and free volume of the IRMOF is substantially determined by the organic linking compound.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhCS.313a2006G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhCS.313a2006G"><span id="translatedtitle">Growing axons analysis by using Granulometric <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gonzalez, Mariela A.; Ballarin, Virginia L.; Rapacioli, Melina; Celín, A. R.; Sánchez, V.; Flores, V.</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>Neurite growth (neuritogenesis) in vitro is a common methodology in the field of developmental neurobiology. Morphological analyses of growing neurites are usually difficult because their thinness and low contrast usually prevent to observe clearly their shape, number, length and spatial orientation. This paper presents the use of the granulometric <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in order to automatically obtain information about the shape, <span class="hlt">size</span> and spatial orientation of growing axons in tissue cultures. The results here presented show that the granulometric <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> results in a very useful morphological tool since it allows the automatic detection of growing axons and the precise characterization of a relevant parameter indicative of the axonal growth spatial orientation such as the quantification of the angle of deviation of the growing direction. The developed algorithms automatically quantify this orientation by facilitating the analysis of these images, which is important given the large number of images that need to be processed for this type of study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040084634','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040084634"><span id="translatedtitle">Turbulent Concentration of Chondrules: <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> and Multifractal Scaling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Hogan, Robert C.; Paque, Julie M.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Size</span>-selective concentration of particles in 3D turbulence may be related to collection of chondrules and other constituents into primitive bodies in a weakly turbulent protoplanetary nebula. In the terrestrial planet region, both the characteristic <span class="hlt">size</span> and narrow <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of chondrules are explained, whereas "fluffier" particles would be concentrated in lower density, or more intensely turbulent, regions of the nebula. The spatial <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of concentrated particle density obeys multifractal scaling, suggesting a dose tie to the turbulent cascade process. This scaling behavior allows predictions of the concentration probabilities to be made in the protoplanetary nebula, which are so large (> 10(exp 3) - 10(exp 4)) that further studies must be made of the role of mass loading.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JGRA..112.2102F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JGRA..112.2102F"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Size</span> and energy <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.; Chao, J. K.</p> <p>2007-02-01</p> <p>In observations from 1995 to 2001 from the Wind spacecraft, 144 interplanetary magnetic flux ropes were identified in the solar wind around 1 AU. Their durations vary from tens of minutes to tens of hours. These magnetic flux ropes include many small- and intermediate-<span class="hlt">sized</span> structures and display a continuous <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in <span class="hlt">size</span>. Energies of these flux ropes are estimated and it is found that the <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of their energies is a good power law spectrum with an index ~-0.87. The possible relationship between them and solar eruptions is discussed. It is suggested that like interplanetary magnetic clouds are interplanetary coronal mass ejections, the small- and intermediate-<span class="hlt">sized</span> interplanetary magnetic flux ropes are the interplanetary manifestations of small coronal mass ejections produced in small solar eruptions. However, these small coronal mass ejections are too weak to appear clearly in the coronagraph observations as an ordinary coronal mass ejection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70012762','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70012762"><span id="translatedtitle">Lognormal field <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> as a consequence of economic truncation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Attanasi, E.D.; Drew, L.J.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The assumption of lognormal (parent) field <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> has for a long time been applied to resource appraisal and evaluation of exploration strategy by the petroleum industry. However, frequency <span class="hlt">distributions</span> estimated with observed data and used to justify this hypotheses are conditional. Examination of various observed field <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> across basins and over time shows that such <span class="hlt">distributions</span> should be regarded as the end result of an economic filtering process. Commercial discoveries depend on oil and gas prices and field development costs. Some new fields are eliminated due to location, depths, or water depths. This filtering process is called economic truncation. Economic truncation may occur when predictions of a discovery process are passed through an economic appraisal model. We demonstrate that (1) economic resource appraisals, (2) forecasts of levels of petroleum industry activity, and (3) expected benefits of developing and implementing cost reducing technology are sensitive to assumptions made about the nature of that portion of (parent) field <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> subject to economic truncation. ?? 1985 Plenum Publishing Corporation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1328320-relationship-between-pore-size-reversible-irreversible-immobilization-ionic-liquid-electrolytes-porous-carbon-under-applied-electric-potential','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1328320-relationship-between-pore-size-reversible-irreversible-immobilization-ionic-liquid-electrolytes-porous-carbon-under-applied-electric-potential"><span id="translatedtitle">Relationship between <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and reversible and irreversible immobilization of ionic liquid electrolytes in porous carbon under applied electric potential</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Mahurin, Shannon M.; Mamontov, Eugene; Thompson, Matthew W.; ...</p> <p>2016-10-04</p> <p>Transport of electrolytes in nanoporous carbon-based electrodes largely defines the function and performance of energy storage devices. Here, using molecular dynamics simulation and quasielastic neutron scattering, we investigate the microscopic dynamics of a prototypical ionic liquid electrolyte, [emim][Tf2N], under applied electric potential in carbon materials with 6.7 nm and 1.5 nm <span class="hlt">pores</span>. The simulations demonstrate the formation of dense layers of counter-ions near the charged surfaces, which is reversible when the polarity is reversed. In the experiment, the ions immobilized near the surface manifest themselves in the elastic scattering signal. The experimentally observed ion immobilization near the wall is fullymore » reversible as a function of the applied electric potential in the 6.7 nm, but not in the 1.5 nm nanopores. In the latter case, remarkably, the first application of the electric potential leads to apparently irreversible immobilization of cations or anions, depending on the polarity, near the carbon <span class="hlt">pore</span> walls. This unexpectedly demonstrates that in carbon electrode materials with the small <span class="hlt">pores</span>, which are optimal for energy storage applications, the polarity of the electrical potential applied for the first time after the introduction of an ionic liquid electrolyte may define the decoration of the small <span class="hlt">pore</span> walls with ions for prolonged periods of time and possibly for the lifetime of the electrode.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1328320','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1328320"><span id="translatedtitle">Relationship between <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and reversible and irreversible immobilization of ionic liquid electrolytes in porous carbon under applied electric potential</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mahurin, Shannon M.; Mamontov, Eugene; Thompson, Matthew W.; Zhang, Pengfei; Turner, C. Heath; Cummings, Peter T.; Dai, Sheng</p> <p>2016-10-04</p> <p>Transport of electrolytes in nanoporous carbon-based electrodes largely defines the function and performance of energy storage devices. Here, using molecular dynamics simulation and quasielastic neutron scattering, we investigate the microscopic dynamics of a prototypical ionic liquid electrolyte, [emim][Tf<sub>2</sub>N], under applied electric potential in carbon materials with 6.7 nm and 1.5 nm <span class="hlt">pores</span>. The simulations demonstrate the formation of dense layers of counter-ions near the charged surfaces, which is reversible when the polarity is reversed. In the experiment, the ions immobilized near the surface manifest themselves in the elastic scattering signal. The experimentally observed ion immobilization near the wall is fully reversible as a function of the applied electric potential in the 6.7 nm, but not in the 1.5 nm nanopores. In the latter case, remarkably, the first application of the electric potential leads to apparently irreversible immobilization of cations or anions, depending on the polarity, near the carbon <span class="hlt">pore</span> walls. This unexpectedly demonstrates that in carbon electrode materials with the small <span class="hlt">pores</span>, which are optimal for energy storage applications, the polarity of the electrical potential applied for the first time after the introduction of an ionic liquid electrolyte may define the decoration of the small <span class="hlt">pore</span> walls with ions for prolonged periods of time and possibly for the lifetime of the electrode.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApPhL.109n3111M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApPhL.109n3111M"><span id="translatedtitle">Relationship between <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and reversible and irreversible immobilization of ionic liquid electrolytes in porous carbon under applied electric potential</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mahurin, Shannon M.; Mamontov, Eugene; Thompson, Matthew W.; Zhang, Pengfei; Turner, C. Heath; Cummings, Peter T.; Dai, Sheng</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Transport of electrolytes in nanoporous carbon-based electrodes largely defines the function and performance of energy storage devices. Using molecular dynamics simulation and quasielastic neutron scattering, we investigate the microscopic dynamics of a prototypical ionic liquid electrolyte, [emim][Tf2N], under applied electric potential in carbon materials with 6.7 nm and 1.5 nm <span class="hlt">pores</span>. The simulations demonstrate the formation of dense layers of counter-ions near the charged surfaces, which is reversible when the polarity is reversed. In the experiment, the ions immobilized near the surface manifest themselves in the elastic scattering signal. The experimentally observed ion immobilization near the wall is fully reversible as a function of the applied electric potential in the 6.7 nm, but not in the 1.5 nm nanopores. In the latter case, remarkably, the first application of the electric potential leads to apparently irreversible immobilization of cations or anions, depending on the polarity, near the carbon <span class="hlt">pore</span> walls. This unexpectedly demonstrates that in carbon electrode materials with the small <span class="hlt">pores</span>, which are optimal for energy storage applications, the polarity of the electrical potential applied for the first time after the introduction of an ionic liquid electrolyte may define the decoration of the small <span class="hlt">pore</span> walls with ions for prolonged periods of time and possibly for the lifetime of the electrode.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70037033','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70037033"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> and failure initiation of submarine and subaerial landslides</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>ten Brink, U.S.; Barkan, R.; Andrews, B.D.; Chaytor, J.D.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Landslides are often viewed together with other natural hazards, such as earthquakes and fires, as phenomena whose <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> obeys an inverse power law. Inverse power law <span class="hlt">distributions</span> are the result of additive avalanche processes, in which the final <span class="hlt">size</span> cannot be predicted at the onset of the disturbance. Volume and area <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of submarine landslides along the U.S. Atlantic continental slope follow a lognormal <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and not an inverse power law. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generated area <span class="hlt">distributions</span> of submarine landslides that show a characteristic <span class="hlt">size</span> and with few smaller and larger areas, which can be described well by a lognormal <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. To generate these <span class="hlt">distributions</span> we assumed that the area of slope failure depends on earthquake magnitude, i.e., that failure occurs simultaneously over the area affected by horizontal ground shaking, and does not cascade from nucleating points. Furthermore, the downslope movement of displaced sediments does not entrain significant amounts of additional material. Our simulations fit well the area <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of landslide sources along the Atlantic continental margin, if we assume that the slope has been subjected to earthquakes of magnitude ??? 6.3. Regions of submarine landslides, whose area <span class="hlt">distributions</span> obey inverse power laws, may be controlled by different generation mechanisms, such as the gradual development of fractures in the headwalls of cliffs. The observation of a large number of small subaerial landslides being triggered by a single earthquake is also compatible with the hypothesis that failure occurs simultaneously in many locations within the area affected by ground shaking. Unlike submarine landslides, which are found on large uniformly-dipping slopes, a single large landslide scarp cannot form on land because of the heterogeneous morphology and short slope distances of tectonically-active subaerial regions. However, for a given earthquake magnitude, the total area</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10146781','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10146781"><span id="translatedtitle">Relative permeability and the microscopic <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of wetting and nonwetting phases in the <span class="hlt">pore</span> space of Berea sandstone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Schlueter, E.M.; Cook, N.G.W. |; Witherspoon, P.A.; Myer, L.R.</p> <p>1994-04-01</p> <p>Experiments to study relative permeabilities of a partially saturated rock have been carried out in Berea sandstone using fluids that can be solidified in place. The effective permeability of the spaces not occupied by the wetting fluid (paraffin wax) or the nonwetting fluid (Wood`s metal), have been measured at various saturations after solidifying each of the phases. The tests were conducted on Berea sandstone samples that had an absolute permeability of about 600 md. The shape of the laboratory-derived relative permeability vs. saturation curves measured with the other phase solidified conforms well with typical curves obtained using conventional experimental methods. The corresponding wetting and nonwetting fluid <span class="hlt">distributions</span> at different saturations are presented and analyzed in light of the role of the <span class="hlt">pore</span> structure in the invasion process, and their impact on relative permeability and capillary pressure. Irreducible wetting and nonwetting phase fluid <span class="hlt">distributions</span> are studied. The effect of clay minerals on permeability is also assessed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3381740','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3381740"><span id="translatedtitle">Increasing the <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">sizes</span> of bone-mimetic electrospun scaffolds comprised of polycaprolactone, collagen I and hydroxyapatite to enhance cell infiltration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Phipps, Matthew C.; Clem, William C.; Grunda, Jessica M.; Clines, Gregory A.; Bellis, Susan L.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Bone-mimetic electrospun scaffolds consisting of polycaprolactone (PCL), collagen I and nanoparticulate hydroxyapatite (HA) have previously been shown to support the adhesion, integrin-related signaling and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), suggesting these matrices serve as promising degradable substrates for osteoregeneration. However, the small <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">sizes</span> in electrospun scaffolds hinder cell infiltration in vitro and tissue-ingrowth into the scaffold in vivo, limiting their clinical potential. In this study, three separate techniques were evaluated for their capability to increase the <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of the PCL/col I/nanoHA scaffolds: limited protease digestion, decreasing the fiber packing density during electro-spinning, and inclusion of sacrificial fibers of the water-soluble polymer PEO. The PEO sacrificial fiber approach was found to be the most effective in increasing scaffold <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span>. Furthermore, the use of sacrificial fibers promoted increased MSC infiltration into the scaffolds, as well as greater infiltration of endogenous cells within bone upon placement of scaffolds within calvarial organ cultures. These collective findings support the use of sacrificial PEO fibers as a means to increase the porosity of complex, bone-mimicking electrospun scaffolds, thereby enhancing tissue regenerative processes that depend upon cell infiltration, such as vascularization and replacement of the scaffold with native bone tissue. PMID:22014462</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25546836','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25546836"><span id="translatedtitle">A feasible way for the fabrication of single walled carbon nanotube/polypyrrole composite film with controlled <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> for neural interface.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xiao, Hengyang; Zhang, Min; Xiao, Yinghong; Che, Jianfei</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/polypyrrole (PPy) composite films with controlled <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> and strong adhesive force was prepared as electrode material for improving the performance of neural electrodes. SWNT film with controlled <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> was first fabricated through electrophoresis with a merit that the <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> can be well tuned by changing the concentration of metal ions in the electrolyte. An ultrathin conformal PPy layer around SWNT bundles in a uniform manner within the entire films was subsequently obtained by pulsed electropolymerization. The adhesion of the SWNT coated electrodes was tested by repeatedly inserting the coated electrode into agar gel to demonstrate the better adhesive force of the coating. Electrochemical results showed that the SWNT/PPy coated metal electrodes have much lower impedance and higher charge storage capacity than the bare metal substrates. Further in vitro culture of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells revealed that the porous SWNT/PPy composite film was non-toxic and well supported the growth of neurons. We demonstrate that the prepared composite film has potential applications in chronic implantable neural electrodes for neural stimulation and recording.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780008637','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780008637"><span id="translatedtitle">Particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> and the vertical <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of suspended matter in the upwelling region off Oregon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kitchen, J. C.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Various methods of presenting and mathematically describing particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> are explained and evaluated. The hyperbolic <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is found to be the most practical but the more complex characteristic vector analysis is the most sensitive to changes in the shape of the particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. A method for determining onshore-offshore flow patterns from the <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of particulates was presented. A numerical model of the vertical structure of two <span class="hlt">size</span> classes of particles was developed. The results show a close similarity to the observed <span class="hlt">distributions</span> but overestimate the particle concentration by forty percent. This was attributed to ignoring grazing by zooplankton. Sensivity analyses showed the <span class="hlt">size</span> preference was most responsive to the maximum specific growth rates and nutrient half saturation constants. The verical structure was highly dependent on the eddy diffusivity followed closely by the growth terms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/922100','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/922100"><span id="translatedtitle">Particle-<span class="hlt">Size-Distribution</span> of Nevada Test Site Soils</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Spriggs, G; Ray-Maitra, A</p> <p>2007-09-17</p> <p>The amount of each <span class="hlt">size</span> particle in a given soil is called the particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> (PSD), and the way it feels to the touch is called the soil texture. Sand, silt, and clay are the three particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span> of mineral material found in soils. Sand is the largest <span class="hlt">sized</span> particle and it feels gritty; silt is medium <span class="hlt">sized</span> and it feels floury; and clay is the smallest and if feels sticky. Knowing the particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of a soil sample helps to understand many soil properties such as how much water, heat, and nutrients the soil will hold, how fast water and heat will move through the soil, and what kind of structure, bulk density and consistence the soil will have. Furthermore, the native particle-<span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of the soil in the vicinity of ground zero of a nuclear detonation plays a major role in nuclear fallout. For soils that have a high-sand content, the near-range fallout will be relatively high and the far-range fallout will be relatively light. Whereas, for soils that have a high-silt and high-clay content, the near-range fallout will be significantly lower and the far-range fallout will be significantly higher. As part of a program funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has recently measured the PSDs from the various major areas at the Nevada Test Site where atmospheric detonations and/or nuclear weapon safety tests were performed back in the 50s and 60s. The purpose of this report is to document those results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10957817','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10957817"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of mist generated during metal machining.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thornburg, J; Leith, D</p> <p>2000-08-01</p> <p>Mist generated by machining processes is formed by three mechanisms: impaction, centrifugal force, and evaporation/condensation. This study characterized the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of soluble and mineral oil mists that resulted from these formation mechanisms. Salient parameters influencing the particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> also were identified. Variables investigated included metalworking fluid and machining characteristics. The <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of the mist generated on a small lathe by each mechanism was measured using an Aerosizer LD. For impaction, only the mineral oil viscosity influenced the mass median diameter of the mist. No parameter affected the geometric standard deviation. High-viscosity mineral oil mist had a mass median diameter of 6.1 microns and a geometric standard deviation of 2.0. Low-viscosity mineral oil mist had a mass median diameter of 21.9 microns and a geometric standard deviation of 2.2. The mass median diameter of the mist generated by centrifugal force depended on the type of metalworking fluid, fluid flow, and rotational speed of the lathe. Mass median diameters for low-viscosity mineral oil mist ranged from 5 to 110 microns. Mass median diameters for soluble oil mist varied between 40 and 80 microns. The average geometric standard deviation was 2.4, and was not affected by any parameter. The mass median diameter and geometric standard deviation of the mist generated by evaporation/condensation varied with the type of metalworking fluid. The mineral oil mist and soluble oil mist mass median diameters were 2.1 microns and 3.2 microns, respectively. No machining or fluid parameter was important because the mist <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> depended on the rate of condensation, coagulation processes, and the dynamics of the apparatus. Using the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> data from all three mechanisms, the estimated inhalable, thoracic, and respirable fractions of the total mass generated for each metalworking fluid were 60 percent, 12 percent, and 8 percent</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014acm..conf....5A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014acm..conf....5A"><span id="translatedtitle">Transneptunians as probes of planet building: The Plutino <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alexandersen, M.; Gladman, B.; Kavelaars, J.; Petit, J.; Gwyn, S.</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Planetesimals that formed during planet formation are the building blocks of giant planet cores; some are preserved as large transneptunian objects (TNOs). Previous work has shown steep power-law <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> for TNOs of diameters > 100 km. Recent results claim a dramatic roll-over or divot in the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of Neptunian Trojans (1:1 resonance with Neptune) and scattering TNOs, with a significant lack of intermediate-<span class="hlt">size</span> D < 100 km planetesimals [1,2,3]. One theoretical explanation for this is that planetesimals were born big, skipping the intermediate <span class="hlt">sizes</span>, contrary to the expectation of bottom-up planetesimal formation. Exploration of the TNO <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> requires more precisely calibrated detections in order to improve statistics on these results. We have searched a 32 sq.deg. area near RA=2 hr to an r-band limiting magnitude of m_r=24.6 using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. This coverage was near the Neptunian L4 region to maximise our detection rate, as this is where Neptunian Trojans reside and where Plutinos (and several other resonant populations) come to perihelion. This program successfully detected and tracked 77 TNOs and Centaurs for up to 17 months, giving us both the high-quality orbits and the quantitative detection efficiency needed for precise modelling. Among our detections were one Uranian Trojan, two Neptunian Trojans, 18 Plutinos (3:2 resonance with Neptune) and other resonant objects. We test TNO <span class="hlt">size</span> and orbital-<span class="hlt">distribution</span> models using a survey simulator, which simulates the detectability of model objects, accounting for the survey biases. We show that the Plutino <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> cannot continue as a rising power law past H_r˜8.3 (equivalent to ˜100 km). A single power law is found rejectable at 99.5 % confidence, and a knee (a broken power law to a softer slope) is also rejectable. A divot (sudden drop in number of objects at a transition <span class="hlt">size</span>), with parameters found independently for scattering TNOs by Shankman</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ApSS..254.3993Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ApSS..254.3993Z"><span id="translatedtitle">Preparation of Ni-doped carbon nanospheres with different surface chemistry and controlled <span class="hlt">pore</span> structure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zubizarreta, L.; Arenillas, A.; Pis, J. J.</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>In classic carbon supports is very difficult to control <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span>, <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, and surface chemical properties at the same time. In this work microporous carbons derived from furfuryl alcohol are used as support to prepare Ni-doped carbon materials. The N 2 flow rate used during the carbonisation process of the precursor influences on the <span class="hlt">size</span> of the nanospheres obtained but not in their textural properties. Microporous carbon nanospheres have been synthesised with a narrow <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> centred in 5.5 Å. The surface chemistry of these materials can be easily modified by different treatments without detriment of the <span class="hlt">pore</span> structure of the doped carbon nanospheres.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5543117','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5543117"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of the Malvern optical particle monitor. [Volumetric <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Anderson, R. J.; Johnson, E.</p> <p>1983-07-01</p> <p>The Malvern 2200/3300 Particle Sizer is a laser-based optical particle <span class="hlt">sizing</span> device which utilizes the principle of Fraunhofer Diffraction as the means of particle <span class="hlt">size</span> measurement. The instrument is designed to analyze particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span> in the range of 1 to 1800 microns diameter through a selection of lenses for the receiving optics. It is not a single-particle counter but rather an ensemble averager over the <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of particles present in the measuring volume. Through appropriate measurement techniques, the instrument can measure the volumetric <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of: solids in gas or liquid suspension; liquid droplets in gas or other immiscible liquids; and, gas bubbles in liquid. (Malvern Handbook, Version 1.5). This report details a limited laboratory evaluation of the Malvern system to determine its operational characteristics, limitations, and accuracy. This investigation focused on relatively small particles in the range of 5 to 150 microns. Primarily, well characterized particles of coal in a coal and water mixture were utilized, but a selection of naturally occurring, industrially generated, and standard samples (i.e., glass beads) wer also tested. The characteristic <span class="hlt">size</span> parameter from the Malvern system for each of these samples was compared with the results of a Coulter particle counter (Model TA II) analysis to determine the <span class="hlt">size</span> measurement accuracy. Most of the particulate samples were suspended in a liquid media (water or isoton, plus a dispersant) for the <span class="hlt">size</span> characterization. Specifically, the investigations contained in this report fall into four categories: (a) Sample-to-lense distance and sample concentration studies, (b) studies testing the applicability to aerosols, (c) tests of the manufacturer supplied software, and (d) <span class="hlt">size</span> measurement comparisons with the results of Coulter analysis. 5 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24113292','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24113292"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">pore</span> scale investigation of crude oil <span class="hlt">distribution</span> and removal from homogeneous porous media during surfactant-induced remediation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ghosh, Jaydeep; Tick, Geoffrey R</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">pore</span>-scale study was conducted to understand interfacial processes contributing to the removal of crude oils from a homogeneous porous medium during surfactant-induced remediation. Synchrotron X-ray microtomography (SXM) was used to obtain high-resolution three-dimensional images of the two-fluid-phase oil/water system, and quantify temporal changes in oil blob <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, blob morphology, and blob surface area before and after sequential surfactant flooding events. The reduction of interfacial tension in conjunction with the sufficient increase in viscous forces as a result of surfactant flushing was most likely responsible for mobilization and recovery of the two lighter oil fractions. However, corresponding increases in viscous forces as a result of a reduction of interfacial tension were insufficient to initiate and maintain the displacement (recovery) of the heavy crude oil fraction during surfactant flushing. In contrast to the heavy oil system, changes in trapping number for the lighter fraction crude oils were sufficient to initiate mobilization as a result of surfactant flushing. Both light and medium oil fractions showed an increase in the number of blobs and total blob surface area, and a reduction in the total volume after 2 <span class="hlt">pore</span> volumes (PVs) of surfactant flooding. This increase in surface area was attributed to the change in blob morphology from spherical to more complex non-spherical ganglia shape characteristics. Moreover, the increase in the number of oil blobs from larger to smaller particles after surfactant flushing may have contributed to the greater cumulative oil surface area. Complete recovery of light and medium oil fractions resulted after 5 PVs of surfactant flooding, whereas the displacement efficiency of heavy-oil fraction was severely limited, even after extended periods of flushing. The results of these experiments demonstrate the utility of SXM for quantifying <span class="hlt">pore</span>-scale interfacial characteristics for specific crude</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2110258','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2110258"><span id="translatedtitle">Immunocytochemical localization of the major polypeptides of the nuclear <span class="hlt">pore</span> complex-lamina fraction. Interphase and mitotic <span class="hlt">distribution</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>This laboratory has previously isolated a fraction from rat liver nuclei consisting of nuclear <span class="hlt">pore</span> complexes associated with the proteinaceous lamina which underlies the inner nuclear membrane. Using protein eluted from sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gels, we have prepared antibodies in chickens to each of the three predominant <span class="hlt">pore</span> complex- lamina bands. Ouchterlony double diffusion analysis shows that each of these individual bands cross-reacts strongly with all three antisera. In immunofluorescence localization performed on tissue culture cells with these antibodies, we obtain a pattern of intense staining at the periphery of the interphase nucleus, with little or no cytoplasmic reaction. Electron microscope immunoperoxidase staining of rat liver nuclei with these antibodies labels exclusively the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, reaction occurs in areas which contain the lamina, but not at the <span class="hlt">pore</span> complexes. While our isolation procedure extracts the internal contents of nuclei completely, semiquantitative Ouchterlony analysis shows that it releases negligible amounts of these lamina antigens. Considered together, our results indicate that these three bands represent major components of a peripheral nuclear lamina, and are not structural elements of an internal "nuclear protein matrix." Fluorescence microscopy shows that the perinuclear interphase localization of these lamina proteins undergoes dramatic changes during mitosis. Concomitant with nuclear envelope disassembly in prophase, these antigens assume a diffuse localization throughout the cell. This <span class="hlt">distribution</span> persists until telophase, when the antigens become progressively and completely localized at the surface of the daughter chromosome masses. We propose that the lamina is a biological polymer which can undergo reversible disassembly during mitosis. PMID:102651</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24155124','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24155124"><span id="translatedtitle">Fabrication of three-dimensional porous scaffolds with controlled filament orientation and large <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> via an improved E-jetting technique.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Jin Lan; Cai, Yan Li; Guo, Yi Lin; Fuh, Jerry Ying Hsi; Sun, Jie; Hong, Geok Soon; Lam, Ruey Na; Wong, Yoke San; Wang, Wilson; Tay, Bee Yen; Thian, Eng San</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Biodegradable polymeric scaffolds have been widely used in tissue engineering as a platform for cell proliferation and subsequent tissue regeneration. Conventional microextrusion methods for three-dimensional (3D) scaffold fabrication were limited by their low resolution. Electrospinning, a form of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing, is an attractive method due to its capability of fabricating high-resolution scaffolds at the nanometer/micrometer scale level. However, the scaffold was composed of randomly orientated filaments which could not guide the cells in a specific direction. Furthermore, the <span class="hlt">pores</span> of the electrospun scaffold were small, thus preventing cell infiltration. In this study, an alternative EHD jet printing (E-jetting) technique has been developed and employed to fabricate 3D polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with desired filament orientation and <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span>. The effect of PCL solution concentration was evaluated. Results showed that solidified filaments were achieved at concentration >70% (w/v). Uniform filaments of diameter 20 μm were produced via the E-jetting technique, and X-ray diffraction and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses revealed that there was no physicochemical changes toward PCL. Scaffold with a <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">size</span> of 450 μm and porosity level of 92%, was achieved. A preliminary in vitro study illustrated that live chondrocytes were attaching on the outer and inner surfaces of collagen-coated E-jetted PCL scaffolds. E-jetted scaffolds increased chondrocytes extracellular matrix secretion, and newly formed matrices from chondrocytes contributed significantly to the mechanical strength of the scaffolds. All these results suggested that E-jetting is an alternative scaffold fabrication technique, which has the capability to construct 3D scaffolds with aligned filaments and large <span class="hlt">pore</span> <span class="hlt">sizes</span> for tissue engineering applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1214459C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1214459C"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Grain <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distributions</span> on Fluid-Sediment Feedback</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Conley, Daniel; Buscombe, Daniel</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>Accounting for the feedback effects between sediment suspension and the generation of turbulence (Conley et al., 2008) has recently been shown to improve predictions of morphological evolution (Falchetti et al. 2010). Accounting for these interactions, which in general lead to an increase in the wave coherent component of transport relative to the mean component of transport, have been shown to even result in a change of transport direction. However most research to date has focused on simulations representing the unrealistic case of sediment beds composed of a single grain <span class="hlt">size</span>. The recently initiated project TSSAR Waves (Turbulence, Sediment Stratification and Altered Resuspension under Waves) has initially focused on examining how the <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> of bed sediments affects this fluid-sediment feedback. It has already been demonstrated (Conley et al. 2008) that the magnitude of the effects of sediment stratification scale with the ratio of maximum orbital velocity to grain settling velocity suggesting that the effects will be highly dependent on the grain <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span>. The nature of these effects has been investigated utilizing a modified version of the Generalized Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM). Implementation of the ability to handle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distributions</span> involved investigating questions such as how the mobility of individual scaseize fractions are related to total bed mobility, how excess shear stress is partitioned among <span class="hlt">size</span> classes and grain <span class="hlt">size</span> dependency of the Schmidt number. Observations from these investigations will be presented as well as predictions of sediment mobilization and suspension which are compared to appropriate laboratory experiments. Reference: Conley, D.C., Falchetti, S., Lohmann, I.P., Brocchini, M. (2008) The effects of flow stratification by non-cohesive sediment on transport in high-energy wave-driven flows. J. Fluid Mech., 610, 43-67. Falchetti, S., Conley, D.C., Brocchini, M. Elgar, S. (2010), Nearshore bar migration and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPS...331..462A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPS...331..462A"><span id="translatedtitle">Validation of <span class="hlt">pore</span> network simulations of ex-situ water <span class="hlt">distributions</span> in a gas diffusion layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with X-ray tomographic images</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Agaesse, Tristan; Lamibrac, Adrien; Büchi, Felix N.; Pauchet, Joel; Prat, Marc</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Understanding and modeling two-phase flows in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of proton exchange membrane fuel cells are important in order to improve fuel cells performance. They are scientifically challenging because of the peculiarities of GDLs microstructures. In the present work, simulations on a <span class="hlt">pore</span> network model are compared to X-ray tomographic images of water <span class="hlt">distributions</span> during an ex-situ water invasion experiment. A method based on watershed segmentation was developed to extract a <span class="hlt">pore</span> network from the 3D segmented image of the dry GDL. <span class="hlt">Pore</span> network modeling and a full morphology model were then used to perform two-phase simulations and compared to the experimental data. The results show good agreement between experimental and simulated microscopic water <span class="hlt">distributions</span>. <span class="hlt">Pore</span> network extraction parameters were also benchmarked using the experimental data and results from full morphology simulations.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA136391','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA136391"><span id="translatedtitle">Measurement of Droplet <span class="hlt">Size</span> <span class="hlt">Distribution</span> in Insecticide and Herbicide Sprays.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1983-04-01</p> <p>exceeding 100 :m, this result is not critical to the measurement requirements of the U.S. Army. o The spread in the processed signal is less for mineral oil...AD-A136 391 MEASUREMENT OF DROPLET <span class="hlt">SIZE</span> DISTRIRUTION IN INSECTICIDE 1/1 AND HERRICIDE SPRAYS(UI KLD ASSOCIATES INC HUNTINGTON U D S MAHLER APR 83...NATIONAL BUREAU Of SIANDARDS 1963 A r TR- 126 AD______ MEASUREMENT Or DROPLET <span class="hlt">SIZE</span> <span class="hlt">DISTRIBUTION</span> IN INSECTICIDE AND HERBICIDE SPRAYS Phase.I Final</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1467776','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1467776"><span id="translatedtitle">Collagen fibril arrangement and <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> in monkey oral mucosa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>OTTANI, V.; FRANCHI, M.; DE PASQUALE, V.; LEONARDI, L.; MOROCUTTI, M.; RUGGERI, A.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Collagen fibre organisation and fibril <span class="hlt">size</span> were studied in the buccal gingival and hard palate mucosa of Macacus rhesus monkey. Light and electron microscopy analysis showed connective papillae exhibiting a similar inner structure in the different areas examined, but varying in <span class="hlt">distribution</span>, shape and <span class="hlt">size</span>. Moving from the deep to surface layers of the buccal gingival mucosa (free and attached portions), large collagen fibril bundles became smaller and progressively more wavy with decreasing collagen fibril diameter. This gradual diameter decrease did not occur in the hard palate mucosa (free portion, rugae and interrugal regions) where the fibril diameter remained constant. A link between collagen fibril diameter and mechanical function is discussed. PMID:9688498</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740014956','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740014956"><span id="translatedtitle">Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Blum, P. (Inventor)</p> <p>1971-01-01</p> <p>A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle <span class="hlt">sizes</span> is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle <span class="hlt">size</span> <span class="hlt">distribution</span> is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ww