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Sample records for porin inhibits cell

  1. Diagnosis of typhoid fever: detection of Salmonella typhi porins-specific antibodies by inhibition ELISA.

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, K S; Palanivel, V; Muthukkaruppan, V

    1993-01-01

    Porins are highly immunogenic outer membrane proteins of Salmonella. Sera from typhoid patients contained a high level of IgG antibodies directed to porins of Salm. typhi. Since porins are highly conserved proteins, anti-porins antibodies both from typhoid patients and healthy normals reacted with porins from several Gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, in order to improve the specificity of detecting Salm. typhi porins-specific antibodies, an inhibition ELISA was developed using enzyme-conjugated MoAbs (MP1 and MPN4) specific to Salm. typhi porins. Sera from typhoid patients with positive haemoculture (16 out of 17) inhibited the binding of MP1 to porins, thus showing a positive test for typhoid, whereas sera from patients with other Gram-negative bacterial infections (n = 7) and from healthy volunteers (66 out of 67) were found to be negative. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of this assay were 94.1, 98.7, 97.8, 94.1 and 98.7% respectively. The validity of our inhibition ELISA for typhoid was higher than that of the Widal test. The diagnosis of typhoid fever as early as 3 days after the onset of fever, using a single specimen is possible. PMID:8222322

  2. Pathogen-associated porin turns IL-10 competent B-1a cells toward proinflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amlan Kanti; Sinha, Debolina; Biswas, Ratna; Biswas, Tapas

    2016-12-01

    Shigellosis is a major problem in the developing countries causing mortality and morbidity particularly among the children. Shigella spp. harbours the epithelial cells of the human colon to infect the host and spread the disease. We analyzed the response of B-1a cells, the major component of the mucosal immune system to porin of Shigella dysenteriae type 1. We show that porin while proliferating B-1a cells, deplete Siglec-G, the inhibitory molecule present on B-1a cells. Adjuvanticity of porin has been shown to govern innate signaling for promoting host adaptive immune response. Up-regulation of CD69 and CD40 denotes activation of the cells parallel to abrogation of Siglec-G. As a result of cell activation, porin stimulated the inflammatory cytokines of CD5(+) B-1a cells, otherwise rich in IL-10. The work shows B-1a cell responses promote the immunopotentiating activity of porin.

  3. Human cell mediated immunity to porins from Salmonella typhi.

    PubMed

    Blanco, F; Isibasi, A; Raúl González, C; Ortiz, V; Paniagua, J; Arreguín, C; Kumate, J

    1993-01-01

    The current studies were undertaken to assess the role of the porins and outer membrane proteins (OMP) in the human immune response to Salmonella typhi 9, 12 Vi:d. Experiments were performed to determinate the lymphocyte activation response to porins in individuals who had been vaccinated against typhoid fever. 10 healthy volunteers were studied before and 10 days after oral or subcutaneous immunisation. Five patients with typhoid fever were also studied. Lymphocyte activation was measured by the 3H thymidine incorporation assay. Individuals with typhoid fever as well as those immunised with oral vaccine responded well to porins and outer membrane proteins, as opposed to those immunised with the subcutaneous vaccine. These results suggest that the porins and OMP play a role in the cellular immune response against Salmonella typhi.

  4. Enhancement of macrophage-mediated tumor cell killing by bacterial outer membrane proteins (porins).

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, J B; Ribi, E; Wheat, R W

    1983-01-01

    Various microbial products are known to influence the function of mouse peritoneal macrophages. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and certain lipid A-associated proteins are known to enhance the tumoricidal effects of macrophages. The purpose of this study was to determine whether porins (outer membrane proteins) of Salmonella typhimurium G30/C21 would influence the activity of macrophages from lipid A-responsive and -unresponsive mice. Porins, extracted by a combined sodium dodecyl sulfate-EDTA method from cell walls, were free of LPS as determined by Limulus amebocyte lysate assay and appeared as a band at approximately 36,000 molecular weight on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In tumor cell killing assays done under LPS-free conditions, the porins in doses of 1 to 10 ng/ml enhanced the tumoricidal effect of macrophages from bacillus Calmette-Guérin-infected C3H/HeN or C3H/HeJ mice. Protein-free LPS enhanced the tumoricidal activity of macrophages from bacillus Calmette-Guérin-infected C3H/HeN but not C3H/HeJ mice. The tumoricidal-enhancing activity of protein-free LPS was blocked by the lipid A-binding antibiotic polymyxin B sulfate, but the effects of porins were not altered by the polymyxin B sulfate. These results suggest that porins, proteins known to alter membrane function, may alter macrophage function by interaction with macrophage membranes. Images PMID:6311745

  5. Proinflammatory signal transduction pathway induced by Shigella flexneri porins in caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Grimaldi; Giovanna, Donnarumma; Brunella, Perfetto; De Anna, Filippis; Alessandro, Melito; Antonietta, Tufano Maria

    2009-01-01

    The recognition of bacterial components on the intestinal epithelial cells occurs through the toll-like receptors and is followed by the induction of an effective innate immune response. We analyzed receptor expression and signaling pathways involved in activation of human colon adenocarcinoma cells after stimulation with porins and LPS of Shigella flexneri. We also analyzed the expression and production of some cytokines, of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, of antimicrobial peptides human β-defensins, and of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase. Our data demonstrate that TLR2 is involved in porin recognition, whereas TLR4 with MD2, is required for LPS recognition. PMID:24031417

  6. Novel Mechanism of Escherichia coli Porin Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Keller, Maria; Vuong, Phu; Misra, Rajeev

    2006-01-01

    A novel mechanism of Escherichia coli porin regulation was discovered from multicopy suppressors that permitted growth of cells expressing a mutant OmpC protein in the absence of DegP. Analyses of two suppressors showed that both substantially lowered OmpC expression. Suppression activities were confined to a short DNA sequence, which we designated ipeX for inhibition of porin expression, and to DNA containing a 3′-truncated ompR gene. The major effect of ipeX on ompC expression was exerted posttranscriptionally, whereas the truncated OmpR protein reduced ompC transcription. ipeX was localized within an untranslated region of 247 base pairs between the stop codon of nmpC—a remnant porin gene from the cryptic phage qsr′ (DLP12) genome—and its predicted Rho-independent transcriptional terminator. Interestingly, another prophage, PA-2, which encodes a porin similar to NmpC, known as Lc, has sequences downstream from lc identical to that of ipeX. PA-2 lysogenization leads to Lc expression and OmpC inhibition. Our data show that the synthesis of the lc transcript, whose 3′ end contains the corresponding ipeX sequence, inhibits OmpC expression. Overexpression of ipeX RNA inhibited both OmpC and OmpF expression but not that of OmpA. ompC-phoA chimeric gene constructs revealed a 248-bp untranslated region of ompC required for ipeX-mediated inhibition. However, no sequence complementarity was found between ipeX and this region of ompC, indicating that inhibition may not involve simple base pairing between the two RNA molecules. The effect of ipeX on ompC, but not on ompF, was independent of the RNA chaperone Hfq. PMID:16385048

  7. Whole-Cell-Based Assay To Evaluate Structure Permeation Relationships for Carbapenem Passage through the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Porin OprD.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Sylvester, Mark A; Velez-Vega, Camilo; Tommasi, Ruben; Durand-Reville, Thomas F; Miller, Alita A

    2017-04-14

    The global emergence of antibiotic resistance, especially in Gram-negative bacteria, is an urgent threat to public health. Discovery of novel classes of antibiotics with activity against these pathogens has been impeded by a fundamental lack of understanding of the molecular drivers underlying small molecule uptake. Although it is well-known that outer membrane porins represent the main route of entry for small, hydrophilic molecules across the Gram-negative cell envelope, the structure-permeation relationship for porin passage has yet to be defined. To address this knowledge gap, we developed a sensitive and specific whole-cell approach in Escherichia coli called titrable outer membrane permeability assay system (TOMAS). We used TOMAS to characterize the structure porin-permeation relationships of a set of novel carbapenem analogues through the Pseudomonas aeruginosa porin OprD. Our results show that small structural modifications, especially the number and nature of charges and their position, have dramatic effects on the ability of these molecules to permeate cells through OprD. This is the first demonstration of a defined relationship between specific molecular changes in a substrate and permeation through an isolated porin. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that impact antibiotic transit through porins should provide valuable insights to antibacterial medicinal chemistry and may ultimately allow for the rational design of porin-mediated uptake of small molecules into Gram-negative bacteria.

  8. Immunobiological activities of Helicobacter pylori porins.

    PubMed Central

    Tufano, M A; Rossano, F; Catalanotti, P; Liguori, G; Capasso, C; Ceccarelli, M T; Marinelli, P

    1994-01-01

    Studies were carried out on some biological activities of Helicobacter pylori porins in vitro. We extracted and purified a porin with an apparent molecular mass of 30 kDa. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes preincubated with H. pylori porins showed a decrease of chemotaxis, of adherence to nylon wool, and of chemiluminescence. Used as chemotaxins in place of zymosan-activated serum or as chemotaxinogens in place of zymosan, the porins induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration. Human monocytes and lymphocytes cultivated in the presence of H. pylori porins released cytokines. Release of the various cytokines studied was obtained with differentiated kinetics and at various porin concentrations. Starting only 3 h after culture, tumor necrosis factor alpha is released quickly, reaching a peak at 18 h, at a porin concentration of 1 microgram/ml/10(6) cells. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) appears later, with a peak at 10 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells, while IL-8 is released after 6 h of culture, with a peak at 24 h, at a porin concentration of 10 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells, while IL-8 is released after 6 h of culture, with a peak at 24 h, at a porin concentration of 10 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells. Lymphocytes stimulated by H. pylori porins release gamma interferon after 18 h of culture at higher concentrations of porins (20 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells). Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor is released from 6 to 48 h at a concentration of 1 microgram/ml/10(6) cells, while both IL-3 and IL-4 are released after 18 h of culture at different porin concentrations (0.1 and 1 microgram/ml/10(6) cells, respectively). Our results lead us to think that during H. pylori infection, surface components, porins in particular, are able to induce a series of chain reactions ranging from the inflammatory to the immunological responses. Images PMID:8132346

  9. Porin channels in Escherichia coli: studies with beta-lactams in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, H; Rosenberg, E Y; Foulds, J

    1983-01-01

    Wild-type Escherichia coli K-12 produces two porins, OmpF (protein 1a) and OmpC (protein 1b). In mutants deficient in both of these "normal" porins, secondary mutants that produce a "new" porin, protein PhoE (protein E), are selected for. We determined the properties of the channels produced by each of these porins by measuring the rates of diffusion of various cephalosporins through the outer membrane in strains producing only one porin species. We found that all porin channels retarded the diffusion of more hydrophobic cephalosporins and that with monoanionic cephalosporins a 10-fold increase in the octanol-water partition coefficient of the solute produced a 5- to 6-fold decrease in the rate of penetration. Electrical charges of the solutes had different effects on different channels. Thus, with the normal porins (i.e., OmpF and OmpC proteins) additional negative charge drastically reduced the penetration rate through the channels, whereas additional positive charge significantly accelerated the penetration. In contrast, diffusion through the PhoE channel was unaffected by the presence of an additional negative charge. We hypothesize that the relative exclusion of hydrophobic and negatively charged solutes by normal porin channels is of ecological advantage to E. coli, which must exclude hydrophobic and anionic bile salts in its natural habitat. The properties of the PhoE porin are also consistent with the recent finding (M. Argast and W. Boos, J. Bacteriol. 143:142-150, 1980; J. Tommassen and B. Lugtenberg, J. Bacteriol. 143:151-157, 1980) that its biosynthesis is derepressed by phosphate starvation; the channel may thus act as an emergency pore primarily for the uptake of phosphate and phosphorylated compounds. Images PMID:6294048

  10. Vibrio cholerae Porin OmpU Induces Caspase-independent Programmed Cell Death upon Translocation to the Host Cell Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shelly; Prasad, G V R Krishna; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-12-25

    Porins, a major class of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, primarily act as transport channels. OmpU is one of the major porins of human pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. In the present study, we show that V. cholerae OmpU has the ability to induce target cell death. Although OmpU-mediated cell death shows some characteristics of apoptosis, such as flipping of phosphatidylserine in the membrane as well as cell size shrinkage and increased cell granularity, it does not show the caspase-3 activation and DNA laddering pattern typical of apoptotic cells. Increased release of lactate dehydrogenase in OmpU-treated cells indicates that the OmpU-mediated cell death also has characteristics of necrosis. Further, we show that the mechanism of OmpU-mediated cell death involves major mitochondrial changes in the target cells. We observe that OmpU treatment leads to the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). AIF translocates to the host cell nucleus, implying that it has a crucial role in OmpU-mediated cell death. Finally, we observe that OmpU translocates to the target cell mitochondria, where it directly initiates mitochondrial changes leading to mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and AIF release. Partial blocking of AIF release by cyclosporine A in OmpU-treated cells further suggests that OmpU may be inducing the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. All of these results lead us to the conclusion that OmpU induces cell death in target cells in a programmed manner in which mitochondria play a central role.

  11. Vibrio cholerae Porin OmpU Induces Caspase-independent Programmed Cell Death upon Translocation to the Host Cell Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shelly; Prasad, G. V. R. Krishna; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-01-01

    Porins, a major class of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, primarily act as transport channels. OmpU is one of the major porins of human pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. In the present study, we show that V. cholerae OmpU has the ability to induce target cell death. Although OmpU-mediated cell death shows some characteristics of apoptosis, such as flipping of phosphatidylserine in the membrane as well as cell size shrinkage and increased cell granularity, it does not show the caspase-3 activation and DNA laddering pattern typical of apoptotic cells. Increased release of lactate dehydrogenase in OmpU-treated cells indicates that the OmpU-mediated cell death also has characteristics of necrosis. Further, we show that the mechanism of OmpU-mediated cell death involves major mitochondrial changes in the target cells. We observe that OmpU treatment leads to the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). AIF translocates to the host cell nucleus, implying that it has a crucial role in OmpU-mediated cell death. Finally, we observe that OmpU translocates to the target cell mitochondria, where it directly initiates mitochondrial changes leading to mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and AIF release. Partial blocking of AIF release by cyclosporine A in OmpU-treated cells further suggests that OmpU may be inducing the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. All of these results lead us to the conclusion that OmpU induces cell death in target cells in a programmed manner in which mitochondria play a central role. PMID:26559970

  12. Human airway epithelial cell responses to Neisseria lactamica and purified porin via Toll-like receptor 2-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuping; Wetzler, Lee M; Nascimento, Laura Oliveira; Massari, Paola

    2010-12-01

    The human airway epithelium is constantly exposed to microbial products from colonizing organisms. Regulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and specific interactions with bacterial ligands is thought to mitigate exacerbation of inflammatory processes induced by the commensal flora in these cells. The genus Neisseria comprises pathogenic and commensal organisms that colonize the human nasopharynx. Neisseria lactamica is not associated with disease, but N. meningitidis occasionally invades the host, causing meningococcal disease and septicemia. Upon colonization of the airway epithelium, specific host cell receptors interact with numerous Neisseria components, including the PorB porin, at the immediate bacterial-host cell interface. This major outer membrane protein is expressed by all Neisseria strains, regardless of pathogenicity, but its amino acid sequence varies among strains, particularly in the surface-exposed regions. The interaction of Neisseria PorB with TLR2 is essential for driving TLR2/TLR1-dependent cellular responses and is thought to occur via the porin's surface-exposed loop regions. Our studies show that N. lactamica PorB is a TLR2 ligand but its binding specificity for TLR2 is different from that of meningococcal PorB. Furthermore, N. lactamica PorB is a poor inducer of proinflammatory mediators and of TLR2 expression in human airway epithelial cells. These effects are reproduced by whole N. lactamica organisms. Since the responsiveness of human airway epithelial cells to colonizing bacteria is in part regulated via TLR2 expression and signaling, commensal organisms such as N. lactamica would benefit from expressing a product that induces low TLR2-dependent local inflammation, likely delaying or avoiding clearance by the host.

  13. Proteomic analysis of human U937 cell line activation mediated by Haemophilus influenzae type b P2 porin and its surface-exposed loop 7.

    PubMed

    Severino, Valeria; Chambery, Angela; Vitiello, Mariateresa; Cantisani, Marco; Galdiero, Stefania; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Malorni, Livia; Di Maro, Antimo; Parente, Augusto

    2010-02-05

    The virulence of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) has been attributed to a variety of potential factors associated with its cell surface, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and major outer membrane proteins (OMPs). P2 porin, one of the best-characterized porins in terms of its functional characteristics, is the most abundant OMP in Hib and has also been shown to possess proinflammatory activity. To characterize the role played by bacterial surface components in disease onset and development, the proteomic profiling of human U937 cell line activated by H. influenzae type b P2 porin and its most active surface-exposed loop (L7) was performed by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The study provided a list of candidate proteins with potential relevance in the host immune and inflammatory response. Most of the differentially expressed proteins are involved in metabolic processes, remodelling of cytoskeleton, stress response and signal transduction pathways. The results constitute the basis for dissecting signal transduction cascades activated by P2 stimulation and gain insights into the molecular events involved in the modulation of pathogen-host cell interactions.

  14. The Acinetobacter baumannii Omp33-36 Porin Is a Virulence Factor That Induces Apoptosis and Modulates Autophagy in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rumbo, Carlos; Fernández Moreira, Esteban; Soares, Nelson Cruz; Carvajal, Micaela; Santillana, Elena; Beceiro, Alejandro; Romero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an extracellular opportunistic human pathogen that is becoming increasingly problematic in hospitals. In the present study, we demonstrate that the A. baumannii Omp 33- to 36-kDa protein (Omp33-36) is a porin that acts as a channel for the passage of water. The protein is found on the cell surface and is released along with other porins in the outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). In immune and connective cell tissue, this protein induced apoptosis by activation of caspases and modulation of autophagy, with the consequent accumulation of p62/SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1) and LC3B-II (confirmed by use of autophagy inhibitors). Blockage of autophagy enables the bacterium to persist intracellularly (inside autophagosomes), with the subsequent development of cytotoxicity. Finally, we used macrophages and a mouse model of systemic infection to confirm that Omp33-36 is a virulence factor in A. baumannii. Overall, the study findings show that Omp33-36 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of A. baumannii infections. PMID:25156738

  15. Putative porin of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) bacteroids induced by glyphosate.

    PubMed

    de María, Nuria; Guevara, Angeles; Serra, M Teresa; García-Luque, Isabel; González-Sama, Alfonso; García de Lacoba, Mario; de Felipe, M Rosario; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2007-08-01

    Application of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) to Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus)-nodulated lupin plants caused modifications in the protein pattern of bacteroids. The most significant change was the presence of a 44-kDa polypeptide in bacteroids from plants treated with the higher doses of glyphosate employed (5 and 10 mM). The polypeptide has been characterized by the amino acid sequencing of its N terminus and the isolation and nucleic acid sequencing of its encoding gene. It is putatively encoded by a single gene, and the protein has been identified as a putative porin. Protein modeling revealed the existence of several domains sharing similarity to different porins, such as a transmembrane beta-barrel. The protein has been designated BLpp, for Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) putative porin, and would be the first porin described in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus). In addition, a putative conserved domain of porins has been identified which consists of 87 amino acids, located in the BLpp sequence 30 amino acids downstream of the N-terminal region. In bacteroids, mRNA of the BLpp gene shows a basal constitutive expression that increases under glyphosate treatment, and the expression of the gene is seemingly regulated at the transcriptional level. By contrast, in free-living bacteria glyphosate treatment leads to an inhibition of BLpp mRNA accumulation, indicating a different effect of glyphosate on BLpp gene expression in bacteroids and free-living bacteria. The possible role of BLpp in a metabolite interchange between Bradyrhizobium and lupin is discussed.

  16. Porin Loss Impacts the Host Inflammatory Response to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kelli L.; Cahill, Bethaney K.; Dilello, Sarah K.; Gutel, Dedra; Brunson, Debra N.; Albertí, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae often exhibit porin loss. In this study, we investigated how porin loss impacted the composition of secreted outer membrane vesicles as well as their ability to trigger proinflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages. We hypothesize that porin loss associated with antibiotic resistance will directly impact both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells. Using clonally related clinical isolates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae with different patterns of porin expression, we demonstrated that altered expression of OmpK35 and OmpK36 results in broad alterations to the protein profile of secreted vesicles. Additionally, the level of OmpA incorporation was elevated in strains lacking a single porin. Porin loss significantly impacted macrophage inflammatory responses to purified vesicles. Outer membrane vesicles lacking both OmpK35 and OmpK36 elicited significantly lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion than vesicles from strains expressing one or both porins. These data demonstrate that antibiotic resistance-associated porin loss has a broad and significant effect on both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells, which may impact bacterial survival and inflammatory reactions in the host. PMID:26666932

  17. TolA central domain interacts with Escherichia coli porins.

    PubMed Central

    Derouiche, R; Gavioli, M; Bénédetti, H; Prilipov, A; Lazdunski, C; Lloubès, R

    1996-01-01

    TolA is an inner membrane protein with three domains: a transmembrane N-terminus and periplasmic central and C-terminal domains. The interaction of TolA with outer membrane porins of Escherichia coli was investigated. Western blot analyses of cell extracts with anti-TolA antibodies indicated that TolA forms high molecular weight complexes specifically with trimeric OmpF, OmpC, PhoE and LamB, but not with OmpA. The interaction of purified TolA domains with purified porins was also studied. TolA interacted with OmpF, PhoE and LamB porins via its central domain, but not with either their denatured monomeric forms or OmpA. Moreover, the presence or absence of lipopolysaccharides associated with trimeric porins did not modify the interactions. These results suggest that the specific interaction of TolA with outer membrane porins might be relevant to the function of Tol proteins. Images PMID:8978668

  18. Interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 gene expression in human monocytes stimulated with Salmonella typhimurium porins.

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, M; Cipollaro de L'ero, G; Donnarumma, G; Marcatili, A; Galdiero, F

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether Salmonella typhimurium porins can affect the expression of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) genes. Human monocytes were treated with porins, and total RNAs were analysed by Northern blotting to evaluate the expression of IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 in both treated and untreated cell cultures. Porins induced a significant increase in IL-1 and IL-6 transcripts. This increase was related to the dose of porins, and it peaked 5 hr after treatment. The same results were obtained when polymyxin B was added to the porin preparation to eliminate eventual traces of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) associated with porins. The porins-mediated increase in interleukin transcripts did not require de novo protein synthesis, and it was because of the enhanced half-life of IL-1 and IL-6 mRNAs, rather an increased rate of gene transcription. These data suggest that porins may affect inflammatory and immunological responses by enhancing the expression of cytokine genes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8567029

  19. Immunobiological activities of a porin fraction isolated from Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953.

    PubMed Central

    Takada, H; Ogawa, T; Yoshimura, F; Otsuka, K; Kokeguchi, S; Kato, K; Umemoto, T; Kotani, S

    1988-01-01

    From Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 cell envelope fraction whose inner membranes had been removed by treatment with sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate, an outer membrane protein (37,000 Mr in a native state) was prepared by extraction with lithium dodecyl sulfate. The protein thus obtained showed distinct porin activity, namely, the ability to form hydrophilic diffusion pores by incorporation into the artificial liposome membrane. The porin fraction exhibited strong immunobiological activities in the in vitro assays: B-cell mitogenicity and polyclonal B-cell activation on murine splenocytes, stimulatory effects on guinea pig peritoneal macrophages, and enhancement of the migration of human blood monocytes. The porin fraction also exhibited immunoadjuvant activity to increase the antibody production against sheep erythrocytes in the spleen of mice that were immunized by sheep erythrocytes with porin. Although chemical analyses revealed that the test porin fraction contained a considerable amount of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (around 12% of the fraction), the studies with LPS-nonresponding C3H/HeJ mice and on the inhibitory effects of polymyxin B strongly suggest that most of the above bioactivities are due to porin protein itself, not to coexistent LPS in the porin fraction. Images PMID:2831155

  20. Putative Porin of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) Bacteroids Induced by Glyphosate▿

    PubMed Central

    de María, Nuria; Guevara, Ángeles; Serra, M. Teresa; García-Luque, Isabel; González-Sama, Alfonso; de Lacoba, Mario García; de Felipe, M. Rosario; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    Application of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) to Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus)-nodulated lupin plants caused modifications in the protein pattern of bacteroids. The most significant change was the presence of a 44-kDa polypeptide in bacteroids from plants treated with the higher doses of glyphosate employed (5 and 10 mM). The polypeptide has been characterized by the amino acid sequencing of its N terminus and the isolation and nucleic acid sequencing of its encoding gene. It is putatively encoded by a single gene, and the protein has been identified as a putative porin. Protein modeling revealed the existence of several domains sharing similarity to different porins, such as a transmembrane beta-barrel. The protein has been designated BLpp, for Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) putative porin, and would be the first porin described in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus). In addition, a putative conserved domain of porins has been identified which consists of 87 amino acids, located in the BLpp sequence 30 amino acids downstream of the N-terminal region. In bacteroids, mRNA of the BLpp gene shows a basal constitutive expression that increases under glyphosate treatment, and the expression of the gene is seemingly regulated at the transcriptional level. By contrast, in free-living bacteria glyphosate treatment leads to an inhibition of BLpp mRNA accumulation, indicating a different effect of glyphosate on BLpp gene expression in bacteroids and free-living bacteria. The possible role of BLpp in a metabolite interchange between Bradyrhizobium and lupin is discussed. PMID:17557843

  1. Structural relatedness of enteric bacterial porins assessed with monoclonal antibodies to Salmonella typhimurium OmpD and OmpC.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S P; Upshaw, Y; Abdullah, T; Singh, S R; Klebba, P E

    1992-01-01

    The immunochemistry and structure of enteric bacterial porins are critical to the understanding of the immune response to bacterial infection. We raised 41 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to Salmonella typhimurium OmpD and OmpC porin trimers and monomers. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunoprecipitations, and/or Western immunoblot techniques indicated that 39 MAbs (11 anti-trimer and 28 anti-monomer) in the panel are porin specific and one binds to the lipopolysaccharide; the specificity of the remaining MAb probably lies in the porin-lipopolysaccharide complex. Among the porin-specific MAbs, 10 bound cell-surface-exposed epitopes, one reacted with a periplasmic epitope, and the remaining 28 recognized determinants that are buried within the outer membrane bilayer. Many of the MAbs reacting with surface-exposed epitopes were highly specific, recognizing only the homologous porin trimers; this suggests that the cell-surface-exposed regions of porins tends to be quite different among S. typhimurium OmpF, OmpC, and OmpD porins. Immunological cross-reaction showed that S. typhimurium OmpD was very closely related to Escherichia coli NmpC and to the Lc porin of bacteriophage PA-2. Immunologically, E. coli OmpG and protein K also appear to belong to the family of closely related porins including E. coli OmpF, OmpC, PhoE, and NmpC and S. typhimurium OmpF, OmpC, and OmpD. It appears, however, that S. typhimurium "PhoE" is not closely related to this group. Finally, about one-third of the MAbs that presumably recognize buried epitopes reacted with porin domains that are widely conserved in 13 species of the family Enterobacteriaceae, but apparently not in the seven nonenterobacterial species tested. These data are evaluated in relation to host immune response to infection by gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:1312535

  2. Cell envelope of Bordetella pertussis: immunological and biochemical analyses and characterization of a major outer membrane porin protein

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    Surface molecules of Bordetella pertussis which may be important in metabolism, pathogenesis, and immunity to whooping cough were examined using cell fractionation and /sup 125/I cell surface labeling. Antigenic envelope proteins were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting procedures using monoclonal antibodies and convalescent sera. A surface protein with a high M/sub r/, missing in a mutant lacking the filamentous hemagglutinin, was identified in virulent Bordetella pertussis but was absent in virulent B. pertussis strains. At least three envelope proteins were found only in virulent B. pertussis strains and were absent or diminished in avirulent and most phenotypically modulated strains. Transposon-induced mutants unable to produce hemolysin, dermonecrotic toxin, pertussis toxin, and filamentous hemagglutinin also lacked these three envelope proteins, confirming that virulence-associated envelope proteins were genetically regulated with other virulence-associated traits. Two dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed at least five heat modifiable proteins which migrated as higher or lower M/sub r/ moieties if solubilized at 25/sup 0/C instead of 100/sup 0/C.

  3. Reevaluation, using intact cells, of the exclusion limit and role of porin OprF in Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Bellido, F; Martin, N L; Siehnel, R J; Hancock, R E

    1992-01-01

    Earlier studies that used model membrane reconstitution methods have come to different conclusions regarding the exclusion limit of the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and whether OprF is the major channel-forming protein in the outer membrane. In this study, a 6.2-kbp SalI fragment, encoding only two cytoplasmic enzymes, alpha-galactosidase and sucrose hydrolase, and the inner membrane raffinose permease, was cloned behind the m-toluate-inducible tol promoter of vector pNM185 to create plasmid pFB71. P. aeruginosa strains harboring pFB71, when grown with inducer, produced both enzymes encoded by the insert and had acquired the ability to grow on the disaccharide melibiose and the trisaccharide raffinose. The rate of growth was dependent on the concentration and size of the saccharide and was decreased three- to fivefold by the absence of OprF, as examined by measuring the growth on melibiose and raffinose of an isogenic OprF-deficient omega insertion derivative, H636(pFB71). At high concentrations, di-, tri-, and tetrasaccharides could pass across the outer membrane to plasmolyze P. aeruginosa, as measured by light scattering and confirmed by electron microscopy. The initial rate kinetics of light-scattering changes were dependent on the size of the saccharide being used. Furthermore, the rates of change in light scattering due to raffinose and stachyose uptake across the outer membrane for strain H636 were fivefold or more lower than for its OprF-sufficient parent H103. These data are consistent with model membrane studies showing that OprF is the most predominant porin for compounds larger than disaccharides in P. aeruginosa and suggest that the exclusion limit for this porin and the outer membrane is greater than the size of a tetrasaccharide. In addition, these data confirmed the existence of other porins with a predominant function in monosaccharide uptake and a more minor function in the uptake of larger saccharides. Images PMID:1322882

  4. Outer membrane and porin characteristics of Serratia marcescens grown in vitro and in rat intraperitoneal diffusion chambers.

    PubMed Central

    Malouin, F; Campbell, G D; Halpenny, M; Becker, G W; Parr, T R

    1990-01-01

    The composition and antibiotic permeability barrier of the outer membrane of Serratia marcescens were assessed in cells grown in vivo and in vitro. Intraperitoneal diffusion chambers implanted in rats were used for the in vivo cultivation of bacteria. Outer membranes isolated from log-phase bacterial cells recovered from these chambers were compared with membranes isolated from cells grown in vitro. Analysis revealed that the suspected 41-kilodalton porin and the OmpA protein were recovered on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels in equal quantities. Several high-molecular-weight proteins, thought to be iron starvation induced, appeared in the diffusion chamber-grown cells. The outer membrane permeability barriers to cephaloridine were similar in in vivo- and in vitro-grown cells based on permeability coefficient calculations. The permeability coefficient of cephaloridine in S. marcescens cells (30.3 x 10(-5) to 38.9 x 10(-5) cm s-1) was greater than that obtained for an Escherichia coli strain expressing only porin OmpC but smaller than those obtained for the E. coli wild type and a strain expressing only porin OmpF. Functional characterization of the suspected porin was performed by using the planar lipid bilayer technology. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-0.4 M NaCl-soluble porin from both in vitro- and in vivo-grown cells showed an average single-channel conductance in 1 M KCl of 1.6. A partial amino acid sequence (19 residues) was obtained for the S. marcescens porin. The sequence showed a very high homology to the E. coli OmpC porin. These data identified the S. marcescens outer membrane 41-kilodalton protein as a porin by both functional and amino acid analyses. Also, the methodology used allowed for efficient growth and recovery of diffusion chamber-grown bacterial cells and permitted identification of specific in vivo-induced changes in bacterial cell membrane composition. Images PMID:2157667

  5. Nucleotide and derived amino acid sequences of the major porin of Comamonas acidovorans and comparison of porin primary structures.

    PubMed Central

    Gerbl-Rieger, S; Peters, J; Kellermann, J; Lottspeich, F; Baumeister, W

    1991-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the gene which codes for the major outer membrane porin (Omp32) of Comamonas acidovorans has been determined. The structural gene encodes a precursor consisting of 351 amino acid residues with a signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues. Comparisons with amino acid sequences of outer membrane proteins and porins from several other members of the class Proteobacteria and of the Chlamydia trachomatis porin and the Neurospora crassa mitochondrial porin revealed a motif of eight regions of local homology. The results of this analysis are discussed with regard to common structural features of porins. PMID:1848840

  6. Improved purification of native meningococcal porin PorB and studies on its structure/function.

    PubMed

    Massari, Paola; King, Carol A; MacLeod, Heather; Wetzler, Lee M

    2005-12-01

    The outer membrane protein PorB of Neisseria meningitidis is a pore-forming protein which has various effects on eukaryotic cells. It has been shown to (1) up-regulate the surface expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 and of MHC class II (which are TLR2/MyD88 dependent and related to the porin's immune-potentiating ability), (2) be involved in prevention of apoptosis by modulating the mitochondrial membrane potential, and (3) form pores in eukaryotic cells. As an outer membrane protein, its native trimeric form isolation is complicated by its insoluble nature, requiring the presence of detergent throughout the whole procedure, and by its tight association with other outer membrane components, such as neisserial LOS or lipoproteins. In this study, an improved chromatographic purification method to obtain an homogeneous product free of endotoxin and lipoprotein is described, without loss of any of the above-mentioned properties of the porin. Furthermore, we have investigated the requirement of the native trimeric structure for the porin's activity. Inactivation of functional PorB trimers into non-functional monomers was achieved by incubation on ice. Thus, routine long- and medium-term storage at low temperature may be a cause of porin inactivation.

  7. Implication of porins in beta-lactam resistance of Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Tran, Que-Tien; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R; Hajjar, Eric; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Davin-Regli, Anne; Winterhalter, Mathias; Weingart, Helge; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2010-10-15

    An integrative approach combining biophysical and microbiological methods was used to characterize the antibiotic translocation through the outer membrane of Providencia stuartii. Two novel members of the General Bacterial Porin family of Enterobacteriaceae, named OmpPst1 and OmpPst2, were identified in P. stuartii. In the presence of ertapenem (ERT), cefepime (FEP), and cefoxitin (FOX) in growth media, several resistant derivatives of P. stuartii ATCC 29914 showed OmpPst1-deficiency. These porin-deficient strains showed significant decrease of susceptibility to β-lactam antibiotics. OmpPst1 and OmpPst2 were purified to homogeneity and reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers to study their biophysical characteristics and their interactions with β-lactam molecules. Determination of β-lactam translocation through OmpPst1 and OmpPst2 indicated that the strength of interaction decreased in the order of ertapenem ≫ cefepime > cefoxitin. Moreover, the translocation of these antibiotics through OmpPst1 was more efficient than through OmpPst2. Heterologous expression of OmpPst1 in the porin-deficient E. coli strain BL21(DE3)omp8 was associated with a higher antibiotic susceptibility of the E. coli cells to β-lactams compared with expression of OmpPst2. All our data enlighten the involvement of porins in the resistance of P. stuartii to β-lactam antibiotics.

  8. Gram-negative trimeric porins have specific LPS binding sites that are essential for porin biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Arunmanee, Wanatchaporn; Pathania, Monisha; Solovyova, Alexandra S.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ridley, Helen; Baslé, Arnaud; van den Berg, Bert; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2016-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria is an unusual asymmetric bilayer with an external monolayer of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and an inner layer of phospholipids. The LPS layer is rigid and stabilized by divalent cation cross-links between phosphate groups on the core oligosaccharide regions. This means that the OM is robust and highly impermeable to toxins and antibiotics. During their biogenesis, OM proteins (OMPs), which function as transporters and receptors, must integrate into this ordered monolayer while preserving its impermeability. Here we reveal the specific interactions between the trimeric porins of Enterobacteriaceae and LPS. Isolated porins form complexes with variable numbers of LPS molecules, which are stabilized by calcium ions. In earlier studies, two high-affinity sites were predicted to contain groups of positively charged side chains. Mutation of these residues led to the loss of LPS binding and, in one site, also prevented trimerization of the porin, explaining the previously observed effect of LPS mutants on porin folding. The high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a trimeric porin–LPS complex not only helps to explain the mutagenesis results but also reveals more complex, subtle porin–LPS interactions and a bridging calcium ion. PMID:27493217

  9. The porin VDAC2 is the mitochondrial platform for Bax retrotranslocation

    PubMed Central

    Lauterwasser, Joachim; Todt, Franziska; Zerbes, Ralf M.; Nguyen, Thanh Ngoc; Craigen, William; Lazarou, Michael; van der Laan, Martin; Edlich, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein Bax can permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane and therefore commit human cells to apoptosis. Bax is regulated by constant translocation to the mitochondria and retrotranslocation back into the cytosol. Bax retrotranslocation depends on pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins and stabilizes inactive Bax. Here we show that Bax retrotranslocation shuttles membrane-associated and membrane-integral Bax from isolated mitochondria. We further discover the mitochondrial porin voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) as essential component and platform for Bax retrotranslocation. VDAC2 ensures mitochondria-specific membrane association of Bax and in the absence of VDAC2 Bax localizes towards other cell compartments. Bax retrotranslocation is also regulated by nucleotides and calcium ions, suggesting a potential role of the transport of these ions through VDAC2 in Bax retrotranslocation. Together, our results reveal the unanticipated bifunctional role of VDAC2 to target Bax specifically to the mitochondria and ensure Bax inhibition by retrotranslocation into the cytosol. PMID:27620692

  10. Salmonella Typhi Porins OmpC and OmpF Are Potent Adjuvants for T-Dependent and T-Independent Antigens.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Toledo, Marisol; Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Perez-Shibayama, Christian; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Becker, Ingeborg; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Cunningham, Adam F; Isibasi, Armando; Bonifaz, Laura C; López-Macías, Constantino

    2017-01-01

    Several microbial components, such as bacterial DNA and flagellin, have been used as experimental vaccine adjuvants because of their inherent capacity to efficiently activate innate immune responses. Likewise, our previous work has shown that the major Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) outer membrane proteins OmpC and OmpF (porins) are highly immunogenic protective antigens that efficiently stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses in the absence of exogenous adjuvants. Moreover, S. Typhi porins induce the expression of costimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells through toll-like receptor canonical signaling pathways. However, the potential of major S. Typhi porins to be used as vaccine adjuvants remains unknown. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant properties of S. Typhi porins against a range of experimental and clinically relevant antigens. Co-immunization of S. Typhi porins with ovalbumin (OVA), an otherwise poorly immunogenic antigen, enhanced anti-OVA IgG titers, antibody class switching, and affinity maturation. This adjuvant effect was dependent on CD4(+) T-cell cooperation and was associated with an increase in IFN-γ, IL-17A, and IL-2 production by OVA-specific CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, co-immunization of S. Typhi porins with an inactivated H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus experimental vaccine elicited higher hemagglutinating anti-influenza IgG titers, antibody class switching, and affinity maturation. Unexpectedly, co-administration of S. Typhi porins with purified, unconjugated Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine (Vi CPS)-a T-independent antigen-induced higher IgG antibody titers and class switching. Together, our results suggest that S. Typhi porins OmpC and OmpF are versatile vaccine adjuvants, which could be used to enhance T-cell immune responses toward a Th1/Th17 profile, while improving antibody responses to otherwise poorly immunogenic T-dependent and T-independent antigens.

  11. Salmonella Typhi Porins OmpC and OmpF Are Potent Adjuvants for T-Dependent and T-Independent Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Toledo, Marisol; Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Perez-Shibayama, Christian; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A.; Becker, Ingeborg; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Cunningham, Adam F.; Isibasi, Armando; Bonifaz, Laura C.; López-Macías, Constantino

    2017-01-01

    Several microbial components, such as bacterial DNA and flagellin, have been used as experimental vaccine adjuvants because of their inherent capacity to efficiently activate innate immune responses. Likewise, our previous work has shown that the major Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) outer membrane proteins OmpC and OmpF (porins) are highly immunogenic protective antigens that efficiently stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses in the absence of exogenous adjuvants. Moreover, S. Typhi porins induce the expression of costimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells through toll-like receptor canonical signaling pathways. However, the potential of major S. Typhi porins to be used as vaccine adjuvants remains unknown. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant properties of S. Typhi porins against a range of experimental and clinically relevant antigens. Co-immunization of S. Typhi porins with ovalbumin (OVA), an otherwise poorly immunogenic antigen, enhanced anti-OVA IgG titers, antibody class switching, and affinity maturation. This adjuvant effect was dependent on CD4+ T-cell cooperation and was associated with an increase in IFN-γ, IL-17A, and IL-2 production by OVA-specific CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, co-immunization of S. Typhi porins with an inactivated H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus experimental vaccine elicited higher hemagglutinating anti-influenza IgG titers, antibody class switching, and affinity maturation. Unexpectedly, co-administration of S. Typhi porins with purified, unconjugated Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine (Vi CPS)—a T-independent antigen—induced higher IgG antibody titers and class switching. Together, our results suggest that S. Typhi porins OmpC and OmpF are versatile vaccine adjuvants, which could be used to enhance T-cell immune responses toward a Th1/Th17 profile, while improving antibody responses to otherwise poorly immunogenic T-dependent and T-independent antigens. PMID:28337196

  12. Effect of phenol-induced changes in lipid composition on conformation of OmpF-like porin of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sanina, Nina; Nina, Sanina; Davydova, Ludmila; Ludmila, Davydova; Bakholdina, Svetlana; Svetlana, Bakholdina; Novikova, Olga; Olga, Novikova; Pornyagina, Olga; Olga, Pornyagina; Solov'eva, Tamara; Tamara, Solov'eva; Shnyrov, Valery; Valery, Shnyrov; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Mikhail, Bogdanov

    2013-07-11

    The present work aimed to compare the effects of different lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) content in lipids derived from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis cells exposed and not exposed to phenol on the conformation of OmpF-like porin of these bacteria. Differential scanning calorimetry and intrinsic protein fluorescence showed that the 2.5-fold increase of LPE content and the corresponding increase in the phase transition temperature of bacterial lipids were accompanied by enhanced protein thermostability. Integral conformational rearrangement of protein was supported by drastic changes in the microenvironment of the tryptophan residues, likely resulting in a convergence of monomers in trimeric porin and exposure of outer tryptophan residues to the water environment. These conformational changes may impede the porin channel permeability under stress conditions in bacteria.

  13. Sialylation of Outer Membrane Porin Protein D: A Mechanistic Basis of Antibiotic Uptake in Pseudomonas aeruginosa*

    PubMed Central

    Khatua, Biswajit; Vleet, Jeremy Van; Choudhury, Biswa Pronab; Chaudhry, Rama; Mandal, Chitra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an environmentally ubiquitous, extracellular, opportunistic pathogen, associated with severe infections of immune-compromised host. We demonstrated earlier the presence of both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids (Sias) on PA (PA+Sias) and normal human serum is their source of Sias. PA+Sias showed decreased complement deposition and exhibited enhanced association with immune-cells through sialic acid binding immunoglobulin like lectins (Siglecs). Such Sias-siglec-9 interaction between PA+Sias and neutrophils helped to subvert host immunity. Additionally, PA+Sias showed more resistant to β-lactam antibiotics as reflected in their minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit the growth of 50% than PA−Sias. Accordingly, we have affinity purified sialoglycoproteins of PA+Sias. They were electrophoresed and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Sequence study indicated the presence of a few α2,6-linked, α2,3-linked, and both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialylated proteins in PA. The outer membrane porin protein D (OprD), a specialized channel-forming protein, responsible for uptake of β-lactam antibiotics, is one such identified sialoglycoprotein. Accordingly, sialylated (OprD+Sias) and non-sialylated (OprD−Sias) porin proteins were separately purified by using anion exchange chromatography. Sialylation of purified OprD+Sias was confirmed by several analytical and biochemical procedures. Profiling of glycan structures revealed three sialylated N-glycans and two sialylated O-glycans in OprD+Sias. In contrast, OprD−Sias exhibit only one sialylated N-glycans. OprD−Sias interacts with β-lactam antibiotics more than OprD+Sias as demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance study. Lyposome-swelling assay further exhibited that antibiotics have more capability to penetrate through OprD−Sias purified from four clinical isolates of PA. Taken together, it

  14. Porin Involvement in Cephalosporin and Carbapenem Resistance of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Aunkham, Anuwat; Schulte, Albert; Winterhalter, Mathias; Suginta, Wipa

    2014-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bps) is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes frequently lethal melioidosis, with a particularly high prevalence in the north and northeast of Thailand. Bps is highly resistant to many antimicrobial agents and this resistance may result from the low drug permeability of outer membrane proteins, known as porins. Principal Findings Microbiological assays showed that the clinical Bps strain was resistant to most antimicrobial agents and sensitive only to ceftazidime and meropenem. An E. coli strain defective in most porins, but expressing BpsOmp38, exhibited considerably lower antimicrobial susceptibility than the control strain. In addition, mutation of Tyr119, the most prominent pore-lining residue in BpsOmp38, markedly altered membrane permeability, substitution with Ala (mutant BpsOmp38Y119A) enhanced uptake of the antimicrobial agents, while substitution with Phe (mutant BpsOmp38Y119F) inhibited uptake. Channel recordings of BpsOmp38 reconstituted in a planar black lipid membrane (BLM) suggested that the higher permeability of BpsOmp38Y119A was caused by widening of the pore interior through removal of the bulky side chain. In contrast, the lower permeability of BpsOmp38Y119F was caused by introduction of the hydrophobic side chain (Phe), increasing the ‘greasiness’ of the pore lumen. Significantly, liposome swelling assays showed no permeation through the BpsOmp38 channel by antimicrobial agents to which Bps is resistant (cefoxitin, cefepime, and doripenem). In contrast, high permeability to ceftazidime and meropenem was observed, these being agents to which Bps is sensitive. Conclusion/Significance Our results, from both in vivo and in vitro studies, demonstrate that membrane permeability associated with BpsOmp38 expression correlates well with the antimicrobial susceptibility of the virulent bacterium B. pseudomallei, especially to carbapenems and cephalosporins. In addition, substitution of the residue Tyr119 affects

  15. Importance of porins for biocide efficacy against Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Elrike; Schmidt, Stefan; Niederweis, Michael; Steinhauer, Katrin

    2011-05-01

    Mycobacteria are among the microorganisms least susceptible to biocides but cause devastating diseases, such as tuberculosis, and increasingly opportunistic infections. The exceptional resistance of mycobacteria to toxic solutes is due to an unusual outer membrane, which acts as an efficient permeability barrier, in synergy with other resistance mechanisms. Porins are channel-forming proteins in the outer membrane of mycobacteria. In this study we used the alamarBlue assay to show that the deletion of Msp porins in isogenic mutants increased the resistance of Mycobacterium smegmatis to isothiazolinones (methylchloroisothiazolinone [MCI]/methylisothiazolinone [MI] and octylisothiazolinone [2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one; OIT]), formaldehyde-releasing biocides {hexahydrotriazine [1,3,5-tris (2-hydroxyethyl)-hexahydrotriazine; HHT] and methylenbisoxazolidine [N,N'-methylene-bis-5-(methyloxazolidine); MBO]}, and the lipophilic biocides polyhexamethylene biguanide and octenidine dihydrochloride 2- to 16-fold. Furthermore, the susceptibility of the porin triple mutant against a complex disinfectant was decreased 8-fold compared to wild-type (wt) M. smegmatis. Efficacy testing in the quantitative suspension test EN 14348 revealed 100-fold improved survival of the porin mutant in the presence of this biocide. These findings underline the importance of porins for the susceptibility of M. smegmatis to biocides.

  16. Importance of Porins for Biocide Efficacy against Mycobacterium smegmatis▿

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, Elrike; Schmidt, Stefan; Niederweis, Michael; Steinhauer, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacteria are among the microorganisms least susceptible to biocides but cause devastating diseases, such as tuberculosis, and increasingly opportunistic infections. The exceptional resistance of mycobacteria to toxic solutes is due to an unusual outer membrane, which acts as an efficient permeability barrier, in synergy with other resistance mechanisms. Porins are channel-forming proteins in the outer membrane of mycobacteria. In this study we used the alamarBlue assay to show that the deletion of Msp porins in isogenic mutants increased the resistance of Mycobacterium smegmatis to isothiazolinones (methylchloroisothiazolinone [MCI]/methylisothiazolinone [MI] and octylisothiazolinone [2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one; OIT]), formaldehyde-releasing biocides {hexahydrotriazine [1,3,5-tris (2-hydroxyethyl)-hexahydrotriazine; HHT] and methylenbisoxazolidine [N,N′-methylene-bis-5-(methyloxazolidine); MBO]}, and the lipophilic biocides polyhexamethylene biguanide and octenidine dihydrochloride 2- to 16-fold. Furthermore, the susceptibility of the porin triple mutant against a complex disinfectant was decreased 8-fold compared to wild-type (wt) M. smegmatis. Efficacy testing in the quantitative suspension test EN 14348 revealed 100-fold improved survival of the porin mutant in the presence of this biocide. These findings underline the importance of porins for the susceptibility of M. smegmatis to biocides. PMID:21398489

  17. Salmonella typhimurium contains an anion-selective outer membrane porin induced by phosphate starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, K; Benz, R; Brass, J; Boos, W

    1985-01-01

    A mutant of Salmonella typhimurium was selected that is constitutive for the pho regulon. It exhibited constitutive glycerol-3-phosphate transport activity and synthesized a new outer membrane porin. Upon measurement of porin activity in black lipid films, it exhibited anion selectivity. It therefore appears analogous to the Escherichia coli PhoE porin. Images PMID:2981826

  18. Structure of a putative BenF-like porin from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 at 2.6 A resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, P.; Swaminathan, S.; Lu, F.; Zhao, X.; Li, Z.; Gilmore, J.; Bain, K.; Rutter, M. E.; Gheyi, T.; Schwinn, D.; Bonanno, J. B.; Pieper, U.; Fajardo, J. E.; Fiser, A.; Almo, S. C.; Chance, M. R.; Baker, D.; Atwell, S.; Thompson, D. A.; Emtage, J. S.; Wasserman, S. R.; Sali, A.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.

    2010-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria typically overcome poor permeability of outer membranes through general porins like OmpF and OmpC, which form water-filled transmembrane pores permitting diffusion of hydrophilic molecules with no particular selectivity. Many bacteria lacking such general porins use substrate-specific porins to overcome growth-limiting conditions and facilitate selective transport of metabolites. Exclusive reliance on substrate-specific porins yields lower membrane permeability to small molecules (<600 Da) versus that seen for Escherichia coli. In Pseudomonads, transit of most small molecules across the cell membrane is thought to be mediated by substrate-specific channels of the OprD superfamily. This property explains, at least in part, the high incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. High-throughput DNA sequencing of the P. aeruginosa chromosome revealed the presence of 19 genes encoding structurally related, substrate-specific porins (with 30-45% pairwise amino acid sequence identity) that mediate transmembrane passage of small, water-soluble compounds. The OprD superfamily encompasses the eponymous OprD subfamily, which includes 9 P. aeruginosa proteins that convey basic amino acids and carbapenem antibiotics, and the OpdK subfamily, which includes 11 P. aeruginosa proteins that convey aromatic acids and other small aromatic compounds. Genome sequencing of other gram-negative bacteria has revealed additional members of the OprD and OpdK subfamilies in various organisms, including other pseudomonads. Among the many bacteria in which OprD superfamily members have been identified are P. putida, P. fluorescens Pf-5, P. syringae, and Azotobacter vinelandii, all of which share closely related genes that encode the so-called BenF-like porins. In P. putida, benF is part of an operon involved in benzoate catabolism regulated by benR. Within this operon, benK, benE, and benF genes have been suggested to contribute toward either influx or efflux

  19. Large-Conductance Transmembrane Porin Made from DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Göpfrich, Kerstin; Li, Chen-Yu; Ricci, Maria; Bhamidimarri, Satya Prathyusha; Yoo, Jejoong; Gyenes, Bertalan; Ohmann, Alexander; Winterhalter, Mathias; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2016-09-27

    DNA nanotechnology allows for the creation of three-dimensional structures at nanometer scale. Here, we use DNA to build the largest synthetic pore in a lipid membrane to date, approaching the dimensions of the nuclear pore complex and increasing the pore-area and the conductance 10-fold compared to previous man-made channels. In our design, 19 cholesterol tags anchor a megadalton funnel-shaped DNA origami porin in a lipid bilayer membrane. Confocal imaging and ionic current recordings reveal spontaneous insertion of the DNA porin into the lipid membrane, creating a transmembrane pore of tens of nanosiemens conductance. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations characterize the conductance mechanism at the atomic level and independently confirm the DNA porins' large ionic conductance.

  20. One-step purification and porin transport activity of the major outer membrane proteins P2 from Haemophilus influenzae, FomA from Fusobacterium nucleatum and PorB from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Kattner, Christof; Pfennig, Sabrina; Massari, Paola; Tanabe, Mikio

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial porins are major outer membrane proteins that function as essential solute transporters between the bacteria and the extracellular environment. Structural features of porins are also recognized by eukaryotic cell receptors involved in innate and adaptive immunity. To better investigate the function of porins, proper refolding is necessary following purification from inclusion bodies [1, 2]. Using a single-step size exclusion chromatographic method, we have purified three major porins from pathogenic bacteria, the OmpP2 (P2) from Haemophilus influenzae, FomA from Fusobacterium nucleatum and PorB from Neisseria meningitidis, at high yield and report their unique solute transport activity with size exclusion limit. Furthermore, we have optimized their purification method and achieved improvement of their thermostability for facilitating functional and structural analyses.

  1. Understanding Voltage Gating of Providencia stuartii Porins at Atomic Level.

    PubMed

    Song, Wanling; Bajaj, Harsha; Nasrallah, Chady; Jiang, Hualiang; Winterhalter, Mathias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Xu, Yechun

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial porins are water-filled β-barrel channels that allow translocation of solutes across the outer membrane. They feature a constriction zone, contributed by the plunging of extracellular loop 3 (L3) into the channel lumen. Porins are generally in the open state, but undergo gating in response to external voltages. To date the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we report results from molecular dynamics simulations on the two porins of Providenica stuartii, Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2, which display distinct voltage sensitivities. Voltage gating was observed in Omp-Pst2, where the binding of cations in-between L3 and the barrel wall results in exposing a conserved aromatic residue in the channel lumen, thereby halting ion permeation. Comparison of Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2 structures and trajectories suggests that their sensitivity to voltage is encoded in the hydrogen-bonding network anchoring L3 onto the barrel wall, as we observed that it is the strength of this network that governs the probability of cations binding behind L3. That Omp-Pst2 gating is observed only when ions flow against the electrostatic potential gradient of the channel furthermore suggests a possible role for this porin in the regulation of charge distribution across the outer membrane and bacterial homeostasis.

  2. Tuning the affinity of anion binding sites in porin channels with negatively charged residues: molecular details for OprP.

    PubMed

    Modi, Niraj; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Bains, Manjeet; Benz, Roland; Hancock, Robert E W; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2015-02-20

    The cell envelope of the Gram negative opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is poorly permeable to many classes of hydrophilic molecules including antibiotics due to the presence of the narrow and selective porins. Here we focused on one of the narrow-channel porins, that is, OprP, which is responsible for the high-affinity uptake of phosphate ions. Its two central binding sites for phosphate contain a number of positively charged amino acids together with a single negatively charged residue (D94). The presence of this negatively charged residue in a binding site for negatively charged phosphate ions is highly surprising due to the potentially reduced binding affinity. The goal of this study was to better understand the role of D94 in phosphate binding, selectivity, and transport using a combination of mutagenesis, electrophysiology, and free-energy calculations. The presence of a negatively charged residue in the binding site is critical for this specific porin OprP as emphasized by the evolutionary conservation of such negatively charged residue in the binding site of several anion-selective porins. Mutations of D94 in OprP to any positively charged or neutral residue increased the binding affinity of phosphate for OprP. Detailed analysis indicated that this anionic residue in the phosphate binding site of OprP, despite its negative charge, maintained energetically favorable phosphate binding sites in the central region of the channel and at the same time decreased residence time thus preventing excessively strong binding of phosphate that would oppose phosphate flux through the channel. Intriguingly mutations of D94 to positively charged residues, lysine and arginine, resulted in very different binding affinities and free energy profiles, indicating the importance of side chain conformations of these positively charged residues in phosphate binding to OprP.

  3. Enhancement of extracellular electron transfer and bioelectricity output by synthetic porin.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yang-Chun; Yu, Yang-Yang; Yang, Yun; Liu, Jing; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Song, Hao

    2013-02-01

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC), is a promising environmental biotechnology for harvesting electricity energy from organic wastes. However, low bacterial membrane permeability of electron shuttles is a limiting factor that restricts the electron shuttle-mediated extracellular electron transfer (EET) from bacteria to electrodes, thus the electricity power output of MFCs. To this end, we heterologously expressed a porin protein OprF from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 into Escherichia coli, which dramatically increased its membrane permeability, delivering a much higher current output in MFCs than its parental strain (BL21). We found that the oprF-expression strain showed more efficient EET than its parental strain. More strikingly, the enhanced membrane permeability also rendered the oprF-expression strain an efficient usage of riboflavin as the electron shuttle, whereas its parental strain was incapable of. Our results substantiated that membrane permeability is crucial for the efficient EET, and indicated that the expression of synthetic porins could be an efficient strategy to enhance bioelectricity generation by microorganisms (including electrogenic bacteria) in MFCs.

  4. Adaptive and mutational resistance: role of porins and efflux pumps in drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lucía; Hancock, Robert E W

    2012-10-01

    The substantial use of antibiotics in the clinic, combined with a dearth of new antibiotic classes, has led to a gradual increase in the resistance of bacterial pathogens to these compounds. Among the various mechanisms by which bacteria endure the action of antibiotics, those affecting influx and efflux are of particular importance, as they limit the interaction of the drug with its intracellular targets and, consequently, its deleterious effects on the cell. This review evaluates the impact of porins and efflux pumps on two major types of resistance, namely, mutational and adaptive types of resistance, both of which are regarded as key phenomena in the global rise of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. In particular, we explain how adaptive and mutational events can dramatically influence the outcome of antibiotic therapy by altering the mechanisms of influx and efflux of antibiotics. The identification of porins and pumps as major resistance markers has opened new possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies directed specifically against these mechanisms.

  5. Large-Conductance Transmembrane Porin Made from DNA Origami

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology allows for the creation of three-dimensional structures at nanometer scale. Here, we use DNA to build the largest synthetic pore in a lipid membrane to date, approaching the dimensions of the nuclear pore complex and increasing the pore-area and the conductance 10-fold compared to previous man-made channels. In our design, 19 cholesterol tags anchor a megadalton funnel-shaped DNA origami porin in a lipid bilayer membrane. Confocal imaging and ionic current recordings reveal spontaneous insertion of the DNA porin into the lipid membrane, creating a transmembrane pore of tens of nanosiemens conductance. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations characterize the conductance mechanism at the atomic level and independently confirm the DNA porins’ large ionic conductance. PMID:27504755

  6. Inhibition of cell-cell binding by lipid assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Bargatze, Robert F.

    2001-05-22

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  7. Active protection of mice against Salmonella typhi by immunization with strain-specific porins.

    PubMed

    Isibasi, A; Ortiz-Navarrete, V; Paniagua, J; Pelayo, R; González, C R; García, J A; Kumate, J

    1992-01-01

    NIH mice were immunized with between 2.5 and 30 micrograms of two highly purified porins, 34 kDa and 36 kDa, isolated from the virulent strain Salmonella typhi 9,12, Vi:d. Of mice immunized with 10 micrograms of porins, 90% were protected against a challenge with up to 500 LD50 (50% lethal doses) of S. typhi 9,12,Vi:d and only 30% protection was observed in mice immunized with the same dose of porins but challenged with the heterologous strain Salmonella typhimurium. These results demonstrate the utility of porins for the induction of a protective status against S. typhi in mice.

  8. Sphingolipids inhibit vimentin-dependent cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Claire L; Kemppainen, Kati; Isoniemi, Kimmo O; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-06-01

    The sphingolipids, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), can induce or inhibit cellular migration. The intermediate filament protein vimentin is an inducer of migration and a marker for epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Given that keratin intermediate filaments are regulated by SPC, with consequences for cell motility, we wanted to determine whether vimentin is also regulated by sphingolipid signalling and whether it is a determinant for sphingolipid-mediated functions. In cancer cells where S1P and SPC inhibited migration, we observed that S1P and SPC induced phosphorylation of vimentin on S71, leading to a corresponding reorganization of vimentin filaments. These effects were sphingolipid-signalling-dependent, because inhibition of either the S1P2 receptor (also known as S1PR2) or its downstream effector Rho-associated kinase (ROCK, for which there are two isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2) nullified the sphingolipid-induced effects on vimentin organization and S71 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the anti-migratory effect of S1P and SPC could be prevented by expressing S71-phosphorylation-deficient vimentin. In addition, we demonstrated, by using wild-type and vimentin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, that the sphingolipid-mediated inhibition of migration is dependent on vimentin. These results imply that this newly discovered sphingolipid-vimentin signalling axis exerts brake-and-throttle functions in the regulation of cell migration.

  9. Cloning, Sequencing, and Role in Serum Susceptibility of Porin II from Mesophilic Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Nogueras, Maria Mercé; Merino, Susana; Aguilar, Alicia; Benedi, Vicente Javier; Tomás, Juan M.

    2000-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced the structural gene for Aeromonas hydrophila porin II from strain AH-3 (serogroup O:34). The genetic position of this gene, like that of ompF in Escherichia coli, is adjacent to aspC and transcribed in the same direction. However, upstream of the porin II gene no similarities with E. coli were found. We obtained defined insertion mutants in porin II gene either in A. hydrophila (O:34) or A. veronii sobria (serogroup O:11) serum-resistant or -sensitive strains. Furthermore, we complemented these mutants with a plasmid harboring only the porin II gene, which allowed us to define the role of porin II as an important surface molecule involved in serum susceptibility and C1q binding in these strains. PMID:10722573

  10. FNC efficiently inhibits mantle cell lymphoma growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Ding, Xixi; Peng, Bangan; Wang, Ning; Ma, Fang; Peng, Youmei; Wang, Qingduan; Chang, Junbiao

    2017-01-01

    FNC, 2'-deoxy-2'-β-fluoro-4'-azidocytidine, is a novel cytidine analogue, that has shown strong antiproliferative activity in human lymphoma, lung adenocarcinoma and acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, we investigated the effects of FNC on mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and the underlying mechanisms. In in vitro experiments, cell viability was detected by the CCK8 assay, and cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and the expression of relative apoptosis proteins were detected by Western Blot. The in vivo antitumor effect of FNC was investigated in a SCID xenograft model. Finally, the mechanisms of action of FNC were assessed using a whole human genome expression profile chip. The data showed that FNC inhibited cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and FNC could induce apoptosis by the death recepter pathways in JeKo-1 cells and arrest the cell cycle in the G1/S or G2/M phase. Notably, FNC showed in vivo efficacy in mice bearing JeKo-1 xenograft tumors. Gene expression profile analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly focused on the immune system process, cellular process and death. These findings implied that FNC may be a valuable therapeutic in mantle cell lymphoma and provided an experimental basis for the early clinical application of FNC.

  11. FNC efficiently inhibits mantle cell lymphoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xixi; Peng, Bangan; Wang, Ning; Ma, Fang; Peng, Youmei; Wang, Qingduan; Chang, Junbiao

    2017-01-01

    FNC, 2'-deoxy-2'-β-fluoro-4'-azidocytidine, is a novel cytidine analogue, that has shown strong antiproliferative activity in human lymphoma, lung adenocarcinoma and acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, we investigated the effects of FNC on mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and the underlying mechanisms. In in vitro experiments, cell viability was detected by the CCK8 assay, and cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and the expression of relative apoptosis proteins were detected by Western Blot. The in vivo antitumor effect of FNC was investigated in a SCID xenograft model. Finally, the mechanisms of action of FNC were assessed using a whole human genome expression profile chip. The data showed that FNC inhibited cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and FNC could induce apoptosis by the death recepter pathways in JeKo-1 cells and arrest the cell cycle in the G1/S or G2/M phase. Notably, FNC showed in vivo efficacy in mice bearing JeKo-1 xenograft tumors. Gene expression profile analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly focused on the immune system process, cellular process and death. These findings implied that FNC may be a valuable therapeutic in mantle cell lymphoma and provided an experimental basis for the early clinical application of FNC. PMID:28333959

  12. SIRT1 controls cell proliferation by regulating contact inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Elizabeth H; Dai, Yan

    2016-09-16

    Contact inhibition keeps cell proliferation in check and serves as a built-in protection against cancer development by arresting cell division upon cell-cell contact. Yet the complete mechanism behind this anti-cancer process remains largely unclear. Here we present SIRT1 as a novel regulator of contact inhibition. SIRT1 performs a wide variety of functions in biological processes, but its involvement in contact inhibition has not been explored to date. We used NIH3T3 cells, which are sensitive to contact inhibition, and H460 and DU145 cancer cells, which lack contact inhibition, to investigate the relationship between SIRT1 and contact inhibition. We show that SIRT1 overexpression in NIH3T3 cells overcomes contact inhibition while SIRT1 knockdown in cancer cells restores their lost contact inhibition. Moreover, we demonstrate that p27 protein expression is controlled by SIRT1 in contact inhibition. Overall, our findings underline the critical role of SIRT1 in contact inhibition and suggest SIRT1 inhibition as a potential strategy to suppress cancer cell growth by restoring contact inhibition.

  13. The binding of antibiotics in OmpF porin.

    PubMed

    Ziervogel, Brigitte K; Roux, Benoît

    2013-01-08

    The structure of OmpF porin in complex with three common antibiotics (zwitterionic ampicillin, anionic ertapenem, and di-anionic carbenicillin) was determined using X-ray crystallography. The three antibiotics are found to bind within the extracellular and periplasmic pore vestibules, away from the narrow OmpF constriction zone. Using the X-ray structures as a starting point, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations with an applied membrane voltage show that ionic current through the OmpF channel is blocked with bound ampicillin, but not with bound carbenicillin. The susceptibility of Escherichia coli expressing OmpF mutants to ampicillin and carbenicillin was also experimentally characterized using microbiologic assays. These results show that general diffusion by OmpF porins allows for transfer of molecules with varied charged states and give insights into the design of more efficient antibiotics. A better understanding of this mechanism will shed light on nature's way of devising channels able to enhance the transport of molecules through membranes.

  14. Salmonella Typhi OmpS1 and OmpS2 porins are potent protective immunogens with adjuvant properties.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Tenorio-Calvo, Alejandra; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Perez-Shibayama, Christian; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; López-Santiago, Rubén; Baeza, Isabel; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Bonifaz, Laura; Isibasi, Armando; Calva, Edmundo; López-Macías, Constantino

    2013-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) is the causal agent of typhoid fever, a disease that primarily affects developing countries. Various antigens from this bacterium have been reported to be targets of the immune response. Recently, the S. Typhi genome has been shown to encode two porins--OmpS1 and OmpS2--which are expressed at low levels under in vitro culture conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that immunizing mice with either OmpS1 or OmpS2 induced production of specific, long-term antibody titres and conferred protection against S. Typhi challenge; in particular, OmpS1 was more immunogenic and conferred greater protective effects than OmpS2. We also found that OmpS1 is a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, whereas OmpS2 is a TLR2 and TLR4 agonist. Both porins induced the production of tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-6, and OmpS2 was also able to induce interleukin-10 production. Furthermore, OmpS1 induced the over-expression of MHC II molecules in dendritic cells and OmpS2 induced the over-expression of CD40 molecules in macrophages and dendritic cells. Co-immunization of OmpS1 or OmpS2 with ovalbumin (OVA) increased anti-OVA antibody titres, the duration and isotype diversity of the OVA-specific antibody response, and the proliferation of T lymphocytes. These porins also had adjuvant effects on the antibody response when co-immunized with either the Vi capsular antigen from S. Typhi or inactivated 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus [A(H1N1)pdm09]. Taken together, the data indicate that OmpS1 and OmpS2, despite being expressed at low levels under in vitro culture conditions, are potent protective immunogens with intrinsic adjuvant properties.

  15. Salmonella Typhi OmpS1 and OmpS2 porins are potent protective immunogens with adjuvant properties

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Tenorio-Calvo, Alejandra; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Perez-Shibayama, Christian; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; López-Santiago, Rubén; Baeza, Isabel; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Bonifaz, Laura; Isibasi, Armando; Calva, Edmundo; López-Macías, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) is the causal agent of typhoid fever, a disease that primarily affects developing countries. Various antigens from this bacterium have been reported to be targets of the immune response. Recently, the S. Typhi genome has been shown to encode two porins – OmpS1 and OmpS2 – which are expressed at low levels under in vitro culture conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that immunizing mice with either OmpS1 or OmpS2 induced production of specific, long-term antibody titres and conferred protection against S. Typhi challenge; in particular, OmpS1 was more immunogenic and conferred greater protective effects than OmpS2. We also found that OmpS1 is a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, whereas OmpS2 is a TLR2 and TLR4 agonist. Both porins induced the production of tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-6, and OmpS2 was also able to induce interleukin-10 production. Furthermore, OmpS1 induced the over-expression of MHC II molecules in dendritic cells and OmpS2 induced the over-expression of CD40 molecules in macrophages and dendritic cells. Co-immunization of OmpS1 or OmpS2 with ovalbumin (OVA) increased anti-OVA antibody titres, the duration and isotype diversity of the OVA-specific antibody response, and the proliferation of T lymphocytes. These porins also had adjuvant effects on the antibody response when co-immunized with either the Vi capsular antigen from S. Typhi or inactivated 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus [A(H1N1)pdm09]. Taken together, the data indicate that OmpS1 and OmpS2, despite being expressed at low levels under in vitro culture conditions, are potent protective immunogens with intrinsic adjuvant properties. PMID:23432484

  16. Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven R Schwarze...SUBTITLE Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteasome Inhibition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0392 5c...proteasome inhibition can act as an anti-neoplastic agent in vivo by sensitizing cancer cells to cell death ligands in the tumor microenvironment

  17. Sequence and transcriptional start site of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane porin protein F gene.

    PubMed Central

    Duchêne, M; Schweizer, A; Lottspeich, F; Krauss, G; Marget, M; Vogel, K; von Specht, B U; Domdey, H

    1988-01-01

    Porin F is one of the major proteins of the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It forms water-filled pores of variable size. Porin F is a candidate for a vaccine against P. aeruginosa because it antigenically cross-reacts in all serotype strains of the International Antigenic Typing Scheme. We have isolated the gene for porin F from a lambda EMBL3 bacteriophage library by using oligodeoxynucleotide hybridization probes and have determined its nucleotide sequence. Different peptide sequences obtained from isolated porin F confirmed the deduced protein sequence. The mature protein consists of 326 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of 35,250. The precursor contains an N-terminal signal peptide of 24 amino acid residues. S1 protection and primer extension experiments, together with Northern (RNA) blots, indicate that the mRNA coding for porin F is monocistronic with short untranslated regions of about 58 bases at the 5' end and about 47 bases at the 3' end. The sequences in the -10 and -35 regions upstream of the transcriptional start site are closely related to the Escherichia coli promoter consensus sequences, which explains why the porin F gene is expressed in E. coli under the control of its own promoter. The amino acid sequence of porin F is not homologous to the different E. coli porins OmpF, OmpC, LamB, and PhoE. On the other hand, a highly homologous region of 30 amino acids between the OmpA proteins of different enteric bacteria and porin F of P. aeruginosa was detected. The core region of the homology to E. coli OmpA had 11 of 12 amino acid residues in common. Images PMID:2447060

  18. Salmonella porins induce a sustained, lifelong specific bactericidal antibody memory response

    PubMed Central

    Secundino, Ismael; López-Macías, Constantino; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Ríos-Sarabia, Nora; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Angel Villasis-Keever, Miguel; Becker, Ingeborg; Luis Puente, José; Calva, Edmundo; Isibasi, Armando

    2006-01-01

    We examined the ability of porins from Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to induce a long-term antibody response in BALB/c mice. These porins triggered a strong lifelong production of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody in the absence of exogenous adjuvant. Analysis of the IgG subclasses produced during this antibody response revealed the presence of the subclasses IgG2b, IgG1, IgG2a and weak IgG3. Despite the high homology of porins, the long-lasting anti-S. typhi porin sera did not cross-react with S. typhimurium. Notably, the antiporin sera showed a sustained lifelong bactericidal-binding activity to the wild-type S. typhi strain, whereas porin-specific antibody titres measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) decreased with time. Because our porin preparations contained the outer membrane proteins C and F (OmpC and OmpF), we evaluated the individual contribution of each porin to the long-lasting antibody response. OmpC and OmpF induced long-lasting antibody titres, measured by ELISA, which were sustained for 300 days. In contrast, although OmpC induced sustained high bactericidal antibody titres for 300 days, postimmunization, the bactericidal antibody titre induced by OmpF was not detected at day 180. These results indicate that OmpC is the main protein responsible for the antibody-mediated memory bactericidal response induced by porins. Taken together, our results show that porins are strong immunogens that confer lifelong specific bactericidal antibody responses in the absence of added adjuvant. PMID:16423041

  19. MET Inhibition in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zuoquan; Lee, Young H.; Boeke, Marta; Jilaveanu, Lucia B.; Liu, Zongzhi; Bottaro, Donald P.; Kluger, Harriet M.; Shuch, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most lethal form of kidney cancer. Small molecule VEGFR inhibitors are widely used but are not curative and various resistance mechanisms such as activation of the MET pathway have been described. Dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitors have recently shown clinical benefit but limited preclinical data evaluates their effects in ccRCC. Methods: An interrogation of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset was performed to evaluate oncogenic alterations in the MET/VEGFR2 pathway. We evaluated the in vitro effects of Cabozantinib, a dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, using a panel of ccRCC cell lines. Drug effects of cell viability and proliferation, migration, cell scatter, anchorage independent growth, and downstream MET/VEGFR2 signaling pathways were assessed. Results: Twelve percent of TCGA cases had possible MET/HGF oncogenic alterations with co-occurrence noted (p<0.001). MET/HGF altered cases had worse overall survival (p=0.044). Cabozantinib was a potent inhibitor of MET and VEGFR2 in vitro in our cell line panel. PI3K, MAPK and mTOR pathways were also suppressed by cabozantinib, however the effects on cell viability in vitro were modest. At nanomolar concentrations of cabozantinib, HGF-stimulated migration, invasion, cellular scattering and soft agar colony formation were inhibited. Conclusions: We provide further preclinical rationale for dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibition in ccRCC. While the MET pathway is implicated in VEGFR resistance, dual inhibitors may have direct anti-tumor effects in a patient subset with evidence of MET pathway involvement. Cabozantinib is a potent dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, significantly inhibits cell migration and invasion in vitro and likely has anti-angiogenic effects similar to other VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Future work involving in vivo models will be useful to better define mechanisms of potential anti-tumor activity. PMID:27390595

  20. Functional role of ompF and ompC porins in pathogenesis of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hejair, Hassan M A; Zhu, Yingchu; Ma, Jiale; Zhang, Yue; Pan, Zihao; Zhang, Wei; Yao, Huochun

    2017-03-14

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli is an important pathogen causes systemic infections in avian species and large economic losses in poultry industry worldwide. The functional role of porins during the infection and their mechanisms of interaction with host tissues for adhesion to and invasion are poorly understood. However, whether porins play a role in infection remains unclear. In this study we evaluated the potential of ompF and ompC outer membrane porins in the pathogenesis of avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) strain TW-XM. The ompF and ompC were deleted to generate a series of mutants. We found that, ΔompF and ΔompC reduced significantly the adherence by 41.3% and 46.1% and invasion capabilities of APEC to mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC) bEnd.3 cells in vitro by 51.9% and 49.7% respectively, compared with the wild strain TW-XM. In vivo experiment based on the measurement of the LD50 have also shown that, ΔompF and ΔompC reduced the bacterial virulence by 9.8-fold, 12.3-fold in ducklings and 9-fold, 10.2-fold in mouse models. Animal infection experiments further revealed that, loss of ompF and ompC reduced TW-XM colonization and invasion capacity in brains, lungs and blood compared to wild-type strain TW-XM (P > 0.01). These virulence-related phenotypes were partially recoverable by genetic complementation. The results of the quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated that, the loss of ompF and ompC significantly decreased the expression levels of ompA, fimC and iBeA genes in the mutant strains, compared to wild-type strainTW-XM (P < 0.01). Collectively, our data demonstrate that inactivation of these two porins decreased adhesion, invasion, colonization, proliferation capacities, possibly by reduced expression levels of ompA, fimC and iBeA, which may indicate the involvement of ompF and ompC in APEC pathogenesis.

  1. OpnS, an outer membrane porin of Xenorhabdus nematophila, confers a competitive advantage for growth in the insect host.

    PubMed

    van der Hoeven, Ransome; Forst, Steven

    2009-09-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila engages in a mutualistic association with an entomopathogenic nematode and also functions as a pathogen toward different insect hosts. We studied the role of the growth-phase-regulated outer membrane protein OpnS in host interactions. OpnS was shown to be a 16-stranded beta-barrel porin. opnS was expressed during growth in insect hemolymph and expression was elevated as the cell density increased. When wild-type and opnS deletion strains were coinjected into insects, the wild-type strain was predominantly recovered from the insect cadaver. Similarly, an opnS-complemented strain outcompeted the DeltaopnS strain. Coinjection of the wild-type and DeltaopnS strains together with uncolonized nematodes into insects resulted in nematode progeny that were almost exclusively colonized with the wild-type strain. Likewise, nematode progeny recovered after coinjection of a mixture of nematodes carrying either the wild-type or DeltaopnS strain were colonized by the wild-type strain. In addition, the DeltaopnS strain displayed a competitive growth defect when grown together with the wild-type strain in insect hemolymph but not in defined culture medium. The DeltaopnS strain displayed increased sensitivity to antimicrobial compounds, suggesting that deletion of OpnS affected the integrity of the outer membrane. These findings show that the OpnS porin confers a competitive advantage for the growth and/or the survival of X. nematophila in the insect host and provides a new model for studying the biological relevance of differential regulation of porins in a natural host environment.

  2. Filtering with Electric Field: The Case of E. coli Porins.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Gutierrez, Silvia; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Bodrenko, Igor; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2015-05-21

    Although the role of general bacterial porins is well established as main pathway for polar antibiotics, the molecular details of their mode-of-action are still under debate. Using molecular dynamics simulations and water as a probe, we demonstrated the strong ordering of water molecules, differently tuned along the axis of diffusion in the transversal direction. Preserved features and important differences were characterized for different channels, allowing to put forward a general model for molecular filtering. The intrinsic electric field, responsible for water ordering, (i) filters those dipolar molecules that can compensate the entropy decrease by dipole alignment in the restricted region and (ii) might create an additional barrier by changing direction when escaping from the restricted region. We tested this model using two antibiotics, cefepime and cefotaxime, through metadynamics free energy calculations. A rational drug design should take this into account for screening molecules with improved permeation properties.

  3. Bestatin inhibits cell growth, cell division, and spore cell differentiation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Poloz, Yekaterina; Catalano, Andrew; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-04-01

    Bestatin methyl ester (BME) is an inhibitor of Zn(2+)-binding aminopeptidases that inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in normal and cancer cells. We have used Dictyostelium as a model organism to study the effects of BME. Only two Zn(2+)-binding aminopeptidases have been identified in Dictyostelium to date, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase A and B (PsaA and PsaB). PSA from other organisms is known to regulate cell division and differentiation. Here we show that PsaA is differentially expressed throughout growth and development of Dictyostelium, and its expression is regulated by developmental morphogens. We present evidence that BME specifically interacts with PsaA and inhibits its aminopeptidase activity. Treatment of cells with BME inhibited the rate of cell growth and the frequency of cell division in growing cells and inhibited spore cell differentiation during late development. Overexpression of PsaA-GFP (where GFP is green fluorescent protein) also inhibited spore cell differentiation but did not affect growth. Using chimeras, we have identified that nuclear versus cytoplasmic localization of PsaA affects the choice between stalk or spore cell differentiation pathway. Cells that overexpressed PsaA-GFP (primarily nuclear) differentiated into stalk cells, while cells that overexpressed PsaAΔNLS2-GFP (cytoplasmic) differentiated into spores. In conclusion, we have identified that BME inhibits cell growth, division, and differentiation in Dictyostelium likely through inhibition of PsaA.

  4. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteriamore » from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides.« less

  5. The PorB porin from commensal Neisseria lactamica induces Th1 and Th2 immune responses to ovalbumin in mice and is a potential immune adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuping; Wetzler, Lee M; Massari, Paola

    2008-02-06

    Porins from pathogenic Neisseriae are among several bacterial products with immune adjuvant activity. Neisseria meningitidis (Nme) PorB, has been shown to induce immune cells activation in a TLR2-dependent manner and acts as a vaccine immune adjuvant. The PorB porin from Neisseria lactamica (Nlac), a common nasopharyngeal commensal, shares significant structural and functional similarities with Nme PorB. In this work we ask whether the immune adjuvant ability of porins from pathogenic Neisserial strains is a characteristic shared with porins from non-pathogenic Neisserial species or whether it is unique for bacterial products derived from microorganisms capable of inducing inflammation and disease. We evaluated the potential immune adjuvant effect of Nlac PorB in mice using ovalbumin (OVA) as a prototype antigen. Immunization with Nlac PorB/OVA induced high OVA-specific IgG and IgM titers compared to OVA alone, similar to other adjuvants such as Nme PorB and alum. High titers of IgG1 and IgG2b were detected as well as production of IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and INF-gamma in response to Nlac PorB, consistent with induction of both a Th1-type and a Th2-type immune response. OVA-specific proliferation was also determined in splenocytes from Nlac PorB/OVA-immunized mice. In addition, B cell activation in vitro and cytokine production in response to Nlac PorB was found to be mediated by TLR2, in a similar manner to Nme PorB.

  6. Nonlinear and asymmetric open channel characteristics of an ion-selective porin in planar membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Mathes, A; Engelhardt, H

    1998-01-01

    The open channel characteristics of the bacterial porin Omp32 from Comamonas acidovorans were investigated by means of conductance measurements in planar lipid bilayers of the Montal-Mueller type. Particularly at low salt conditions (< or = 30 mM KCl) Omp32 exhibited some unusual asymmetric and nonlinear functional properties. Current-voltage relationship measurements showed that conductance depends on the orientation of porin molecules and is a nonlinear function of the applied membrane potential. Conductance also depends on the salt concentration in a manner not common to porins and the salt concentration modulates the nonlinearity of conductance-voltage relationships. Omp32 is strongly anion-selective. The nonlinear and asymmetric conductance of the open channel is a new observation in porins. PMID:9726928

  7. OmpK26, a Novel Porin Associated with Carbapenem Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    García-Sureda, Laura; Doménech-Sánchez, Antonio; Barbier, Mariette; Juan, Carlos; Gascó, Joan; Albertí, Sebastián

    2011-01-01

    Clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae resistant to carbapenems are being isolated with increasing frequency. Loss of the expression of the major nonspecific porins OmpK35/36 is a frequent feature in these isolates. In this study, we looked for porins that could compensate for the loss of the major porins in carbapenem-resistant organisms. Comparison of the outer membrane proteins from two K. pneumoniae clinical isogenic isolates that are susceptible (KpCS-1) and resistant (KpCR-1) to carbapenems revealed the absence of OmpK35/36 and the presence of a new 26-kDa protein in the resistant isolate. An identical result was obtained when another pair of isogenic isolates that are homoresistant (Kpn-3) and heteroresistant (Kpn-17) to carbapenems were compared. Mass spectrometry and DNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that this new protein, designated OmpK26, is a small monomeric oligogalacturonate-specific porin that belongs to the KdgM family of porins. Insertion-duplication mutagenesis of the OmpK26 coding gene, yjhA, in the carbapenem-resistant, porin-deficient isolate KpCR-1 caused the expression of OmpK36 and the reversion to the carbapenem-susceptible phenotype, suggesting that OmpK26 is indispensable for KpCR-1 to lose OmpK36 and become resistant to these antibiotics. Moreover, loss of the major porin and expression of OmpK26 reduced in vitro fitness and attenuated virulence in a murine model of acute systemic infection. Altogether, these results indicate that expression of the oligogalacturonate-specific porin OmpK26 compensates for the absence of OmpK35/36 and allows carbapenem resistance in K. pneumoniae but cannot restore the fitness of the microorganism. PMID:21807980

  8. How β-Lactam Antibiotics Enter Bacteria: A Dialogue with the Porins

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, Alexander; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Bessonov, Andrey N.; Winterhalter, Mathias; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistant (MDR) infections have become a major concern in hospitals worldwide. This study investigates membrane translocation, which is the first step required for drug action on internal bacterial targets. β-lactams, a major antibiotic class, use porins to pass through the outer membrane barrier of Gram-negative bacteria. Clinical reports have linked the MDR phenotype to altered membrane permeability including porin modification and efflux pump expression. Methodology/Principal Findings Here influx of β-lactams through the major Enterobacter aerogenes porin Omp36 is characterized. Conductance measurements through a single Omp36 trimer reconstituted into a planar lipid bilayer allowed us to count the passage of single β-lactam molecules. Statistical analysis of each transport event yielded the kinetic parameters of antibiotic travel through Omp36 and distinguishable translocation properties of β-lactams were quantified for ertapenem and cefepime. Expression of Omp36 in an otherwise porin-null bacterial strain is shown to confer increases in the killing rate of these antibiotics and in the corresponding bacterial susceptibility. Conclusions/Significance We propose the idea of a molecular “passport” that allows rapid transport of substrates through porins. Deciphering antibiotic translocation provides new insights for the design of novel drugs that may be highly effective at passing through the porin constriction zone. Such data may hold the key for the next generation of antibiotics capable of rapid intracellular accumulation to circumvent the further development MDR infections. PMID:19434239

  9. Integrin inhibition promotes atypical anoikis in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Silginer, M; Weller, M; Ziegler, U; Roth, P

    2014-01-01

    Integrins regulate cellular adhesion and transmit signals important for cell survival, proliferation and motility. They are expressed by glioma cells and may contribute to their malignant phenotype. Integrin inhibition may therefore represent a promising therapeutic strategy. GL-261 and SMA-560 glioma cells grown under standard conditions uniformly detached and formed large cell clusters after integrin gene silencing or pharmacological inhibition using EMD-121974, a synthetic Arg-Gly-Asp-motif peptide, or GLPG0187, a nonpeptidic integrin inhibitor. After 120 h, the clusters induced by integrin inhibition decayed and cells died. In contrast, when cells were cultured under stem cell (sphere) conditions, no disaggregation became apparent upon integrin inhibition, and cell death was not observed. As poly-HEMA-mediated detachment had similar effects on cell viability as integrin inhibition, we postulated that cell death may result from detachment alone, which was confirmed using various permissive and nonpermissive substrates. No surrogate markers of apoptosis were detected and electron microscopy confirmed that necrosis represents the dominant morphology of detachment-induced cell death. In addition, integrin inhibition resulted in the induction of autophagy that represents a survival signal. When integrins were inhibited in nonsphere glioma cells, the TGF-β pathway was strongly impaired, whereas no such effect was observed in glioma cells cultured under sphere conditions. Cell death induced by integrin inhibition was rescued by the addition of recombinant transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and accelerated by exposure to the TGF-β receptor inhibitor, SD-208. In summary, cell death following integrin inhibition is detachment mediated, represents an atypical form of anoikis involving necrosis as well as autophagy, and is modulated by TGF-β pathway activity. PMID:24457956

  10. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I: OUTER MEMBRANE INSERTION, TRIMERIZATION, AND PORIN FUNCTION REQUIRE A C-TERMINAL β-BARREL DOMAIN.

    PubMed

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-05-08

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprC(N) and TprC(C)) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)) of Treponema denticola and that TprC(C) is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSP(C)-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSP(N)-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSP(C)-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSP(N)-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP.

  11. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular

  12. Inhibition of caspases prevents ototoxic and ongoing hair cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Ogilvie, Judith M.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory hair cells die after acoustic trauma or ototoxic insults, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate hair cell death are not known. Here we identify several important signaling events that regulate the death of vestibular hair cells. Chick utricles were cultured in media supplemented with the ototoxic antibiotic neomycin and selected pharmacological agents that influence signaling molecules in cell death pathways. Hair cells that were treated with neomycin exhibited classically defined apoptotic morphologies such as condensed nuclei and fragmented DNA. Inhibition of protein synthesis (via treatment with cycloheximide) increased hair cell survival after treatment with neomycin, suggesting that hair cell death requires de novo protein synthesis. Finally, the inhibition of caspases promoted hair cell survival after neomycin treatment. Sensory hair cells in avian vestibular organs also undergo continual cell death and replacement throughout mature life. It is unclear whether the loss of hair cells stimulates the proliferation of supporting cells or whether the production of new cells triggers the death of hair cells. We examined the effects of caspase inhibition on spontaneous hair cell death in the chick utricle. Caspase inhibitors reduced the amount of ongoing hair cell death and ongoing supporting cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In isolated sensory epithelia, however, caspase inhibitors did not affect supporting cell proliferation directly. Our data indicate that ongoing hair cell death stimulates supporting cell proliferation in the mature utricle.

  13. Structures of the OmpF porin crystallized in the presence of foscholine-12

    PubMed Central

    Kefala, Georgia; Ahn, Chihoon; Krupa, Martin; Esquivies, Luis; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon

    2010-01-01

    The endogenous Escherichia coli porin OmpF was crystallized as an accidental by-product of our efforts to express, purify, and crystallize the E. coli integral membrane protein KdpD in the presence of foscholine-12 (FC12). FC12 is widely used in membrane protein studies, but no crystal structure of a protein that was both purified and crystallized with this detergent has been reported in the Protein Data Bank. Crystallization screening for KdpD yielded two different crystals of contaminating protein OmpF. Here, we report two OmpF structures, the first membrane protein crystal structures for which extraction, purification, and crystallization were done exclusively with FC12. The first structure was refined in space group P21 with cell parameters a = 136.7 Å, b = 210.5 Å, c = 137 Å, and β = 100.5°, and the resolution of 3.8 Å. The second structure was solved at the resolution of 4.4 Å and was refined in the P321 space group, with unit cell parameters a = 215.5 Å, b = 215.5 Å, c = 137.5 Å, and γ = 120°. Both crystal forms show novel crystal packing, in which the building block is a tetrahedral arrangement of four trimers. Additionally, we discuss the use of FC12 for membrane protein crystallization and structure determination, as well as the problem of the OmpF contamination for membrane proteins overexpressed in E. coli. PMID:20196071

  14. Flavonoids from Citrus unshiu Marc. inhibit cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells by selective inhibition of VCAM-1.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hana; Lee, Won Sup; Yun, Jeong Won; Jung, Ji Hyun; Yi, Sang Mi; Kim, Hye Jung; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gonsup; Jung, Jin-Myung; Ryu, Chung Ho; Shin, Sung Chul; Hong, Soon Chan

    2013-11-01

    Citrus fruits have been used as edible fruit and a component of traditional medicine for various diseases including cancer since ancient times. Herein, we investigated the anticancer activity of flavonoids of Citrus unshiu Marc. (FCM) focusing on anti-metastatic effects. We prepared FCM and performed experiments using MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. FCM inhibited TNF-induced cancer cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) without showing any toxicity. FCM inhibited the expression of VCAM-1, but not of ICAM-1, on MDA-MB-231 cells as well as HUVECs. FCM inhibited protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation, but not Akt phosphorylation. FCM also inhibited cancer cell invasion in a dose-dependent manner, but not MMP-9 expression. In conclusion, this study suggested that FCM inhibits TNF-induced cancer cell adhesion to HUVECs by inhibiting VCAM-1 through inhibition of PKC, providing evidence that FCM have anti-metastatic activity by inhibiting adhesion molecules and invasion on human breast cancer cells.

  15. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  16. Hili inhibits HIV replication in activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Peterlin, B Matija; Liu, Pingyang; Wang, Xiaoyun; Cary, Daniele; Shao, Wei; Leoz, Marie; Hong, Tian; Pan, Tao; Fujinaga, Koh

    2017-03-22

    Piwil proteins restrict the replication of mobile genetic elements in the germline. They are also expressed in many transformed cell lines. In this report, we discovered that the human piwil 2 (hili) can also inhibit HIV replication, especially in activated CD4+ T cells that are the preferred target cells for this virus in the infected host. Although resting cells did not express hili, it was rapidly induced following T cell activation. In these cells and transformed cell lines, depletion of hili increased levels of viral proteins and new viral particles. Further studies revealed that hili binds to tRNA. Some of them represent rare tRNA species, whose codons are over-represented in the viral genome. Targeting tRNA(Arg)(UCU) with an antisense oligonucleotide replicated effects of hili and also inhibited HIV replication. Finally, hili also inhibited the retrotransposition of the endogenous intracysternal A particle (IAP) by a similar mechanism. Thus, hili joins a list of host proteins that inhibit the replication of HIV and other mobile genetic elements.IMPORTANCE Piwil proteins inhibit the movement of mobile genetic elements in the germline. In their absence, sperm does not form and male mice are sterile. This inhibition is thought to occur via small piRNAs. However, in some species and in human somatic cells, piwil proteins bind primarily to tRNA. In this report, we demonstrate that human piwil proteins, especially hili, not only bind to select tRNA species that include rare tRNAs, but also inhibit HIV replication. Importantly, T cell activation induces the expression of hili in CD4+ T cells. Since hili also inhibited the movement of an endogenous retrovirus (IAP), our finding shed new light on this intracellular resistance to exogenous and endogenous retroviruses as well as other mobile genetic elements.

  17. Inhibition of host cell catalase by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a possible mechanism for cell injury.

    PubMed Central

    Almagor, M; Yatziv, S; Kahane, I

    1983-01-01

    This study demonstrates that viable Mycoplasma pneumoniae cells inhibit catalase activity in several types of intact human cells as well as in solution. Human erythrocyte catalase was inhibited up to 72%, and the inhibition of catalase in human cultured skin fibroblasts, lung carcinoma epithelial cells, and ciliated epithelial cells from human nasal polyps ranged between 75 and 80%. UV light-killed mycoplasmas failed to inhibit catalase activity both in intact cells and in vitro. After M. pneumoniae infection of human cultured skin fibroblasts, the level of malonyldialdehyde, an indicator for membrane lipid peroxidation, was 3.5 times higher than in control fibroblasts. Virulent M. pneumoniae completely inhibited catalase activity in solution, whereas the nonvirulent strains had a lesser ability to inhibit catalase activity. These findings suggest that as a result of host cell catalase inhibition by M. pneumoniae, the toxicity of the hydrogen peroxide generated by the microorganism and the affected cell is enhanced, thereby inducing host cell damage. PMID:6407999

  18. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Melck, Dominique; Palmisano, Antonella; Bisogno, Tiziana; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Anandamide was the first brain metabolite shown to act as a ligand of “central” CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report that the endogenous cannabinoid potently and selectively inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Anandamide dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 and EFM-19 cells with IC50 values between 0.5 and 1.5 μM and 83–92% maximal inhibition at 5–10 μM. The proliferation of several other nonmammary tumoral cell lines was not affected by 10 μM anandamide. The anti-proliferative effect of anandamide was not due to toxicity or to apoptosis of cells but was accompanied by a reduction of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. A stable analogue of anandamide (R)-methanandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 also inhibited EFM-19 cell proliferation, whereas arachidonic acid was much less effective. These cannabimimetic substances displaced the binding of the selective cannabinoid agonist [3H]CP 55,940 to EFM-19 membranes with an order of potency identical to that observed for the inhibition of EFM-19 cell proliferation. Moreover, anandamide cytostatic effect was inhibited by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A. Cell proliferation was arrested by a prolactin mAb and enhanced by exogenous human prolactin, whose mitogenic action was reverted by very low (0.1–0.5 μM) doses of anandamide. Anandamide suppressed the levels of the long form of the prolactin receptor in both EFM-19 and MCF-7 cells, as well as a typical prolactin-induced response, i.e., the expression of the breast cancer cell susceptibility gene brca1. These data suggest that anandamide blocks human breast cancer cell proliferation through CB1-like receptor-mediated inhibition of endogenous prolactin action at the level of prolactin receptor. PMID:9653194

  19. An adaptive response of Enterobacter aerogenes to imipenem: regulation of porin balance in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Sotto, Albert; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène; Bouziges, Nicole; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Davin-Regli, Anne

    2013-02-01

    Imipenem (IPM) is a carbapenem antibiotic frequently used in severe hospital infections. Several reports have mentioned the emergence of resistant isolates exhibiting membrane modifications. A study was conducted between September 2005 and August 2007 to survey infections due to Enterobacter aerogenes in patients hospitalised in a French university hospital. Resistant E. aerogenes clinical isolates obtained from patients treated with IPM and collected during the 3 months following initiation of treatment were phenotypically and molecularly characterised for β-lactamases, efflux pumps activity and outer membrane proteins. Among the 339 patients infected with E. aerogenes during the study period, 41 isolates (12.1%) were resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and 17 patients (5.0%) were treated with IPM. The isolates from these 17 patients presented TEM-24 and basal efflux expression. Following IPM treatment, an IPM-intermediate-susceptible (IPM-I) isolate emerged in 11 patients and an IPM-resistant (IPM-R) isolate in 6 patients. A change in the porin balance (Omp35/Omp36) was observed in IPM-I isolates exhibiting ertapenem resistance. Finally, a porin deficiency (Omp35 and Omp36 absence) was detected in IPM-R isolates associated with efflux pump expression. This study indicates that the alteration in porin expression, including the shift of porin expression and lack of porins, contribute to the E. aerogenes adaptive response to IPM treatment.

  20. Variation in the Neisseria lactamica porin, and its relationship to meningococcal PorB.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Julia S; Callaghan, Martin J; Derrick, Jeremy P; Maiden, Martin C J

    2008-05-01

    One potential vaccine strategy in the fight against meningococcal disease involves the exploitation of outer-membrane components of Neisseria lactamica, a commensal bacterium closely related to the meningococcus, Neisseria meningitidis. Although N. lactamica shares many surface structures with the meningococcus, little is known about the antigenic diversity of this commensal bacterium or the antigenic relationships between N. lactamica and N. meningitidis. Here, the N. lactamica porin protein (Por) was examined and compared to the related PorB antigens of N. meningitidis, to investigate potential involvement in anti-meningococcal immunity. Relationships among porin sequences were determined using distance-based methods and F(ST), and maximum-likelihood analyses were used to compare the selection pressures acting on the encoded proteins. These analyses demonstrated that the N. lactamica porin was less diverse than meningococcal PorB and although it was subject to positive selection, this was not as strong as the positive selection pressures acting on the meningococcal porin. In addition, the N. lactamica porin gene sequences and the protein sequences of the loop regions predicted to be exposed to the human immune system were dissimilar to the corresponding sequences in the meningococcus. This suggests that N. lactamica Por, contrary to previous suggestions, may have limited involvement in the development of natural immunity to meningococcal disease and might not be effective as a meningococcal vaccine component.

  1. Trends of the major porin gene (ompF) evolution: insight from the genus Yersinia.

    PubMed

    Stenkova, Anna M; Isaeva, Marina P; Shubin, Felix N; Rasskazov, Valeri A; Rakin, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    OmpF is one of the major general porins of Enterobacteriaceae that belongs to the first line of bacterial defense and interactions with the biotic as well as abiotic environments. Porins are surface exposed and their structures strongly reflect the history of multiple interactions with the environmental challenges. Unfortunately, little is known on diversity of porin genes of Enterobacteriaceae and the genus Yersinia especially. We analyzed the sequences of the ompF gene from 73 Yersinia strains covering 14 known species. The phylogenetic analysis placed most of the Yersinia strains in the same line assigned by 16S rDNA-gyrB tree. Very high congruence in the tree topologies was observed for Y. enterocolitica, Y. kristensenii, Y. ruckeri, indicating that intragenic recombination in these species had no effect on the ompF gene. A significant level of intra- and interspecies recombination was found for Y. aleksiciae, Y. intermedia and Y. mollaretii. Our analysis shows that the ompF gene of Yersinia has evolved with nonrandom mutational rate under purifying selection. However, several surface loops in the OmpF porin contain positively selected sites, which very likely reflect adaptive diversification Yersinia to their ecological niches. To our knowledge, this is a first investigation of diversity of the porin gene covering the whole genus of the family Enterobacteriaceae. This study demonstrates that recombination and positive selection both contribute to evolution of ompF, but the relative contribution of these evolutionary forces are different among Yersinia species.

  2. Inhibition of brain tumor cell proliferation by alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyesun; Oh, Seung-ick; Hong, Sunghoi E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr; Sung, Jiwon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Yoon, Myonggeun E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr; Koh, Eui Kwan

    2014-11-17

    This study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which electric fields affect cell function, and to determine the optimal conditions for electric field inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Low-intensity (<2 V/cm) and intermediate-frequency (100–300 kHz) alternating electric fields were applied to glioblastoma cell lines. These electric fields inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and abnormal mitosis due to the malformation of microtubules. These effects were significantly dependent on the intensity and frequency of applied electric fields.

  3. Interferon-alpha and dexamethasone inhibit adhesion of T cells to endothelial cells and synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, K.; Kawakami, A.; Nakashima, M.; Ida, H.; Sakito, S.; Matsuoka, N.; Terada, K.; Sakai, M.; Kawabe, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Ishimaru, T.; Kurouji, K.; Fujita, N.; Aoyagi, T.; Maeda, K.; Nagataki, S.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated whether interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interferon-alpha (IFN-α) and glucocorticoids affected the adhesion of T cells to human umbilical endothelial cells or human synovial cells. About 30% of peripheral blood T cells could bind to unstimulated endothelial cells, but only a few T cells could bind to unstimulated synovial cells. When both endothelial cells and synovial cells were cultured with recombinant IFN-γ (rIFN-γ), the percentage of T cell binding to both types of cells increased in a dose-dependent manner. rIFN-α and dexamethasone blocked the T cell binding to unstimulated endothelial cells. Furthermore, rIFN-α and dexamethasone suppressed T cell binding to both endothelial cells and synovial cells stimulated by IFN-γ, and also inhibited intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression on both endothelial cells and synovial cells stimulated by IFN-γ. These results suggest that IFN-α and glucocorticoids may inhibit T cell binding to endothelial cells or synovial cells by modulating adhesion molecule expression on these cells. PMID:1606729

  4. Glyphosate and AMPA inhibit cancer cell growth through inhibiting intracellular glycine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Lambrechts, Mark J; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Ge, Dongxia; Yin, Rutie; Xi, Mingrong; You, Zongbing

    2013-01-01

    Glycine is a nonessential amino acid that is reversibly converted from serine intracellularly by serine hydroxymethyltransferase. Glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), are analogs to glycine, thus they may inhibit serine hydroxymethyltransferase to decrease intracellular glycine synthesis. In this study, we found that glyphosate and AMPA inhibited cell growth in eight human cancer cell lines but not in two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines. AMPA arrested C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cells in the G1/G0 phase and inhibited entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. AMPA also promoted apoptosis in C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cell lines. AMPA upregulated p53 and p21 protein levels as well as procaspase 9 protein levels in C4-2B cells, whereas it downregulated cyclin D3 protein levels. AMPA also activated caspase 3 and induced cleavage of poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase. This study provides the first evidence that glyphosate and AMPA can inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of cancer cells but not normal cells, suggesting that they have potentials to be developed into a new anticancer therapy.

  5. Inhibition Of Call-Cell Binding By Kipid Assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O. , Bargatze, Robert F.

    2003-12-16

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  6. Sickle cell microRNAs inhibit the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Duraisingh, Manoj T; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-08-16

    Sickle cell hemoglobin conveys resistance to malaria. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, LaMonte et al. (2012) demonstrate a surprising mechanism for this innate immunity. A microRNA enriched in sickle red blood cells is translocated into the parasite, incorporated covalently into P. falciparum mRNAs and inhibits parasite growth.

  7. Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Proliferation by LRH-1 Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0396 TITLE: INHIBITION OF PANCREATIC CANCER CELL...DATES COVERED 15September2012–14September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INHIBITION OF PANCREATIC CANCER CELL PROLIFERATION BY LRH-1 INHIBITORS 5a...of pancreatic cancer is devastating, with mortality rates nearing its incidence rates. To date, there are no effective targeted anti-pancreatic

  8. Doxycycline inhibits leukemic cell migration via inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhuai; Xiang, Ru; Zhang, Xiangzhong; Chen, Yunxian

    2015-09-01

    Doxycycline, a tetracycline-based antibiotic, has been reported to attenuate melanoma cell migration through inhibiting the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. However, it remains to be elucidated whether doxycycline exerts this effect on leukemia cell migration. The present study aimed to examine the role of doxycycline in leukemia cell migration. The invasion capacities of the human leukemia cell lines KG1a (acute myelogenous leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia) were evaluated using Matrigel® matrix‑coated Transwell® chamber assays; leukemic cell lines treated with doxycycline (1 µg/ml) or anti‑β1‑integrin antibodies were added to the upper chamber, while untreated cells were included as controls. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to further understand the influence of doxycycline treatment on the expression of FAK and gelatinases in the KG1a and K562 leukemic cell lines. In addition, FAK protein expression and phosphorylation were determined using western blot analysis in order to investigate the mechanism by which doxycycline inhibited leukemic cell migration. The results revealed that doxycycline treatment significantly attenuated the migration of KG1a and K562 cells, which was demonstrated to be associated with inhibition of the expression and phosphorylation of FAK. In addition, doxycycline treatment inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2 and MMP‑9 expression. Furthermore, incubation with blocking anti‑β1‑integrin antibodies had an analogous inhibitory effect on leukemic cell migration to that of doxycycline. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that doxycycline attenuated leukemic cell migration through inhibiting the FAK signaling pathway. Therefore, doxycycline may have potential for use as a novel strategy for the treatment of leukemia.

  9. Mechanism of inhibition of cell proliferation by Vinca alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Jordan, M A; Thrower, D; Wilson, L

    1991-04-15

    We have used a structure-activity approach to investigate whether the Vinca alkaloids inhibit cell proliferation primarily by means of their effects on mitotic spindle microtubules or by another mechanism or by a combination of mechanisms. Five Vinca alkaloids were used to investigate the relationship in HeLa cells between inhibition of cell proliferation and blockage of mitosis, alteration of spindle organization, and depolymerization of microtubules. Indirect immunofluorescence staining of microtubules and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining of chromatin were used to characterize the effects of the drugs on the distributions of cells in stages of the cell cycle and on the organization of microtubules and chromosomes in metaphase spindles. The microtubule polymer was isolated from cells and quantified using a competitive enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay for tubulin. We observed a nearly perfect coincidence between the concentration of each Vinca derivative that inhibited cell proliferation and the concentration that caused 50% accumulation of cells at metaphase, despite the fact that the antiproliferative potencies of the drugs varied over a broad concentration range. Inhibition of cell proliferation and blockage of cells at metaphase at the lowest effective concentrations of all Vinca derivatives occurred with little or no microtubule depolymerization or spindle disorganization. With increasing drug concentrations, the organization of microtubules and chromosomes in arrested mitotic spindles deteriorated in a manner that was common to all five congeners. These results indicate that the antiproliferative activity of the Vinca alkaloids at their lowest effective concentrations in HeLa cells is due to inhibition of mitotic spindle function. The results suggest further that the Vinca alkaloids inhibit cell proliferation by altering the dynamics of tubulin addition and loss at the ends of mitotic spindle microtubules rather than by depolymerizing the microtubules

  10. Electron crystallography of PhoE porin, an outer membrane, channel- forming protein from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Walian, P.J.

    1989-11-01

    One approach to studying the structure of membrane proteins is the use of electron crystallography. Dr. Bing Jap has crystallized PhoE pore-forming protein (porin) from the outer membrane of escherichia coli (E. coli) into monolayer crystals. The findings of this research and those of Jap (1988, 1989) have determined these crystals to be highly ordered, yielding structural information to a resolution of better than 2.8 angstroms. The task of this thesis has been to collect and process the electron diffraction patterns necessary to generate a complete three-dimensional set of high resolution structure factor amplitudes of PhoE porin. Fourier processing of these amplitudes when combined with the corresponding phase data is expected to yield the three-dimensional structure of PhoE porin at better than 3.5 angstroms resolution. 92 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs. (CBS)

  11. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F; Kady, Ismail O

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase.

  12. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  13. Blue light inhibits proliferation of melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Anja; Distler, Elisabeth; Klapczynski, Anna; Arpino, Fabiola; Kuch, Natalia; Simon-Keller, Katja; Sticht, Carsten; van Abeelen, Frank A.; Gretz, Norbert; Oversluizen, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    Photobiomodulation with blue light is used for several treatment paradigms such as neonatal jaundice, psoriasis and back pain. However, little is known about possible side effects concerning melanoma cells in the skin. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of blue LED irradiation with respect to proliferation of melanoma cells. For that purpose we used the human malignant melanoma cell line SK-MEL28. Cell proliferation was decreased in blue light irradiated cells where the effect size depended on light irradiation dosage. Furthermore, with a repeated irradiation of the melanoma cells on two consecutive days the effect could be intensified. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting with Annexin V and Propidium iodide labeling did not show a higher number of dead cells after blue light irradiation compared to non-irradiated cells. Gene expression analysis revealed down-regulated genes in pathways connected to anti-inflammatory response, like B cell signaling and phagosome. Most prominent pathways with up-regulation of genes were cytochrome P450, steroid hormone biosynthesis. Furthermore, even though cells showed a decrease in proliferation, genes connected to the cell cycle were up-regulated after 24h. This result is concordant with XTT test 48h after irradiation, where irradiated cells showed the same proliferation as the no light negative control. In summary, proliferation of melanoma cells can be decreased using blue light irradiation. Nevertheless, the gene expression analysis has to be further evaluated and more studies, such as in-vivo experiments, are warranted to further assess the safety of blue light treatment.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a conserved porin protein from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Doig, P; Exner, M M; Hancock, R E; Trust, T J

    1995-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a causative agent of gastritis in humans and is correlated with gastric ulcer formation. Infections with this bacterium have proven difficult to treat with antimicrobial agents. To better understand how this bacterium transports compounds such as antimicrobial agents across its outer membrane, identification of porin proteins is important. We have recently identified a family of H. pylori porins (HopA to HopD) (M. M. Exner, P. Doig, T. J. Trust, and R. E. W. Hancock, Infect. Immun. 63:1567-1572, 1995). Here, we report on an unrelated porin species (HopE) from this bacterium. This protein had a apparent molecular mass of 31 kDa and was seen to form 50- and 90-kDa aggregates that were designated putative dimeric and trimeric forms, respectively. The protein was purified to homogeneity and, with a model planar lipid membrane system, was shown to act as a nonselective pore with a single channel conductance in 1.0 M KCl of 1.5 nS, similarly to other bacterial nonspecific porins. An internal peptide sequence of HopE shared homology with the P2 porin of Haemophilus influenzae. HopE was also shown to be antigenic in vivo as assessed by sera taken from H. pylori-infected individuals and was immunologically conserved with both patient sera and specific monoclonal antibodies. From these data, it appears that HopE is a major nonselective porin of H. pylori. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:7559328

  15. Development of an enhanced chromosomal expression system based on porin synthesis operon for halophile Halomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jin; Fu, Xiao-Zhi; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Jin-Chun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2014-11-01

    Since halophile Halomonas spp. can grow contamination free in seawater under unsterile and continuous conditions, it holds great promise for industrial biotechnology to produce low-cost chemicals in an economic way. Yet, metabolic engineering methods are urgently needed for Halomonas spp. It is commonly known that chromosomal expression is more stable yet weaker than plasmid one is. To overcome this challenge, a novel chromosomal expression method was developed for halophile Halomonas TD01 and its derivatives based on a strongly expressed porin gene as a site for external gene integration. The gene of interest was inserted downstream the porin gene, forming an artificial operon porin-inserted gene. This chromosome expression system was proven functional by some examples: First, chromosomal expression of heterologous polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthase gene phaC Re from Ralstonia eutropha completely restored the PHB accumulation level in endogenous phaC knockout mutant of Halomonas TD01. The integrated phaC Re was expressed at the highest level when inserted at the locus of porin compared with insertions in other chromosome locations. Second, an inducible expression system was constructed in phaC-deleted Halomonas TD01 by integrating the lac repressor gene (lacI) into the porin site in the host chromosome. The native porin promoter was inserted with the key 21 bp DNA of lac operator (lacO) sequence to become an inducible promoter encoded in a plasmid. This inducible system allowed on-off switch of gene expression in Halomonas TD strains. Thus, the stable and strong chromosomal expression method in Halomonas TD spp. was established.

  16. A proteomic approach to understand the role of the outer membrane porins in the organic solvent-tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PseA.

    PubMed

    Hemamalini, R; Khare, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Solvent-tolerant microbes have the unique ability to thrive in presence of organic solvents. The present study describes the effect of increasing hydrophobicity (log Pow values) of organic solvents on the outer membrane proteome of the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PseA cells. The cells were grown in a medium containing 33% (v/v) alkanes of increasing log Pow values. The outer membrane proteins were extracted by alkaline extraction from the late log phase cells and changes in the protein expression were studied by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Seven protein spots showed significant differential expression in the solvent exposed cells. The tryptic digest of the differentially regulated proteins were identified by LC-ESI MS/MS. The identity of these proteins matched with porins OprD, OprE, OprF, OprH, Opr86, LPS assembly protein and A-type flagellin. The reported pI values of these proteins were in the range of 4.94-8.67 and the molecular weights were in the range of 19.5-104.5 kDa. The results suggest significant down-regulation of the A-type flagellin, OprF and OprD and up-regulation of OprE, OprH, Opr86 and LPS assembly protein in presence of organic solvents. OprF and OprD are implicated in antibiotic uptake and outer membrane stability, whereas A-type flagellin confers motility and chemotaxis. Up-regulated OprE is an anaerobically-induced porin while Opr86 is responsible for transport of small molecules and assembly of the outer membrane proteins. Differential regulation of the above porins clearly indicates their role in adaptation to solvent exposure.

  17. Boric acid inhibits human prostate cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Wade T; Eckhert, Curtis D

    2004-12-08

    The role of boron in biology includes coordinated regulation of gene expression in mixed bacterial populations and the growth and proliferation of higher plants and lower animals. Here we report that boric acid, the dominant form of boron in plasma, inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCaP, in a dose-dependent manner. Non-tumorigenic prostate cell lines, PWR-1E and RWPE-1, and the cancer line PC-3 were also inhibited, but required concentrations higher than observed human blood levels. Studies using DU-145 cells showed that boric acid induced a cell death-independent proliferative inhibition, with little effect on cell cycle stage distribution and mitochondrial function.

  18. Cell proliferation inhibition in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Extended durations of spaceflight have been shown to be deleterious on an organismic level; however, mechanisms underlying cellular sensitivity to the gravitational environment remain to be elucidated. The majority of the gravitational studies to date indicates that cell regulatory pathways may be influenced by their gravitational environment. Still, few cell biology experiments have been performed in space flight and even fewer experiments have been repeated on subsequent flights. With flight opportunities on STS-50, 54, and 57, Sf9 cells were flown in the BioServe Fluids Processing Apparatus and cell proliferation was measured with and without exposure to a cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) inhibitor. Results from these flights indicate that the Sf9 cells grew comparable to ground controls, that the CeReS inhibitor bound to its specific receptor, and that its signal transduction cascade was not gravity sensitive.

  19. Lithium inhibits tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastasis through the inhibition of TGFBIp expression in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Yong-Sun; Lee, Rina; Lee, Boram; Choi, Seung-Il; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2016-02-09

    Metastasis is the main cause of mortality in cancer patients. Although there are many anti-cancer drugs targeting tumor growth, anti-metastatic agents are rarely developed. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are crucial for cancer progression; in particular, lymphangiogenesis is pivotal for metastasis in cancer. Here we report that lithium inhibits colon cancer metastasis by blocking lymphangiogenesis. Lithium reduces the expression of transforming growth factor-β-induced protein (TGFBIp) in colon cancer cells by inhibiting Smad3 phosphorylation via GSK3β inactivation. Moreover, lithium inhibits lymphatic endothelial cell migration, which is increased upon TGFBIp expression in tumor cells. Lithium had no significant effect on SW620 tumor growth in vitro and in vivo; however, it inhibited lymphangiogenesis in tumors. In tumor xenografts model, lithium was found to prevent metastasis to the lungs, liver, and lymph nodes by inhibiting TGFBIp-induced tumor lymphangiogenesis. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a novel role of lithium in the inhibition of colon cancer metastasis by blocking TGFBIp expression, and thereby TGFBIp-induced lymphangiogenesis, in primary tumors.

  20. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 affects endothelial progenitor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Colleselli, Daniela; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Mosheimer, Birgit A.; Kaehler, Christian M. . E-mail: C.M.Kaehler@uibk.ac.at

    2006-09-10

    Growing evidence indicates that inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and various types of cancer. Endothelial progenitor cells recruited from the bone marrow have been shown to be involved in the formation of new vessels in malignancies and discussed for being a key point in tumour progression and metastasis. However, until now, nothing is known about an interaction between COX and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Proliferation kinetics, cell cycle distribution and rate of apoptosis were analysed by MTT test and FACS analysis. Further analyses revealed an implication of Akt phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Both COX-1 and COX-2 expression can be found in bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. COX-2 inhibition leads to a significant reduction in proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. COX-2 inhibition leads further to an increased cleavage of caspase-3 protein and inversely to inhibition of Akt activation. Highly proliferating endothelial progenitor cells can be targeted by selective COX-2 inhibition in vitro. These results indicate that upcoming therapy strategies in cancer patients targeting COX-2 may be effective in inhibiting tumour vasculogenesis as well as angiogenic processes.

  1. LncRNA SNHG12 promotes cell growth and inhibits cell apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.Z.; Xu, C.L.; Wu, H.; Shen, S.J.

    2017-01-01

    Several long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) might be correlated with the prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) and serve as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker. However, the exact expression pattern of small nucleolar RNA host gene 12 (SNHG12) in colorectal cancer and its clinical significance remains unclear. The level of SNHG12 was detected by qRT-PCR in CRC tissues and CRC cells. MTT assay and colony formation assay were performed to examine the cell proliferation of CRC cells transfected with pcDNA-SNHG12 or si-SNHG12. Flow cytometry technology was used to detect cell cycle and cell apoptosis of CRC cells transfected with pcDNA-SNHG12 or si-SNHG12. The protein level of cell cycle progression-related molecules, including cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4, CDK6), cyclin D1 (CCND1) and cell apoptosis-related molecule caspase 3 was detected by western blot. The effect of SNHG12 knockdown was examined in vivo. Increased levels of SNHG12 were observed in CRC tissues and in CRC cells. SNHG12 promoted the cell proliferation of CRC cells. In addition, SNHG12 overexpression boosted the cell cycle progression of SW480 cells transfected with pcDNA-SNHG12 and SNHG12 knockdown inhibited the cell cycle progression of HT29 cells transfected with si-SNHG12. SNHG12 also inhibited the cell apoptosis of CRC cells. We also found that SNHG12 increased the expression of cell cycle-related proteins and suppressed the expression of caspase 3. Our results suggest that SNHG12 promoted cell growth and inhibited cell apoptosis in CRC cells, indicating that SNHG12 might be a useful biomarker for colorectal cancer. PMID:28225893

  2. Protein kinase C activators inhibit capillary endothelial cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Doctrow, S.R.

    1986-05-01

    Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) binds specifically to bovine capillary endothelial (BCE) cells (K/sub d/ = 8nM) and inhibits the proliferation (K/sub 50/ = 6 +/- 4 nM). Under similar conditions, PDBu does not inhibit the growth of bovine aortic endothelial or smooth muscle cells. PDBu markedly attenuates the response of BCE cells to purified human hepatoma-derived growth factor which, in the absence of PDBu, stimulates BCE cell growth by about 3-fold. Several observations suggest that the inhibition of BCE cell growth by PDBu is mediated by protein kinase C: (1) different phorbol compounds inhibit BCE cell growth according to the relative potencies as protein kinase C activators (12-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate > PDBu >> phorbol 12,13-diacetate >>>..beta..-phorbol; ..cap alpha..-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate). (2) Specific binding of PDBu to BCE cells is displaced by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol (diC/sub 8/), a protein kinase C activator and an analog of the putative second messenger activating this kinase in vivo. The weak protein kinase C activator, sn-1,2-dibutyrylglycerol, does not affect PDBu binding. (3) A cytosolic extract from BCE cells contains a Ca/sup 2 +//phosphatidylserine-dependent kinase that is activated by diC/sub 8/ and PDBu, but not by ..beta..-phorbol. These results support a role for protein kinase C in suppressing capillary endothelial cell growth and may therefore have implications in the intracellular regulation of angiogenesis.

  3. Inhibition of cell proliferation by the Mad1 transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, M F; Ashmun, R A; Sherr, C J; Eisenman, R N; Ayer, D E

    1996-01-01

    Mad1 is a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper protein that is induced upon differentiation of a number of distinct cell types. Mad1 dimerizes with Max and recognizes the same DNA sequences as do Myc:Max dimers. However, Mad1 and Myc appear to have opposing functions. Myc:Max heterodimers activate transcription while Mad:Max heterodimers repress transcription from the same promoter. In addition Mad1 has been shown to block the oncogenic activity of Myc. Here we show that ectopic expression of Mad1 inhibits the proliferative response of 3T3 cells to signaling through the colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor. The ability of over-expressed Myc and cyclin D1 to complement the mutant CSF-1 receptor Y809F (containing a Y-to-F mutation at position 809) is also inhibited by Mad1. Cell cycle analysis of proliferating 3T3 cells transfected with Mad1 demonstrates a significant decrease in the fraction of cells in the S and G2/M phases and a concomitant increase in the fraction of G1 phase cells, indicating that Mad1 negatively influences cell cycle progression from the G1 to the S phase. Mutations in Mad1 which inhibit its activity as a transcription repressor also result in loss of Mad1 cell cycle inhibitory activity. Thus, the ability of Mad1 to inhibit cell cycle progression is tightly coupled to its function as a transcriptional repressor. PMID:8649388

  4. Foxp3+ T cells inhibit antitumor immune memory modulated by mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanping; Sparwasser, Tim; Figlin, Robert; Kim, Hyung L

    2014-04-15

    Inhibition of mTOR signaling enhances antitumor memory lymphocytes. However, pharmacologic mTOR inhibition also enhances regulatory T-cell (Treg) activity. To counter this effect, Treg control was added to mTOR inhibition in preclinical models. Tregs were controlled with CD4-depleting antibodies because CD4 depletion has high translational potential and already has a well-established safety profile in patients. The antitumor activity of the combination therapy was CD8 dependent and controlled growth of syngeneic tumors even when an adoptive immunotherapy was not used. Lymphocytes resulting from the combination therapy could be transferred into naïve mice to inhibit aggressive growth of lung metastases. The combination therapy enhanced CD8 memory formation as determined by memory markers and functional studies of immune recall. Removal of FoxP3-expressing T lymphocytes was the mechanism underlying immunologic memory formation following CD4 depletion. This was confirmed using transgenic DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells) mice to specifically remove Foxp3(+) T cells. It was further confirmed with reciprocal studies where stimulation of immunologic memory because of CD4 depletion was completely neutralized by adoptively transferring tumor-specific Foxp3(+) T cells. Also contributing to tumor control, Tregs that eventually recovered following CD4 depletion were less immunosuppressive. These results provide a rationale for further study of mTOR inhibition and CD4 depletion in patients.

  5. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang Zhang, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  6. HEPES inhibits the conversion of prion protein in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Delmouly, Karine; Belondrade, Maxime; Casanova, Danielle; Milhavet, Ollivier; Lehmann, Sylvain

    2011-05-01

    HEPES is a well-known buffering reagent used in cell-culture medium. Interestingly, this compound is also responsible for significant modifications of biological parameters such as uptake of organic molecules, alteration of oxidative stress mechanisms or inhibition of ion channels. While using cell-culture medium supplemented with HEPES on prion-infected cells, it was noticed that there was a significant concentration-dependent inhibition of accumulation of the abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)). This effect was present only in live cells and was thought to be related to modification of the PrP environment or biology. These results could modify the interpretation of cell-culture assays of prion therapeutic agents, as well as of previous cell biology results obtained in the field using HEPES buffers. This inhibitory effect of HEPES could also be exploited to prevent contamination or propagation of prions in cell culture.

  7. Cutting edge: inhibition of T cell activation by TIM-2.

    PubMed

    Knickelbein, Jared E; de Souza, Anjali J; Tosti, Richard; Narayan, Preeti; Kane, Lawrence P

    2006-10-15

    T cell Ig and mucin domain protein 2 (TIM-2) has been shown to regulate T cell activation in vitro and T cell-mediated disease in vivo. However, it is still not clear whether TIM-2 acts mainly to augment T cell function or to inhibit it. We have directly examined the function of TIM-2 in murine and human T cell lines. Our results indicate that expression of TIM-2 significantly impairs the induction of NFAT and AP-1 transcriptional reporters by not only TCR ligation but also by the pharmacological stimuli PMA and ionomycin. This does not appear to be due to a general effect on cell viability, and the block in NFAT activation can be bypassed by expression of activated alleles of Ras or calcineurin, or MEK kinase, in the case of AP-1. Thus, our data are consistent with a model whereby TIM-2 inhibits T cell activation.

  8. Inhibiting ice recrystallization and optimization of cell viability after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Chaytor, Jennifer L; Tokarew, Jacqueline M; Wu, Luke K; Leclère, Mathieu; Tam, Roger Y; Capicciotti, Chantelle J; Guolla, Louise; von Moos, Elisabeth; Findlay, C Scott; Allan, David S; Ben, Robert N

    2012-01-01

    The ice recrystallization inhibition activity of various mono- and disaccharides has been correlated with their ability to cryopreserve human cell lines at various concentrations. Cell viabilities after cryopreservation were compared with control experiments where cells were cryopreserved with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The most potent inhibitors of ice recrystallization were 220 mM solutions of disaccharides; however, the best cell viability was obtained when a 200 mM d-galactose solution was utilized. This solution was minimally cytotoxic at physiological temperature and effectively preserved cells during freeze-thaw. In fact, this carbohydrate was just as effective as a 5% DMSO solution. Further studies indicated that the cryoprotective benefit of d-galactose was a result of its internalization and its ability to mitigate osmotic stress, prevent intracellular ice formation and/or inhibit ice recrystallization. This study supports the hypothesis that the ability of a cryoprotectant to inhibit ice recrystallization is an important property to enhance cell viability post-freeze-thaw. This cryoprotective benefit is observed in three different human cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the ability of a potential cryoprotectant to inhibit ice recrystallation may be used as a predictor of its ability to preserve cells at subzero temperatures.

  9. Metformin inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Rongbin; Li, Jijun; Johnson, Cameron W.; Rassoulian, Cyrus; Olumi, Aria F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common proliferative abnormality of the prostate affecting elderly men throughout the world. Epidemiologic studies have shown that diabetes significantly increases the risk of developing BPH, although whether anti-diabetic medications preventing the development of BPH remains to be defined. We have previously found that stromally expressed insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) promotes benign prostatic epithelial cell proliferation through paracrine mechanisms. Here, we seek to understand if metformin, a first line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells through reducing the expression of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and regulating cell cycle. Methods BPE cell lines BPH-1 and P69, murine fibroblasts3T3 and primary human prostatic fibroblasts were cultured and tested in this study. Cell proliferation and the cell cycle were analyzed by MTS assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of IGF-1R was determined by western-blot and immunocytochemistry. The level of IGF-1 secretion in culture medium was measured by ELISA. Results Metformin (0.5-10mM, 6-48h) significantly inhibited the proliferation of BPH-1 and P69 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Treatment with metformin for 24 hours lowered the G2/M cell population by 43.24% in P69 cells and 24.22% in BPH-1 cells. On the other hand, IGF-1 (100ng/mL, 24h) stimulated the cell proliferation (increased by 28.81% in P69 cells and 20.95% in BPH-1 cells) and significantly enhanced the expression of IGF-1R in benign prostatic epithelial cells. Metformin (5mM) abrogated the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells induced by IGF-1. In 3T3 cells, the secretion of IGF-1 was significantly inhibited by metformin from 574.31pg/ml to 197.61pg/ml. The conditioned media of 3T3 cells and human prostatic fibroblasts promoted the proliferation of epithelial cells and the

  10. Mitochondrial Porin Isoform AtVDAC1 Regulates the Competence of Arabidopsis thaliana to Agrobacterium-Mediated Genetic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Tackmin

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in plants depends on the virulence of Agrobacterium strains, the plant tissue culture conditions, and the susceptibility of host plants. Understanding the molecular interactions between Agrobacterium and host plant cells is crucial when manipulating the susceptibility of recalcitrant crop plants and protecting orchard trees from crown gall disease. It was discovered that Arabidopsis voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (atvdac1) mutant has drastic effects on Agrobacterium-mediated tumorigenesis and growth developmental phenotypes, and that these effects are dependent on a Ws-0 genetic background. Genetic complementation of Arabidopsis vdac1 mutants and yeast porin1-deficient strain with members of the AtVDAC gene family revealed that AtVDAC1 is required for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and there is weak functional redundancy between AtVDAC1 and AtVDAC3, which is independent of porin activity. Furthermore, atvdac1 mutants were deficient in transient and stable transformation by Agrobacterium, suggesting that AtVDAC1 is involved in the early stages of Agrobacterium infection prior to transferred-DNA (T-DNA) integration. Transgenic plants overexpressing AtVDAC1 not only complemented the phenotypes of the atvdac1 mutant, but also showed high efficiency of transient T-DNA gene expression; however, the efficiency of stable transformation was not affected. Moreover, the effect of phytohormone treatment on competence to Agrobacterium was compromised in atvdac1 mutants. These data indicate that AtVDAC1 regulates the competence of Arabidopsis to Agrobacterium infection. PMID:27643450

  11. Lateral inhibition of Notch signaling in neoplastic cells

    PubMed Central

    Heth, Jason A.; Muraszko, Karin M.; Fan, Xing; Bar, Eli E.; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    During normal development, heterogeneous expression of Notch ligands can result in pathway suppression in the signal-sending cell, a process known as lateral inhibition. It is unclear if an analogous phenomenon occurs in malignant cells. We observed significant induction of Notch ligands in glioblastoma neurospheres and pancreatic carcinoma cells cultured in low oxygen, suggesting that this phenomenon could occur around hypoxic regions. To model lateral inhibition in these tumors, the ligand Jagged1 was overexpressed in glioblastoma and pancreatic carcinoma cells, resulting in overall induction of pathway targets. However, when ligand high and ligand low cells from a single line were co-cultured and then separated, we noted suppression of Notch pathway targets in the former and induction in the latter, suggesting that neoplastic lateral inhibition can occur. We also found that repression of Notch pathway targets in signal-sending cells may occur through the activity of a Notch ligand intracellular domain, which translocates into the nucleus. Understanding how this neoplastic lateral inhibition process functions in cancer cells may be important in targeting ligand driven Notch signaling in solid tumors. PMID:25557173

  12. Thrombomodulin inhibits the activation of eosinophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Roeen, Ziaurahman; Toda, Masaaki; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N; Onishi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Yasuma, Taro; Urawa, Masahito; Taguchi, Osamu; Gabazza, Esteban C

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils and mast cells play critical roles in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Activation of both cells leads to the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in the airway of asthmatic patients. Recently, we have shown that inhaled thrombomodulin inhibits allergic bronchial asthma in a mouse model. In the present study, we hypothesize that thrombomodulin can inhibit the activation of eosinophils and mast cells. The effect of thrombomodulin on the activation and release of inflammatory mediators from eosinophils and mast cells was evaluated. Thrombomodulin inhibited the eotaxin-induced chemotaxis, upregulation of CD11b and degranulation of eosinophils. Treatment with thrombomodulin also significantly suppressed the degranulation and synthesis of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in eosinophils and mast cells. Mice treated with a low-dose of inhaled thrombomodulin have decreased number of eosinophils and activated mast cells and Th2 cytokines in the lungs compared to untreated mice. The results of this study suggest that thrombomodulin may modulate allergic responses by inhibiting the activation of both eosinophils and mast cells.

  13. Targeting Btk with ibrutinib inhibit gastric carcinoma cells growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Dao; Chen, Xiao Ying; Ji, Ke Wei; Tao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases family. It has previously been reported to be expressed in B cells and has an important role in B-cell malignancies. While the roles of Btk in the pathogenesis of certain B-cell malignancies are well established, the functions of Btk in gastric carcinoma have never been investigated. Herein, we found that Btk is over-expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues and gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells, but not that of the normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell, which express very little Btk. Inhibition of Btk by its inhibitor ibrutinib has an additive inhibitory effect on gastric cancer cell growth. Treatment of gastric cancer cells, but not immortalized breast epithelial cells with ibrutinib results in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk signals. Ibrutinib also induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells as well as is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for gastric carcinoma patients. Finally, ibrutinib markedly reduces tumor growth and increases tumor cell apoptosis in the tumors formed in mice inoculated with the gastric carcinoma cells. Given these promising preclinical results for ibrutinib in gastric carcinoma, a strategy combining Btk inhibitor warrants attention in gastric cancer. PMID:27508020

  14. Inhibition of cell adhesion by phosphorylated Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Kouichi; Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Miyake, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphorylation status of the C-terminal Thr residues of Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin (ERM) is often linked to cell shape change. To determine the role of phophorylated ERM, we modified phosphorylation status of ERM and investigated changes in cell adhesion and morphology. Treatment with Calyculin-A (Cal-A), a protein phosphatase inhibitor, dramatically augmented phosphorylated ERM (phospho-ERM). Cal-A-treatment or expression of phospho-mimetic Moesin mutant (Moesin-TD) induced cell rounding in adherent cells. Moreover, reattachment of detached cells to substrate was inhibited by either treatment. Phospho-ERM, Moesin-TD and actin cytoskeleton were observed at the plasma membrane of such round cells. Augmented cell surface rigidity was also observed in both cases. Meanwhile, non-adherent KG-1 cells were rather rich in phospho-ERM. Treatment with Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor that dephosphorylates phospho-ERM, up-regulated the integrin-dependent adhesion of KG-1 cells to substrate. These findings strongly suggest the followings: (1) Phospho-ERM inhibit cell adhesion, and therefore, dephosphorylation of ERM proteins is essential for cell adhesion. (2) Phospho-ERM induce formation and/or maintenance of spherical cell shape. (3) ERM are constitutively both phosphorylated and dephosphorylated in cultured adherent and non-adherent cells.

  15. Rectification Properties and pH-Dependent Selectivity of Meningococcal Class 1 Porin

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Javier; Komarov, Alexander G.; Aguilella, Vicente M.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the current rectification properties and selectivity of class 1 porin (PorA) from Neisseria meningitidis (strain H44/76 Δ3Δ4) reconstituted in planar lipid membranes varying salt concentrations and pH. PorA channel shows voltage gating with a characteristic time remarkably longer than other porins. Its current-voltage asymmetry, evaluated as the current rectification ratio, changes nonmonotonically with salt concentration. Interestingly, it reaches its maximum value at physiological concentration. Porin selectivity, quantified by reversal potential measurements, is also significantly asymmetric. Depending on the direction of the salt gradient, the channel becomes more or less selective (10:1 vs. 5:1 Na+/Cl−). Besides, the reversal potential measurements suggest that porin inserts directionally following the concentration gradient. Measurements over a wide range of pH show that although PorA is strongly cation selective at pH >6, its selectivity gradually changes to anionic in an acidic medium (pH < 4). We show that a continuum electrodiffusion model quantitatively accounts for conductance and reversal potential measurements at positive and negative applied voltages. PMID:17965131

  16. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  17. Marine algal fucoxanthin inhibits the metastatic potential of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tae-Wook; Choi, Hee-Jung; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Jeong, Han-Sol; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Joo, Myungsoo; Choi, Jun-Yong; Han, Chang-Woo; Kim, So-Yeon; Choi, Jae-Sue; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2013-10-04

    Metastasis is major cause of malignant cancer-associated mortality. Fucoxanthin has effect on various pharmacological activities including anti-cancer activity. However, the inhibitory effect of fucoxanthin on cancer metastasis remains unclear. Here, we show that fucoxanthin isolated from brown alga Saccharina japonica has anti-metastatic activity. To check anti-metastatic properties of fucoxanthin, in vitro models including assays for invasion, migration, actin fiber organization and cancer cell-endothelial cell interaction were used. Fucoxanthin inhibited the expression and secretion of MMP-9 which plays a critical role in tumor invasion and migration, and also suppressed invasion of highly metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells as evidenced by transwell invasion assay. In addition, fucoxanthin diminished the expressions of the cell surface glycoprotein CD44 and CXC chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) which play roles in migration, invasion and cancer-endothelial cell adhesion. Fucoxanthin markedly suppressed cell migration in wound healing assay and inhibited actin fiber formation. The adhesion of B16-F10 melanoma cells to the endothelial cells was significantly inhibited by fucoxanthin. Moreover, in experimental lung metastasis in vivo assay, fucoxanthin resulted in significant reduction of tumor nodules. Taken together, we demonstrate, for the first time, that fucoxanthin suppresses metastasis of highly metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Strategies for maximizing ATP supply in the microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi: direct binding of mitochondria to the parasitophorous vacuole and clustering of the mitochondrial porin VDAC.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Christian; Howell, Matthew; Bhella, David; Lucocq, John

    2014-04-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites with extremely reduced genomes and a dependence on host-derived ATP. The microsporidium Encephalitozoon cuniculi proliferates within a membranous vacuole and we investigated how the ATP supply is optimized at the vacuole-host interface. Using spatial EM quantification (stereology), we found a single layer of mitochondria coating substantial proportions of the parasitophorous vacuole. Mitochondrial binding occurred preferentially over the vegetative 'meront' stages of the parasite, which bulged into the cytoplasm, thereby increasing the membrane surface available for mitochondrial interaction. In a broken cell system mitochondrial binding was maintained and was typified by electron dense structures (< 10 nm long) bridging between outer mitochondrial and vacuole membranes. In broken cells mitochondrial binding was sensitive to a range of protease treatments. The function of directly bound mitochondria, as measured by the membrane potential sensitive dye JC-1, was indistinguishable from other mitochondria in the cell although there was a generalized depression of the membrane potential in infected cells. Finally, quantitative immuno-EM revealed that the ATP-delivering mitochondrial porin, VDAC, was concentrated atthe mitochondria-vacuole interaction site. Thus E. cuniculi appears to maximize ATP supply by direct binding of mitochondria to the parasitophorous vacuole bringing this organelle within 0.020 microns of the growing vegetative form of the parasite. ATP-delivery is further enhanced by clustering of ATP transporting porins in those regions of the outer mitochondrial membrane lying closest to the parasite.

  19. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of β-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, cytochrome c release and cell death. These events were fully prevented by Imeglimin treatment. This protective effect on cell death occurred without any effect on oxygen consumption rate, on lactate production and on cytosolic redox or phosphate potentials. Imeglimin also dramatically decreased reactive oxygen species production, inhibiting specifically reverse electron transfer through complex I. We conclude that Imeglimin prevents hyperglycemia-induced cell death in HMEC-1 through inhibition of PTP opening without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration nor affecting cellular energy status. Considering the high prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic subjects, these results together suggest a potential benefit of Imeglimin in diabetic angiopathy. PMID:27551496

  20. Inhibition of DNA synthesis in Meth A cells by chlorpromazine.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, T; Natori, S; Sekimizu, K

    1993-10-01

    We examined the influence of chlorpromazine, a phenothiazine derivative, on DNA synthesis in Meth A cells. Pulse-labelling experiments with [3H]thymidine showed that chlorpromazine inhibited DNA synthesis in cells cultured in vitro. The drug also inhibited DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei. Observation by fluorescence microscopy of fibroblastic cells stained with chlorpromazine indicated that the drug was localized in the cytoplasm and nuclear membranes, suggesting that it inhibited DNA synthesis in a manner dependent on the interaction of replication proteins with nuclear membranes. Meth A sarcomas growing in the endoderm of BALB/c mice regressed on intra-tumor injection of chlorpromazine, indicating that the drug has an anticancer action.

  1. Ribavirin Inhibits Parrot Bornavirus 4 Replication in Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Musser, Jeffrey M B; Heatley, J Jill; Koinis, Anastasia V; Suchodolski, Paulette F; Guo, Jianhua; Escandon, Paulina; Tizard, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Parrot bornavirus 4 is an etiological agent of proventricular dilatation disease, a fatal neurologic and gastrointestinal disease of psittacines and other birds. We tested the ability of ribavirin, an antiviral nucleoside analog with antiviral activity against a range of RNA and DNA viruses, to inhibit parrot bornavirus 4 replication in duck embryonic fibroblast cells. Two analytical methods that evaluate different products of viral replication, indirect immunocytochemistry for viral specific nucleoprotein and qRT-PCR for viral specific phosphoprotein gene mRNA, were used. Ribavirin at concentrations between 2.5 and 25 μg/mL inhibited parrot bornavirus 4 replication, decreasing viral mRNA and viral protein load, in infected duck embryonic fibroblast cells. The addition of guanosine diminished the antiviral activity of ribavirin suggesting that one possible mechanism of action against parrot bornavirus 4 may likely be through inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibition. This study demonstrates parrot bornavirus 4 susceptibility to ribavirin in cell culture.

  2. Effectiveness of natural and synthetic complexes of porin and O polysaccharide as vaccines against Brucella abortus in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, A J; Rowe, G E; Duncan, J R; Eis, M J; Widom, J; Ganem, B; Morein, B

    1988-01-01

    A single vaccination of mice with a complex of porin and smooth lipopolysaccharide (porin-S-LPS) extracted from virulent Brucella abortus 2308 provided significant protection (P less than 0.01 to P less than 0.001) against challenge with the same strain, equivalent to that achieved by vaccination with living attenuated B. abortus 19. The porin-S-LPS vaccine given without adjuvant or in several adjuvants (trehalose dimycolate and muramyl dipeptide; the pluronic polymer L-121 and muramyl dipeptide; or complexed with Quil A in immunostimulating complexes) provided equivalent protection. In contrast, one vaccination with porin complexed with rough LPS (porin-R-LPS) from a rough mutant of strain 2308 provided no protection with any adjuvant tested. In one experiment, two inoculations with the porin-R-LPS resulted in a low level of protection, probably owing to priming of the animals for production of O-polysaccharide-specific antibodies. However, one vaccination with rough-strain porin covalently bound to purified O polysaccharide conferred protection equal to that obtained with natural complexes of porin-S-LPS or with living strain 19. A synthetic vaccine containing long chains of O polysaccharide was more effective than one prepared with short chains. Protective vaccines caused the formation of increased concentrations of circulating O-polysaccharide-specific antibodies, although there were individual exceptions to the quantitative association between O-polysaccharide-specific antibodies and protection. Antibodies specific for porin or R-LPS were found in negligible quantities in vaccinated mice. These results provide additional evidence that the O polysaccharide will constitute an essential component of an effective subcellular vaccine against B. abortus and that O-polysaccharide-specific antibodies play an important role in protective immunity in brucellosis. PMID:2844673

  3. Tumor treating fields inhibit glioblastoma cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Hyo Sook; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with alternating electric fields at an intermediate frequency (100–300 kHz), referred to as tumor treating fields (TTF) therapy, inhibits cancer cell proliferation. In the present study, we demonstrated that TTF application suppressed the metastatic potential of U87 and U373 glioblastoma cell lines via the NF-kB, MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Wound-healing and transwell assays showed that TTF suppressed cell migration and invasion compared with controls. Soft agar and three-dimensional culture assays showed that TTF inhibited both anchorage-dependent (cell proliferation) and anchorage-independent (colony formation) GBM cell growth. TTF dysregulated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-related genes, such as vimentin and E-cadherin, which partially accounted for TTF inhibition of cell migration and invasion. We further demonstrated that TTF application suppressed angiogenesis by downregulating VEGF, HIF1α and matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. TTF also inhibited NF-kB transcriptional activity. Collectively, our findings show that TTF represents a promising novel anti-invasion and anti-angiogenesis therapeutic strategy for use in GBM patients. PMID:27556184

  4. Lutein Inhibits the Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells via Cytosolic and Mitochondrial Akt Pathways (Lutein Inhibits RPE Cells Migration)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ching-Chieh; Chan, Chi-Ming; Chen, Han-Min; Wu, Chia-Chun; Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Lee, Pei-Lan; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2014-01-01

    During the course of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells will de-differentiate, proliferate, and migrate onto the surfaces of the sensory retina. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) can induce migration of RPE cells via an Akt-related pathway. In this study, the effect of lutein on PDGF-BB-induced RPE cells migration was examined using transwell migration assays and Western blot analyses. We found that both phosphorylation of Akt and mitochondrial translocation of Akt in RPE cells induced by PDGF-BB stimulation were suppressed by lutein. Furthermore, the increased migration observed in RPE cells with overexpressed mitochondrial Akt could also be suppressed by lutein. Our results demonstrate that lutein can inhibit PDGF-BB induced RPE cells migration through the inhibition of both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Akt activation. PMID:25110866

  5. Inhibition of Telomerase Recruitment and Cancer Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Mai; Nandakumar, Jayakrishnan; Sullivan, Kelly D.; Espinosa, Joaquín M.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Continued proliferation of human cells requires maintenance of telomere length, usually accomplished by telomerase. Telomerase is recruited to chromosome ends by interaction with a patch of amino acids (the TEL patch, for TPP1 glutamate (E) and leucine (L)-rich patch) on the surface of telomere protein TPP1. In previous studies, interruption of this interaction by mutation prevented telomere extension in HeLa cells, but the cell culture continued to grow. We now show that the telomerase inhibitor BIBR1532 acts together with TEL patch mutations to inhibit the growth of HeLa cell lines and that apoptosis is a prominent mechanism of death of these cells. Survivor cells take over the population beginning around 40 days in culture. These cells no longer express the TEL patch mutant TPP1, apparently because of silencing of the expression cassette, a survival mechanism that would not be available to cancer cells. These results provide hope that inhibiting the binding of telomerase to the TEL patch of TPP1, perhaps together with a modest inhibition of the telomerase enzyme, could comprise an effective anticancer therapy for the ∼90% of human tumors that are telomerase-positive. PMID:24097987

  6. Diversity of fate outcomes in cell pairs under lateral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Guisoni, Nara; Martinez-Corral, Rosa; Garcia Ojalvo, Jordi; de Navascués, Joaquín

    2017-02-07

    Cell fate determination by lateral inhibition via Notch/Delta signalling has been extensively studied. Most formalised models consider Notch/Delta interactions in fields of cells, with parameters that typically lead to symmetry breaking of signalling states between neighbouring cells, commonly resulting in salt-and-pepper fate patterns. Here we consider the case of signalling between isolated cell pairs, and find that the bifurcation properties of a standard mathematical model of lateral inhibition can lead to stable symmetric signalling states. We apply this model to the adult intestinal stem cell (ISC) of Drosophila, whose fate is stochastic but dependent on the Notch/Delta pathway. We observe a correlation between signalling state in cell pairs and their contact area. We interpret this behaviour in terms of the properties of our model in the presence of population variability in contact areas, which affects the effective signalling threshold of individual cells. Our results suggest that the dynamics of Notch/Delta signalling can contribute to explain stochasticity in stem cell fate decisions, and that the standard model for lateral inhibition can account for a wider range of developmental outcomes than previously considered.

  7. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag-/- γc-/- mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions. PMID:26915707

  8. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-02-26

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag(-/-) γc(-/-) mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions.

  9. Pirin Inhibits Cellular Senescence in Melanocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Licciulli, Silvia; Luise, Chiara; Scafetta, Gaia; Capra, Maria; Giardina, Giuseppina; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bosari, Silvano; Viale, Giuseppe; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tonelli, Chiara; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Alcalay, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence has been widely recognized as a tumor suppressing mechanism that acts as a barrier to cancer development after oncogenic stimuli. A prominent in vivo model of the senescence barrier is represented by nevi, which are composed of melanocytes that, after an initial phase of proliferation induced by activated oncogenes (most commonly BRAF), are blocked in a state of cellular senescence. Transformation to melanoma occurs when genes involved in controlling senescence are mutated or silenced and cells reacquire the capacity to proliferate. Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein that likely functions as a transcriptional regulator whose expression levels are altered in different types of tumors. We analyzed the expression pattern of PIR in adult human tissues and found that it is expressed in melanocytes and has a complex pattern of regulation in nevi and melanoma: it is rarely detected in mature nevi, but is expressed at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Loss of function and overexpression experiments in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR is involved in the negative control of cellular senescence and that its expression is necessary to overcome the senescence barrier. Our results suggest that PIR may have a relevant role in melanoma progression. PMID:21514450

  10. TACE (ADAM17) inhibits Schwann cell myelination.

    PubMed

    La Marca, Rosa; Cerri, Federica; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Bachi, Angela; Feltri, M Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Blobel, Carl P; Quattrini, Angelo; Salzer, James L; Taveggia, Carla

    2011-06-12

    Tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme (TACE; also known as ADAM17) is a proteolytic sheddase that is responsible for the cleavage of several membrane-bound molecules. We report that TACE cleaves neuregulin-1 (NRG1) type III in the epidermal growth factor domain, probably inactivating it (as assessed by deficient activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase pathway), and thereby negatively regulating peripheral nervous system (PNS) myelination. Lentivirus-mediated knockdown of TACE in vitro in dorsal root ganglia neurons accelerates the onset of myelination and results in hypermyelination. In agreement, motor neurons of conditional knockout mice lacking TACE specifically in these cells are significantly hypermyelinated, and small-caliber fibers are aberrantly myelinated. Further, reduced TACE activity rescues hypomyelination in NRG1 type III haploinsufficient mice in vivo. We also show that the inhibitory effect of TACE is neuron-autonomous, as Schwann cells lacking TACE elaborate myelin of normal thickness. Thus, TACE is a modulator of NRG1 type III activity and is a negative regulator of myelination in the PNS.

  11. Parasitic inhibition of cell death facilitates symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Pannebakker, Bart A; Loppin, Benjamin; Elemans, Coen P H; Humblot, Lionel; Vavre, Fabrice

    2007-01-02

    Symbiotic microorganisms have had a large impact on eukaryotic evolution, with effects ranging from parasitic to mutualistic. Mitochondria and chloroplasts are prime examples of symbiotic microorganisms that have become obligate for their hosts, allowing for a dramatic extension of suitable habitats for life. Out of the extraordinary diversity of bacterial endosymbionts in insects, most are facultative for their hosts, such as the ubiquitous Wolbachia, which manipulates host reproduction. Some endosymbionts, however, have become obligatory for host reproduction and/or survival. In the parasitoid wasp Asobara tabida the presence of Wolbachia is necessary for host oogenesis, but the mechanism involved is yet unknown. We show that Wolbachia influences programmed cell death processes (a host regulatory feature typically targeted by pathogens) in A. tabida, making its presence essential for the wasps' oocytes to mature. This suggests that parasite strategies, such as bacterial regulation of host apoptosis, can drive the evolution of host dependence, allowing for a swift transition from parasitism to mutualism.

  12. Pyridinylquinazolines Selectively Inhibit Human Methionine Aminopeptidase-1 in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feiran; Bhat, Shridhar; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Chen, Xiaochun; Miller, Michelle S.; Nacev, Benjamin A.; Cheng, Yim Ling; Meyers, David J.; Tenney, Karen; Shim, Joong Sup; Crews, Phillip; Amzel, L. Mario; Ma, Dawei; Liu, Jun O.

    2013-01-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) which remove the initiator methionine from nascent peptides are essential in all organisms. While MetAP2 has been demonstrated to be a therapeutic target for inhibiting angiogenesis in mammals, MetAP1 seems to be vital for cell proliferation. Our earlier efforts identified two structural classes of human MetAP1 (HsMetAP1)-selective inhibitors (1–4). But all of them failed to inhibit cellular HsMetAP1. Using Mn(II) or Zn(II) to activate HsMetAP1, we found that 1–4 could only effectively inhibit purified HsMetAP1 in the presence of physiologically unachievable concentrations of Co(II). In an effort to seek Co(II)-independent inhibitors, a novel structural class containing a 2-(pyridin-2-yl)quinazoline core has been discovered. Many compounds in this class potently and selectively inhibited HsMetAP1 without Co(II). Subsequently, we demonstrated that 11j, an auxiliary metal-dependent inhibitor, effectively inhibited HsMetAP1 in primary cells. This is the first report that an HsMetAP1-selective inhibitor is effective against its target in cells. PMID:23634668

  13. Pyridinylquinazolines selectively inhibit human methionine aminopeptidase-1 in cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feiran; Bhat, Shridhar; Gabelli, Sandra B; Chen, Xiaochun; Miller, Michelle S; Nacev, Benjamin A; Cheng, Yim Ling; Meyers, David J; Tenney, Karen; Shim, Joong Sup; Crews, Phillip; Amzel, L Mario; Ma, Dawei; Liu, Jun O

    2013-05-23

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs), which remove the initiator methionine from nascent peptides, are essential in all organisms. While MetAP2 has been demonstrated to be a therapeutic target for inhibiting angiogenesis in mammals, MetAP1 seems to be vital for cell proliferation. Our earlier efforts identified two structural classes of human MetAP1 (HsMetAP1)-selective inhibitors (1-4), but all of them failed to inhibit cellular HsMetAP1. Using Mn(II) or Zn(II) to activate HsMetAP1, we found that 1-4 could only effectively inhibit purified HsMetAP1 in the presence of physiologically unachievable concentrations of Co(II). In an effort to seek Co(II)-independent inhibitors, a novel structural class containing a 2-(pyridin-2-yl)quinazoline core has been discovered. Many compounds in this class potently and selectively inhibited HsMetAP1 without Co(II). Subsequently, we demonstrated that 11j, an auxiliary metal-dependent inhibitor, effectively inhibited HsMetAP1 in primary cells. This is the first report that an HsMetAP1-selective inhibitor is effective against its target in cells.

  14. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate.

  15. Atorvastatin inhibits myocardin expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Jiang, Jixin; Yin, Hao; Wang, Lifeng; Tian, Ruijuan; Li, Haijie; Wang, Zengyong; Li, Dong; Wang, Yuebing; Gui, Yu; Walsh, Michael P; Zheng, Xi-Long

    2012-07-01

    Atorvastatin (ATV), an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, is widely prescribed as a lipid-lowering drug. It also inhibits the RhoA-Rho-associated kinase pathway in vascular smooth muscle (SM) cells and critically inhibits SM function. Myocardin is a coactivator of serum response factor, which upregulates SM contractile proteins. The RhoA-Rho-associated kinase pathway, which directly triggers SM contraction, also increases myocardin gene expression. Therefore, we investigated whether ATV inhibits myocardin gene expression in SM cells. In mice injected with ATV (IP 20 μg/g per day) for 5 days, myocardin gene expression was significantly downregulated in aortic and carotid arterial tissues with decreased expression of myocardin target genes SM α-actin and SM22. Correspondingly, the contractility of aortic rings in mice treated with ATV or the Rho-associated kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was reduced in response to treatment with either KCl or phenylephrine. In cultured mouse and human aortic SM cells, KCl treatment stimulated the expression of myocardin, SM α-actin, and SM22. These stimulatory effects were prevented by ATV treatment. ATV-induced inhibition of myocardin expression was prevented by pretreatment with either mevalonate or geranylgeranylpyrophosphate but not farnesylpyrophosphate. Treatment with Y-27632 mimicked ATV effects on the gene expression of myocardin, SM α-actin, and SM22, further suggesting a role for the RhoA-Rho-associated kinase pathway in ATV effects. Furthermore, ATV treatment inhibited RhoA membrane translocation and activation; these effects were prevented by pretreatment with mevalonate. We conclude that ATV inhibits myocardin gene expression in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a novel mechanism for ATV inhibition of vascular contraction.

  16. Nifuroxazide inhibits survival of multiple myeloma cells by directly inhibiting STAT3.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik A; Walker, Sarah R; Kepich, Alicia; Gashin, Laurie B; Hideshima, Teru; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C; Frank, David A

    2008-12-15

    Constitutive activation of the transcription factor STAT3 contributes to the pathogenesis of many cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM). Since STAT3 is dispensable in most normal tissue, targeted inhibition of STAT3 is an attractive therapy for patients with these cancers. To identify STAT3 inhibitors, we developed a transcriptionally based assay and screened a library of compounds known to be safe in humans. We found the drug nifuroxazide to be an effective inhibitor of STAT3 function. Nifuroxazide inhibits the constitutive phosphorylation of STAT3 in MM cells by reducing Jak kinase autophosphorylation, and leads to down-regulation of the STAT3 target gene Mcl-1. Nifuroxazide causes a decrease in viability of primary myeloma cells and myeloma cell lines containing STAT3 activation, but not normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Although bone marrow stromal cells provide survival signals to myeloma cells, nifuroxazide can overcome this survival advantage. Reflecting the interaction of STAT3 with other cellular pathways, nifuroxazide shows enhanced cytotoxicity when combined with either the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide or the MEK inhibitor UO126. Therefore, using a mechanistic-based screen, we identified the clinically relevant drug nifuroxazide as a potent inhibitor of STAT signaling that shows cytotoxicity against myeloma cells that depend on STAT3 for survival.

  17. Caerulomycin A Suppresses Immunity by Inhibiting T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Arun; Khatri, Neeraj; Vohra, Rakesh M.; Jolly, Ravinder S.; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Caerulomycin A (CaeA) is a known antifungal and antibiotic agent. Further, CaeA is reported to induce the expansion of regulatory T cell and prolongs the survival of skin allografts in mouse model of transplantation. In the current study, CaeA was purified and characterized from a novel species of actinomycetes, Actinoalloteichus spitiensis. The CaeA was identified for its novel immunosuppressive property by inhibiting in vitro and in vivo function of T cells. Methods Isolation, purification and characterization of CaeA were performed using High Performance Flash Chromatography (HPFC), NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. In vitro and in vivo T cell studies were conducted in mice using flowcytometry, ELISA and thymidine-[methyl-3H] incorporation. Results CaeA significantly suppressed T cell activation and IFN-γ secretion. Further, it inhibited the T cells function at G1 phase of cell cycle. No apoptosis was noticed by CaeA at a concentration responsible for inducing T cell retardation. Furthermore, the change in the function of B cells but not macrophages was observed. The CaeA as well exhibited substantial inhibitory activity in vivo. Conclusion This study describes for the first time novel in vitro and in vivo immunosuppressive function of CaeA on T cells and B cells. CaeA has enough potential to act as a future immunosuppressive drug. PMID:25286329

  18. Single Granule Cells Excite Golgi Cells and Evoke Feedback Inhibition in the Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Yaeger, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    In cerebellum-like circuits, synapses from thousands of granule cells converge onto principal cells. This fact, combined with theoretical considerations, has led to the concept that granule cells encode afferent input as a population and that spiking in individual granule cells is relatively unimportant. However, granule cells also provide excitatory input to Golgi cells, each of which provide inhibition to hundreds of granule cells. We investigated whether spiking in individual granule cells could recruit Golgi cells and thereby trigger widespread inhibition in slices of mouse cochlear nucleus. Using paired whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, trains of action potentials at 100 Hz in single granule cells was sufficient to evoke spikes in Golgi cells in ∼40% of paired granule-to-Golgi cell recordings. High-frequency spiking in single granule cells evoked IPSCs in ∼5% of neighboring granule cells, indicating that bursts of activity in single granule cells can recruit feedback inhibition from Golgi cells. Moreover, IPSPs mediated by single Golgi cell action potentials paused granule cell firing, suggesting that inhibitory events recruited by activity in single granule cells were able to control granule cell firing. These results suggest a previously unappreciated relationship between population coding and bursting in single granule cells by which spiking in a small number of granule cells may have an impact on the activity of a much larger number of granule cells. PMID:25788690

  19. Arachidonic acid inhibits glycine transport in cultured glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zafra, F; Alcantara, R; Gomeza, J; Aragon, C; Gimenez, C

    1990-01-01

    The effects of arachidonic acid on glycine uptake, exchange and efflux in C6 glioma cells were investigated. Arachidonic acid produced a dose-dependent inhibition of high-affinity glycine uptake. This effect was not due to a simple detergent-like action on membranes, as the inhibition of glycine transport was most pronounced with cis-unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, whereas saturated and trans-unsaturated fatty acids had relatively little or no effect. Endogenous unsaturated non-esterified fatty acids may exert a similar inhibitory effect on the transport of glycine. The mechanism for this inhibitory effect has been examined in a plasma membrane vesicle preparation derived from C6 cells, which avoids metabolic or compartmentation interferences. The results suggest that part of the selective inhibition of glycine transport by arachidonic acid could be due to the effects of the arachidonic acid on the lipid domain surrounding the carrier. PMID:2121132

  20. Rottlerin inhibits cell growth and invasion via down-regulation of Cdc20 in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lixia; Hou, Yingying; Yin, Xuyuan; Su, Jingna; Zhao, Zhe; Ye, Xiantao; Zhou, Xiuxia; Zhou, Li; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Rottlerin, isolated from a medicinal plant Mallotus phillippinensis, has been demonstrated to inhibit cellular growth and induce cytoxicity in glioblastoma cell lines through inhibition of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III. Emerging evidence suggests that rottlerin exerts its antitumor activity as a protein kinase C inhibitor. Although further studies revealed that rottlerin regulated multiple signaling pathways to suppress tumor cell growth, the exact molecular insight on rottlerin-mediated tumor inhibition is not fully elucidated. In the current study, we determine the function of rottlerin on glioma cell growth, apoptosis, cell cycle, migration and invasion. We found that rottlerin inhibited cell growth, migration, invasion, but induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Mechanistically, the expression of Cdc20 oncoprotein was measured by the RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in glioma cells treated with rottlerin. We observed that rottlerin significantly inhibited the expression of Cdc20 in glioma cells, implying that Cdc20 could be a novel target of rottlerin. In line with this, over-expression of Cdc20 decreased rottlerin-induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis, whereas down-regulation of Cdc20 by its shRNA promotes rottlerin-induced anti-tumor activity. Our findings indicted that rottlerin could exert its tumor suppressive function by inhibiting Cdc20 pathway which is constitutively active in glioma cells. Therefore, down-regulation of Cdc20 by rottlerin could be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of glioma. PMID:27626499

  1. ATF3 inhibits PPARγ-stimulated transactivation in adipocyte cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Min-Kyung; Jung, Myeong Ho

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • ATF3 inhibits PPARγ-stimulated transcriptional activation. • ATF3 interacts with PPARγ. • ATF3 suppresses p300-mediated transcriptional coactivation. • ATF3 decreases the binding of PPARγ and recruitment of p300 to PPRE. - Abstract: Previously, we reported that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) downregulates peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPARγ) gene expression and inhibits adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells. Here, we investigated another role of ATF3 on the regulation of PPARγ activity. ATF3 inhibited PPARγ-stimulated transactivation of PPARγ responsive element (PPRE)-containing reporter or GAL4/PPARγ chimeric reporter. Thus, ATF3 effectively repressed rosiglitazone-stimulated expression of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2), PPARγ target gene, in 3T3-L1 cells. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST pulldown assay demonstrated that ATF3 interacted with PPARγ. Accordingly, ATF3 prevented PPARγ from binding to PPRE on the aP2 promoter. Furthermore, ATF3 suppressed p300-mediated transcriptional coactivation of PPRE-containing reporter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that overexpression of ATF3 blocked both binding of PPARγ and recruitment of p300 to PPRE on aP2 promoter induced by rosiglitazone treatment in 3T3-L1 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that ATF3 interacts with PPARγ and represses PPARγ-mediated transactivation through suppression of p300-stimulated coactivation in 3T3-L1 cells, which may play a role in inhibition of adipocyte differentiation.

  2. Fluoxetine regulates cell growth inhibition of interferon-α.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Min; Yu, Bu-Chin; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Sun, Hung-Yu; Chien, Yu-Chieh; Su, Hui-Chen; Yen, Shu-Yang; Lai, Hsin-Wen; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Young, Kung-Chia; Tsao, Chiung-Wen

    2016-10-01

    Fluoxetine, a well-known anti-depression agent, may act as a chemosensitizer to assist and promote cancer therapy. However, how fluoxetine regulates cellular signaling to enhance cellular responses against tumor cell growth remains unclear. In the present study, addition of fluoxetine promoted growth inhibition of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) in human bladder carcinoma cells but not in normal uroepithelial cells through lessening the IFN-α-induced apoptosis but switching to cause G1 arrest, and maintaining the IFN-α-mediated reduction in G2/M phase. Activations and signal transducer and transactivator (STAT)-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) were involved in this process. Chemical inhibitions of STAT-1 or PPAR-α partially rescued bladder carcinoma cells from IFN-α-mediated growth inhibition via blockades of G1 arrest, cyclin D1 reduction, p53 downregulation and p27 upregulation in the presence of fluoxetine. However, the functions of both proteins were not involved in the control of fluoxetine over apoptosis and maintained the declined G2/M phase of IFN-α. These results indicated that activation of PPAR-α and STAT-1 participated, at least in part, in growth inhibition of IFN-α in the presence of fluoxetine.

  3. Lysyl oxidase propeptide inhibits smooth muscle cell signaling and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Paola A.; Vora, Siddharth; Sume, Siddika Selva; Yang, Dan; Hilaire, Cynthia St.; Guo Ying; Palamakumbura, Amitha H.; Schreiber, Barbara M.; Ravid, Katya; Trackman, Philip C.

    2008-02-01

    Lysyl oxidase is required for the normal biosynthesis and maturation of collagen and elastin. It is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells, and its increased expression has been previously found in atherosclerosis and in models of balloon angioplasty. The lysyl oxidase propeptide (LOX-PP) has more recently been found to have biological activity as a tumor suppressor, and it inhibits Erk1/2 Map kinase activation. We reasoned that LOX-PP may have functions in normal non-transformed cells. We, therefore, investigated its effects on smooth muscle cells, focusing on important biological processes mediated by Erk1/2-dependent signaling pathways including proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression. In addition, we investigated whether evidence for accumulation of LOX-PP could be found in vivo in a femoral artery injury model. Recombinant LOX-PP was expressed and purified, and was found to inhibit primary rat aorta smooth muscle cell proliferation and DNA synthesis by more than 50%. TNF-{alpha}-stimulated MMP-9 expression and Erk1/2 activation were both significantly inhibited by LOX-PP. Immunohistochemistry studies carried out with affinity purified anti-LOX-PP antibody showed that LOX-PP epitopes were expressed at elevated levels in vascular lesions of injured arteries. These novel data suggest that LOX-PP may provide a feedback control mechanism that serves to inhibit properties associated with the development of vascular pathology.

  4. Antisense inhibition of hyaluronan synthase-2 in human osteosarcoma cells inhibits hyaluronan retention and tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ynishida@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Knudson, Warren; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2005-07-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor associated with childhood and adolescence. The results of numerous studies have suggested that hyaluronan plays an important role in regulating the aggressive behavior of various types of cancer cells. However, no studies have addressed hyaluronan with respect to osteosarcomas. In this investigation, the mRNA expression copy number of three mammalian hyaluronan synthases (HAS) was determined using competitive RT-PCR in the osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line, MG-63. MG-63 are highly malignant osteosarcoma cells with an abundant hyaluronan-rich matrix. The results demonstrated that HAS-2 is the predominant HAS in MG-63. Accumulation of intracellular hyaluronan increased in association with the proliferative phase of these cells. The selective inhibition of HAS-2 mRNA in MG-63 cells by antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides resulted in reduced hyaluronan accumulation by these cells. As expected, the reduction in hyaluronan disrupted the assembly of cell-associated matrices. However, of most interest, coincident with the reduction in hyaluronan, there was a substantial decrease in cell proliferation, a decrease in cell motility and a decrease in cell invasiveness. These data suggest that hyaluronan synthesized by HAS-2 in MG-63 plays a crucial role in osteosarcoma cell proliferation, motility, and invasion.

  5. Fermented red ginseng extract inhibits cancer cell proliferation and viability.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jisun; Jeon, Seong Bin; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Hyeji; Kim, Ju; Kwon, Bo Ra; Yu, Kang-Yeol; Cha, Jeong-Dan; Hwang, Seung-Mi; Choi, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Yong-Seob

    2015-04-01

    Red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) is the most widely recognized medicinal herb due to its remedial effects in various disorders, such as cancers, diabetes, and heart problems. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of fermented red ginseng extract (f-RGE; provided by Jeonju Biomaterials Institute, Jeonju, South Korea) in a parallel comparison with the effect of nonfermented red ginseng extract (nf-RGE; control) on several cancer cell lines--MCF-7 breast cancer cells, HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and reprogrammed MCF-7 cells (mimicking cancer stem cells). Cells were cultured at various concentrations of RGE (from 0.5 up to 5 mg/mL) and their viabilities and proliferative properties were examined. Our data demonstrate the following: (1) nf-RGE inhibited cell viability at ≥1 mg/mL for MCF-7 cells and ≥2 mg/mL for HepG2 cells, (2) in the presence of a carcinogenic agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), nf-RGE treatment in combination with paclitaxel synergistically decreased MCF-7 as well as HepG2 cell viability, (3) f-RGE (which contained a greater level of Rg3 content) more effectively decreased the viability of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells compared to nf-RGE, and (4) f-RGE appeared more potent for inhibiting cancerous differentiation of reprogrammed MCF-7 cells in a synergistic fashion with paclitaxel, especially in the presence of TPA, compared to nf-RGE. These findings suggest that f-RGE treatment may be more effective for decreasing cancer cell survival by inducing apoptotic cell death and also presumably for preventing cancer stem cell differentiation compared to nf-RGE.

  6. A novel LZAP-binding protein, NLBP, inhibits cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junhye; Cho, Hyun Jung; Han, Seung Hun; No, Jin Gu; Kwon, Jae Young; Kim, Hongtae

    2010-04-16

    LXXLL/leucine zipper-containing alternative reading frame (ARF)-binding protein (LZAP) was recently shown to function as a tumor suppressor through inhibition of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. LZAP is also known as a negative regulator of cell invasion, and its expression was demonstrated to be reduced in several tumor tissues. However, the molecular mechanism of the negative effect of LZAP on cell invasion is unclear. In this study, we identify NLBP as a novel LZAP-binding protein using tandem affinity purification. We demonstrate the negative effects of NLBP on cell invasion and the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. NLBP expression was not detected in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with strong invasive activity, whereas its expression was detected in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line with no invasive activity. We also demonstrate that these two proteins mutually affect the stability of each other by inhibiting ubiquitination of the other protein. Based on these results, we suggest that NLBP may act as a novel tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell invasion, blocking NF-kappaB signaling, and increasing stability of the LZAP protein.

  7. A Novel LZAP-binding Protein, NLBP, Inhibits Cell Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Junhye; Cho, Hyun Jung; Han, Seung Hun; No, Jin Gu; Kwon, Jae Young; Kim, Hongtae

    2010-01-01

    LXXLL/leucine zipper-containing alternative reading frame (ARF)-binding protein (LZAP) was recently shown to function as a tumor suppressor through inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. LZAP is also known as a negative regulator of cell invasion, and its expression was demonstrated to be reduced in several tumor tissues. However, the molecular mechanism of the negative effect of LZAP on cell invasion is unclear. In this study, we identify NLBP as a novel LZAP-binding protein using tandem affinity purification. We demonstrate the negative effects of NLBP on cell invasion and the NF-κB signaling pathway. NLBP expression was not detected in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with strong invasive activity, whereas its expression was detected in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line with no invasive activity. We also demonstrate that these two proteins mutually affect the stability of each other by inhibiting ubiquitination of the other protein. Based on these results, we suggest that NLBP may act as a novel tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell invasion, blocking NF-κB signaling, and increasing stability of the LZAP protein. PMID:20164180

  8. Myc inhibits JNK-mediated cell death in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiuhong; Feng, Yu; Chen, Xinhong; Li, Wenzhe; Xue, Lei

    2017-04-01

    The proto-oncogene Myc is well known for its roles in promoting cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. However, in this study, we found from a genetic screen that Myc inhibits, rather than promotes, cell death triggered by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling in Drosophila. Firstly, expression of Drosophila Myc (dMyc) suppresses, whereas loss of dMyc enhances, ectopically activated JNK signaling-induced cell death. Secondly, dMyc impedes physiologically activated JNK pathway-mediated cell death. Thirdly, loss of dMyc triggers JNK pathway activation and JNK-dependent cell death. Finally, the mammalian cMyc gene, when expressed in Drosophila, impedes activated JNK signaling-induced cell death. Thus, besides its well-studied apoptosis promoting function, Myc also antagonizes JNK-mediated cell death in Drosophila, and this function is likely conserved from fly to human.

  9. Inhibition of host cell apoptosis by Eimeria bovis sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Lang, Mirjam; Kann, Michael; Zahner, Horst; Taubert, Anja; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2009-03-09

    Sophisticated evasion strategies of obligate intracellular parasites, in particular prevention of host cell apoptosis, are necessary to ensure successful replication. To study the ability of Eimeria bovis in this regard, in vitro experiments were performed applying bovine foetal gastrointestinal cells (BFGC), bovine umbilical vein endothelial cells (BUVEC) and African green monkey kidney cells (VERO) as host cells. BUVEC and BFGC allow maturation of sporozoites to macromeronts, in VERO cells sporozoites survive for weeks without showing further development. In highly infected BUVEC monolayers, infected cells survived until merozoite release whereas uninfected cells underwent apoptosis. Light microscopy and TUNEL assays performed 3-10 days p.i. showed that, within infected BFGC and VERO cell monolayers, uninfected cells underwent programmed cell death after application of various inducers of apoptosis, whereas infected cells survived. Incidentally, the anti-apoptotic efficacies in infected cells were independent of the drugs and the host cell type. We could not demonstrate significant differences between infected and uninfected cells after colchicin treatment in terms of translation of phosphatidylserines to the host cell surface, caspase 3 activity and cytochrome c release, probably since obtainable infection rates were too low. However, we could show by laser scanning confocal microscopy on single cell levels that the expression of the anti-apoptotic factors cellular Flice inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) and cellular inhibition of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1) were enhanced in E. bovis infected cells after application of colchicin, in the latter case also in non-infected cells directly neighbouring infected ones. Our data show that E. bovis protects its host cell from apoptosis by increasing expression of c-IAP1 and c-FLIP.

  10. Hugl-1 inhibits glioma cell growth in intracranial model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejiao; Lu, Dong; Ma, Peng; Liu, Huaqiang; Cao, Yuewen; Sang, Ben; Zhu, Xianlong; Shi, Qiong; Hu, Jinxia; Yu, Rutong; Zhou, Xiuping

    2015-10-01

    Drosophila lethal (2) giant larvae (lgl) has been reported as a tumor suppressor and could regulate the Drosophila hippo signaling. Human giant larvae-1(Hugl-1), one human homologue of Drosophila lgl, also has been reported to be involved in the development of some human cancers. However, whether Hugl-1 is associated with the pathogenesis of malignant gliomas remains poorly understood. In the present work, we examined the effect of Hugl-1 on glioma cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Firstly, we found that Hugl-1 protein levels decreased in the human glioma tissues, suggesting that Hugl-1 is involved in glioma progression. Unfortunately, either stably or transiently over-expressing Hugl-1 did not affect glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In addition, Hugl-1 over-expression did not regulate hippo signaling pathway. Interestingly, over-expression of Hugl-1 not only inhibited gliomagenesis but also markedly inhibited cell proliferation and promoted the apoptosis of U251 cells in an orthotopic model of nude mice. Taken together, this study provides the evidence that Hugl-1 inhibits glioma cell growth in intracranial model of nude mice, suggesting that Hugl-1 might be a potential tumor target for glioma therapy.

  11. Inhibition of osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Moioli, Eduardo K.; Hong, Liu; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been shown to differentiate into osteoblasts that, in turn, are capable of forming tissues analogous to bone. The present study was designed to investigate the inhibition of osteogenesis by hMSCs. Bone marrow-derived hMSCs were treated with transforming growth factor β-3 (TGFβ3) at various doses during or after their differentiation into osteogenic cells. TGFβ3 was encapsulated in poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres and released via controlled delivery in the osteogenic culture of hMSCs and hMSC-derived osteoblasts for up to 28 days. Controlled release of TGFβ3 inhibited the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, as evidenced by significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and staining, as well as decreased mineral deposition. After hMSCs had been differentiated into osteoblasts, controlled release of TGFβ3 further inhibited not only alkaline phosphatase and mineral deposition but also osteocalcin expression. These findings demonstrate the potential for sustained modulation of the behavior of stem cells and/or stem cell-derived lineage-specific cells via controlled release of growth factor(s). The attenuation of osteogenic differentiation of MSCs may facilitate understanding not only the regulation and patterning of osteogenesis in development but also several pathological models such as osteopetrosis, craniosynostosis, and heart valve calcification. PMID:17537129

  12. Sex steroids inhibit osmotic swelling of retinal glial cells.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Florian; Wurm, Antje; Linnertz, Regina; Pannicke, Thomas; Iandiev, Ianors; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    Osmotic swelling of glial cells may contribute to the development of retinal edema. We investigated whether sex steroids inhibit the swelling of glial somata in acutely isolated retinal slices and glial cells of the rat. Superfusion of retinal slices or cells from control animals with a hypoosmolar solution did not induce glial swelling, whereas glial swelling was observed in slices of postischemic and diabetic retinas. Progesterone, testosterone, estriol, and 17beta-estradiol prevented glial swelling with half-maximal effects at approximately 0.3, 0.6, 6, and 20 microM, respectively. The effect of progesterone was apparently mediated by transactivation of metabotropic glutamate receptors, P2Y1, and adenosine A1 receptors. The data suggest that sex steroids may inhibit cytotoxic edema in the retina.

  13. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Mice H22 Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yiye; Ni, Yanbo; Yang, Jing; Lin, Xutao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lixia

    2016-01-01

    Background It is widely recognized that astaxanthin (ASX), a member of the carotenoid family, has strong biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and immune-modulation activities. Previous studies have confirmed that ASX can effectively inhibit hepatoma cells in vitro. Material/Methods MTT was used to assay proliferation of mice H22 cells, and flow cytometry was used to determine apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of H22 cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, anti-tumor activity of ASX was observed in mice. Results ASX inhibited the proliferation of H22 cells, promoted cell necrosis, and induced cell cycle arrest in G2 phase in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions This study indicated that ASX can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in mice H22 hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27333866

  14. Paclitaxel inhibits the hyper-activation of spleen cells by lipopolysaccharide and induces cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel was isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew, Taxus brevifolia, and used as an anticancer agent. Paclitaxel prevents cancer cell division by inhibiting spindle fiber function, inducing cell death. A recent study demonstrated that paclitaxel binds to myeloid differentiation protein-2 of Toll-like receptor 4 and prevents the signal transduction of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Paclitaxel converts immune cells hypo-responsive to LPS. In this study, we investigated whether paclitaxel can inhibit the phenotype and function of immune cells. To accomplish this, we used spleen cells, a major type of immune cell, LPS, a representative inflammatory agent and a mitogen for B lymphocytes. LPS profoundly increased the activation and cytokine production of spleen cells. However, paclitaxel significantly inhibited LPS-induced hyper-activation of spleen cells. Furthermore, we found that paclitaxel induced cell death of LPS-treated spleen cells. These results suggest that paclitaxel can inhibit the hyper-immune response of LPS in spleen cells via a variety of mechanisms. These findings suggest that paclitaxel can be used as a modulating agent for diseases induced by hyper-activation of B lymphocytes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that paclitaxel inhibits the function of spleen cells activated by LPS, and further induces cell death. PMID:27030196

  15. Estrogen inhibits cell cycle progression and retinoblastoma phosphorylation in rhesus ovarian surface epithelial cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jay W.; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-10-31

    Estrogen promotes the growth of some ovarian cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, but has been shown to inhibit growth of normal ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells at micromolar concentrations (1μg/ml). OSE cells express the estrogen receptor (ER)-α, and are the source of 90% of various cancers. The potential sensitivity of OSE cells to estrogen stresses the importance of understanding the estrogen-dependent mechanisms at play in OSE proliferation and transformation, as well as in anticancer treatment. We investigated the effects of estradiol on cell proliferation in vitro, and demonstrate an intracellular locus of action of estradiol in cultured rhesus ovarian surface epithelial (RhOSE) cells. We show that ovarian and breast cells are growth-inhibited by micromolar concentration of estradiol and that this inhibition correlates with estrogen receptor expression. We further show that normal rhesus OSE cells do not activate ERK or Akt in response to estradiol nor does estradiol block the ability of serum to stimulate ERK or induce cyclin D expression. Contrarily, estradiol inhibits serum-dependent retinoblastoma protein (Rb) phosphorylation and blocks DNA synthesis. This inhibition does not formally arrest cells and is reversible within hours of estrogen withdrawal. Our data are consistent with growth inhibition by activation of Rb and indicate that sensitivity to hormone therapy in anticancer treatment can be modulated by cell cycle regulators downstream of the estrogen receptor.

  16. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K. )

    1990-11-15

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling.

  17. Salinomycin inhibits osteosarcoma by targeting its tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qing-Lian; Zhao, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Jin-Chun; Liang, Yi; Yin, Jun-Qiang; Zou, Chang-Ye; Xie, Xian-Biao; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Shen, Jing-Nan; Kang, Tiebang; Wang, Jin

    2011-12-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in children and adolescents and is typically associated with a poor prognosis. Tumor stem cells (TSCs) are presumed to drive tumor initiation and tumor relapse or metastasis. Hence, the poor prognosis of osteosarcoma likely results from a failure to target the osteosarcoma stem cells. Here, we have utilized three different methods to enrich TSCs in osteosarcoma and further evaluated whether salinomycin could selectively target TSCs in osteosarcoma. Our results indicated that sarcosphere selection, chemotherapy selection and stem cell marker OCT4 or SOX2 over-expression are all effective in the enrichment of TSCs from osteosarcoma cell lines. Further investigation found that salinomycin inhibited osteosarcoma by selectively targeting its stem cells both in vitro and in vivo without severe side effects, and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be involved in this inhibition of salinomycin. Taken together, we have identified that salinomycin is an effective inhibitor of osteosarcoma stem cells, supporting the use of salinomycin for elimination of osteosarcoma stem cells and implying a need for further clinical evaluation.

  18. Ethylene Inhibits Cell Proliferation of the Arabidopsis Root Meristem.

    PubMed

    Street, Ian H; Aman, Sitwat; Zubo, Yan; Ramzan, Aleena; Wang, Xiaomin; Shakeel, Samina N; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2015-09-01

    The root system of plants plays a critical role in plant growth and survival, with root growth being dependent on both cell proliferation and cell elongation. Multiple phytohormones interact to control root growth, including ethylene, which is primarily known for its role in controlling root cell elongation. We find that ethylene also negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root meristem of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Genetic analysis indicates that the inhibition of cell proliferation involves two pathways operating downstream of the ethylene receptors. The major pathway is the canonical ethylene signal transduction pathway that incorporates CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2, and the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 family of transcription factors. The secondary pathway is a phosphorelay based on genetic analysis of receptor histidine kinase activity and mutants involving the type B response regulators. Analysis of ethylene-dependent gene expression and genetic analysis supports SHORT HYPOCOTYL2, a repressor of auxin signaling, as one mediator of the ethylene response and furthermore, indicates that SHORT HYPOCOTYL2 is a point of convergence for both ethylene and cytokinin in negatively regulating cell proliferation. Additional analysis indicates that ethylene signaling contributes but is not required for cytokinin to inhibit activity of the root meristem. These results identify key elements, along with points of cross talk with cytokinin and auxin, by which ethylene negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root apical meristem.

  19. Prolyl hydroxylase 3 inhibited the tumorigenecity of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lei; Qu, Jianguo; Dang, Shengchun; Mao, Zhengfa; Wang, Xuqing; Fan, Xin; Sun, Kang; Zhang, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world, and it is very urgent to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Although HIF-1α is the most highly characterized target of prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PHD3), PHD3 has been shown to regulate several signal pathways independent of HIF-1α. Here, we found that the expression of PHD3 was decreased in the clinical gastric cancer samples and reversely correlated with tumor size and tumor stage. Over-expression of PHD3 in the gastric cancer cells significantly inhibited cell growth in vitro and in vivo, while knockdown the expression of PHD3 promoted the tumorigenecity of gastric cancer cells. Mechanistically, it showed that PHD3 downregulated the expression of beta-catenin and inhibited beta-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) signaling. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PHD3 inhibits gastric cancer by suppressing the beta-catenin/TCF signaling and PHD3 might be an important therapeutic target in gastric cancer.

  20. Troglitazone inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell growth and intimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Law, R E; Meehan, W P; Xi, X P; Graf, K; Wuthrich, D A; Coats, W; Faxon, D; Hsueh, W A

    1996-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration are responses to arterial injury that are highly important to the processes of restenosis and atherosclerosis. In the arterial balloon injury model in the rat, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) are induced in the vessel wall and regulate these VSMC activities. Novel insulin sensitizing agents, thiazolidinediones, have been demonstrated to inhibit insulin and epidermal growth factor-induced growth of VSMCs. We hypothesized that these agents might also inhibit the effect of PDGF and bFGF on cultured VSMCs and intimal hyperplasia in vivo. Troglitazone (1 microM), a member of the thiazolidinedione class, produced a near complete inhibition of both bFGF-induced DNA synthesis as measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation (6.5+/-3.9 vs. 17.6+/-4.3% cells labeled, P < 0.05) and c-fos induction. This effect was associated with an inhibition (by 73+/-4%, P < 0.01) by troglitazone of the transactivation of the serum response element, which regulates c-fos expression. Inhibition of c-fos induction by troglitazone appeared to occur via a blockade of the MAP kinase pathway at a point downstream of MAP kinase activation by MAP kinase kinase. At this dose, troglitazone also inhibited PDGF-BB-directed migration of VSMC (by 70+/-6%, P < 0.01). These in vitro effects were operative in vivo. Quantitative image analysis revealed that troglitazone-treated rats had 62% (P < 0.001) less neointima/media area ratio 14 d after balloon injury of the aorta compared with injured rats that received no troglitazone. These results suggest troglitazone is a potent inhibitor of VSMC proliferation and migration and, thus, may be a useful agent to prevent restenosis and possibly atherosclerosis. PMID:8878442

  1. Inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes lung cancer cells to paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tonghai; Yang, Lin; Wang, Guangsuo; Ding, Guanggui; Peng, Bin; Wen, Yuxin; Wang, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and plays an important role in the control of cell cycle progression. Skp2 is upregulated in several cancers, including lung cancers, but the role of Skp2 in the tumorigenesis and anticancer drug resistance in human lung cancer remains to be determined. We report here that Skp2 positively regulated mitotic arrest deficient 2 (MAD2) expression and that inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes human lung cancer cells to paclitaxel. Knockdown of Skp2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased Mad2 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in A549 and NCI-H1975 cells, accompanied with upregulation of p27 but decrease of the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb). In contrast, ectopic overexpression of Skp2 increased Mad2 mRNA and protein levels and phosphorylation of Rb, while it decreased p27. Pharmacological inhibition of CDK1/2 by flavopiridol or E2F1 with HLM006474 led to downregulation of Mad2 expression and prevented the increase of Mad2 expression by Skp2. Most importantly, pharmacological inhibition of Skp2 sensitized A549 and NCI-H1299 cells to paclitaxel. Our results demonstrated that SKP2 positively regulates the gene expression of MAD2 through p27-CDKs-E2F1 signaling pathway and that inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes A549 and NCI-H1299 cells to paclitaxel, suggesting that small molecule inhibitors of Skp2 are potential agents for the treatment of lung cancer with upregulation of Skp2. PMID:28176922

  2. CD101 inhibits the expansion of colitogenic T cells

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Regina; Dornhoff, Heike; Baier, Julia L.C.; Purtak, Martin; Opoka, Robert; Koller, Anna Katharina; Atreya, Raya; Rau, Tilman T.; Daniel, Christoph; Amann, Kerstin; Bogdan, Christian; Mattner, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    CD101 exerts negative-costimulatory effects in vitro, but its function in vivo remains poorly defined. CD101 is abundantly expressed on lymphoid and myeloid cells in intestinal tissues, but absent from naïve splenic T cells. Here, we assessed the impact of CD101 on the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using a T cell transfer model of chronic colitis, we found that in recipients of naïve T cells from CD101+/+ donors up to 30% of the recovered lymphocytes expressed CD101, correlating with an increased IL-2-mediated FoxP3-expression. Transfer of CD101−/− T cells caused more severe colitis and was associated with an expansion of IL-17-producing T cells and an enhanced expression of IL-2Rα/β independently of FoxP3. The co-transfer of naïve and regulatory T cells (Treg) protected most effectively from colitis, when both donor and recipient mice expressed CD101. While the expression of CD101 on T cells was sufficient for Treg-function and the inhibition of T cell proliferation, sustained IL-10-production required additional CD101-expression by myeloid cells. Finally, in patients with IBD a reduced CD101-expression on peripheral and intestinal monocytes and CD4+ T cells correlated with enhanced IL-17-production and disease activity. Thus, CD101-deficiency is a novel marker for progressive colitis and potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26813346

  3. Superfolder GFP reporters validate diverse new mRNA targets of the classic porin regulator, MicF RNA.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Colin P; Podkaminski, Dimitri; Papenfort, Kai; Urban, Johannes H; Hinton, Jay C D; Vogel, Jörg

    2012-05-01

    MicF is a textbook example of a small regulatory RNA (sRNA) that acts on a trans-encoded target mRNA through imperfect base pairing. Discovery of MicF as a post-transcriptional repressor of the major Escherichia coli porin OmpF established the paradigm for a meanwhile common mechanism of translational inhibition, through antisense sequestration of a ribosome binding site. However, whether MicF regulates additional genes has remained unknown for almost three decades. Here, we have harnessed the new superfolder variant of GFP for reporter-gene fusions to validate newly predicted targets of MicF in Salmonella. We show that the conserved 5' end of MicF acts by seed pairing to repress the mRNAs of global transcriptional regulator Lrp, and periplasmic protein YahO, while a second targeting region is also required to regulate the mRNA of the lipid A-modifying enzyme LpxR. Interestingly, MicF targets lpxR at both the ribosome binding site and deep within the coding sequence. MicF binding in the coding sequence of lpxR decreases mRNA stability through exacerbating the use of a native RNase E site proximal to the short MicF-lpxR duplex. Altogether, this study assigns the classic MicF sRNA to the growing class of Hfq-associated regulators that use diverse mechanisms to impact multiple loci.

  4. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrer, Joerg; Wagner, Silvia; Buerkle, Alexander; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  5. Ponicidin Inhibits Monocytic Leukemia Cell Growth by Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia-Jun; Zhang, Yong; Guang, Wei-Bin; Yang, Hong-Zhi; Lin, Dong-Jun; Xiao, Ruo-Zhi

    2008-01-01

    In this study two monocytic leukemia cell lines, U937 and THP-1 cells, were used to investigate the anti-proliferation effects caused by ponicidin. Cell viability was measured by an MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry as well as DNA fragmentation analysis. Cell morphology was observed using an inverted microscope and Hoechst 33258 staining. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to detect survivin as well as Bax and Bcl-2 expressions after the cells were treated with different concentrations of ponicidin. The results revealed that ponicidin could inhibit the growth of U937 and THP-1 cells significantly by induction of apoptosis. The suppression was in both time- and dose-dependent manner. Marked morphological changes of cell apoptosis were observed clearly after the cells were treated with ponicidin for 48∼72 h. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated that both survivin and Bcl-2 expressions were down-regulated remarkably while Bax expression remained constant before and after apoptosis occurred. We therefore conclude that ponicidin has significant anti-proliferation effects by inducing apoptosis on leukemia cells in vitro, downregulation of survivin as well as Bcl-2 expressions may be the important apoptosis inducing mechanisms. The results suggest that ponicidin may serve as potential therapeutic agent for leukemia. PMID:19330074

  6. Ultrafast proton transport in sub-1-nm diameter carbon nanotube porins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Ramya H.; Allen, Frances I.; Kim, Kyunghoon; Belliveau, Allison; Noy, Aleksandr

    2016-07-01

    Proton transport plays an important role in many biological processes due to the ability of protons to rapidly translocate along chains of hydrogen-bonded water molecules. Molecular dynamics simulations have predicted that confinement in hydrophobic nanochannels should enhance the rate of proton transport. Here, we show that 0.8-nm-diameter carbon nanotube porins, which promote the formation of one-dimensional water wires, can support proton transport rates exceeding those of bulk water by an order of magnitude. The transport rates in these narrow nanotube pores also exceed those of biological channels and Nafion. With larger 1.5-nm-diameter nanotube porins, proton transport rates comparable to bulk water are observed. We also show that the proton conductance of these channels can be modulated by the presence of Ca2+ ions. Our results illustrate the potential of small-diameter carbon nanotube porins as a proton conductor material and suggest that strong spatial confinement is a key factor in enabling efficient proton transport.

  7. Role of the mar-sox-rob Regulon in Regulating Outer Membrane Porin Expression▿†

    PubMed Central

    Chubiz, Lon M.; Rao, Christopher V.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple factors control the expression of the outer membrane porins OmpF and OmpC in Escherichia coli. In this work, we investigated the role of the mar-sox-rob regulon in regulating outer membrane porin expression in response to salicylate. We provide both genetic and physiological evidence that MarA and Rob can independently activate micF transcription in response to salicylate, leading to reduced OmpF expression. MarA was also found to repress OmpF expression through a MicF-independent pathway. In the case of OmpC, we found that its transcription was moderately increased in response to salicylate. However, this increase was independent of MarA and Rob. Finally, we found that the reduction in OmpF expression in a tolC mutant is due primarily to Rob. Collectively, this work further clarifies the coordinated role of MarA and Rob in regulating the expression of the outer membrane porins. PMID:21398557

  8. Asymmetric pore occupancy in crystal structure of OmpF porin from Salmonella typhi.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, D; Arockiasamy, Arulandu; Kumar, P D; Sharma, Amit; Krishnaswamy, S

    2012-06-01

    OmpF is a major general diffusion porin of Salmonella typhi, a Gram-negative bacterium, which is an obligatory human pathogen causing typhoid. The structure of S. typhi Ty21a OmpF (PDB Id: 3NSG) determined at 2.8 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography shows a 16-stranded β-barrel with three β-barrel monomers associated to form a trimer. The packing observed in S. typhi Ty21a rfOmpF crystals has not been observed earlier in other porin structures. The variations seen in the loop regions provide a starting point for using the S. typhi OmpF for structure-based multi-valent vaccine design. Along one side of the S. typhi Ty21a OmpF pore there exists a staircase arrangement of basic residues (20R, 60R, 62K, 65R, 77R, 130R and 16K), which also contribute, to the electrostatic potential in the pore. This structure suggests the presence of asymmetric electrostatics in the porin oligomer. Moreover, antibiotic translocation, permeability and reduced uptake in the case of mutants can be understood based on the structure paving the way for designing new antibiotics.

  9. Characterisation and immune responses to meningococcal recombinant porin complexes incorporated into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Sandra; Abel, Ana; Marzoa, Juan; Gorringe, Andrew; Criado, Teresa; Ferreirós, Carlos M

    2009-08-27

    We have analysed the structure of meningococcal outer membrane complexes and found that the main complexes are formed by different combinations of PorA and/or PorB molecules, associated to other proteins such as RmpM. In view of the growing knowledge of the importance of conformational epitopes in the immune responses to many pathogens, our aim in this study was to analyse the interactions of PorA and PorB by reconstitution of both recombinant porins into liposomes and determine the relevance of these interactions for the immune response. Recombinant PorA and PorB incorporated into liposomes associate forming complexes that are homomeric when only one of the porins is present, but heteromeric when both neisserial porins are present, mimicking those found previously in native outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Association of PorA and PorB to form heterocomplexes modifies the immunogenicity of at least PorB, allowing the production of antibodies that recognise conformational epitopes, and produces new epitopes that react with a 50 kDa outer membrane protein not yet identified.

  10. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo; Yoo, Young-Do; Park, Won-Bong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. {yields} The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. {yields} The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. {yields} P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. {yields} Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC{sup -/-} cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC{sup -/-} clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  11. Honokiol inhibits melanoma stem cells by targeting notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Venugopal, Anand; Ramamoorthy, Prabhu; Standing, David; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Umar, Shahid; Jensen, Roy A; Anant, Shrikant; Mammen, Joshua M V

    2015-12-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive disease with limited therapeutic options. Here, we determined the effects of honokiol (HNK), a biphenolic natural compound on melanoma cells and stemness. HNK significantly inhibited melanoma cell proliferation, viability, clonogenicity and induced autophagy. In addition, HNK significantly inhibited melanosphere formation in a dose dependent manner. Western blot analyses also demonstrated reduction in stem cell markers CD271, CD166, Jarid1b, and ABCB5. We next examined the effect of HNK on Notch signaling, a pathway involved in stem cell self-renewal. Four different Notch receptors exist in cells, which when cleaved by a series of enzymatic reactions catalyzed by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Converting Enzyme (TACE) and γ-secretase protein complex, results in the release of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD), which then translocates to the nucleus and induces target gene expression. Western blot analyses demonstrated that in HNK treated cells there is a significant reduction in the expression of cleaved Notch-2. In addition, there was a reduction in the expression of downstream target proteins, Hes-1 and cyclin D1. Moreover, HNK treatment suppressed the expression of TACE and γ-secretase complex proteins in melanoma cells. To confirm that suppression of Notch-2 activation is critical for HNK activity, we overexpressed NICD1, NICD2, and performed HNK treatment. NICD2, but not NICD1, partially restored the expression of Hes-1 and cyclin D1, and increased melanosphere formation. Taken together, these data suggest that HNK is a potent inhibitor of melanoma cells, in part, through the targeting of melanoma stem cells by suppressing Notch-2 signaling.

  12. Fucoidan inhibits angiogenesis induced by multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fen; Luo, Guoping; Xiao, Qing; Chen, Liping; Luo, Xiaohua; Lv, Jinglong; Chen, Lixue

    2016-10-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable hematological neoplasms. Our previous studies showed that Fucoidan possessed anti-myeloma effect by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting invasion of myeloma cells. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Fucoidan on angiogenesis induced by human myeloma cells and elucidated its possible mechanisms. Multiple myeloma cells were treated with Fucoidan at different concentrations, then the conditioned medium (CM) was collected. The levels of VEGF in the CM were tested by ELISA. The results showed that Fucoidan significantly decreased VEGF secretion by RPMI-8226 and U266 cells. The tube formation assay and migration test on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to examine the effect of Fucoidan on angiogenesis induced by human myeloma cells. The results showed that Fucoidan decreased HUVECs formed tube structures and inhibited HUVECs migration, and suppressed the angiogenic ability of multiple myeloma RPMI-8226 and U266 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The study also showed that Fucoidan downregulated the expression of several kinds of proteins, which may be correlated with the reduction of angiogenesis induced by myeloma cells. Moreover, results were compared from normoxic and hypoxic conditions, they showed that Fucoidan had anti-angiogenic activity. Furthermore, in a multiple myeloma xenograft mouse model, it indicated that Fucoidan negatively affected tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that Fucoidan was able to interfere with angiogenesis of multiple myeloma cells both in vitro and in vivo and may have a substantial potential in the treatment of MM.

  13. Radiosensitization by Inhibiting STAT1 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Zhouguang; Tretiakova, Maria; Zhang Zhongfa; Li Yan; Wang Xiaozhen; Zhu, Julie Xiaohong; Gao Yuanhong; Mai Weiyuan; Furge, Kyle; Qian Chaonan; Amato, Robert; Butler, E. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been historically regarded as a radioresistant malignancy, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is not understood. This study investigated the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), a transcription factor downstream of the interferon-signaling pathway, in radioresistant RCC. Methods and Materials: The expressions of STAT1 and STAT3 in 164 human clear cell RCC samples, 47 papillary RCC samples, and 15 normal kidney tissue samples were examined by microarray expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. Western blotting was performed to evaluate the total and phosphorylated STAT1 expression in CRL-1932 (786-O) (human clear cell RCC), SKRC-39 (human papillary RCC), CCL-116 (human fibroblast), and CRL-1441 (G-401) (human Wilms tumor). STAT1 was reduced or inhibited by fludarabine and siRNA, respectively, and the effects on radiation-induced cell death were investigated using clonogenic assays. Results: STAT1 expression, but not STAT3 expression, was significantly greater in human RCC samples (p = 1.5 x 10{sup -8} for clear cell; and p = 3.6 x 10{sup -4} for papillary). Similarly, the expression of STAT1 was relatively greater in the two RCC cell lines. STAT1 expression was reduced by both fludarabine and siRNA, significantly increasing the radiosensitivity in both RCC cell lines. Conclusion: This is the first study reporting the overexpression of STAT1 in human clear cell and papillary RCC tissues. Radiosensitization in RCC cell lines was observed by a reduction or inhibition of STAT1 signaling, using fludarabine or siRNA. Our data suggest that STAT1 may play a key role in RCC radioresistance and manipulation of this pathway may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy.

  14. Barium inhibits arsenic-mediated apoptotic cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ichiro; Uemura, Noriyuki; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Thang, Nguyen D; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Akhand, Anwarul A; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Our fieldwork showed more than 1 μM (145.1 μg/L) barium in about 3 μM (210.7 μg/L) arsenic-polluted drinking well water (n = 72) in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, while the mean concentrations of nine other elements in the water were less than 3 μg/L. The types of cancer include squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We hypothesized that barium modulates arsenic-mediated biological effects, and we examined the effect of barium (1 μM) on arsenic (3 μM)-mediated apoptotic cell death of human HSC-5 and A431 SCC cells in vitro. Arsenic promoted SCC apoptosis with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation (apoptotic pathway). In contrast, arsenic also inhibited SCC apoptosis with increased NF-κB activity and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) expression level and decreased JNK activity (antiapoptotic pathway). These results suggest that arsenic bidirectionally promotes apoptotic and antiapoptotic pathways in SCC cells. Interestingly, barium in the presence of arsenic increased NF-κB activity and XIAP expression and decreased JNK activity without affecting ROS production, resulting in the inhibition of the arsenic-mediated apoptotic pathway. Since the anticancer effect of arsenic is mainly dependent on cancer apoptosis, barium-mediated inhibition of arsenic-induced apoptosis may promote progression of SCC in patients in Bangladesh who keep drinking barium and arsenic-polluted water after the development of cancer. Thus, we newly showed that barium in the presence of arsenic might inhibit arsenic-mediated cancer apoptosis with the modulation of the balance between arsenic-mediated promotive and suppressive apoptotic pathways.

  15. Extended monod kinetics for substrate, product, and cell inhibition.

    PubMed

    Han, K; Levenspiel, O

    1988-08-05

    A generalized form of Monod kinetics is proposed to account for all kinds of product, cell, and substrate inhibition. This model assumes that there exists a critical inhibitor concentration above which cells cannot grow, and that the constants of the Monod equation are functions of this limiting inhibitor concentration. Methods for evaluating the constants of this rate form are presented. Finally the proposed kinetic form is compared with the available data in the literature, which unfortunately is very sparse. In all cases, this equation form fitted the data very well.

  16. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  17. Oxidative stress inhibits distant metastasis by human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Piskounova, Elena; Agathocleous, Michalis; Murphy, Malea M.; Hu, Zeping; Huddlestun, Sara E.; Zhao, Zhiyu; Leitch, A. Marilyn; Johnson, Timothy M.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Morrison, Sean J.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancer cells commonly enter the blood and disseminate systemically but are highly inefficient at forming distant metastases for poorly understood reasons. We studied human melanomas that differed in their metastasis histories in patients and in their capacity to metastasize in NSG mice. All melanomas had high frequencies of cells that formed subcutaneous tumours, but much lower percentages of cells that formed tumours after intravenous or intrasplenic transplantation, particularly among inefficient metastasizers. Melanoma cells in the blood and visceral organs experienced oxidative stress not observed in established subcutaneous tumours. Successfully metastasizing melanomas underwent reversible metabolic changes during metastasis that increased their capacity to withstand oxidative stress, including increased dependence upon NADPH-generating enzymes in the folate pathway. Anti-oxidants promoted distant metastasis in NSG mice. Folate pathway inhibition using low-dose methotrexate, ALDH1L2 knockdown, or MTHFD1 knockdown inhibited distant metastasis without significantly affecting the growth of subcutaneous tumors in the same mice. Oxidative stress thus limits distant metastasis by melanoma cells in vivo. PMID:26466563

  18. Ozone Inhibits Guard Cell K+ Channels Implicated in Stomatal Opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsethaugen, Gro; Pell, Eva J.; Assmann, Sarah M.

    1999-11-01

    Ozone (O3) deleteriously affects organisms ranging from humans to crop plants, yet little is understood regarding the underlying mechanisms. In plants, O3 decreases CO2 assimilation, but whether this could result from direct O3 action on guard cells remained unknown. Potassium flux causes osmotically driven changes in guard cell volume that regulate apertures of associated microscopic pores through which CO2 is supplied to the photosynthetic mesophyll tissue. We show in Vicia faba that O3 inhibits (i) guard cell K+ channels that mediate K+ uptake that drives stomatal opening; (ii) stomatal opening in isolated epidermes; and (iii) stomatal opening in leaves, such that CO2 assimilation is reduced without direct effects of O3 on photosynthetic capacity. Direct O3 effects on guard cells may have ecological and agronomic implications for plant productivity and for response to other environmental stressors including drought.

  19. FH535 inhibited migration and growth of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Iida, Joji; Dorchak, Jesse; Lehman, John R; Clancy, Rebecca; Luo, Chunqing; Chen, Yaqin; Somiari, Stella; Ellsworth, Rachel E; Hu, Hai; Mural, Richard J; Shriver, Craig D

    2012-01-01

    There is substantial evidence indicating that the WNT signaling pathway is activated in various cancer cell types including breast cancer. Previous studies reported that FH535, a small molecule inhibitor of the WNT signaling pathway, decreased growth of cancer cells but not normal fibroblasts, suggesting this pathway plays a role in tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we tested FH535 as a potential inhibitor for malignant phenotypes of breast cancer cells including migration, invasion, and growth. FH535 significantly inhibited growth, migration, and invasion of triple negative (TN) breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB231 and HCC38) in vitro. We demonstrate that FH535 was a potent growth inhibitor for TN breast cancer cell lines (HCC38 and MDA-MB-231) but not for other, non-TN breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D or SK-Br3) when cultured in three dimensional (3D) type I collagen gels. Western blotting analyses suggest that treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with FH535 markedly inhibited the expression of NEDD9 but not activations of FAK, Src, or downstream targets such as p38 and Erk1/2. We demonstrated that NEDD9 was specifically associated with CSPG4 but not with β1 integrin or CD44 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Analyses of gene expression profiles in breast cancer tissues suggest that CSPG4 expression is higher in Basal-type breast cancers, many of which are TN, than any other subtypes. These results suggest not only a mechanism for migration and invasion involving the canonical WNT-signaling pathways but also novel strategies for treating patients who develop TN breast cancer.

  20. Isoliquiritigenin inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Ling; Kuo, Po-Lin; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2005-02-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (4,2',4'-trihydroxychalcone, ISL) is a natural pigment with a simple chalcone structure. In this study, we report the ISL-induced inhibition on the growth of human hepatoma cells (Hep G2) for the first time. The cell growth inhibition achieved by ISL treatment resulted in programmed cell death in a caspase activation-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 10.51 microg/mL. Outcomes of ISL treatment included the up-regulation of IkappaBalpha expression in the cytoplasm, and the decrease of NF-kappaB level as well as its activity in the nucleus. In addition, ISL also suppressed the expression of Bcl-XL and c-IAP1/2 protein, the downstream target molecule of NF-kappaB. These results demonstrated that ISL treatment inhibited the NF-kappaB cell survival-signaling pathway and induced apoptotic cell death in Hep G2 cells.

  1. Inhibition of murine erythroleukemia cell differentiation by 3-deazaadenosine.

    PubMed

    Sherman, M L; Shafman, T D; Spriggs, D R; Kufe, D W

    1985-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that 5'-methylthioadenosine, an inhibitor of S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) hydrolase, blocks induction of murine erythroleukemia cell (MEL) differentiation. The nucleoside analogue 3-deazaadenosine (c3Ado) is both an efficient substrate and a potent inhibitor of AdoHcy hydrolase. The present study was undertaken to determine whether c3Ado would similarly inhibit MEL differentiation. The results demonstrate that c3Ado inhibits induction of MEL differentiation by dimethyl sulfoxide, hexamethylene bisacetamide, butyric acid, and diazapam. c3Ado blocks the appearance of the differentiated MEL phenotype by inhibiting both MEL heme synthesis and transcription of alpha- and beta-globin RNA. The inhibitory effect of c3Ado on MEL differentiation is concentration dependent, reversible, and potentiated by L-homocysteine thiolactone. Furthermore the AdoHcy/AdoMet ratio increases nearly 3.5-fold after 24 h of treatment with 50 microM c3Ado. In contrast, this c3Ado effect is not associated with polyamine depletion or cytostasis. These findings indicate that c3Ado blocks the induction of MEL differentiation at a transcriptional level and that this effect may be related to inhibition of AdoHcy hydrolase.

  2. Cinnamon effectively inhibits the activity of leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, X; Su, M C; Zhao, R B; Ouyang, H M; Dong, X D; Hu, P; Pei, Q; Lu, J; Li, Z F; Zhang, C R; Yang, T-H

    2016-08-19

    Cinnamon is the main component of Sanyangxuedai, which is one of the effective traditional Chinese medicines for treating malignancies. Leukemia is a prevalent malignant disease that Sanyangxuedai has been used to treat. Although successful in several studies, there is a lack of solid evidence as to why Sanyangxuedai has an effect on leukemia, and little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, the active ingredients of cinnamon were isolated, purified, and identified. The transwell transport pool formed with the Caco-2 cell model was used to filter the active ingredients of cinnamon by simulating the gastrointestinal barrier in vitro. Moreover, the cell morphology, cell cycle status, apoptosis status, and antigenic variation of the cell surface antigens were observed and measured in K562 cells after treatment with the active ingredients of cinnamon. Our results showed that 50-75 μM was a safe concentration of cinnamon extract for treatment of K562 cells for 72 h. The cinnamon extract caused growth inhibition of K562 cells. Cinnamon extract seemed to arrest the cells at the G1 stage and increased the apoptosis rate significantly. Interestingly, cinnamon extract treatment upregulated the expression of erythroid and myeloid differentiation antigens and downregulated that of the megakaryocytic differentiation antigens in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings indicate that cinnamon extract from Sanyangxuedai may be effective for treating leukemia.

  3. Dendritic cell MST1 inhibits Th17 differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunxiao; Bi, Yujing; Li, Yan; Yang, Hui; Yu, Qing; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yu; Su, Huilin; Jia, Anna; Hu, Ying; Han, Linian; Zhang, Jiangyuan; Li, Simin; Tao, Wufan; Liu, Guangwei

    2017-01-01

    Although the differentiation of CD4+T cells is widely studied, the mechanisms of antigen-presenting cell-dependent T-cell modulation are unclear. Here, we investigate the role of dendritic cell (DC)-dependent T-cell differentiation in autoimmune and antifungal inflammation and find that mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) signalling from DCs negatively regulates IL-17 producing-CD4+T helper cell (Th17) differentiation. MST1 deficiency in DCs increases IL-17 production by CD4+T cells, whereas ectopic MST1 expression in DCs inhibits it. Notably, MST1-mediated DC-dependent Th17 differentiation regulates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and antifungal immunity. Mechanistically, MST1-deficient DCs promote IL-6 secretion and regulate the activation of IL-6 receptor α/β and STAT3 in CD4+T cells in the course of inducing Th17 differentiation. Activation of the p38 MAPK signal is responsible for IL-6 production in MST1-deficient DCs. Thus, our results define the DC MST1–p38MAPK signalling pathway in directing Th17 differentiation. PMID:28145433

  4. GATA2 Inhibition Sensitizes Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanan; Xuan, Binbin; Fan, Yingchao; Sheng, Huiming; Zhuang, Wenfang

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance constitutes one of the main obstacles for clinical recovery of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Therefore, the treatment of AML requires new strategies, such as adding a third drug. To address whether GATA2 could act as a regulator of chemotherapy resistance in human leukemia cells, we observed KG1a cells and clinical patients’ AML cells with a classic drug (Cerubidine) and Gefitinib. After utilizing chemotherapy, the expression of GATA2 and its target genes (EVI, SCL and WT1) in surviving AML cells and KG1a cells were significantly enhanced to double and quadrupled compared to its original level respectively. Furthermore, with continuous chemotherapeutics, AML cells with GATA2 knockdown or treated with GATA2 inhibitor (K1747) almost eliminated with dramatically reduced expression of WT1, SCL, EVI, and significantly increased apoptotic population. Therefore, we propose that reducing GATA2 expression or inhibition of its transcription activity can relieve the drug resistance of acute myeloid leukemia cells and it would be helpful for eliminating the leukemia cells in patients. PMID:28114350

  5. Ubenimex inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion by inhibiting the expression of APN and inducing autophagic cell death in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Niu, Zhihong; Jia, Yang; Cui, Meng; Han, Liping; Zhang, Yongfei; Liu, Zheng; Bi, Dongbin; Liu, Shuai

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in males worldwide and is commonly associated with metastasis. Moreover, in prostate cancer, aminopeptidase N (APN) expression is closely correlated with metastasis. Ubenimex, an APN inhibitor, is widely used as an adjunct therapy for cancer, enhancing the function of immunocompetent cells and conferring antitumor effects. However, due to the low expression of APN, it is rarely used to treat prostate cancer. Recently, the induction of autophagy as a molecular mechanism has been strongly connected with tumor cell death. Thus, we investigated whether ubenimex could inhibit cell proliferation, migration and invasion by downregulating APN expression to induce autophagic cell death in prostate cancer cells. The LNCaP and PC-3 cell lines were treated with different doses of ubenimex. Cell viability was measured using growth curve analysis and WST-8 proliferation assay. Autophagic cell death was assessed using fluorescence microscopy and acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) staining. Protein expression was assessed by immunofluorescence and western blot analyses. Autophagosomes were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Wound-healing migration assays were performed to determine the migratory ability of the PC-3 cells. In addition, nude mice were used in the present study to examine PC-3 cell proliferation in vivo. The results revealed that APN expression differed between the metastatic and non-metastatic prostate cancer cells. In addition, ubenimex inhibited APN expression in the prostate cancer cells. Ubenimex increased prostate cancer cell death, as determined using the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) cytotoxicity assay. This effect was accompanied by increased levels of LC3B. Furthermore, ubenimex inhibited PC-3 cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Ubenimex inhibited the cell migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells by downregulating APN expression. Finally, ubenimex induced

  6. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis.

  7. Carbocisteine inhibits rhinovirus infection in human tracheal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, H; Yamaya, M; Sasaki, T; Inoue, D; Nakayama, K; Yamada, M; Asada, M; Yoshida, M; Suzuki, T; Nishimura, H; Sasaki, H

    2006-07-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of a mucolytic drug, carbocisteine, on rhinovirus (RV) infection in the airways. Human tracheal epithelial cells were infected with a major-group RV, RV14. RV14 infection increased virus titres and the cytokine content of supernatants. Carbocisteine reduced supernatant virus titres, the amount of RV14 RNA in cells, cell susceptibility to RV infection and supernatant cytokine concentrations, including interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, after RV14 infection. Carbocisteine reduced the expression of mRNA encoding intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, the receptor for the major group of RVs. It also reduced the supernatant concentration of a soluble form of ICAM-1, the number and fluorescence intensity of acidic endosomes in the cells before RV infection, and nuclear factor-kappaB activation by RV14. Carbocisteine also reduced the supernatant virus titres of the minor group RV, RV2, although carbocisteine did not reduce the expression of mRNA encoding a low density lipoprotein receptor, the receptor for RV2. These results suggest that carbocisteine inhibits rhinovirus 2 infection by blocking rhinovirus RNA entry into the endosomes, and inhibits rhinovirus 14 infection by the same mechanism as well as by reducing intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels. Carbocisteine may modulate airway inflammation by reducing the production of cytokines in rhinovirus infection.

  8. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  9. Myostatin inhibits cell proliferation and protein synthesis in C2C12 muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, W E; Bhasin, S; Artaza, J; Byhower, F; Azam, M; Willard, D H; Kull, F C; Gonzalez-Cadavid, N

    2001-02-01

    Myostatin mutations in mice and cattle are associated with increased muscularity, suggesting that myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. To test the hypothesis that myostatin inhibits muscle cell growth, we examined the effects of recombinant myostatin in mouse skeletal muscle C2C12 cells. After verification of the expression of cDNA constructs in a cell-free system and in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, the human recombinant protein was expressed as the full-length (375-amino acid) myostatin in Drosophila cells (Mst375D), or the 110-amino acid carboxy-terminal protein in Escherichia coli (Mst110EC). These proteins were identified by immunoblotting and were purified. Both Mst375D and Mst110EC dose dependently inhibited cell proliferation (cell count and Formazan assay), DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation), and protein synthesis ([1-14C]leucine incorporation) in C2C12 cells. The inhibitory effects of both proteins were greater in myotubes than in myoblasts. Neither protein had any significant effects on protein degradation or apoptosis. In conclusion, recombinant myostatin proteins inhibit cell proliferation, DNA synthesis, and protein synthesis in C2C12 muscle cells, suggesting that myostatin may control muscle mass by inhibiting muscle growth or regeneration.

  10. Arginase inhibition enhances angiogenesis in endothelial cells exposed to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Bhatta, Anil; Toque, Haroldo A; Rojas, Modesto; Yao, Lin; Xu, Zhimin; Patel, Chintan; Caldwell, Ruth B; Caldwell, R William

    2015-03-01

    Hypoxia-induced arginase elevation plays an essential role in several vascular diseases but influence of arginase on hypoxia-mediated angiogenesis is completely unknown. In this study, in vitro network formation in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) was examined after exposure to hypoxia for 24h with or without arginase inhibition. Arginase activity, protein levels of the two arginase isoforms, eNOS, and VEGF as well as production of NO and ROS were examined to determine the involvement of arginase in hypoxia-mediated angiogenesis. Hypoxia elevated arginase activity and arginase 2 expression but reduced active p-eNOS(Ser1177) and NO levels in BAEC. In addition, both VEGF protein levels and endothelial elongation and network formation were reduced with continued hypoxia, whereas ROS levels increased and NO levels decreased. Arginase inhibition limited ROS, restored NO formation and VEGF expression, and prevented the reduction of angiogenesis. These results suggest a fundamental role of arginase activity in regulating angiogenic function.

  11. A triterpenoid from wild bitter gourd inhibits breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Li-Yuan; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chu, Po-Chen; Lin, Wei-Yu; Chiu, Shih-Jiuan; Weng, Jing-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The antitumor activity of 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23(E)-dien-19-al (TCD), a triterpenoid isolated from wild bitter gourd, in breast cancer cells was investigated. TCD suppressed the proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with IC50 values at 72 h of 19 and 23 μM, respectively, via a PPARγ−independent manner. TCD induced cell apoptosis accompanied with pleiotrophic biological modulations including down-regulation of Akt-NF-κB signaling, up-regulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and p53, increased reactive oxygen species generation, inhibition of histone deacetylases protein expression, and cytoprotective autophagy. Together, these findings provided the translational value of TCD and wild bitter gourd as an antitumor agent for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26926586

  12. Polydatin Inhibits Formation of Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Liu, Meixia; Guo, Gang; Zhang, Wengao; Liu, Longtao

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, a Chinese herbal medicine, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for a long time. Polydatin, one of the major active ingredients in Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, has been recently shown to possess extensive cardiovascular pharmacological activities. In present study, we examined the effects of Polydatin on the formation of peritoneal macrophage-derived foam cells in Apolipoprotein E gene knockout mice (ApoE−/−) and explored the potential underlying mechanisms. Peritoneal macrophages were collected from ApoE−/− mice and cultured in vitro. These cells sequentially were divided into four groups: Control group, Model group, Lovastatin group, and Polydatin group. Our results demonstrated that Polydatin significantly inhibits the formation of foam cells derived from peritoneal macrophages. Further studies indicated that Polydatin regulates the metabolism of intracellular lipid and possesses anti-inflammatory effects, which may be regulated through the PPAR-γ signaling pathways. PMID:26557864

  13. A triterpenoid from wild bitter gourd inhibits breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Li-Yuan; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chu, Po-Chen; Lin, Wei-Yu; Chiu, Shih-Jiuan; Weng, Jing-Ru

    2016-03-01

    The antitumor activity of 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23(E)-dien-19-al (TCD), a triterpenoid isolated from wild bitter gourd, in breast cancer cells was investigated. TCD suppressed the proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with IC50 values at 72 h of 19 and 23 μM, respectively, via a PPARγ‑independent manner. TCD induced cell apoptosis accompanied with pleiotrophic biological modulations including down-regulation of Akt-NF-κB signaling, up-regulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and p53, increased reactive oxygen species generation, inhibition of histone deacetylases protein expression, and cytoprotective autophagy. Together, these findings provided the translational value of TCD and wild bitter gourd as an antitumor agent for patients with breast cancer.

  14. A triterpenoid from wild bitter gourd inhibits breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Li-Yuan; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chu, Po-Chen; Lin, Wei-Yu; Chiu, Shih-Jiuan; Weng, Jing-Ru

    2016-03-01

    The antitumor activity of 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23(E)-dien-19-al (TCD), a triterpenoid isolated from wild bitter gourd, in breast cancer cells was investigated. TCD suppressed the proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with IC50 values at 72 h of 19 and 23 μM, respectively, via a PPARγ-independent manner. TCD induced cell apoptosis accompanied with pleiotrophic biological modulations including down-regulation of Akt-NF-κB signaling, up-regulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and p53, increased reactive oxygen species generation, inhibition of histone deacetylases protein expression, and cytoprotective autophagy. Together, these findings provided the translational value of TCD and wild bitter gourd as an antitumor agent for patients with breast cancer.

  15. Androglobin knockdown inhibits growth of glioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Lu, Yi-Sheng; Li, Xia; Zhu, Zhi-Chuan; Li, Kui; Liu, Ji-Wei; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Ze-Lan

    2014-01-01

    Globin family was famous for oxygen supply function of its members such as hemoglobin and myoglobin. With the progress of research, several members of this protein family have been proven to play roles in tumors including glioma. Androglobin (ADGB) is a recently identified member of globin family with very few studies about its function. In the present study, we show that ADGB plays an oncogene role in glioma. Lentiviral vector mediated ADGB knockdown inhibited the proliferation of glioma cell lines determined by MTT assay and colony formation assay. ADGB knockdown also increased the apoptosis of glioma cell line U251 assessed by flow cytometry. In addition, western blot showed that ADGB knockdown altered levels of several proteins related to proliferation, survival or apoptosis in U251 cells. These findings suggest ADGB is involved in the progression of glioma in vitro. PMID:24966926

  16. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  17. Inhibition of human natural killer cell activity by Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease and elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, B K; Kharazmi, A

    1987-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease (AP) and elastase (Ela) on human natural killer (NK) cell activity in vitro. AP and Ela were found to inhibit NK cell function. Addition of alpha interferon and interleukin-2 did not abolish this inhibition of NK cell activity. Adhesion of effector to target cells was studied in a single-cell agarose assay of monocyte-depleted NK-cell-enriched cell populations. AP and Ela were shown to inhibit effector/target cell conjugate formation. Furthermore, AP and Ela inhibited the binding of the monoclonal antibody Leu-11, which reacts with the Fc receptor of NK cells. The inhibition of NK cell binding to the target cell by P. aeruginosa proteases is most likely due to proteolytic cleavage of the surface receptors involved in the binding of the effector cell to the target cell. PMID:3030937

  18. Xanthohumol inhibits proliferation of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Kai; Yin, Shankai; Zheng, Hongliang; Min, Daliu

    2016-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a flavonoid compound that exhibits antioxidant and anticancer effects, and is used to treat atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of xanthohumol on the cell proliferation of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and to understand the mechanism of its action. The effects of xanthohumol on the cell viability and apoptosis rate of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma SCC4 cells were assessed by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining. In addition, the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins, caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) p53 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), as well as anti-apoptotic markers, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1), were analyzed by western blotting. The results revealed that treatment with 40 µM xanthohumol significantly inhibited the proliferation of SCC4 cells. Furthermore, xanthohumol treatment (40 µM) induced SCC4 cell apoptosis, as indicated by the significant increase in activity and expression of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, PARP, p53 and AIF. By contrast, the protein expression of Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 was significantly decreased following treatment with 40 µM xanthohumol. Taken together, the results of the present study indicated that xanthohumol mediates growth suppression and apoptosis induction, which was mediated via the suppression of Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 and activation of PARP, p53 and AIF signaling pathways. Therefore, future studies that investigate xanthohumol as a potential therapeutic agent for laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma are required.

  19. Xanthohumol inhibits proliferation of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Wang, Kai; Yin, Shankai; Zheng, Hongliang; Min, Daliu

    2016-01-01

    Xanthohumol is a flavonoid compound that exhibits antioxidant and anticancer effects, and is used to treat atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of xanthohumol on the cell proliferation of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and to understand the mechanism of its action. The effects of xanthohumol on the cell viability and apoptosis rate of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma SCC4 cells were assessed by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining. In addition, the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins, caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) p53 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), as well as anti-apoptotic markers, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1), were analyzed by western blotting. The results revealed that treatment with 40 µM xanthohumol significantly inhibited the proliferation of SCC4 cells. Furthermore, xanthohumol treatment (40 µM) induced SCC4 cell apoptosis, as indicated by the significant increase in activity and expression of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, PARP, p53 and AIF. By contrast, the protein expression of Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 was significantly decreased following treatment with 40 µM xanthohumol. Taken together, the results of the present study indicated that xanthohumol mediates growth suppression and apoptosis induction, which was mediated via the suppression of Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 and activation of PARP, p53 and AIF signaling pathways. Therefore, future studies that investigate xanthohumol as a potential therapeutic agent for laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma are required. PMID:28105237

  20. RNA interference targeting raptor inhibits proliferation of gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Lee, Chung Wa; Cho, Chi Hin; Chan, Francis Ka Leung; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu

    2011-06-10

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is dysregulated in gastric cancer. The biologic function of mTORC1 in gastric carcinogenesis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that disruption of mTORC1 function by RNA interference-mediated downregulation of raptor substantially inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation through induction of G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-phase cell cycle arrest. The anti-proliferative effect was accompanied by concomitant downregulation of activator protein-1 and upregulation of Smad2/3 transcriptional activities. In addition, the expression of cyclin D{sub 3} and p21{sup Waf1}, which stabilizes cyclin D/cdk4 complex for G{sub 1}-S transition, was reduced by raptor knockdown. In conclusion, disruption of mTORC1 inhibits gastric cancer cell proliferation through multiple pathways. This discovery may have an implication in the application of mTORC1-directed therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  1. Cancer cell proliferation is inhibited by specific modulation frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, J W; Pennison, M J; Brezovich, I; Yi, N; Yang, C T; Ramaker, R; Absher, D; Myers, R M; Kuster, N; Costa, F P; Barbault, A; Pasche, B

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is clinical evidence that very low and safe levels of amplitude-modulated electromagnetic fields administered via an intrabuccal spoon-shaped probe may elicit therapeutic responses in patients with cancer. However, there is no known mechanism explaining the anti-proliferative effect of very low intensity electromagnetic fields. Methods: To understand the mechanism of this novel approach, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells were exposed to 27.12 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields using in vitro exposure systems designed to replicate in vivo conditions. Cancer cells were exposed to tumour-specific modulation frequencies, previously identified by biofeedback methods in patients with a diagnosis of cancer. Control modulation frequencies consisted of randomly chosen modulation frequencies within the same 100 Hz–21 kHz range as cancer-specific frequencies. Results: The growth of HCC and breast cancer cells was significantly decreased by HCC-specific and breast cancer-specific modulation frequencies, respectively. However, the same frequencies did not affect proliferation of nonmalignant hepatocytes or breast epithelial cells. Inhibition of HCC cell proliferation was associated with downregulation of XCL2 and PLP2. Furthermore, HCC-specific modulation frequencies disrupted the mitotic spindle. Conclusion: These findings uncover a novel mechanism controlling the growth of cancer cells at specific modulation frequencies without affecting normal tissues, which may have broad implications in oncology. PMID:22134506

  2. Silencing of carboxypeptidase E inhibits cell proliferation, tumorigenicity, and metastasis of osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shuli; Li, Xu; Li, Leiming; Wang, Liguo; Du, Zhangzhen; Yang, Yan; Zhao, Jiansong; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase E (CPE), a prohormone processing enzyme, has been implicated in the progression of multiple malignancies. However, the biological role and molecular mechanisms of CPE in osteosarcoma remain elusive. In this study, we assessed the effects of CPE on cell proliferation, tumorigenicity, migration, and invasion in osteosarcoma. Our results showed that silencing of CPE significantly inhibited cell proliferation, caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, decreased the expression levels of cell cycle protein, cyclin D1, and inhibited tumorigenicity in vivo. Additionally, CPE downregulation repressed the migratory and invasive capacities of osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of CPE-ΔN (a splice variant of CPE) enhanced the cell growth, migration, and invasion of osteosarcoma cells. It is possible that both CPE forms are involved in the tumorigenesis and development of osteosarcoma, and therefore CPE may provide a promising biological target for osteosarcoma therapy. PMID:27274275

  3. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions.

  4. Bruceantin inhibits multiple myeloma cancer stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mark E; Berndt, Sarah; Carpentier, Gilles; Pezzuto, John M; Cuendet, Muriel

    2016-09-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) continues to claim the lives of a majority of patients. MM cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been demonstrated to sustain tumor growth. Due to their ability to self-renew and to express detoxifying enzymes and efflux transporters, MM-CSCs are rendered highly resistant to conventional therapies. Therefore, managing MM-CSCs characteristics could have profound clinical implications. Bruceantin (BCT) is a natural product previously demonstrated to inhibit the growth of MM in RPMI 8226 cells-inoculated mouse xenograft models, and to cause regression in already established tumors. The objectives of the present study were to test the inhibitory effects of BCT on MM-CSCs growth derived from a human primary tumor, and to explore a mechanism of action underlying these effects. BCT exhibited potent antiproliferative activity in MM-CSCs starting at 25 nM. BCT induced cell cycle arrest, cell death and apoptosis in MM-CSCs as well as inhibited cell migration and angiogenesis in vitro. Using a qPCR screen, it was found that the gene expression of a number of Notch pathway members was altered. Pretreatment of MM-CSCs with the γ-secretase inhibitor RO4929097, a Notch pathway inhibitor, reversed BCT-induced effects on MM-CSCs proliferation. In this study, BCT was shown to be an effective agent in controlling the proliferation, viability and migration of MM-CSCs as well as angiogenesis in vitro. The effect on MM-CSCs proliferation may be mediated by the Notch pathway. These results warrant further investigation of BCT in a broader set of human-derived MM-CSCs and with in vivo models representative of MM.

  5. QSOX1 Inhibits Autophagic Flux in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Poillet, Laura; Pernodet, Nicolas; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël; Adami, Pascale; Borg, Christophe; Jouvenot, Michèle; Delage-Mourroux, Régis; Despouy, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    The QSOX1 protein (Quiescin Sulfhydryl oxidase 1) catalyzes the formation of disulfide bonds and is involved in the folding and stability of proteins. More recently, QSOX1 has been associated with tumorigenesis and protection against cellular stress. It has been demonstrated in our laboratory that QSOX1 reduces proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells in vitro and reduces tumor growth in vivo. In addition, QSOX1 expression has been shown to be induced by oxidative or ER stress and to prevent cell death linked to these stressors. Given the function of QSOX1 in these two processes, which have been previously linked to autophagy, we wondered whether QSOX1 might be regulated by autophagy inducers and play a role in this catabolic process. To answer this question, we used in vitro models of breast cancer cells in which QSOX1 was overexpressed (MCF-7) or extinguished (MDA-MB-231). We first showed that QSOX1 expression is induced following amino acid starvation and maintains cellular homeostasis. Our results also indicated that QSOX1 inhibits autophagy through the inhibition of autophagosome/lysosome fusion. Moreover, we demonstrated that inhibitors of autophagy mimic the effect of QSOX1 on cell invasion, suggesting that its role in this process is linked to the autophagy pathway. Previously published data demonstrated that extinction of QSOX1 promotes tumor growth in NOG mice. In this study, we further demonstrated that QSOX1 null tumors present lower levels of the p62 protein. Altogether, our results demonstrate for the first time a role of QSOX1 in autophagy in breast cancer cells and tumors. PMID:24475161

  6. QSOX1 inhibits autophagic flux in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Poillet, Laura; Pernodet, Nicolas; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël; Adami, Pascale; Borg, Christophe; Jouvenot, Michèle; Delage-Mourroux, Régis; Despouy, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    The QSOX1 protein (Quiescin Sulfhydryl oxidase 1) catalyzes the formation of disulfide bonds and is involved in the folding and stability of proteins. More recently, QSOX1 has been associated with tumorigenesis and protection against cellular stress. It has been demonstrated in our laboratory that QSOX1 reduces proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells in vitro and reduces tumor growth in vivo. In addition, QSOX1 expression has been shown to be induced by oxidative or ER stress and to prevent cell death linked to these stressors. Given the function of QSOX1 in these two processes, which have been previously linked to autophagy, we wondered whether QSOX1 might be regulated by autophagy inducers and play a role in this catabolic process. To answer this question, we used in vitro models of breast cancer cells in which QSOX1 was overexpressed (MCF-7) or extinguished (MDA-MB-231). We first showed that QSOX1 expression is induced following amino acid starvation and maintains cellular homeostasis. Our results also indicated that QSOX1 inhibits autophagy through the inhibition of autophagosome/lysosome fusion. Moreover, we demonstrated that inhibitors of autophagy mimic the effect of QSOX1 on cell invasion, suggesting that its role in this process is linked to the autophagy pathway. Previously published data demonstrated that extinction of QSOX1 promotes tumor growth in NOG mice. In this study, we further demonstrated that QSOX1 null tumors present lower levels of the p62 protein. Altogether, our results demonstrate for the first time a role of QSOX1 in autophagy in breast cancer cells and tumors.

  7. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  8. Molecular mechanisms of cholangiocarcinoma cell inhibition by medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Leelawat, Surang; Leelawat, Kawin

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is one of the most common causes of cancer-associated mortality in Thailand. Certain phytochemicals have been demonstrated to modulate apoptotic signaling pathways, which may be targeted for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of specific medicinal plants on the inhibition of CCA cell proliferation, and to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this. A WST-1 cell proliferation assay was performed using an RMCCA1 cell line, and apoptotic signaling pathways were also investigated using a PathScan Stress and Apoptosis Signaling Antibody Array Kit. The cell proliferation assay indicated that extracts from the Phyllanthus emblica fruit pulp (PEf), Phyllanthus emblica seed (PEs), Terminalia chebula fruit pulp (TCf), Terminalia chebula seed (TCs), Areca catechu seed (ACs), Curcuma longa (CL) and Moringa oleifera seed (MOs) exerted anti-proliferative activity in RMCCA1 cells. In addition, the PathScan assay revealed that certain pro-apoptotic molecules, including caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, checkpoint kinase 2 and tumor protein 53, exhibited increased activity in RMCCA1 cells treated with the aforementioned selected plant extracts, with the exception of PEf. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways (including ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK) expression level was significantly increased in RMCCA1 cells pre-treated with extracts of PEs, TCf, CL and MOs. The activation of protein kinase B (Akt) was significantly demonstrated in RMCCA1 cells pre-treated with extracts of TCf, ACs and MOs. In summary, the present study demonstrated that extracts of PEs, TCf, TCs, ACs, CL and MOs exhibited anti-proliferative effects in CCA cells by inducing pro-apoptotic signals and modulating signal transduction molecules. Further studies in vivo are required to demonstrate the potential applications of specific plant extracts for the treatment of human cancer. PMID:28356985

  9. AP-2α inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell growth and migration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenhuan; Chen, Cheng; Liang, Zhongheng; Qiu, Junlu; Li, Xinxin; Hu, Xiang; Xiang, Shuanglin; Ding, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Transcription factor AP-2α is involved in many types of human cancers, but its role in hepatocellular carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that expression of AP-2α was low in 40% of human hepatocellular cancers compared with adjacent normal tissues by immunohistochemical analysis. Moreover, AP-2α expression was low or absent in hepatocellular cancer cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, SMMC-7721 and MHHC 97-H). Human liver cancer cell lines SMMC-7721 and Hep3B stably overexpressing AP-2α were established by lentiviral infection and puromycin screening, and the ectopic expression of AP-2α was able to inhibit hepatocellular cancer cell growth and proliferation by cell viability, MTT assay and liquid colony formation in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, AP-2α overexpression decreased liver cancer cell migration and invasion as assessed by wound healing and Transwell assays, increasing the sensitivity of liver cancer cells to cisplatin analyzed by MTT assays. Also AP-2α overexpression suppressed the sphere formation and renewed the ability of cancer stem cells. Finally, we found that AP-2α is epigenetically modified and modulates the levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), β-catenin, p53, EMT, and CD133 expression in liver cancer cell lines. These results suggested that AP-2α expression is low in human hepatocellular cancers by regulating multiple signaling to affect hepatocellular cancer cell growth and migration. Therefore, AP-2α might represent a novel potential target in human hepatocellular cancer therapy.

  10. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan; Xu, Chuan; Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui; Zhou, Zhansong; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Cui, Hongjuan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Tigecycline inhibited cell growth and proliferation in human gastric cancer cells. • Tigecycline induced autophagy not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. • AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated after tigecycline treatment. • Tigecycline inhibited tumor growth in xenograft model of human gastric cancer cells. - Abstract: Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  11. WEHI-3 cells inhibit adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Jing; Liu, Gexiu; Yan, Guoyao; He, Dongmei; Zhou, Ying; Chen, Shengting

    2015-06-26

    By investigating the anti-adipogenic effects of WEHI-3 cells – a murine acute myelomonocytic leukemia cell line – we sought to improve the efficiency of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Analysis of Oil Red O staining and the expression of adipogenic genes, including PPARγ, C/EBPα, FAS and LPL, indicated that WEHI-3 cells significantly inhibited 3T3-L1 mouse preadipocyte cells from differentiating into adipocytes. In vivo, fat vacuoles in mice injected with WEHI-3 cells were also remarkably reduced in the murine bone marrow pimelosis model. Moreover, the key gene in the Rho signaling pathway, ROCKII, and the key gene in the Wnt signaling pathway, β-catenin, were both upregulated compared with the control group. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ROCKII and β-catenin reversed these WEHI-3-mediated anti-adipogenic effects. Taken together, these data suggest that WEHI-3 cells exert anti-adipogenic effects and that both ROCKII and β-catenin are involved in this process. - Highlights: • WEHI-3, an acute myelomonocytic leukemia cell line, inhibited 3T3-L1 preadipocyte from differentiating into adipocyte. • WEHI-3 cells can arrest 3T3-L1 cells in G0/G1 phase by secreting soluble factors and thus inhibit their proliferation. • WEHI-3 cells reduced bone marrow pimelosis in the murine model. • Both ROCKII and β-catenin were involved in the WEHI-3-mediated anti-adipogenic effects.

  12. Inhibition of TRPC6 reduces non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiao-Yu; Yan, Yan; Zhai, Yu-Jia; Bao, Qing; Doetsch, Paul W.; Deng, Xingming; Thai, Tiffany L.; Alli, Abdel A.; Eaton, Douglas C.; Shen, Bao-Zhong; Ma, He-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) channel is highly expressed in several types of cancer cells. However, it remains unclear whether TRPC6 contributes to the malignancy of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We used a human NSCLC A549 cell line as a model and found that pharmacological blockade or molecular knockdown of TRPC6 channel inhibited A549 cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at the S-G2M phase and caused a significant portion of cells detached and rounded-up, but did not induce any types of cell death. Western blot and cell cycle analysis show that the detached round cells at the S-G2M phase expressed more TRPC6 than the still attached polygon cells at the G1 phase. Patch-clamp data also show that TRPC whole-cell currents in the detached cells were significantly higher than in the still attached cells. Inhibition of Ca2+-permeable TRPC6 channels significantly reduced intracellular Ca2+ in A549 cells. Interestingly, either blockade or knockdown of TRPC6 strongly reduced the invasion of this NSCLC cell line and decreased the expression of an adherent protein, fibronectin, and a tight junction protein, zonula occluden protein-1 (ZO-1). These data suggest that TRPC6-mediated elevation of intracellular Ca2+ stimulates NSCLC cell proliferation by promoting cell cycle progression and that inhibition of TRPC6 attenuates cell proliferation and invasion. Therefore, further in vivo studies may lead to a consideration of using a specific TRPC6 blocker as a complement to treat NSCLC. PMID:28030826

  13. Inhibition of VEGF induces cellular senescence in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mohammad R; Ho, Shirley H Y; Owen, David A; Tai, Isabella T

    2011-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors, such as bevacizumab, have improved outcomes in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Recent studies have suggested that VEGF can delay the onset of cellular senescence in human endothelial cells. As VEGF receptors are known to be upregulated in CRC, we hypothesized that VEGF inhibition may directly influence cellular senescence in this disease. In our study, we observed that treatment with bevacizumab caused a significant increase (p < 0.05) in cellular senescence in vitro in several CRC cells, such as MIP101, RKO, SW620 and SW480 cells, compared to untreated or human IgG-treated control cells. Similar results were also obtained from cells treated with a VEGFR2 kinase inhibitor Ki8751. In vivo, cellular senescence was detected in MIP101 tumor xenografts from 75% of mice treated with bevacizumab, while cellular senescence was undetectable in xenografts from mice treated with saline or human IgG (p < 0.05). Interestingly, we also observed that the proportion of senescent cells in colon cancer tissues obtained from patients treated with bevacizumab was 4.4-fold higher (p < 0.01) than those of untreated patients. To understand how VEGF inhibitors may regulate cellular senescence, we noted that among the two important regulators of senescent growth arrest of tumor cells, bevacizumab-associated increase in cellular senescence coincided with an upregulation of p16 but appeared to be independent of p53. siRNA silencing of p16 gene in MIP101 cells suppressed bevacizumab-induced cellular senescence, while silencing of p53 had no effect. These findings demonstrate a novel antitumor activity of VEGF inhibitors in CRC, involving p16.

  14. Downregulation of CCR1 inhibits human hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaofeng; Fan Jia; E-mail: jiafan99@yahoo.com; Wang Xiaoying; Zhou Jian; Qiu Shuangjian; Yu Yao; Liu Yinkun; Tang Zhaoyou

    2007-04-20

    CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) has an important role in the recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. The migration and metastasis of tumor cells shares many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is mainly regulated by chemokine receptor-ligand interactions. CCR1 is highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and tissues with unknown functions. In this study, we silenced CCR1 expression in the human HCC cell line HCCLM3 using artificial microRNA (miRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) and examined the invasiveness and proliferation of CCR1-silenced HCCLM3 cells and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The miRNA-mediated knockdown expression of CCR1 significantly inhibited the invasive ability of HCCLM3 cells, but had only a minor effect on the cellular proliferation rate. Moreover, CCR1 knockdown significantly reduced the secretion of MMP-2. Together, these findings indicate that CCR1 has an important role in HCCLM3 invasion and that CCR1 might be a new target of HCC treatment.

  15. MBD3 inhibits formation of liver cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruizhi; He, Qihua; Han, Shuo; Zhang, Mingzhi; Liu, Jinwen; Su, Ming; Wei, Shiruo; Wang, Xuan; Shen, Li

    2017-01-01

    Liver cancer cells can be reprogrammed into induced cancer stem cells (iCSCs) by exogenous expression of the reprogramming transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc (OSKM). The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex is essential for reprogramming somatic cells. In this study, we investigated the function of NuRD in the induction of liver CSCs. We showed that suppression of methyl-CpG binding domain protein 3 (MBD3), a core subunit of the NuRD repressor complex, together with OSKM transduction, induces conversion of liver cancer cells into stem-like cells. Expression of the transcription factor c-JUN is increased in MBD3-depleted iCSCs, and c-JUN activates endogenous pluripotent genes and regulates iCSC-related genes. These results indicate that MBD3/NuRD inhibits the induction of iCSCs, while c-JUN facilitates the generation of CSC-like properties. The iCSC reprogramming approach devised here provides a novel platform for dissection of the disordered signaling in liver CSCs. In addition, our results indicate that c-JUN may serve as a potential target for liver cancer therapy. PMID:27894081

  16. Behavioral inspiratory inhibition: inactivated and activated respiratory cells.

    PubMed

    Orem, J

    1989-11-01

    = 0.27 +/- 0.03, mean +/- SE). 4) The latency of their activation in response to the task averaged 58 +/- 2.7 (SE) ms and was significantly shorter than the latency of inactivation of the high eta 2-valued inspiratory cells. 5) This activation was intense and prolonged. 6. It is hypothesized that the activated cells integrate nonrespiratory and respiratory inputs and act to inhibit other respiratory cells during the behavioral inhibition of inspiration.

  17. Gliotoxin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junxiong; Wang, Chenliang; Lan, Wenjian; Huang, Chunying; Lin, Mengmeng; Wang, Zhongyang; Liang, Wanling; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Yang, Xiangling; Liu, Huanliang

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of new bioactive compounds from marine natural sources is very important in pharmacological research. Here we developed a Wnt responsive luciferase reporter assay to screen small molecule inhibitors of cancer associated constitutive Wnt signaling pathway. We identified that gliotoxin (GTX) and some of its analogues, the secondary metabolites from marine fungus Neosartorya pseufofischeri, acted as inhibitors of the Wnt signaling pathway. In addition, we found that GTX downregulated the β-catenin levels in colorectal cancer cells with inactivating mutations of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or activating mutations of β-catenin. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GTX induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in multiple colorectal cancer cell lines with mutations of the Wnt signaling pathway. Together, we illustrated a practical approach to identify small-molecule inhibitors of the Wnt signaling pathway and our study indicated that GTX has therapeutic potential for the prevention or treatment of Wnt dependent cancers and other Wnt related diseases. PMID:26445050

  18. Phloroglucinol Inhibits the in vitro Differentiation Potential of CD34 Positive Cells into Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yi-Hong; Lee, Jun-Hee; Jung, Seok-Yun; Kim, Jae-Won; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Dong-Hyung; Lee, Kyu-Sup; Lee, Boo-Yong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2012-01-01

    Inhibiting the bioactivities of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) results in significant inhibition of neovessel formation during tumor angiogenesis. To investigate the potential effect of phloroglucinol as an EPC inhibitor, we performed several in vitro functional assays using CD34+ cells isolated from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB). Although a high treatment dose of phloroglucinol did not show any cell toxicity, it specifically induced the cell death of EPCs under serum free conditions through apoptosis. In the EPC colony-forming assay (EPC-CFA), we observed a significant decreased in the small EPC-CFUs for the phloroglucinol group, implying that phloroglucinol inhibited the early stage of EPC commitment. In addition, in the in vitro expansion assay using CD34+ cells, treatment with phloroglucinol was shown to inhibit endothelial lineage commitment, as demonstrated by the decrease in endothelial surface markers of EPCs including CD34+, CD34+/CD133+, CD34+/CD31+ and CD34+/CXCR4+. This is the first report to demonstrate that phloroglucinol can inhibit the functional bioactivities of EPCs, indicating that phloroglucinol may be used as an EPC inhibitor in the development of biosafe anti-tumor drugs that target tumor angiogenesis. PMID:24116289

  19. Kaempferol inhibits cell proliferation and glycolysis in esophagus squamous cell carcinoma via targeting EGFR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shihua; Wang, Xiaowei; Li, Chunguang; Zhao, Tiejun; Jin, Hai; Fang, Wentao

    2016-08-01

    Antitumor activity of kaempferol has been studied in various tumor types, but its potency in esophagus squamous cell carcinoma is rarely known. Here, we reported the activity of kaempferol against esophagus squamous cell carcinoma as well as its antitumor mechanisms. Results of cell proliferation and colony formation assay showed that kaempferol substantially inhibited tumor cell proliferation and clone formation in vitro. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that tumor cells were induced G0/G1 phase arrest after kaempferol treatment, and the expression of protein involved in cell cycle regulation was dramatically changed. Except the potency on cell proliferation, we also discovered that kaempferol had a significant inhibitory effect against tumor glycolysis. With the downregulation of hexokinase-2, glucose uptake and lactate production in tumor cells were dramatically declined. Mechanism studies revealed kaempferol had a direct effect on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity, and along with the inhibition of EGFR, its downstream signaling pathways were also markedly suppressed. Further investigations found that exogenous overexpression of EGFR in tumor cells substantially attenuated glycolysis suppression induced by kaempferol, which implied that EGFR also played an important role in kaempferol-mediated glycolysis inhibition. Finally, the antitumor activity of kaempferol was validated in xenograft model and kaempferol prominently restrained tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, dramatic decrease of EGFR activity and hexokinase-2 expression were observed in kaempferol-treated tumor tissue, which confirmed these findings in vitro. Briefly, these studies suggested that kaempferol, or its analogues, may serve as effective candidates for esophagus squamous cell carcinoma management.

  20. Curcumin inhibits Rift Valley fever virus replication in human cells.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Senina, Svetlana; Lundberg, Lindsay; Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Das, Ravi; Baer, Alan; Bethel, Laura; Turell, Michael; Hartman, Amy Lynn; Das, Bhaskar; Bailey, Charles; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2012-09-28

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus that is classified as a select agent, an emerging infectious virus, and an agricultural pathogen. Understanding RVFV-host interactions is imperative to the design of novel therapeutics. Here, we report that an infection by the MP-12 strain of RVFV induces phosphorylation of the p65 component of the NFκB cascade. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of p65 (serine 536) involves phosphorylation of IκBα and occurs through the classical NFκB cascade. A unique, low molecular weight complex of the IKK-β subunit can be observed in MP-12-infected cells, which we have labeled IKK-β2. The IKK-β2 complex retains kinase activity and phosphorylates an IκBα substrate. Inhibition of the IKK complex using inhibitors impairs viral replication, thus alluding to the requirement of an active IKK complex to the viral life cycle. Curcumin strongly down-regulates levels of extracellular infectious virus. Our data demonstrated that curcumin binds to and inhibits kinase activity of the IKK-β2 complex in infected cells. Curcumin partially exerts its inhibitory influence on RVFV replication by interfering with IKK-β2-mediated phosphorylation of the viral protein NSs and by altering the cell cycle of treated cells. Curcumin also demonstrated efficacy against ZH501, the fully virulent version of RVFV. Curcumin treatment down-regulated viral replication in the liver of infected animals. Our data point to the possibility that RVFV infection may result in the generation of novel versions of host components (such as IKK-β2) that, by virtue of altered protein interaction and function, qualify as unique therapeutic targets.

  1. Curcumin Inhibits Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Senina, Svetlana; Lundberg, Lindsay; Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Das, Ravi; Baer, Alan; Bethel, Laura; Turell, Michael; Hartman, Amy Lynn; Das, Bhaskar; Bailey, Charles; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus that is classified as a select agent, an emerging infectious virus, and an agricultural pathogen. Understanding RVFV-host interactions is imperative to the design of novel therapeutics. Here, we report that an infection by the MP-12 strain of RVFV induces phosphorylation of the p65 component of the NFκB cascade. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of p65 (serine 536) involves phosphorylation of IκBα and occurs through the classical NFκB cascade. A unique, low molecular weight complex of the IKK-β subunit can be observed in MP-12-infected cells, which we have labeled IKK-β2. The IKK-β2 complex retains kinase activity and phosphorylates an IκBα substrate. Inhibition of the IKK complex using inhibitors impairs viral replication, thus alluding to the requirement of an active IKK complex to the viral life cycle. Curcumin strongly down-regulates levels of extracellular infectious virus. Our data demonstrated that curcumin binds to and inhibits kinase activity of the IKK-β2 complex in infected cells. Curcumin partially exerts its inhibitory influence on RVFV replication by interfering with IKK-β2-mediated phosphorylation of the viral protein NSs and by altering the cell cycle of treated cells. Curcumin also demonstrated efficacy against ZH501, the fully virulent version of RVFV. Curcumin treatment down-regulated viral replication in the liver of infected animals. Our data point to the possibility that RVFV infection may result in the generation of novel versions of host components (such as IKK-β2) that, by virtue of altered protein interaction and function, qualify as unique therapeutic targets. PMID:22847000

  2. T-705 (favipiravir) inhibition of arenavirus replication in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, Michelle; Russell, Andrew; Juelich, Terry; Messina, Emily L; Smee, Donald F; Freiberg, Alexander N; Holbrook, Michael R; Furuta, Yousuke; de la Torre, Juan-Carlos; Nunberg, Jack H; Gowen, Brian B

    2011-02-01

    A number of New World arenaviruses (Junín [JUNV], Machupo [MACV], and Guanarito [GTOV] viruses) can cause human disease ranging from mild febrile illness to a severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever syndrome. These highly pathogenic viruses and the Old World Lassa fever virus pose a significant threat to public health and national security. The only licensed antiviral agent with activity against these viruses, ribavirin, has had mixed success in treating severe arenaviral disease and is associated with significant toxicities. A novel pyrazine derivative currently in clinical trials for the treatment of influenza virus infections, T-705 (favipiravir), has demonstrated broad-spectrum activity against a number of RNA viruses, including arenaviruses. T-705 has also been shown to be effective against Pichinde arenavirus infection in a hamster model. Here, we demonstrate the robust antiviral activity of T-705 against authentic highly pathogenic arenaviruses in cell culture. We show that T-705 disrupts an early or intermediate stage in viral replication, distinct from absorption or release, and that its antiviral activity in cell culture is reversed by the addition of purine bases and nucleosides, but not with pyrimidines. Specific inhibition of viral replication/transcription by T-705 was demonstrated using a lymphocytic choriomeningitis arenavirus replicon system. Our findings indicate that T-705 acts to inhibit arenavirus replication/transcription and may directly target the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

  3. Caudatin Inhibits Human Glioma Cells Growth Through Triggering DNA Damage-Mediated Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Kun; Yang, Ming-feng; Fan, Cun-dong; Sun, Bao-liang

    2015-10-01

    Caudatin, one of the species of C-21 steroidal glycosides mainly isolated from the root of Cynanchum bungei Decne, exhibits potent anticancer activities. However, the mechanism remains poorly defined. In the present study, the growth inhibitory effect and mechanism of caudatin on human glioma cells were evaluated in vitro. The results revealed that caudatin time- and dose-dependently inhibited U251 and U87 cells growth. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that caudatin-induced growth inhibition against U251 and U87 cells was mainly achieved by the induction of G0/G1 and S-phase cell cycle arrest through triggering DNA damage, as convinced by the up-regulation of p53, p21, and histone phosphorylation, as well as the down-regulation of cyclin D1. Moreover, caudatin treatment also triggered the activation of ERK and inactivation of AKT pathway. LY294002 (an AKT inhibitor) addition enhanced caudation-induced AKT inhibition, indicating that caudatin inhibited U251 cells growth in an AKT-dependent manner. Taken together, these results indicate that caudatin may act as a novel cytostatic reagent against human glioma cells through the induction of DNA damage-mediated cell cycle arrest with the involvement of modulating MAPK and AKT pathways.

  4. Amelioration of the Fitness Costs of Antibiotic Resistance Due To Reduced Outer Membrane Permeability by Upregulation of Alternative Porins.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Michael; Andersson, Dan I

    2015-12-01

    The fitness cost of antibiotic resistance is a key parameter in determining the evolutionary success of resistant bacteria. Studies of the effect of antibiotic resistance on bacterial fitness are heavily biased toward target alterations. Here we investigated how the costs in the form of a severely impaired growth rate associated with resistance due to absence of two major outer membrane porins can be genetically compensated. We performed an evolution experiment with 16 lineages of a double mutant of Escherichia coli with the ompCF genes deleted, and reduced fitness and increased resistance to different classes of antibiotics, including the carbapenems ertapenem and meropenem. After serial passage for only 250 generations, the relative growth rate increased from 0.85 to 0.99 (susceptible wild type set to 1.0). Compensation of the costs followed two different adaptive pathways where upregulation of expression of alternative porins bypassed the need for functional OmpCF porins. The first compensatory mechanism involved mutations in the phoR and pstS genes, causing constitutive high-level expression of the PhoE porin. The second mechanism involved mutations in the hfq and chiX genes that disrupted Hfq-dependent small RNA regulation, causing overexpression of the ChiP porin. Although susceptibility was restored in compensated mutants with PhoE overexpression, evolved mutants with high ChiP expression maintained the resistance phenotype. Our findings may explain why porin composition is often altered in resistant clinical isolates and provide new insights into how bypass mechanisms may allow genetic adaptation to a common multidrug resistance mechanism.

  5. Molecular Basis of Filtering Carbapenems by Porins from β-Lactam-resistant Clinical Strains of Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Harsha; Scorciapino, Mariano A.; Moynié, Lucile; Page, Malcolm G. P.; Naismith, James H.; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins known as porins are the major pathway by which hydrophilic antibiotics cross the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Single point mutations in porins can decrease the permeability of an antibiotic, either by reduction of channel size or modification of electrostatics in the channel, and thereby confer clinical resistance. Here, we investigate four mutant OmpC proteins from four different clinical isolates of Escherichia coli obtained sequentially from a single patient during a course of antimicrobial chemotherapy. OmpC porin from the first isolate (OmpC20) undergoes three consecutive and additive substitutions giving rise to OmpC26, OmpC28, and finally OmpC33. The permeability of two zwitterionic carbapenems, imipenem and meropenem, measured using liposome permeation assays and single channel electrophysiology differs significantly between OmpC20 and OmpC33. Molecular dynamic simulations show that the antibiotics must pass through the constriction zone of porins with a specific orientation, where the antibiotic dipole is aligned along the electric field inside the porin. We identify that changes in the vector of the electric field in the mutated porin, OmpC33, create an additional barrier by “trapping” the antibiotic in an unfavorable orientation in the constriction zone that suffers steric hindrance for the reorientation needed for its onward translocation. Identification and understanding the underlying molecular details of such a barrier to translocation will aid in the design of new antibiotics with improved permeation properties in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26645688

  6. Methyl-donor nutrients inhibit breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Park, Chung S; Cho, Kyongshin; Bae, Dong R; Joo, Nam E; Kim, Hyung H; Mabasa, Lawrence; Fowler, Andrea W

    2008-01-01

    Lipotropes (methyl group containing nutrients, including methionine, choline, folate, and vitamin B(12)) are dietary methyl donors and cofactors that are involved in one-carbon metabolism, which is important for genomic DNA methylation reactions and nucleic acid synthesis. One-carbon metabolism provides methyl groups for all biological methylation pathways and is highly dependent on dietary supplementation of methyl nutrients. Nutrition is an important determinant of breast cancer risk and tumor behavior, and dietary intervention may be an effective approach to prevent breast cancer. Apoptosis is important for the regulation of homeostasis and tumorigenesis. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 may be a regulatory target in cancer therapy; controlling or modulating its expression may be a therapeutic strategy against breast cancer. In this study, the effects of lipotrope supplementation on the growth and death of human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MCF-7 were examined and found to inhibit growth of both T47D and MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the ratios of apoptotic cells to the total number of cells were approximately 44% and 34% higher in the lipotrope-supplemented treatments of T47D and MCF-7 cancer cells, respectively, compared with the control treatments. More importantly, Bcl-2 protein expression was decreased by approximately 25% from lipotrope supplementation in T47D cells, suggesting that lipotropes can induce breast cancer cell death by direct downregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression. Cancer treatment failure is often correlated with Bcl-2 protein upregulation. These data may be useful in the development of effective nutritional strategies to prevent and reduce breast cancer in humans.

  7. The Hsp70 inhibiting peptide aptamer A17 potentiates radiosensitization of tumor cells by Hsp90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Daniela; Garrido, Carmen; Combs, Stephanie E; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    The inhibition of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a promising strategy to increase the radiosensitivity of tumor cells. However, Hsp90 inhibition induces the expression of Hsp70 which is a prominent cytoprotective protein. Therefore, dual targeting of Hsp70 and Hsp90 might be beneficial to increase the radiosensitivity of tumor cells. Hsp70 inhibiting peptide aptamers have been shown to increase the sensitivity of tumor cells to apoptosis induced by different anticancer drugs. Herein, we studied the radiosensitizing activity of the Hsp70 inhibiting peptide aptamer A17 in combination with the Hsp90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922. Whereas A17 significantly increased apoptosis induction by NVP-AUY922 it did not significantly affect the radiosensitivity of human lung and breast cancer cells. However, Hsp70 inhibition by the aptamer A17 potentiated the radiosensitizing effects of the Hsp90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922. Mechanistically we speculate that an increased number of DNA double strand breaks and an enhanced G2/M arrest might be responsible for the increased radiosensitization in A17 expressing tumor cells. Therefore, the simultaneous inhibition of Hsp90 and Hsp70 combined with radiotherapy might provide a promising anti-cancer strategy.

  8. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling pathway impedes cancer cell proliferation by promotion of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoli; Deng, Libin; Chen, Qi; Wang, Yao; Xu, Rong; Shi, Chao; Shao, Jia; Hu, Guohui; Gao, Meng; Rao, Hai; Luo, Shiwen; Lu, Quqin

    2015-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence implicate that aberrant activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is involved in a variety of human cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying how cancer cells respond to Hh inhibition remain to be elucidated. In this study, we found that blockade of Hh signaling suppresses cell proliferation in human cancer cells. Microarray analysis revealed that differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in human cancer cells are enriched in autophagy pathway in response to the inhibition of Hh signaling. Interestingly, inhibition of Hh signaling induced autophagy, whereas activation of Hh signaling by ligand treatments prevented the induction of autophagy. In addition, inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) partially suppressed cytotoxicity induced by inhibition of Hh signaling. Finally, in autophagy deficient cells, cytotoxic effect triggered by inhibition of Hh signaling was partially reversed, indicating the modulation of autophagy by Hh signaling is autophagy-specific. These results suggest that inhibition of Hh signaling impedes cancer cell proliferation in part through induction of autophagy.

  9. Chinese medicinal herbs inhibit growth of murine renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lau, B H; Ruckle, H C; Botolazzo, T; Lui, P D

    1994-01-01

    Tumors are known to produce factors suppressing immune functions. We previously showed that a murine renal cell carcinoma (Renca) suppressed macrophage function in vitro and that this suppression was abolished by co-incubation with extracts of two Chinese medicinal herbs. We now report that these phytochemicals are capable of inhibiting growth of Renca in vivo. BALB/c mice were transplanted intraperitoneally (IP) with 1-2 x 10(5) Renca cells. One day after tumor transplant, mice were randomized into two groups. One group was treated IP, daily for 10 days, with 100 microliters of phytochemicals containing 500 micrograms each of Astragalus membranaceus and Ligustrum lucidum, while the other group received saline as controls. A cure rate of 57% was obtained with these phytochemicals when the initial tumor load was 2 x 10(5), and 100% when the initial tumor load was 1 x 10(5). Additional experiments were performed to investigate the mechanisms involved in this protection. Splenic macrophages from tumor-bearing mice were shown to have depressed chemiluminescent oxidative burst activity, and this depression was restored with phytochemical treatment. Splenocytes from mice transplanted with Renca responded less favorably to interleukin-2 (IL-2) in generating lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells; again this depression was restored with phytochemical treatment. Our data suggest that these phytochemicals may have exerted their antitumor effects via augmentation of phagocyte and LAK cell activities.

  10. Salidroside inhibits endogenous hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingyu; Jin, Lianhai; Shen, Nan; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Zhengli

    2013-01-01

    Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., shows potent antioxidant property. Herein, we investigated the protective effects of salidroside against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in human endothelial cells (EVC-304). EVC-304 cells were incubated in the presence or absence of low steady states of H2O2 (3-4 µM) generated by glucose oxidase (GOX) with or without salidroside. 3(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) assays were performed, together with Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometric analysis using Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) label. The results indicated that salidroside pretreatment attenuated endogenous H2O2 induced apoptotic cell death in EVC-304 cells in a dose-dependent pattern. Furthermore, Western blot data revealed that salidroside inhibited activation of caspase-3, 9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) induced by endogenous H2O2. It also decreased the expression of Bax and rescued the balance of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. All these results demonstrated that salidroside may present a potential therapy for oxidative stress in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

  11. IGFBP‐3 inhibits Wnt signaling in metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zingariello, Maria; Sancillo, Laura; Panasiti, Vincenzo; Polinari, Dorina; Martella, Marianna; Rosa Alba, Rana; Londei, Paola

    2016-01-01

    In previous works, we have shown that insulin‐like growth factor‐binding protein‐3 (IGFBP‐3), a tissue and circulating protein able to bind to IGFs, decreases drastically in the blood serum of patients with diffuse metastatic melanoma. In agreement with the clinical data, recombinant IGFBP‐3 was found to inhibit the motility and invasiveness of cultured metastatic melanoma cells and to prevent growth of grafted melanomas in mice. The present work was aimed at identifying the signal transduction pathways underlying the anti‐tumoral effects of IGFBP‐3. We show that the anti‐tumoral effect of IGFBP‐3 is due to inhibition of the Wnt pathway and depends upon the presence of CD44, a receptor protein known to modulate Wnt signaling. Once it has entered the cell, IGFBP‐3 binds the Wnt signalosome interacting specifically with its component GSK‐3β. As a consequence, the β‐catenin destruction complex dissociates from the LRP6 Wnt receptor and GSK‐3β is activated through dephosphorylation, becoming free to target cytoplasmic β‐catenin which is degraded by the proteasomal pathway. Altogether, the results suggest that IGFBP‐3 is a novel and effective inhibitor of Wnt signaling. As IGFBP‐3 is a physiological protein which has no detectable toxic effects either on cultured cells or live mice, it might qualify as an interesting new therapeutic agent in melanoma, and potentially many other cancers with a hyperactive Wnt signaling. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27377812

  12. Stromelysin generates a fibronectin fragment that inhibits Schwann cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Our previous report (Muir, D., S. Varon, and M. Manthorpe. 1990. J. Cell Biol. 109:2663-2672) described the isolation and partial characterization of a 55-kD antiproliferative protein found in Schwann cell (SC) and schwannoma cell line-conditioned media and we concluded that SC proliferation is under negative autocrine control. In the present study the 55-kD protein was found to possess metalloprotease activity and stromelysin immunoreactivity. The SC-derived metalloprotease shares many properties with stromelysin isolated from other sources including the ability to cleave fibronectin (FN). Furthermore, limited proteolysis of FN by the SC-derived protease generated a FN fragment which itself expresses a potent antiproliferative activity for SCs. The active FN fragment corresponds to the 29-kD amino-terminal region of the FN molecule which was also identified as an active component in SC CM. Additional evidence that a proteolytic fragment of FN can possess antiproliferative activity for SCs was provided by the finding that plasmin can generate an amino- terminal FN fragment which mimicked the activity of the SC metalloprotease-generated antiproliferative FN fragment. Both the 55-kD SC metalloprotease and the 29-kD FN fragment could completely and reversibly inhibit proliferation of SCs treated with various mitogens and both were largely ineffective at inhibiting proliferation by immortalized or transformed SC lines. Normal and transformed SC types do secrete the proform of stromelysin, however, transformed cultures do not produce activated stromelysin and thus cannot generate the antiproliferative fragment of FN. These results suggest that, once activated, a SC-derived protease similar to stromelysin cleaves FN and generates an antiproliferative activity which can maintain normal SC quiescence in vitro. PMID:1730742

  13. Amygdalin inhibits the growth of renal cell carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Juengel, Eva; Thomas, Anita; Rutz, Jochen; Makarevic, Jasmina; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-02-01

    Although amygdalin is used by many cancer patients as an antitumor agent, there is a lack of information on the efficacy and toxicity of this natural compound. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of amygdalin on the growth of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells was examined. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to the RCC cell lines, Caki-1, KTC-26 and A498, for 24 h or 2 weeks. Untreated cells served as controls. Tumor cell growth and proliferation were determined using MTT and BrdU tests, and cell cycle phases were evaluated. Expression of the cell cycle activating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1 and D3 as well as of the cell cycle inhibiting proteins p19 and p27 was examined by western blot analysis. Surface expression of the differentiation markers E- and N-cadherin was also investigated. Functional blockade by siRNA was used to determine the impact of several proteins on tumor cell growth. Amygdalin treatment caused a significant reduction in RCC cell growth and proliferation. This effect was correlated with a reduced percentage of G2/M-phase RCC cells and an increased percentage of cells in the G0/1-phase (Caki-1 and A498) or cell cycle arrest in the S-phase (KTC-26). Furthermore, amygdalin induced a marked decrease in cell cycle activating proteins, in particular cdk1 and cyclin B. Functional blocking of cdk1 and cyclin B resulted in significantly diminished tumor cell growth in all three RCC cell lines. Aside from its inhibitory effects on growth, amygdalin also modulated the differentiation markers, E- and N-cadherin. Hence, exposing RCC cells to amygdalin inhibited cell cycle progression and tumor cell growth by impairing cdk1 and cyclin B expression. Moreover, we noted that amygdalin affected differentiation markers. Thus, we suggest that amygdalin exerted RCC antitumor effects in vitro.

  14. Berberine inhibits cell growth and mediates caspase-independent cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Garcia, Lina; Efferth, Thomas; Torres, Amada; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Youns, Mahmoud

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies with an increasing incidence worldwide. In addition to the poor survival rates, combinations using gemcitabine as a backbone have failed to show any benefit beyond monotherapy. These facts underscore an urgent need for novel therapeutic options and motivated us to study the effect of berberine on pancreatic cancer cells. Here, we undertook an mRNA-based gene expression profiling study in order to get deeper insight into the molecular targets mediating the growth inhibitory effects of berberine on pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal ones. Twenty-four hours after treatment, berberine showed preferential selectivity toward pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal ones. Moreover, expression profiling and Ingenuity pathway analysis results showed that the cytotoxicity of berberine was accompanied with an activation of BRCA1-mediated DNA damage response, G1/S and G2/M cell cycle checkpoint regulation, and P53 signalling pathways. The activation of these signalling pathways might be explained by the fact that berberine intercalates DNA and induces DNA strand break through inhibition of topoisomerases and induction of DNA lesions.

  15. Myricetin inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianfang; Chen, Xiaonan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Du, Yuwen; Sun, Qianqian; Zang, Wenqiao; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2015-10-01

    Myricetin is a flavonoid that is abundant in fruits and vegetables and has protective effects against cancer and diabetes. However, the mechanism of action of myricetin against gastric cancer (GC) is not fully understood. We researched myricetin on the proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle in GC HGC-27 and SGC7901 cells, to explore the underlying mechanism of action. Cell Counting Kit (CCK)-8 assay, Western blotting, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis assay were used to evaluate the effects of myricetin on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and the cell cycle. To analyze the binding properties of ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2) with myricetin, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis was performed. CCK8 assay showed that myricetin inhibited GC cell proliferation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that myricetin induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in GC cells. Western blotting indicated that myricetin influenced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of GC cells by regulating related proteins. SPR analysis showed strong binding affinity of RSK2 and myricetin. Myricetin bound to RSK2, leading to increased expression of Mad1, and contributed to inhibition of HGC-27 and SGC7901 cell proliferation. Our results suggest the therapeutic potential of myricetin in GC.

  16. The marine-derived fungal metabolite, terrein, inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Fei; Wang, Shu-Ying; Shen, Hong; Yao, Xiao-Fen; Zhang, Feng-Li; Lai, Dongmei

    2014-12-01

    The difficulties faced in the effective treatment of ovarian cancer are multifactorial, but are mainly associated with relapse and drug resistance. Cancer stem-like cells have been reported to be an important contributor to these hindering factors. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anticancer activities of a bioactive fungal metabolite, namely terrein, against the human epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3, primary human ovarian cancer cells and ovarian cancer stem-like cells. Terrein was separated and purified from the fermentation metabolites of the marine sponge-derived fungus, Aspergillus terreus strain PF26. Its anticancer activities against ovarian cancer cells were investigated by cell proliferation assay, cell migration assay, cell apoptosis and cell cycle assays. The ovarian cancer stem-like cells were enriched and cultured in a serum-free in vitro suspension system. Terrein inhibited the proliferation of the ovarian cancer cells by inducing G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. The underlying mechanisms involved the suppression of the expression of LIN28, an important marker gene of stemness in ovarian cancer stem cells. Of note, our study also demonstrated the ability of terrein to inhibit the proliferation of ovarian cancer stem-like cells, in which the expression of LIN28 was also downregulated. Our findings reveal that terrein (produced by fermention) may prove to be a promising drug candidate for the treatment of ovarian cancer by inhibiting the proliferation of cancer stem-like cells.

  17. Luteolin inhibits lung metastasis, cell migration, and viability of triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Matthew T; Liang, Yayun; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Hyder, Salman M

    2017-01-01

    Most breast cancer-related deaths from triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) occur following metastasis of cancer cells and development of tumors at secondary sites. Because TNBCs lack the three receptors targeted by current chemotherapeutic regimens, they are typically treated with extremely aggressive and highly toxic non-targeted treatment strategies. Women with TNBC frequently develop metastatic lesions originating from drug-resistant residual cells and have poor prognosis. For this reason, novel therapeutic strategies that are safer and more effective are sought. Luteolin (LU) is a naturally occurring, non-toxic plant compound that has proven effective against several types of cancer. With this in mind, we conducted in vivo and in vitro studies to determine whether LU might suppress metastasis of TNBC. In an in vivo mouse metastasis model, LU suppressed metastasis of human MDA-MB-435 and MDA-MB-231 (4175) LM2 TNBC cells to the lungs. In in vitro assays, LU inhibited cell migration and viability of MDA-MB-435 and MDA-MB-231 (4175) LM2 cells. Further, LU induced apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 (4175) LM2 cells. Relatively low levels (10 µM) of LU significantly inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion in MDA-MB-231 (4175) LM2 cells, suggesting that it has the ability to suppress a potent angiogenic and cell survival factor. In addition, migration of MDA-MB-231 (4175) LM2 cells was inhibited upon exposure to an antibody against the VEGF receptor, KDR, but not by exposure to a VEGF165 antibody. Collectively, these data suggest that the anti-metastatic properties of LU may, in part, be due to its ability to block VEGF production and KDR-mediated activity, thereby inhibiting tumor cell migration. These studies suggest that LU deserves further investigation as a potential treatment option for women with TNBC. PMID:28096694

  18. Cigarette smoke decreases mitochondrial porin expression and steroidogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Mahuya; Whittal, Randy M.; Gairola, C. Gary; Bose, Himangshu S.

    2008-03-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) facilitates the movement of cholesterol from the outer to inner mitochondrial membrane for steroidogenesis. Here, we investigated the effect of cigarette smoke (CS) on steroidogenesis using adrenal mitochondria isolated from mice chronically exposed to CS. Steroidogenesis was decreased approximately 78% in CS-exposed mitochondria, as measured by synthesis of the steroid hormone precursor pregnenolone. This effect was accompanied by decreased mitochondrial import of {sup 35}S-StAR. Further characterization of the imported {sup 35}S-StAR by native gradient PAGE revealed the presence of a high molecular weight complex in both control and CS-exposed groups. Following density gradient fractionation of {sup 35}S-StAR that had been extracted from control mitochondria, precursor StAR could be found in fractions 2-6 and smaller-sized StAR complexes in fractions 6-13. In the CS-exposed group, the appearance of precursor shifted from fraction 1-6 and the smaller complexes in fractions 6-9 disappeared. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the {sup 35}S-StAR-associated protein complex was composed of several resident matrix proteins as well as the OMM resident, VDAC. VDAC expression was greatly reduced by CS, and blockage of VDAC with Koenig's polyanion decreased pregnenolone synthesis in isolated mitochondria. Taken together, these results suggest that VDAC may participate in steroidogenesis by promoting StAR interaction with the OMM and that CS may inhibit steroidogenesis by reducing VDAC-StAR interactions.

  19. Asiatic acid inhibits adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; Piao, Cheng-dong; Sun, Hong-hui; Ren, Xian-Sheng; Bai, Yun-Shen

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) are the common precursors for both osteoblasts and adipocytes. With aging, BMSC osteoblast differentiation decreases whereas BMSC differentiation into adipocytes increases, resulting in increased adipogenesis and bone loss. In the present study, we investigated the effect of asiatic acid (AA) on adipocytic differentiation of BMSCs. AA inhibited the adipogenic induction of lipid accumulation, activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and expression of marker genes in adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (ap) 2, and adipsin. Further, we found that AA did not alter clonal expansion rate and expression of C/EBPβ, upstream key regulator of PPARγ, and binding activity of C/EBPβ to PPARγ promoter was not affected by AA as well. These findings suggest that AA may modulate differentiation of BMSCs to cause a lineage shift away from the adipocytes, and inhibition of PPARγ by AA is through C/EBPβ-independent mechanisms. Thus, AA could be a potential candidate for a novel drug against osteoporosis.

  20. Resveratrol induces cell death and inhibits human herpesvirus 8 replication in primary effusion lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng-Yi; Chen, Chang-Yu; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Hong, Shin; Chen, Hung-Ming; Chiou, Yee-Hsuan; Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Wang, Lin-Yu; Wang, Yi-Fen

    2015-12-05

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) has been reported to inhibit proliferation of various cancer cells. However, the effects of resveratrol on the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) harboring primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells remains unclear. The anti-proliferation effects and possible mechanisms of resveratrol in the HHV8 harboring PEL cells were examined in this study. Results showed that resveratrol induced caspase-3 activation and the formation of acidic vacuoles in the HHV8 harboring PEL cells, indicating resveratrol treatment could cause apoptosis and autophagy in PEL cells. In addition, resveratrol treatment increased ROS generation but did not lead to HHV8 reactivation. ROS scavenger (N-acetyl cysteine, NAC) could attenuate both the resveratrol induced caspase-3 activity and the formation of acidic vacuoles, but failed to attenuate resveratrol induced PEL cell death. Caspase inhibitor, autophagy inhibitors and necroptosis inhibitor could not block resveratrol induced PEL cell death. Moreover, resveratrol disrupted HHV8 latent infection, inhibited HHV8 lytic gene expression and decreased virus progeny production. Overexpression of HHV8-encoded viral FLICE inhibitory protein (vFLIP) could partially block resveratrol induced cell death in PEL cells. These data suggest that resveratrol-induced cell death in PEL cells may be mediated by disruption of HHV8 replication. Resveratrol may be a potential anti-HHV8 drug and an effective treatment for HHV8-related tumors.

  1. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As2O3 induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As2O3 on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As2O3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As2O3 treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As2O3 is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  2. Contact inhibition of phagocytosis in epithelial sheets: alterations of cell surface properties induced by cell-cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Vasiliev, J M; Gelfand, I M; Domnina, L V; Zacharova, O S; Ljubimov, A V

    1975-02-01

    Contact inhibition of phagocytosis was found to be characteristic for epithelial sheets formed in cultures by several cell types: normal and transformed mouse kidney cells, and differentiated mouse hepatoma cells. In these sheets most central cells surrounded by other cells had very low phagocytic activity. In contrast, marginal cells having a free edge were able to perform an active phagocytosis. Contact inhibition of phagocytosis was absent in dense cultures of mouse embryo fibroblasts and in cultures of anaplastic mouse hepatoma 22a. The upper surface of epithelial sheets was nonadhesive for prelabeled epithelial cells and fibroblasts. In contrast, the upper surface of dense cultures of mouse fibroblasts was adhesive for these cells. These and other data strengthen the suggestion that contact inhibition of phagocytosis is a result of different adhesiveness of the upper cell surface and of the surfaces near the free edge. Agents inhibiting cell surface movements at the free edges of marginal epithelial cells (cytochalasin, azide, sorbitol, low temperature) prevented adhesion of particles to these edges. Possibly, the surface of actively moving cytoplasmic processes is the only cell part that has adhesive properties necessary for the formation of attachments with other cellular and noncellular surfaces. In epithelial sheets, in contrast to fibroblast cultures, Colcemid did not activate movements of immobile contacting cell edges. These results indicate that mechanisms of contact immobilization of cell surface may be different in epithelium and fibroblasts. Firm contacts formed between epithelial cells are sufficient for stable immobilization of the surface; additional stabilization of the surface by microtubules is not essential. Fibroblasts do not form firm contacts and the Colcemid-sensitive stabilization process is essential for maintenance of the immobile state of their surfaces. Differences in the stability of cell surface immobilization produced by cell-cell

  3. Inhibition of neuronal cell-cell adhesion measured by the microscopic aggregation assay and impedance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiertz, R. W. F.; Marani, E.; Rutten, W. L. C.

    2010-10-01

    Microscopic aggregation assay and impedance sensing (IS) were used to monitor a change in in vitro neuron-neuron adhesion in response to blocking of cell adhesion molecules. By blocking neuron-neuron adhesion, migration and aggregation of neuronal cells can be inhibited. This leads to better control of spatial arrangement of cells in culture. In the literature N-CAM, L1 and N-cadherin proteins are pointed out as main regulators of neuronal adhesion. In this study, these three main cell adhesion molecules were used to inhibit neuron-to-neuron adhesion and aggregation. Both soluble extracellular domains and antigen antibodies were added to these adhesion molecules. They were investigated for their blocking ability in neuronal cultures. First, in a 96 h aggregation assay on a low-adhesive substrate, the effect of inhibition of the three proteins on aggregation of cortical neurons was investigated optically. Both L1 antibody and L1 protein had no effect on the degree of aggregation. An N-cadherin antibody however was shown to be effective in aggregation inhibition at concentrations of 1 and 3 µg ml-1. Up to 96 h no aggregation occurred. A similar effect was achieved by the N-cadherin protein, although less distinct. N-CAM blocking revealed no inhibition of aggregation. Second, results from IS corresponded to those of the aggregation assays. In these experiments neuron-neuron adhesion was also inhibited by blocking N-CAM L1 and N-cadherin. Cortical neurons were cultured in small wells containing circular 100 µm diameter gold electrodes, so small changes in cell-cell interactions in monolayers of neurons could be monitored by IS. Impedances of neuron-covered electrodes were significantly lower in the presence of the N-cadherin antibody and protein at concentrations of 1, 3 and 10 µg ml-1, indicating a less profound binding between adjacent neurons. Results from the aggregation assays and impedance measurements demonstrate the applicability of blocking cell adhesion

  4. Glycosylation inhibitors efficiently inhibit P-selectin-mediated cell adhesion to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Pushpankur; Rajendran, Mythilypriya; Odo, Nadine; Ikuta, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play a critical role in the adhesive interactions of multiple cell types in sickle cell disease (SCD). We previously showed that anti-P-selectin aptamer efficiently inhibits cell adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) and permits SCD mice to survive hypoxic stress. In an effort to discover new mechanisms with which to inhibit P-selectin, we examined the role of glycosylation. P-selectin is a 90 kDa protein but was found to migrate as 90 and 140 kDa bands on gel electrophoresis. When P-selectin isolated from ECs was digested with peptide N-glycosidase F, but not O-glycosidase, the 140 kDa band was lost and the 90 kDa band was enhanced. Treatment of ECs with tunicamycin, an N-glycosylation inhibitor, suppressed CD62P (P-selectin) expression on the cell surface as well as the 140 kDa form in the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the 140 kDa band is N-glycosylated and glycosylation is critical for cell surface expression of P-selectin in ECs. Thrombin, which stimulates P-selectin expression on ECs, induced AKT phosphorylation, whereas tunicamycin inhibited AKT phosphorylation, suggesting that AKT signaling is involved in the tunicamycin-mediated inhibition of P-selectin expression. Importantly, the adhesion of sickle red blood cells (sRBCs) and leukocytes to ECs induced by thrombin or hypoxia was markedly inhibited by two structurally distinct glycosylation inhibitors; the levels of which were comparable to that of a P-selectin monoclonal antibody which most strongly inhibited cell adhesion in vivo. Knockdown studies of P-selectin using short-hairpin RNAs in ECs suppressed sRBC adhesion, indicating a legitimate role for P-selectin in sRBC adhesion. Together, these results demonstrate that P-selectin expression on ECs is regulated in part by glycosylation mechanisms and that glycosylation inhibitors efficiently reduce the adhesion of sRBCs and leukocytes to ECs. Glycosylation inhibitors may lead to a novel therapy which inhibits cell adhesion in SCD.

  5. Homocysteine injures vascular endothelial cells by inhibiting mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fengyong; Qi, Xiujing; Gao, Zheng; Yang, Xingju; Zheng, Xingfeng; Duan, Chonghao; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of homocysteine (Hcy) in the pathogenesis of pulmonary embolism (PE) and the associated molecular mechanisms in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Hcy contents were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry using Annexin-V staining. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity was assessed with an enzyme activity assay, and the expression levels of COX 17 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were measured using a microplate reader with a fluorescence probe. The results demonstrated that, compared with the control group, the serum Hcy levels were significantly elevated in the PE group, suggesting that Hcy may be an indicator for PE. Following treatment with Hcy, the apoptosis rate was markedly elevated in HUVECs. Moreover, Hcy decreased COX activity and downregulated the expression of COX 17 in HUVECs. Furthermore, Hcy increased the ROS levels in these endothelial cells. However, all the above-mentioned physiopathological changes induced by Hcy in HUVECs could be restored by folic acid. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that Hcy inhibited COX activity, downregulated COX 17 expression, increased intracellular ROS levels and enhanced apoptosis in endothelial cells. PMID:27698720

  6. Mast cell desensitization inhibits calcium flux and aberrantly remodels actin

    PubMed Central

    Ang, W.X. Gladys; Church, Alison M.; Kulis, Mike; Choi, Hae Woong; Burks, A. Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Rush desensitization (DS) is a widely used and effective clinical strategy for the rapid inhibition of IgE-mediated anaphylactic responses. However, the cellular targets and underlying mechanisms behind this process remain unclear. Recent studies have implicated mast cells (MCs) as the primary target cells for DS. Here, we developed a murine model of passive anaphylaxis with demonstrated MC involvement and an in vitro assay to evaluate the effect of DS on MCs. In contrast with previous reports, we determined that functional IgE remains on the cell surface of desensitized MCs following DS. Despite notable reductions in MC degranulation following DS, the high-affinity IgE receptor FcεRI was still capable of transducing signals in desensitized MCs. Additionally, we found that displacement of the actin cytoskeleton and its continued association with FcεRI impede the capacity of desensitized MCs to evoke the calcium response that is essential for MC degranulation. Together, these findings suggest that reduced degranulation responses in desensitized MCs arise from aberrant actin remodeling, providing insights that may lead to improvement of DS treatments for anaphylactic responses. PMID:27669462

  7. Pseudorabies virus infection inhibits autophagy in permissive cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingxia; Hou, Linlin; Tang, Yan-dong; Liu, Yonggang; Wang, Shujie; Wang, Jingfei; Shen, Nan; An, Tongqing; Tian, Zhijun; Cai, Xuehui

    2017-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that autophagy is involved in the infection processes of different pathogens. Autophagy is now recognized as an essential component of innate and adaptive immunity. Several herpesviruses have developed various strategies to evade this antiviral mechanism. Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a swine herpesvirus with a broad host range that causes devastating disease in infected pigs. In this study, we described the interaction between PRV and autophagy for the first time. PRV infection had a dual effect on the cell autophagy response; during the early period of infection, PRV virions induced autophagy without viral replication, and with viral protein expression, PRV reduced the basal level of autophagy in several permissive cells. We observed that inhibit the level of autophagy could increase the titer of infectious PRV. We also found that the conserved alphaherpesvirus US3 tegument protein may reduce the level of autophagy via activation of the AKT/mTOR pathways in PRV infected cells. These findings suggest that autophagy likely contributes to clearance of PRV, and that the virus has evolved strategies to antagonize this pathway. PMID:28059118

  8. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves), a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Methods Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE) was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau’s method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. Results CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Conclusions Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death. Therefore, identification

  9. Inhibition of miR-29c promotes proliferation, and inhibits apoptosis and differentiation in P19 embryonic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Song, Guixian; Liu, Ming; Qian, Lingmei; Wang, Lihua; Gu, Haitao; Shen, Yahui

    2016-03-01

    In our previous study, the upregulation of microRNA (miR)-29c was identified in the mother of a fetus with a congenital heart defect. However, the functional and regulatory mechanisms of miR‑29c in the development of the heart remain to be elucidated. In the present study, the role and mechanism of miR‑29c inhibition in heart development were investigated in an embryonic carcinoma cell model. Inhibition of miR‑29c promoted proliferation, and suppressed the apoptosis and differentiation of P19 cells. It was also demonstrated that Wingless‑related MMTV integration site 4 (Wnt4) was a target of miR‑29c, determined using bioinformatic analysis combined with luciferase assays. The inhibition of miR‑29c stimulated the WNT4/β‑catenin pathway, promoting proliferation of the P19 cells, but suppressing their differentiation into cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of miR‑29c promoted the expression of B cell lymphoma‑2 and inhibited cell apoptosis. These results demonstrate the significance of miR‑29c in the process of cardiac development and suggest that miR-29c dysregulation may be associated with the occurrence of CHD. Thus, miR-29c may have therapeutic potential in the future.

  10. The major outer membrane protein of Acidovorax delafieldii is an anion-selective porin.

    PubMed

    Brunen, M; Engelhardt, H; Schmid, A; Benz, R

    1991-07-01

    The major outer membrane protein (Omp34) of Acidovorax delafieldii (formerly Pseudomonas delafieldii) was purified to homogeneity and was characterized biochemically and functionally. The polypeptide has an apparent molecular weight (Mr) of 34,000, and it forms stable oligomers at pH 9.0 in the presence of 10% octylpolyoxyethylene or 2% lithium dodecyl sulfate below 70 degrees C. The intact protein has a characteristic secondary structure composition, as revealed by Fourier transforming infrared spectroscopy (about 60% beta sheet). These features and the amino acid composition are typical for porins. The purified Omp34 is associated with 1 to 2 mol of lipopolysaccharide per mol of the monomer. Pore-forming activity was demonstrated with lipid bilayer experiments. Single-channel and selectivity measurements showed that the protein forms highly anion-selective channels. The unusual dependence of the single-channel conductance on salt concentration suggests that the porin complexes bear positive surface charges, accumulating negatively charged counterions at the pore mouth.

  11. Toward screening for antibiotics with enhanced permeation properties through bacterial porins.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Eric; Bessonov, Andrey; Molitor, Alexander; Kumar, Amit; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R; Winterhalter, Mathias; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Ruggerone, Paolo; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2010-08-17

    Gram-negative bacteria are protected by an outer membrane barrier, and to reach their periplasmic target, penicillins have to diffuse through outer membrane porins such as OmpF. Here we propose a structure-dynamics-based strategy for improving such antibiotic uptake. Using a variety of experiments (high-resolution single channel recording, Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC), liposome swelling assay) and accelerated molecular simulations, we decipher the subtle balance of interactions governing ampicillin diffusion through the porin OmpF. This suggests mutagenesis of a hot spot residue of OmpF for which additional simulations reveal drastic changes in the molecular and energetic pathway of ampicillin's diffusion. Inverting the problem, we predict and describe how benzylpenicillin diffuses with a lower effective energy barrier by interacting differently with OmpF. The thorough comparison between the theoretical predictions and the three independent experiments, which were set up to measure the kinetics of transport and biological activity, gives insights on how to combine such different investigation techniques with the aim of providing complementary validation. Our study illustrates the importance of microscopic interactions at the constriction region of the biological channel to control the antibiotic flux through it. We conclude by providing a complete inventory of the channel and antibiotic hot spots and discuss the implications in terms of antibacterial screening and design.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a family of porin proteins from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Exner, M M; Doig, P; Trust, T J; Hancock, R E

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to identify heat-modifiable outer membrane proteins, which were candidates for porins, from Helicobacter pylori membrane preparations. Four such proteins with apparent molecular masses of 48, 49, 50, and 67 kDa were isolated. The four proteins copurified together after selective detergent solubilizations followed by anion-exchange chromatography, and each protein was ultimately purified to homogeneity by gel purification. These proteins were then tested for pore-forming ability with a planar lipid bilayer model membrane system. All four proteins appeared to be present as monomers, and they formed pores with low single-channel conductances in 1.0 M KCl of 0.36, 0.36, 0.30, and 0.25 nS, respectively, for the 48-, 49-, 50-, and 67-kDa proteins which we propose to designate HopA, HopB, HopC, and HopD. N-terminal amino acid sequence analyses showed a high degree of homology among all four proteins, and it appears that these proteins constitute a family of related porins in H. pylori. PMID:7534278

  13. Thoc1 inhibits cell growth via induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jianmei; Zou, Shitao; Hu, Mengshang; Zhu, Ran; Xu, Jiaying; Jiao, Yang; Fan, Saijun

    2014-06-01

    THO complex 1 (Thoc1) is a human nuclear matrix protein that binds to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein (pRb). While some studies suggest that Thoc1 has characteristics of a tumor suppressor protein, whether Thoc1 can inhibit lung cancer cell growth is not clear. In the present study, we observed that Thoc1 is lowly expressed in the lung cancer cell lines SPC-A1 and NCI-H1975. Then, we investigated the potential effects of Thoc1 on lung cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis after stable transfection of these lines with a Thoc1 expression vector. We found that overexpression of Thoc1 can inhibit cell proliferation, induce G2/M cell cycle arrest and promote apoptosis. Further investigation indicated that overexpression of Thoc1 is involved in the inhibition of cell cycle-related proteins cyclin A1 and B1 and of pro-apoptotic factors Bax and caspase-3. In vivo experiments showed that tumors overexpressing Thoc1 display a slower growth rate than the control xenografts and show reduced expression of the protein Ki-67, which localized on the nuclear membrane. Taken together, our data show that in lung cancer cells, Thoc1 inhibits cell growth through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These results indicate that Thoc1 may be used as a novel therapeutic target for human lung cancer treatment.

  14. Rosiglitazone inhibits cell proliferation by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ADPKD cyst-lining epithelia cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yawei; Dai, Bing; Fu, Lili; Jia, Jieshuang; Mei, Changlin

    2010-06-01

    Abnormal proliferation is an important pathological feature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Many drugs inhibiting cell proliferation have been proved to be effective in slowing the disease progression in ADPKD. Recent evidence has suggested that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) ligands have anti-neoplasm effects through inhibiting cell growth and inducing cell apoptosis in various cancer cells. In the present study, we examined the expression of PPARgamma in human ADPKD kidney tissues and cyst-lining epithelial cell line, and found that the expression of PPARgamma was greater in ADPKD kidney tissues and cyst-lining epithelial cell line than in normal kidney tissues and human kidney cortex (HKC) cell line. Rosiglitazone inhibited significantly proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. These effects were diminished by GW9662, a specific PPARgamma antagonist. Cell cycle analysis showed a G0/G1 arrest in human ADPKD cyst-lining epithelial cells with rosiglitazone treatment. Analysis of cell cycle regulatory proteins revealed that rosiglitazone decreased the protein levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, pRb, cyclin D1, cyclin D2 and Cdk4 but increased the levels of p21 and p27 in a dose-dependent manner. Rosiglitazone also induced apoptosis in cyst-lining epithelial cells, which was correlated with increased bax expression and decreased bcl-2 expression. These results suggest PPARgamma agonist might serve as a promising drug for the treatment of ADPKD.

  15. Salinomycin inhibits the tumor growth of glioma stem cells by selectively suppressing glioma-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tunan; Yi, Liang; Li, Fei; Hu, Rong; Hu, Shengli; Yin, Yi; Lan, Chuan; Li, Zhao; Fu, Chuhua; Cao, Liu; Chen, Zhi; Xian, Jishu; Feng, Hua

    2015-04-01

    Glioma‑initiating cells are a small population of cells that have the ability to undergo self‑renewal and initiate tumorigenesis. In the present study, the potential role of salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, on the suppression of glioma cell growth was investigated. GL261 glioma cells were maintained in a stem‑cell‑like status [GL261 neurospheres (GL261‑NS)] or induced for differentiation [GL261 adherent cells (GL261‑AC)]. It was demonstrated that salinomycin significantly reduced the cell viability of GL261‑NS and GL261‑AC cells in a dose‑dependent manner, with a more substantial inhibition of GL261‑NS proliferation (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of salinomycin on cell growth was more effective than that of 1‑(4‑amino‑2‑methyl‑5‑pyrimid l)‑methyl‑3‑(2‑chloroethyl)‑3‑nitrosourea hydrochloride and vincristine (P<0.05). Salinomycin depleted GL261‑NS from tumorspheres and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, salinomycin prolonged the median survival time of glioma‑bearing mice (P<0.05). Therefore, the present study indicated that salinomycin may preferentially inhibit glioma‑initiated cell growth by inducing apoptosis, suggesting that salinomycin may provide a valuable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  16. Inhibition of FGF signaling accelerates neural crest cell differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jaroonwitchawan, Thiranut; Muangchan, Pattamon; Noisa, Parinya

    2016-12-02

    Neural crest (NC) is a transient population, arising during embryonic development and capable of differentiating into various somatic cells. The defects of neural crest development leads to neurocristopathy. Several signaling pathways were revealed their significance in NC cell specification. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) is recognized as an important signaling during NC development, for instance Xenopus and avian; however, its contributions in human species are remained elusive. Here we used human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to investigate the consequences of FGF inhibition during NC cell differentiation. The specific-FGF receptor inhibitor, SU5402, was used in this investigation. The inhibition of FGF did not found to affect the proliferation or death of hPSC-derived NC cells, but promoted hPSCs to commit NC cell fate. NC-specific genes, including PAX3, SLUG, and TWIST1, were highly upregulated, while hPSC genes, such as OCT4, and E-CAD, rapidly reduced upon FGF signaling blockage. Noteworthy, TFAP-2α, a marker of migratory NC cells, abundantly presented in SU5402-induced cells. This accelerated NC cell differentiation could be due to the activation of Notch signaling upon the blockage of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, since NICD was increased by SU5402. Altogether, this study proposed the contributions of FGF signaling in controlling human NC cell differentiation from hPSCs, the crosstalk between FGF and Notch, and might imply to the influences of FGF signaling in neurocristophatic diseases.

  17. Differences in antiproliferative effect of STAT3 inhibition in HCC cells with versus without HBV expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yun; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Haiyang; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-06-05

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays an important role in the etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) inactivation could inhibit the tumor growth of HCC. In this study, differential antiproliferative effect of STAT3 inhibition was observed with HBV-related HCC cells being more resistant than non-HBV-related HCC cells. Resistance of HBV-related HCC cells to STAT3 inhibition was positively correlated to the expression of HBV. Enhanced ERK activation after STAT3 blockade was detected in HBV-related HCC cells but not in non-HBV-related HCC cells. Combined ERK and STAT3 inhibition eliminates the discrepancy between the two types of HCC cells. Moderate reduced HBV expression was found after STAT3 inhibition. These findings disclose a discrepancy in cellular response to STAT3 inhibition between non-HBV-related and HBV-related HCC cells and underscore the complexity of antiproliferative effect of STAT3 inactivation in HBV-related HCC cells. - Highlights: • HBV endows HCC cells with resistance to STAT3 inactivation on proliferation. • Abnormal ERK activation after STAT3 inhibition in HBV-related HCC cells. • Combined ERK and STAT3 inhibition eliminates the discrepancy. • STAT3 inhibition moderately reduces HBV expression.

  18. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan; Xu, Chuan; Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui; Zhou, Zhansong; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Cui, Hongjuan

    2014-03-28

    Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  19. Caspase Inhibition Blocks Cell Death and Enhances Mitophagy but Fails to Promote T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sih-han; Martin, Sean M.; Harris, Peter S.; Knudson, C. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Caspase-9 is a component of the apoptosome that mediates cell death following release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Inhibition of Caspase-9 with a dominant negative construct (Casp9DN) blocks apoptosome function, promotes viability and has been implicated in carcinogenesis. Inhibition of the apoptosome in vitro impairs mitochondrial function and promotes mitophagy. To examine whether inhibition of the apoptosome would enhance mitophagy and promote oncogenesis in vivo, transgenic mice were generated that express Casp9DN in the T cell lineage. The effects of Casp9DN on thymocyte viability, mitophagy and thymic tumor formation were examined. In primary thymocytes, Casp9DN delayed dexamethasone (Dex)-induced cell death, altered mitochondrial structure, and decreased oxidant production. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that inhibition of the apoptosome resulted in structurally abnormal mitochondria that in some cases were engulfed by double-membrane structures resembling autophagosomes. Consistent with mitochondria being engulfed by autophagosomes (mitophagy), confocal microscopy showed colocalization of LC3-GFP and mitochondria. However, Casp9DN did not significantly accelerate T-cell lymphoma alone, or in combination with Lck-Bax38/1, or with Beclin 1+/− mice, two tumor-prone strains in which altered mitochondrial function has been implicated in promoting tumor development. In addition, heterozygous disruption of Beclin 1 had no effect on T-cell lymphoma formation in Lck-Bax38/1 mice. Further studies showed that Beclin 1 levels had no effect on Casp9DN-induced loss of mitochondrial function. These results demonstrate that neither inhibition of apoptosome function nor Beclin 1 haploinsufficiency accelerate T-cell lymphoma development in mice. PMID:21611191

  20. Immune inhibition of virus release from human and nonhuman cells by antibody to viral and host cell determinants.

    PubMed

    Shariff, D M; Davies, J; Desperbasques, M; Billstrom, M; Geerligs, H J; Welling, G W; Welling-Wester, S; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1991-01-01

    Immune inhibition of release of the DNA viruses, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and pseudorabies virus by anti-viral and anti-host cell sera occurred while two RNA viruses, influenza and encephalomyocarditis, were inhibited only by anti-viral sera (not anti-host cell sera). Simian virus 40 and surprisingly two herpes viruses, bovine mamillitis and equine abortion, were not inhibited by either anti-viral or anti-host sera. Using the herpes simplex virus model, inhibition of virus release was detected in different cells of human and nonhuman origin with cross-inhibition between cell lines of different origin; thus, this form of immunotherapy may not require antibody to be tissue or organ specific. Evidence of inhibition of virus release from neoplastic and leukemic cell lines suggests possible application of this approach to control of virus-mediated leukoproliferative pathology (e.g. Burkitt's lymphoma or adult T cell leukemia).

  1. Vitisin A inhibits adipocyte differentiation through cell cycle arrest in 3T3-L1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soon-hee; Park, Hee-Sook; Lee, Myoung-su; Cho, Yong-Jin; Kim, Young-Sup; Hwang, Jin-Taek; Sung, Mi Jeong; Kim, Myung Sunny; Kwon, Dae Young

    2008-07-18

    Inhibition of adipocyte differentiation is one approach among the anti-obesity strategies. This study demonstrates that vitisin A, a resveratrol tetramer, inhibits adipocyte differentiation most effectively of 18 stilbenes tested. Fat accumulation and PPAR{gamma} expression were decreased by vitisin A in a dose-dependent manner. Vitisin A significantly inhibited preadipocyte proliferation and consequent differentiation within the first 2 days of treatment, indicating that the anti-adipogenic effect of vitisin A was derived from anti-proliferation. Based on cell cycle analysis, vitisin A blocked the cell cycle at the G1-S phase transition, causing cells to remain in the preadipocyte state. Vitisin A increased p21 expression, while the Rb phosphorylation level was reduced. Therefore, vitisin A seems to induce G1 arrest through p21- and consequent Rb-dependent suppression of transcription. On the other hand, ERK and Akt signaling pathways were not involved in the anti-mitotic regulation by vitisin A. Taken together, these results suggest that vitisin A inhibits adipocyte differentiation through preadipocyte cell cycle arrest.

  2. Amygdalin-mediated inhibition of non-small cell lung cancer cell invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Qian, Liyu; Xie, Bo; Wang, Yaguo; Qian, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a common malignant tumor claiming the highest fatality worldwide for a long period of time. Unfortunately, most of the current treatment methods are still based on the characteristics of cancer cells in the primary lesion and the prognosis is often much poorer in patients with metastatic cancers. Amygdalin, a natural product of glycosides and lots of evidence shows that amygdalin can inhibit the proliferation of some kinds of cancer cells. In this study, we first obtained the highly metastatic NSCLC cell lines H1299/M and PA/M and further treated these cells with amygdalin. We found that the in vitro proliferability of H1299/M and PA/M was inhibited, but such inhibition required higher concentration of amygdalin. When lower concentration of amygdalin was used for the experiments, we observed that the in vitro invasive and migration capacities of H1299/M and PA/M were significantly inhibited. These results strongly suggested that amygdalin was likely to have anti-metastatic NSCLC effect. This study offers information of the role of amygdalin that may be useful as a therapeutic target in lung tumors.

  3. Nicotine inhibits potassium currents in Aplysia bag cell neurons.

    PubMed

    White, Sean H; Sturgeon, Raymond M; Magoski, Neil S

    2016-06-01

    Acetylcholine and the archetypal cholinergic agonist, nicotine, are typically associated with the opening of ionotropic receptors. In the bag cell neurons, which govern the reproductive behavior of the marine snail, Aplysia californica, there are two cholinergic responses: a relatively large acetylcholine-induced current and a relatively small nicotine-induced current. Both currents are readily apparent at resting membrane potential and result from the opening of distinct ionotropic receptors. We now report a separate current response elicited by applying nicotine to cultured bag cell neurons under whole cell voltage-clamp. This current was ostensibly inward, best resolved at depolarized voltages, presented a noncooperative dose-response with a half-maximal concentration near 1.5 mM, and associated with a decrease in membrane conductance. The unique nicotine-evoked response was not altered by intracellular perfusion with the G protein blocker GDPβS or exposure to classical nicotinic antagonists but was occluded by replacing intracellular K(+) with Cs(+) Consistent with an underlying mechanism of direct inhibition of one or more K(+) channels, nicotine was found to rapidly reduce the fast-inactivating A-type K(+) current as well as both components of the delayed-rectifier K(+) current. Finally, nicotine increased bag cell neuron excitability, which manifested as reduction in spike threshold, greater action potential height and width, and markedly more spiking to continuous depolarizing current injection. In contrast to conventional transient activation of nicotinic ionotropic receptors, block of K(+) channels could represent a nonstandard means for nicotine to profoundly alter the electrical properties of neurons over prolonged periods of time.

  4. Electric impedance sensing during the inhibition of cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Wiertz, R F; Rutten, W C; Marani, E

    2008-01-01

    Electric cell impedance sensing (ECIS) was used to monitor the change of in vitro neuron-neuron adhesion in response to the blocking of N-Cam, N-Cadherin and L1. ECIS is a method in which cell morphology and cell mobility can be indirectly measured by changes in intercellular resistance. Antibodies and soluble extracellular domains of the cell adhesion molecules N-Cam, N-Cadherin and L1 were used as blockers of these adhesion molecules on the cell surface. In a 96 hour aggregation assay on a low adhesive substrate, the effect of mentioned blockers on the aggregation was investigated. The N-Cadherin antibody showed effective in aggregation inhibition at concentrations of 3 and 10 micrograms/ml. Up to 96 hours no aggregation occurred. A similar effect was achieved by the N-Cadherin protein, although less distinct. Blocking of N-CAM and L1 revealed no inhibition of aggregation. Results from impedance measurements correspond to those of the aggregation assays. The neuron-neuron adhesion in monolayers was inhibited by blocking of cell adhesion molecules and monitored by ECIS. Impedances of neuron covered electrodes were significantly lower in the presence of N-Cadherin antibody and protein at concentrations of 1, 3 and 10 micrograms/ml, indicating a less profound binding between adjacent neuron.The results from both the aggregation assays and the impedance measurements demonstrate the applicability of CAM blocking for the regulation of culture topography.

  5. FAK and HAS Inhibition Synergistically Decrease Colon Cancer Cell Viability and Affect Expression of Critical Genes

    PubMed Central

    Heffler, Melissa; Golubovskaya, Vita; Conroy, Jeffrey; Liu, Song; Wang, Dan; Cance, William; Dunn, Kelli B.

    2013-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), hyaluronan (HA), and hyaluronan synthase-3 (HAS3) have been implicated in cancer growth and progression. FAK inhibition with the small molecule inhibitor Y15 decreases colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. HAS3 inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases FAK expression and activation, and exogenous HA increases FAK activation. We sought to determine the genes affected by HAS and FAK inhibition and hypothesized that dual inhibition would synergistically inhibit viability. Y15 (FAK inhibitor) and the HAS inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) decreased viability in a dose dependent manner; viability was further inhibited by treatment with Y15 and 4-MU in colon cancer cells. HAS inhibited cells treated with 2μM of Y15 showed significantly decreased viability compared to HAS scrambled cells treated with the same dose (p<0.05) demonstrating synergistic inhibition of viability with dual FAK/HAS inhibition. Microarray analysis showed more than 2-fold up- or down-regulation of 121 genes by HAS inhibition, and 696 genes by FAK inhibition (p<0.05) and revealed 29 common genes affected by both signaling. Among the genes affected by FAK or HAS3 inhibition were genes, playing role in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, adhesion, transcription, heat-shock and WNT pathways. Thus, FAK or HAS inhibition decreases SW620 viability and affects several similar genes, which are involved in the regulation of tumor survival. Dual inhibition of FAK and HAS3 decreases viability to a greater degree than with either agent alone, and suggests that synergistic inhibition of colon cancer cell growth can result from affecting similar genetic pathways. PMID:22934709

  6. FAK and HAS inhibition synergistically decrease colon cancer cell viability and affect expression of critical genes.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Melissa; Golubovskaya, Vita M; Conroy, Jeffrey; Liu, Song; Wang, Dan; Cance, William G; Dunn, Kelli B

    2013-05-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), hyaluronan (HA), and hyaluronan synthase-3 (HAS3) have been implicated in cancer growth and progression. FAK inhibition with the small molecule inhibitor Y15 decreases colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. HAS3 inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases FAK expression and activation, and exogenous HA increases FAK activation. We sought to determine the genes affected by HAS and FAK inhibition and hypothesized that dual inhibition would synergistically inhibit viability. Y15 (FAK inhibitor) and the HAS inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) decreased viability in a dose dependent manner; viability was further inhibited by treatment with Y15 and 4-MU in colon cancer cells. HAS inhibited cells treated with 2 μM of Y15 showed significantly decreased viability compared to HAS scrambled cells treated with the same dose (p < 0.05) demonstrating synergistic inhibition of viability with dual FAK/HAS inhibition. Microarray analysis showed more than 2-fold up- or down-regulation of 121 genes by HAS inhibition, and 696 genes by FAK inhibition (p < 0.05) and revealed 29 common genes affected by both signaling. Among the genes affected by FAK or HAS3 inhibition were genes, playing role in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, adhesion, transcription, heatshock and WNT pathways. Thus, FAK or HAS inhibition decreases SW620 viability and affects several similar genes, which are involved in the regulation of tumor survival. Dual inhibition of FAK and HAS3 decreases viability to a greater degree than with either agent alone, and suggests that synergistic inhibition of colon cancer cell growth can result from affecting similar genetic pathways.

  7. Naringenin inhibits migration of lung cancer cells via the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and −9

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Huai-Lu; Chang, Yuh-Ming; Lai, Shih-Chan; Chen, Ke-Min; Wang, Kuan-Chu; Chiu, Tsu-Ting; Chang, Fu-Hsin; Hsu, Li-Sung

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is among the most common causes of cancer-related mortality. It has a high mortality rate and resistance to chemotherapy due to its high metastatic potential. Naringenin, a bioactive compound identified in several fruits, displays anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects. Furthermore, naringenin mitigates the migration of several human cancer cell types. However, the effects of naringenin on lung cancer remain unclear. The current study investigated the mechanisms of naringenin on the migration of lung cancer A549 cells. The results indicate that significant alteration in A549 cell proliferation was observed in response to naringenin (0–300 µM) treatment for 24 and 48 h. Furthermore, a dose-dependent migration inhibition of A549 in the presence of naringenin was observed by healing and transwell migration assays. In addition, a zymography assay revealed that naringenin exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and −9 activities. Furthermore, naringenin also inhibited the activities of AKT in a dose-dependent manner. These observations indicated that naringenin inhibited the migration of lung cancer A549 cells through several mechanisms, including the inhibition of AKT activities and reduction of MMP-2 and −9 activities. PMID:28352360

  8. D-Glucosamine inhibits proliferation of human cancer cells through inhibition of p70S6K

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Hyun-Ji; Lee, Jason S.; Song, Dae-Kyu; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Jang, Byeong-Churl; Suh, Seong-Il; Park, Jong-Wook; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki . E-mail: wonki@dsmc.or.kr

    2007-09-07

    Although D-glucosamine has been reported as an inhibitor of tumor growth both in vivo and in vitro, the mechanism for the anticancer effect of D-glucosamine is still unclear. Since there are several reports suggesting D-glucosamine inhibits protein synthesis, we examined whether D-glucosamine affects p70S6 K activity, an important signaling molecule involved in protein translation. In the present study, we found D-glucosamine inhibited the activity of p70S6K and the proliferation of DU145 prostate cancer cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. D-Glucosamine decreased phosphorylation of p70S6K, and its downstream substrates RPS6, and eIF-4B, but not mTOR and 4EBP1 in DU145 cells, suggesting that D-glucosamine induced inhibition of p70S6K is not through the inhibition of mTOR. In addition, D-glucosamine enhanced the growth inhibitory effects of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR. These findings suggest that D-glucosamine can inhibit growth of cancer cells through dephosphorylation of p70S6K.

  9. Cell growth inhibition and DNA incorporation of mitomycin C in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Murayama, T; Oda, M; Miyakoshi, M

    1998-01-01

    The present study was performed to clarify the effects of a 4-min exposure of mitomycin C (MMC) on cell growth, the cell cycle and MMC dose incorporated into DNA, using Chang's cultured human conjunctival cells. A low dose of MMC ranging from 0.00025 to 0.004% showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity when cell growth was active. Fifty percent cell viability was found when cells were treated with 0.001% MMC. A flow cytometer showed that 0.001% MMC inhibited the DNA synthetic phase. After 0.04% MMC was exposed to 3 x 10(6) cells and immediately rinsed, DNA was isolated to measure the dose of MMC detected from DNA. The total amount of DNA was 7 micrograms from which 3 micrograms of MMC was detected by high performance liquid chromatography. The above results revealed that the lowest concentration of MMC which caused 50% cell viability and cell cycle inhibition was 0.001% and that MMC was rapidly incorporated into DNA.

  10. Metformin inhibits cell growth by upregulating microRNA-26a in renal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng-Qiang; Wang, Ji-Jiao; Yan, Jia-Sheng; Huang, Jian-Hua; Li, Wei; Che, Jian-Ping; Wang, Guang-Chun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Jun-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metformin, a biguanide class of anti-diabetic drugs, possesses anti-cancer properties and may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis. However, the mechanism by which metformin affects various cancers, including renal cancer still unknown. MiR-26a induces cell growth, cell cycle and cell apoptosis progression via direct targeting of Bcl-2, clyclin D1 and PTEN in cancer cells. In the present study, we used 786-O human renal cancer cell lines to study the effects and mechanisms of metformin. Metformin treatment inhibited RCC cells proliferation by increasing expression of miR-26a in 786-O cells (P < 0.05). As a result, protein abundance of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 was decreased and PTEN was increased in cells exposed to metformin. Also over-expression of miR-26a can inhibited cell proliferation by down-regulating Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and up-regulating PTEN expression. Therefore, these data for the first time provide novel evidence for a mechanism that the anticancer activities of metformin are due to upregulation of miR-26a and affect its downstream target gene. PMID:25419360

  11. Comparative proteomic analysis of the Haemophilus ducreyi porin-deficient mutant 35000HP::P2AB.

    PubMed

    Davie, Jeremiah J; Campagnari, Anthony A

    2009-04-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is an obligate human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually transmitted, genital ulcerative disease chancroid. The genome of strain 35000HP contains two known porin proteins, OmpP2A and OmpP2B. Loss of OmpP2A and OmpP2B expression in the mutant 35000HP::P2AB resulted in no obvious growth defect or phenotype. Comparison of outer membrane profiles indicated increased expression of the 58.5-kDa chaperone, GroEL, in the porin-deficient mutant. A proteomics-based comparison resulted in the identification of 231 proteins present in membrane-associated protein samples, of which a subset of 56 proteins was differentially expressed at a level of 1.5-fold or greater in the porin-deficient strain 35000HP::P2AB relative to that in 35000HP. Twenty of the differentially expressed proteins were selected for real-time PCR, resulting in the validation of 90% of the selected subgroup. Proteins identified in these studies suggested a decreased membrane stability phenotype, which was verified by disk diffusion assay. Loss of OmpP2A and OmpP2B resulted in global protein expression changes which appear to compensate for the absence of porin expression in 35000HP::P2AB.

  12. Inhibition by Tyroserleutide (YSL) on the Invasion and Adhesion of the Mouse Melanoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhi; Che, Xu-chun; Lu, Rong; Zheng, Min-na; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Li, Jin-ping; Jian, Xu; Shi, Lin-xi; Liu, Jun-yan; Gao, Wen-yuan

    2007-01-01

    Tyroserleutide (YSL) is an active, low-molecular-weight polypeptide, comprised of three amino acids, that has shown antitumor effects on human hepatocarcinoma BEL-7402 in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the inhibition of YSL on invasion and adhesion of the mouse B16-F10 melanoma cell line by injecting B16-F10 cells into the tail veins of C57BL/6 mice to establish an experimental lung metastasis model. YSL inhibited B16-F10 cell metastasis to lung, reducing the number and area of metastasis lesions. When we treated B16-F10 cells with YSL (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 μg/mL) in vitro, we found that YSL inhibited the proliferation of B16-F10 cells with a 28.11% rate of inhibition. YSL significantly decreased the adhesiveness of B16-F10 cells to Matrigel with a 29.15% inhibition rate; YSL also significantly inhibited the invasion of B16-F10 cells, producing an inhibition of 35.31%. By analyses with Western blot and real-time RT-PCR, we found that YSL markedly inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 in B16-F10 cells. These data suggest that YSL inhibits the growth, invasion, and adhesion of B16-F10 cells. PMID:17515953

  13. Targeting Notch1 inhibits invasion and angiogenesis of human breast cancer cells via inhibition Nuclear Factor-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Su, Chuanfu; Shan, Yuqing; Yang, Shouxiang; Ma, Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Notch-1, a type-1 transmembrane protein, plays critical roles in the pathogenesis and progression of human malignancies, including breast cancer; however, the precise mechanism by which Notch-1 causes tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis remain unclear. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are critically involved in the processes of tumor cell invasion and metastasis, we investigated whether targeting Notch-1 could be mechanistically associated with the down-regulation of NF-κB, IL-8, VEGF, and MMP-9, resulting in the inhibition of invasion and angiogenesis of breast cancer cells. Our data showed that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inactivation of NF-κB activity and inhibits the expression of its target genes, such as IL-8, VEGF and MMP-9. We also found that down-regulation of Notch-1 decreased cell invasion, and vice versa Consistent with these results, we also found that the down-regulation of Notch-1 not only decreased MMP-9 mRNA and its protein expression but also inhibited MMP-9 active form. Moreover, conditioned medium from Notch-1 siRNA-transfected breast cancer cells showed reduced levels of IL-8 and VEGF and, in turn, inhibited the tube formation of HUVECs, suggesting that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, conditioned medium from Notch-1 cDNA-transfected breast cancer cells showed increased levels of IL-8 and VEGF and, in turn, promoted the tube formation of HUVECs, suggesting that Notch-1 overexpression leads to the promotion of angiogenesis.We therefore concluded that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inactivation NF-κB and its target genes (IL-8, MMP-9 and VEGF), resulting in the inhibition of invasion and angiogenesis. PMID:27398151

  14. Human Diversity in a Cell Surface Receptor that Inhibits Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Anu; Leite, Mara; Kulasekara, Bridget R; Altura, Melissa A; Ogahara, Cassandra; Weiss, Eli; Fu, Wenqing; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; O'Keeffe, Michael; Terhorst, Cox; Akey, Joshua M; Miller, Samuel I

    2016-07-25

    Mutations in genes encoding autophagy proteins have been associated with human autoimmune diseases, suggesting that diversity in autophagy responses could be associated with disease susceptibility or severity. A cellular genome-wide association study (GWAS) screen was performed to explore normal human diversity in responses to rapamycin, a microbial product that induces autophagy. Cells from several human populations demonstrated variability in expression of a cell surface receptor, CD244 (SlamF4, 2B4), that correlated with changes in rapamycin-induced autophagy. High expression of CD244 and receptor activation with its endogenous ligand CD48 inhibited starvation- and rapamycin-induced autophagy by promoting association of CD244 with the autophagy complex proteins Vps34 and Beclin-1. The association of CD244 with this complex reduced Vps34 lipid kinase activity. Lack of CD244 is associated with auto-antibody production in mice, and lower expression of human CD244 has previously been implicated in severity of human rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, indicating that increased autophagy as a result of low levels of CD244 may alter disease outcomes.

  15. Silencing homeobox C6 inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wentao; Lao, Xinyuan; Zhu, Dexiang; Lin, Qi; Xu, Pingping; Wei, Ye; Xu, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox C6 (HOXC6), a member of the homeobox family that encodes highly conserved transcription factors, plays a vital role in various carcinomas. In this study, we used a tissue microarray (TMA) consisting of 462 CRC samples to demonstrate that HOXC6 is more abundantly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues than adjacent normal mucosa. Clinicopathological data indicated that higher HOXC6 expression correlated with poor overall survival and was associated with primary tumor location in the right colon, primary tumor (pT) stage 3/4 and primary node (pN) stage 1/2. Multivariate analysis showed that high HOXC6 expression was an independent risk factor for poor CRC patient prognosis. HOXC6 downregulation via lentivirus-mediated expression of HOXC6-targeting shRNA reduced HCT116 cell viability and colony formation in vitro, and reduced growth of subcutaneous xenografts in nude mouse. HOXC6 thus appears to promote CRC cell proliferation and tumorigenesis through autophagy inhibition and mTOR pathway activation. PMID:27081081

  16. Andrographolide inhibits hepatoma cells growth and affects the expression of cell cycle related proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kai-Kai; Liu, Tian-Yu; Xu, Chong; Ji, Li-Li; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2009-09-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the toxic effects of andrographolide (Andro) on hepatoma cells and elucidate its preliminary mechanisms. After cells were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-50 micromol x L(-1)) for 24 h, cell viability was evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Furthermore, after hepatoma cells (Hep3B and HepG2) were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-30 micromol x L(-1)) for 14 d, the number of colony formation was accounted under microscope. Cell cycle related proteins such as Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin B and Cyclin D1 were detected with Western blotting assay and the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. MTT results showed that Andro induced growth inhibition of hepatoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner but had no significant effects on human normal liver L-02 cells. Andro dramatically decreased the colony formation of hepatoma cells in the concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, Andro induced a decrease of Hep3B cells at the G0-G1 phase and a concomitant accumulation of cells at G2-M phase. At the molecular level, Western blotting results showed that Andro decreased the expression of Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin B proteins in a time-dependent manner, which are all cell cycle related proteins. Taken together, the results demonstrated that Andro specifically inhibited the growth of hepatoma cells and cellular cell cycle related proteins were possibly involved in this process.

  17. Chronic inhibition of tumor cell-derived VEGF enhances the malignant phenotype of colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor-a (VEGF)-targeted therapies have become an important treatment for a number of human malignancies. The VEGF inhibitors are actually effective in several types of cancers, however, the benefits are transiently, and the vast majority of patients who initially respond to the therapies will develop resistance. One of possible mechanisms for the acquired resistance may be the direct effect(s) of VEGF inhibitors on tumor cells expressing VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Thus, we investigated here the direct effect of chronic VEGF inhibition on phenotype changes in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Methods To chronically inhibit cancer cell-derived VEGF, human CRC cell lines (HCT116 and RKO) were chronically exposed (2 months) to an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (mAb) or were disrupted the Vegf gene (VEGF-KO). Effects of VEGF family members were blocked by treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VEGFR-TKI). Hypoxia-induced apoptosis under VEGF inhibited conditions was measured by TUNEL assay. Spheroid formation ability was assessed using a 3-D spheroid cell culture system. Results Chronic inhibition of secreted/extracellular VEGF by an anti-VEGF mAb redundantly increased VEGF family member (PlGF, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2), induced a resistance to hypoxia-induced apoptosis, and increased spheroid formation ability. This apoptotic resistance was partially abrogated by a VEGFR-TKI, which blocked the compensate pathway consisted of VEGF family members, or by knockdown of Vegf mRNA, which inhibited intracellular function(s) of all Vegf gene products. Interestingly, chronic and complete depletion of all Vegf gene products by Vegf gene knockout further augmented these phenotypes in the compensate pathway-independent manner. These accelerated phenotypes were significantly suppressed by knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α that was up-regulated in the VEGF-KO cell lines. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic

  18. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  19. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Warner, Timothy D.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  20. HPV16E7-specific siRNA inhibits cell proliferation in CaSki cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-guo; Li, Li; Zhang, Shui-Wen; Wei, Xiaoguang

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is the main cause for the genesis of cervical carcinomas. After infection, E6 and E7 genes of HPV were integrated to the genome of the cervical epithelium. Continued expression of the transforming oncoproteins E6 and E7 not only drives the neoplastic progression in cervical epithelium, but also plays an important role in maintaining the malignant phenotype of cervical cancer cells. The aim of this study is to explore the effects of liposomal transfection of HPV16E7 siRNA on the proliferation of cervical carcinoma cell line CaSki. The siRNA interfering HPV16E7 gene was synthesized and transfected into CaSki cells by liposome to observe the cell morphology changes under microscope. The cell proliferation index was detected by flow cytometry; HPV16E7 mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR and its protein level was determined by Western blot. After transfection of the CaSki cell by siRNA, cell proliferation was inhibited significantly, and the expression of HPV16E7 mRNA and protein level of HPV16E7 decreased. HPV16E7 siRNA is able to inhibit growth of CaSki cells. HPV16E7 might become a new target for genetic therapy of cervical carcinoma.

  1. Simvastatin induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits proliferation of bladder cancer cells via PPARγ signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Cao, Rui; Wang, Yongzhi; Qian, Guofeng; Dan, Han C.; Jiang, Wei; Ju, Lingao; Wu, Min; Xiao, Yu; Wang, Xinghuan

    2016-01-01

    Simvastatin is currently one of the most common drugs for old patients with hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerotic diseases by reducing cholesterol level and anti-lipid properties. Importantly, simvastatin has also been reported to have anti-tumor effect, but the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. We collected several human bladder samples and performed microarray. Data analysis suggested bladder cancer (BCa) was significantly associated with fatty acid/lipid metabolism via PPAR signalling pathway. We observed simvastatin did not trigger BCa cell apoptosis, but reduced cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied by PPARγ-activation. Moreover, flow cytometry analysis indicated that simvastatin induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, suggested by downregulation of CDK4/6 and Cyclin D1. Furthermore, simvastatin suppressed BCa cell metastasis by inhibiting EMT and affecting AKT/GSK3β. More importantly, we found that the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and the alterations of CDK4/6 and Cyclin D1 triggered by simvastatin could be recovered by PPARγ-antagonist (GW9662), whereas the treatment of PPARα-antagonist (GW6471) shown no significant effects on the BCa cells. Taken together, our study for the first time revealed that simvastatin inhibited bladder cancer cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest at G1/G0 phase via PPARγ signalling pathway. PMID:27779188

  2. MiRNA-30a-mediated autophagy inhibition sensitizes renal cell carcinoma cells to sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bing; Zhu, Hua; Gu, Donghua; Pan, Xiaodong; Qian, Lin; Xue, Boxin; Yang, Dongrong; Zhou, Jundong; Shan, Yuxi

    2015-04-03

    Chemotherapy-induced autophagy activation often contributes to cancer resistance. MiRNA-30a (miR-30a) is a potent inhibitor of autophagy by downregulating Beclin-1. In this study, we characterized the role of miR-30a in sorafenib-induced activity in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. We found that expression of miR-30a was significantly downregulated in several human RCC tissues and in RCC cell lines. Accordingly, its targeted gene Beclin-1 was upregulated. Sorafenib activated autophagy in RCC cells (786-0 and A489 lines), evidenced by p62 degradation, Beclin-1/autophagy protein 5 (ATG-5) upregulation and light chain (LC)3B-I/-II conversion. Exogenously expressing miR-30a in 786-0 or A489 cells inhibited Beclin-1 expression and enhanced sorafenib-induced cytotoxicity. In contrast, knockdown of miR-30a by introducing antagomiR-30a increased Beclin-1 expression, and inhibited sorafenib-induced cytotoxicity against RCC cells. Autophagy inhibitors, including chloroquine, 3-methyaldenine or Bafliomycin A1, enhanced sorafenib activity, causing substantial cell apoptosis. Meanwhile, knockdown of Beclin-1 or ATG-5 by targeted siRNAs also increased sorafenib-induced cytotoxicity in above RCC cells. These findings indicate that dysregulation of miR-30a in RCC may interfere with the effectiveness of sorafenib-mediated apoptosis by an autophagy-dependent pathway, thus representing a novel potential therapeutic target for RCC.

  3. Hyperbaric oxygen promotes malignant glioma cell growth and inhibits cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Gang; Zhan, Yi-Ping; Pan, Shu-Yi; Wang, Hai-Dong; Zhang, Dun-Xiao; Gao, Kai; Qi, Xue-Ling; Yu, Chun-Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequently diagnosed intracranial malignant tumor in adults. Clinical studies have indicated that hyperbaric oxygen may improve the prognosis and reduce complications in glioma patients; however, the specific mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. The present study investigated the direct effects of hyperbaric oxygen stimulation on glioma by constructing an intracranial transplanted glioma model in congenic C57BL/6J mice. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) was used to assess the growth of intracranial transplanted GL261-Luc glioma cells in vivo, while flow cytometric and immunohistochemical assays were used to detect and compare the expression of the biomarkers, Ki-67, CD34 and TUNEL, reflecting the cell cycle, apoptosis and angiogenesis. BLI demonstrated that hyperbaric oxygen promoted the growth of intracranially transplanted GL261-Luc glioma cells in vivo. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that hyperbaric oxygen promoted GL261-Luc glioma cell proliferation and also prevented cell cycle arrest. In addition, hyperbaric oxygen inhibited the apoptosis of the transplanted glioma cells. Immunohistochemical analysis also indicated that hyperbaric oxygen increased positive staining for Ki-67 and CD34, while reducing staining for TUNEL (a marker of apoptosis). The microvessel density was significantly increased in the hyperbaric oxygen treatment group compared with the control group. In conclusion, hyperbaric oxygen treatment promoted the growth of transplanted malignant glioma cells in vivo and also inhibited the apoptosis of these cells.

  4. Benzyl isothiocyanate inhibits HNSCC cell migration and invasion, and sensitizes HNSCC cells to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M Allison; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis and chemoresistance represent two detrimental events that greatly hinder the outcome for those suffering with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Herein, we investigated benzyl isothiocyanate's (BITC) ability to inhibit HNSCC migration and invasion and enhance chemotherapy. Our data suggests that treatment with BITC 1) induced significant reductions in the viability of multiple HNSCC cell lines tested (HN12, HN8, and HN30) after 24 and 48 h, 2) decreased migration and invasion of the HN12 cells in a dose dependent manner, and 3) inhibited expression and altered localization of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker, vimentin. We also observed that a pretreatment of BITC followed by cisplatin treatment 1) induced a greater decrease in HN12, HN30, and HN8 cell viability and total cell count than either treatment alone and 2) significantly increased apoptosis when compared to either treatment alone. Taken together these data suggest that BITC has the capacity to inhibit processes involved in metastasis and enhance the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Consequently, the results indicate that further investigation, including in vivo studies, are warranted.

  5. Lycopene inhibits the cell proliferation and invasion of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ye, Min; Wu, Qundan; Zhang, Min; Huang, Jinbei

    2016-10-01

    Lycopene has been shown to be associated with anticancer effects in numerous tumor types. However, the underlying mechanisms of lycopene in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remain to be determined. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of lycopene overload and the cytotoxic effects of lycopene on HNSCC cells, and to determine the possible mechanisms involved. Treatment with lycopene at a dose of >10 µM for >24 h inhibited the growth of FaDu and Cal27 cells in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner. The clearest increase in growth inhibition was due to the apoptotic population being significantly increased. The invasion abilities decreased with 25 µM lycopene exerting significant inhibitory effects (P<0.01). Mechanistic studies revealed that lycopene induced the upregulation of the pro‑apoptotic protein, B‑cell lymphoma‑associated X protein, and therefore, resulted in the inhibition of the protein kinase B and mitogen‑activated protein kinase signaling pathway. These data provided insights into the antitumor activity of lycopene in HNSCC cells.

  6. Lycopene inhibits the cell proliferation and invasion of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Min; Wu, Qundan; Zhang, Min; Huang, Jinbei

    2016-01-01

    Lycopene has been shown to be associated with anticancer effects in numerous tumor types. However, the underlying mechanisms of lycopene in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remain to be determined. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of lycopene overload and the cytotoxic effects of lycopene on HNSCC cells, and to determine the possible mechanisms involved. Treatment with lycopene at a dose of >10 µM for >24 h inhibited the growth of FaDu and Cal27 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The clearest increase in growth inhibition was due to the apoptotic population being significantly increased. The invasion abilities decreased with 25 µM lycopene exerting significant inhibitory effects (P<0.01). Mechanistic studies revealed that lycopene induced the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein, B-cell lymphoma-associated X protein, and therefore, resulted in the inhibition of the protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. These data provided insights into the antitumor activity of lycopene in HNSCC cells. PMID:27510325

  7. Nitric oxide inhibits irreversibly P815 cell proliferation: involvement of potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Costa, R S A; Assreuy, J

    2002-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to inhibit both normal and cancer cell proliferation. Potassium channels are involved in cell proliferation and, as NO activates these channels, we investigated the effect of NO on the proliferation of murine mastocytoma cell lines and the putative involvement of potassium channels. NO (in the form of NO donors) caused dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation in the P815 cell line inducing growth arrest in the mitosis phase. Incubation with NO donor for 4 or 24 h had a similar inhibitory effect on cell proliferation, indicating that this effect is irreversible. The inhibitory effect of NO was completely prevented by the blockade of voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium channels, but not by blockade of ATP-dependent channels. NO inhibition of cell proliferation was unaffected by guanylate cyclase and by cytoskeleton disruptors. Therefore, NO inhibits cell proliferation irreversibly via a potassium channel-dependent but guanylate cyclase-independent pathway in murine mastocytoma cells.

  8. Inhibition of SREBP increases gefitinib sensitivity in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Jia, Wenzhi; Yang, Hao; Liu, Liu; Zhou, Xiang; Miao, Ping; Sun, Xiaoguang; Song, Shaoli; Zhao, Xiaoping; Liu, Jianjun; Huang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The clinical success of EGFR inhibitors in patients with lung cancer is limited by the inevitable development of treatment resistance. Here, we show that inhibition of SREBP increase gefitinib sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Interference of SREBP1 binding partner MARVELD1 potentiate the therapeutic effect of gefitinib as well. Mechanistically, SREBP inhibition decreases the cell membrane fluidity, results in a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR. Therefore, targeting lipid metabolism combined with EGFR-TKIs is potentially a novel therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:27447558

  9. Gambogic acid induces apoptosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells via inducing proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianping; Lan, Xiaoying; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Chong; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Zang, Dan; Liao, Yuning; Zhang, Peiquan; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2015-04-08

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a great challenge to improving the survival of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), especially those with activated B-cell-like DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL). Therefore it is urgent to search for novel agents for the treatment of DLBCL. Gambogic acid (GA), a small molecule derived from Chinese herb gamboges, has been approved for Phase II clinical trial for cancer therapy by Chinese FDA. In the present study, we investigated the effect of GA on cell survival and apoptosis in DLBCL cells including both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells. We found that GA induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, which is associated with proteasome malfunction. These findings provide significant pre-clinical evidence for potential usage of GA in DLBCL therapy particularly in ABC-DLBCL treatment.

  10. Growth Inhibition of Breast Tumor Cells by Hypodense and Normodense Eosinophilic Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    with a Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter using CCR3 (Eotaxin Receptor) and CD49d antibodies. 6 Supernatants (24hr, 48hr and 72hr) from FACS sorted...MDA-MB-23 1 cells (fig. 26). The last cell line tested was established from the GRC.014.24S subline (which is CCR3 ), using the FACS Sorter and...Abdelnaby A, Hunter KA, Howland C, Brown R, Awich J, and Oredipe 0. (Manuscript In Preparation) CCR3 +, CD49÷’ and CD 15’ EBV Transformed Sublines Inhibit

  11. Inhibition of Kv channel expression by NSAIDs depolarizes membrane potential and inhibits cell migration by disrupting calpain signaling.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher; Littlejohn, Alaina; Thomas, Laurel; Marsh, Elizabeth; Lillich, James D

    2015-12-15

    Clinical use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is well known to cause gastrointestinal ulcer formation via several mechanisms that include inhibiting epithelial cell migration and mucosal restitution. The drug-affected signaling pathways that contribute to inhibition of migration by NSAIDs are poorly understood, though previous studies have shown that NSAIDs depolarize membrane potential and suppress expression of calpain proteases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel subunits. Kv channels play significant roles in cell migration and are targets of NSAID activity in white blood cells, but the specific functional effects of NSAID-induced changes in Kv channel expression, particularly on cell migration, are unknown in intestinal epithelial cells. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of NSAIDs on expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, and 1.6 in vitro and/or in vivo and evaluated the functional significance of loss of Kv subunit expression. Indomethacin or NS-398 reduced total and plasma membrane protein expression of Kv1.3 in cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Additionally, depolarization of membrane potential with margatoxin (MgTx), 40mM K(+), or silencing of Kv channel expression with siRNA significantly reduced IEC-6 cell migration and disrupted calpain activity. Furthermore, in rat small intestinal epithelia, indomethacin and NS-398 had significant, yet distinct, effects on gene and protein expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, or 1.6, suggesting that these may be clinically relevant targets. Our results show that inhibition of epithelial cell migration by NSAIDs is associated with decreased expression of Kv channel subunits, and provide a mechanism through which NSAIDs inhibit cell migration and may contribute to NSAID-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity.

  12. Inhibition of Kv channel expression by NSAIDs depolarizes membrane potential and inhibits cell migration by disrupting calpain signaling

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Kristopher; Littlejohn, Alaina; Thomas, Laurel; Marsh, Elizabeth; Lillich, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is well known to cause gastrointestinal ulcer formation via several mechanisms that include inhibiting epithelial cell migration and mucosal restitution. The drug-affected signaling pathways that contribute to inhibition of migration by NSAIDs are poorly understood, though previous studies have shown that NSAIDs depolarize membrane potential and suppress expression of calpain proteases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel subunits. Kv channels play significant roles in cell migration and are targets of NSAID activity in white blood cells, but the specific functional effects of NSAID-induced changes in Kv channel expression, particularly on cell migration, are unknown in intestinal epithelial cells. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of NSAIDs on expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, and 1.6 in vitro and/or in vivo and evaluated the functional significance of loss of Kv subunit expression. Indomethacin or NS-398 reduced total and plasma membrane protein expression of Kv1.3 in cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Additionally, depolarization of membrane potential with margatoxin (MgTx), 40 mM K+, or silencing of Kv channel expression with siRNA significantly reduced IEC-6 cell migration and disrupted calpain activity. Furthermore, in rat small intestinal epithelia, indomethacin and NS-398 had significant, yet distinct, effects on gene and protein expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, or 1.6, suggesting that these may be clinically relevant targets. Our results show that inhibition of epithelial cell migration by NSAIDs is associated with decreased expression of Kv channel subunits, and provide a mechanism through which NSAIDs inhibit cell migration and may contribute to NSAID-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. PMID:26549367

  13. Contribution of efflux pumps, porins, and β-lactamases to multidrug resistance in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Rumbo, C; Gato, E; López, M; Ruiz de Alegría, C; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Martínez-Martínez, L; Vila, J; Pachón, J; Cisneros, J M; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Pascual, A; Bou, G; Tomás, M

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, glycylcyclines, tetracyclines, and quinolones in 90 multiresistant clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from two genetically unrelated A. baumannii clones: clone PFGE-ROC-1 (53 strains producing the OXA-58 β-lactamase enzyme and 18 strains with the OXA-24 β-lactamase) and clone PFGE-HUI-1 (19 strains susceptible to carbapenems). We used real-time reverse transcriptase PCR to correlate antimicrobial resistance (MICs) with expression of genes encoding chromosomal β-lactamases (AmpC and OXA-51), porins (OmpA, CarO, Omp33, Dcap-like, OprB, Omp25, OprC, OprD, and OmpW), and proteins integral to six efflux systems (AdeABC, AdeIJK, AdeFGH, CraA, AbeM, and AmvA). Overexpression of the AdeABC system (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 30- to 45-fold) was significantly associated with resistance to tigecycline, minocycline, and gentamicin and other biological functions. However, hyperexpression of the AdeIJK efflux pump (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 8- to 10-fold) was significantly associated only with resistance to tigecycline and minocycline (to which the TetB efflux system also contributed). TetB and TetA(39) efflux pumps were detected in clinical strains and were associated with resistance to tetracyclines and doxycycline. The absence of the AdeABC system and the lack of expression of other mechanisms suggest that tigecycline-resistant strains of the PFGE-HUI-1 clone may be associated with a novel resistance-nodulation-cell efflux pump (decreased MICs in the presence of the inhibitor Phe-Arg β-naphthylamide dihydrochloride) and the TetA(39) system.

  14. Contribution of Efflux Pumps, Porins, and β-Lactamases to Multidrug Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Rumbo, C.; Gato, E.; López, M.; Ruiz de Alegría, C.; Fernández-Cuenca, F.; Martínez-Martínez, L.; Vila, J.; Pachón, J.; Cisneros, J. M.; Rodríguez-Baño, J.; Pascual, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, glycylcyclines, tetracyclines, and quinolones in 90 multiresistant clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from two genetically unrelated A. baumannii clones: clone PFGE-ROC-1 (53 strains producing the OXA-58 β-lactamase enzyme and 18 strains with the OXA-24 β-lactamase) and clone PFGE-HUI-1 (19 strains susceptible to carbapenems). We used real-time reverse transcriptase PCR to correlate antimicrobial resistance (MICs) with expression of genes encoding chromosomal β-lactamases (AmpC and OXA-51), porins (OmpA, CarO, Omp33, Dcap-like, OprB, Omp25, OprC, OprD, and OmpW), and proteins integral to six efflux systems (AdeABC, AdeIJK, AdeFGH, CraA, AbeM, and AmvA). Overexpression of the AdeABC system (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 30- to 45-fold) was significantly associated with resistance to tigecycline, minocycline, and gentamicin and other biological functions. However, hyperexpression of the AdeIJK efflux pump (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 8- to 10-fold) was significantly associated only with resistance to tigecycline and minocycline (to which the TetB efflux system also contributed). TetB and TetA(39) efflux pumps were detected in clinical strains and were associated with resistance to tetracyclines and doxycycline. The absence of the AdeABC system and the lack of expression of other mechanisms suggest that tigecycline-resistant strains of the PFGE-HUI-1 clone may be associated with a novel resistance-nodulation-cell efflux pump (decreased MICs in the presence of the inhibitor Phe-Arg β-naphthylamide dihydrochloride) and the TetA(39) system. PMID:23939894

  15. Suppression of autophagy augments the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition on human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Xiaopeng; Du, Jie; Hua, Song; Zhang, Haowen; Gu, Cheng; Wang, Jie; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jianfeng; Yu, Jiahua Liu, Fenju

    2015-01-15

    Radiotherapy is an essential component of the standard therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. To increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells is a feasible solution to improve the therapeutic effects. It has been suggested that inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) can radiosensitize glioma cells, probably via the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In this study, human malignant glioma cells, U251 and A172, were treated with an STAT3 inhibitor, WP1066, or a short hairpin RNA plasmid targeting STAT3 to suppress the activation of STAT3 signaling. The radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition were confirmed in glioma cells. Intriguingly, combination of ionizing radiation exposure and STAT3 inhibition triggered a pronounced increase of autophagy flux. To explore the role of autophagy, glioma cells were treated with 3-methyladenine or siRNA for autophagy-related gene 5, and it was demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy further strengthened the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition. Accordingly, more apoptotic cells were induced by the dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 signaling. In conclusion, our data revealed a protective role of autophagy in the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition, and inhibition of both autophagy and STAT3 might be a potential therapeutic strategy to increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells. - Highlights: • Inactivation of STAT3 signaling radiosensitizes malignant glioma cells. • STAT3 inhibition triggers a significant increase of autophagy flux induced by ionizing radiation in glioma cells. • Suppression of autophagy further strengthens the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition in glioma cells. • Dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 induce massive apoptotic cells upon exposure to ionizing radiation.

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells with rhBMP-2 inhibits the growth of canine osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) belong to a unique group of proteins that includes the growth factor TGF-β. BMPs play important roles in cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and inhibition of cell growth. They also participate in the maturation of several cell types, depending on the microenvironment and interactions with other regulatory factors. Depending on their concentration gradient, the BMPs can attract various types of cells and act as chemotactic, mitogenic, or differentiation agents. BMPs can interfere with cell proliferation and the formation of cartilage and bone. In addition, BMPs can induce the differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells into various cell types, including chondroblasts and osteoblasts. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of treatment with rhBMP-2 on the proliferation of canine mesenchymal stem cells (cMSCs) and the tumor suppression properties of rhBMP-2 in canine osteocarcoma (OST) cells. Osteosarcoma cell lines were isolated from biopsies and excisions of animals with osteosarcoma and were characterized by the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Butantan Institute. The mesenchymal stem cells were derived from the bone marrow of canine fetuses (cMSCs) and belong to the University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine (FMVZ-USP) stem cell bank. After expansion, the cells were cultured in a 12-well Transwell system; cells were treated with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells associated with rhBMP2. Expression of the intracytoplasmic and nuclear markers such as Caspase-3, Bax, Bad, Bcl-2, Ki-67, p53, Oct3/4, Nanog, Stro-1 were performed by flow citometry. Results We evaluated the regenerative potential of in vitro treatment with rhBMP-2 and found that both osteogenic induction and tumor regression occur in stem cells from canine bone marrow. rhBMP-2 inhibits the proliferation capacity of OST cells by mechanisms of apoptosis and tumor suppression mediated by p53. Conclusion We

  17. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Hetero-adhesion of Cancer Cells to Endothelial Cells: Restraining Circulating Tumor Cells from Initiating Metastatic Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yusheng; Yu, Ting; Liang, Haiyan; Wang, Jichuang; Xie, Jingjing; Shao, Jingwei; Gao, Yu; Yu, Suhong; Chen, Shuming; Wang, Lie; Jia, Lee

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to vascular endothelial bed becomes a crucial starting point in metastatic cascade. We hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) may prevent cancer metastasis from happening by its direct vasodilation and inhibition of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Here we show that S-nitrosocaptopril (CAP-NO, a typical NO donor) produced direct vasorelaxation that can be antagonized by typical NO scavenger hemoglobin and guanylate cyclase inhibitor. Cytokines significantly stimulated production of typical CAMs by the highly-purified human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). CAP-NO inhibited expression of the stimulated CAMs (particularly VCAM-1) and the resultant hetero-adhesion of human colorectal cancer cells HT-29 to the HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner. The same concentration of CAP-NO, however, did not significantly affect cell viability, cell cycle and mitochondrial membrane potential of HT-29, thus excluding the possibility that inhibition of the hetero-adhesion was caused by cytotoxicity by CAP-NO on HT-29. Hemoglobin reversed the inhibition of CAP-NO on both the hetero-adhesion between HT-29 and HUVECs and VCAM-1 expression. These data demonstrate that CAP-NO, by directly releasing NO, produces vasorelaxation and interferes with hetero-adhesion of cancer cells to vascular endothelium via down-regulating expression of CAMs. The study highlights the importance of NO in cancer metastatic prevention.

  18. Purification and characterization of protein H, the major porin of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, G; Duclohier, H; Thomas, D; Shechter, E; Wróblewski, H

    1993-01-01

    Protein H (B. Lugtenberg, R. van Boxtel, D. Evenberg, M. de Jong, P. Storm, and J. Frik, Infect. Immun. 52:175-182, 1986) is the major polypeptide of the outer membrane of Pasteurella multocida, a bacterium pathogenic for humans and animals. We have purified this protein to homogeneity by size exclusion chromatography after selective extraction with surfactants and demonstrated its pore-forming ability after reincorporation into planar lipid bilayers. In these experiments, the current through the pores was a linear function of the applied voltage in the range of -50 to +50 mV. Voltages beyond +/- 50 mV tended to partially close the channels, giving rise to apparent negative resistances. These observations suggest that protein H channels are probably not voltage regulated in vivo. With the patch clamp technique, single-channel conductance fluctuations of 0.33 nS were recorded in 1 M KCl. Electrophoretic and circular dichroism analyses showed that protein H forms homotrimers stable in sodium dodecyl sulfate at room temperature, with a high content of beta-sheet secondary structure. Upon boiling, the trimers were fully dissociated into monomers with an increase of alpha helix and irregular structure, at the expense of beta sheets. The apparent molecular mass of fully denatured monomers ranged between 37 and 41.8 kDa, depending on the electrophoretic system used for analysis. The trimeric arrangement of protein H was confirmed by image analysis of negatively stained, two-dimensional crystal arrays. This morphological study revealed, in agreement with electrophoretical data, a trimeric structure with an overall diameter of 7.7 nm. Each monomer appeared to contain a pore with an average diameter of 1 nm. Quantitative comparisons revealed that the amino acid composition (hydropathy index of -0.40) and the N-terminal sequence (determined over 36 residues) of protein H are similar to those of bacterial general porins, notably porin P2 of Haemophilus influenzae. We conclude

  19. Transient inhibition of cell proliferation does not compromise self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruoxing; Guo, Yan-Lin

    2012-10-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have unlimited capacity for self-renewal and can differentiate into various cell types when induced. They also have an unusual cell cycle control mechanism driven by constitutively active cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks). In mouse ESCs (mESCs). It is proposed that the rapid cell proliferation could be a necessary part of mechanisms that maintain mESC self-renewal and pluripotency, but this hypothesis is not in line with the finding in human ESCs (hESCs) that the length of the cell cycle is similar to differentiated cells. Therefore, whether rapid cell proliferation is essential for the maintenance of mESC state remains unclear. We provide insight into this uncertainty through chemical intervention of mESC cell cycle. We report here that inhibition of Cdks with olomoucine II can dramatically slow down cell proliferation of mESCs with concurrent down-regulation of cyclin A, B and E, and the activation of the Rb pathway. However, mESCs display can recover upon the removal of olomoucine II and are able to resume normal cell proliferation without losing self-renewal and pluripotency, as demonstrated by the expression of ESC markers, colony formation, embryoid body formation, and induced differentiation. We provide a mechanistic explanation for these observations by demonstrating that Oct4 and Nanog, two major transcription factors that play critical roles in the maintenance of ESC properties, are up-regulated via de novo protein synthesis when the cells are exposed to olomoucine II. Together, our data suggest that short-term inhibition of cell proliferation does not compromise the basic properties of mESCs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Cdks slows down mESCs proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mESCs display remarkable recovery capacity from short-term cell cycle interruption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short-term cell cycle interruption does not compromise mESC self-renewal. Black

  20. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles inhibit prostate cancer by attenuating the stemness of cancer cells via inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Yang, Qi-Wei; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Tie; Shi, Min-Feng; Sun, Chen-Xia; Gao, Xiu-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Qiong; Cui, Xin-Gang; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2017-01-01

    Disordered copper metabolism plays a critical role in the development of various cancers. As a nanomedicine containing copper, cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) exert ideal antitumor pharmacological effects in vitro and in vivo. Prostate cancer is a frequently diagnosed male malignancy prone to relapse, and castration resistance is the main reason for endocrine therapy failure. However, whether CONPs have the potential to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer is still unknown. Here, using the castration-resistant PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line as a model, we report that CONPs can selectively induce apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. CONPs can also attenuate the stemness of cancer cells and inhibit the Wnt signaling pathway, both of which highlight the great potential of CONPs as a new clinical castration-resistant prostate cancer therapy.

  1. M2muscarinic receptors inhibit cell proliferation and migration in urothelial bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pacini, Luca; De Falco, Elena; Di Bari, Maria; Coccia, Andrea; Siciliano, Camilla; Ponti, Donatella; Pastore, Antonio Luigi; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Carbone, Antonio; Tata, Ada Maria; Calogero, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The role of muscarinic receptors in several diseases including cancer has recently emerged. To evaluate the hypothesis that muscarinic acetylcholine receptors may play a role in bladder cancer as well as in other tumor types, we investigated their expression in bladder tumor specimens. All examined samples expressed the M1, M2 and M3 receptor subtypes. We also found that the level of M2 transcripts, but not those of M1 or M3, significantly increased with the tumor histologic grade. In view of these results, we proceeded to investigate whether the M2 agonist Arecaidine had any effect on in vitro cell growth and migration of T24 cells, a bladder tumor cell line expressing the muscarinic receptors, including the M2 subtype. We observed that Arecaidine significantly reduced T24 and 5637 cell proliferation and migration in a concentration dependent manner. The silencing of M2 receptor by siRNA in T24 and 5637 cell lines showed the inability of Arecaidine (100 μM) to inhibit cell proliferation after 48 hours, whereas the use of M1 and M3 antagonists in T24 appeared not to counteract the Arecaidine effect, suggesting that the inhibition of cell proliferation was directly dependent on M2 receptor activation. These data suggest that M2 muscarinic receptors may play a relevant role in bladder cancer and represent a new attractive therapeutic target. PMID:25482946

  2. African Swine Fever Virus IAP Homologue Inhibits Caspase Activation and Promotes Cell Survival in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nogal, María L.; González de Buitrago, Gonzalo; Rodríguez, Clara; Cubelos, Beatriz; Carrascosa, Angel L.; Salas, María L.; Revilla, Yolanda

    2001-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) A224L is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family. We have investigated the antiapoptotic function of the viral IAP both in stably transfected cells and in ASFV-infected cells. A224L was able to substantially inhibit caspase activity and cell death induced by treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha and cycloheximide or staurosporine when overexpressed in Vero cells by gene transfection. We have also observed that ASFV infection induces caspase activation and apoptosis in Vero cells. Furthermore, using a deletion mutant of ASFV lacking the A224L gene, we have shown that the viral IAP modulates the proteolytic processing of the effector cell death protease caspase-3 and the apoptosis which are induced in the infected cells. Our findings indicate that A224L interacts with the proteolytic fragment of caspase-3 and inhibits the activity of this protease during ASFV infection. These observations could indicate a conserved mechanism of action for ASFV IAP and other IAP family members to suppress apoptosis. PMID:11222676

  3. Paeoniflorin Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis via Inhibition of Dendritic Cell Function and Th17 Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Qi, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Yuanyang; Cai, Li; Xu, Haiyan; Zhang, Lili; Su, Bing; Nie, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Paeoniflorin (PF) is a monoterpene glycoside and exhibits multiple effects, including anti-inflammation and immunoregulation. To date, the effect of PF on multiple sclerosis (MS) has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of PF in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS. After administered with PF, the onset and clinical symptoms of EAE mice were significantly ameliorated, and the number of Th17 cells infiltrated in central nervous system (CNS) and spleen was also dramatically decreased. Instead of inhibiting the differentiation of Th17 cells directly, PF influenced Th17 cells via suppressing the expression of costimulatory molecules and the production of interlukin-6 (IL-6) of dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo and in vitro, which may be attributable to the inhibition of IKK/NF-κB and JNK signaling pathway. When naïve CD4+ T cells were co-cultured with PF-treated dendritic cells under Th17-polarizing condition, the percentage of Th17 cells and the phosphorylation of STAT3 were decreased, as well as the mRNA levels of IL-17, RORα, and RORγt. Our study provided insights into the role of PF as a unique therapeutic agent for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and illustrated the underlying mechanism of PF from a new perspective. PMID:28165507

  4. Restoration of WNT4 inhibits cell growth in leukemia-derived cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background WNT signaling pathways are significantly altered during cancer development. Vertebrates possess two classes of WNT signaling pathways: the “canonical” WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway, and the “non-canonical” pathways including WNT/Ca2+ and WNT/Planar cell polarity [PCP] signaling. WNT4 influences hematopoietic progenitor cell expansion and survival; however, WNT4 function in cancer development and the resulting implications for oncogenesis are poorly understood. The aim of this study was twofold: first, to determine the expression of WNT4 in mature peripheral blood cells and diverse leukemia-derived cells including cell lines from hematopoietic neoplasms and cells from patients with leukemia; second, to identify the effect of this ligand on the proliferation and apoptosis of the blast-derived cell lines BJAB, Jurkat, CEM, K562, and HL60. Methods We determined WNT4 expression by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and T- and B-lymphocytes from healthy individuals, as well as from five leukemia-derived cell lines and blasts derived from patients with leukemia. To analyze the effect of WNT4 on cell proliferation, PBMCs and cell lines were exposed to a commercially available WNT4 recombinant human protein. Furthermore, WNT4 expression was restored in BJAB cells using an inducible lentiviral expression system. Cell viability and proliferation were measured by the addition of WST-1 to cell cultures and counting cells; in addition, the progression of the cell cycle and the amount of apoptosis were analyzed in the absence or presence of WNT4. Finally, the expression of WNT-pathway target genes was measured by qRT-PCR. Results WNT4 expression was severely reduced in leukemia-derived cell lines and blasts derived from patients with leukemia. The exposure of cell lines to WNT4 recombinant protein significantly inhibited cell proliferation; inducing WNT4 expression in BJAB

  5. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xi-fei; Ren, Xiao-hu; Meng, Xiao-jing; Huang, Hai-yan; Zhao, Qiong-hui; Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jian-jun; Zou, Fei

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We employed RNA interference to knockdown SET expression in breast cancer cells. • Knockdown of SET expression inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Knockdown of SET expression increases the activity and expression of PP2A. • Knockdown of SET expression decreases the expression of MMP-9. - Abstract: Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell-like cells from children foreskin inhibit the growth of SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yahong; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Zhihong; Zhan, Jie; Sun, Xiaochun; Qian, Hui; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Wenrong

    2013-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) become a research hotspot in recent years because of their roles in regenerative medicine and tissue injury repair. However, the limited source for MSCs hampers its clinical application. In this study, we isolated and identified human mesenchymal stem cell-like cells from foreskin (hFMSCs) by explant culture. HFMSCs had similar morphology and immunophenotype to that of human bone marrow derived-mesenchymal stem cells. HFMSCs formed colonies after 9 days of inoculation and could be propagated for more than 50 passages. HFMSCs had a normal karyotype and high G0/G1 phase independent of passage number. Further, hFMSCs could be induced to differentiate into osteocytes and adipocytes. We found that the growth of SGC-7901 (human gastric adenocarcinoma) cells could be suppressed by simultaneous injection of hFMSCs in vivo. HFMSCs also inhibited SGC-7901 cell proliferation in vitro. HFMSC co-injection resulted in a decrease in PCNA-positive and an increase in apoptotic tumor cells. HFMSCs derived conditioned medium inhibited the expression of BCL-2 while increased the expression of BAX and caspase-3 in SGC-7901 cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that children foreskin is a new source for MSCs and hFMSCs could inhibit gastric cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Inhibition of FAAH confers increased stem cell migration via PPARα.

    PubMed

    Wollank, Yvonne; Ramer, Robert; Ivanov, Igor; Salamon, Achim; Peters, Kirsten; Hinz, Burkhard

    2015-10-01

    Regenerative activity in tissues of mesenchymal origin depends on the migratory potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The present study focused on inhibitors of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which catalyzes the degradation of endocannabinoids (anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and endocannabinoid-like substances (N-oleoylethanolamine, N-palmitoylethanolamine). Boyden chamber assays, the FAAH inhibitors, URB597 and arachidonoyl serotonin (AA-5HT), were found to increase the migration of human adipose-derived MSCs. LC-MS analyses revealed increased levels of all four aforementioned FAAH substrates in MSCs incubated with either FAAH inhibitor. Following addition to MSCs, all FAAH substrates mimicked the promigratory action of FAAH inhibitors. Promigratory effects of FAAH inhibitors and substrates were causally linked to activation of p42/44 MAPKs, as well as to cytosol-to-nucleus translocation of the transcription factor, PPARα. Whereas PPARα activation by FAAH inhibitors and substrates became reversed upon inhibition of p42/44 MAPK activation, a blockade of PPARα left p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation unaltered. Collectively, these data demonstrate FAAH inhibitors and substrates to cause p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, which subsequently activates PPARα to confer increased migration of MSCs. This novel pathway may be involved in regenerative effects of endocannabinoids whose degradation could be a target of pharmacological intervention by FAAH inhibitors.

  8. Inhibition of FAAH confers increased stem cell migration via PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Wollank, Yvonne; Ramer, Robert; Ivanov, Igor; Salamon, Achim; Peters, Kirsten; Hinz, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative activity in tissues of mesenchymal origin depends on the migratory potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The present study focused on inhibitors of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which catalyzes the degradation of endocannabinoids (anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and endocannabinoid-like substances (N-oleoylethanolamine, N-palmitoylethanolamine). Boyden chamber assays, the FAAH inhibitors, URB597 and arachidonoyl serotonin (AA-5HT), were found to increase the migration of human adipose-derived MSCs. LC-MS analyses revealed increased levels of all four aforementioned FAAH substrates in MSCs incubated with either FAAH inhibitor. Following addition to MSCs, all FAAH substrates mimicked the promigratory action of FAAH inhibitors. Promigratory effects of FAAH inhibitors and substrates were causally linked to activation of p42/44 MAPKs, as well as to cytosol-to-nucleus translocation of the transcription factor, PPARα. Whereas PPARα activation by FAAH inhibitors and substrates became reversed upon inhibition of p42/44 MAPK activation, a blockade of PPARα left p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation unaltered. Collectively, these data demonstrate FAAH inhibitors and substrates to cause p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, which subsequently activates PPARα to confer increased migration of MSCs. This novel pathway may be involved in regenerative effects of endocannabinoids whose degradation could be a target of pharmacological intervention by FAAH inhibitors. PMID:26263913

  9. Phagocytosis by macrophages and endothelial cells inhibits procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rui; Gao, Chunyan; Li, Wen; Zhu, Jiuxin; Novakovic, Valerie; Wang, Jing; Ma, Ruishuang; Zhou, Jin; Gilbert, Gary E; Shi, Jialan

    2012-03-08

    The coagulopathy of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is mainly related to procoagulant substances and fibrinolytic activators of APL blasts, but the fate of these leukemic cells is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of APL blasts by macrophages and endothelial cells in vitro and consequent procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity of APL cells. We found that human umbilical vein endothelial cells as well as THP-1 and monocyte-derived macrophages bound, engulfed, and subsequently degraded immortalized APL cell line NB4 and primary APL cells. Lactadherin promoted phagocytosis of APL cells in a time-dependent fashion. Furthermore, factor Xa and prothrombinase activity of phosphatidylserine-exposed target APL cells was time-dependently decreased after incubation with phagocytes (THP-1-derived macrophages or HUVECs). Thrombin production on target APL cells was reduced by 40%-45% after 2 hours of coincubation with phagocytes and 80% by a combination of lactadherin and phagocytes. Moreover, plasmin generation of target APL cells was inhibited 30% by 2 hours of phagocytosis and ∼ 50% by lactadherin-mediated engulfment. These results suggest that engulfment by macrophages and endothelial cells reduce procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity of APL blasts. Lactadherin and phagocytosis could cooperatively ameliorate the clotting disorders in APL.

  10. Shielding of the Geomagnetic Field Alters Actin Assembly and Inhibits Cell Motility in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Wei-Chuan; Zhang, Zi-Jian; Wang, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F.; He, Rong-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that absence of the geomagnetic field (GMF), the so-called hypomagnetic field (HMF) environment, alters the biological functions in seemingly non-magnetosensitive cells and organisms, which indicates that the GMF could be sensed by non-iron-rich and non-photo-sensing cells. The underlying mechanisms of the HMF effects on those cells are closely related to their GMF sensation but remain poorly understood so far. Previously, we found that the HMF represses expressions of genes associated with cell migration and cytoskeleton assembly in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cell line). Here, we measured the HMF-induced changes on cell morphology, adhesion, motility and actin cytoskeleton in SH-SY5Y cells. The HMF inhibited cell adhesion and migration accompanied with a reduction in cellular F-actin amount. Moreover, following exposure to the HMF, the number of cell processes was reduced and cells were smaller in size and more round in shape. Furthermore, disordered kinetics of actin assembly in vitro were observed during exposure to the HMF, as evidenced by the presence of granule and meshed products. These results indicate that elimination of the GMF affects assembly of the motility-related actin cytoskeleton, and suggest that F-actin is a target of HMF exposure and probably a mediator of GMF sensation. PMID:27029216

  11. Infantile hemangioma-derived stem cells and endothelial cells are inhibited by class 3 semaphorins

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hironao; Huang, Lan; Kelly, Ryan P.; Oudenaarden, Clara R.L.; Dagher, Adelle; Hofmann, Nicole A.; Moses, Marsha A.; Bischoff, Joyce; Klagsbrun, Michael

    2015-08-14

    Class 3 semaphorins were discovered as a family of axon guidance molecules, but are now known to be involved in diverse biologic processes. In this study, we investigated the anti-angiogenic potential of SEMA3E and SEMA3F (SEMA3E&F) in infantile hemangioma (IH). IH is a common vascular tumor that involves both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Our lab has identified and isolated hemangioma stem cells (HemSC), glucose transporter 1 positive (GLUT1{sup +}) endothelial cells (designated as GLUT1{sup sel} cells) based on anti-GLUT1 magnetic beads selection and GLUT1-negative endothelial cells (named HemEC). We have shown that these types of cells play important roles in hemangiogenesis. We report here that SEMA3E inhibited HemEC migration and proliferation while SEMA3F was able to suppress the migration and proliferation in all three types of cells. Confocal microscopy showed that stress fibers in HemEC were reduced by SEMA3E&F and that stress fibers in HemSC were decreased by SEMA3F, which led to cytoskeletal collapse and loss of cell motility in both cell types. Additionally, SEMA3E&F were able to inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced sprouts in all three types of cells. Further, SEMA3E&F reduced the level of p-VEGFR2 and its downstream p-ERK in HemEC. These results demonstrate that SEMA3E&F inhibit IH cell proliferation and suppress the angiogenic activities of migration and sprout formation. SEMA3E&F may have therapeutic potential to treat or prevent growth of highly proliferative IH. - Highlights: • SEMA3E&F reduce actin stress fibers and induce cytoskeletal collapse in HemEC. • SEMA3E&F inhibit angiogenic activities of HemEC. • SEMA3E&F can interrupt the VEGF-A-VEGFR2-ERK signaling pathway in HemEC. • Plexin D1 and NRP2 are induced during HemSC/GLUT1{sup sel}-to-EC differentiation.

  12. HIV infection of monocytes-derived dendritic cells inhibits Vγ9Vδ2 T cells functions.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Alessandra; Tumino, Nicola; Casetti, Rita; Agrati, Chiara; Turchi, Federica; Bordoni, Veronica; Cimini, Eleonora; Martini, Federico

    2014-01-01

    DCs act as sentinel cells against incoming pathogens and represent the most potent antigen presenting cells, having the unique capability to prime naïve T cells. In addition to their role in induction of adaptive immune responses, DC are also able to activate innate cells as γδ T cells; in particular, a reciprocal crosstalk between DC and γδ T cells was demonstrated. However, whether HIV infection may alter DC-Vγ9Vδ2 T cells cross-talk was not yet described. To clarify this issue, we cultured activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells with HIV infected monocyte derived DC (MoDC). After 5 days we evaluated MoDC phenotype, and Vγ9Vδ2 T cells activation and proliferation. In our model, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were not able to proliferate in response to HIV-infected MoDC, although an up-regulation of CD69 was observed. Upon phosphoantigens stimulation, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells proliferation and cytokine production were inhibited when cultured with HIV-infected MoDC in a cell-contact dependent way. Moreover, HIV-infected MoDC are not able to up-regulate CD86 molecules when cultured with activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, compared with uninfected MoDC. Further, activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are not able to induce HLA DR up-regulation and CCR5 down-regulation on HIV-infected MoDC. These data indicate that HIV-infected DC alter the capacity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to respond to their antigens, pointing out a new mechanisms of induction of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells anergy carried out by HIV, that could contribute to immune evasion.

  13. HIV Infection of Monocytes-Derived Dendritic Cells Inhibits Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Alessandra; Tumino, Nicola; Casetti, Rita; Agrati, Chiara; Turchi, Federica; Bordoni, Veronica; Cimini, Eleonora; Martini, Federico

    2014-01-01

    DCs act as sentinel cells against incoming pathogens and represent the most potent antigen presenting cells, having the unique capability to prime naïve T cells. In addition to their role in induction of adaptive immune responses, DC are also able to activate innate cells as γδ T cells; in particular, a reciprocal crosstalk between DC and γδ T cells was demonstrated. However, whether HIV infection may alter DC-Vγ9Vδ2 T cells cross-talk was not yet described. To clarify this issue, we cultured activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells with HIV infected monocyte derived DC (MoDC). After 5 days we evaluated MoDC phenotype, and Vγ9Vδ2 T cells activation and proliferation. In our model, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were not able to proliferate in response to HIV-infected MoDC, although an up-regulation of CD69 was observed. Upon phosphoantigens stimulation, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells proliferation and cytokine production were inhibited when cultured with HIV-infected MoDC in a cell-contact dependent way. Moreover, HIV-infected MoDC are not able to up-regulate CD86 molecules when cultured with activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, compared with uninfected MoDC. Further, activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are not able to induce HLA DR up-regulation and CCR5 down-regulation on HIV-infected MoDC. These data indicate that HIV-infected DC alter the capacity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to respond to their antigens, pointing out a new mechanisms of induction of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells anergy carried out by HIV, that could contribute to immune evasion. PMID:25340508

  14. Semicarbazone EGA Inhibits Uptake of Diphtheria Toxin into Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA) from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA) has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT). Here, we demonstrate that EGA also protects human cells from diphtheria toxin by inhibiting the pH-dependent translocation of DTA across cell membranes. The results suggest that EGA might serve for treatment and/or prevention of the severe disease diphtheria. PMID:27428999

  15. Inhibition of allogeneic T-cell response by Kupffer cells expressing indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Mao-Lin; Wang, Yao-Dong; Tian, Yi-Feng; Lai, Zhi-De; Yan, Lv-Nan

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To explore the possibility and mechanism of inhibiting allogeneic T-cell responses by Kupffer cells (KC) pretreated with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in vitro. METHODS: The expressions of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) mRNA and FasL mRNA in KC pretreated with IFN-γ were studied with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The catabolism of tryptophan by IDO from KC was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Allogeneic T-cell response was used to confirm the inhibition of KC in vitro. The proliferation of lymphocytes was detected using [3H] thymidine incorporation. Cell cycle and lymphocyte apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometric assay. RESULTS: Real-time PCR revealed IDO mRNA and FasL mRNA expressions in KC pretreated with IFN-γ, and IDO catabolic effect was confirmed by a decrease in tryptophan and increase in kynurenine concentration. KC expressing IDO and FasL in BABL/c mice acquired the ability to suppress the proliferation of T-cells from C57BL/6, which could be blocked by addition of 1-methyl-tryptophan and anti-FasL antibody. KC expressing IDO could induce allogeneic T-cell apoptosis. CONCLUSION: In addition to Fas/FasL pathway, IDO may be another mechanism for KC to induce immune tolerance. PMID:20128035

  16. Sorafenib inhibits cell growth but fails to enhance radio- and chemosensitivity of glioblastoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Matthias; Struve, Nina; Müller-Goebel, Justus; Köcher, Sabrina; Petersen, Cordula; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Rothkamm, Kai; Kriegs, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most common malignant type of primary brain tumor. GBM are intensively treated with surgery and combined radiochemotherapy using X-irradiation and temozolomide (TMZ) but they are still associated with an extremely poor prognosis, urging for the development of new treatment strategies. To improve the outcome of GBM patients, the small molecule multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib has moved into focus of recent research. Sorafenib has already been shown to enhance the radio- and radiochemosensitivity of other tumor entities. Whether sorafenib is also able to sensitize GBM cells to radio- and chemotherapy is still an unsolved question which we have addressed in this study. Methods The effect of sorafenib on signaling, proliferation, radiosensitivity, chemosensitivity and radiochemosensitivity was analyzed in six glioblastoma cell lines using Western blot, proliferation- and colony formation assays. Results In half of the cell lines sorafenib clearly inhibited MAPK signaling. We also observed a strong blockage of proliferation, which was, however, not associated with MAPK pathway inhibition. Sorafenib had only minor effects on cell survival when administered alone. Most importantly, sorafenib treatment failed to enhance GBM cell killing by irradiation, TMZ or combined treatment, and instead rather caused resistance in some cell lines. Conclusion Our data suggest that sorafenib treatment may not improve the efficacy of radiochemotherapy in GBM. PMID:27542273

  17. Inhibition of Cdc42 is essential for Mig-6 suppression of cell migration induced by EGF.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinni; Niu, MengMeng; Chen, Deshi; Chen, Jing; Cao, Yang; Li, Xiaorong; Ying, Haoqiang; Bergholz, Johann; Zhang, Yujun; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong

    2016-08-02

    The adaptor protein Mig-6 is a negative regulator of EGF signaling. It is shown that Mig-6 inhibits cell migration via direct interaction with the ErbB receptors, thereby inhibiting cross-phosphorylation or targeting the receptors for degradation. Mig-6 has also been shown to bind to and inhibit the Rho GTPase Cdc42 to suppress cytoskeletal rearrangement. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which Mig-6 inhibits cell migration via Cdc42 is still not entirely clear. Here, we show that Mig-6 binding to Cdc42 is necessary and sufficient to inhibit EGF-induced filopodia formation and migration. This binding, mediated by four specific residues (I11, R12, M26, R30) in the Mig-6 CRIB domain, is essential for Mig-6 function. In addition, ectopic expression of Cdc42 reverses Mig-6 inhibition of cell migration. Mig-6 CRIB domain, alone, is sufficient to inhibit cell migration. Conversely, Mig-6 binding to EGFR is dispensable for Mig-6-mediated inhibition of cell migration. Moreover, we found that decreased Mig-6 expression correlates with cancer progression in breast and prostate cancers. Together, our results demonstrate that Mig-6 inhibition of Cdc42 signaling is critical in Mig-6 function to suppress cell migration and that dysregulation of this pathway may play a critical role in cancer development.

  18. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xi-fei; Ren, Xiao-hu; Meng, Xiao-jing; Huang, Hai-yan; Zhao, Qiong-hui; Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jian-jun; Zou, Fei

    2014-10-10

    Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  19. FcR-Like 2 Inhibition of B Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation of B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Tanisha A.; Haga, Christopher L.; Ehrhardt, Götz R. A.; Davis, Randall S.; Cooper, Max D.

    2017-01-01

    FcR-like (FCRL) 2 is a transmembrane protein with immunomodulatory potential that is preferentially expressed by memory B cells in humans. It has two consensus ITIMs in addition to a putative ITAM sequence in its cytoplasmic domain. We have confirmed the cellular distribution of FCRL2 and analyzed its functional potential to show that coligation with the BCR leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of its ITIM motifs and subsequent Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 recruitment to facilitate inhibition of BCR signaling. Mutational analysis indicates that the tyrosine residues in both inhibitory motifs of FCRL2 are required for complete inhibition of BCR signaling, whereas tyrosines in the putative activation motif are dispensable for signal modulation. These findings suggest a negative immunomodulatory function for FCRL2 in the regulation of memory B cells. PMID:21068405

  20. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells sense hepatitis C virus-infected cells, produce interferon, and inhibit infection.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ken; Asabe, Shinichi; Wieland, Stefan; Garaigorta, Urtzi; Gastaminza, Pablo; Isogawa, Masanori; Chisari, Francis V

    2010-04-20

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, is a single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus that infects >170 million people worldwide and causes acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite its ability to block the innate host response in infected hepatocyte cell lines in vitro, HCV induces a strong type 1 interferon (IFN) response in the infected liver. The source of IFN in vivo and how it is induced are currently undefined. Here we report that HCV-infected cells trigger a robust IFN response in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) by a mechanism that requires active viral replication, direct cell-cell contact, and Toll-like receptor 7 signaling, and we show that the activated pDC supernatant inhibits HCV infection in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Importantly, the same events are triggered by HCV subgenomic replicon cells but not by free virus particles, suggesting the existence of a novel cell-cell RNA transfer process whereby HCV-infected cells can activate pDCs to produce IFN without infecting them. These results may explain how HCV induces IFN production in the liver, and they reveal a heretofore unsuspected aspect of the innate host response to viruses that can subvert the classical sensing machinery in the cells they infect, and do not infect or directly activate pDCs.

  1. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Su, Chun-Li; Chen, Kwun-Min; Fang, Kang

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  2. Overexpression of Aurora-A kinase promotes tumor cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Liu, Rong; Jin, Shun Qian; Fan, Fei Yue; Zhan, Qi Min

    2006-04-01

    Aurora-A kinase, a serine/threonine protein kinase, is a potential oncogene. Amplification and overexpression of Aurora-A have been found in several types of human tumors, including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). It has been demonstrated that cells overexpressing Aurora-A are more resistant to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating these effects remain largely unknown. In this report, we showed that overexpression of Aurora-A through stable transfection of pEGFP-Aurora-A in human ESCC KYSE150 cells significantly promoted cell proliferation and inhibited cisplatin- or UV irradiation-induced apoptosis. Cleavages of caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in Aurora-A overexpressing cells were substantially reduced after cisplatin or UV treatment. Furthermore, we found that silencing of endogenous Aurora-A kinase with siRNA substantially enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin- or UV-induced apoptosis in human ESCC EC9706 cells. In parallel, overexpression of Aurora-A potently upregulated the expression of Bcl-2. Moreover, the knockdown of Bcl-2 by siRNA abrogated the Aurora-A's effect on inhibiting apoptosis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that Aurora-A overexpression promoting cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis, suggesting a novel mechanism that is closely related to malignant phenotype and anti-cancer drugs resistance of ESCC cells.

  3. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  4. Digitoxin and a synthetic monosaccharide analog inhibit cell viability in lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Elbaz, Hosam A.; Stueckle, Todd A.; Wang, Hua-Yu Leo; O'Doherty, George A.; Lowry, David T.; Sargent, Linda M.; Wang, Liying; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms of digitoxin-inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H460) cells remain unclear. Understanding how digitoxin or derivate analogs induce their cytotoxic effect below therapeutically relevant concentrations will help in designing and developing novel, safer and more effective anti-cancer drugs. In this study, NCI-H460 cells were treated with digitoxin and a synthetic analog D6-MA to determine their anti-cancer activity. Different concentrations of digitoxin and D6-MA were used and the subsequent changes in cell morphology, viability, cell cycle, and protein expressions were determined. Digitoxin and D6-MA induced dose-dependent apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells via caspase-9 cleavage, with D6-MA possessing 5-fold greater potency than digitoxin. In comparison, non-tumorigenic immortalized bronchial and small airway epithelial cells displayed significantly less apoptotic sensitivity compared to NCI-H460 cells suggesting that both digitoxin and D6-MA were selective for NSCLC. Furthermore, NCI-H460 cells arrested in G(2)/M phase following digitoxin and D6-MA treatment. Post-treatment evaluation of key G2/M checkpoint regulatory proteins identified down-regulation of cyclin B1/cdc2 complex and survivin. Additionally, Chk1/2 and p53 related proteins experienced down-regulation suggesting a p53-independent cell cycle arrest mechanism. In summary, digitoxin and D6-MA exert anti-cancer effects on NCI-H460 cells through apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, with D6-MA showing at least 5-fold greater potency relative to digitoxin. -- Highlights: ► Digitoxin and synthetic analog D6-MA induced apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner. ► Apoptotic cell death induced by analog was 5-fold more potent when compared to digitoxin. ► NCI-H460 cells arrested in G(2)/M phase following digitoxin (≥ 5 nM) and analog (≥ 1 nM) treatment. ► Digitoxin inhibited the expression of cyclin

  5. Inhibition of HIV replication by pokeweed antiviral protein targeted to CD4+ cells by monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarling, Joyce M.; Moran, Patricia A.; Haffar, Omar; Sias, Joan; Richman, Douglas D.; Spina, Celsa A.; Myers, Dorothea E.; Kuebelbeck, Virginia; Ledbetter, Jeffrey A.; Uckun, Fatih M.

    1990-09-01

    FUNCTIONAL impairment and selective depletion of CD4+ T cells, the hallmark of AIDS, are at least partly caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) type 1 binding to the CD4 molecule and infecting CD4+ cells1,2. It may, therefore, be of therapeutic value to target an antiviral agent to CD4+ cells to prevent infection and to inhibit HIV-1 production in patients' CD4+ cells which contain proviral DNA3,4. We report here that HIV-1 replication in normal primary CD4+ T cells can be inhibited by pokeweed antiviral protein, a plant protein of relative molecular mass 30,000 (ref. 5), which inhibits replication of certain plant RNA viruses6-8, and of herpes simplex virus, poliovirus and influenza virus9-11. Targeting pokeweed antiviral protein to CD4+ T cells by conjugating it to monoclonal antibodies reactive with CDS, CD7 or CD4 expressed on CD4+ cells, increased its anti-HIV potency up to 1,000-fold. HIV-1 replication is inhibited at picomolar concentrations of conjugates of pokeweed antiviral protein and monoclonal antibodies, which do not inhibit proliferation of normal CD4+ T cells or CD4-dependent responses. These conjugates inhibit HIV-1 protein synthesis and also strongly inhibit HIV-1 production in activated CD4+ T cells from infected patients.

  6. Nitric oxide inhibits calpain-mediated proteolysis of talin in skeletal muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, T. J.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide can inhibit cytoskeletal breakdown in skeletal muscle cells by inhibiting calpain cleavage of talin. The nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside prevented many of the effects of calcium ionophore on C(2)C(12) muscle cells, including preventing talin proteolysis and release into the cytosol and reducing loss of vinculin, cell detachment, and loss of cellular protein. These results indicate that nitric oxide inhibition of calpain protected the cells from ionophore-induced proteolysis. Calpain inhibitor I and a cell-permeable calpastatin peptide also protected the cells from proteolysis, confirming that ionophore-induced proteolysis was primarily calpain mediated. The activity of m-calpain in a casein zymogram was inhibited by sodium nitroprusside, and this inhibition was reversed by dithiothreitol. Previous incubation with the active site-targeted calpain inhibitor I prevented most of the sodium nitroprusside-induced inhibition of m-calpain activity. These data suggest that nitric oxide inhibited m-calpain activity via S-nitrosylation of the active site cysteine. The results of this study indicate that nitric oxide produced endogenously by skeletal muscle and other cell types has the potential to inhibit m-calpain activity and cytoskeletal proteolysis.

  7. X-ray crystallographic and mass spectrometric structure determination and functional characterization of succinylated porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus: implications for ion selectivity and single-channel conductance.

    PubMed Central

    Przybylski, M.; Glocker, M. O.; Nestel, U.; Schnaible, V.; Blüggel, M.; Diederichs, K.; Weckesser, J.; Schad, M.; Schmid, A.; Welte, W.; Benz, R.

    1996-01-01

    The role of charges near the pore mouth has been discussed in theoretical work about ion channels. To introduce new negative charges in a channel protein, amino groups of porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus 37b4 were succinylated with succinic anhydride, and the precise extent and sites of succinylations and structures of the succinylporins determined by mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. Molecular weight and peptide mapping analyses using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry identified selective succinylation of three lysine-epsilon-amino groups (Lys-46, Lys-298, Lys-300) and the N-terminal alpha-amino group. The structure of a tetra-succinylated porin (TS-porin) was determined to 2.4 A and was generally found unchanged in comparison to native porin to form a trimeric complex. All succinylated amino groups found in a mono/di-succinylated porin (MS-porin) and a TS-porin are localized at the inner channel surface and are solvent-accessible: Lys-46 is located at the channel constriction site, whereas Lys-298, Lys-300, and the N-terminus are all near the periplasmic entrance of the channel. The Lys-46 residue at the central constriction loop was modeled as succinyl-lysine from the electron density data and shown to bend toward the periplasmic pore mouth. The electrical properties of the MS-and TS-porins were determined by reconstitution into black lipid membranes, and showed a negative charge effect on ion transport and an increased cation selectivity through the porin channel. The properties of a typical general diffusion porin changed to those of a channel that contains point charges near the pore mouth. The single-channel conductance was no longer a linear function of the bulk aqueous salt concentration. The substantially higher cation selectivity of the succinylated porins compared with the native protein is consistent with the increase of negatively charged groups introduced. These results show tertiary structure

  8. Small-molecule targeting of proliferating cell nuclear antigen chromatin association inhibits tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zongqing; Wortman, Matthew; Dillehay, Kelsey L; Seibel, William L; Evelyn, Chris R; Smith, Shanna J; Malkas, Linda H; Zheng, Yi; Lu, Shan; Dong, Zhongyun

    2012-06-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a potential anticancer target, forms a homotrimer and is required for DNA replication and numerous other cellular processes. The purpose of this study was to identify novel small molecules that modulate PCNA activity to affect tumor cell proliferation. An in silico screen of a compound library against a crystal structure of PCNA and a subsequent structural similarity search of the ZINC chemical database were carried out to derive relevant docking partners. Nine compounds, termed PCNA inhibitors (PCNA-Is), were selected for further characterization. PCNA-I1 selectively bound to PCNA trimers with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of ~0.2 to 0.4 μM. PCNA-Is promoted the formation of SDS-refractory PCNA trimers. PCNA-I1 dose- and time-dependently reduced the chromatin-associated PCNA in cells. Consistent with its effects on PCNA trimer stabilization, PCNA-I1 inhibited the growth of tumor cells of various tissue types with an IC(50) of ~0.2 μM, whereas it affected the growth of nontransformed cells at significantly higher concentrations (IC(50), ~1.6 μM). Moreover, uptake of BrdU was dose-dependently reduced in cells treated with PCNA-I1. Mechanistically the PCNA-Is mimicked the effect of PCNA knockdown by siRNA, inducing cancer cell arrest at both the S and G(2)/M phases. Thus, we have identified a class of compounds that can directly bind to PCNA, stabilize PCNA trimers, reduce PCNA association with chromatin, and inhibit tumor cell growth by inducing a cell cycle arrest. They are valuable tools in studying PCNA function and may be useful for future PCNA-targeted cancer therapy.

  9. Vincristine sulfate-induced cell transformation, mitotic inhibition and aneuploidy in cultured Syrian hamster embryo cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, T.; Suzuki, N.; Maizumi, H.; Barrett, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Vincristine, a naturally occurring Vinca alkaloid and widely used anti-neoplastic agent, was examined for its ability to induce cell transformation, inhibition of growth and mitosis, and genetic effects in Syrian hamster embryo cells in culture. Treatment of the cells with doses of less than or equal to 1 ng/ml vincristine sulfate (VCR) had no effect on cell growth, while exposure to greater than or equal to 3 ng/ml reduced the growth rate and treatment with 30 ng/ml resulted in no detectable increase in cell number. At this latter dose the mitotic index of the cells increased significantly suggesting that VCR delayed completion of mitosis. Exposure of the cells to VCR at doses of 1-10 ng/ml for 48 h resulted in morphological transformation of the cells in a doserelated fashion. The vincristine-treated transformed colonies were morphologically indistinguishable from colonies transformed by benzo(a)pyrene or other chemical carcinogens. Morphological transformation was induced by VCR at non-toxic and slightly toxic doses as measured by a reduction in colony-forming ability of the treated cells. Over the dose range which resulted in cell transformation, VCR failed to induce either detectable gene mutations at two genetic loci, unscheduled DNA synthesis, or chromosome aberrations in the Syrian hamster embryo cells. However, a significant dose-dependent increase in aneuploid cells with a near-diploid chromosome number was induced by VCR. Both chromosome losses and gains were induced which is consistent with a non-disjunctional mechanism. These results further support our hypothesis that aneuploidy is one possible mechanism for induction of this early step in the neoplastic transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells. Furthermore, these findings indicate that VCR may have some carcinogenic potential if exposure to rapidly dividing cells occurs.

  10. Advanced Glycation End Products Inhibit the Proliferation of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells by Inhibiting Cathepsin D

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Chang, Ye; Ye, Ning; Dai, Dongxue; Chen, Yintao; Zhang, Naijin; Sun, Guozhe; Sun, Yingxian

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on the proliferation and migration ability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Cell proliferation was detected by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, real-time cell analyzer and 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. Cell migration was detected by wound-healing and transwell assay. AGEs significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of HUVECs in a time-and dose-dependent way. Western blotting revealed that AGEs dramatically increased the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) II/I and p62. Immunofluorescence of p62 and acridine orange staining revealed that AGEs significantly increased the expression of p62 and the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, respectively. Chloroquine (CQ) could further promote the expression of LC3 II/I and p62, increase the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and promote cell injury induced by AGEs. In addition, AGEs reduced cathepsin D (CTSD) expression in a time-dependent way. Overexpression of wild-type CTSD significantly decreased the ratio of LC 3 II/I as well as p62 accumulation induced by AGEs, but overexpression of catalytically inactive mutant CTSD had no such effects. Only overexpression of wild-type CTSD could restore the proliferation of HUVECs inhibited by AGEs. However, overexpression of both wild-type CTSD and catalytically inactive mutant CTSD could promote the migration of HUVECs inhibited by AGEs. Collectively, our study found that AGEs inhibited the proliferation and migration in HUVECs and promoted autophagic flux, which in turn played a protective role against AGEs-induced cell injury. CTSD, in need of its catalytic activity, may promote proliferation in AGEs-treated HUVECs independent of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Meanwhile, CTSD could improve the migration of AGEs-treated HUVECs regardless of its enzymatic activity. PMID:28218663

  11. Advanced Glycation End Products Inhibit the Proliferation of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells by Inhibiting Cathepsin D.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Chang, Ye; Ye, Ning; Dai, Dongxue; Chen, Yintao; Zhang, Naijin; Sun, Guozhe; Sun, Yingxian

    2017-02-17

    We aimed to investigate the effect of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on the proliferation and migration ability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Cell proliferation was detected by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, real-time cell analyzer and 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. Cell migration was detected by wound-healing and transwell assay. AGEs significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of HUVECs in a time-and dose-dependent way. Western blotting revealed that AGEs dramatically increased the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) II/I and p62. Immunofluorescence of p62 and acridine orange staining revealed that AGEs significantly increased the expression of p62 and the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, respectively. Chloroquine (CQ) could further promote the expression of LC3 II/I and p62, increase the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and promote cell injury induced by AGEs. In addition, AGEs reduced cathepsin D (CTSD) expression in a time-dependent way. Overexpression of wild-type CTSD significantly decreased the ratio of LC 3 II/I as well as p62 accumulation induced by AGEs, but overexpression of catalytically inactive mutant CTSD had no such effects. Only overexpression of wild-type CTSD could restore the proliferation of HUVECs inhibited by AGEs. However, overexpression of both wild-type CTSD and catalytically inactive mutant CTSD could promote the migration of HUVECs inhibited by AGEs. Collectively, our study found that AGEs inhibited the proliferation and migration in HUVECs and promoted autophagic flux, which in turn played a protective role against AGEs-induced cell injury. CTSD, in need of its catalytic activity, may promote proliferation in AGEs-treated HUVECs independent of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Meanwhile, CTSD could improve the migration of AGEs-treated HUVECs regardless of its enzymatic activity.

  12. Membrane Vesicles Released by Intestinal Epithelial Cells Infected with Rotavirus Inhibit T-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Alfonso; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Rojas, Olga Lucía; Wolf, Marie; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Rotavirus (RV) predominantly replicates in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), and “danger signals” released by these cells may modulate viral immunity. We have recently shown that human model IEC (Caco-2 cells) infected with rhesus-RV release a non-inflammatory group of immunomodulators that includes heat shock proteins (HSPs) and TGF-β1. Here we show that both proteins are released in part in association with membrane vesicles (MV) obtained from filtrated Caco-2 supernatants concentrated by ultracentrifugation. These MV express markers of exosomes (CD63 and others), but not of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or nuclei. Larger quantities of proteins associated with MV were released by RV-infected cells than by non-infected cells. VP6 co-immunoprecipitated with CD63 present in these MV, and VP6 co-localized with CD63 in RV-infected cells, suggesting that this viral protein is associated with the MV, and that this association occurs intracellularly. CD63 present in MV preparations from stool samples from 36 children with gastroenteritis due or not due to RV were analyzed. VP6 co-immunoprecipitated with CD63 in 3/8 stool samples from RV-infected children, suggesting that these MV are released by RV-infected cells in vivo. Moreover, fractions that contained MV from RV-infected cells induced death and inhibited proliferation of CD4+ T cells to a greater extent than fractions from non-infected cells. These effects were in part due to TGF-β, because they were reversed by treatment of the T cells with the TGF-β-receptor inhibitor ALK5i. MV from RV-infected and non-infected cells were heterogeneous, with morphologies and typical flotation densities described for exosomes (between 1.10 and 1.18 g/mL), and denser vesicles (>1.24 g/mL). Both types of MV from RV-infected cells were more efficient at inhibiting T-cell function than were those from non-infected cells. We propose that RV infection of IEC releases MV that modulate viral immunity. PMID:21142445

  13. MicroRNA-126 inhibits invasion in non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, M.; Brawner, E.; Batte, K.; Yu, L.; Hunter, M.G.; Otterson, G.A.; Nuovo, G.; Marsh, C.B.; Nana-Sinkam, S.P.

    2008-09-05

    Crk is a member of a family of adaptor proteins that are involved in intracellular signal pathways altering cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. Increased expression of Crk has been described in lung cancer and associated with increased tumor invasiveness. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNAs (approximately 21-25 nt long) that are capable of targeting genes for either degradation of mRNA or inhibition of translation. Crk is a predicted putative target gene for miR-126. Over-expression of miR126 in a lung cancer cell line resulted in a decrease in Crk protein without any alteration in the associated mRNA. These lung cancer cells exhibit a decrease in adhesion, migration, and invasion. Decreased cancer cell invasion was also evident following targeted knockdown of Crk. MiR-126 alters lung cancer cell phenotype by inhibiting adhesion, migration, and invasion and the effects on invasion may be partially mediated through Crk regulation.

  14. Inhibiting stromal cell heparan sulfate synthesis improves stem cell mobilization and enables engraftment without cytotoxic conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Borja; Ferraro, Francesca; Yusuf, Rushdia Z.; Cook, Colleen M.; Yu, Vionnie W. C.; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Sykes, Stephen M.; Palchaudhuri, Rahul; Schajnovitz, Amir; Lotinun, Sutada; Lymperi, Stefania; Mendez-Ferrer, Simon; del Toro, Raquel; Day, Robyn; Vasic, Radovan; Acharya, Sanket S.; Baron, Roland; Lin, Charles P.; Yamaguchi, Yu; Wagers, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    The glycosyltransferase gene, Ext1, is essential for heparan sulfate production. Induced deletion of Ext1 selectively in Mx1-expressing bone marrow (BM) stromal cells, a known population of skeletal stem/progenitor cells, in adult mice resulted in marked changes in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) localization. HSPC egressed from BM to spleen after Ext1 deletion. This was associated with altered signaling in the stromal cells and with reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 production by them. Further, pharmacologic inhibition of heparan sulfate mobilized qualitatively more potent and quantitatively more HSPC from the BM than granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone, including in a setting of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor resistance. The reduced presence of endogenous HSPC after Ext1 deletion was associated with engraftment of transfused HSPC without any toxic conditioning of the host. Therefore, inhibiting heparan sulfate production may provide a means for avoiding the toxicities of radiation or chemotherapy in HSPC transplantation for nonmalignant conditions. PMID:25202142

  15. Inhibition of DNA synthesis in CCL 39 cells by impermeable iron chelators.

    PubMed

    Alcaín, F J; Löw, H; Crane, F L

    1997-02-01

    The synthesis of DNA in CCl 39 cells is inhibited by the presence of the Fe2+ chelator bathophenanthroline disulfonate (BPS) when growth is stimulated by thrombin EGF plus insulin, but not by fetal calf serum. The presence of transferrin and Fe3+ in fetal calf serum can be the basis for lack of BPS effect with serum. The impermeable Fe3+ chelator Tiron does not, by itself, inhibit growth factor induced DNA synthesis, but it induces together with BPS inhibition on fetal calf serum induced DNA synthesis. The combined effect of BPS and Tiron is similar to inhibition of DNA synthesis by impermeable polyvalent DTPA which can chelate both Fe2+ and Fe3+ but does not inhibit ribonucleotide reductase in intact cells. Ferrous iron that bind BPS can relieve the inhibition at stoichiometric concentration. Ferric iron also prevents the inhibition even though it does not bind BPS. BPS does not inhibit DNA synthesis in HeLa cells. BPS reacts with iron from CCl 39 cells but not from HeLa cells. Data show that iron available for impermeable external chelators is in the ferrous state, and that exogenous iron should be reduced before it reverses the inhibition.

  16. CH5137291, an androgen receptor nuclear translocation-inhibiting compound, inhibits the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Nobuyuki; Kawata, Hiromitsu; Nishimoto, Ayako; Nakamura, Ryo; Tsunenari, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Miho; Tachibana, Kazutaka; Shiraishi, Takuya; Yoshino, Hitoshi; Honma, Akie; Emura, Takashi; Ohta, Masateru; Nakagawa, Toshito; Houjo, Takao; Corey, Eva; Vessella, Robert L; Aoki, Yuko; Sato, Haruhiko

    2015-04-01

    Resistance of prostate cancer to castration is currently an unavoidable problem. The major mechanisms underlying such resistance are androgen receptor (AR) overexpression, androgen-independent activation of AR, and AR mutation. To address this problem, we developed an AR pure antagonist, CH5137291, with AR nuclear translocation-inhibiting activity, and compared its activity and characteristics with that of bicalutamide. Cell lines corresponding to the mechanisms of castration resistance were used: LNCaP-BC2 having AR overexpression and LNCaP-CS10 having androgen-independent AR activation. VCaP and LNCaP were used as hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cells. In vitro functional assay clearly showed that CH5137291 inhibited the nuclear translocation of wild-type ARs as well as W741C- and T877A-mutant ARs. In addition, it acted as a pure antagonist on the transcriptional activity of these types of ARs. In contrast, bicalutamide did not inhibit the nuclear translocation of these ARs, and showed a partial/full agonistic effect on the transcriptional activity. CH5137291 inhibited cell growth more strongly than bicalutamide in VCaP and LNCaP cells as well as in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 cells in vitro. In xenograft models, CH5137291 strongly inhibited the tumor growth of LNCaP, LNCaP-BC2, and LNCaP-CS10, whereas bicalutamide showed a weaker effect in LNCaP and almost no effect in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 xenografts. Levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in plasma correlated well with the antitumor effect of both agents. CH5137291 inhibited the growth of LNCaP tumors that had become resistant to bicalutamide treatment. A docking model suggested that CH5137291 intensively collided with the M895 residue of helix 12, and therefore strongly inhibited the folding of helix 12, a cause of AR agonist activity, in wild-type and W741C-mutant ARs. In cynomolgus monkeys, the serum concentration of CH5137291 increased dose-dependently and PSA level decreased 80% at 100 mg/kg. CH

  17. Thymoquinone suppresses metastasis of melanoma cells by inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Israr; Muneer, Kashiff M.; Tamimi, Iman A.; Chang, Michelle E.; Ata, Muhammad O.; Yusuf, Nabiha

    2013-07-01

    The inflammasome is a multi-protein complex which when activated regulates caspase-1 activation and IL-1β and IL-18 secretion. The NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR, and pyrin domain-containing protein 3) inflammasome is constitutively assembled and activated in human melanoma cells. We have examined the inhibitory effect of thymoquinone (2-isopropyl-5-methylbenzo-1,4-quinone), a major ingredient of black seed obtained from the plant Nigella sativa on metastatic human (A375) and mouse (B16F10) melanoma cell lines. We have assessed whether thymoquinone inhibits metastasis of melanoma cells by targeting NLRP3 subunit of inflammasomes. Using an in vitro cell migration assay, we found that thymoquinone inhibited the migration of both human and mouse melanoma cells. The inhibitory effect of thymoquinone on metastasis was also observed in vivo in B16F10 mouse melanoma model. The inhibition of migration of melanoma cells by thymoquinone was accompanied by a decrease in expression of NLRP3 inflammasome resulting in decrease in proteolytic cleavage of caspase-1. Inactivation of caspase-1 by thymoquinone resulted in inhibition of IL-1β and IL-18. Treatment of mouse melanoma cells with thymoquinone also inhibited NF-κB activity. Furthermore, inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by thymoquinone resulted in partial inactivation of NLRP3 inflammasome. Thus, thymoquinone exerts its inhibitory effect on migration of human and mouse melanoma cells by inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome. Thus, our results indicate that thymoquinone can be a potential immunotherapeutic agent not only as an adjuvant therapy for melanoma, but also, in the control and prevention of metastatic melanoma. - Highlights: • Thymoquinone causes inhibition of migration of melanoma cells. • Thymoquinone causes inhibition of metastasis in vivo. • Thymoquinone causes inhibition of migration by activation of NLRP3 inflammasome.

  18. Raman spectrum reveals Mesenchymal stem cells inhibiting HL60 cells growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xin; Fang, Shaoyin; Zhang, Daosen; Zhang, Qinnan; Lu, Xiaoxu; Tian, Jindong; Fan, Jinping; LiyunZhong

    2017-04-01

    Though some research results reveals that Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability of inhibiting tumor cells proliferation, it remains controversial about the precise interaction mechanism during MSCs and tumor cells co-culture. In this study, combing Raman spectroscopic data and principle component analysis (PCA), the biochemical changes of MSCs or Human promyelocytic leukemia (HL60) cells during their co-culture were presented. The obtained results showed that some main Raman peaks of HL60 assigned to nucleic acids or proteins were greatly higher in intensity in the late stage of co-culture than those in the early stage of co-culture while they were still lower relative to the control group, implicating that the effect of MSCs inhibiting HL60 proliferation appeared in the early stage but gradually lost the inhibiting ability in the late stage of co-culture. Moreover, some other peaks of HL60 assigned to proteins were decreased in intensity in the early stage of co-culture relative to the control group but rebounded to the level similar to the control group in the late stage, showing that the content and structure changes of these proteins might be generated in the early stage but returned to the original state in the late stage of co-culture. As a result, in the early stage of MSCs-HL60 co-culture, along with the level of Akt phosphorylation of HL60 was lowered relative to its control group, the proliferation rate of HL60 cells was decreased. And in the late stage of co-culture, along with the level of Akt phosphorylation was rebounded, the reverse transfer of Raman peaks within 875-880 cm- 1 appeared, thus MSCs lost the ability to inhibit HL60 growth and HL60 proliferation was increased. In addition, it was observed that the peak at 811 cm- 1, which is a marker of RNA, was higher in intensity in the late stage than that in the control group, indicating that MSCs might be differentiated into myofibroblast-like MSCs. In addition, PCA results also exhibited

  19. PML(NLS(-)) inhibits cell apoptosis and promotes proliferation in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan-Mei; Zhong, Liang; Zhang, Xi; Hu, Xiu-Xiu; Liu, Bei-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) is a cell-growth suppressor, and PML-retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RARα) is known as a fusion gene of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Studies have reported that neutrophil elastase(NE) cleaved bcr-1-derived PML-RARα in early myeloid cells leading to the removal of nuclear localization signal (NLS) from PML. The resultant PML without NLS named PML(NLS(-)). PML(NLS(-)) mainly locates and functions in the cytoplasm. PML(NLS(-)) may act in different ways from PML, but its biological characteristics have not been reported. In this study, the PML (NLS(-)) was silenced with shRNA [HL-60/pPML(NLS(-))-shRNA] and over-expressed by preparation of recombinant adenovirus [HL-60/pAd-PML(NLS(-))]. The mRNA and protein expression of PML(NLS(-)) were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. Cell proliferation in vitro was assessed by MTT assay. Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to detect apoptotic cells. The transcription of BCL-2, BAX and C-MYC was detected in HL-60/pAd-PML(NLS(-)) cells. Our results showed that compared to the control group, the expression of PML(NLS(-)) was significantly reduced in the HL-60/pPML(NLS(-))-shRNA cells, and increased significantly in the HL-60/pAd-PML(NLS(-)) cells. The proliferation was significantly inhibited in the HL-60/pPML(NLS(-))-shRNA cells in a time-dependent manner, but markedly promoted in the HL-60/pAd-PML(NLS(-)) cells treated with 60 μmol/L emodin. FCM revealed the apoptosis increased in HL-60/pPML(NLS(-))-shRNA cells, and decreased in the HL-60/pAd-PML(NLS(-)) cells. The expression of BAX decreased significantly, while that of BCL-2 and C-MYC increased significantly in HL-60/ pAd-PML(NLS(-)) cells. Down-regulation of PML(NLS(-)) expression inhibits the proliferation and induces the apoptosis of HL-60 cells. On the contrary, over-expression of PML(NLS(-)) promotes the proliferation and reduce the emodin-induced apoptosis of HL-60 cells.

  20. Topology prediction of Brucella abortus Omp2b and Omp2a porins after critical assessment of transmembrane beta strands prediction by several secondary structure prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Paquet, J Y; Vinals, C; Wouters, J; Letesson, J J; Depiereux, E

    2000-02-01

    In order to propose a reliable model for Brucella porin topology, several structure prediction methods were evaluated in their ability to predict porin topology. Four porins of known structure were selected as test-cases and their secondary structure delineated. The specificity and sensitivity of 11 methods were separately evaluated. Our critical assessment shows that some secondary structure prediction methods (PHD, Dsc, Sopma) originally designed to predict globular protein structure are useful on porin topology prediction. The overall best prediction is obtained by combining these three "generalist" methods with a transmembrane beta strand prediction technique. This "consensus" method was applied to Brucella porins Omp2b and Omp2a, sharing no sequence homology with any other porin. The predicted topology is a 16-stranded antiparallel beta barrel with Omp2a showing a higher number of negatively charged residue in the exposed loops than Omp2b. Experiments are in progress to validate the proposed topology and the functional hypotheses. The ability of the proposed consensus method to predict topology of complex outer membrane protein is briefly discussed.

  1. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in CD133+ population in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-Qiang; Tan, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Bao-Wei; Wu, Tao; Liu, Ping; Sun, Shao-Jun; Cao, Yin-Guang

    2016-03-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the role of 3-bromopyruvate in inhibition of CD133+ U87 human glioma cell population growth. The results demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate inhibited the viability of both CD133+ and parental cells derived from U87 human glioma cell line. However, the 3-bromopyruvate-induced inhibition in viability was more prominent in CD133+ cells at 10 μM concentration after 48 h. Treatment of CD133+ cells with 3-bromopyruvate caused reduction in cell population and cell size, membrane bubbling, and degradation of cell membranes. Hoechst 33258 staining showed condensation of chromatin material and fragmentation of DNA in treated CD133+ cells after 48 h. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibited the migration rate of CD133+ cells significantly compared to the parental cells. Flow cytometry revealed that exposure of CD133+ cells to 3-bromopyruvate increased the cell population in S phase from 24.5 to 37.9 % with increase in time from 12 to 48 h. In addition, 3-bromopyruvate significantly enhanced the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3 in CD133+ cells compared to the parental cells. Therefore, 3-bromopyruvate is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of glioma by targeting stem cells selectively.

  2. ME-10TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT INFILTRATING MYELOID DERIVED SUPPRESSOR CELLS INHIBIT ANTI-TUMOR T CELL RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Neha; Ayala, Mariela; Li, Youping; Assi, Hikmat; Candolfi, Marianela; Dzaman, Marta; Lowenstein, Pedro; Castro, Maria

    2014-01-01

    MDSCs represent a population of immature myeloid cells at various stages of differentiation that inhibit anti-tumor T cell-mediated responses. We demonstrate the accumulation of MDSCs in GL26 induced glioma and B16 melanoma bearing mice. Absolute numbers of Ly-6G+ (Gr-1high) MDSCs showed a 200 fold increase within the tumor microenvironment (TME) 28 days post-tumor implantation. The numbers of Ly-6C+ (Gr-1low) MDSCs also showed a similar trend within the TME. While this massive influx of MDSCs was noted within intracranial tumors, MDSC levels did not increase in the dLNs, spleen or bone marrow (BM) of intracranial tumor bearing mice. MDSCs numbers were significantly elevated in the blood of GL26 intracranial tumor bearing mice at 28 days. Mice bearing B16 tumors in the flank showed a ∼5 fold increased influx of Ly-6G+ MDSCs while the Ly6C+ MDSCs increased marginally by 1.1 fold within the tumor mass. Levels of circulating MDSCs also increased by ∼10 fold, while the levels of splenic MDSCs did not change. While both Ly-6G+ and Ly6C+ MDSCs isolated from the brain TME of GL26 intracranial tumor bearing mice inhibited antigen-specific T cell proliferation, Ly6C+ MDSC were found to be more efficient. Ly6G+ or Ly6C+ MDSCs from the bone marrow of intracranial tumor bearing mice failed to suppress antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Splenic and bone marrow MDSCs from naïve mice also did not inhibit antigen-specific T cell proliferation suggesting that TME derived factors may activate MDSCs to exert their immune-suppressive properties. Microarray analysis of glioma cell lines showed elevated levels of CXCL1 mRNA and splenic MDSCs from GL26 tumor mice showed upregulation of the CXCR2 mRNA. Preliminary experiments indicate that CXCR2 signaling mediates MDSC chemotaxis. Overall, our data suggests that strategies that inhibit MDSC recruitment to the TME and/or block their activity could enhance the T cell mediated tumor clearance.

  3. Chloroquine alleviates etoposide-induced centrosome amplification by inhibiting CDK2 in adrenocortical tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T-Y; Syu, J-S; Lin, T-C; Cheng, H-l; Lu, F-l; Wang, C-Y

    2015-01-01

    The antitumor drug etoposide (ETO) is widely used in treating several cancers, including adrenocortical tumor (ACT). However, when used at sublethal doses, tumor cells still survive and are more susceptible to the recurring tumor due to centrosome amplification. Here, we checked the effect of sublethal dose of ETO in ACT cells. Sublethal dose of ETO treatment did not induce cell death but arrested the ACT cells in G2/M phase. This resulted in centrosome amplification and aberrant mitotic spindle formation leading to genomic instability and cellular senescence. Under such conditions, Chk2, cyclin A/CDK2 and ERK1/2 were aberrantly activated. Pharmacological inactivation of Chk2, CDK2 or ERK1/2 or depletion of CDK2 or Chk2 inhibited the centrosome amplification in ETO-treated ACT cells. In addition, autophagy was activated by ETO and was required for ACT cell survival. Chloroquine, the autophagy inhibitor, reduced ACT cell growth and inhibited ETO-induced centrosome amplification. Chloroquine alleviated CDK2 and ERK, but not Chk2, activation and thus inhibited centrosome amplification in either ETO- or hydroxyurea-treated ACT cells. In addition, chloroquine also inhibited centrosome amplification in osteosarcoma U2OS cell lines when treated with ETO or hydroxyurea. In summary, we have demonstrated that chloroquine inhibited ACT cell growth and alleviated DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification by inhibiting CDK2 and ERK activity, thus preventing genomic instability and recurrence of ACT. PMID:26690546

  4. Phycocyanin Inhibits Tumorigenic Potential of Pancreatic Cancer Cells: Role of Apoptosis and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Gaoyong; Gao, Bing; Gao, Yingnv; Yang, Xuegan; Cheng, Xiaodong; Ou, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most lethal human malignancies, and unresponsive to current chemotherapies. Here we investigate the therapeutic potential of phycocyanin as an anti-PDA agent in vivo and in vitro. Phycocyanin, a natural product purified from Spirulina, effectively inhibits the pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo. Phycocyanin induces G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptotic and autophagic cell death in PANC-1 cells. Inhibition of autophagy by targeting Beclin 1 using siRNA significantly suppresses cell growth inhibition and death induced by phycocyanin, whereas inhibition of both autophagy and apoptosis rescues phycocyanin-mediated cell death. Mechanistically, cell death induced by phycocyanin is the result of cross-talk among the MAPK, Akt/mTOR/p70S6K and NF-κB pathways. Phycocyanin is able to induce apoptosis of PANC-1 cell by activating p38 and JNK signaling pathways while inhibiting Erk pathway. On the other hand, phycocyanin promotes autophagic cell death by inhibiting PI3/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, phycocyanin promotes the activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which plays an important role in balancing phycocyanin-mediated apoptosis and autosis. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate that phycocyanin exerts anti-pancreatic cancer activity by inducing apoptotic and autophagic cell death, thereby identifying phycocyanin as a promising anti-pancreatic cancer agent. PMID:27694919

  5. Cordycepin Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Proliferation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Line H1975 via Inhibiting the Phosphorylation of EGFR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Wu, Xue; Liang, Yan-Ni; Wang, Li; Song, Zhong-Xing; Liu, Jian-Li; Tang, Zhi-Shu

    2016-09-27

    Cordycepin is an active component of the traditional Chinese medicine Cordyceps sinensis and Cordyceps militaris with notable anticancer activity. Though the prominent inhibitory activity was reported in different kinds of cancer cell lines, the concrete mechanisms remain elusive. It was reported that cordycepin could be converted into tri-phosphates in vivo to confuse a number of enzymes and interfere the normal cell function. For the inhibitory mechanism of EGFR inhibitors and the structure similarity of ATP and tri-phosphated cordycepin, human lung cancer cell line H1975 was employed to investigate the inhibitory effect of cordycepin. The results showed that cordycepin could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed that H1975 cells could be arrested at the G₀/G₁ phase after cordycepin treatment. The expression levels of apoptosis-related protein Caspase-3 and Bcl-2 and phosphorylated expression levels of EGFR, AKT and ERK1/2 were all decreased compared with the control group stimulated with EGF. However, the protein expression levels of proapoptotic protein Bax and cleaved caspase-3 were increased. These results implied that cordycepin could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis via the EGFR signaling pathway. Our results indicated that there was potential to seek a novel EGFR inhibitor from cordycepin and its chemical derivatives.

  6. Targeting PDK1 with dichloroacetophenone to inhibit acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell growth.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lijun; Tian, Yun; Yu, Zhenlong; Shi, Dingbo; Wang, Jingshu; Zhang, Changlin; Peng, Ruoyu; Chen, Xuezhen; Liu, Congcong; Chen, Yiming; Huang, Wenlin; Deng, Wuguo

    2016-01-12

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 (PDK1), a key metabolic enzyme involved in aerobic glycolysis, is highly expressed in many solid tumors. Small molecule compound DAP (2,2-dichloroacetophenone) is a potent inhibitor of PDK1. Whether targeting PDK1 with DAP can inhibit acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and how it works remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the effect of inhibition of PDK1 with DAP on cell growth, apoptosis and survival in AML cells and identified the underlying mechanisms. We found that treatment with DAP significantly inhibited cell proliferation, increased apoptosis induction and suppressed autophagy in AML cells in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in an AML mouse model in vivo. We also showed that inhibition of PDK1 with DAP increased the cleavage of pro-apoptotic proteins (PARP and Caspase 3) and decreased the expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins (BCL-xL and BCL-2) and autophagy regulators (ULK1, Beclin-1 and Atg). In addition, we found that DAP inhibited the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PDK1 interacted with ULK1, BCL-xL and E3 ligase CBL-b in AML cells, and DPA treatment could inhibit the interactions. Collectively, our results indicated that targeting PDK1 with DAP inhibited AML cell growth via multiple signaling pathways and suggest that targeting PDK1 may be a promising therapeutic strategy for AMLs.

  7. Inhibition of the activation of Hageman factor (factor XII) by peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ratnoff, O D; Emanuelson, M M; Ziats, N P

    1987-01-01

    Suspensions of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes, T or B lymphocytes, platelets or granulocytes, and cell-depleted supernatant fluids of these suspensions inhibited activation of Hageman factor (HF, Factor XII) by ellagic acid, a property not shared by erythrocytes. PBMC also inhibited HF activation by glass or sulfatides. Contaminating platelets may have contributed to inhibition by PBMC. Elaboration of agents inhibiting HF activation required metabolically active cells. The inhibitor(s) in PBMC supernates were not identified with known agents, but had properties of a nonenzymatic protein. PBMC supernates did not contain fibrinogen, nor alter the thrombin, prothrombin, or partial thromboplastin times of normal plasma, amidolysis by activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent (Factor XIa) or activated Stuart factor (Factor Xa) or esterolysis by C1 (C1 esterase); they inhibited plasmin minimally. These experiments suggest that peripheral blood cells may impede intravascular coagulation. Whether this property helps maintain the fluidity of blood is unclear. PMID:3498741

  8. Coniferyl Aldehyde Attenuates Radiation Enteropathy by Inhibiting Cell Death and Promoting Endothelial Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function. PMID:26029925

  9. Myeloid Cell Arg1 Inhibits Control of Arthritogenic Alphavirus Infection by Suppressing Antiviral T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Kristina S.; Tan, Jeslin J. L.; McCarthy, Mary K.; Her, Zhisheng; Berger, Jennifer N.; Ng, Lisa F. P.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV), are responsible for explosive epidemics involving millions of cases. These mosquito-transmitted viruses cause inflammation and injury in skeletal muscle and joint tissues that results in debilitating pain. We previously showed that arginase 1 (Arg1) was highly expressed in myeloid cells in the infected and inflamed musculoskeletal tissues of RRV- and CHIKV-infected mice, and specific deletion of Arg1 from myeloid cells resulted in enhanced viral control. Here, we show that Arg1, along with other genes associated with suppressive myeloid cells, is induced in PBMCs isolated from CHIKV-infected patients during the acute phase as well as the chronic phase, and that high Arg1 expression levels were associated with high viral loads and disease severity. Depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells from RRV-infected Arg1-deficient mice restored viral loads to levels detected in T cell-depleted wild-type mice. Moreover, Arg1-expressing myeloid cells inhibited virus-specific T cells in the inflamed and infected musculoskeletal tissues, but not lymphoid tissues, following RRV infection in mice, including suppression of interferon-γ and CD69 expression. Collectively, these data enhance our understanding of the immune response following arthritogenic alphavirus infection and suggest that immunosuppressive myeloid cells may contribute to the duration or severity of these debilitating infections. PMID:26436766

  10. Coniferyl aldehyde attenuates radiation enteropathy by inhibiting cell death and promoting endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ye-Ji; Jung, Myung Gu; Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function.

  11. Armet, a UPR-upregulated protein, inhibits cell proliferation and ER stress-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolou, Andria; Shen Yuxian; Liang Yan; Luo Jun; Fang Shengyun

    2008-08-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress that initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR activates both adaptive and apoptotic pathways, which contribute differently to disease pathogenesis. To further understand the functional mechanisms of UPR, we identified 12 commonly UPR-upregulated genes by expression microarray analysis. Here, we describe characterization of Armet/MANF, one of the 12 genes whose function was not clear. We demonstrated that the Armet/MANF protein was upregulated by various forms of ER stress in several cell lines as well as by cerebral ischemia of rat. Armet/MANF was localized in the ER and Golgi and was also a secreted protein. Silencing Armet/MANF by siRNA oligos in HeLa cells rendered cells more susceptible to ER stress-induced death, but surprisingly increased cell proliferation and reduced cell size. Overexpression of Armet/MANF inhibited cell proliferation and improved cell viability under glucose-free conditions and tunicamycin treatment. Based on its inhibitory properties for both proliferation and cell death we have demonstrated, Armet is, thus, a novel secreted mediator of the adaptive pathway of UPR.

  12. Inhibition of Th17 Cell Differentiation as a Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    0736 TITLE: Inhibition of Th17 Cell Differentiation as a Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Annalisa D’Andrea, PhD...29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Inhibition of Th17 Cell Differentiation as a Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...were not able to screen compounds. Additionally, experiments aimed to reproduce data showing an association of miR-326 with Th17 cells failed to

  13. Inhibition of Nb2 T-lymphoma cell growth by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Rayhel, E J; Prentice, D A; Tabor, P S; Flurkey, W H; Geib, R W; Laherty, R F; Schnitzer, S B; Chen, R; Hughes, J P

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) inhibits proliferation of Nb2 cells, a rat T lymphoma, in response to lactogens and interleukin-2. Prostaglandins may play an important role in the pathway through which TGF-beta exerts its inhibitory actions, because prostaglandin E2 also inhibits proliferation of Nb2 cells, and indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, reverses the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta on Nb2 cell proliferation. PMID:3262338

  14. Crude Garlic Extract Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis of Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Bagul, Mukta; Kakumanu, Srikanth; Wilson, Thomas A

    2015-07-01

    Garlic and its lipid-based extracts have played an important medicinal role in humans for centuries that includes antimicrobial, hypoglycemic, and lipid-lowering properties. The present study was to investigate the effects of crude garlic extract (CGE) on the proliferation of human breast, prostate, hepatic, and colon cancer cell lines and mouse macrophageal cells, not previously studied. The human cancer cell lines, such as hepatic (Hep-G2), colon (Caco-2), prostate (PC-3), and breast (MCF-7), were propagated at 37°C; air/CO2 (95:5 v/v) using the ATCC-formulated RPMI-1640 Medium and 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), while the mouse macrophage cell line (TIB-71) was propagated at 37°C; air/CO2 (95:5 v/v) using the ATCC-formulated DMEM and 10% FBS. All cells were plated at a density of ∼5000 cells/well. After overnight incubation, the cells were treated with 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, or 1 μg/mL of CGE an additional 72 h. Inhibition of cell proliferation of 80-90% was observed for Hep-G2, MCF-7, TIB-71, and PC-3 cells, but only 40-55% for the Caco-2 cells when treated with 0.25, 0.5, or 1 μg/mL. In a coculture study of Caco-2 and TIB-71 cells, inhibition of cell proliferation of 90% was observed for Caco-2 cells compared to the 40-55% when cultured separately. CGE also induced cell cycle arrest and had a fourfold increase in caspase activity (apoptosis) in PC-3 cells when treated at a dose of 0.5 or 1 μg/mL. This investigation of CGE clearly highlights the fact that the lipid bioactive compounds in CGE have the potential as promising anticancer agents.

  15. Inhibition of notch signaling in glioblastoma targets cancer stem cells via an endothelial cell intermediate.

    PubMed

    Hovinga, Koos E; Shimizu, Fumiko; Wang, Rong; Panagiotakos, Georgia; Van Der Heijden, Maartje; Moayedpardazi, Hamideh; Correia, Ana Sofia; Soulet, Denis; Major, Tamara; Menon, Jayanthi; Tabar, Viviane

    2010-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly heterogeneous malignant tumor. Recent data suggests the presence of a hierarchical organization within the GBM cell population that involves cancer cells with stem-like behavior, capable of repopulating the tumor and contributing to its resistance to therapy. Tumor stem cells are thought to reside within a vascular niche that provides structural and functional support. However, most GBM studies involve isolated tumor cells grown under various culture conditions. Here, we use a novel three-dimensional organotypic "explant" system of surgical GBM specimens that preserves cytoarchitecture and tumor stroma along with tumor cells. Notch inhibition in explants results in decreased proliferation and self-renewal of tumor cells but is also associated with a decrease in endothelial cells. When endothelial cells are selectively eliminated from the explants via a toxin conjugate, we also observed a decrease in self-renewal of tumor stem cells. These findings support a critical role for tumor endothelial cells in GBM stem cell maintenance, mediated at least in part by Notch signaling. The explant system further highlighted differences in the response to radiation between explants and isolated tumor neurospheres. Combination treatment with Notch blockade and radiation resulted in a substantial decrease in proliferation and in self-renewal in tumor explants while radiation alone was less effective. This data suggests that the Notch pathway plays a critical role in linking angiogenesis and cancer stem cell self-renewal and is thus a potential therapeutic target. Three-dimensional explant systems provide a novel approach for the study of tumor and microenvironment interactions.

  16. Selected Phytochemicals and Culinary Plant Extracts Inhibit Fructose Uptake in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yurim; Lim, Yeni; Kwon, Oran

    2015-09-18

    This study compared the ability of nine culinary plant extracts containing a wide array of phytochemicals to inhibit fructose uptake and then explored the involvement of intestinal fructose transporters and phytochemicals for selected samples. The chemical signature was characterized by high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Inhibition of [(14)C]-fructose uptake was tested by using human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Then, the relative contribution of the two apical-facing intestinal fructose transporters, GLUT2 and GLUT5, and the signature components for fructose uptake inhibition was confirmed in naive, phloretin-treated and forskolin-treated Caco-2 cells. HPLC/MS analysis of the chemical signature revealed that guava leaf contained quercetin and catechin, and turmeric contained curcumin, bisdemethoxycurcumin and dimethoxycurcumin. Similar inhibition of fructose uptake (by ~50%) was observed with guava leaf and turmeric in Caco-2 cells, but with a higher contribution of GLUT2 for turmeric and that of GLUT5 for guava leaf. The data suggested that, in turmeric, demethoxycurcumin specifically contributed to GLUT2-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, and curcumin did the same to GLUT5-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, but GLUT2 inhibition was more potent. By contrast, in guava leaf, catechin specifically contributed to GLUT5-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, and quercetin affected both GLUT5- and GLUT2-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, resulting in the higher contribution of GLUT5. These results suggest that demethoxycurcumin is an important contributor to GLUT2-mediated fructose uptake inhibition for turmeric extract, and catechin is the same to GLUT5-mediated fructose uptake inhibition for guava leaf extract. Quercetin, curcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin contributed to both GLUT5- and GLUT2-mediated fructose uptake inhibition, but the contribution to GLUT5 inhibition was higher than the contribution to GLUT2 inhibition.

  17. Coronatine Inhibits Stomatal Closure through Guard Cell-Specific Inhibition of NADPH Oxidase-Dependent ROS Production

    PubMed Central

    Toum, Laila; Torres, Pablo S.; Gallego, Susana M.; Benavídes, María P.; Vojnov, Adrián A.; Gudesblat, Gustavo E.

    2016-01-01

    Microbes trigger stomatal closure through microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) synthesizes the polyketide toxin coronatine, which inhibits stomatal closure by MAMPs and by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA). The mechanism by which coronatine, a jasmonic acid-isoleucine analog, achieves this effect is not completely clear. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential second messengers in stomatal immunity, therefore we investigated the possible effect of coronatine on their production. We found that coronatine inhibits NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production induced by ABA, and by the flagellin-derived peptide flg22. This toxin also inhibited NADPH oxidase-dependent stomatal closure induced by darkness, however, it failed to prevent stomatal closure by exogenously applied H2O2 or by salicylic acid, which induces ROS production through peroxidases. Contrary to what was observed on stomata, coronatine did not affect the oxidative burst induced by flg22 in leaf disks. Additionally, we observed that in NADPH oxidase mutants atrbohd and atrbohd/f, as well as in guard cell ABA responsive but flg22 insensitive mutants mpk3, mpk6, npr1-3, and lecrk-VI.2-1, the inhibition of ABA stomatal responses by both coronatine and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium was markedly reduced. Interestingly, coronatine still impaired ABA-induced ROS synthesis in mpk3, mpk6, npr1-3, and lecrk-VI.2-1, suggesting a possible feedback regulation of ROS on other guard cell ABA signaling elements in these mutants. Altogether our results show that inhibition of NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS synthesis in guard cells plays an important role during endophytic colonization by Pst through stomata. PMID:28018388

  18. Sodium arsenite-induced inhibition of cell proliferation is related to inhibition of IL-2 mRNA expression in mouse activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Conde, Patricia; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C; Goytia-Acevedo, Raquel C; Calderon-Aranda, Emma S

    2007-04-01

    A proposed mechanism for the As-induced inhibition of cell proliferation is the inhibition of IL-2 secretion. However, the effects of arsenite on IL-2 mRNA expression or on the ERK pathway in activated-T cells have not yet been described. We examined the effect of arsenite on IL-2 mRNA expression, cell activation and proliferation in PHA-stimulated murine lymphocytes. Arsenite (1 and 10 microM) decreased IL-2 mRNA expression, IL-2 secretion and cell proliferation. Arsenite (10 microM) strongly inhibited ERK-phosphorylation. However, the partial inhibition (50%) of IL-2 mRNA produced by 1 microM, consistent with the effects on IL-2 secretion and cell proliferation, could not be explained by the inhibition of ERK-phosphorylation, which was not affected at this concentration. The inhibition of IL-2 mRNA expression caused by 1 microM could be associated to effects on pathways located downstream or parallel to ERK. Arsenite also decreased early activation (surface CD69+ expression) in both CD4+ and CD8+, and decreased total CD8+ count without significantly affecting CD4+, supporting that the cellular immune response mediated by cytotoxic T cells is an arsenic target. Thus, our results suggest that arsenite decreases IL-2 mRNA levels and T-cell activation and proliferation. However, further studies on the effects of arsenite on IL-2 gene transcription and IL-2 mRNA stability are needed.

  19. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, Julie A.; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H.; Bravo, Brandon J.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R.; DeForge, Laura E.; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Wyne P.; Maciejewski, Patricia M.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L.; Whitney, J. Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B.; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S.

    2011-09-20

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor-dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes Fc{gamma}RIII-induced TNF{alpha}, IL-1{beta} and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and Fc{gamma}R-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell- or myeloid cell-driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P N; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5mM at 24h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential.

  1. The novel herbicide oxaziclomefone inhibits cell expansion in maize cell cultures without affecting turgor pressure or wall acidification.

    PubMed

    O'Looney, Nichola; Fry, Stephen C

    2005-11-01

    Oxaziclomefone [OAC; IUPAC name 3-(1-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-1-methylethyl)-3,4-dihydro-6-methyl-5-phenyl-2H-1,3-oxazin-4-one] is a new herbicide that inhibits cell expansion in grass roots. Its effects on cell cultures and mode of action were unknown. In principle, cell expansion could be inhibited by a decrease in either turgor pressure or wall extensibility. Cell expansion was estimated as settled cell volume; cell division was estimated by cell counting. Membrane permeability to water was measured by a novel method involving simultaneous assay of the efflux of (3)H(2)O and [(14)C]mannitol from a 'bed' of cultured cells. Osmotic potential was measured by depression of freezing point. OAC inhibited cell expansion in cultures of maize (Zea mays), spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and rose (Rosa sp.), with an ID(50) of 5, 30 and 250 nm, respectively. In maize cultures, OAC did not affect cell division for the first 40 h. It did not affect the osmotic potential of cell sap or culture medium, nor did it impede water transport across cell membranes. It did not affect cells' ability to acidify the apoplast (medium), which may be necessary for 'acid growth'. As OAC did not diminish turgor pressure, its ability to inhibit cell expansion must depend on changes in wall extensibility. It could be a valuable tool for studies on cell expansion.

  2. Sorafenib and 2-Deoxyglucose Synergistically Inhibit Proliferation of both Sorafenib Sensitive and Resistant HCC Cells by Inhibiting ATP Production

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Ryan; Wani, Nissar A.; Ghoshal, Kalpana; Jacob, Samson T.; Motiwala, Tasneem

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths globally1,2. Sorafenib is the only first-line systemic drug for advanced HCC, but it has very limited survival benefits because patients treated with sorafenib either suffer from side effects or show disease progression after initial response. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop novel strategies for first-line and second-line therapy. The association between sorafenib resistance and glycolysis prompted us to screen several drugs with known anti-glycolytic activity to identify those that will sensitize cells to sorafenib. We demonstrate that the combination of glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) and sorafenib drastically inhibits viability of sorafenib sensitive and resistant cells. However, the combination of other anti-glycolytic drugs like lonidamine, gossypol, 3-bromopyruvate and imatinib with sorafenib does not show synergistic effect. Cell cycle analysis revealed that the combination of 2DG and sorafenib induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1. Mechanistic investigation suggests that the cell-cycle arrest is due to depletion of cellular ATP that activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which, in turn, inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to induce cell cycle arrest. This study provides strong evidence for the therapeutic potential of the combination of sorafenib and 2-deoxyglucose for HCC. PMID:27938509

  3. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA+3) Inhibits IL-7 Signaling in Mouse Pre-B Cells.

    PubMed

    Ezeh, Peace C; Xu, Huan; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-02-01

    Our previously published data show that As(+3) in vivo and in vitro, at very low concentrations, inhibits lymphoid, but not myeloid stem cell development in mouse bone marrow. We also showed that the As(+3) metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(+3)), was responsible for the observed pre-B cell toxicity caused by As(+3). Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is the primary growth factor responsible for pre-lymphoid development in mouse and human bone marrow, and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5) is a transcriptional factor in the IL-7 signaling pathway. We found that MMA(+3) inhibited STAT5 phosphorylation at a concentration as low as 50 nM in mouse bone marrow pre-B cells. Inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by As(+3) occurred only at a concentration of 500 nM. In the IL-7 dependent mouse pre-B 2E8 cell line, we also found selective inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by MMA(+3), and this inhibition was dependent on effects on JAK3 phosphorylation. IL-7 receptor expression on 2E8 cell surface was also suppressed by 50 nM MMA(+3) at 18 h. As further evidence for the inhibition of STAT5, we found that the induction of several genes required in B cell development, cyclin D1, E2A, EBF1, and PAX5, were selectively inhibited by MMA(+3). Since 2E8 cells lack the enzymes responsible for the conversion of As(+3) to MMA(+3) in vitro, the results of these studies suggest that As(+3) induced inhibition of pre-B cell formation in vivo is likely dependent on the formation of MMA(+3) which in turn inhibits IL-7 signaling at several steps in mouse pre-B cells.

  4. Langerhans cells and NK cells cooperate in the inhibition of chemical skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Christoph H.; Komenda, Kerstin; Hermann, Martin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tissue immunosurveillance is an important mechanism to prevent cancer. Skin treatment with the carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), followed by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetra-decanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), is an established murine model for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, the innate immunological events occurring during the initiation of chemical carcinogenesis with DMBA remain elusive. Here, we discovered that natural killer (NK) cells and Langerhans cells (LC) cooperate to impair this oncogenic process in murine skin. The depletion of NK cells or LC caused an accumulation of DNA-damaged, natural killer group 2D-ligand (NKG2D-L) expressing keratinocytes and accelerated tumor growth. Notably, the secretion of TNFα mainly by LC promoted the recruitment of NK cells into the epidermis. Indeed, the TNFα-induced chemokines CCL2 and CXCL10 directed NK cells to DMBA-treated epidermis. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism how innate immune cells cooperate in the inhibition of cutaneous chemical carcinogenesis.

  5. ATRA mechanically reprograms pancreatic stellate cells to suppress matrix remodelling and inhibit cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chronopoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Benjamin; Sarper, Muge; Cortes, Ernesto; Auernheimer, Vera; Lachowski, Dariusz; Attwood, Simon; García, Rebeca; Ghassemi, Saba; Fabry, Ben; del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy with a dismal survival rate. Persistent activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can perturb the biomechanical homoeostasis of the tumour microenvironment to favour cancer cell invasion. Here we report that ATRA, an active metabolite of vitamin A, restores mechanical quiescence in PSCs via a mechanism involving a retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR-β)-dependent downregulation of actomyosin (MLC-2) contractility. We show that ATRA reduces the ability of PSCs to generate high traction forces and adapt to extracellular mechanical cues (mechanosensing), as well as suppresses force-mediated extracellular matrix remodelling to inhibit local cancer cell invasion in 3D organotypic models. Our findings implicate a RAR-β/MLC-2 pathway in peritumoural stromal remodelling and mechanosensory-driven activation of PSCs, and further suggest that mechanical reprogramming of PSCs with retinoic acid derivatives might be a viable alternative to stromal ablation strategies for the treatment of PDAC. PMID:27600527

  6. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Hempstead, Andrew D; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-12-08

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR.

  7. Porin alterations present in non-carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae with high and intermediate levels of carbapenem resistance in Chile.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Aniela; Villagra, Nicolás A; Undabarrena, Agustina; Gallardo, Natalia; Keller, Nicole; Moraga, Marcela; Román, Juan C; Mora, Guido C; García, Patricia

    2012-09-01

    The main goal of this work was to identify the mechanisms responsible for carbapenem resistance in 61 Chilean clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae (Enterobacter spp., Serratia marcescens, Morganella morganii, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) with reduced susceptibility to at least one carbapenem (ertapenem, imipenem or meropenem). All of the isolates were analysed for the presence of carbapenemases, extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), AmpC enzymes and outer-membrane proteins. None of the isolates exhibited carbapenemase activity nor did they have any of the carbapenemase genes that were screened for. Most of the 61 strains produced at least one ESBL and/or one AmpC enzyme and either lost their porins or had altered porins according to sequence analysis. The distribution of ESBLs and AmpC enzymes was different among the species studied. Resistance in K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolates was associated with ESBLs; in M. morganii isolates, resistance was attributed to overexpression of an AmpC enzyme; and in Enterobacter spp. isolates, resistance was associated with both types of enzymes. In K. pneumoniae isolates, porin integrity was more a determinant of carbapenem resistance than the presence of ESBLs, whereas in isolates of Enterobacter spp., M. morganii and S. marcescens, the presence of an overexpressed AmpC enzyme was associated with higher imipenem and meropenem MIC values. Therefore, carbapenem resistance in Chilean isolates is not due to true carbapenemases but rather to a combination of porin loss/alteration and β-lactamase activity. The fact that carbapenemases were not detected in this study is unique, given that many countries in the region have already reported the presence of these enzymes.

  8. Programmed death-1(+) T cells inhibit effector T cells at the pathological site of miliary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Mohan, A; Dey, A B; Mitra, D K

    2017-02-01

    Optimal T cell activation is vital for the successful resolution of microbial infections. Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is a key immune check-point receptor expressed by activated T cells. Aberrant/excessive inhibition mediated by PD-1 may impair host immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, leading to disseminated disease such as miliary tuberculosis (MTB). PD-1 mediated inhibition of T cells in pulmonary tuberculosis and TB pleurisy is reported. However, their role in MTB, particularly at the pathological site, remains to be addressed. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of PD-1-PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) in T cell responses at the pathological site from patients of TB pleurisy and MTB as clinical models of contained and disseminated forms of tuberculosis, respectively. We examined the expression and function of PD-1 and its ligands (PD-L1-PD-L2) on host immune cells among tuberculosis patients. Bronchoalveolar lavage-derived CD3 T cells in MTB expressed PD-1 (54·2 ± 27·4%, P ≥ 0·0009) with significantly higher PD-1 ligand-positive T cells (PD-L1: 19·8 ± 11·8%; P ≥ 0·019, PD-L2: 12·6 ± 6·2%; P ≥ 0·023), CD19(+) B cells (PD-L1: 14·4 ± 10·4%; P ≥ 0·042, PD-L2: 2·6 ± 1·43%; not significant) and CD14(+) monocytes (PD-L1: 40·2 ± 20·1%; P ≥ 0·047, PD-L2: 22·4 ± 15·6%; P ≥ 0·032) compared with peripheral blood (PB) of MTB and healthy controls. The expression of PD-1 was associated with a diminished number of cells producing effector cytokines interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-2 and elevated apoptosis. Locally accumulated T cells were predominantly PD-1(+) -PD-L1(+) , and blocking this pathway restores the protective T cell response. We conclude that M. tuberculosis exploits the PD-1 pathway to evade the host immune response by altering the T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 balance at the pathological site of MTB, thereby

  9. MicroRNA-199a-5p inhibits cisplatin-induced drug resistance via inhibition of autophagy in osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yusheng; Jiang, Wei; Hu, Yuling; Da, Zixun; Zeng, Chao; Tu, Min; Deng, Zhenhan; Xiao, Wenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common cancer of the bone. Chemotherapy is commonly used for the clinical treatment of OS. However, chemoresistance to cisplatin [also known as diamminedichloridoplatinum (II) (DDP)] is a major obstacle for OS therapy, the underlying mechanism of which is not fully understood. The present study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miR)-199a-5p in the regulation of chemoresistance to DDP in OS cells. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that the expression level of miR-199a-5p was significantly reduced in human OS MG63 cells. In addition, DDP treatment also upregulated the protein levels of light chain 3 (LC3)-II and Beclin1 as well as the ratio of LC3-II vs. LC3-I in MG63 cells, indicating that autophagy was activated. Restoration of miR-199a-5p expression promoted DDP-induced inhibition of MG63 cell proliferation and inhibited DDP-induced autophagy, as indicated by the reduced protein levels of LC3-II and Beclin1 and the ratio of LC3-II vs. LC3-I. Finally, luciferase reporter assay data revealed that miR-199a-5p directly targeted Beclin1 and negatively mediated Beclin1 expression at a post-transcriptional level in MG63 cells. In conclusion, our study suggests that miR-199a-5p promotes the cytotoxicity of DDP in OS cells via inhibition of autophagy. Therefore, miR-199a-5p/autophagy signaling is involved in chemoresistance and may become a potential target for the treatment of DDP-resistant OS. PMID:27895792

  10. Induction of immune responses by two recombinant proteins of brucella abortus, outer membrane proteins 2b porin and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kyung Yong; Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hyun-Eui; Lee, Jin Ju; Kim, Suk; Yoo, Han Sang

    2014-06-28

    The diagnosis of Brucella abortus is mainly based on serological methods using antibody against LPS, which has diagnostic problems. Therefore, to solve this problem, we evaluated two proteins of B. abortus, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SodC) and outer membrane proteins 2b porin (Omp2b). The genes were cloned and expressed in a pMAL system, and the recombinant proteins, rOmp2b and rSodC, were purified as fusion forms with maltosebinding protein. The identity of the proteins was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis with sera of mice infected with B. abortus. Production of cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) was investigated in RAW 264.7 cells and mouse splenocytes after stimulation with the proteins. Moreover, cellular and humoral immune responses were investigated in BALB/c mice after immunization with the proteins. TNF-α, IL-6, and NO were significantly inducible in RAW 264.7 cells. Splenocytes of naive mice produced IFN-γ and IL-4 significantly by stimulation. Moreover, number of IgG, IFN-γ, and IL-4 producing cells were increased in immunized mice with the two proteins. Production of IgG and IgM with rOmp2b was higher than those with rSodC in immunized mice. These results suggest that the two recombinant proteins of B. abortus may be potential LPS-free proteins for diagnosis.

  11. Nafamostat Mesilate Inhibits TNF-α-Induced Vascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction by Inhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species Production.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Woong; Song, Hee-Jung; Kang, Shin Kwang; Kim, Yonghwan; Jung, Saet-Byel; Jee, Sungju; Moon, Jae Young; Suh, Kwang-Sun; Lee, Sang Do; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Kim, Cuk-Seong

    2015-05-01

    Nafamostat mesilate (NM) is a serine protease inhibitor with anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory effects. NM has been used in Asia for anticoagulation during extracorporeal circulation in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy and extra corporeal membrane oxygenation. Oxidative stress is an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease and is associated with vascular endothelial function. We investigated whether NM could inhibit endothelial dysfunction induced by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with TNF-α for 24 h. The effects of NM on monocyte adhesion, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) protein expression, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation, and intracellular superoxide production were then examined. NM (0.01~100 µg/mL) did not affect HUVEC viability; however, it inhibited the increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and p66shc expression elicited by TNF-α (3 ng/mL), and it dose dependently prevented the TNF-α-induced upregulation of endothelial VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. In addition, it mitigated TNF-α-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation and the adhesion of U937 monocytes. These data suggest that NM mitigates TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion and the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules, and that the anti-adhesive effect of NM is mediated through the inhibition of p66shc, ROS production, and p38 MAPK activation.

  12. Effect of black raspberry extract in inhibiting NFkappa B dependent radioprotection in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Natarajan, Mohan; Singh, Jamunarani Veeraraghavan Nisha; Jamgade, Ambarish; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Anant, Shrikant; Herman, Terence S; Aravindan, Natarajan

    2010-01-01

    Black raspberry extracts (RSE) have been shown to inhibit cancer cell growth and stimulate apoptosis. Also, studies have demonstrated that RSE inhibits transcriptional regulators including NFkappa B. Accordingly, we investigated the effect of RSE in inhibiting radiation (IR) induced NFkappa B mediated radioprotection in breast adenocarcinoma cells. MCF-7 cells were exposed to IR (2Gy), treated with RSE (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 micro g/ml) or treated with RSE (1.0 micro g/ml) followed by IR exposure, and harvested after 1, 3, 6, 24, 48, and 72 h. NFkappa B DNA-binding activity was measured by EMSA and phosphorylated Ikappa Balpha by immunoblotting. Expression of IAP1, IAP2, XIAP and survivin were measured by QPCR and immunoblotting. Cell survival was measured using MTT assay and cell death using Caspase-3/7 activity. Effect of RSE on IR induced MnSOD, TNFalpha, IL-1alpha and MnSOD activity was also determined. RSE inhibited NFkappa B activity in a dose-dependent manner. Also, RSE inhibited IR-induced sustained activation of NFkappa B, and NFkappa B regulated IAP1, IAP2, XIAP, and survivin. In addition, RSE inhibited IR-induced TNFalpha, IL-1alpha, and MnSOD levels and MnSOD activity. RSE suppressed cell survival and enhanced cell death. These results suggest that RSE may act as a potent radiosensitizer by overcoming the effects of NFkappa B mediated radioprotection in human breast cancer cells.

  13. Nelfinavir augments proteasome inhibition by bortezomib in myeloma cells and overcomes bortezomib and carfilzomib resistance.

    PubMed

    Kraus, M; Bader, J; Overkleeft, H; Driessen, C

    2013-03-01

    HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PI) are oral drugs for HIV treatment. HIV-PI have antitumor activity via induction of ER-stress, inhibition of phospho-AKT (p-AKT) and the proteasome, suggesting antimyeloma activity. We characterize the effects of all approved HIV-PI on myeloma cells. HIV-PI were compared regarding cytotoxicity, proteasome activity, ER-stress induction and AKT phosphorylation using myeloma cells in vitro. Nelfinavir is the HIV-PI with highest cytotoxic activity against primary myeloma cells and with an IC50 near therapeutic drug blood levels (8-14 μM), irrespective of bortezomib sensitivity. Only nelfinavir inhibited intracellular proteasome activity in situ at drug concentrations <40 μM. Ritonavir, saquinavir and lopinavir inhibited p-AKT comparable to nelfinavir, and showed similar synergistic cytotoxicity with bortezomib against bortezomib-sensitive cells. Nelfinavir had superior synergistic activity with bortezomib/carfilzomib in particular against bortezomib/carfilzomib-resistant myeloma cells. It inhibited not only the proteasomal β1/β5 active sites, similar to bortezomib/carfilzomib, but in addition the β2 proteasome activity not targeted by bortezomib/carfilzomib. Additional inhibition of β2 proteasome activity is known to sensitize cells for bortezomib and carfilzomib. Nelfinavir has unique proteasome inhibiting activity in particular on the bortezomib/carfilzomib-insensitive tryptic (β2) proteasome activity in intact myeloma cells, and is active against bortezomib/carfilzomib-resistant myeloma cells in vitro.

  14. Patched1 and Patched2 inhibit Smoothened non-cell autonomously

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Brock; Casillas, Catalina; Alfaro, Astrid C; Jägers, Carina; Roelink, Henk

    2016-01-01

    Smoothened (Smo) inhibition by Patched (Ptch) is central to Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Ptch, a proton driven antiporter, is required for Smo inhibition via an unknown mechanism. Hh ligand binding to Ptch reverses this inhibition and activated Smo initiates the Hh response. To determine whether Ptch inhibits Smo strictly in the same cell or also mediates non-cell-autonomous Smo inhibition, we generated genetically mosaic neuralized embryoid bodies (nEBs) from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). These experiments utilized novel mESC lines in which Ptch1, Ptch2, Smo, Shh and 7dhcr were inactivated via gene editing in multiple combinations, allowing us to measure non-cell autonomous interactions between cells with differing Ptch1/2 status. In several independent assays, the Hh response was repressed by Ptch1/2 in nearby cells. When 7dhcr was targeted, cells displayed elevated non-cell autonomous inhibition. These findings support a model in which Ptch1/2 mediate secretion of a Smo-inhibitory cholesterol precursor. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17634.001 PMID:27552050

  15. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application. PMID:26204945

  16. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-07-20

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application.

  17. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kanayo; Sakaguchi, Minoru; Tanaka, Satoshi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Takaoka, Masanori

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  18. Senescent stromal cells induce cancer cell migration via inhibition of RhoA/ROCK/myosin-based cell contractility

    PubMed Central

    Aifuwa, Ivie; Giri, Anjil; Longe, Nick; Lee, Sang Hyuk; An, Steven S.; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Cells induced into senescence exhibit a marked increase in the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines termed senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Here we report that SASP from senescent stromal fibroblasts promote spontaneous morphological changes accompanied by an aggressive migratory behavior in originally non-motile human breast cancer cells. This phenotypic switch is coordinated, in space and time, by a dramatic reorganization of the actin and microtubule filament networks, a discrete polarization of EB1 comets, and an unconventional front-to-back inversion of nucleus-MTOC polarity. SASP-induced morphological/migratory changes are critically dependent on microtubule integrity and dynamics, and are coordinated by the inhibition of RhoA and cell contractility. RhoA/ROCK inhibition reduces focal adhesions and traction forces, while promoting a novel gliding mode of migration. PMID:26483365

  19. Induction of Premature Senescence by Hsp90 Inhibition in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Restall, Ian J.; Lorimer, Ian A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is a promising new target in cancer therapy and selective Hsp90 inhibitors are currently in clinical trials. Previously these inhibitors have been reported to induce either cell cycle arrest or cell death in cancer cells. Whether the cell cycle arrest is reversible or irreversible has not generally been assessed. Here we have examined in detail the cell cycle arrest and cell death responses of human small cell lung cancer cell lines to Hsp90 inhibition. Methodology/Principal Findings In MTT assays, small cell lung cancer cells showed a biphasic response to the Hsp90 inhibitors geldanamycin and radicicol, with low concentrations causing proliferation arrest and high concentrations causing cell death. Assessment of Hsp90 intracellular activity using loss of client protein expression showed that geldanamycin concentrations that inhibited Hsp90 correlated closely with those causing proliferation arrest but not cell death. The proliferation arrest induced by low concentrations of geldanamycin was not reversed for a period of over thirty days following drug removal and showed features of senescence. Rare populations of variant small cell lung cancer cells could be isolated that had additional genetic alterations and no longer underwent irreversible proliferation arrest in response to Hsp90 inhibitors. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that: (1) Hsp90 inhibition primarily induces premature senescence, rather than cell death, in small cell lung cancer cells; (2) small cell lung cancer cells can bypass this senescence through further genetic alterations; (3) Hsp90 inhibitor-induced cell death in small cell lung cancer cells is due to inhibition of a target other than cytosolic Hsp90. These results have implications with regard to how these inhibitors will behave in clinical trials and for the design of future inhibitors in this class. PMID:20552022

  20. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Inhibits Human Small-Cell Lung Cancer Proliferation in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruno, Kaname; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1998-11-01

    Small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is an aggressive, rapidly growing and metastasizing, and highly fatal neoplasm. We report that vasoactive intestinal peptide inhibits the proliferation of SCLC cells in culture and dramatically suppresses the growth of SCLC tumor-cell implants in athymic nude mice. In both cases, the inhibition was mediated apparently by a cAMP-dependent mechanism, because the inhibition was enhanced by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine in proportion to increases in intracellular cAMP levels, and the inhibition was abolished by selective inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. If confirmed in clinical trials, this antiproliferative action of vasoactive intestinal peptide may offer a new and promising means of suppressing SCLC in human subjects, without the toxic side effects of chemotherapeutic agents.

  1. Positive regulation of the Shewanella oneidensis OmpS38, a major porin facilitating anaerobic respiration, by Crp and Fur

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tong; Ju, Lili; Yin, Jianhua; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    Major porins are among the most abundant proteins embedded in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, playing crucial roles in maintenance of membrane structural integrity and OM permeability. Although many OM proteins (especially c-type cytochromes) in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for respiratory versatility, have been extensively studied, physiological significance of major porins remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that OmpS38 and OmpA are two major porins, neither of which is responsive to changes in osmolarity or contributes to the intrinsic resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. However, OmpS38 but not OmpA is largely involved in respiration of non-oxygen electron acceptors. We then provide evidence that expression of ompS38 is transcribed from two promoters, the major of which is favored under anaerobic conditions while the other appears constitutive. The major promoter is under the direct control of Crp, the master regulator dictating respiration. As a result, the increase in the level of OmpS38 correlates with an elevated activity in Crp under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the activity of the major promoter is also affected by Fur, presumably indirectly, the transcription factor for iron-dependent gene expression. PMID:26381456

  2. Differential expression of porins OmpP2A and OmpP2B of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Prather, Derrick T; Bains, Manjeet; Hancock, Robert E W; Filiatrault, Melanie J; Campagnari, Anthony A

    2004-11-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a strict human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease chancroid. The genome of the human-passaged strain of H. ducreyi (35000HP) contains two homologous genes whose protein products have estimated molecular masses of 46 and 43 kDa. A comparative analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that these proteins share 27 to 33% identity to the outer membrane protein P2 (OmpP2), a major porin of Haemophilus influenzae. Therefore, these proteins have been designated OmpP2A and OmpP2B, respectively. The detection of ompP2A and ompP2B transcripts by reverse transcriptase PCR indicated that these genes were independently transcribed in H. ducreyi 35000HP. Western blot analysis of outer membrane proteins isolated from a geographically diverse collection of H. ducreyi clinical isolates revealed that OmpP2A and OmpP2B were differentially expressed among these strains. Although PCR analysis suggested that ompP2A and ompP2B were conserved among the strains tested, the differential expression observed was due to nucleotide additions and partial gene deletions. Purified OmpP2A and OmpP2B were isolated under nondenaturing conditions, and subsequent analysis demonstrated that these two proteins exhibited porin activity. OmpP2A and OmpP2B are the first porins described for H. ducreyi.

  3. Positive regulation of the Shewanella oneidensis OmpS38, a major porin facilitating anaerobic respiration, by Crp and Fur.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tong; Ju, Lili; Yin, Jianhua; Gao, Haichun

    2015-09-18

    Major porins are among the most abundant proteins embedded in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, playing crucial roles in maintenance of membrane structural integrity and OM permeability. Although many OM proteins (especially c-type cytochromes) in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for respiratory versatility, have been extensively studied, physiological significance of major porins remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that OmpS38 and OmpA are two major porins, neither of which is responsive to changes in osmolarity or contributes to the intrinsic resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. However, OmpS38 but not OmpA is largely involved in respiration of non-oxygen electron acceptors. We then provide evidence that expression of ompS38 is transcribed from two promoters, the major of which is favored under anaerobic conditions while the other appears constitutive. The major promoter is under the direct control of Crp, the master regulator dictating respiration. As a result, the increase in the level of OmpS38 correlates with an elevated activity in Crp under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the activity of the major promoter is also affected by Fur, presumably indirectly, the transcription factor for iron-dependent gene expression.

  4. Inhibition of proliferation and induction of differentiation of glioma cells with Datura stramonium agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, T; Yamazaki, K; Yamori, T; Endo, T

    2002-10-07

    We found that a lectin, Datura stramonium agglutinin, induced irreversible differentiation in C6 glioma cells. The differentiated cells had long processes, a low rate of proliferation and a high content of glial fibrillary acidic protein. When the medium was replaced with Datura stramonium agglutinin-free medium after 1 h, cell proliferation continued to be inhibited. Experiments with several other lectins indicated that both recognition of linear N-acetyllactosamine repeats and recognition of multiantennary units of cell-surface glycans were required for the inhibition of C6 proliferation. Proliferation of four human glial tumour cells was also inhibited by Datura stramonium agglutinin. Further, these differentiated human glial tumour cells had long processes and a high content of glial fibrillary acidic protein similar to differentiated C6 glioma cells. Taken together, these observations suggest that Datura stramonium agglutinin may be useful as a new therapy for treating glioma without side effects.

  5. Microfluidic switching system for analyzing chemotaxis responses of wortmannin-inhibited HL-60 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuxin; Sai, Jiqing; Richmond, Ann

    2009-01-01

    The chemotaxis of phosphoinositide kinase-3 (PI3K)-inhibited differentiated HL-60 cells stably expressing CXCR2 was studied in a microfluidic switching gradient device that can generate stable and well-defined forward and reverse gradients. Wortmannin, a widely used PI3K inhibitor, was added during cell preparation and the experiment process. The studies quantify the chemotaxis gradient and the effects of a change in the direction of a CXCL-8 gradient on cell migration. PI3K-inhibited HL-60 cells migrated more efficiently toward the gradient before gradient switching than after, as measured by the effective chemotactic index. The inhibited HL-60 cells also showed that inadequate polarization, slower response time, and reduced cell populations can follow the gradient change. We observed that the role of PI3K in directing cellular response to gradient reversal was important in cell polarization and directional sensing associated with gradient switching. PMID:18205049

  6. Anticancer agent xanthohumol inhibits IL-2 induced signaling pathways involved in T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongbo; Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Arbab, Ali S.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Gautam, Subhash C.

    2013-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone present in hops exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study we show that XN inhibits the proliferation of mouse lymphoma cells and IL-2 induced proliferation and cell cycle progression in mouse splenic T cells. The suppression of T cell proliferation by XN was due to the inhibition of IL-2 induced Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/STAT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) signaling pathways. XN also inhibited proliferation-related cellular proteins such as c-Myc, c-Fos and NF-κB and cyclin D1. Thus, understanding of IL-2 induced cell signaling pathways in normal T cells, which are constitutively turned on in T cell lymphomas may facilitate development of XN for the treatment of hematologic cancers. PMID:22946339

  7. Targeting autophagy potentiates chemotherapy-induced apoptosis and proliferation inhibition in hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xian-Ling; Li, Ding; Hu, Fei; Song, Jian-Rui; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Deng, Wei-Jie; Sun, Kai; Zhao, Qiu-Dong; Xie, Xu-Qin; Song, Yu-Jiao; Wu, Meng-Chao; Wei, Li-Xin

    2012-07-28

    Induction of cell death and inhibition of cell growth are the main targets of cancer therapy. Here we evaluated the role of autophagy on chemoresistance of human hepatocarcinoma (HCC) cell lines, focusing on its crosstalk with cell apoptosis and proliferation. In this study, a chemotherapeutic agent (cisplatin or 5FU) induced the formation of autophagosomes in three human HCC cell lines and upregulated the expression of autophagy protein LC3-II. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine or si-beclin 1 increased chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in HCC cells. Meanwhile, increased damage of the mitochondrial membrane potential was also observed in HCC cells when autophagy was inhibited. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy reduced clone formation and impaired cell growth of HCC cells when treated with chemotherapy. Co-administration of an autophagy inhibitor (chloroquine) and chemotherapy significantly inhibited tumor growth in a mouse xenograft tumor model, with greater extent of apoptosis and impaired proliferation of tumor cells. This study suggests that autophagy is a potential novel target to improve therapy efficiency of conventional chemotherapeutics towards HCC.

  8. Inhibition of proteasome activity by various fruits and vegetables is associated with cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Marina S; Chen, Di; Dou, Q Ping

    2004-01-01

    There is a large amount of scientific evidence showing that fruits and vegetables lower the risk of cancer. However, the responsible molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Our previous studies have demonstrated that inhibition of proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity is associated with cancer cell apoptosis, which may also be the major mechanism responsible for the anticancer effects of green tea polyphenols. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that some fruits and vegetables inhibit tumor cell proteasome activity and that this inhibition contributes to their cancer-preventative activities. We report that the extracts of apple and grape are more potent than onion, tomato and celery in: (i) inhibiting the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity in leukemia Jurkat T cell extract; (ii) accumulating the polyubiquitinated proteins in intact Jurkat T cells; (iii) inducing activation of caspase-3/-7 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in intact Jurkat T cells; and (iv) inducing the appearance of spherical cells preferentially in prostate cancer PC-3 over the normal NIH 3T3 cell line. We also found that strawberry extract had some effect on Jurkat T cell extract and the prostate PC-3 cell line but not on intact Jurkat T cells. Our findings suggest that the proteasome is a cancer-related molecular target for, at least, the extracts of apple, grape and onion, and that the inhibition of proteasome activity by these fruits or vegetable may contribute to their cancer-preventative effects, although other molecular mechanisms may also be involved.

  9. Slow and sustained nitric oxide releasing compounds inhibit multipotent vascular stem cell proliferation and differentiation without causing cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Brandon M.; Leix, Kyle Alexander; Ji, Yajing; Glaves, Richard Samuel Elliot; Ash, David E.; Mohanty, Dillip K.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) proliferate and differentiate. • Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of MVSCs. • Nitric oxide inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs). • Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) neither de-differentiate nor proliferate. - Abstract: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cerebral and myocardial infarction. It is believed that neointimal growth common in the later stages of atherosclerosis is a result of vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) de-differentiation in response to endothelial injury. However, the claims of the SMC de-differentiation theory have not been substantiated by monitoring the fate of mature SMCs in response to such injuries. A recent study suggests that atherosclerosis is a consequence of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) differentiation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known mediator against atherosclerosis, in part because of its inhibitory effect on SMC proliferation. Using three different NO-donors, we have investigated the effects of NO on MVSC proliferation. Results indicate that NO inhibits MVSC proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. A slow and sustained delivery of NO proved to inhibit proliferation without causing cell death. On the other hand, larger, single-burst NO concentrations, inhibits proliferation, with concurrent significant cell death. Furthermore, our results indicate that endogenously produced NO inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) and subsequently to SMC as well.

  10. Schisandrin B inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in human cholangiocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaohui; Wang, Shuai; Mu, Yunchuan; Zheng, Yixiong

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is the second most common hepatic cancer with high resistance to current chemotherapies and extremely poor prognosis. The present study aimed to examine the effects of schisandrin B (Sch B) on CCA cells both in vitro and in vivo and to examine its underlying mechanism. We found that Sch B inhibited the viability and proliferation of CCA cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner as assessed by MTT and colony formation assays. The flow cytometric assay revealed G0/G1 phase arrest in the Sch B-treated HCCC-9810 and RBE cells. In addition, Sch B induced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma apoptosis as shown by the results of Annexin V/PI double staining. Rhodamine 123 staining revealed that Sch B decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, western blot analysis indicated that Sch B induced apoptosis by upregulating Bax, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved PARP, and by downregulating cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and CDK-4. Moreover, Sch B significantly inhibited HCCC-9810 xenograft growth in athymic nude mice. In summary, these findings suggest that Sch B exhibited potent antitumor activities via the induction of CCA apoptosis and that Sch B may be a promising drug for the treatment of CCA. PMID:27499090

  11. Schisandrin B inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in human cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohui; Wang, Shuai; Mu, Yunchuan; Zheng, Yixiong

    2016-10-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is the second most common hepatic cancer with high resistance to current chemotherapies and extremely poor prognosis. The present study aimed to examine the effects of schisandrin B (Sch B) on CCA cells both in vitro and in vivo and to examine its underlying mechanism. We found that Sch B inhibited the viability and proliferation of CCA cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner as assessed by MTT and colony formation assays. The flow cytometric assay revealed G0/G1 phase arrest in the Sch B-treated HCCC-9810 and RBE cells. In addition, Sch B induced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma apoptosis as shown by the results of Annexin V/PI double staining. Rhodamine 123 staining revealed that Sch B decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, western blot analysis indicated that Sch B induced apoptosis by upregulating Bax, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved PARP, and by downregulating cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and CDK-4. Moreover, Sch B significantly inhibited HCCC-9810 xenograft growth in athymic nude mice. In summary, these findings suggest that Sch B exhibited potent antitumor activities via the induction of CCA apoptosis and that Sch B may be a promising drug for the treatment of CCA.

  12. Mosla dianthera inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reactions through the inhibition of histamine release and inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun . E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Mosla dianthera (Maxim.) (AEMD) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of drugs for the treatment of allergic disease is an important subject in human health. AEMD inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. AEMD decreased immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reactions, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. AEMD attenuated intracellular calcium level and release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Furthermore, AEMD attenuated the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated TNF-{alpha}, IL-8 and IL-6 secretion in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of AEMD on the pro-inflammatory cytokines was nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. AEMD decreased PMA and A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. Our findings provide evidence that AEMD inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  13. Inhibition of DNA topoisomerases I and II and growth inhibition of HL-60 cells by novel acridine-based compounds.

    PubMed

    Janočková, Jana; Plšíková, Jana; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Jendželovský, Rastislav; Mikeš, Jaromír; Kovaľ, Ján; Hamuľaková, Slávka; Fedoročko, Peter; Kuča, Kamil; Kožurková, Mária

    2015-08-30

    HL-60 cancer cells were treated with a series of novel acridine derivatives (derivatives 1-4) in order to test the compounds' ability to inhibit both cancer cell growth and topoisomerase I and II activity. Binding studies of derivatives 1-4 with calf thymus DNA were also performed using a number of techniques (UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, thermal denaturation, linear dichroism and viscometry) to determine the nature of the interaction between the compounds and ctDNA. The binding constants for the complexes of the studied acridine derivatives with DNA were calculated from UV-Vis spectroscopic titrations (K=3.1×10(4)-2.0×10(3)M(-1)). Some of the compounds showed a strong inhibitory effect against Topo II at the relatively low concentration of 5μM. Topo I/II inhibition mode assays were also performed and verified that the novel compounds are topoisomerase suppressors rather than poisons. The biological activities of derivatives were studied using MTT assay and flow cytometric methods (detection of mitochondrial membrane potential, measurement of cell viability) after 24 and 48h incubation. The ability of derivatives to impair cell proliferation was tested by an analysis of cell cycle distribution.

  14. Morin, a Flavonoid from Moraceae, Inhibits Cancer Cell Adhesion to Endothelial Cells and EMT by Downregulating VCAM1 and Ncadherin.

    PubMed

    Lee, JeongHee; Jin, Hana; Lee, Won Sup; Nagappan, Arulkumar; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gon Sup; Jung, JinMyung; Ryu, Chung Ho; Shin, Sung Chul; Hong, Soon Chan; Kim, Hye Jung

    2016-01-01

    Morin, a flavonoid found in figs and other Moraceae species, displays a variety of biological actions, exerting antioxidant, antiinflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects. Here, we investigated the anticancer activity of morin focusing on antiadhesive influence. We performed experiments with MDAMB231 human breast cancer cells. Morin inhibited TNFinduced cancer cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) without showing any toxicity. It further inhibited the expression of VCAM1 on MDAMB231 cells as well as HUVECs. Morin also decreased the expression of Ncadherin on MDAMB231 cells. In addition, there was apparent antimetastatic activity in vivo. In conclusion, this study suggested that morin inhibits cancer cell adhesion to HUVECs by reducing VCAM1, and EMT by targeting Ncadherin, and that it features antimetastatic activity in vivo. Further investigation of possible antimetastatic activity of morin against human breast cancer cells is warranted.

  15. Degradable poly(apigenin) polymer inhibits tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cochran, David B; Gray, Lindsay N; Anderson, Kimberly W; Dziubla, Thomas D

    2016-10-01

    Cancer and the inflammatory system share a complex intertwined relationship. For instance, in response to an injury or stress, vascular endothelial cells will express cell adhesion molecules as a means of recruiting leukocytes. However, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been shown to highjack this expression for the adhesion and invasion during the metastatic cascade. As such, the initiation of endothelial cell inflammation, either by surgical procedures (cancer resection) or chemotherapy can inadvertently increase the metastatic potential of CTCs. Yet, systemic delivery of anti-inflammatories, which weaken the entire immune system, may not be preferred in some treatment settings. In this work, we demonstrate that a long-term releasing flavone-based polymer and subsequent nanoparticle delivery system can inhibit tumor cell adhesion, through the suppression of endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression. The degradation of a this anti-inflammatory polymer provides longer term, localized release profile of active therapeutic drug in nanoparticle form as compared with that of the free drug, permitting more targeted anti-metastatic therapies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1438-1447, 2016.

  16. Overexpression of Selenoprotein SelK in BGC-823 Cells Inhibits Cell Adhesion and Migration.

    PubMed

    Ben, S B; Peng, B; Wang, G C; Li, C; Gu, H F; Jiang, H; Meng, X L; Lee, B J; Chen, C L

    2015-10-01

    Effects of human selenoprotein SelK on the adhesion and migration ability of human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells using Matrigel adhesion and transwell migration assays, respectively, were investigated in this study. The Matrigel adhesion ability of BGC-823 cells that overexpressed SelK declined extremely significantly (p < 0.01) compared with that of the cells not expressing the protein. The migration ability of BGC-823 cells that overexpressed SelK also declined extremely significantly (p < 0.01). On the other hand, the Matrigel adhesion ability and migration ability of the cells that overexpressed C-terminally truncated SelK did not decline significantly. The Matrigel adhesion ability and migration ability of human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells that overexpressed SelK did not show significant change (p > 0.05) with the cells that overexpressed the C-terminally truncated protein. In addition to the effect on Matrigel adhesion and migration, the overexpression of SelK also caused a loss in cell viability (as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay) and induced apoptosis as shown by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The cytosolic free Ca2+ level of these cells was significantly increased as detected by flow cytometry. But the overexpression of SelK in HEK-293 cells caused neither significant loss in cell viability nor apoptosis induction. Only the elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+ level in these cells was significant. Taken together, the results suggest that the overexpression of SelK can inhibit human cancer cell Matrigel adhesion and migration and cause both the loss in cell viability and induction of apoptosis. The release of intracellular Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum might be a mechanism whereby the protein exerted its impact. Furthermore, only the full-length protein, but not C-terminally truncated form, was capable of producing such impact. The embryonic cells were not influenced by the

  17. Melatonin Cytotoxicity Is Associated to Warburg Effect Inhibition in Ewing Sarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Sanchez, Ana M.; Antolin, Isaac; Puente-Moncada, Noelia; Suarez, Santos; Gomez-Lobo, Marina; Rodriguez, Carmen; Martin, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin kills or inhibits the proliferation of different cancer cell types, and this is associated with an increase or a decrease in reactive oxygen species, respectively. Intracellular oxidants originate mainly from oxidative metabolism, and cancer cells frequently show alterations in this metabolic pathway, such as the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis). Thus, we hypothesized that melatonin could also regulate differentially oxidative metabolism in cells where it is cytotoxic (Ewing sarcoma cells) and in cells where it inhibits proliferation (chondrosarcoma cells). Ewing sarcoma cells but not chondrosarcoma cells showed a metabolic profile consistent with aerobic glycolysis, i.e. increased glucose uptake, LDH activity, lactate production and HIF-1α activation. Melatonin reversed Ewing sarcoma metabolic profile and this effect was associated with its cytotoxicity. The differential regulation of metabolism by melatonin could explain why the hormone is harmless for a wide spectrum of normal and only a few tumoral cells, while it kills specific tumor cell types. PMID:26252771

  18. The induction of cellular senescence in dental follicle cells inhibits the osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Morsczeck, Christian; Gresser, Jan; Ettl, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    Dental stem cells such as human dental follicle cells (DFCs) have opened new promising treatment alternatives for today's dental health issues such as periodontal tissue regeneration. However, cellular senescence represents a restricting factor to cultured stem cells, resulting in limited lifespan and reduced cell differentiation potential. Therefore, this study evaluated if and how DFCs exhibit features of cellular senescence after being expanded in cell culture. The cell proliferation of DFCs decreased, while the cell size increased during prolonged cell culture. Moreover, DFCs expressed the senescence-associated β-galactosidase after a prolonged cell culture. The onset of senescence inhibited both the induction of osteoblast markers RUNX2 and osteopontin and the biomineralization of DFCs after stimulation of the osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, we showed that a prolonged cell culture induces cellular senescence and inhibits the osteogenic differentiation in DFCs.

  19. Triptolide inhibits cell growth and GRP78 protein expression but induces cell apoptosis in original and radioresistant NPC cells

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wuwu; Lai, Chen; Chen, Zhikang; Wang, Ran; Long, Xueying; Feng, Xueping

    2016-01-01

    The radioresistance is the key factor to hamper curative effect and survival of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Nature triptolide (TPL) has been found to circumvent drug-resistant effect of cancer, but its effect on NPC radioresistance has been rarely studied. In the present study, the 10 Gy-resistant CNE2 subclones (CNE2-SR) were used as a NPC radioresistant model. The IC50 of TPL in CNE2 and CNE2-SR cells was measured by MTT assay, cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and protein expression was examined by western blot. Our data showed that TPL treatment decreased the percentage of viable cells, and IC50 value in CNE2 and CNE2-SR cells was 23.6 ± 1.41 nmol/L and 31.2 ± 1.16 nmol/L, respectively. Six Gy was a moderate dosage of X-ray for CNE2, and 25 nM TPL was close to IC50 value of CNE2 and CNE2-SR. Six Gy X-ray and/or 25 nM TPL significantly inhibited tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, 6 Gy X-ray and/or 25 nM TPL significantly inhibited cell growth and induced cell apoptosis and M/G2 phase arrest in CNE2 and CNE2-SR cells. Moreover, TPL treatment significantly inhibited the expression of GRP78 protein in CNE2 and CNE2-SR cells. These results suggest that TPL may serve as a potential radiosensitizer agent for NPC treatment. PMID:27391061

  20. Overexpression of immunoglobulin G prompts cell proliferation and inhibits cell apoptosis in human urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liang, Pei-Yu; Li, Hao-Yong; Zhou, Zhi-Yan; Jin, Ying-Xia; Wang, Sheng-Xing; Peng, Xiao-Hui; Ou, Shan-Ji

    2013-06-01

    Only B lymphocytes can express immunoglobulins according to the traditional immunological theories, and the expression of immunoglobulin G (IgG) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein was found in certain human cancer cells recently. However, the expression pattern of IgG and its possible role in human urothelial carcinoma are still elusive. In this study, we investigated the expression of IgG in two human urothelial carcinoma cell lines, T24 and BIU-87, and in 56 cases of clinical urothelial carcinoma tissues. The mRNA of IgG was positively detected by in situ hybridization and reverse transcription PCR; furthermore, IgG protein was also positively detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Moreover, blockade of tumor-derived IgG by either antihuman IgG antibody or antisense oligonucleotides increased cell apoptosis and inhibited cell growth in bladder cancer cell lines in vitro, and antihuman IgG antibody could suppress the growth of xenotransplant tumor in vivo. In addition, either antihuman IgG antibody or antisense oligonucleotides enhanced the sensitivity to mitomycin C in bladder cancer cell line T24. Furthermore, blockade of IgG in bladder cancer cell T24 resulted in upregulation of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Our results indicated that bladder cancer cells were capable of expressing IgG, and blockade of IgG expression induced cell apoptosis through activation of caspase-dependent pathway. A novel potential targeted therapy for bladder cancer will be possibly developed based on these data.

  1. TAZ promotes cell growth and inhibits Celastrol-induced cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuren; Ma, Kai; Chen, Lechuang; Zhu, Hongxia; Liang, Shufang; Liu, Mei; Xu, Ningzhi

    2016-10-01

    Hippo pathway is a highly conservative signalling pathway related to the development of organisms, which has been demonstrated to be strongly linked to the tumorigenesis and tumour progression. As the major downstream effector of Hippo pathway, yes-associated protein (YAP), is a transcriptional activator of target genes that are involved in cell proliferation and survival. As an oncogene, YAP can promote cell growth and inhibit cell apoptosis. Another major downstream effector of Hippo pathway, transcriptional co-activators with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), is nearly 60% homologous with YAP. In the present study, we assume that TAZ probably has the similar function to YAP. To test this issue, we established an inducible and a stable expression system of TAZ in T-Rex-293 and HEK293 cells respectively. The results of cell growth curves, colony formation assay and tumour xenograft growth showed that overexpression of TAZ could promote cell growth in vitro and in vivo Meanwhile, we found that up-regulated expression of TAZ could partially restore Celastrol-induced cell apoptosis. Induced overexpression of TAZ could up-regulate its target genes including ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein (ANKRD), cysteine-rich 61 (CYR61) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), increase the expression of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), decrease the expression of Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) and activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) pathway, which may be the mechanism underlying anti-apoptosis of TAZ. All these findings indicated that TAZ acts as an oncogene that could be a key regulator of cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  2. Wnt signaling inhibits adrenal steroidogenesis by cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Elisabeth M; Kuick, Rork; Finco, Isabella; Bohin, Natacha; Hrycaj, Steven M; Wellik, Deneen M; Hammer, Gary D

    2014-09-01

    Wnt/β-catenin (βcat) signaling is critical for adrenal homeostasis. To elucidate how Wnt/βcat signaling elicits homeostatic maintenance of the adrenal cortex, we characterized the identity of the adrenocortical Wnt-responsive population. We find that Wnt-responsive cells consist of sonic hedgehog (Shh)-producing adrenocortical progenitors and differentiated, steroidogenic cells of the zona glomerulosa, but not the zona fasciculata and rarely cells that are actively proliferating. To determine potential direct inhibitory effects of βcat signaling on zona fasciculata-associated steroidogenesis, we used the mouse ATCL7 adrenocortical cell line that serves as a model system of glucocorticoid-producing fasciculata cells. Stimulation of βcat signaling caused decreased corticosterone release consistent with the observed reduced transcription of steroidogenic genes Cyp11a1, Cyp11b1, Star, and Mc2r. Decreased steroidogenic gene expression was correlated with diminished steroidogenic factor 1 (Sf1; Nr5a1) expression and occupancy on steroidogenic promoters. Additionally, βcat signaling suppressed the ability of Sf1 to transactivate steroidogenic promoters independent of changes in Sf1 expression level. To investigate Sf1-independent effects of βcat on steroidogenesis, we used Affymetrix gene expression profiling of Wnt-responsive cells in vivo and in vitro. One candidate gene identified, Ccdc80, encodes a secreted protein with unknown signaling mechanisms. We report that Ccdc80 is a novel βcat-regulated gene in adrenocortical cells. Treatment of adrenocortical cells with media containing secreted Ccdc80 partially phenocopies βcat-induced suppression of steroidogenesis, albeit through an Sf1-independent mechanism. This study reveals multiple mechanisms of βcat-mediated suppression of steroidogenesis and suggests that Wnt/βcat signaling may regulate adrenal homeostasis by inhibiting fasciculata differentiation and promoting the undifferentiated state of progenitor

  3. Wnt Signaling Inhibits Adrenal Steroidogenesis by Cell-Autonomous and Non–Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Elisabeth M.; Kuick, Rork; Finco, Isabella; Bohin, Natacha; Hrycaj, Steven M.; Wellik, Deneen M.

    2014-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin (βcat) signaling is critical for adrenal homeostasis. To elucidate how Wnt/βcat signaling elicits homeostatic maintenance of the adrenal cortex, we characterized the identity of the adrenocortical Wnt-responsive population. We find that Wnt-responsive cells consist of sonic hedgehog (Shh)-producing adrenocortical progenitors and differentiated, steroidogenic cells of the zona glomerulosa, but not the zona fasciculata and rarely cells that are actively proliferating. To determine potential direct inhibitory effects of βcat signaling on zona fasciculata-associated steroidogenesis, we used the mouse ATCL7 adrenocortical cell line that serves as a model system of glucocorticoid-producing fasciculata cells. Stimulation of βcat signaling caused decreased corticosterone release consistent with the observed reduced transcription of steroidogenic genes Cyp11a1, Cyp11b1, Star, and Mc2r. Decreased steroidogenic gene expression was correlated with diminished steroidogenic factor 1 (Sf1; Nr5a1) expression and occupancy on steroidogenic promoters. Additionally, βcat signaling suppressed the ability of Sf1 to transactivate steroidogenic promoters independent of changes in Sf1 expression level. To investigate Sf1-independent effects of βcat on steroidogenesis, we used Affymetrix gene expression profiling of Wnt-responsive cells in vivo and in vitro. One candidate gene identified, Ccdc80, encodes a secreted protein with unknown signaling mechanisms. We report that Ccdc80 is a novel βcat-regulated gene in adrenocortical cells. Treatment of adrenocortical cells with media containing secreted Ccdc80 partially phenocopies βcat-induced suppression of steroidogenesis, albeit through an Sf1-independent mechanism. This study reveals multiple mechanisms of βcat-mediated suppression of steroidogenesis and suggests that Wnt/βcat signaling may regulate adrenal homeostasis by inhibiting fasciculata differentiation and promoting the undifferentiated state of progenitor

  4. TAZ promotes cell growth and inhibits Celastrol-induced cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuren; Ma, Kai; Chen, Lechuang; Zhu, Hongxia; Liang, Shufang; Liu, Mei; Xu, Ningzhi

    2016-01-01

    Hippo pathway is a highly conservative signalling pathway related to the development of organisms, which has been demonstrated to be strongly linked to the tumorigenesis and tumour progression. As the major downstream effector of Hippo pathway, yes-associated protein (YAP), is a transcriptional activator of target genes that are involved in cell proliferation and survival. As an oncogene, YAP can promote cell growth and inhibit cell apoptosis. Another major downstream effector of Hippo pathway, transcriptional co-activators with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), is nearly 60% homologous with YAP. In the present study, we assume that TAZ probably has the similar function to YAP. To test this issue, we established an inducible and a stable expression system of TAZ in T-Rex-293 and HEK293 cells respectively. The results of cell growth curves, colony formation assay and tumour xenograft growth showed that overexpression of TAZ could promote cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Meanwhile, we found that up-regulated expression of TAZ could partially restore Celastrol-induced cell apoptosis. Induced overexpression of TAZ could up-regulate its target genes including ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein (ANKRD), cysteine-rich 61 (CYR61) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), increase the expression of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), decrease the expression of Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) and activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) pathway, which may be the mechanism underlying anti-apoptosis of TAZ. All these findings indicated that TAZ acts as an oncogene that could be a key regulator of cell proliferation and apoptosis. PMID:27515420

  5. AT7867 Inhibits Human Colorectal Cancer Cells via AKT-Dependent and AKT-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chen; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Shibing; Li, Xiangcheng

    2017-01-01

    AKT is often hyper-activated in human colorectal cancers (CRC). This current study evaluated the potential anti-CRC activity by AT7867, a novel AKT and p70S6K1 (S6K1) dual inhibitor. We showed that AT7867 inhibited survival and proliferation of established (HT-29, HCT116 and DLD-1 lines) and primary human CRC cells. Meanwhile, it provoked caspase-dependent apoptosis in the CRC cells. Molecularly, AT7867 blocked AKT-S6K1 activation in CRC cells. Restoring AKT-S6K1 activation, via expression of a constitutively-active AKT1 (“ca-AKT1”), only partially attenuated AT7867-induced HT-29 cell death. Further studies demonstrated that AT7867 inhibited sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) activity to promote pro-apoptotic ceramide production in HT-29 cells. Such effects by AT7867 were independent of AKT inhibition. AT7867-indued ceramide production and subsequent HT-29 cell apoptosis were attenuated by co-treatment of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), but were potentiated with the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor PDMP. In vivo, intraperitoneal injection of AT7867 inhibited HT-29 xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. AKT activation was also inhibited in AT7867-treated HT-29 tumors. Together, the preclinical results suggest that AT7867 inhibits CRC cells via AKT-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PMID:28081222

  6. Inhibition of TNF-alpha induced cell death in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and Jurkat cells by protocatechuic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhou-Stache, J; Buettner, R; Artmann, G; Mittermayer, C; Bosserhoff, A K

    2002-11-01

    The Chinese herb radix Salviae miltiorrhizae (RSM) is used in traditional Chinese medicine as a treatment for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Several components of the plant extract from salvia mitorrhiza bunge have been determined previously, one of which is protocatechuic acid (PAC). It has been found, in the study, that PAC inhibited TNF-alpha-induced cell death of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and Jurkat cells in a concentration of 100 microM when applied 2 h prior to TNF-alpha exposure. Molecular studies revealed that PAC activated NF-kappaB with a maximum effect after 30 min of treatment. Inhibition of NF-kappaB action by MG132 and NF-kappaB inhibitory peptide suppressed the cell-protective effect of PAC. Further, degradation of IkBalpha occurred in response to PAC treatment. The results provide evidence that activation of NF-kappaB plays an important role in mediating the cell-protecting effect of PAC on HUVECs and Jurkat cells. Further studies are required to test whether PAC, a component of radix salviae miltiorrhizae, could be useful in preventing in vivo cell death resulting from cardiovascular or cerebrovascular diseases.

  7. Ionene polymers for selectively inhibiting the vitro growth of malignant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Ionene polymers of the structure ##STR1## WHERE X AND Y ARE INTEGERS FROM 3 TO 16, Z.sup.- is an anion such as a halogen and n is an integer from 50 to 150 are found to bind negatively charged mammalian cells such as malignant cells and can be utilized to selectively inhibit the growth of malignant cells in vitro.

  8. Statins Inhibit the Proliferation and Induce Cell Death of Human Papilloma Virus Positive and Negative Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crescencio, María Elena; Rodríguez, Emma; Páez, Araceli; Masso, Felipe A.; Montaño, Luis F.; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2009-01-01

    Statins, competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, have anti-tumoral effects on multiple cancer types; however, little is known about their effect on cervical cancer. We evaluated the effect on proliferation, cell cycle, oxidative stress and cell death of three statins on CaSki, HeLa (HPV+) and ViBo (HPV−) cervical cancer cell lines. Cell proliferation was assayed by crystal violet staining, cell cycle by flow cytometry and cell death by annexin-V staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was evaluated by the oxidation of 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate and nitrite concentration (an indirect measure of nitric oxide (NO) production), by the Griess reaction. Inhibition of cell proliferation by atorvastatin, fluvastatin and simvastatin was dose-dependent. ViBo cells were the most responsive. Statins did not affect the cell cycle, instead they induced cell death. The antiproliferative effect in ViBo cells was completely inhibited with mevalonate, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) treatments. In contrast, cell proliferation of CaSki and HeLa cells was partially (33%) rescued with these intermediates. The three statins increased ROS and nitrite production, mainly in the ViBo cell line. These results suggest that statins exert anti-tumoral effects on cervical cancer through inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of cell death and oxidative stress. Statins could be an aid in the treatment of cervical cancer, especially in HPV− tumors. PMID:23675166

  9. The antifungal antibiotic, clotrimazole, inhibits Cl- secretion by polarized monolayers of human colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rufo, P A; Jiang, L; Moe, S J; Brugnara, C; Alper, S L; Lencer, W I

    1996-01-01

    Clotrimazole (CLT) prevents dehydration of the human HbSS red cell through inhibition of Ca++-dependent (Gardos) K+ channels in vitro (1993. J. Clin Invest. 92:520-526.) and in patients (1996. J. Clin Invest. 97:1227-1234.). Basolateral membrane K+ channels of intestinal crypt epithelial cells also participate in secretagogue-stimulated Cl- secretion. We examined the ability of CLT to block intestinal Cl- secretion by inhibition of K+ transport. Cl- secretion was measured as short-circuit current (Isc) across monolayers of T84 cells. CLT reversibly inhibited Cl- secretory responses to both cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent agonists with IC50 values of approximately 5 microM. Onset of inhibition was more rapid when CLT was applied to the basolateral cell surface. Apical Cl- channel and basolateral NaK2Cl cotransporter activities were unaffected by CLT treatment as assessed by isotopic flux measurement. In contrast, CLT strongly inhibited basolateral 86Rb efflux. These data provide evidence that CLT reversibly inhibits Cl- secretion elicited by cAMP-, cGMP-, or Ca2+-dependent agonists in T84 cells. CLT acts distal to the generation of cAMP and Ca2+ signals, and appears to inhibit basolateral K+ channels directly. CLT and related drugs may serve as novel antidiarrheal agents in humans and animals. PMID:8903326

  10. Dichotomy of cellular inhibition by small-molecule inhibitors revealed by single-cell analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Robert M.; Erez, Amir; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in drug development, a quantitative and physiological understanding of how small-molecule inhibitors act on cells is lacking. Here, we measure the signalling and proliferative response of individual primary T-lymphocytes to a combination of antigen, cytokine and drug. We uncover two distinct modes of signalling inhibition: digital inhibition (the activated fraction of cells diminishes upon drug treatment, but active cells appear unperturbed), versus analogue inhibition (the activated fraction is unperturbed whereas activation response is diminished). We introduce a computational model of the signalling cascade that accounts for such inhibition dichotomy, and test the model predictions for the phenotypic variability of cellular responses. Finally, we demonstrate that the digital/analogue dichotomy of cellular response as revealed on short (signal transduction) timescales, translates into similar dichotomy on longer (proliferation) timescales. Our single-cell analysis of drug action illustrates the strength of quantitative approaches to translate in vitro pharmacology into functionally relevant cellular settings. PMID:27687249

  11. Dichotomy of cellular inhibition by small-molecule inhibitors revealed by single-cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Robert M.; Erez, Amir; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2016-09-01

    Despite progress in drug development, a quantitative and physiological understanding of how small-molecule inhibitors act on cells is lacking. Here, we measure the signalling and proliferative response of individual primary T-lymphocytes to a combination of antigen, cytokine and drug. We uncover two distinct modes of signalling inhibition: digital inhibition (the activated fraction of cells diminishes upon drug treatment, but active cells appear unperturbed), versus analogue inhibition (the activated fraction is unperturbed whereas activation response is diminished). We introduce a computational model of the signalling cascade that accounts for such inhibition dichotomy, and test the model predictions for the phenotypic variability of cellular responses. Finally, we demonstrate that the digital/analogue dichotomy of cellular response as revealed on short (signal transduction) timescales, translates into similar dichotomy on longer (proliferation) timescales. Our single-cell analysis of drug action illustrates the strength of quantitative approaches to translate in vitro pharmacology into functionally relevant cellular settings.

  12. SAMHD1 is down regulated in lung cancer by methylation and inhibits tumor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jia-lei; Lu, Fan-zhen; Shen, Xiao-Yong; Wu, Yun; Zhao, Li-ting

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SAMHD1 expression level is down regulated in lung adenocarcinoma. • The promoter of SAMHD1 is methylated in lung adenocarcinoma. • Over expression of SAMHD1 inhibits the proliferation of lung cancer cells. - Abstract: The function of dNTP hydrolase SAMHD1 as a viral restriction factor to inhibit the replication of several viruses in human immune cells was well established. However, its regulation and function in lung cancer have been elusive. Here, we report that SAMHD1 is down regulated both on protein and mRNA levels in lung adenocarcinoma compared to adjacent normal tissue. We also found that SAMHD1 promoter is highly methylated in lung adenocarcinoma, which may inhibit its gene expression. Furthermore, over expression of the SAMHD1 reduces dNTP level and inhibits the proliferation of lung tumor cells. These results reveal the regulation and function of SAMHD1 in lung cancer, which is important for the proliferation of lung tumor cells.

  13. Time-lapse cinematography of the capillary tube cell migration inhibition test.

    PubMed

    Bray, M A

    1980-01-01

    The kinetics of human and guinea pig cell migration inhibition have been studied using time-lapse cinematography of cells migrating from capillary tubes. Guinea pig and human cells exhibit markedly different kinetics in the absence of inhibitors. Specific antigen causes a dose-related inhibition of migration for up to 60 h using guinea pig cells and a peak of inhibition after 18 h using the human leucocyte system. The timing of measurement of maximum activity more critical for the latter test. The kinetics of lymphokine generation have been examined and the migration inhibitory activity of the plant mitogen (PHA), a Kurloff cell product and a continuous cell line supernatant have been compared with the inhibitory profiles of lymphokine preparations and specific antigen.

  14. Lumican Inhibits SNAIL-Induced Melanoma Cell Migration Specifically by Blocking MMP-14 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stasiak, Marta; Boncela, Joanna; Perreau, Corinne; Karamanou, Konstantina; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Proult, Isabelle; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Chakravarti, Shukti; Maquart, François-Xavier; Kowalska, M. Anna; Wegrowski, Yanusz; Brézillon, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan, inhibits MMP-14 activity and melanoma cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Snail triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions endowing epithelial cells with migratory and invasive properties during tumor progression. The aim of this work was to investigate lumican effects on MMP-14 activity and migration of Snail overexpressing B16F1 (Snail-B16F1) melanoma cells and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Lumican inhibits the Snail induced MMP-14 activity in B16F1 but not in HT-29 cells. In Snail-B16F1 cells, lumican inhibits migration, growth, and melanoma primary tumor development. A lumican-based strategy targeting Snail-induced MMP-14 activity might be useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:26930497

  15. p38 MAPK-inhibited dendritic cells induce superior antitumor immune responses and overcome regulatory T cell-mediated immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yong; Zhang, Mingjun; Wang, Siqing; Hong, Bangxing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Li, Haiyan; Zheng, Yuhuan; Yang, Jing; Davis, Richard E.; Qian, Jianfei; Hou, Jian; Yi, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy is a promising method but so far has demonstrated limited clinical benefits. Regulatory T cells (Treg) represent a major obstacle to cancer immunotherapy approaches. Here we show that inhibiting p38 MAPK during DC differentiation enables DCs to activate tumor-specific effector T cells (Teff), inhibiting the conversion of Treg and compromising Treg inhibitory effects on Teff. Inhibition of p38 MAPK in DCs lowers expression of PPARγ, activating p50 and upregulation of OX40L expression in DCs. OX40L/OX40 interactions between DCs and Teff and/or Treg are critical for priming effective and therapeutic antitumor responses. Similarly, p38 MAPK inhibition also augments the T cell-stimulatory capacity of human monocyte-derived DCs in the presence of Treg. These findings contribute to ongoing efforts to improve DC-based immunotherapy in human cancers. PMID:24957461

  16. PTEN Loss Antagonizes Calcitriol-mediated Growth Inhibition in Prostate Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) inhibits proliferation of multiple cancer cell types including prostate cells and upregulates p21 and/or p27, while loss of...the treatment of prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vitamin D3 , AKT inhibition, synergism, prostate cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...American men 1. It has been suggested that the development of clinical prostate cancer may be associated with vitamin D3 deficiency 2, 3

  17. Fibroblast growth factor-2 inhibits mineralization of osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells by inhibiting the functioning of matrix vesicles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Cui, Yazhou; Luan, Jing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhenxing; Han, Jinxiang

    2014-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) inhibits osteoblast mineralization, but the mechanism by which it does so is not fully understood. Matrix vesicles (MVs) play an essential role in the initiation of mineralization, so the current study examined the effect of FGF2 on the functioning of MVs to investigate this mechanism. This study found that FGF2 significantly inhibited differentiation and mineralization of osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells, as indicated by down-regulation of mRNA expression of the osteogenic master regulator runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and collagen 1 alpha 1 (Colla1), and by decreasing the formation of bone nodules. MVs were isolated from Saos-2 cells cultured in osteogenic medium supplemented with and without FGF2 and their presence was verified using electron microscopy and Western blotting. FGF2 markedly reduced the ALP activity of and in vitro mineralization by MVs. These findings suggest that FGF2 inhibits osteoblast mineralization by limiting the capacity of MVs.

  18. Inhibition of cell-cycle progression in human colorectal carcinoma Lovo cells by andrographolide.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming-Der; Lin, Hui-Hsuan; Lee, Yi-Che; Chao, Jian-Kang; Lin, Rong-An; Chen, Jing-Hsien

    2008-08-11

    In recent years, attention has been focused on the anti-cancer properties of pure components, an important role in the prevention of disease. Andrographolide (Andro), the major constituent of Andrographis paniculata (Burm. F.) Nees plant, is implicated towards its pharmacological activity. To investigate the mechanism basis for the anti-tumor properties of Andro, Andro was used to examine its effect on cell-cycle progression in human colorectal carcinoma Lovo cells. The data from cell growth experiment showed that Andro exhibited the anti-proliferation effect on Lovo cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This event was accompanied the arrest of the cells at the G1-S phase by Andro at the tested concentrations of 0-30 microM. Cellular uptake of Andro and Andro was confirmed by capillary electrophoresis analysis and the intracellular accumulation of Andro (0.61+/-0.07 microM/mg protein) was observed when treatment of Lovo cells with Andro for 12h. In addition, an accumulation of the cells in G1 phase (15% increase for 10 microM of Andro) was observed as well as by the association with a marked decrease in the protein expression of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cdk2 and Cdk4. Andro also inducted the content of Cdk inhibitor p21 and p16, and the phosphorylation of p53. Further immunoprecipitation studies found that, in response to the treatment, the formation of Cyclin D1/Cdk4 and Cyclin A/Cdk2 complexes had declined, preventing the phosphorylation of Rb and the subsequent dissociation of Rb/E2F complex. These results suggested Andro can inhibit Lovo cell growth by G1-S phase arrest, and was exerted by inducing the expression of p53, p21 and p16 that, in turn, repressed the activity of Cyclin D1/Cdk4 and/or Cyclin A/Cdk2, as well as Rb phosphorylation.

  19. Kuwanon V Inhibits Proliferation, Promotes Cell Survival and Increases Neurogenesis of Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Sun-Young; Park, Min-Hye; Lee, Mina; Kim, Jae-Ouk; Lee, Ha-Rim; Han, Byung Woo; Svendsen, Clive N.; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the ability to proliferate and differentiate into neurons and glia. Regulation of NSC fate by small molecules is important for the generation of a certain type of cell. The identification of small molecules that can induce new neurons from NSCs could facilitate regenerative medicine and drug development for neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we screened natural compounds to identify molecules that are effective on NSC cell fate determination. We found that Kuwanon V (KWV), which was isolated from the mulberry tree (Morus bombycis) root, increased neurogenesis in rat NSCs. In addition, during NSC differentiation, KWV increased cell survival and inhibited cell proliferation as shown by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine pulse experiments, Ki67 immunostaining and neurosphere forming assays. Interestingly, KWV enhanced neuronal differentiation and decreased NSC proliferation even in the presence of mitogens such as epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2. KWV treatment of NSCs reduced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, increased mRNA expression levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, down-regulated Notch/Hairy expression levels and up-regulated microRNA miR-9, miR-29a and miR-181a. Taken together, our data suggest that KWV modulates NSC fate to induce neurogenesis, and it may be considered as a new drug candidate that can regenerate or protect neurons in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25706719

  20. Notch inhibition suppresses nasopharyngeal carcinoma by depleting cancer stem-like side population cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shudong; Zhang, Ruxin; Liu, Fenye; Wang, Hong; Wu, Jing; Wang, Yanqing

    2012-08-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) is responsible for the initiation, proliferation and radiation resistance. Side population (SP) cells are a rare subset of cells enriched with CSCs. The targeting of key signaling pathways that are active in CSCs is a therapeutic approach to treating cancer. Notch signaling is important for the self-renewal and maintenance of stem cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that downregulation of Notch signaling could enhance radiosensitivity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells. In this study, we found that Notch signaling was highly activated in SP cells compared with that of non-SP (NSP) cells of NPC. Therefore, Notch inhibition could reduce the proportion of SP cells. As SP cells decreased, proliferation, anti-apoptosis and tumorigenesis were also decreased. This study shows that Notch inhibition may be a promising clinical approach in CSC-targeting therapy for NPC.

  1. BLNK suppresses pre-B-cell leukemogenesis through inhibition of JAK3.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Joji; Yamamoto, Mutsumi; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Satoh, Hitoshi; Bundo, Kenji; Kubo, Masato; Goitsuka, Ryo; Farrar, Michael A; Kitamura, Daisuke

    2009-02-12

    Pre-B-cell leukemia spontaneously develops in BLNK-deficient mice, and pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in children often lack BLNK protein expression, demonstrating that BLNK functions as a tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism by which BLNK suppresses pre-B-cell leukemia, as well as the identification of other genetic alterations that collaborate with BLNK deficiency to cause leukemogenesis, are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the JAK3/STAT5 signaling pathway is constitutively activated in pre-B leukemia cells derived from BLNK(-/-) mice, mostly due to autocrine production of IL-7. Inhibition of IL-7R signaling or JAK3/STAT5 activity resulted in the induction of p27(kip1) expression and cell-cycle arrest, accompanied by apoptosis in the leukemia cells. Transgene-derived constitutively active STAT5 (STAT5b-CA) strongly synergized with the loss of BLNK to initiate leukemia in vivo. In the leukemia cells, exogenously expressed BLNK inhibited autocrine JAK3/STAT5 signaling, resulting in p27(kip1) induction, cell-cycle arrest, and apoptosis. BLNK-inhibition of JAK3 was dependent on the binding of BLNK to JAK3. These data indicate that BLNK normally regulates IL-7-dependent proliferation and survival of pre-B cells through direct inhibition of JAK3. Thus, somatic loss of BLNK and concomitant mutations leading to constitutive activation of Jak/STAT5 pathway result in the generation of pre-B-cell leukemia.

  2. ERP44 inhibits human lung cancer cell migration mainly via IP3R2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xue; Jin, Meng; Chen, Ying-Xiao; Wang, Jun; Zhai, Kui; Chang, Yan; Yuan, Qi; Yao, Kai-Tai; Ji, Guangju

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cell migration is involved in tumour metastasis. However, the relationship between calcium signalling and cancer migration is not well elucidated. In this study, we used the human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line to examine the role of endoplasmic reticulum protein 44 (ERP44), which has been reported to regulate calcium release inside of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), in cell migration. We found that the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs/ITPRs) inhibitor 2-APB significantly inhibited A549 cell migration by inhibiting cell polarization and pseudopodium protrusion, which suggests that Ca2