Science.gov

Sample records for pork

  1. Pork Puzzlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Pork Producers Council, Des Moines, IA.

    Pork Puzzlers is a nutrition education activity booklet for elementary-level students. It includes word scrambles; quizzes with pictures that describe the Food Guide Pyramid; a nutrition word search; a mathematics problem that includes questions on pork; a maze that uses food clues; a letter decoding activity that focuses on a pork dinner; a meal…

  2. 7 CFR 1230.11 - Imported pork and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Imported pork and pork products. 1230.11 Section 1230... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information...

  3. 7 CFR 1230.11 - Imported pork and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Imported pork and pork products. 1230.11 Section 1230... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information...

  4. 7 CFR 1230.11 - Imported pork and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Imported pork and pork products. 1230.11 Section 1230... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information...

  5. 7 CFR 1230.11 - Imported pork and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Imported pork and pork products. 1230.11 Section 1230... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information...

  6. 7 CFR 1230.11 - Imported pork and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Imported pork and pork products. 1230.11 Section 1230... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information...

  7. 9 CFR 318.10 - Prescribed treatment of pork and products containing pork to destroy trichinae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sausage containing pork muscle tissue, and pork such as bacon and jowls, other than those covered by..., containing pork muscle tissue (not including pork hearts, pork stomachs, and pork livers), or the pork muscle...) Heating. (i) All parts of the pork muscle tissue shall be heated according to one of the time...

  8. 9 CFR 318.10 - Prescribed treatment of pork and products containing pork to destroy trichinae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... sausage containing pork muscle tissue, and pork such as bacon and jowls, other than those covered by..., containing pork muscle tissue (not including pork hearts, pork stomachs, and pork livers), or the pork muscle...) Heating. (i) All parts of the pork muscle tissue shall be heated according to one of the time...

  9. 9 CFR 318.10 - Prescribed treatment of pork and products containing pork to destroy trichinae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... sausage containing pork muscle tissue, and pork such as bacon and jowls, other than those covered by..., containing pork muscle tissue (not including pork hearts, pork stomachs, and pork livers), or the pork muscle...) Heating. (i) All parts of the pork muscle tissue shall be heated according to one of the time...

  10. 9 CFR 318.10 - Prescribed treatment of pork and products containing pork to destroy trichinae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... sausage containing pork muscle tissue, and pork such as bacon and jowls, other than those covered by..., containing pork muscle tissue (not including pork hearts, pork stomachs, and pork livers), or the pork muscle...) Heating. (i) All parts of the pork muscle tissue shall be heated according to one of the time...

  11. 7 CFR 1230.19 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1230.19 Pork. Pork means the flesh of a porcine animal....

  12. 7 CFR 1230.19 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1230.19 Pork. Pork means the flesh of a porcine animal....

  13. Replacement of Pork Meat with Pork Head Meat for Frankfurters

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeon, Ki-Hong; Park, Jong-Dae; Sung, Jung-Min; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of reducing pork meat concentrations from 50% to 30% and replacing it with up to 20% pork head meat on chemical composition, cooking characteristics, physicochemical and textural properties, apparent viscosity, and sensory characteristics of frankfurters was determined. The highest moisture content in frankfurters was found in the control and T1 (frankfurter with 45% pork meat + 5% pork head). Protein and fat contents in frankfurters with pork head meat added were significantly (p<0.05) higher than those in the control. When the concentration of pork head meat was increased from 0% to 20%, cooking loss, total expressible fluid separation, fat separation, and pH of frankfurters were increased, while the lightness, redness, yellowness, and apparent viscosity of frankfurters were decreased. Ash contents, cohesiveness, color, and tenderness of sensory characteristics of frankfurters added with different amounts of pork meat or pork head meat were not significantly (p>0.05) different from those of the control or there treatments. Frankfurters in T4 (frankfurter with 30% pork meat + 20% pork head) had the lowest (p<0.05) hardness and gumminess. The hardness and gumminess of frankfurters in other treatments were not significantly different (p>0.05) from that in the control. Frankfurters with higher pork head meat concentrations had lower flavor, juiciness, and overall acceptability scores. Therefore, replacing pork meat with pork head meat in the formulation could successfully produce results similar to those of control frankfurters. The best results were obtained when 10% pork head meat was used to replace pork meat.

  14. Replacement of Pork Meat with Pork Head Meat for Frankfurters

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeon, Ki-Hong; Park, Jong-Dae; Sung, Jung-Min; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of reducing pork meat concentrations from 50% to 30% and replacing it with up to 20% pork head meat on chemical composition, cooking characteristics, physicochemical and textural properties, apparent viscosity, and sensory characteristics of frankfurters was determined. The highest moisture content in frankfurters was found in the control and T1 (frankfurter with 45% pork meat + 5% pork head). Protein and fat contents in frankfurters with pork head meat added were significantly (p<0.05) higher than those in the control. When the concentration of pork head meat was increased from 0% to 20%, cooking loss, total expressible fluid separation, fat separation, and pH of frankfurters were increased, while the lightness, redness, yellowness, and apparent viscosity of frankfurters were decreased. Ash contents, cohesiveness, color, and tenderness of sensory characteristics of frankfurters added with different amounts of pork meat or pork head meat were not significantly (p>0.05) different from those of the control or there treatments. Frankfurters in T4 (frankfurter with 30% pork meat + 20% pork head) had the lowest (p<0.05) hardness and gumminess. The hardness and gumminess of frankfurters in other treatments were not significantly different (p>0.05) from that in the control. Frankfurters with higher pork head meat concentrations had lower flavor, juiciness, and overall acceptability scores. Therefore, replacing pork meat with pork head meat in the formulation could successfully produce results similar to those of control frankfurters. The best results were obtained when 10% pork head meat was used to replace pork meat. PMID:27621683

  15. Replacement of Pork Meat with Pork Head Meat for Frankfurters.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeon, Ki-Hong; Park, Jong-Dae; Sung, Jung-Min; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of reducing pork meat concentrations from 50% to 30% and replacing it with up to 20% pork head meat on chemical composition, cooking characteristics, physicochemical and textural properties, apparent viscosity, and sensory characteristics of frankfurters was determined. The highest moisture content in frankfurters was found in the control and T1 (frankfurter with 45% pork meat + 5% pork head). Protein and fat contents in frankfurters with pork head meat added were significantly (p<0.05) higher than those in the control. When the concentration of pork head meat was increased from 0% to 20%, cooking loss, total expressible fluid separation, fat separation, and pH of frankfurters were increased, while the lightness, redness, yellowness, and apparent viscosity of frankfurters were decreased. Ash contents, cohesiveness, color, and tenderness of sensory characteristics of frankfurters added with different amounts of pork meat or pork head meat were not significantly (p>0.05) different from those of the control or there treatments. Frankfurters in T4 (frankfurter with 30% pork meat + 20% pork head) had the lowest (p<0.05) hardness and gumminess. The hardness and gumminess of frankfurters in other treatments were not significantly different (p>0.05) from that in the control. Frankfurters with higher pork head meat concentrations had lower flavor, juiciness, and overall acceptability scores. Therefore, replacing pork meat with pork head meat in the formulation could successfully produce results similar to those of control frankfurters. The best results were obtained when 10% pork head meat was used to replace pork meat. PMID:27621683

  16. 7 CFR 1230.19 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pork. 1230.19 Section 1230.19 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1230.19 Pork. Pork...

  17. 7 CFR 1230.19 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pork. 1230.19 Section 1230.19 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1230.19 Pork. Pork...

  18. 7 CFR 1230.110 - Assessments on imported pork and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Assessments on imported pork and pork products. 1230... PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Rules and Regulations Assessments § 1230.110 Assessments on imported pork and pork products. (a) The following Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS)...

  19. 7 CFR 1230.608 - Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products... AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.608 Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products. The term Imported porcine...

  20. 7 CFR 1230.110 - Assessments on imported pork and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Assessments on imported pork and pork products. 1230... PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Rules and Regulations Assessments § 1230.110 Assessments on imported pork and pork products. (a) The following Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS)...

  1. 7 CFR 1230.608 - Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products... AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.608 Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products. The term Imported porcine...

  2. 7 CFR 1230.110 - Assessments on imported pork and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Assessments on imported pork and pork products. 1230... PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Rules and Regulations Assessments § 1230.110 Assessments on imported pork and pork products. (a) The following Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS)...

  3. 7 CFR 1230.608 - Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products... AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.608 Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products. The term Imported porcine...

  4. 7 CFR 1230.608 - Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products... AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.608 Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products. The term Imported porcine...

  5. 7 CFR 1230.608 - Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products... AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.608 Imported porcine animals, pork, and pork products. The term Imported porcine...

  6. 7 CFR 1230.19 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pork. 1230.19 Section 1230.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND... INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1230.19 Pork. Pork...

  7. 7 CFR 65.175 - Ground pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ground pork. 65.175 Section 65.175 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.175 Ground pork. Ground pork means...

  8. 7 CFR 65.215 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pork. 65.215 Section 65.215 Agriculture Regulations of..., PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.215 Pork. Pork means meat produced from hogs....

  9. 7 CFR 65.215 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pork. 65.215 Section 65.215 Agriculture Regulations of..., PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.215 Pork. Pork means meat produced from hogs....

  10. 7 CFR 65.175 - Ground pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ground pork. 65.175 Section 65.175 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.175 Ground pork. Ground pork means...

  11. 7 CFR 65.175 - Ground pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ground pork. 65.175 Section 65.175 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.175 Ground pork. Ground pork means...

  12. 7 CFR 65.215 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pork. 65.215 Section 65.215 Agriculture Regulations of..., PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.215 Pork. Pork means meat produced from hogs....

  13. 7 CFR 65.175 - Ground pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ground pork. 65.175 Section 65.175 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.175 Ground pork. Ground pork means...

  14. 7 CFR 65.215 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pork. 65.215 Section 65.215 Agriculture Regulations of..., PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.215 Pork. Pork means meat produced from hogs....

  15. Tapeworm infection - beef or pork

    MedlinePlus

    ... are infected when they pass segments of the worm in their stool, especially if the segments are ... In rare cases, worms can cause a blockage in the intestine. If pork tapeworm larvae move out of the intestine, they can cause ...

  16. 9 CFR 319.141 - Fresh pork sausage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fresh pork sausage. 319.141 Section... Sausage § 319.141 Fresh pork sausage. “Fresh Pork Sausage” is sausage prepared with fresh pork or frozen pork or both, but not including pork byproducts, and may contain Mechanically Separated (Species)...

  17. 9 CFR 319.141 - Fresh pork sausage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fresh pork sausage. 319.141 Section... Sausage § 319.141 Fresh pork sausage. “Fresh Pork Sausage” is sausage prepared with fresh pork or frozen pork or both, but not including pork byproducts, and may contain Mechanically Separated (Species)...

  18. 9 CFR 319.141 - Fresh pork sausage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fresh pork sausage. 319.141 Section... Sausage § 319.141 Fresh pork sausage. “Fresh Pork Sausage” is sausage prepared with fresh pork or frozen pork or both, but not including pork byproducts, and may contain Mechanically Separated (Species)...

  19. 7 CFR 1230.613 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pork. 1230.613 Section 1230.613 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.613 Pork. The term...

  20. 7 CFR 1230.20 - Pork product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pork product. 1230.20 Section 1230.20 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1230.20...

  1. 7 CFR 1230.613 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pork. 1230.613 Section 1230.613 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.613 Pork. The term...

  2. 7 CFR 1230.614 - Pork product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pork product. 1230.614 Section 1230.614 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.614 Pork product. The...

  3. 7 CFR 1230.20 - Pork product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pork product. 1230.20 Section 1230.20 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1230.20...

  4. 7 CFR 1230.613 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pork. 1230.613 Section 1230.613 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.613 Pork. The term...

  5. 7 CFR 1230.20 - Pork product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pork product. 1230.20 Section 1230.20 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1230.20...

  6. 7 CFR 1230.20 - Pork product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pork product. 1230.20 Section 1230.20 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1230.20...

  7. 7 CFR 1230.614 - Pork product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pork product. 1230.614 Section 1230.614 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.614 Pork product. The...

  8. 7 CFR 1230.613 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pork. 1230.613 Section 1230.613 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.613 Pork. The term...

  9. 7 CFR 1230.614 - Pork product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pork product. 1230.614 Section 1230.614 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.614 Pork product. The...

  10. 7 CFR 1230.614 - Pork product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pork product. 1230.614 Section 1230.614 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.614 Pork product. The...

  11. 7 CFR 1230.614 - Pork product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pork product. 1230.614 Section 1230.614 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.614 Pork product. The...

  12. 7 CFR 1230.20 - Pork product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pork product. 1230.20 Section 1230.20 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1230.20...

  13. 9 CFR 319.29 - Miscellaneous pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Miscellaneous pork products. (a) Partially defatted pork fatty tissue. “Partially Defatted Pork Fatty Tissue” is... fatty tissue, exclusive of skin. Such product shall have a pinkish color and a fresh odor and appearance....

  14. 9 CFR 319.29 - Miscellaneous pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Miscellaneous pork products. (a) Partially defatted pork fatty tissue. “Partially Defatted Pork Fatty Tissue” is... fatty tissue, exclusive of skin. Such product shall have a pinkish color and a fresh odor and appearance....

  15. 9 CFR 319.29 - Miscellaneous pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Miscellaneous pork products. (a) Partially defatted pork fatty tissue. “Partially Defatted Pork Fatty Tissue” is... fatty tissue, exclusive of skin. Such product shall have a pinkish color and a fresh odor and appearance....

  16. 9 CFR 319.29 - Miscellaneous pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Miscellaneous pork products. (a) Partially defatted pork fatty tissue. “Partially Defatted Pork Fatty Tissue” is... fatty tissue, exclusive of skin. Such product shall have a pinkish color and a fresh odor and appearance....

  17. The United States pork niche market phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Honeyman, M S; Pirog, R S; Huber, G H; Lammers, P J; Hermann, J R

    2006-08-01

    After the broad industrialization of the US pork industry, there has been a development of niche markets for export and domestic pork; that is, there is a pork niche market phenomenon. The US pork niche market phenomenon is characterized, and 2 of the major markets are explained in detail. With the Midwest's tradition of a diversified family-based agriculture and record low hog prices of the late 1990s, the conditions were conducive for this phenomenon to develop. Pork niche markets utilize various sales methods including Internet sales, local abattoir sales, direct marketing, farmer networks, and targeting to organized groups. In 2003, there were approximately 35 to 40 active pork niche marketing efforts in Iowa. The Berkshire breed is an example of a swine breed that has had a recent resurgence because of niche markets. Berkshire pork is known for tenderness and excellent quality. Berkshire registrations have increased 4-fold in the last 10 yr. One of the larger niche marketers of "natural pork" is Niman Ranch Pork, which has more than 400 farmer-producers and processes about 2,500 pigs weekly. Many US consumers of pork are interested in issues concerning the environment, food safety, pig welfare, and pig farm ownership and structure. These consumers may be willing to pay more for pork from farmers who are also concerned about these issues. Small- and medium-sized swine farmers are active in pork niche markets. Niche markets claim product differentiation by superior or unique product quality and social attributes. Quality attributes include certain swine breeds, and meat quality, freshness, taste or flavor, and tenderness. Social or credence attributes often are claimed and include freedom from antibiotics and growth promotants; local family farm production; natural, organic, outdoor, or bedded rearing; humane rearing; known origin; environmentally friendly production; and the absence of animal by-products in the feed. Niche pork markets and alternative swine

  18. The United States pork niche market phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Honeyman, M S; Pirog, R S; Huber, G H; Lammers, P J; Hermann, J R

    2006-08-01

    After the broad industrialization of the US pork industry, there has been a development of niche markets for export and domestic pork; that is, there is a pork niche market phenomenon. The US pork niche market phenomenon is characterized, and 2 of the major markets are explained in detail. With the Midwest's tradition of a diversified family-based agriculture and record low hog prices of the late 1990s, the conditions were conducive for this phenomenon to develop. Pork niche markets utilize various sales methods including Internet sales, local abattoir sales, direct marketing, farmer networks, and targeting to organized groups. In 2003, there were approximately 35 to 40 active pork niche marketing efforts in Iowa. The Berkshire breed is an example of a swine breed that has had a recent resurgence because of niche markets. Berkshire pork is known for tenderness and excellent quality. Berkshire registrations have increased 4-fold in the last 10 yr. One of the larger niche marketers of "natural pork" is Niman Ranch Pork, which has more than 400 farmer-producers and processes about 2,500 pigs weekly. Many US consumers of pork are interested in issues concerning the environment, food safety, pig welfare, and pig farm ownership and structure. These consumers may be willing to pay more for pork from farmers who are also concerned about these issues. Small- and medium-sized swine farmers are active in pork niche markets. Niche markets claim product differentiation by superior or unique product quality and social attributes. Quality attributes include certain swine breeds, and meat quality, freshness, taste or flavor, and tenderness. Social or credence attributes often are claimed and include freedom from antibiotics and growth promotants; local family farm production; natural, organic, outdoor, or bedded rearing; humane rearing; known origin; environmentally friendly production; and the absence of animal by-products in the feed. Niche pork markets and alternative swine

  19. 7 CFR 1230.110 - Assessments on imported pork and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Rules and Regulations Assessments § 1230.110.... Pork and pork products Article description Assessment Cents/lb Cents/kg 0203 Meat of swine, fresh....0000 Of swine, frozen: Livers .20 .440920 0206.49.0000 Of swine, frozen: Other .20 .440920 0210...

  20. 7 CFR 1230.110 - Assessments on imported pork and pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Rules and Regulations Assessments § 1230.110.... Pork and pork products Article description Assessment Cents/lb Cents/kg 0203 Meat of swine, fresh....0000 Of swine, frozen: Livers .20 .440920 0206.49.0000 Of swine, frozen: Other .20 .440920 0210...

  1. Zinc bioavailability in pork loin

    SciTech Connect

    Hortin, A.E.; Bechtel, P.J. Baker, D.H. )

    1991-03-15

    Pork loins were uniformly trimmed and divided into three groups: raw, roasted and braised. Following cooking, the loins were freeze dried and then ground to a fine granular consistency. Zinc levels of 51, 60 and 63 mg/kg dry matter (DM) were contained in the raw, roasted and braised products, respectively. The chick bioavailability (BV) assay employed a Zn-deficient soy isolate basal diet that was supplemented with 0, 5 or 10 mg Zn/kg from ZnSO{sub 4}{center dot}H{sub 2}O to produce a standard straight-line response in tibia Zn as a function of supplemental Zn intake. Experimental Zn sources were also added to the basal diet to provide 10 mg Zn/kg. Standard curve methodology indicated that Zn BV was unaffected by cooking. Roasted pork lion had a Zn BV of 184% relative to ZnSO{sub 4}{center dot}H{sub 2}O. Addition of 0.40% L-cysteine to the diet containing 10 mg Zn/kg from ZnSO{sub 4}{center dot}H{sub 2}O increased Zn BV to 175%. Results with histidine as a Zn-enhancing factor were variable. It is apparent that pork loin is an excellent source of bioavailable Zn, and SH-containing compounds such as cysteine and glutathione that are present in meat may contribute to enhanced gut absorption of meat-source Zn.

  2. Prediction of pork fat attributes using NIR Images of frozen and thawed pork.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Liu, L; Ngadi, M O

    2016-09-01

    The potential of NIR hyperspectral images of fresh, frozen, and frozen-thawed pork was investigated to quantify intramuscular fat (IMF) content and marbling score (MS) of pork. A Gabor filter which is a Gaussian function-based texture extraction algorithm was applied for image preprocessing after ROI (region of interest) selection. Both raw and Gabor filtered mean spectra of fresh, frozen, and frozen-thawed pork were calculated and their first derivatives at selected optimal wavelengths were used to establish multiple linear regression (MLR) models. The MLR models based on the first derivative of Gabor filtered mean spectra produced best results for both IMF content prediction and marbling score assessment. Models were used to visualize fat distribution in pork loin. The current study therefore demonstrated the potential of using NIR images of frozen-thawed pork to assess IMF content and using frozen and frozen-thawed pork to evaluate MS of pork.

  3. Prediction of pork fat attributes using NIR Images of frozen and thawed pork.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Liu, L; Ngadi, M O

    2016-09-01

    The potential of NIR hyperspectral images of fresh, frozen, and frozen-thawed pork was investigated to quantify intramuscular fat (IMF) content and marbling score (MS) of pork. A Gabor filter which is a Gaussian function-based texture extraction algorithm was applied for image preprocessing after ROI (region of interest) selection. Both raw and Gabor filtered mean spectra of fresh, frozen, and frozen-thawed pork were calculated and their first derivatives at selected optimal wavelengths were used to establish multiple linear regression (MLR) models. The MLR models based on the first derivative of Gabor filtered mean spectra produced best results for both IMF content prediction and marbling score assessment. Models were used to visualize fat distribution in pork loin. The current study therefore demonstrated the potential of using NIR images of frozen-thawed pork to assess IMF content and using frozen and frozen-thawed pork to evaluate MS of pork. PMID:27132204

  4. Factors Affecting the Textural Properties of Pork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmer, Sean Frederick

    2009-01-01

    Research concerning rate and extent of tenderization has focused on beef or lamb. However, it is critical to understand these processes in pork, especially as retailers move towards minimally processed or non-enhanced product. The objectives of this experiment were to evaluate the textural properties of pork (firmness and tenderness) by examining…

  5. 7 CFR 65.215 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pork. 65.215 Section 65.215 Agriculture Regulations of... MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS,...

  6. 9 CFR 319.160 - Smoked pork sausage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Smoked pork sausage. 319.160 Section 319.160 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... § 319.160 Smoked pork sausage. “Smoked Pork Sausage” is pork sausage that is smoked with hardwood...

  7. 9 CFR 319.160 - Smoked pork sausage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Smoked pork sausage. 319.160 Section 319.160 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... § 319.160 Smoked pork sausage. “Smoked Pork Sausage” is pork sausage that is smoked with hardwood...

  8. 9 CFR 319.160 - Smoked pork sausage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Smoked pork sausage. 319.160 Section 319.160 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... § 319.160 Smoked pork sausage. “Smoked Pork Sausage” is pork sausage that is smoked with hardwood...

  9. 9 CFR 319.160 - Smoked pork sausage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Smoked pork sausage. 319.160 Section... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Uncooked, Smoked Sausage § 319.160 Smoked pork sausage. “Smoked Pork Sausage” is pork sausage that is smoked with hardwood...

  10. 9 CFR 319.141 - Fresh pork sausage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fresh pork sausage. 319.141 Section... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Sausage Generally: Fresh Sausage § 319.141 Fresh pork sausage. “Fresh Pork Sausage” is sausage prepared with fresh pork or...

  11. 7 CFR 1230.613 - Pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pork. 1230.613 Section 1230.613 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... means the flesh of a porcine animal....

  12. 7 CFR 65.175 - Ground pork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING... pork of skeletal origin that is produced in conformance with all applicable Food Safety and...

  13. Quality Improvement of Pork Loin by Dry Aging

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Cheorun; Lee, Kyung Haeng; You, Insin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of dry aging on the quality of pork loin. Longissimus lumborum muscles were dissected from the right half of five pork carcasses and were used as the control samples. The left halves of the carcasses were aged at 2±1℃ and a relative humidity of 80% for 40 d. The total aerobic bacteria count was similar between the control and dry-aged pork loin (p>0.05). Lactic-acid bacteria was absent in both the control and dry-aged pork loins. Dry-aged pork loin contained low moisture and high protein and ash compared to the controls (p<0.05). The pH was higher and cooking loss was lower in dry-aged pork loin compared to that in the control (p<0.05). Flavor related compounds, such as total free amino acid, hypoxanthine, and inosine of pork loin were higher in dry-aged pork loin; whereas, inosine 5'-monophosphate and guanosine 5'-monophosphate were low in dry-aged pork loin than control (p<0.05). There was no difference in carnosine and anserine content between dry-aged pork loin and the control (p>0.05). Dry-aged pork loin had lower hardness and shear force and received higher core in sensory evaluation than the control (p<0.05). According to the results, dry aging improved textural and sensorial quality of pork loin. PMID:27433108

  14. Quality Improvement of Pork Loin by Dry Aging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheol Woo; Lee, Ju Ri; Kim, Min Kyu; Jo, Cheorun; Lee, Kyung Haeng; You, Insin; Jung, Samooel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of dry aging on the quality of pork loin. Longissimus lumborum muscles were dissected from the right half of five pork carcasses and were used as the control samples. The left halves of the carcasses were aged at 2±1℃ and a relative humidity of 80% for 40 d. The total aerobic bacteria count was similar between the control and dry-aged pork loin (p>0.05). Lactic-acid bacteria was absent in both the control and dry-aged pork loins. Dry-aged pork loin contained low moisture and high protein and ash compared to the controls (p<0.05). The pH was higher and cooking loss was lower in dry-aged pork loin compared to that in the control (p<0.05). Flavor related compounds, such as total free amino acid, hypoxanthine, and inosine of pork loin were higher in dry-aged pork loin; whereas, inosine 5'-monophosphate and guanosine 5'-monophosphate were low in dry-aged pork loin than control (p<0.05). There was no difference in carnosine and anserine content between dry-aged pork loin and the control (p>0.05). Dry-aged pork loin had lower hardness and shear force and received higher core in sensory evaluation than the control (p<0.05). According to the results, dry aging improved textural and sensorial quality of pork loin. PMID:27433108

  15. 76 FR 23513 - Wholesale Pork Reporting Negotiated Rulemaking Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 59 Wholesale Pork Reporting Negotiated... committee meeting. SUMMARY: This document announces the third meeting of the Wholesale Pork Reporting... language to amend the Livestock Mandatory Reporting (LMR) regulations to implement mandatory pork...

  16. Consumer choice of pork chops in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, M T; Guo, H L; Tseng, T F; Roan, S W; Ngapo, T M

    2010-07-01

    Digital photographs of pork chops varying systematically in appearance were presented to 716 Taiwanese consumers in a study that aimed to identify the most important characteristics of fresh pork which determine consumer choice in Taiwan. Relationships between consumer segmentation in choice and socio-demographic and cultural differences were also investigated. Colour and fat cover were the most frequently chosen of the four characteristics studied. Dark red colour was preferred by 64% of consumers and lean fat cover by 44%. Marbling and drip were less important in the decision making process being used by less than a half of consumers. The four preference-based clusters of consumers showed no correlation with socio-demographic-based consumer clusters, but did show significant links with possession of a refrigerator, age at which schooling was completed, liking pork for its price and gender of consumer.

  17. Adapting to Pork-Barrel Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, John

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the increasing trend toward the pork-barrel funding of science projects, particularly for grants to academic institutions. Addresses the new strategies being employed by opponents of such funding. Describes some of the possible ramifications of the various strategies and the perceived link between science funding and economic growth. (TW)

  18. Salmonella Derby Clonal Spread from Pork

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Ana; Herrera-León, Silvia; Pozo, Javier; Rubio, Pedro; Usera, Miguel A.; Carvajal, Ana; Echeita, M. Aurora

    2005-01-01

    The genetic diversity of the Derby serotype of Salmonella enterica in Spain was examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Out of 24 identified PFGE profiles, a major clone was detected in 19% of strains from humans, 52% from food, and 62% from swine. This clone (clone 1) was isolated from pork products, suggesting swine as its source. PMID:15890121

  19. Salmonella Derby clonal spread from pork.

    PubMed

    Valdezate, Sylvia; Vidal, Ana; Herrera-León, Silvia; Pozo, Javier; Rubio, Pedro; Usera, Miguel A; Carvajal, Ana; Echeita, M Aurora

    2005-05-01

    The genetic diversity of the Derby serotype of Salmonella enterica in Spain was examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Out of 24 identified PFGE profiles, a major clone was detected in 19% of strains from humans, 52% from food, and 62% from swine. This clone (clone 1) was isolated from pork products, suggesting swine as its source.

  20. Beef and pork packing industries.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, James M

    2003-07-01

    A remarkable transformation of the meatpacking industry occurred in the last 25 years. That transformation consolidated the industry into one that could deliver large volumes of meat at low costs. Slaughter plants grew much larger and realized economies of scale from their size, and operations within plants were rationalized to emphasize the delivery of a small set of consistent major products (boxed beef, cut-up pork, and by-products) to retailers, wholesalers, and other processors. Similar developments occurred in livestock feeding whereby the industry realized significant cost reductions by consolidating production in very large cattle feedlots and hog farms. Gains from scale have largely been met (absent the development of new technologies that are not yet on the horizon); therefore, we are unlikely to see similar shifts in plant sizes in the next 25 years. The major forces affecting meatpacking and livestock feeding in the near future are more likely to revolve around tighter coordination among livestock production, meatpacking, wholesaling, and retailing. Although much of the recent response to food safety concerns took the form of investments in equipment, testing, and training within meatpacking plants, packers and retailers are likely to focus more on assurance of livestock production quality and methods in the future. Such assurance can be met through vertical integration or through a greater reliance on tightly drawn contracts; producers who attempt to provide the assurance while still selling through cash markets will need to develop paper trails of testing and quality assurance that will move through the marketing chain with livestock. Similarly, because of likely increased future demand for meats of assured consumer qualities, such as organically grown products or branded meat products with very specific traits, producers will likely need to provide similar indicators of assurance throughout the marketing chain. Finally, the funding offered through

  1. Pre-slaughter handling and pork quality.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, L; Van de Perre, V; Permentier, L; De Bie, S; Verbeke, G; Geers, R

    2015-02-01

    Environmental variables, as sound levels, were collected during the pre-slaughter process in 18 different Belgian commercial slaughterhouses. Four pre-slaughter phases were determined: firstly after arrival of the truck at the slaughterhouse and just before unloading, secondly during unloading, thirdly at lairage and finally while moving to the stunner. A total of 8508 pigs was examined during the pre-slaughter process, of which the pH(LT) (M. longissimus thoracis), at 30 min post-mortem was measured. For each pre-slaughter phase, variables which might influence pork quality were determined. Moreover, this study made it possible to infer a checklist to represent and predict PSE traits of pork for all kind of pre-slaughter situations. The checklist shows also that the impact on pork quality is more decisive for the variables measured close to the stunning phase. Hence, this information is useful for the industry to optimize handling of pigs, reducing the risk for PSE traits.

  2. Presence of Helicobacter suis on pork carcasses.

    PubMed

    De Cooman, L; Houf, K; Smet, A; Flahou, B; Ducatelle, R; De Bruyne, E; Pasmans, F; Haesebrouck, F

    2014-09-18

    Helicobacter (H.) suis is a world-wide spread pathogen which not only colonizes the stomach of pigs, but is also the most prevalent gastric non-H. pylori Helicobacter (NHPH) species in humans. H. suis infections are associated with gastric lesions both in pigs and in humans. Recently, the presence of viable H. suis bacteria has been demonstrated in minced pork, suggesting that manipulation or consumption of contaminated pig meat is a possible route of transmission of this zoonotic agent. The main goal of this study was to determine the extent of pork carcass contamination with H. suis at slaughter. In two consecutive studies, the occurrence of H. suis DNA was assessed in scalding water, head and mouth swabs, mesenteric lymph nodes, palatine tonsils and on the chest, shoulder and ham region of pork carcasses from three slaughterhouses using qPCR with ureA gene based H. suis-specific primers. H. suis DNA was detected on carcasses in all slaughterhouses, in 8.3% of all 1083 samples. It was found in all sampled matrices, except for the palatine tonsils and scalding water samples. Contamination levels of dressed pork samples did not exceed 184 genomic equivalents per 100cm(2) (shoulder, ham) or 300cm(2) (chest). All positive PCR products were subjected to sequence analysis of the ureA gene to confirm the identification of H. suis bacteria. Using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) on a selection of the positive samples, 5 unique sequence types (STs) could be assigned. Multiple H. suis strains were present on samples derived from one specific pig herd. Since H. suis DNA was detected in 11% (n: 90) of the mesenteric lymph nodes derived at the slaughterhouse, it was determined whether these organisms can colonize the mesenteric lymph nodes after experimental infection. Despite high-level colonization of the porcine stomachs with the H. suis strain, no H. suis DNA was detected in the mesenteric lymph nodes at four weeks after experimental infection. This might indicate that

  3. Effect of Replacing Pork Fat with Vegetable Oils on Quality Properties of Emulsion-type Pork Sausages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jin; Jung, Eun-Hee; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Joon; Choi, Yang-Ii

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the quality properties of emulsion-type pork sausages when pork fat is replaced with vegetable oil mixtures during processing. Pork sausages were processed under six treatment conditions: T1 (20% pork fat), T2 (10% pork fat + 2% grape seed oil + 4% olive oil + 4% canola oil), T3 (4% grape seed oil + 16% canola oil), T4 (4% grape seed oil + 4% olive oil + 12% canola oil), T5 (4% grape seed oil + 8% olive oil + 8% canola oil), and T6 (4% grape seed oil + 12% olive oil + 4% canola oil). Proximate analysis showed significant (p<0.05) differences in the moisture, protein, and fat content among the emulsion-type pork sausages. Furthermore, replacement with vegetable oil mixtures significantly decreased the ash content (p<0.05), increased water-holding capacity in emulsion-type pork sausages. Also, cholesterol content in T6 was significantly lower than T2 (p<0.05). In the texture profile analysis, hardness and chewiness of emulsion-type pork sausages were significantly (p<0.05) decreased by vegetable oil mixtures replacement. On the contrary, cohesiveness and springiness in the T4 group were similar to those of group T1. The unsaturated fatty acid content in emulsion-type pork sausages was increased by vegetable oil mixtures replacement. Replacement of pork fat with mixed vegetable oils had no negative effects on the quality properties of emulsion-type pork sausages, and due to its reduced saturated fatty acid composition, the product had the quality characteristics of the healthy meat products desired by consumers.

  4. Effect of Replacing Pork Fat with Vegetable Oils on Quality Properties of Emulsion-type Pork Sausages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Jin; Jung, Eun-Hee; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Joon; Choi, Yang-II

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the quality properties of emulsion-type pork sausages when pork fat is replaced with vegetable oil mixtures during processing. Pork sausages were processed under six treatment conditions: T1 (20% pork fat), T2 (10% pork fat + 2% grape seed oil + 4% olive oil + 4% canola oil), T3 (4% grape seed oil + 16% canola oil), T4 (4% grape seed oil + 4% olive oil + 12% canola oil), T5 (4% grape seed oil + 8% olive oil + 8% canola oil), and T6 (4% grape seed oil + 12% olive oil + 4% canola oil). Proximate analysis showed significant (p<0.05) differences in the moisture, protein, and fat content among the emulsion-type pork sausages. Furthermore, replacement with vegetable oil mixtures significantly decreased the ash content (p<0.05), increased water-holding capacity in emulsion-type pork sausages. Also, cholesterol content in T6 was significantly lower than T2 (p<0.05). In the texture profile analysis, hardness and chewiness of emulsion-type pork sausages were significantly (p<0.05) decreased by vegetable oil mixtures replacement. On the contrary, cohesiveness and springiness in the T4 group were similar to those of group T1. The unsaturated fatty acid content in emulsion-type pork sausages was increased by vegetable oil mixtures replacement. Replacement of pork fat with mixed vegetable oils had no negative effects on the quality properties of emulsion-type pork sausages, and due to its reduced saturated fatty acid composition, the product had the quality characteristics of the healthy meat products desired by consumers. PMID:26761810

  5. Effect of Replacing Pork Fat with Vegetable Oils on Quality Properties of Emulsion-type Pork Sausages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jin; Jung, Eun-Hee; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Joon; Choi, Yang-Ii

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the quality properties of emulsion-type pork sausages when pork fat is replaced with vegetable oil mixtures during processing. Pork sausages were processed under six treatment conditions: T1 (20% pork fat), T2 (10% pork fat + 2% grape seed oil + 4% olive oil + 4% canola oil), T3 (4% grape seed oil + 16% canola oil), T4 (4% grape seed oil + 4% olive oil + 12% canola oil), T5 (4% grape seed oil + 8% olive oil + 8% canola oil), and T6 (4% grape seed oil + 12% olive oil + 4% canola oil). Proximate analysis showed significant (p<0.05) differences in the moisture, protein, and fat content among the emulsion-type pork sausages. Furthermore, replacement with vegetable oil mixtures significantly decreased the ash content (p<0.05), increased water-holding capacity in emulsion-type pork sausages. Also, cholesterol content in T6 was significantly lower than T2 (p<0.05). In the texture profile analysis, hardness and chewiness of emulsion-type pork sausages were significantly (p<0.05) decreased by vegetable oil mixtures replacement. On the contrary, cohesiveness and springiness in the T4 group were similar to those of group T1. The unsaturated fatty acid content in emulsion-type pork sausages was increased by vegetable oil mixtures replacement. Replacement of pork fat with mixed vegetable oils had no negative effects on the quality properties of emulsion-type pork sausages, and due to its reduced saturated fatty acid composition, the product had the quality characteristics of the healthy meat products desired by consumers. PMID:26761810

  6. Occurrence of Yersinia spp. in raw beef, pork and chicken.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, H; Hoshina, K; Nakamura, R; Ito, Y

    1987-04-01

    One hundred and twenty raw ground beef, pork and chicken samples from ten local grocery stores during a one year period were assayed for the presence of Yersinia spp., using direct and postenrichment KOH treatment. Seven thousand and fifty-five different isolates were recovered from 119 (99%) samples of beef and pork and 118 (98%) samples of chicken, including 27 Yersinia enterocolitica serotype 03 biotype 3B phage type 2 (4 pork samples), 4 Y. enterocolitica serotype 03 biotype 4 phage type 8 (3 pork samples), 4,066 Y. enterocolitica biotype 1, 2,194 Yersinia intermedia, 509 Yersinia frederiksenii, and 251 Yersinia kristensenii. Y. enterocolitica serotype 03 was isolated from 6 pork samples, including simultaneously isolation of both biotypes 3B and 4 from one sample. There was the negative correlation between the incidence of isolation of serotype 03 and the environmental temperature, but other environmental Yersinia spp. were frequently isolated through the year. Y. enterocolitica serotype 03 isolates were counted by alkali direct treatment at less than 10(3) cells per g of pork samples, and environmental Yersinia spp. at less than 10(5) cells per g of beef, pork and chicken samples. This may be the first evidence that some pork is contaminated with at least 10(3) Y. enterocolitica serotype 03 cells per g.

  7. 76 FR 12887 - Wholesale Pork Reporting Negotiated Rulemaking Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... committee meeting. SUMMARY: This document announces the second meeting of the Wholesale Pork Reporting... language to amend the Livestock Mandatory Reporting (LMR) regulations to implement mandatory pork price... the Notice of Establishment of Negotiated Rulemaking Committee published November 24, 2010 (75...

  8. Non-invasive Prediction of Pork Loin Tenderness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present experiment was conducted to develop a non-invasive method to predict tenderness of pork loins. Boneless pork loins (n = 901) were evaluated either on line on the loin boning and trimming line of large-scale commercial plants (n = 465) or at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center abattoir ...

  9. Production systems and influence on eating quality of pork.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, Michel; Lebret, Bénédicte

    2010-02-01

    The present paper reviews the available information on the eating quality of pork from the perspective of production systems considered at farm level. Among the specifications differentiating systems having a claim on eating quality, breed, feeding strategy, rearing conditions and slaughter age/weight of the pigs may influence pork eating quality. Specific genetic X environment interactions such as the use of slow growing-fat local breeds reared in extensive conditions, as encountered in local Mediterranean systems, lead to high eating quality of pork and pork products Organic production per se has little influence on the eating quality of pork. Welfare-oriented specifications such as enriched living environment, outdoor access or free-range rearing have limited consequences on pork quality. Because boar taint negatively impacts the consumer acceptability of pork, a total ban on castration to improve animal welfare would be a real challenge for the management of pork quality in those countries where entire male pig production is not currently common. PMID:20374788

  10. From pig to pork: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the pork production chain.

    PubMed

    Lassok, Birgit; Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois

    2013-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major global public health concern and could be a food safety issue. Recurrent reports have documented that pig herds are an important reservoir for MRSA, specifically the livestock-associated sequence type 398. The high prevalence of MRSA in pig primary production facilities and the frequent detection of MRSA of the same types in pork and pig meat products raise the question of underlying mechanisms behind the introduction and transmission of MRSA along the pork production chain. A comprehensive review of current literature on the worldwide presence of livestock-associated MRSA in various steps of the pork production chain revealed that the slaughter process plays a decisive role in MRSA transmission from farm to fork. Superficial heat treatments such as scalding and flaming during the slaughter process can significantly reduce the burden of MRSA on the carcasses. However, recontamination with MRSA might occur via surface treating machinery, as a result of fecal contamination at evisceration, or via increased human handling during meat processing. By optimizing processes for carcass decontamination and avoiding recontamination by effective cleaning and personal hygiene management, transmission of MRSA from pig to pork can be minimized.

  11. 76 FR 28910 - Importation of Live Swine, Swine Semen, Pork, and Pork Products From Liechtenstein and Switzerland

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... Semen, Pork, and Pork Products From Liechtenstein and Switzerland AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... the importation of animals and animal products to add Liechtenstein and Switzerland to the region of... the regulations list regions of the world that are declared free of or low-risk for CSF....

  12. The impacts of information about the risks and benefits of pork consumption on Chinese consumers' perceptions towards, and intention to eat, pork.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Wim; Liu, Rongduo

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the impacts of information on the benefits and risks of eating pork on Chinese consumers' attitudes and intentions. Data were collected in March 2013 through a consumer survey (n=909) in Beijing and Baoding City. An experiment was conducted using three types of message (positive, negative, and balanced) combined with three information sources (government, research institutes, and the pork industry). Participants ate pork almost every second day. They perceived pork as rather nutritious and relatively expensive and had neutral views about its healthiness and safety. Exposure to negative information (about risks only) resulted in a significant and negative change in consumers' perceptions of pork's nutritional value, price, healthiness and safety, while exposure to positive information (about benefits only) caused a positive change in consumers' perceptions about pork's healthiness and safety. Exposure to balanced information resulted in a significant and negative change in the perceived nutritional value of pork. Participants' intended frequency of pork consumption was significantly lower after exposure to information, irrespective of the type of information received. Exposure to risks-only information decreased consumers' intention to eat pork, while exposure to benefit-only information had a positive effect on consumers' intentions to eat pork. Exposure to balanced risk/benefit information had no effect on intended pork consumption. Of the information used, governmental materials were found to have a positive impact on consumers' perceptions of pork's safety. Implications for communication strategies with Chinese consumers about pork consumption are discussed. PMID:25119515

  13. The impacts of information about the risks and benefits of pork consumption on Chinese consumers' perceptions towards, and intention to eat, pork.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Wim; Liu, Rongduo

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the impacts of information on the benefits and risks of eating pork on Chinese consumers' attitudes and intentions. Data were collected in March 2013 through a consumer survey (n=909) in Beijing and Baoding City. An experiment was conducted using three types of message (positive, negative, and balanced) combined with three information sources (government, research institutes, and the pork industry). Participants ate pork almost every second day. They perceived pork as rather nutritious and relatively expensive and had neutral views about its healthiness and safety. Exposure to negative information (about risks only) resulted in a significant and negative change in consumers' perceptions of pork's nutritional value, price, healthiness and safety, while exposure to positive information (about benefits only) caused a positive change in consumers' perceptions about pork's healthiness and safety. Exposure to balanced information resulted in a significant and negative change in the perceived nutritional value of pork. Participants' intended frequency of pork consumption was significantly lower after exposure to information, irrespective of the type of information received. Exposure to risks-only information decreased consumers' intention to eat pork, while exposure to benefit-only information had a positive effect on consumers' intentions to eat pork. Exposure to balanced risk/benefit information had no effect on intended pork consumption. Of the information used, governmental materials were found to have a positive impact on consumers' perceptions of pork's safety. Implications for communication strategies with Chinese consumers about pork consumption are discussed.

  14. Requirements of supply chain management in differentiating European pork chains.

    PubMed

    Trienekens, Jacques; Wognum, Nel

    2013-11-01

    This paper summarizes results obtained by research into pork chain management in the EU Integrated Project Q-Porkchains. Changing demands for intrinsic and extrinsic quality attributes of pork products impact the way supply chain management should be organized from the farmer down to the consumer. The paper shows the importance of Quality Management Systems for integrating supply chains and enhancing consumer confidence. The paper also presents innovations in information system integration for aligning information exchange in the supply chain and logistics concepts based on innovative measurement technologies at the slaughterhouse stage. In the final section research challenges towards sustainable pork supply chains satisfying current consumer demands are presented. PMID:23611335

  15. Requirements of supply chain management in differentiating European pork chains.

    PubMed

    Trienekens, Jacques; Wognum, Nel

    2013-11-01

    This paper summarizes results obtained by research into pork chain management in the EU Integrated Project Q-Porkchains. Changing demands for intrinsic and extrinsic quality attributes of pork products impact the way supply chain management should be organized from the farmer down to the consumer. The paper shows the importance of Quality Management Systems for integrating supply chains and enhancing consumer confidence. The paper also presents innovations in information system integration for aligning information exchange in the supply chain and logistics concepts based on innovative measurement technologies at the slaughterhouse stage. In the final section research challenges towards sustainable pork supply chains satisfying current consumer demands are presented.

  16. Benchmarking value in the pork supply chain: Characterization of US pork in the retail marketplace.

    PubMed

    Wright, L I; Scanga, J A; Belk, K E; Engle, T E; Tatum, J D; Person, R C; McKenna, D R; Griffin, D B; McKeith, F K; Savell, J W; Smith, G C

    2005-11-01

    Retail pork from eight US cities was obtained for quality and palatability evaluations. Boneless pork loin chops were classified into one of three quality categories - "high," "average," or "low" - with higher quality chops possessing more desirable color, marbling, juiciness, and shear force characteristics than lower quality chops. Loin chops that were enhanced (injected with solution to improve juiciness and/or tenderness) had higher (P<0.05) pH, less purge and cook loss, and higher palatability ratings compared to non-enhanced chops. Hams compared by their protein fat free (PFF) classifications showed that ham and water product received the highest (P<0.05) ratings for juiciness and tenderness, and ham with natural juices received the highest (P<0.05) texture, ham flavor intensity, and smoke flavor ratings. Bacon was compared by price/brand categories; however, the highest priced, national branded bacon (US$12.03/kg) was similar (P>0.05) for most quality and all palatability traits to the lowest priced, national branded bacon (US$6.47/kg) and the store branded bacon (US$8.30/kg) even though retail prices differed widely. Overall, there were tremendous ranges in values for these products indicating that retail pork is quite variable and that efforts to improve the quality and consistency of it must continue.

  17. Hyperspectral imaging technique for determination of pork freshness attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongyu; Zhang, Leilei; Peng, Yankun; Tang, Xiuying; Chao, Kuanglin; Dhakal, Sagar

    2011-06-01

    Freshness of pork is an important quality attribute, which can vary greatly in storage and logistics. The specific objectives of this research were to develop a hyperspectral imaging system to predict pork freshness based on quality attributes such as total volatile basic-nitrogen (TVB-N), pH value and color parameters (L*,a*,b*). Pork samples were packed in seal plastic bags and then stored at 4°C. Every 12 hours. Hyperspectral scattering images were collected from the pork surface at the range of 400 nm to 1100 nm. Two different methods were performed to extract scattering feature spectra from the hyperspectral scattering images. First, the spectral scattering profiles at individual wavelengths were fitted accurately by a three-parameter Lorentzian distribution (LD) function; second, reflectance spectra were extracted from the scattering images. Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) method was used to establish prediction models to predict pork freshness. The results showed that the PLSR models based on reflectance spectra was better than combinations of LD "parameter spectra" in prediction of TVB-N with a correlation coefficient (r) = 0.90, a standard error of prediction (SEP) = 7.80 mg/100g. Moreover, a prediction model for pork freshness was established by using a combination of TVB-N, pH and color parameters. It could give a good prediction results with r = 0.91 for pork freshness. The research demonstrated that hyperspectral scattering technique is a valid tool for real-time and nondestructive detection of pork freshness.

  18. Effect of processing plant on pork quality.

    PubMed

    Hambrecht, E; Eissen, J J; Verstegen, M W A

    2003-06-01

    The impact of processing plant on pork quality was studied by assessing pork quality in three commercial plants (A, B, C). Plants differed in the layout of the races, stunning systems (A and B: electrical, C: CO(2) stunning) and chilling systems (A: rapid chilling, B and C: conventional). Factors not related to the processing plants (e.g. genetic background of animals, transport, lairage) were standardized. In total, nine batches of about 150 pigs each were processed. Each batch was purchased at a commercial farm and randomly divided into three groups for delivery to the three processing plants. Meat quality was evaluated by measuring early post-mortem muscle pH and temperature as well as ultimate pH, meat colour (Minolta Chroma Meter and Japanese colour scale), filter paper score (FPS), electrical conductivity (EC) and drip loss. Plant C produced an inferior quality compared to plants A and B: meat was paler (C: 2.8 vs. A: 2.9 and B: 3.0 on the Japanese colour scale) and had higher drip losses (C: 5.2 vs. A: 4.8 and B: 4.9%). Meat colour hardly differed between plants A and B but waterholding properties were best at plant A as indicated by FPS (A: 2.4 vs. B: 2.8 vs. C: 3.3) and EC (A: 5.4 vs. B: 6.4 vs. C: 7.4 mS). It is concluded that processing plant may influence meat quality. Correlations between early post-mortem measurements and meat quality traits were low. Nevertheless, high carcass temperatures and low pH values early post-mortem were shown to lead to inferior meat quality.

  19. Formation and mitigation of heterocyclic aromatic amines in fried pork.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Yu, Chundi; Mei, Jingbo; Wang, Shuo

    2013-01-01

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are potent mutagens and carcinogens generated during the heat processing of meat. HAAs, which are abundant in processed meat products, include 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (4,8-DiMeIQx), and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (PhIP). The content of these three HAAs in fried pork was determined by LC-MS/MS. The effects of frying time and temperature, sample shape, and addition of antioxidants on the generation of HAAs were investigated. The results show that HAAs were produced during frying, and their levels increased with increasing frying time and temperature. Pork patties had the highest concentration of HAAs compared with pork meatballs and pork strips. The addition of antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB), liquorice extract, tea polyphenol, phytic acid and sodium iso-ascorbate to pork before frying had an inhibitory effect on HAA generation, with AOB being the most effective antioxidant. Inhibition levels of nearly 69.73% for MeIQx, 53.59% for 4,8-DiMeIQx and 77.07% for PhIP in fried pork were achieved when the concentrations of AOB added were 0.02, 0.01 and 0.10 g kg⁻¹, respectively.

  20. Factors of significance for pork quality-a review.

    PubMed

    Rosenvold, Katja; Andersen, Henrik J

    2003-07-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge about factors of importance for pork quality with special emphasis on technological quality attributes. It is evident that production and slaughter factors can be used to control technological quality traits. However, most of the present knowledge is based on studies investigating the influence of a single or at the most two factors. This survey reveals that: -Most important, an understanding of how production and slaughter factors interact in relation to pork quality is a must to give the maximum number of tools to control pork quality and hereby meat quality demands of tomorrow. -The existence of a new genetic pool (elimination of the halothane and RN(-) genes in the commercial pig populations of tomorrow) force the meat science into a renaissance, as the influence of production and slaughter factors on pork quality may be fundamentally different in this new genetic pool. -A basic understanding on how muscle glycogen stores are influenced by genotype and feeding regime and the interaction with pre-slaughter handling might be the next major breakthrough in controlling technological pork quality. -Introduction of new production systems claim parallel studies to prevent unforseen negative effect on quality. -A holistic approach is needed to give an overall understanding of the influence of production, peri and post mortem factors on pork quality.

  1. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella spp. in pork burger patties.

    PubMed

    Gurman, P M; Ross, T; Holds, G L; Jarrett, R G; Kiermeier, A

    2016-02-16

    Predictive models, to estimate the reduction in Escherichia coli O157:H7 concentration in beef burgers, have been developed to inform risk management decisions; no analogous model exists for Salmonella spp. in pork burgers. In this study, "Extra Lean" and "Regular" fat pork minces were inoculated with Salmonella spp. (Salmonella 4,[5],12,i:-, Salmonella Senftenberg and Salmonella Typhimurium) and formed into pork burger patties. Patties were cooked on an electric skillet (to imitate home cooking) to one of seven internal temperatures (46, 49, 52, 55, 58, 61, 64 °C) and Salmonella enumerated. A generalised linear logistic regression model was used to develop a predictive model for the Salmonella concentration based on the internal endpoint temperature. It was estimated that in pork mince with a fat content of 6.1%, Salmonella survival will be decreased by -0.2407log10 CFU/g for a 1 °C increase in internal endpoint temperature, with a 5-log10 reduction in Salmonella concentration estimated to occur when the geometric centre temperature reaches 63 °C. The fat content influenced the rate of Salmonella inactivation (P=0.043), with Salmonella survival increasing as fat content increased, though this effect became negligible as the temperature approached 62 °C. Fat content increased the time required for patties to achieve a specified internal temperature (P=0.0106 and 0.0309 for linear and quadratic terms respectively), indicating that reduced fat pork mince may reduce the risk of salmonellosis from consumption of pork burgers. Salmonella serovar did not significantly affect the model intercepts (P=0.86) or slopes (P=0.10) of the fitted logistic curve. This predictive model can be applied to estimate the reduction in Salmonella in pork burgers after cooking to a specific endpoint temperature and hence to assess food safety risk.

  2. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella spp. in pork burger patties.

    PubMed

    Gurman, P M; Ross, T; Holds, G L; Jarrett, R G; Kiermeier, A

    2016-02-16

    Predictive models, to estimate the reduction in Escherichia coli O157:H7 concentration in beef burgers, have been developed to inform risk management decisions; no analogous model exists for Salmonella spp. in pork burgers. In this study, "Extra Lean" and "Regular" fat pork minces were inoculated with Salmonella spp. (Salmonella 4,[5],12,i:-, Salmonella Senftenberg and Salmonella Typhimurium) and formed into pork burger patties. Patties were cooked on an electric skillet (to imitate home cooking) to one of seven internal temperatures (46, 49, 52, 55, 58, 61, 64 °C) and Salmonella enumerated. A generalised linear logistic regression model was used to develop a predictive model for the Salmonella concentration based on the internal endpoint temperature. It was estimated that in pork mince with a fat content of 6.1%, Salmonella survival will be decreased by -0.2407log10 CFU/g for a 1 °C increase in internal endpoint temperature, with a 5-log10 reduction in Salmonella concentration estimated to occur when the geometric centre temperature reaches 63 °C. The fat content influenced the rate of Salmonella inactivation (P=0.043), with Salmonella survival increasing as fat content increased, though this effect became negligible as the temperature approached 62 °C. Fat content increased the time required for patties to achieve a specified internal temperature (P=0.0106 and 0.0309 for linear and quadratic terms respectively), indicating that reduced fat pork mince may reduce the risk of salmonellosis from consumption of pork burgers. Salmonella serovar did not significantly affect the model intercepts (P=0.86) or slopes (P=0.10) of the fitted logistic curve. This predictive model can be applied to estimate the reduction in Salmonella in pork burgers after cooking to a specific endpoint temperature and hence to assess food safety risk. PMID:26686598

  3. Consumer satisfaction with pork meat and derived products in five European countries.

    PubMed

    Resano, Helena; Perez-Cueto, Federico J A; de Barcellos, Marcia D; Veflen-Olsen, Nina; Grunert, Klaus G; Verbeke, Wim

    2011-02-01

    This paper investigates consumers' satisfaction level with pork meat and derived products in five European countries. Data were collected through a cross-sectional web-based survey in Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Greece, and Poland during January 2008 with a total sample of 2437 consumers. Data included socio-demographics and questions regarding satisfaction with 27 common pork-based products; classified into fresh pork, processed pork and pork meat products. Satisfaction was evaluated in terms of overall satisfaction, as well as satisfaction with health-giving qualities, price, convenience and taste. Logistic regression analyses showed taste as the main determinant of satisfaction, followed by convenience. Healthfulness is not a significant driver of overall satisfaction. Price influences satisfaction with fresh pork more than with processed products. Tasty pork, easy to prepare and consume, with adequate promotion of its healthfulness, and with a good price/quality relationship appears to be the key factor to satisfy pork consumers. PMID:21029759

  4. 7 CFR 59.205 - Mandatory reporting of wholesale pork sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mandatory reporting of wholesale pork sales. 59.205... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Swine Reporting § 59.205 Mandatory reporting of wholesale pork... sows and boars (by 2 p.m. central time) the following information on total pork sales established...

  5. 7 CFR 59.205 - Mandatory reporting of wholesale pork sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mandatory reporting of wholesale pork sales. 59.205... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Swine Reporting § 59.205 Mandatory reporting of wholesale pork... sows and boars (by 2 p.m. central time) the following information on total pork sales established...

  6. 9 CFR 319.312 - Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with..., Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.312 Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce. “Pork with Barbecue Sauce” and “Beef with Barbecue Sauce” shall consist of not less than 50...

  7. 9 CFR 319.312 - Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with..., Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.312 Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce. “Pork with Barbecue Sauce” and “Beef with Barbecue Sauce” shall consist of not less than 50...

  8. 9 CFR 327.23 - Compliance procedure for cured pork products offered for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compliance procedure for cured pork... procedure for cured pork products offered for entry. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: (1) A Product is that cured pork article which is contained within one Group as defined in paragraph...

  9. 9 CFR 319.312 - Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with..., Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.312 Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce. “Pork with Barbecue Sauce” and “Beef with Barbecue Sauce” shall consist of not less than 50...

  10. 9 CFR 319.312 - Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with..., Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.312 Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce. “Pork with Barbecue Sauce” and “Beef with Barbecue Sauce” shall consist of not less than 50...

  11. Pork in good company? Exploratory analysis of side dishes, beverages, foodscapes and individual characteristics.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Wim; Perez-Cueto, Federico J A; de Barcellos, Marcia Dutra; Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the association between pork as the main meal component and the choice for side dishes and beverages depending on foodscape and individual characteristics, including overweight and obesity among fresh pork consumers (n=2156) in five European countries (Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Greece and Poland). Males were found to combine pork more with caloric drinking (odds ratio=1.32) and low levels of vegetable intake (odds ratio=1.32) compared to females. Younger consumers were more likely to combine pork with low levels of vegetable intake but less likely to combine pork with sauces or condiments. Heavy users of pork were more likely (odds ratio=1.43) to combine pork with sauces or condiments. The study also found an association between being overweight or obese and higher consumption of carbohydrate rich staple foods (odds ratio=1.30) and caloric drinks (odds ratio=1.30) as side dishes to pork meat. Substantial cross-cultural differences were revealed in line with typical pork consumption and meal composition habits in the respective countries. Finally, this study found that the company of family plays a significant role when choosing side dishes for pork as meal center, thus constituting a relevant venue for the positioning and marketing of pork, as well as for future public health information about meals with pork as main meal component. PMID:23562715

  12. Pork in good company? Exploratory analysis of side dishes, beverages, foodscapes and individual characteristics.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Wim; Perez-Cueto, Federico J A; de Barcellos, Marcia Dutra; Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the association between pork as the main meal component and the choice for side dishes and beverages depending on foodscape and individual characteristics, including overweight and obesity among fresh pork consumers (n=2156) in five European countries (Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Greece and Poland). Males were found to combine pork more with caloric drinking (odds ratio=1.32) and low levels of vegetable intake (odds ratio=1.32) compared to females. Younger consumers were more likely to combine pork with low levels of vegetable intake but less likely to combine pork with sauces or condiments. Heavy users of pork were more likely (odds ratio=1.43) to combine pork with sauces or condiments. The study also found an association between being overweight or obese and higher consumption of carbohydrate rich staple foods (odds ratio=1.30) and caloric drinks (odds ratio=1.30) as side dishes to pork meat. Substantial cross-cultural differences were revealed in line with typical pork consumption and meal composition habits in the respective countries. Finally, this study found that the company of family plays a significant role when choosing side dishes for pork as meal center, thus constituting a relevant venue for the positioning and marketing of pork, as well as for future public health information about meals with pork as main meal component.

  13. Nondestructive prediction of pork freshness parameters using multispectral scattering images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiuying; Li, Cuiling; Peng, Yankun; Chao, Kuanglin; Wang, Mingwu

    2012-05-01

    Optical technology is an important and immerging technology for non-destructive and rapid detection of pork freshness. This paper studied on the possibility of using multispectral imaging technique and scattering characteristics to predict the freshness parameters of pork meat. The pork freshness parameters selected for prediction included total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), color parameters (L *, a *, b *), and pH value. Multispectral scattering images were obtained from pork sample surface by a multispectral imaging system developed by ourselves; they were acquired at the selected narrow wavebands whose center wavelengths were 517,550, 560, 580, 600, 760, 810 and 910nm. In order to extract scattering characteristics from multispectral images at multiple wavelengths, a Lorentzian distribution (LD) function with four parameters (a: scattering asymptotic value; b: scattering peak; c: scattering width; d: scattering slope) was used to fit the scattering curves at the selected wavelengths. The results show that the multispectral imaging technique combined with scattering characteristics is promising for predicting the freshness parameters of pork meat.

  14. Pork grade evaluation using hyperspectral imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Rui; Cai, Bo; Wang, Shoubing; Ji, Huihua; Chen, Huacai

    2011-11-01

    The method to evaluate the grade of the pork based on hyperspectral imaging techniques was studied. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on the hyperspectral image data to extract the principal components which were used as the inputs of the evaluation model. By comparing the different discriminating rates in the calibration set and the validation set under different information, the choice of the components can be optimized. Experimental results showed that the classification evaluation model was the optimal when the principal of component (PC) of spectra was 3, while the corresponding discriminating rate was 89.1% in the calibration set and 84.9% in the validation set. It was also good when the PC of images was 9, while the corresponding discriminating rate was 97.2% in the calibration set and 91.1% in the validation set. The evaluation model based on both information of spectra and images was built, in which the corresponding PCs of spectra and images were used as the inputs. This model performed very well in grade classification evaluation, and the discriminating rates of calibration set and validation set were 99.5% and 92.7%, respectively, which were better than the two evaluation models based on single information of spectra or images.

  15. Identification of pork quality parameters by proteomics.

    PubMed

    van de Wiel, Dick F M; Zhang, Wei Li

    2007-09-01

    A major parameter for quality of pork is its waterholding capacity (WHC). Prediction of WHC immediately after slaughter would be of benefit both to slaughterhouses for reasons of better logistics and/or branding of premium-meat, and to consumers for improved quality of meat products such as ham. In our pilot study on proteome analysis of porcine muscle by two-dimensional electrophoresis, we have identified at least three and possibly eight significantly changed proteins that may serve as marker proteins for waterholding capacity. The most clearly identified proteins are creatine phospho kinase M-type (CPK), desmin, and a transcription activator (SWI/SNF related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator of chromatin subfamily A member1, SNF2L1). A possible mechanism of how these proteins may influence WHC is discussed. An optimised protocol for protein extraction that provides for sufficient amounts of relatively pure proteins has been developed. Further studies are needed to validate and extend our preliminary results.

  16. Effect of Amaranthus Pigments on Quality Characteristics of Pork Sausages

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cunliu; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Hui; Chen, Conggui

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the possibility of substituting Amaranthus pigments for nitrates in the of manufacture pork sausage. Five treatments of pork sausages (5% fat) with two levels of sodium nitrite (0 and 0.015%), or three levels (0.1%, 0.2% and 0.3%) of pigments extracted from red Amaranthus were produced. The addition of Amaranthus pigments resulted in the significant increase of a* values, sensory color, flavor and overall acceptance scores, but the significant reduction of b* values, TBA values and VBN values (p<0.05). Based mainly on the results of overall acceptance during 29 d storage, it could be concluded that Amaranthus pigments showed a potential as nitrite alternative for pork sausage manufacture. PMID:25049507

  17. Prediction of Pork Quality by Fuzzy Support Vector Machine Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianxi; Yu, Huaizhi; Wang, Jiamin

    Existing objective methods to evaluate pork quality in general do not yield satisfactory results and their applications in meat industry are limited. In this study, fuzzy support vector machine (FSVM) method was developed to evaluate and predict pork quality rapidly and nondestructively. Firstly, the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) was used to eliminate the noise component in original spectrum and the new spectrum was reconstructed. Then, considering the characteristic variables still exist correlation and contain some redundant information, principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out. Lastly, FSVM was developed to differentiate and classify pork samples into different quality grades using the features from PCA. Jackknife tests on the working datasets indicated that the prediction accuracies were higher than other methods.

  18. Characterization of Extended Spectrum Β-Lactamase Producing Enterobacteria and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Raw Pork and Cooked Pork Products in South China.

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Ye, Lei; Yu, Li; Zhou, Chenqing; Meng, Hecheng

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we assessed the co-colonization with extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Enterobacteria (ESBL-E) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in raw pork and cooked pork products in south China. In total, 240 raw pork and 240 cooked pork samples collected from supermarkets (n = 20) and local butcher shops (n = 20) in the city of Guangzhou (China) were investigated. Raw pork and cooked pork was more frequent colonization with ESBL-E (7.5% in raw pork and 0.4% in cooked pork products) than with MRSA (4.2% in raw pork). Two of samples were contaminated with both tested types of multidrug-resistant bacteria. High antibiotic-resistance rate with wide spectrums of both ESBL-E and MRSA isolated were observed. In ESBL-E isolates, TEM (n = 15), CTX-M-1 (n = 3), CTX-M-9 (n = 1), and SHV (n = 1) genes were detected. TEM and SHV genes were associated with CTX-M-1 in 2 isolates, respectively. The CTX-M-9 gene of 1 isolate from cooked pork samples was found to be transferred to Escherichia coli J53 by conjugation. Detected MLST-types of MRSA were livestock-associated ST7 (n = 5) and ST9 (n = 4), as well as hospital-acquired ST239 (n = 1), suggesting contamination from human source(s) during meat processing. These findings confirmed a contamination of raw pork and cooked pork with ESBL-E and MRSA and emphasized the necessity of enforcing hygienic practices and specific detection of MRSA and ESBL-producing bacteria in meat processing and storage. PMID:27232438

  19. Ultrasonic characterization of pork meat salting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pérez, J. V.; De Prados, M.; Pérez-Muelas, N.; Cárcel, J. A.; Benedito, J.

    2012-12-01

    Salting process plays a key role in the preservation and quality of dry-cured meat products. Therefore, an adequate monitoring of salt content during salting is necessary to reach high quality products. Thus, the main objective of this work was to test the ability of low intensity ultrasound to monitor the salting process of pork meat. Cylindrical samples (diameter 36 mm, height 60±10 mm) of Biceps femoris were salted (brine 20% NaCl, w/w) at 2 °C for 1, 2, 4 and 7 days. During salting and at each experimental time, three cylinders were taken in order to measure the ultrasonic velocity at 2 °C. Afterwards, the cylinders were split in three sections (height 20 mm), measuring again the ultrasonic velocity and determining the salt and the moisture content by AOAC standards. In the whole cylinders, moisture content was reduced from 763 (g/kg sample) in fresh samples to 723 (g/kg sample) in samples salted for 7 days, while the maximum salt gain was 37.3 (g/kg sample). Although, moisture and salt contents up to 673 and 118 (g/kg sample) were reached in the sections of meat cylinders, respectively. During salting, the ultrasonic velocity increased due to salt gain and water loss. Thus, significant (p<0.05) linear relationships were found between the ultrasonic velocity and the salt (R2 = 0.975) and moisture (R2 = 0.863) contents. In addition, the change of the ultrasonic velocity with the increase of the salt content showed a good agreement with the Kinsler equation. Therefore, low intensity ultrasound emerges as a potential technique to monitor, in a non destructive way, the meat salting processes carried out in the food industry.

  20. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., pork shoulder, or pork loin came from a swine that was never out of the region in which the dry-cured... (9 CFR, chapter III), including requirements that the pork or pork products be prepared only in... beyond salting; and (3) In the case of Iberian pork loins processed in accordance with paragraph...

  1. Absence of pork-like insulin in guinea pig tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, J; Yalow, R S

    1982-01-01

    By using a technique for concentrating insulin 100-fold from tissue extracts with 75-95% recoveries, we earlier failed to detect pork-like insulin in guinea pig tissues and thus were unable to confirm reports from the National Institutes of Health that these tissues contain a pork-like insulin at concentrations averaging 1 ng/g. This difference could have been due to differences in strains of guinea pigs studied or in the species specificities of the antisera used for radioimmunoassay. In the current study, tissue extracts from both NIH and Hartley guinea pigs were assayed with three antisera routinely used in our laboratory and one antiserum that had been used in the National Institutes of Health laboratory. We observed that pork-like insulin in tissues from both strains of guinea pigs as determined with the four antisera is less than 0.02 ng/g. We therefore conclude that is is unlikely that nonpancreatic guinea pig tissues contain or synthesize a peptide resembling pork or other non-guinea pig mammalian insulin. PMID:7045868

  2. Evaluating Pork Producers Acceptance of Distance Education Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCamp, Stephanie; Richert, Brian; Singleton, Wayne; Vines, Neal; Slipher, Greg

    2001-01-01

    After 38 pork producers were introduced to eight distance educational media, most were willing to try all media except chatrooms and multimedia kits; 86% preferred face-to-face to distance education although 87% believed distance education is the future for information access. Limited distance education use may be due to limited exposure rather…

  3. 9 CFR 319.29 - Miscellaneous pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Miscellaneous pork products. 319.29 Section 319.29 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Raw Meat Products §...

  4. "Chilled" pork--Part II. Consumer perception of sensory quality.

    PubMed

    Ngapo, T M; Riendeau, L; Laberge, C; Fortin, J

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare consumer perception of the sensory quality of grilled Canadian pork destined for Japanese and domestic markets, with particular reference to export selection criteria imposed by Japanese importers and transportation conditions. Consumers from Quebec, Canada tasted local and export quality pork subjected to "chilled" (aged 43 days at -1.7 °C) or conventional ageing (5 days at 3.1 °C). Consumers' scores (out of 10) were higher (P<0.05) in the "chilled" than conventionally aged pork for tenderness (6.8 vs 5.7), juiciness (6.6 vs 6.0), taste liking (6.4 vs 5.9) and overall acceptability (6.7 vs 6.1). When informed that the conventionally aged, domestic quality pork was destined for the domestic market, consumer scores increased significantly (P<0.05). No effect of information was observed on the perception of the 'chilled' export quality meat, perhaps a consequence of the high sensory quality observed prior to labelling.

  5. Using Economics and Genetics To Produce Leaner Pork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Mary A., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    The booklet describes the STAGES (Swine Testing and Genetic Evaluation System) program developed at Purdue University (Indiana), along with the USDA, National Pork Producers Council and swine breed associations. By selecting breeding stock from a coded catalogue developed by STAGES, producers are able to select the best breeding stock for more…

  6. Properties of bologna-type sausages with pork back-fat replaced with pork skin and amorphous cellulose.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Faria, Miriam; Cipriano, Tayssa Martins; da Cruz, Adriano Gomes; Santos, Bibiana Alves Dos; Pollonio, Marise Aparecida Rodrigues; Campagnol, Paulo Cezar Bastianello

    2015-06-01

    Bologna-type sausages were produced with 50% of their pork back-fat content replaced with gels elaborated with different ratios of pork skin, water, and amorphous cellulose (1:1:0, 1:1:0.1, 1:1:0.2, 1:1:0.3, and 1:1:0.4). The impact of such replacement on the physico-chemical characteristics and the consumer sensory profiling was evaluated. The modified treatments had 42% less fat, 18% more protein, and 8% more moisture than the control group. Treatments with amorphous cellulose had a lower cooking loss and higher emulsion stability. High amorphous cellulose content (1:1:0.3 and 1:1:0.4) increased hardness, gumminess, and chewiness. The gel formulated with the ratio of 1:1:0.2 (pork skin: water: amorphous cellulose gel) provided a sensory sensation similar to that provided by fat and allowed products of good acceptance to be obtained. Therefore, a combination of pork skin and amorphous cellulose is useful in improving technological quality and producing healthier and sensory acceptable bologna-type sausages. PMID:25688689

  7. Consumer perceptions of pork eating quality as affected by pork quality attributes and end-point cooked temperature.

    PubMed

    Moeller, S J; Miller, R K; Edwards, K K; Zerby, H N; Logan, K E; Aldredge, T L; Stahl, C A; Boggess, M; Box-Steffensmeier, J M

    2010-01-01

    The study evaluated the interactive and individual effects of fresh pork loin (n=679) ultimate pH (pH), intramuscular fat (IMF), Minolta L* color (L*), Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBS), and four cooked temperatures (62.8 degrees C, 68.3 degrees C, 73.9 degrees C, and 79.4 degrees C) on consumer (n=2280) perception of eating quality (n=13,265 observations). Data were analyzed using ordered logistical regression. Predicted mean responses were consistently near or under five on the 1-8-point end-anchored scale, indicating a neutral perception of pork eating quality regardless of fresh quality or cooked temperature. Responses improved as IMF and pH increased and WBS decreased, whereas L* did not contribute significantly to variation in responses. Increasing IMF resulted in a very small incremental improvement in responses, but was of practical size only when comparing the least (1%) to the greatest (6%) levels. Loin pH and WBS were primary contributors to consumer perceptions, whereby an incremental increase in pH (0.20 unit) and decrease in WBS (4.9 N) resulted in a 4-5% reduction in the proportion of consumers rating pork as >or= 6 (favorable) on the 8-point scale. No interactions between quality and temperature effects were observed. Increased cooked temperature was negatively (P<0.05) associated with Overall-Like and Tenderness ratings, but the incremental effect was small. Juiciness-Like and Level responses decreased by 0.50 units as temperature increased across the range. Consumer responses favor pork with lower WBS, greater pH and IMF, and pork cooked to a lower temperature.

  8. Consumer perceptions of pork eating quality as affected by pork quality attributes and end-point cooked temperature.

    PubMed

    Moeller, S J; Miller, R K; Edwards, K K; Zerby, H N; Logan, K E; Aldredge, T L; Stahl, C A; Boggess, M; Box-Steffensmeier, J M

    2010-01-01

    The study evaluated the interactive and individual effects of fresh pork loin (n=679) ultimate pH (pH), intramuscular fat (IMF), Minolta L* color (L*), Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBS), and four cooked temperatures (62.8 degrees C, 68.3 degrees C, 73.9 degrees C, and 79.4 degrees C) on consumer (n=2280) perception of eating quality (n=13,265 observations). Data were analyzed using ordered logistical regression. Predicted mean responses were consistently near or under five on the 1-8-point end-anchored scale, indicating a neutral perception of pork eating quality regardless of fresh quality or cooked temperature. Responses improved as IMF and pH increased and WBS decreased, whereas L* did not contribute significantly to variation in responses. Increasing IMF resulted in a very small incremental improvement in responses, but was of practical size only when comparing the least (1%) to the greatest (6%) levels. Loin pH and WBS were primary contributors to consumer perceptions, whereby an incremental increase in pH (0.20 unit) and decrease in WBS (4.9 N) resulted in a 4-5% reduction in the proportion of consumers rating pork as >or= 6 (favorable) on the 8-point scale. No interactions between quality and temperature effects were observed. Increased cooked temperature was negatively (P<0.05) associated with Overall-Like and Tenderness ratings, but the incremental effect was small. Juiciness-Like and Level responses decreased by 0.50 units as temperature increased across the range. Consumer responses favor pork with lower WBS, greater pH and IMF, and pork cooked to a lower temperature. PMID:20374749

  9. Plasma cholesterol-suppressing effect of papain-hydrolyzed pork meat in rats fed hypercholesterolemic diet.

    PubMed

    Morimatsu, F; Ito, M; Budijanto, S; Watanabe, I; Furukawa, Y; Kimura, S

    1996-04-01

    The effects of papain-hydrolyzed pork meat on plasma and liver cholesterol levels were studied in rats fed a cholesterol-enriched diet. In rats fed the low-molecular-weight fraction of papain-hydrolyzed pork meat, the plasma cholesterol concentration, more particularly the VLDL and LDL cholesterol concentrations, were significantly lower (p < 0.01) than in the rats fed untreated pork meat or soybean protein. Feeding with this fraction rather than with untreated pork meat also led to a significantly lower liver cholesterol concentration (p < 0.01) and increased fecal excretion of neutral and acidic steroids. The low-molecular-weight fraction contained peptides with molecular weights of 3,000 or less and had an amino acid composition similar to that of pork meat itself. This study suggests that peptides produced by papain-hydrolysis of pork meat have a hypocholesterolemic activity through their interference with the steroid absorption process. PMID:8780972

  10. Changes in Quality Characteristics of Pork Patties Containing Multilayered Fish Oil Emulsion during Refrigerated Storage

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yeon-Ji; Kwon, Yun-Joong; Min, Sang-Gi

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the effect of multilayered fish oil (FO) emulsion without or with trans-cinnamaldehyde on pork patties. Multilayered FO (-primary, -secondary, -tertiary) emulsions were prepared using a layer-by-layer deposition technique with Tween 20, chitosan, and low methoxyl pectin, and were added to pork patties at the same concentration. Pork patties were then stored for 20 d in a refrigerator (5℃) to study changes in quality. The results showed that the pH value of all samples significantly decreased but cooking loss increased during storage (p<0.05). However, water-holding capacity and moisture content showed no remarkable difference between treatments and storage periods (p>0.05). All pork patties containing multilayered FO (treated samples) showed higher values for lightness and significantly lower values for yellowness compared to control pork patties (untreated sample). Lipid oxidation was higher in treated pork patties than in control pork patties during storage. In addition, lipid oxidation and total viable bacterial count in pork patties decreased as the number of coating layers increased. However, hardness, cohesiveness, and springiness of all samples showed no significant change during storage (p>0.05) as compared to fresh pork patties. Furthermore, these did not remarkable change with addition of trans-cinnamaldehyde in all pork patties. From our results, we suggest that FO emulsion did not affect the texture characteristics of fresh pork patties, indicating that it could be used to improve the quality of pork patties by contributing high-quality fat such as unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26761802

  11. Changes in Quality Characteristics of Pork Patties Containing Multilayered Fish Oil Emulsion during Refrigerated Storage.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeon-Ji; Kwon, Yun-Joong; Min, Sang-Gi; Choi, Mi-Jung

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the effect of multilayered fish oil (FO) emulsion without or with trans-cinnamaldehyde on pork patties. Multilayered FO (-primary, -secondary, -tertiary) emulsions were prepared using a layer-by-layer deposition technique with Tween 20, chitosan, and low methoxyl pectin, and were added to pork patties at the same concentration. Pork patties were then stored for 20 d in a refrigerator (5℃) to study changes in quality. The results showed that the pH value of all samples significantly decreased but cooking loss increased during storage (p<0.05). However, water-holding capacity and moisture content showed no remarkable difference between treatments and storage periods (p>0.05). All pork patties containing multilayered FO (treated samples) showed higher values for lightness and significantly lower values for yellowness compared to control pork patties (untreated sample). Lipid oxidation was higher in treated pork patties than in control pork patties during storage. In addition, lipid oxidation and total viable bacterial count in pork patties decreased as the number of coating layers increased. However, hardness, cohesiveness, and springiness of all samples showed no significant change during storage (p>0.05) as compared to fresh pork patties. Furthermore, these did not remarkable change with addition of trans-cinnamaldehyde in all pork patties. From our results, we suggest that FO emulsion did not affect the texture characteristics of fresh pork patties, indicating that it could be used to improve the quality of pork patties by contributing high-quality fat such as unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26761802

  12. Pork as a Source of Omega-3 (n-3) Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Michael E.R.; Vahmani, Payam; Turner, Tyler D.; Mapiye, Cletos; Juárez, Manuel; Prieto, Nuria; Beaulieu, Angela D.; Zijlstra, Ruurd T.; Patience, John F.; Aalhus, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Pork is the most widely eaten meat in the world, but typical feeding practices give it a high omega-6 (n-6) to omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid ratio and make it a poor source of n-3 fatty acids. Feeding pigs n-3 fatty acids can increase their contents in pork, and in countries where label claims are permitted, claims can be met with limited feeding of n-3 fatty acid enrich feedstuffs, provided contributions of both fat and muscle are included in pork servings. Pork enriched with n-3 fatty acids is, however, not widely available. Producing and marketing n-3 fatty acid enriched pork requires regulatory approval, development costs, quality control costs, may increase production costs, and enriched pork has to be tracked to retail and sold for a premium. Mandatory labelling of the n-6/n-3 ratio and the n-3 fatty acid content of pork may help drive production of n-3 fatty acid enriched pork, and open the door to population-based disease prevention polices (i.e., food tax to provide incentives to improve production practices). A shift from the status-quo, however, will require stronger signals along the value chain indicating production of n-3 fatty acid enriched pork is an industry priority. PMID:26694475

  13. Fortification of pork loins with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and its effect on flavour.

    PubMed

    Meadus, William J; Turner, Tyler D; Dugan, Michael Er; Aalhus, Jennifer L; Duff, Pascale; Rolland, David; Uttaro, Bethany; Gibson, Lorna L

    2013-01-01

    Pork is traditionally low in docosahexanoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) and deficient in omega-3 fats for a balanced human diet. DHA as triglycerides was commercially prepared from the microalgae Schizochytrium and injected into fresh pork loins. Treatments of a mixed brine control (CON), 3.1% sunflower oil in mixed brine (SF) and a 3.1% DHA oil in mixed brine (DHA) were injected into pork loins at 10 mL/100 g and grilled at 205°C. After cooking, the CON and SF pork loins contained 0.03 to 0.05 mg DHA/g of pork and the DHA injected loins contained approximately 1.46 mg DHA/g. This also changed the fatty acid profile of omega-6: omega-3 from, 5 to 1 in the CON pork, to a ratio of 1.7 to 1 in DHA pork. The appearance, odor, oxidation rates and sensory taste, as judged by a trained panel, determined the DHA injected meat to be, 'slightly desirable' and gave lower 'off flavour' scores, relative to the CON and SF injected pork. Pork can be fortified with DHA oil to 146 mg/100 g serving, which would meet half the recommended daily omega 3 fatty acid requirements for adult humans and would be desirable in taste. PMID:24257205

  14. Fortification of pork loins with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and its effect on flavour

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pork is traditionally low in docosahexanoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) and deficient in omega-3 fats for a balanced human diet. DHA as triglycerides was commercially prepared from the microalgae Schizochytrium and injected into fresh pork loins. Treatments of a mixed brine control (CON), 3.1% sunflower oil in mixed brine (SF) and a 3.1% DHA oil in mixed brine (DHA) were injected into pork loins at 10 mL/100 g and grilled at 205°C. After cooking, the CON and SF pork loins contained 0.03 to 0.05 mg DHA/g of pork and the DHA injected loins contained approximately 1.46 mg DHA/g. This also changed the fatty acid profile of omega-6: omega-3 from, 5 to 1 in the CON pork, to a ratio of 1.7 to 1 in DHA pork. The appearance, odor, oxidation rates and sensory taste, as judged by a trained panel, determined the DHA injected meat to be, 'slightly desirable’ and gave lower 'off flavour’ scores, relative to the CON and SF injected pork. Pork can be fortified with DHA oil to 146 mg/100 g serving, which would meet half the recommended daily omega 3 fatty acid requirements for adult humans and would be desirable in taste. PMID:24257205

  15. Functional and safety evaluation of transgenic pork rich in omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Tang, Maoxue; Qian, Lili; Jiang, Shengwang; Zhang, Jian; Song, Pengkun; Chen, Yaoxing; Cui, Wentao; Li, Kui

    2014-08-01

    Genetically modified animals rich in omega-3 unsaturated fatty acid offer a new strategy to improve the human health, but at the same time present a challenge in terms of food safety assessment. In this study, we evaluated the function and safety of sFat-1 transgenic pork rich in omega-3 fatty acids in mice by feeding basic diet and diets that contain wild type pork and sFat-1 transgenic pork. Blood biochemistry, haematology, peripheral T cell distributions, bacterial counts, gross necropsy, histopathology and organ weights were performed in mice fed with different doses of wild type and transgenic pork. Results indicated that both low and high dose of wild type and transgenic pork had no significant effect on blood biochemistry, T cell distribution, immunoglobulins and bacterial counts in intestine and feces. However, it was noted that both low and high dose of transgenic pork improved the liver immune system in mice, which is probably due to the beneficial contribution of high level of the "good" fatty acids in transgenic pork. There is no significant effect of transgenic pork on all other organs in mice. In summary, our study clearly demonstrated that feeding transgenic pork rich in omega-3 fatty acids did not cause any harm to mice, and in fact, improved the liver immune system.

  16. Volatile organic compounds and Photobacterium phosphoreum associated with spoilage of modified-atmosphere-packaged raw pork.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Timo T; Dalgaard, Paw; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-02-01

    Accumulation of volatile organic compounds was monitored in association with sensory quality, bacterial concentrations and culture-independent microbial community analyses in raw pork loin and pork collar during storage under high-oxygen modified atmosphere at +4 °C. Of the 48 volatile compounds detected in the pork samples, the levels of acetoin, diacetyl and 3-methyl-1-butanol had the highest correlations with the sensory scores and bacterial concentrations. These compounds accumulated in all of the four monitored lots of non-sterile pork but not in the sterilized pork during chilled storage. According to the culture-dependent and culture-independent characterization of bacterial communities, Brochothrix thermosphacta, lactic acid bacteria (Carnobacterium, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Weissella) and Photobacterium spp. predominated in pork samples. Photobacterium spp., typically not associated with spoilage of meat, were detected also in 8 of the 11 retail packages of pork investigated subsequently. Eleven isolates from the pork samples were shown to belong to Photobacterium phosphoreum by phenotypic tests and sequencing of the 16S rRNA and gyrB gene fragments. Off-odors in pork samples with high proportion of Photobacterium spp. were associated with accumulation of acetoin, diacetyl and 3-methyl-1-butanol in meat, but these compounds did not explain all the off-odors reported in sensory analyses. PMID:26623935

  17. Pork as a Source of Omega-3 (n-3) Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Michael E R; Vahmani, Payam; Turner, Tyler D; Mapiye, Cletos; Juárez, Manuel; Prieto, Nuria; Beaulieu, Angela D; Zijlstra, Ruurd T; Patience, John F; Aalhus, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Pork is the most widely eaten meat in the world, but typical feeding practices give it a high omega-6 (n-6) to omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid ratio and make it a poor source of n-3 fatty acids. Feeding pigs n-3 fatty acids can increase their contents in pork, and in countries where label claims are permitted, claims can be met with limited feeding of n-3 fatty acid enrich feedstuffs, provided contributions of both fat and muscle are included in pork servings. Pork enriched with n-3 fatty acids is, however, not widely available. Producing and marketing n-3 fatty acid enriched pork requires regulatory approval, development costs, quality control costs, may increase production costs, and enriched pork has to be tracked to retail and sold for a premium. Mandatory labelling of the n-6/n-3 ratio and the n-3 fatty acid content of pork may help drive production of n-3 fatty acid enriched pork, and open the door to population-based disease prevention polices (i.e., food tax to provide incentives to improve production practices). A shift from the status-quo, however, will require stronger signals along the value chain indicating production of n-3 fatty acid enriched pork is an industry priority. PMID:26694475

  18. Volatile organic compounds and Photobacterium phosphoreum associated with spoilage of modified-atmosphere-packaged raw pork.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Timo T; Dalgaard, Paw; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-02-01

    Accumulation of volatile organic compounds was monitored in association with sensory quality, bacterial concentrations and culture-independent microbial community analyses in raw pork loin and pork collar during storage under high-oxygen modified atmosphere at +4 °C. Of the 48 volatile compounds detected in the pork samples, the levels of acetoin, diacetyl and 3-methyl-1-butanol had the highest correlations with the sensory scores and bacterial concentrations. These compounds accumulated in all of the four monitored lots of non-sterile pork but not in the sterilized pork during chilled storage. According to the culture-dependent and culture-independent characterization of bacterial communities, Brochothrix thermosphacta, lactic acid bacteria (Carnobacterium, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Weissella) and Photobacterium spp. predominated in pork samples. Photobacterium spp., typically not associated with spoilage of meat, were detected also in 8 of the 11 retail packages of pork investigated subsequently. Eleven isolates from the pork samples were shown to belong to Photobacterium phosphoreum by phenotypic tests and sequencing of the 16S rRNA and gyrB gene fragments. Off-odors in pork samples with high proportion of Photobacterium spp. were associated with accumulation of acetoin, diacetyl and 3-methyl-1-butanol in meat, but these compounds did not explain all the off-odors reported in sensory analyses.

  19. Influence of dietary fat on pork eating quality.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Verónica; Najes, Luis M; Provincial, Laura; Guillén, Elena; Gil, Mario; Roncalés, Pedro; Beltrán, José A

    2012-12-01

    This study compared the influence of dietary fat sources on meat quality, fatty acid composition and sensory attributes in pork. The experiment was conducted with 43 entire male pigs (Pietrain×(Landrace×Large White)) which were fed a basal diet without added fat (control diet) or supplemented with different sources of fat: animal fat (1%, AF1; 3%, AF3), soyabean oil (1%, SBO1) and calcium soaps of palm oil (1%, CaSPO1). Dietary fat supplementation did not significantly affect ultimate pH, colour, Warner-Bratzler shear force values, sensory attributes or SFA. Pigs fed SBO1 had the lowest proportion of MUFA and the highest of PUFA. In conclusion, these dietary fat sources could be recommended for inclusion in diets, at these levels, with no detrimental effect on eating quality. Despite finding no significant differences, the PCA afforded a comprehensive view of the predominating attributes of pork from animals fed the different fats.

  20. Implementation of irradiation of pork for trichina control

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, R.E.; Post, A.R.; Post, R.C. )

    1988-07-01

    This article describes the attempts to develop adequate regulatory framework for the use of ionizing radiations in the preservation of food. To be successful, a uniform set of guidelines are needed for the selection, calibration, and application of dosimetry systems; clearance of packaging materials; labeling information; and consumer education programs are essential. The primary regulatory agency that food processors must satisfy is the US FDA. In 1985, in response to an industry petition, the FDA amended its food additive regulations to permit the use of gamma radiation sources to irradiate fresh, non-heat processed pork cuts or carcasses to control Trichinellaspiralis. The regulation permits irradiation of only fresh pork within a dose range of 0.3 to 1 kGy.

  1. Effect of irradiated pork on physicochemical properties of meat emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Sung, Jung-Min; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Ham, Youn-Kyung; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2016-02-01

    The effect of pork irradiated with doses up to 10 kGy on meat emulsions formulated with carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) was investigated. Raw pork was vacuums packaged at a thickness of 2.0 cm and irradiated by X-ray linear accelerator (15 kW, 5 MeV). The emulsion had higher lightness, myofibrillar protein solubility, total protein solubility, and apparent viscosity with increasing doses, whereas cooking loss, total expressible fluid separation, and hardness decreased. There were no significant differences in fat separation, sarcoplasmic protein solubility, springiness, and cohesiveness. Our results indicated that it is treatment by ionizing radiation which causes the effects the physicochemical properties of the final raw meat product.

  2. Consumers' sensory acceptability of pork from immunocastrated male pigs.

    PubMed

    Font I Furnols, M; Gispert, M; Guerrero, L; Velarde, A; Tibau, J; Soler, J; Hortós, M; García-Regueiro, J A; Pérez, J; Suárez, P; Oliver, M A

    2008-12-01

    Boar taint is the off-odour or off flavour of cooked pork. Currently, the most common method of controlling boar taint is surgical castration. However, immunocastration has been used in some parts of the world as an alternative to surgical castration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensory acceptability of meat from immunocastrated pigs (IM) compared with meat from females (FE), surgically castrated (CM) and entire males (EM). Twenty animals of each type were evaluated by 201 consumers in 20 sessions. Longissimus thoracis muscle of the different animals was cooked in an oven at 180°C for 10min. Consumers scored the odour and the flavour of the meat in a 9-point category scale without an intermediate level. There were no significant differences in consumer's evaluation of meat from IM, CM, and FE. In contrast, EM meat presented a higher percentage of dissatisfied scores and was significantly (P<0.05) less accepted than meat from CM, IM and FE. Consumers' acceptability of EM meat was always lower, independently of its androstenone levels. However meat with low levels of androstenone was more accepted that meat with medium or high levels of this substance. It can be concluded that immunocastration produced pork that was accepted by the consumers, and was indistinguishable from pork from CM or FE. PMID:22063830

  3. Community and occupational health concerns in pork production: a review.

    PubMed

    Donham, K J

    2010-04-01

    Public concerns relative to adverse consequences of large-scale livestock production have been increasingly voiced since the late 1960s. Numerous regional, national, and international conferences have been held on the subject since 1994. This paper provides a review of the literature on the community and occupational health concerns of large-scale livestock production with a focus on pork production. The industry has recognized the concerns of the public, and the national and state pork producer groups are including these issues as an important component of their research and policy priorities. One reason large-scale livestock production has raised concern is that a significant component of the industry has separated from traditional family farming and has developed like other industries in management, structure, and concentration. The magnitude of the problem cited by environmental groups has often been criticized by the pork production industry for lack of science-based evidence to document environmental concerns. In addition to general environmental concerns, occupational health of workers has become more relevant because many operations now are employing more than 10 employees, which brings many operations in the United States under the scrutiny of the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration. In this paper, the scientific literature is reviewed relative to the science basis of occupational and environmental impacts on community and worker health. Further, recommendations are made to help promote sustainability of the livestock industry within the context of maintaining good stewardship of our environmental and human capital. PMID:20154166

  4. Identification of irradiated refrigerated pork with the DNA comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, M. M.; Marin-Huachaca, N. S.; Mancini-Filho, J.; Delincée, H.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2004-09-01

    Food irradiation can contribute to a safer and more plentiful food supply by inactivating pathogens, eradicating pests and by extending shelf-life. Particularly in the case of pork meat, this process could be a useful way to inactivate harmful parasites such as Trichinella and Taenia solium. Ionizing radiation causes damage to the DNA of the cells (e.g. strand breaks), which can be used to detect irradiated food. Microelectrophoresis of single cells (``Comet Assay'') is a simple and rapid test for DNA damage and can be used over a wide dose range and for a variety of products. Refrigerated pork meat was irradiated with a 60Co source, Gammacell 220 (A.E.C.L.) installed in IPEN (Sa~o Paulo, Brazil). The doses given were 0, 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5kGy for refrigerated samples. Immediately after irradiation the samples were returned to the refrigerator (6°C). Samples were kept in the refrigerator after irradiation. Pork meat was analyzed 1, 8 and 10 days after irradiation using the DNA ``Comet Assay''. This method showed to be an inexpensive and rapid technique for qualitative detection of irradiation treatment.

  5. Prediction of pork color attributes using computer vision system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin; Young, Jennifer; Liu, Jeng Hung; Bachmeier, Laura; Somers, Rose Marie; Chen, Kun Jie; Newman, David

    2016-03-01

    Color image processing and regression methods were utilized to evaluate color score of pork center cut loin samples. One hundred loin samples of subjective color scores 1 to 5 (NPB, 2011; n=20 for each color score) were selected to determine correlation values between Minolta colorimeter measurements and image processing features. Eighteen image color features were extracted from three different RGB (red, green, blue) model, HSI (hue, saturation, intensity) and L*a*b* color spaces. When comparing Minolta colorimeter values with those obtained from image processing, correlations were significant (P<0.0001) for L* (0.91), a* (0.80), and b* (0.66). Two comparable regression models (linear and stepwise) were used to evaluate prediction results of pork color attributes. The proposed linear regression model had a coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.83 compared to the stepwise regression results (R(2)=0.70). These results indicate that computer vision methods have potential to be used as a tool in predicting pork color attributes. PMID:26619035

  6. Quality Evaluation of Pork with Various Freezing and Thawing Methods.

    PubMed

    Ku, Su Kyung; Jeong, Ji Yun; Park, Jong Dae; Jeon, Ki Hong; Kim, Eun Mi; Kim, Young Boong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the physicochemical and sensory quality characteristics due to the influence of various thawing methods on electro-magnetic and air blast frozen pork were examined. The packaged pork samples, which were frozen by air blast freezing at -45℃ or electro-magnetic freezing at -55℃, were thawed using 4 different methods: refrigeration (4±1℃), room temperature (RT, 25℃), cold water (15℃), and microwave (2450 MHz). Analyses were carried out to determine the drip and cooking loss, water holding capacity (WHC), moisture content and sensory evaluation. Frozen pork thawed in a microwave indicated relatively less thawing loss (0.63-1.24%) than the other thawing methods (0.68-1.38%). The cooking loss after electro-magnetic freezing indicated 37.4% by microwave thawing, compared with 32.9% by refrigeration, 36.5% by RT, and 37.2% by cold water in ham. The thawing of samples frozen by electro-magnetic freezing showed no significant differences between the methods used, while the moisture content was higher in belly thawed by microwave (62.0%) after electro-magnetic freezing than refrigeration (54.8%), RT (61.3%), and cold water (61.1%). The highest overall acceptability was shown for microwave thawing after electro-magnetic freezing but there were no significant differences compared to that of the other samples.

  7. Study on classification of pork quality using hyperspectral imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Shan; Bai, Jun; Wang, Haibin

    2015-12-01

    The relative problems' research of chilled meat, thawed meat and spoiled meat discrimination by hyperspectral image technique were proposed, such the section of feature wavelengths, et al. First, based on 400 ~ 1000nm range hyperspectral image data of testing pork samples, by K-medoids clustering algorithm based on manifold distance, we select 30 important wavelengths from 753 wavelengths, and thus select 8 feature wavelengths (454.4, 477.5, 529.3, 546.8, 568.4, 580.3, 589.9 and 781.2nm) based on the discrimination value. Then 8 texture features of each image under 8 feature wavelengths were respectively extracted by two-dimensional Gabor wavelets transform as pork quality feature. Finally, we build a pork quality classification model using the fuzzy C-mean clustering algorithm. Through the experiment of extracting feature wavelengths, we found that although the hyperspectral images between adjacent bands have a strong linear correlation, they show a significant non-linear manifold relationship from the entire band. K-medoids clustering algorithm based on manifold distance used in this paper for selecting the characteristic wavelengths, which is more reasonable than traditional principal component analysis (PCA). Through the classification result, we conclude that hyperspectral imaging technology can distinguish among chilled meat, thawed meat and spoiled meat accurately.

  8. 76 FR 45769 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Pork and Poultry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Collection; Pork and Poultry Products From Mexico Transiting the United States AGENCY: Animal and Plant... ] information collection associated with regulations for pork and poultry products from Mexico transiting the... coming. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For information on pork and poultry products from...

  9. Parasitic zoonoses present some risks with low-temperature cooking of pork.

    PubMed

    Purslow, Peter

    2016-09-01

    A recent article in this journal documents enhanced sensory qualities of pork cooked to low temperatures. The aim of this letter is to point out that the incidence of Trichinella spiralis in many countries and the more widespread incidence of Toxoplasma gondii present a concern for the adoption of low temperature cooking of pork unless extended cooking times are used. PMID:27115863

  10. Dynamic model for predicting growth of salmonella spp. in ground sterile pork

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predictive model for Salmonella spp. growth in ground pork was developed and validated using kinetic growth data. Salmonella spp. kinetic growth data in ground pork was collected at several isothermal conditions (between 10 and 45C) and Baranyi model was fitted to describe the growth at each temper...

  11. Changes in nutrient levels for three fresh pork loin cuts between 1992-2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since pork nutrient composition changes have occurred over the past two decades, a collaborative study was conducted by scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Texas Tech University and the National Pork Board to determine current nutrient values. The purpose was to obtain analytic...

  12. Parasitic zoonoses present some risks with low-temperature cooking of pork.

    PubMed

    Purslow, Peter

    2016-09-01

    A recent article in this journal documents enhanced sensory qualities of pork cooked to low temperatures. The aim of this letter is to point out that the incidence of Trichinella spiralis in many countries and the more widespread incidence of Toxoplasma gondii present a concern for the adoption of low temperature cooking of pork unless extended cooking times are used.

  13. 9 CFR 327.23 - Compliance procedure for cured pork products offered for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance procedure for cured pork... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY... procedure for cured pork products offered for entry. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section:...

  14. Characteristics of pork belly consumption in South Korea and their health implication.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jee-Hwan; Yang, Han-Sul; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Go, Gwang-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Fresh pork belly is a highly popular meat in South Korea, accounting for 59 % of the approximately 100 g of meat per capita that is consumed daily. Fresh pork belly offers not only high-quality protein from the lean cuts but also substantial micronutrients including fat-soluble vitamins and minerals. However, fresh pork belly generally consists of about 30 % fat, with saturated fatty acids representing half of this value. Excessive consumption of saturated fatty acids increases total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides while decreasing high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, raising concerns about an increased risk of hyperlipidemia, followed by cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we discuss the consumption and production trends in South Korea, the general characteristics, and health issues related to fresh pork belly to delineate the features of pork production and consumer welfare.

  15. A survey of Mexican retail chain stores for fresh U.S. pork.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Leidenz, N; Howard, S T; Ruíz Flores, A; Ngapo, T M; Belk, K E

    2016-09-01

    An overview of fresh US pork in the Mexican market was achieved by surveying fresh US pork packages (n=342) for sale in five Mexican cities. Data on cut, primal/sub-primal from which the cut was sourced, subcutaneous and seam fat thicknesses, marbling scores, and presence of bone were collated. The most prevalent identifiable retail cuts were milanesa (thin slice of pork, breaded or non-breaded) and trozos (diced pork) derived primarily from the leg and accounting for 68% of the total US pork on sale. Over 90% of the retail cuts were trimmed to 3.2mm or less of external fat and the average marbling score was 2.26. Differences in distribution and fat measures were observed with chain, location and socio-economic status of clientele indicating potential for a targeted marketing approach in Mexico.

  16. Factors influencing the commercialisation of cloning in the pork industry.

    PubMed

    Pratt, S L; Sherrer, E S; Reeves, D E; Stice, S L

    2006-01-01

    Production of cloned pigs using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a repeatable and predictable procedure and multiple labs around the world have generated cloned pigs and genetically modified cloned pigs. Due to the integrated nature of the pork production industry, pork producers are the most likely to benefit and are in the best position to introduce cloning in to production systems. Cloning can be used to amplify superior genetics or be used in conjunction with genetic modifications to produce animals with superior economic traits. Though unproven, cloning could add value by reducing pig-to-pig variability in economically significant traits such as growth rate, feed efficiency, and carcass characteristics. However, cloning efficiencies using SCNT are low, but predictable. The inefficiencies are due to the intrusive nature of the procedure, the quality of oocytes and/or the somatic cells used in the procedure, the quality of the nuclear transfer embryos transferred into recipients, pregnancy rates of the recipients, and neonatal survival of the clones. Furthermore, in commercial animal agriculture, clones produced must be able to grow and thrive under normal management conditions, which include attainment of puberty and subsequent capability to reproduce. To integrate SCNT into the pork industry, inefficiencies at each step of the procedure must be overcome. In addition, it is likely that non-surgical embryo transfer will be required to deliver cloned embryos, and/or additional methods to generate high health clones will need to be developed. This review will focus on the state-of-the-art for SCNT in pigs and the steps required for practical implementation of pig cloning in animal agriculture.

  17. Procedures for evaluating pork carcass and cut composition

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, A.L.H.

    1989-01-01

    Five studies were completed to investigate various production and evaluation procedures related to pork carcass composition and meat quality. A comparison of market hog characteristics of pigs selected by feeder pig frame size or current USDA feeder pig standards was made. In general, feeder pig frame size did differentiate between carcass skeletal traits (i.e., carcass length, radius length). However, frame sizing did not improve on current feeder pig grades in discriminating between carcass composition characteristics. Liquid scintillation of potassium-40 was used to estimate pork carcass composition of 124 boars barrows and gilts, ranging from 23 to 114 kg live weight. Pigs were counted live, slaughtered and one side of the carcass was counted. The side was then ground and sampled for percent protein, fat and moisture. Carcass weight and {sup 40}K determined potassium of the carcass explain more of the variation in carcass composition than live animal traits. Carcass measurements were used to determine value and percentages of fat standardized lean, protein, fat and moisture in the carcass using 265 barrow and gilt carcasses. In a separate study, belly composition was estimated from carcass and belly parameters (n = 338). Ribbed carcasses measurements were almost always superior to unribbed carcass measurements when estimating carcass or belly composition. Tenth rib fat depth was the most useful single variable for predicting belly fat, protein, moisture and lean. Some precision and accuracy were lost when using parameters from unribbed carcasses to estimate carcass or belly composition as compared to including parameters from ribbed carcasses. The sensory and nutritive value of cooked pork center loin chops and roasts were investigated. Levels of fat cover and internal temperature did not greatly affect cholesterol content.

  18. Stepwise chilling: tender pork without compromising water-holding capacity.

    PubMed

    Rosenvold, K; Borup, U; Therkildsen, M

    2010-05-01

    The current pork slaughter process is primarily optimized to reduce cooler shrink and the incidence of PSE pork. Elimination of the halothane gene and improved preslaughter handling have decreased the incidence of PSE pork and improved the water-holding capacity of the muscle; however, the chilling process has not been optimized to accommodate these changes. The hypothesis that stepwise chilling could improve tenderness without compromising water-holding capacity was tested in this study. The stepwise chilling treatments were composed of a rapid chilling to 10 or 15 degrees C (in a chilling tunnel) and a 6-h holding period at 10 or 15 degrees C, followed by rapid chilling to 4 degrees C. Both treatments were compared directly with a chilling treatment that simulated conventional tunnel chilling; one carcass half from each pig was allocated to a stepwise chilling treatment, whereas the other carcass half was allocated to the control treatment. A total of 42 pigs were slaughtered on 6 slaughter days. Biopsies were collected for analysis of glycogen degradation and glycogen debranching enzyme activity from slaughter until 72 h postmortem, and samples for color, sarcomere length, drip loss, Warner-Bratzler shear force, and sensory analysis were removed from the carcass 24 h postmortem. Substantial temperature differences were obtained during the holding period between the stepwise and conventionally chilled carcass halves. These had almost, but not completely, disappeared by 22 h postmortem, and although the differences were small, pH was significantly (P < 0.01) less in the stepwise-chilled carcasses compared with the control carcasses. The stepwise chilling treatments led to significantly improved (P < 0.01) tenderness in LM without compromising quality indicators or attributes such as pH, drip loss, or ham processing yield, although color of the stepwise-chilled pork was affected. Neither the tenderness of processed semimembranosus muscle nor the shear force of

  19. Color changes in irradiated cooked pork sausage with different fat sources and packaging during storage.

    PubMed

    Jo, C; Jin, S K; Ahn, D U

    2000-05-01

    Pork sausages were prepared with lean pork meat, fat from different sources [backfat (BF), corn oil (CO) or flaxseed oil (FO); 10% of lean meat], NaCl (2%), and ice water (10%). The emulsified meat batters were stuffed into casings (3 cm in diameter) and cooked to an internal temperature of 72°C. Cooked sausages were sliced and vacuum- or aerobic-packaged individually. Sausages were irradiated at a 0, 2.5, or 4.5 kGy dose and stored in a 4°C refrigerator for 8 days. Aerobic-packaged, irradiated cooked sausages prepared with BF and FO showed higher Hunter L-values than nonirradiated controls at day 0, but the difference disappeared at day 8. Irradiation increased the Hunter a-value in vacuum-packaged cooked pork sausages regardless of the fat source used, and the increase of the Hunter a-value was dose-dependent. In contrast, the Hunter a-value decreased by irradiation in aerobic-packaged cooked pork sausages prepared with BF or FO. The Hunter a-value of cooked pork sausage with aerobic packaging was significantly reduced at day 8. Hunter b-values increased at Day 8 in irradiated cooked pork sausages except for the sausage prepared with CO at 2.5 kGy. Cooked pork sausages prepared with CO were lighter, and sausage prepared with FO was redder and more yellow (p<0.05) in vacuum packaging.

  20. Rapid discrimination of enhanced quality pork by visible and near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Prieto, N; Juárez, M; Larsen, I L; López-Campos, Ó; Zijlstra, R T; Aalhus, J L

    2015-12-01

    This study tested the ability of visible and near infrared spectroscopy (Vis-NIRS) to discriminate enhanced quality pork. Vis-NIR spectra were collected on intact chops from 148 pork carcasses using a portable LabSpec®4 spectrometer (350-2500 nm). Partial least squares discriminant analyses based on Vis-NIR spectra correctly classified 94, 95 and 100% of the 2d, and 95, 98 and 100% of the 14 d aged pork samples within Lacombe, Duroc and Iberian pig breeds, respectively. Moreover, Vis-NIRS correctly classified 97 and 99% of the moisture enhanced (ME) and Non-ME pork samples aged for 2d, and 94 and 95% of those aged for 14 d, as well as 94 and 97% of the 2 and 14 d aged pork samples, respectively. Conversely, Vis-NIRS technology could not differentiate pork samples based on pre-slaughter diet or post-slaughter carcass chilling process. Vis-NIRS can segregate enhanced quality pork according to production factors and post-mortem strategies such as pig breed, moisture enhancing and ageing period. PMID:26188360

  1. Effect of Oyster Shell Calcium Powder on the Quality of Restructured Pork Ham

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Seok; Lee, Hyun-Jin; Jin, Sang-Keun; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Choi, Yang-Il

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of oyster shell calcium powder (OSCP) as a substitute for phosphates in curing agent, on the quality of restructured pork ham. Restructured pork ham was processed under six treatment conditions: T1 (no additives), T2 (0.3% sodium tripolyphosphate), T3 (1.5% NaCl+0.5% whey protein), T4 (1.5% NaCl+0.5% whey protein+0.15% OSCP), T5 (1.5% NaCl+0.5% whey protein+0.3% OSCP), and T6 (1.5% NaCl+0.5% whey protein+0.5% OSCP). Addition of OSCP significantly increased the ash content and pH of restructured pork ham (p<0.05), but did not affect the cooking loss and water holding capacity values of restructured pork ham. Addition of OSCP had no effect on Hunter a and b surface color values of restructured pork ham, but did decrease the Hunter L surface color value (p<0.05). The addition of 0.5% OSCP showed significantly higher chewiness and springiness values of restructured pork ham, compared with the addition of phosphates (p<0.05). In conclusion, the addition of OSCP combined with low NaCl and 0.5% whey protein can be considered a viable substitute for phosphates in the curing agent, when processing restructured pork ham. PMID:26761179

  2. Differences in quality characteristics of normal, PSE and DFD pork.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, P G; Bolink, A H; Merkus, G S

    1988-01-01

    Differences in water-holding capacity, colour and tenderness/toughness were studied in 21 pork loins belonging to three quality categories, i.e. dark firm dry (DFD), normal and pale soft exudative (PSE). The division into the three groups was based upon the ultimate pH-values of the loins (< pH 5·5, pH 5·5-6·0, pH > 6·4). The PSE loins were characterized by a poor waterholding capacity, higher cooking loss and paler colour in contrast to the DFD category. The normal loins took an intermediate position. Neither sarcomere length, determined on fresh muscle tissue, nor Armour tenderometer values showed significant differences between the various quality categories. This was in contrast to the Warner-Bratzler (W-B) shear force values, determined on cooked loins, which had the lowest values in the DFD category. A strong relationship between the W-B values and the cooking losses was found. It was concluded that neither sarcomere length nor Armour tenderometer measurements were able to predict the shear force values of cooked pork loins.

  3. Efficacy of Tomato Powder as Antioxidant in Cooked Pork Patties

    PubMed Central

    Kim, I. S.; Jin, S. K.; Yang, M. R.; Chu, G. M.; Park, J. H.; Rashid, R. H. I.; Kim, J. Y.; Kang, S. N.

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of tomato powder (TP) on cooked pork patties during storage at 10±1°C in the dark. The total phenolic and flavonoid contents of TP extract were 26.22 mg gallic acid/100 g and 3.52 mg quercetin/100 g, respectively. The extract of TP showed a potential antioxidant activity in the DPPH radical-scavenging assay (EC50 = 16.76 μg/mL). Pork patties were manufactured with 0.25% (T1), 0.5% (T2), 0.75% (T3) and 1.0% (T4) TP in a basic formula (C). The pH and volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) values of T2, T3 and T4 patties were lower (p<0.05) than the C patties during storage. Increased concentration of TP in meat patties decreased (p<0.05) the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and total plate count (TPC) values at d 7 of storage. Tomato treated-patties had lower (p<0.05) values for lightness (L*), but higher (p<0.05) values for redness (a*) and yellowness (b*) at d 3 and 7 of storage compared with the C. In the case of sensory evaluation, the scores of colour, flavour and overall acceptability of T3 and T4 patties were higher (p<0.05) than those of the C patty after 3 or 7 days of storage. PMID:25049917

  4. Cluster analysis application in research on pork quality determinants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybylski, W.; Wasiewicz, P.; Zieliński, P.; Gromadzka-Ostrowska, J.; Olczak, E.; Jaworska, D.; Niemyjski, S.; Santé-Lhoutellier, V.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper data mining methods were applied to investigate features determining high quality pork meat. The aim of the study was analysis of conditionality of the pork meat quality defined in coherence with HDL and LDL cholesterol concentration, plasma leptin, triglycerides, plasma glucose and serum. The research was carried out on 54 pigs. originated from crossbreeding of Naima sows with P76-PenArLan boars hybrids line. Meat quality parameters were evaluated in samples derived from the Longissimus (LD) muscle taken behind the last rib on the basis: the pH value, meat colour, drip loss, the RTN, intramuscular fat and glycolytic potential. The results of this study were elaborated by using R environment and show that cluster and regression analysis can be a useful tool for in-depth analysis of the determinants of the quality of pig meat in homogeneous populations of pigs. However, the question of determinants of the level of glycogen and fat in meat requires further research.

  5. Efficacy of tomato powder as antioxidant in cooked pork patties.

    PubMed

    Kim, I S; Jin, S K; Yang, M R; Chu, G M; Park, J H; Rashid, R H I; Kim, J Y; Kang, S N

    2013-09-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of tomato powder (TP) on cooked pork patties during storage at 10±1°C in the dark. The total phenolic and flavonoid contents of TP extract were 26.22 mg gallic acid/100 g and 3.52 mg quercetin/100 g, respectively. The extract of TP showed a potential antioxidant activity in the DPPH radical-scavenging assay (EC50 = 16.76 μg/mL). Pork patties were manufactured with 0.25% (T1), 0.5% (T2), 0.75% (T3) and 1.0% (T4) TP in a basic formula (C). The pH and volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) values of T2, T3 and T4 patties were lower (p<0.05) than the C patties during storage. Increased concentration of TP in meat patties decreased (p<0.05) the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and total plate count (TPC) values at d 7 of storage. Tomato treated-patties had lower (p<0.05) values for lightness (L*), but higher (p<0.05) values for redness (a*) and yellowness (b*) at d 3 and 7 of storage compared with the C. In the case of sensory evaluation, the scores of colour, flavour and overall acceptability of T3 and T4 patties were higher (p<0.05) than those of the C patty after 3 or 7 days of storage. PMID:25049917

  6. Effects of nutritional modifications on the water-holding capacity of fresh pork: a review.

    PubMed

    Apple, J K

    2007-11-01

    Although genetics and preslaughter handling and management have the greatest impact on pork quality - especially water-holding capacity (WHC) - modifications to swine diets may offset the negative effects of genotype and/or pig handling on pork quality or improve quality attributes of pork from pigs with the genetic potential for good quality. There is little evidence that pork WHC is altered by the lysine or protein level (and source), cereal grain, or fat source used in growing-finishing diets. Yet, recent research indicates that feeding low-starch, high-fibre, high-fat, glycogen-reducing diets effectively improves the WHC of pork. Moreover, meta-analysis of the available information indicated that including 100, 200, or 400+ mg of alpha-tochopherol per kilogram of diet reduced pork drip losses by 10.1%, 30.5%, and 25.9%, respectively, whereas supplementing swine diets with magnesium for 1-2 days, 3-4 days, or 5-7 days reduced drip losses by 23.1%, 13.7%, or 15.9%, respectively. Some swine nutritionists have advocated the removal of vitamins and trace minerals from finishing diets; however, deletion of vitamin/trace mineral premixes actually reduced the WHC of pork, whereas drip losses were reduced by elevating the dietary inclusion levels of vitamins and trace minerals 150-250% of the recommended levels. Additionally, there is no evidence that feeding pigs ractopamine hydrochloride or injections of porcine somatotropin affect pork WHC. There may not be a single 'silver bullet' that will remedy poor quality genetics or poor animal management, but improvements in pork WHC can be achieved with some modifications to swine finishing diets.

  7. Supplementation of Pork Patties with Bovine Plasma Protein Hydrolysates Augments Antioxidant Properties and Improves Quality

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyun-Woo

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of bovine plasma protein (PP) hydrolysates on the antioxidant and quality properties of pork patties during storage. Pork patties were divided into 4 groups: without butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and PP hydrolysates (control), 0.02% BHT (T1), 1% PP hydrolysates (T2), and 2% PP hydrolysates (T3). Pork patty supplemented with PP hydrolysates had higher pH values and lower weight loss during cooking than the control patties. Results showed that lightness and hardness both decreased upon the addition of PP hydrolysates. All samples containing BHT and PP hydrolysates had reduced TBARS and peroxide values during storage. In particular, 2% PP hydrolysates were more effective in delaying lipid oxidation than were the other treatments. It was concluded that treatment with 2% PP hydrolysates can enhance the acceptance of pork patty. PMID:27194928

  8. Effect of Different Tumbling Marination Treatments on the Quality Characteristics of Prepared Pork Chops

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tian; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Jiang, Yun; Ma, Ruixue; Song, Lei; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different tumbling marination treatments (control group, CG; conventional static marination, SM; vacuum continuous tumbling marination, CT; vacuum intermittent tumbling marination, IT) on the quality characteristics of prepared pork chops was investigated under simulated commercial conditions. The CT treatment increased (p<0.05) the pH value, b* value, product yield, tenderness, overall flavor, sensory juiciness and overall acceptability in comparison to other treatments for prepared boneless pork chops. The CT treatment decreased (p<0.05) cooking loss, shear force value, hardness, gumminess and chewiness compared with other treatments. In addition, CT treatment effectively improved springiness and sensory color more than other treatments. However, IT treatment achieved the numerically highest (p<0.05) L* and a* values. These results suggested that CT treatment obtained the best quality characteristics of prepared pork chops and should be adopted as the optimal commercial processing method for this prepared boneless pork chops. PMID:25557823

  9. Detection of pork adulteration by highly-specific PCR assay of mitochondrial D-loop.

    PubMed

    Karabasanavar, Nagappa S; Singh, S P; Kumar, Deepak; Shebannavar, Sunil N

    2014-02-15

    We describe a highly specific PCR assay for the authentic identification of pork. Accurate detection of tissues derived from pig (Sus scrofa) was accomplished by using newly designed primers targeting porcine mitochondrial displacement (D-loop) region that yielded an unique amplicon of 712 base pairs (bp). Possibility of cross-amplification was precluded by testing as many as 24 animal species (mammals, birds, rodent and fish). Suitability of PCR assay was confirmed in raw (n = 20), cooked (60, 80 and 100 °C), autoclaved (121 °C) and micro-oven processed pork. Sensitivity of detection of pork in other species meat using unique pig-specific PCR was established to be at 0.1%; limit of detection (LOD) of pig DNA was 10 pg (pico grams). The technique can be used for the authentication of raw, processed and adulterated pork and products under the circumstances of food adulteration related disputes or forensic detection of origin of pig species.

  10. Occurrence of sulfa drug residues in canadian pork liver.

    PubMed

    Neidert, E; Saschenbrecker, P W; Patterson, J R; Fesser, A

    1985-09-01

    Sulfonamide residues in the livers of wholesome carcasses of Canadian pork were monitored over the six year period ending March 31, 1985. The annual rate of violative residues decreased from 9.92% to 2.75% over the course of the six years. At present the incidence of violation in the livers is 2.35% and there is no significant difference within the various regions of Canada. This would result in a muscle violative rate of 0.8%.The only sulfonamide found at violative levels was sulfamethazine. All violative samples were within the range 0.11-4.00 ppm. Over the period of the survey the incidence of violations at all levels decreased. Violations at higher levels decreased most rapidly resulting in a continuous reduction of the mean level in violative samples.

  11. Tapeworm infection resulting from pork eaten at a wedding banquet.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z F; Guo, H; Huang, X X

    1997-01-01

    Forty-five people who had attended a wedding banquet were examined by means of both Avidin-Biotin Peroxidase Complex-ELISA (ABC-ELISA) and Kato stool thick smear technic. The results revealed that the positive rates with ABC-ELISA were 15.56% (7/45) and Kato Katz 0.62% (1/161). There was a significant difference between the two positive rates (p < 0.005). Six people at the wedding had taeniasis and 4 of them also had cysticercosis. Local people have no habit of eating uncooked pork, but at this banquet the meat from an infected cysticerci pig was used for preparing dishes for the wedding feast and the cold dishes were contaminated by the bladder worms as the result of using the same chopping block. PMID:9656342

  12. Meat quality variation in the robotic sorting of pork loins.

    PubMed

    Swatland, H J; Uttaro, B; Goldenberg, A A; Lu, Z

    1998-10-01

    A robot was used to make fiber-optic reflectance measurements from 400 to 700 nm in 10-nm increments at six sites, 10 cm apart, along the length of 48 pork loins. Meat quality was assessed in the longissimus dorsi near the thoracolumbar junction using 1) a bag-drip method for fluid loss, 2) a subjective evaluation of wetness, 3) a colorimeter measurement of paleness (CIE L), and 4) a subjective evaluation for Japanese pork color scores (JPCS). Sorting of the loins in the commercial plant from which they originated was correlated (P < .01) with fluid loss (r=.57), with wetness scores (r=-.57), with CIE L* (r=.71), and with JPCS (r=-.64). Laboratory measurements of pH at the site of meat quality assessment were correlated (P < .01) with fluid loss (r=-.61), with wetness scores (r=.65), with CIE L* (r=-.74), and with JPCS (r=.77). Average spectra obtained robotically were correlated (P < .01) with fluid loss (r=.56 at 670 nm, and R=.76 adding 560 and 540 nm), with wetness score (r=-.65 at 480 nm, and R=.75 adding 530 and 570 nm), with CIE L* (r=.76 at 480 nm, and R=.82 adding 690 and 520 nm), and with JPCS (r=-.70). In sorting loins that were all categorized as normal at the plant, mean reflectance data collected robotically were correlated with fluid loss, r=.42 (P > .05) at 700 nm and R=.58 (P > .05) adding 430 nm; with wetness score, r=.25 (P > .05); with CIE L*, r=.58 (P < .025) at 700 nm; and with JPCS, r=-.71 (P < .01) at 700 nm. Thus, as well as detecting obvious PSE loins, the robotic probe also had a limited capability to sort loins all categorized as normal at the plant.

  13. Relationships between physical and structural properties of intramuscular connective tissue and toughness of raw pork.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takanori; Fang, Suhong; Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Koui

    2009-02-01

    We studied the relationships between the shear-force value and physical and structural properties of the intramuscular connective tissue (IMCT) in six classes of porcine skeletal muscle to elucidate the contribution of IMCT to toughness of raw pork. The shear-force value of raw pork correlated significantly with that of the IMCT model prepared from each class of skeletal muscle (P < 0.05). The correlation suggested that the variable toughness of pork was caused by the mechanical strength of the endomysium and perimysium. The thickness of the secondary perimysium correlated significantly with the shear-force value of raw pork (P < 0.05) and with that of the IMCT model (P < 0.05). The shear-force value of raw pork correlated significantly with the total amount of collagen (P < 0.05) but not with the heat-solubility of collagen. We concluded therefore that the thickness of the secondary perimysium determines the mechanical strength of IMCT and contributes to toughness in raw pork.

  14. "Chilled" pork--Part I: Sensory and physico-chemical quality.

    PubMed

    Ngapo, T M; Riendeau, L; Laberge, C; Leblanc, D; Fortin, J

    2012-12-01

    Chilled meat exportation comprises chilling within 48 h post-mortem to temperatures <0 °C without freezing and holding under these conditions for several weeks. The effects of this ageing on sensory quality of pork are unknown and hence the objective of this study was to compare the sensory quality of Canadian pork as found in an export (Japan) market and locally. Regardless that the Japanese market's quality criteria were met, pork sorted on-line differed (P<0.05) from that for the domestic market only for lightness, exudate and cooking loss; no differences in intramuscular fat content were observed. Overall, a trained panel scored weaker pork and meat flavours and odours in the export than the domestic pork as a result of either the quality by selection if roasted or the ageing (-1.7 °C, 43 days exported chilled or 3.1 °C, 5 days domestic) if grilled or shabu shabu. Grilled pork was also more tender, sweeter and had stronger caramel flavour with the chilled ageing. PMID:22633163

  15. Effect of soy sauce on lipid oxidation of irradiated pork patties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Choi, Yun-Sang; Choi, Ji-Hun; Lee, Mi-Ai; Song, Dong-Heon; Kim, Hack-Youn; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to find out the antioxidant effect of the soy sauce on lipid oxidation of electron beam irradiated pork patties. The pork patties prepared with sodium chloride or soy sauce solution at identical salt concentrations were irradiated at 0 or 5 kGy, and peroxide value, conjugated diene, 2-thiobarbituric acid, and free fatty acid values were evaluated for 10 days (4 °C). The irradiated pork patties treated with soy sauce showed the lowest peroxide value and 2-thiobarbituric acid value at the end of storage compared to those prepared with sodium chloride. The irradiated pork patties formulated with soy sauce and 0.5% ascorbic acid had similar 2-thiobarbituric acid and free fatty acid values compared to those of the non-irradiated pork patties treated with sodium chloride. Our results suggested that the soy sauce can retard the lipid oxidation of irradiated pork patty, and a synergistic effect between soy sauce and ascorbic acid was observed.

  16. Enhancement of Pork Jerky Using Co-cultures of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Angel Yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changqing; Lu, Ziyang; Huang, Jing; He, Sha; Tan, Hui; Wang, Gang; Liu, Dayu; Li, Yubin

    2016-09-01

    Strains of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Angel Yeast were combined to ferment raw pork and make pork jerky. After fermentation, the jerky was dried and then tested for sensory evaluation, pH and free amino acid content. The results showed that the optimal conditions for fermentation using L. bulgaricus and Angel Yeast were: a pH of 6.5, a 1:1 (v/v) ratio of L. bulgaricus to Angel Yeast, a fermentation time of 42 h and temperature of 25 °C. The results showed that the pork jerky fermented with the combined strains was not very sour which was close to the pH of 7.0 and had a higher free amino acid content which was more than 68.3 mg/100 g compared with the pork jerky fermented by either L. bulgaricus or Angel Yeast alone. Overall, the results demonstrate that fermentation of raw pork with combined strains of L. bulgaricus and Angel Yeast improves the quality and flavor of pork jerky.

  17. Enhancement of Pork Jerky Using Co-cultures of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Angel Yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changqing; Lu, Ziyang; Huang, Jing; He, Sha; Tan, Hui; Wang, Gang; Liu, Dayu; Li, Yubin

    2016-09-01

    Strains of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Angel Yeast were combined to ferment raw pork and make pork jerky. After fermentation, the jerky was dried and then tested for sensory evaluation, pH and free amino acid content. The results showed that the optimal conditions for fermentation using L. bulgaricus and Angel Yeast were: a pH of 6.5, a 1:1 (v/v) ratio of L. bulgaricus to Angel Yeast, a fermentation time of 42 h and temperature of 25 °C. The results showed that the pork jerky fermented with the combined strains was not very sour which was close to the pH of 7.0 and had a higher free amino acid content which was more than 68.3 mg/100 g compared with the pork jerky fermented by either L. bulgaricus or Angel Yeast alone. Overall, the results demonstrate that fermentation of raw pork with combined strains of L. bulgaricus and Angel Yeast improves the quality and flavor of pork jerky. PMID:27407292

  18. Improving prediction of total viable counts in pork based on hyperspectral scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Feifei; Peng, Yankun; Song, Yulin; Guo, Hui; Chao, Kuanglin

    2012-05-01

    A hyperspectral scattering technique was investigated for predicting the total viable counts (TVC) of pork in the article. Fresh pork was purchased from a local market and stored at 4°C for 1-15 days. Totally 35 samples were used in the experiment and 2-4 samples were taken out randomly each day for collecting hyperspectral images and reference microbiological tests. Gompertz function was applied to fit the scattering profiles of pork and Teflon, and the fitting results were pretty good in the spectral range of 470-1010 nm. Both individual parameters and integrated parameters were explored to develop the multi-linear regression models for predicting pork TVC, and the results indicated that individual Gompertz parameter α was superior to other individual parameters, while the integrated parameters can perform better. The best result for predicting pork TVC was achieved by the form of (α, β, ɛ), with the RCV of 0.963. The study demonstrated that hyperspectral scattering technique combined with Gompertz function was potential for rapid determination of pork TVC, and would be a valid tool for monitoring the quality and safety attributes of meat in the future.

  19. Nondestructive detection of pork comprehensive quality based on spectroscopy and support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Peng, Yankun; Zhang, Leilei; Dhakal, Sagar; Wang, Caiping

    2014-05-01

    Pork is one of the highly consumed meat item in the world. With growing improvement of living standard, concerned stakeholders including consumers and regulatory body pay more attention to comprehensive quality of fresh pork. Different analytical-laboratory based technologies exist to determine quality attributes of pork. However, none of the technologies are able to meet industrial desire of rapid and non-destructive technological development. Current study used optical instrument as a rapid and non-destructive tool to classify 24 h-aged pork longissimus dorsi samples into three kinds of meat (PSE, Normal and DFD), on the basis of color L* and pH24. Total of 66 samples were used in the experiment. Optical system based on Vis/NIR spectral acquisition system (300-1100 nm) was self- developed in laboratory to acquire spectral signal of pork samples. Median smoothing filter (M-filter) and multiplication scatter correction (MSC) was used to remove spectral noise and signal drift. Support vector machine (SVM) prediction model was developed to classify the samples based on their comprehensive qualities. The results showed that the classification model is highly correlated with the actual quality parameters with classification accuracy more than 85%. The system developed in this study being simple and easy to use, results being promising, the system can be used in meat processing industry for real time, non-destructive and rapid detection of pork qualities in future.

  20. "Chilled" pork--Part I: Sensory and physico-chemical quality.

    PubMed

    Ngapo, T M; Riendeau, L; Laberge, C; Leblanc, D; Fortin, J

    2012-12-01

    Chilled meat exportation comprises chilling within 48 h post-mortem to temperatures <0 °C without freezing and holding under these conditions for several weeks. The effects of this ageing on sensory quality of pork are unknown and hence the objective of this study was to compare the sensory quality of Canadian pork as found in an export (Japan) market and locally. Regardless that the Japanese market's quality criteria were met, pork sorted on-line differed (P<0.05) from that for the domestic market only for lightness, exudate and cooking loss; no differences in intramuscular fat content were observed. Overall, a trained panel scored weaker pork and meat flavours and odours in the export than the domestic pork as a result of either the quality by selection if roasted or the ageing (-1.7 °C, 43 days exported chilled or 3.1 °C, 5 days domestic) if grilled or shabu shabu. Grilled pork was also more tender, sweeter and had stronger caramel flavour with the chilled ageing.

  1. Pressure shift freezing of pork muscle: effect on color, drip loss, texture, and protein stability.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Songming; Le Bail, Alain; Chapleau, Nicolas; Ramaswamy, Hosahalli S; De Lamballerie-Anton, Marie

    2004-01-01

    Cylindrical specimens (50 mm diameter and 160 mm length) of fresh pork muscle (boneless rib portions) packed in plastic bags were frozen by pressure shift freezing (PSF) at 100, 150, and 200 MPa, air blast freezing (ABF), and liquid immersion freezing (LIF). Temperature and phase transformations of the muscle tissue were monitored during the freezing process at three locations: center, midway between the center and the surface, and near the surface. Pork muscle quality changes [color, drip loss (both thawing and cooking), texture (shear force), and protein stability (DSC thermal profiles)] were evaluated after thawing the frozen samples at room temperature (20 degrees C). Employing pressures above 150 MPa caused very significant (P < 0.01) color changes in pork muscle during the PSF process. The PSF process reduced thawing drip loss of pork muscle but did not cause obvious changes in total drip loss following thawing and subsequent cooking. PSF at 150 and 200 MPa resulted in considerable denaturation of myofibrillar proteins of pork muscle. The PSF process also caused an increase in the pork muscle toughness as compared with that of unfrozen, ABF, and LIF samples.

  2. Effect of low dose irradiation on the microbial and sensory characteristics of fresh pork loins. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.G.; Rust, R.E.; Kraft, A.A.; Walker, H.W.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of low dose (100 krad) irradiation on microflora, sensory characteristics, and development of oxidative rancidity of vacuum packed pork loins was investigated after irradiation and during low temperature (4/sup 0/C) storage up to 21 days. Irradiation reduced numbers of mesophiles, psychrotrophs, anaerobic bacteria (P<0.01), and staphylococci (P<0.05), with the effect on mesophiles and psychrotrophic spoilage organisms the greatest. Effect of irradiation on sensory characteristics of pork loin was minimal with no detectable differences between irradiated and nonirradiated pork after 14 days of storage. Irradiation of pork did not affect cooking loss or thiobarbituric acid values. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Risk profiles of pork and poultry meat and risk ratings of various pathogen/product combinations.

    PubMed

    Mataragas, M; Skandamis, P N; Drosinos, E H

    2008-08-15

    Risk profiles of pork and poultry meat were carried out using an Excel-based software program, Risk Ranger. It is a semi-quantitative risk estimator answering various questions relating to the probability of exposure to a hazard, susceptibility of the population of interest, severity of the illness caused by the hazard if present and probability of food containing an infectious dose. Therefore, qualitative and quantitative inputs were used to estimate and rank the risk of various hazards/food combinations. Risk scores provided by the tool were characterized as low, medium and high. Also, health risk was estimated separately, where needed, for low and high risk populations. Low risk scores were obtained for Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) for low risk population. High risk scores were obtained for hepatitis E virus (HEV) in raw pork products (both low and high risk populations). Moderate risk scores for Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes in processed pork or poultry-meat products (ready-to-eat or to be reheated) and partially cooked pork products were also obtained (low risk population). Scores for Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens and Bacillus cereus and various product types were mostly in the "medium" risk category, except for S. aureus/ready-to-eat pork products able to support growth of the organism, which fell into the high risk category. Campylobacter spp. gave moderate risk scores with one exception (raw poultry products), whereas Y. enterocolitica showed combinations of low risk and few of medium risk. High risk pathogen/product combinations identified were: 1) temperature abused, ready-to-eat pork and/or poultry-meat products with extended shelf life and cross-contaminated by L. monocytogenes (high risk population), EHEC (high risk population) or S. aureus (all population), 2) partially cooked or processed intended to be reheated pork products cross-contaminated by L. monocytogenes

  4. Risk profiles of pork and poultry meat and risk ratings of various pathogen/product combinations.

    PubMed

    Mataragas, M; Skandamis, P N; Drosinos, E H

    2008-08-15

    Risk profiles of pork and poultry meat were carried out using an Excel-based software program, Risk Ranger. It is a semi-quantitative risk estimator answering various questions relating to the probability of exposure to a hazard, susceptibility of the population of interest, severity of the illness caused by the hazard if present and probability of food containing an infectious dose. Therefore, qualitative and quantitative inputs were used to estimate and rank the risk of various hazards/food combinations. Risk scores provided by the tool were characterized as low, medium and high. Also, health risk was estimated separately, where needed, for low and high risk populations. Low risk scores were obtained for Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) for low risk population. High risk scores were obtained for hepatitis E virus (HEV) in raw pork products (both low and high risk populations). Moderate risk scores for Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes in processed pork or poultry-meat products (ready-to-eat or to be reheated) and partially cooked pork products were also obtained (low risk population). Scores for Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens and Bacillus cereus and various product types were mostly in the "medium" risk category, except for S. aureus/ready-to-eat pork products able to support growth of the organism, which fell into the high risk category. Campylobacter spp. gave moderate risk scores with one exception (raw poultry products), whereas Y. enterocolitica showed combinations of low risk and few of medium risk. High risk pathogen/product combinations identified were: 1) temperature abused, ready-to-eat pork and/or poultry-meat products with extended shelf life and cross-contaminated by L. monocytogenes (high risk population), EHEC (high risk population) or S. aureus (all population), 2) partially cooked or processed intended to be reheated pork products cross-contaminated by L. monocytogenes

  5. Prevalence, numbers and characteristics of Salmonella spp. on Irish retail pork.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, D M; Duggan, S J; Gonzales-Barron, U; Fanning, S; Butler, F; Cormican, M; Duffy, G

    2009-05-31

    Salmonella is a common contaminant of raw pork and represents a public health risk. Both qualitative and quantitative data on Salmonella in pork at retail are required for assessment of consumer exposure to the pathogen. Pork samples (n=500) were collected at random from butchers' shops and supermarkets in the Republic of Ireland between January and November, 2007 and examined for prevalence and numbers of Salmonella using a PCR screen followed by cultural examination of positive samples. Salmonella numbers were assessed using a three tube most probable number (MPN) technique. Any Salmonella recovered were characterised by serotype, phage type and antibiogram, and subtyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Enterobacteriaceae were also enumerated to see if there was a correlation between the Salmonella status of the pork and hygiene levels at retail outlets. Salmonella spp. were detected on 13/500 (2.6%) pork cuts at numbers between <0.03 and 2.10 MPN/g. The mean Enterobacteriaceae counts was 3.12 log(10) CFU/g (range -0.26-6.52 log(10) CFU/g). Salmonella Typhimurium was the most common serotype and the majority of isolates were multi antibiotic resistant. PFGE analysis showed evidence of persistence of some strains, with an S. Typhimurium U310 recovered from a pork abattoir being identical (100%) to a strain found a year later in a sample from a retail outlet. There was also evidence of cross contamination of Salmonella isolates between samples. There was a direct association between Salmonella contamination of pork and Enterobacteriaceae numbers, which indicates the need for good hygiene practices at retail for control of this pathogen.

  6. Factors Affecting Detection of Hepatitis E Virus on Canadian Retail Pork Chops and Pork Livers Assayed Using Real-Time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, B J; Leblanc, D; Avery, B; Pearl, D L; Houde, A; Rajić, A; McEwen, S A

    2016-03-01

    We collected 599 Canadian retail pork chops and 283 pork livers routinely (usually weekly) from April 2011 to March 2012 using the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS) retail sampling platform. Samples were assayed using validated real-time (q) reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested classical RT-PCR for the detection of hepatitis E virus (HEV), porcine enteric calicivirus (PEC) and rotavirus (RV). The presence of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. was measured on a subset of our samples. Exact logistic regression models were fitted for predictors for HEV detection, for each assay. For both assays, sample type (pork chop versus liver) was a significant predictor for HEV RNA detection. For nested classical RT-PCR but not qRT-PCR, region of sample collection was a significant predictor (P = 0.008) of HEV detection. Odds of HEV detection were greatest in spring relative to other seasons. E. coli was a significant predictor for HEV RNA detection using the qRT-PCR (P = 0.03). Overall, the prevalence of E. coli, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. was significantly greater than HEV, PEC or RV on our retail pork samples. Our sparse data set for the detection of PEC and RV precluded modelling of risk factors for the detection of these viruses. PMID:26192650

  7. A systematic review/meta-analysis of primary research investigating swine, pork or pork products as a source of zoonotic hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, B J; Rajić, A; Greig, J; Waddell, L; Trottier, G; Houde, A; Harris, J; Borden, L N; Price, C

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of our study were to identify and categorize primary research investigating swine/pork as a source of zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) using the relatively new technique of scoping study, and to investigate the potential association between human exposure to swine/pork and HEV infection quantitatively using systematic review/meta-analysis methodology. From 1890 initially identified abstracts, 327 were considered for the review. Five study design types (cross-sectional, prevalence, genotyping, case-report and experimental transmission studies) were identified. A significant association between occupational exposure to swine and human HEV IgG seropositivity was reported in 10/13 cross-sectional studies. The association reported between pork consumption and HEV IgG seropositivity was inconsistent. The quantification of viral load in swine and retail pork, viral load required for infection in primates, cohort and case-control studies in humans, and formal risk assessment are recommended before specific public-health policy actions are taken.

  8. 9 CFR 94.8 - Pork and pork products from regions where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....) and regulations thereunder (9 CFR, chapter III, part 327), including requirements that the pork or...) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 94.8, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... the Island of Sardinia, Italy. 8 The Administrator bases the reason to believe African swine...

  9. 9 CFR 94.8 - Pork and pork products from regions where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....) and regulations thereunder (9 CFR, chapter III, part 327), including requirements that the pork or...) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 94.8, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... the Island of Sardinia, Italy. 7 The Administrator bases the reason to believe African swine...

  10. 9 CFR 94.8 - Pork and pork products from regions where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/animal_disease_status.shtml. Copies of... 210 minutes after which they must be cooked in hot oil (deep-fried) at a minimum of 104 °C for an....) and regulations thereunder (9 CFR, chapter III, part 327), including requirements that the pork...

  11. 9 CFR 94.8 - Pork and pork products from regions where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... maintained on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/animal_disease_status... approximately 210 minutes after which they must be cooked in hot oil (deep-fried) at a minimum of 104 °C for an....) and regulations thereunder (9 CFR, chapter III, part 327), including requirements that the pork...

  12. Survival of Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium in vacuum-packed, moisture-enhanced pork.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xuesong; Dickson, James S

    2012-03-01

    The abilities of Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium to survive in vacuum-packaged, moisture-enhanced pork stored at 4 or 10°C were examined. Pork loins were surface inoculated with either C. jejuni or Salmonella Typhimurium and then moisture enhanced to a target of 10 or 20%. The enhanced pork loins were sliced 1 cm thick and vacuum packaged. A pork loin without moisture enhancement was sliced and vacuum packaged as a control. Samples were collected, plated, and the numbers of surviving organisms were determined periodically during storage at 4 and 10°C. The numbers of C. jejuni or Salmonella Typhimurium in samples with different moisture enhancement levels were similar (P > 0.05). No significant differences (P > 0.05) in C. jejuni counts were observed between samples at 10°C and those at 4°C. In contrast, the numbers of Salmonella Typhimurium in samples at 10°C had significantly (P < 0.05) increased (0.41 log CFU/g) from those at the refrigerated temperature of 4°C. Vacuum storage at 4 and 10°C for 28 days did not result in dramatic reductions in the mean numbers of C. jejuni and Salmonella Typhimurium. Our findings indicate that vacuum packaging under chilled conditions will not add substantially to safety for moisture-enhanced pork. Strict hygienic practices or the implementation of decontamination technologies is recommended.

  13. Frequency of Toxoplasma gondii in pork meat in Ocotlán, Jalisco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Galván-Ramirez, M L; Madriz Elisondo, A L; Rico Torres, C P; Luna-Pastén, H; Rodríguez Pérez, L R; Rincón-Sánchez, A R; Franco, R; Salazar-Montes, A; Correa, D

    2010-06-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an infection caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular obligate parasite. Its transmission has usually been attributed to ingestion of undercooked or raw meat. The frequency of T. gondii in pork, the most common meat for human consumption in Jalisco, Mexico, is unknown; in Guadalajara city high prevalence of human toxoplasmosis has been documented. Forty-eight samples of pork meat from butcher shops in Ocotlán city were analyzed. Through bioassay, 50 g of tissue was homogenized in an acidic pepsin solution and inoculated subcutaneously to previously immunosuppressed mice. Blood samples from the mice tail vein were obtained before inoculation and 7, 14, 28, and 45 days postinoculation to analyze anti-Toxoplasma immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG antibody kinetics by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For histopathology, small fragments of the brain, lungs, heart, and skeletal muscle were extracted on day 45 and were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Also, DNA was extracted from the pork meat for PCR amplification of the B1 gene. Even though all pork samples were negative by histopathology and PCR, IgG and IgM antibodies against T. gondii were detected in 1 of the 48 inoculated mice, reflecting a frequency of 2.1% positive pork meat, which is lower than expected but similar to that found in other regions.

  14. Effect of organic and conventional rearing system on the mineral content of pork.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Wang, Donghua; Yang, Shuming

    2016-08-01

    Dietary composition and rearing regime largely determine the trace elemental composition of pigs, and consequently their concentration in animal products. The present study evaluates thirteen macro- and trace element concentrations in pork from organic and conventional farms. Conventional pigs were given a commercial feed with added minerals; organic pigs were given a feed based on organic feedstuffs. The content of macro-elements (Na, K, Mg and Ca) and some trace elements (Ni, Fe, Zn and Sr) in organic and conventional meat samples showed no significant differences (P>0.05). Several trace element concentrations in organic pork were significantly higher (P<0.05) compared to conventional pork: Cr (808 and 500μg/kg in organic and conventional pork, respectively), Mn (695 and 473μg/kg) and Cu (1.80 and 1.49mg/kg). The results showed considerable differences in mineral content between samples from pigs reared in organic and conventional systems. Our results also indicate that authentication of organic pork can be realized by applying multivariate chemometric methods such as discriminant analysis to this multi-element data.

  15. Umami and related components in "chilled" pork for the Japanese market.

    PubMed

    Ngapo, T M; Vachon, L

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate umami-related components and their evolution in Canadian pork destined for the Japanese market. Export quality pork loins for Japan were subjectively selected on-line for marbling, colour and firmness; remaining loins were retained for the domestic market. At 48h post-mortem, samples were aged 5d at 4.0°C (fresh) or 13, 28, 43 or 58d at -1.7°C (chilled). Meat qualities differed only in pH (<0.1 pH unit; P<0.05). Generally, free amino acid concentrations increased and nucleotide concentrations decreased with longer ageing periods. The equivalent umami concentration (EUC) was highest in the pork aged 5d at 4.0°C and at 43d -1.7°C (P<0.05) which is estimated as the transportation time for Canadian chilled exports to Japan. A lack of differences in EUC between domestic and export pork and between fresh and 43d chilled ageing demonstrates that Canadian chilled pork in Japan has the EUC of its fresh 5d counterpart. PMID:27424307

  16. Effect of Fresh Garlic on Lipid Oxidation and Microbiological Changes of Pork Patties during Refrigerated Storage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The effects of two levels (1.4 vs 2.8%) of fresh garlic on lipid oxidation and microbial growth in pork patties were evaluated. Hunter color (L, a, b), pH, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), oxidative volatile compounds, total bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae in the pork patties with or without fresh garlic were measured during storage at 4℃. Addition of fresh garlic decreased redness (a), while increased pH and yellowness (b) values of the fresh pork patties were observed, regardless of the levels added. The TBARS values of the pork patties were increased with the addition of fresh garlic (p<0.05). Similar results were observed in oxidative volatile compounds. A total of 13 volatile compounds were detected in the patties (5 sulfur-containing compounds, including allyl mercaptan, allyl methyl sulfide, diallyl sulfide, methyl-(E)-propenyl-disulfide, and diallyl disulfide, and the 8 other oxidative compounds, including 1-pentanol, hexanal, 1-hexanol, heptanal, (E)-2-heptenal, 1-octen-3-ol, (E)-2-octenal and nonanal). Fresh garlic accelerated development of oxidative products in the pork patties, especially hexanal and the total oxidative volatile compounds. However, the addition of 1.4 and 2.8% of fresh garlic inhibited the growth of total bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae, indicating low total bacterial counts and Enterobacteriaceae than the controls. PMID:26761498

  17. Quantitative analysis and detection of adulteration in pork using near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuxia; Cheng, Fang; Xie, Lijuan

    2010-04-01

    Authenticity is an important food quality criterion. Rapid methods for confirming authenticity or detecting adulteration are increasingly demanded by food processors and consumers. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been used to detect economic adulteration in pork . Pork samples were adulterated with liver and chicken in 10% increments. Prediction and quantitative analysis were done using raw data and pretreatment spectra. The optimal prediction result was achieved by partial least aquares(PLS) regression with standard normal variate(SNV) pretreatment for pork adulterated with liver samples, and the correlation coefficient(R value), the root mean square error of calibration(RMSEC) and the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) were 0.97706, 0.0673 and 0.0732, respectively. The best model for pork meat adulterated with chicken samples was obtained by PLS with the raw spectra, and the correlation coefficient(R value), RMSEP and RMSEC were 0.98614, 0.0525, and 0.122, respectively. The result shows that NIR technology can be successfully used to detect adulteration in pork meat adulterated with liver and chicken.

  18. Quantitative risk assessment for human salmonellosis through the consumption of pork sausage in Porto Alegre, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mürmann, Lisandra; Corbellini, Luis Gustavo; Collor, Alexandre Ávila; Cardoso, Marisa

    2011-04-01

    A quantitative microbiology risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the risk of Salmonella infection to consumers of fresh pork sausages prepared at barbecues in Porto Alegre, Brazil. For the analysis, a prevalence of 24.4% positive pork sausages with a level of contamination between 0.03 and 460 CFU g(-1) was assumed. Data related to frequency and habits of consumption were obtained by a questionnaire survey given to 424 people. A second-order Monte Carlo simulation separating the uncertain parameter of cooking time from the variable parameters was run. Of the people interviewed, 87.5% consumed pork sausage, and 85.4% ate it at barbecues. The average risk of salmonellosis per barbecue at a minimum cooking time of 15.6 min (worst-case scenario) was 6.24 × 10(-4), and the risk assessed per month was 1.61 × 10(-3). Cooking for 19 min would fully inactivate Salmonella in 99.9% of the cases. At this cooking time, the sausage reached a mean internal temperature of 75.7°C. The results of the quantitative microbiology risk assessment revealed that the consumption of fresh pork sausage is safe when cooking time is approximately 19 min, whereas undercooked pork sausage may represent a nonnegligible health risk for consumers.

  19. The economic impact of H1N1 on Mexico's tourist and pork sectors.

    PubMed

    Rassy, Dunia; Smith, Richard D

    2013-07-01

    By examining tourist arrivals and pork output and trade statistics, this analysis estimates the economic impact to the Mexican tourism and pork sectors because of the H1N1 influenza pandemic. It also assesses the role of the international response in the context of this economic impact. For tourism, losing almost a million overseas visitors translated into losses of around $US2.8bn, which extended over a five-month period, mostly because of the slow return of European travellers. For the pork industry, temporal decreases in output were observed in most of the country and related to H1N1 incidence (p = 0.048, r = 0.37). By the end of 2009, Mexico had a pork trade deficit of $US27m. The losses derived from this pandemic were clearly influenced by the risk perception created in tourist-supplying and pork trade partners. Results suggest that the wider economic implications of health-related emergencies can be significant and need to be considered in preparedness planning. For instance, more effective surveillance and data gathering would enable policy to target emergency funding to the sectors and regions hardest hit. These results also stress the importance of being familiar with trade networks so as to be able to anticipate the international response and respond accordingly.

  20. Prevalence, characteristics, and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella in retail pork in Jiangsu province, eastern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Chen; Pan, Zhi-Ming; Kang, Xi-Long; Geng, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Zhong-Yi; Cai, Yin-Qiang; Jiao, Xin-An

    2014-02-01

    Salmonella is commonly isolated from raw pork and is a leading cause of foodborne illness. Because China has the highest rate of pork consumption and the largest number of pig breeding facilities in the world, an epidemiological analysis of Salmonella species from pork in China is warranted. In this study, pork samples (n = 1,096) were collected from 20 major free markets in four cities of Jiangsu province from August 2010 to December 2012. A total of 163 Salmonella isolates were recovered from 154 Salmonella-positive samples. Among 14 Salmonella serovars identified, Derby (47.9%) was most prevalent, followed by Typhimurium (10.4%), Meleagridis (9.2%), Anatum (8.6%), and London (6.7%). Antimicrobial sensitivity testing revealed that 134 (82.2%) of the isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent, and 41 (25.2%) were resistant to more than three antimicrobials. The highest resistance was to tetracycline (66.3% of isolates) followed by ampicillin (39.9%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (31.3%), and nalidixic acid (30.1%). Multilocus sequence typing analysis revealed 14 sequence type (ST) patterns; ST40 was the most common (77 isolates) followed by ST64 (19 isolates). Our research revealed a high prevalence of Salmonella in retail pork. Diversity among the Salmonella isolates was high in terms of serovar and genotype, and multidrug resistance was prevalent. Multilocus sequence type was generally associated with serovar and provided a reliable prediction of the most common Salmonella serovars.

  1. Influence of on-farm production practices on sensory and technological quality characteristics of pork loin.

    PubMed

    Omana, D A; Goddard, E; Plastow, G S; Janz, J; Ma, L; Anders, S; Moore, S S; Bruce, H L

    2014-01-01

    Quality of pork from pigs raised either traditionally (outdoor access or bedded settings with no sub-therapeutic antibiotics or growth promotants in feed) or conventionally (commercial indoor) was evaluated. Pork loins (m. longissimus thoracis et lumborum, LTL) from four hundred pigs from either traditional or conventional production systems (n=200) fed commercially formulated diets ad libitum were harvested at slaughter. Intramuscular crude fat content and lean color (L* and b*) values were significantly decreased in conventional pork loins. LTL from conventionally-raised pig carcasses showed increased (P<0.05) mean pH, moisture content and reduced cooking loss and shear force values and had increased tenderness and juiciness scores compared to those from traditionally-raised pig carcasses. Results indicated that pork from conventionally raised pigs was superior to that from traditionally raised pigs in terms of tenderness and juiciness, suggesting that consumers may value pork from traditionally raised pigs on the basis of factors other than eating quality and appearance. PMID:23927920

  2. Low temperature cooking of pork meat - Physicochemical and sensory aspects.

    PubMed

    Becker, André; Boulaaba, Annika; Pingen, Sylvia; Krischek, Carsten; Klein, Günter

    2016-08-01

    Low-temperature cooking is increasingly used in the food sector. This study compared three different low temperature heating methods and one conventional cooking procedure of pork meat in a combi steamer with special emphasis on sensory parameters. Low temperature, long time (LTLT) treatments over 20h at 53°C or 58°C (LTLT 53°C or 58°C) showed considerable effects on meat tenderization. Heating to a core temperature of 60°C (low temperature method=LT) at 60°C oven temperature resulted in less tender but clearly juicier meat. LTLT 53°C and LT were evaluated as being equally acceptable by the panelists. The tenderest meat (LTLT 58°C) was mainly rejected because of a crumbly and dry mouth feeling. Conventional heating to a core temperature of 80°C at 180°C oven temperature resulted in low eating quality due to high toughness and low juiciness. PMID:27060409

  3. Water transfer analysis in pork meat supported by NMR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cabrera, M A; Gou, P; Foucat, L; Renou, J P; Daudin, J D

    2004-05-01

    NMR proton density imaging was used to study isothermal and unidirectional drying of pork semi membranosus muscle samples at temperatures of 12, 16 and 20 °C. An independent calibration of the transversal relaxation time T(2) as a function of the moisture content was carried out to convert the signal amplitude into moisture content. Due to spatial heterogeneity in drying, 2D images were needed to assess the evolution of 1D moisture profiles. The relationship between the effective water diffusivity (D) was calculated in function of water content (X) using the Boltzman transformation which needs no a priori on the relationship D=f(X); the effect of lipid content, temperature and fibre direction on this relationship were also studied. In all cases a decrease in water content brought about a decrease in D. A slight increase in lipid content led to a dramatic decrease in D. The fibre direction relative to water movement had a negligible effect. No significative differences in D between the three temperatures were observed, due to variability in the chemical composition of the samples. PMID:22061130

  4. Genomic DNA characterization of pork spleen by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Embús, D. A.; Orrego Cardozo, M.; Vargas-Hernández, C.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the study of Raman signal enhancement due to interaction between ZnO rods and pork spleen DNA is reported. ZnO microstructures were synthesized by the Sol-Gel method and afterward combined with porcine spleen DNA extracted in the previous stages, following standardized cell lysis, deproteinization, and precipitation processes. Raman spectroscopy was used for the characterization of structures of ZnO and ZnO-DNA complex, and the results show the respective bands of ZnO wurtzite hexagonal phase for modes E2 (M), A1(TO), E2(High), E1(LO), and 2LO. Due to the SERS effect in the spectral range from 200 to 1800 cm,-1 Raman bands caused by vibrations of the deoxyribose C-O-C binding were also observed, producing deformation of the ring as shown in the 559 cm-1 peak. The broad band at 782 cm-1, together with the complex vibration of the string 5'-COPO-C3', is over a wide band of thymine (790 cm-1) or cytosine (780 cm-1). A prominent band near 1098 cm-1 assigned to symmetric stretching vibration phosphodioxy group (PO2-) DNA backbone is most favoured in intensity by the addition of ZnO particles originated by the SERS effect. This effect suggests a possible mechanism for enhancing the Raman signal due to the electromagnetic interaction between a DNA molecule and the flat surface of the ZnO rod.

  5. International trade in meat: the tip of the pork chop.

    PubMed

    Galloway, James N; Burke, Marshall; Bradford, G Eric; Naylor, Rosamond; Falcon, Walter; Chapagain, Ashok K; Gaskell, Joanne C; McCullough, Ellen; Mooney, Harold A; Oleson, Kirsten L L; Steinfeld, Henning; Wassenaar, Tom; Smil, Vaclav

    2007-12-01

    This paper provides an original account of global land, water, and nitrogen use in support of industrialized livestock production and trade, with emphasis on two of the fastest-growing sectors, pork and poultry. Our analysis focuses on trade in feed and animal products, using a new model that calculates the amount of "virtual" nitrogen, water, and land used in production but not embedded in the product. We show how key meat-importing countries, such as Japan, benefit from "virtual" trade in land, water, and nitrogen, and how key meat-exporting countries, such as Brazil, provide these resources without accounting for their true environmental cost. Results show that Japan's pig and chicken meat imports embody the virtual equivalent of 50% of Japan's total arable land, and half of Japan's virtual nitrogen total is lost in the US. Trade links with China are responsible for 15% of the virtual nitrogen left behind in Brazil due to feed and meat exports, and 20% of Brazil's area is used to grow soybean exports. The complexity of trade in meat, feed, water, and nitrogen is illustrated by the dual roles of the US and The Netherlands as both importers and exporters of meat. Mitigation of environmental damage from industrialized livestock production and trade depends on a combination of direct-pricing strategies, regulatory approaches, and use of best management practices. Our analysis indicates that increased water- and nitrogen-use efficiency and land conservation resulting from these measures could significantly reduce resource costs.

  6. Low temperature cooking of pork meat - Physicochemical and sensory aspects.

    PubMed

    Becker, André; Boulaaba, Annika; Pingen, Sylvia; Krischek, Carsten; Klein, Günter

    2016-08-01

    Low-temperature cooking is increasingly used in the food sector. This study compared three different low temperature heating methods and one conventional cooking procedure of pork meat in a combi steamer with special emphasis on sensory parameters. Low temperature, long time (LTLT) treatments over 20h at 53°C or 58°C (LTLT 53°C or 58°C) showed considerable effects on meat tenderization. Heating to a core temperature of 60°C (low temperature method=LT) at 60°C oven temperature resulted in less tender but clearly juicier meat. LTLT 53°C and LT were evaluated as being equally acceptable by the panelists. The tenderest meat (LTLT 58°C) was mainly rejected because of a crumbly and dry mouth feeling. Conventional heating to a core temperature of 80°C at 180°C oven temperature resulted in low eating quality due to high toughness and low juiciness.

  7. International trade in meat: the tip of the pork chop.

    PubMed

    Galloway, James N; Burke, Marshall; Bradford, G Eric; Naylor, Rosamond; Falcon, Walter; Chapagain, Ashok K; Gaskell, Joanne C; McCullough, Ellen; Mooney, Harold A; Oleson, Kirsten L L; Steinfeld, Henning; Wassenaar, Tom; Smil, Vaclav

    2007-12-01

    This paper provides an original account of global land, water, and nitrogen use in support of industrialized livestock production and trade, with emphasis on two of the fastest-growing sectors, pork and poultry. Our analysis focuses on trade in feed and animal products, using a new model that calculates the amount of "virtual" nitrogen, water, and land used in production but not embedded in the product. We show how key meat-importing countries, such as Japan, benefit from "virtual" trade in land, water, and nitrogen, and how key meat-exporting countries, such as Brazil, provide these resources without accounting for their true environmental cost. Results show that Japan's pig and chicken meat imports embody the virtual equivalent of 50% of Japan's total arable land, and half of Japan's virtual nitrogen total is lost in the US. Trade links with China are responsible for 15% of the virtual nitrogen left behind in Brazil due to feed and meat exports, and 20% of Brazil's area is used to grow soybean exports. The complexity of trade in meat, feed, water, and nitrogen is illustrated by the dual roles of the US and The Netherlands as both importers and exporters of meat. Mitigation of environmental damage from industrialized livestock production and trade depends on a combination of direct-pricing strategies, regulatory approaches, and use of best management practices. Our analysis indicates that increased water- and nitrogen-use efficiency and land conservation resulting from these measures could significantly reduce resource costs. PMID:18240675

  8. Comparative study of mineral composition of beef steak and pork chops depending on the thermal preparation method.

    PubMed

    Goran, Gheorghe Valentin; Tudoreanu, Liliana; Rotaru, Elena; Crivineanu, Victor

    2016-08-01

    This study focuses on the effects of three different thermal preparation methods (roasting, boiling, and microwave cooking) on the mineral concentrations of beef and pork, as well as on the comparison of mineral levels between these two types of meat. In this study, raw and cooked beef and pork samples were selected and analyzed by ICP-OES in order to determine mineral concentrations. In general, thermal preparation clearly increased mineral concentrations in cooked samples compared to raw meat. The highest mineral concentration was identified in the roasted samples. Trace element concentrations in beef were significantly higher compared to pork. In pork, Na concentration decreased in all samples, suggesting that Na is lost with water. Zn mean content in cooked beef samples registered significant differences compared to pork cooked samples. The percentage of water loss during the microwave thermal preparation for beef samples was higher than the other two treatments. PMID:27088876

  9. Inadequate labeling of pork sausages prepared in Corsica causing a trichinellosis outbreak in France

    PubMed Central

    Ruetsch, Caroline; Delaunay, Pascal; Armengaud, Alexis; Peloux-Petiot, Françoise; Dupouy-Camet, Jean; Vallée, Isabelle; Polack, Bruno; Boireau, Pascal; Marty, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Three cases of human trichinellosis due to Trichinella britovi were reported in 2015 in the Southeast of France resulting from consumption of raw pork sausages (figatelli) prepared in Corsica. Fourteen other people ate figatelli from the same batch but were not infected due to the figatelli being well cooked. This is the first reported human trichinellosis outbreak due to consumption of Corsican sausages prepared from uncontrolled pork. Consumption of raw figatelli is a common tradition in Corsica. As a result, the health recommendation to cook the product well is not always applied. In the present case, the figatelli product label was not sufficiently visible to advise consumers of the risks associated with uncooked pork. PMID:27317463

  10. Hepatitis E Virus in Surface Water, Sediments, and Pork Products Marketed in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Heldt, F H; Staggmeier, R; Gularte, J S; Demoliner, M; Henzel, A; Spilki, F R

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging causative agent of food and waterborne hepatitis in human beings. HEV circulates among human populations and swine herds, and may be found in water contaminated by swine feces, as well as in pork. In the present study, 68 sediment samples and 250 water samples collected from the Sinos River tributaries, as well as 50 samples of pork products (pâté and blood sausage) marketed in the Sinos River watershed region, Brazil, were tested for the presence of HEV genome. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction followed by nucleotide sequencing was used for detection and characterization of HEV genomes. Overall, 36 % of food samples tested positive for HEV (genotype 3). No sediment or water samples were positive. These results suggest that contaminated pork products may be a source of HEV infection within this region and indicate a need for better monitoring of food safety and swine herds. PMID:27169536

  11. Consumers' expected quality and intention to purchase high quality pork meat.

    PubMed

    Papanagiotou, P; Tzimitra-Kalogianni, I; Melfou, K

    2013-03-01

    Expected quality is believed to be one of the most important factors that influence consumers' intention to purchase food. The present study seeks to explore the concept of pork meat expected quality and compare it with self-stated consumer intention to purchase pork meat. The aim is attempted by means of a field research conducted in Greece, following a conjoint analytic procedure. Results show that quality expectations comply with intention to buy pork, in many aspects. However, several differences have been identified. More specifically, country of origin and marbling appear to be more important for respondents' purchase decisions than they are for their quality evaluations, while the opposite appears to be true for price. Finally, socio-demographic factors such as gender, level of education, place of purchase and consumption habits seem to influence perceptions. PMID:23273449

  12. Development of loop-mediated isothermal amplification to detect Streptococcus suis and its application to retail pork meat in Japan.

    PubMed

    Arai, Sakura; Tohya, Mari; Yamada, Ryoko; Osawa, Ro; Nomoto, Ryohei; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Sekizaki, Tsutomu

    2015-09-01

    We here developed a novel loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to detect Streptococcus suis in raw pork meat. This method, designated LAMPSS, targeted the recombination/repair protein (recN) gene of S. suis and detected all serotypes of S. suis, except those taxonomically removed from authentic S. suis, i.e., serotypes 20, 22, 26, 32, 33, and 34. The specificity of LAMPSS was confirmed and its detection limit was 5.4cfu/reaction. Among the 966 raw pork meat samples examined, including sliced pork, minced pork, and the liver, tongue, heart, and small intestine, 255 samples tested positive with LAMPSS. The rate of contamination was higher in the organs than in pork. No significant difference was observed in the total bacterial count between LAMPSS-positive and -negative samples. The number of shops that provided LAMPSS-positive pork was slightly higher in those that sold swine organs and pork than in those that sold only pork, suggesting that cross contamination occurred from the organs to pork. Among the 255 which tested positive for LAMPSS, only 47 samples tested positive for the previously described LAMP specific for S. suis serotype 2. Two isolates of S. suis serotype 2, belonging to sequence type 28, which is potentially hazardous to humans, as well as those of some other serotypes were obtained from 19 out of 47 samples by combining LAMP with a replica plating method. These results suggest that LAMPSS will be a useful tool for the surveillance of raw pork meat in the retail market.

  13. Development of loop-mediated isothermal amplification to detect Streptococcus suis and its application to retail pork meat in Japan.

    PubMed

    Arai, Sakura; Tohya, Mari; Yamada, Ryoko; Osawa, Ro; Nomoto, Ryohei; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Sekizaki, Tsutomu

    2015-09-01

    We here developed a novel loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to detect Streptococcus suis in raw pork meat. This method, designated LAMPSS, targeted the recombination/repair protein (recN) gene of S. suis and detected all serotypes of S. suis, except those taxonomically removed from authentic S. suis, i.e., serotypes 20, 22, 26, 32, 33, and 34. The specificity of LAMPSS was confirmed and its detection limit was 5.4cfu/reaction. Among the 966 raw pork meat samples examined, including sliced pork, minced pork, and the liver, tongue, heart, and small intestine, 255 samples tested positive with LAMPSS. The rate of contamination was higher in the organs than in pork. No significant difference was observed in the total bacterial count between LAMPSS-positive and -negative samples. The number of shops that provided LAMPSS-positive pork was slightly higher in those that sold swine organs and pork than in those that sold only pork, suggesting that cross contamination occurred from the organs to pork. Among the 255 which tested positive for LAMPSS, only 47 samples tested positive for the previously described LAMP specific for S. suis serotype 2. Two isolates of S. suis serotype 2, belonging to sequence type 28, which is potentially hazardous to humans, as well as those of some other serotypes were obtained from 19 out of 47 samples by combining LAMP with a replica plating method. These results suggest that LAMPSS will be a useful tool for the surveillance of raw pork meat in the retail market. PMID:26043307

  14. Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus on Belgian Pork.

    PubMed

    Verhegghe, Marijke; Crombé, Florence; Luyckx, Kaat; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Butaye, Patrick; Herman, Lieve; Heyndrickx, Marc; Rasschaert, Geertrui

    2016-01-01

    Since the first description of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA), a high prevalence was observed in pigs. At present, questions remain about the transmission of LA-MRSA to the general human population through pork. The objectives of the present study were to determine the prevalence of LA-MRSA in Belgian pork and to determine the role of the pork production chain and butcheries in transmission of LA-MRSA to the human population. Pig meat samples (chops, bacon, minced pork, ribs, forelimbs, and ears; n = 137) originating from four butcheries (A through D) were spread plated on ChromID MRSA plates both before and after overnight enrichment culture. Suspect colonies were confirmed using a MRSA-specific triplex PCR assay and a CC398-specific PCR assay. The isolates (n = 147) were further characterized by SCCmec typing, multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, a selection of isolates were subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and spa typing. Direct plating revealed a MRSA prevalence of 8%. After enrichment, MRSA was isolated from 98 (72%) of 137 samples of which the majority were from rib, ear, and forelimb. The majority (97%) of obtained isolates belonged to CC398, the main LA-MRSA type. A high level of genetic diversity was noted among the isolates from one butchery. Thirty antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were found; 13 and 9% of the isolates had Cip-Tet-Tri and Gen-Kan-Tet-Tob-Tri profiles, respectively. These results indicate the importance of enrichment for MRSA detection of pork. The observed genetic diversity of the isolates indicated that the pork production chain can be considered a source of multiple MRSA types that could be transmitted to the human population through cross-contaminated meat.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus is More Prevalent in Retail Beef Livers than in Pork and other Beef Cuts

    PubMed Central

    Abdalrahman, Lubna S.; Wells, Harrington; Fakhr, Mohamed K.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the top five pathogens contributing to acquired foodborne illnesses causing an estimated quarter million cases every year in the US. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of Methicillin Susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in retail beef livers, beef, and pork meats sold in Tulsa, Oklahoma and to characterize the recovered strains for their virulence and antimicrobial resistance. Ninety six chilled retail beef (50 beef livers and 46 beef other cuts), and 99 pork meat samples were collected. The prevalence in beef livers was 40/50 (80%) followed by other beef cuts 23/46 (50%) then pork 43/99 (43.3%). No isolates were positive for MRSA since none harbored the mecA or mecC gene. A total of 334 recovered S. aureus isolates (143 beef livers, 76 beef, and 115 pork isolates) were screened for their antimicrobial susceptibility against 16 different antimicrobials and their possession of 18 different toxin genes. Multidrug resistance was more prevalent in the pork isolates followed by beef then beef livers. The prevalence of enterotoxin genes such as seg, seh, and sei and the toxic shock syndrome gene tst was higher in the pork isolates than in the beef ones. The hemolysin genes, particularly hlb, were more prevalent in isolates from beef livers. Molecular typing of a subset of the recovered isolates showed that they are highly diverse where spa typing was more discriminatory than PFGE. The alarmingly high incidence of S. aureus in retail beef livers in this study should raise awareness about the food safety of such meat products. PMID:25927961

  16. Estimation of Pork Quality Traits Using Exsanguination Blood and Postmortem Muscle Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Choe, J. H.; Choi, M. H.; Ryu, Y. C.; Go, G. W.; Choi, Y. M.; Lee, S. H.; Lim, K. S.; Lee, E. A.; Kang, J. H.; Hong, K. C.; Kim, B. C.

    2015-01-01

    The current study was designed to estimate the pork quality traits using metabolites from exsanguination blood and postmortem muscle simultaneously under the Korean standard pre- and post-slaughter conditions. A total of 111 Yorkshire (pure breed and castrated male) pigs were evaluated under the Korean standard conditions. Measurements were taken of the levels of blood glucose and lactate at exsanguination, and muscle glycogen and lactate content at 45 min and 24 h postmortem. Certain pork quality traits were also evaluated. Correlation analysis and multiple regression analysis including stepwise regression were performed. Exsanguination blood glucose and lactate levels were positively correlated with each other, negatively related to postmortem muscle glycogen content and positively associated with postmortem muscle lactate content. A rapid and extended postmortem glycolysis was associated with high levels of blood glucose and lactate, with high muscle lactate content, and with low muscle glycogen content during postmortem. In addition, these were also correlated with paler meat color and reduced water holding capacity. The results of multiple regression analyses also showed that metabolites in exsanguination blood and postmortem muscle explained variations in pork quality traits. Especially, levels of blood glucose and lactate and content of muscle glycogen at early postmortem were significantly associated with an elevated early glycolytic rate. Furthermore, muscle lactate content at 24 h postmortem alone accounted for a considerable portion of the variation in pork quality traits. Based on these results, the current study confirmed that the main factor influencing pork quality traits is the ultimate lactate content in muscle via postmortem glycolysis, and that levels of blood glucose and lactate at exsanguination and contents of muscle glycogen and lactate at postmortem can explain a large portion of the variation in pork quality even under the standard

  17. [Fatal anaphylaxis after eating wild boar meat in a patient with pork-cat syndrome].

    PubMed

    Drouet, M; Sabbah, A; Le Sellin, J; Bonneau, J C; Gay, G; Dubois-Gosnet, C

    2001-04-01

    Crossed allergy between pork and cat epithelia was described by us in 1994. It is due to serum albumin. Nowadays, other bio-chemical observations allow "completion" of the syndrome by extension of the crossed reactivity between other mammal meats and other epithelia of dog and horse. The authors report an observation of the pork-cat syndrome (developing in the form of anaphylaxis, and then ending in the death of the patient), following consumption of wild boar meat. Co-factors, such as effort, taking alcohol or hormonal condition may complicate the picture to make diagnosis more difficult.

  18. Effect of irradiation and storage time on lipid oxidation of chilled pork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Anwei; Wan, Fachun; Xu, Tongcheng; Du, Fangling; Wang, Wenliang; Zhu, Qingjun

    2011-03-01

    The effects of γ-irradiation with different doses (0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 kGy) and storage time (0-30 days) on the lipid oxidation of chilled pork and the combined effect of irradiation and antioxidant on the lipid oxidative stability during storage at 4 °C were investigated. The results indicated that irradiation treatment increased lipid oxidation, measured as peroxide (PV) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values. Lipid oxidation was increased with the increase in storage time. The addition of tea polyphenol (TP) was effective in controlling the lipid oxidation of chilled pork after irradiation during cold storage.

  19. Activities of pork muscle proteases in model cured meat systems.

    PubMed

    Toldrá, F; Rico, E; Flores, J

    1992-03-01

    The effect of curing agents (salt, nitrate, ascorbic acid and glucose) and processing parameters (pH, water activity and drying and cooking temperatures) on pork muscle cathepsins B, D, H and L as well as leucyl, arginyl and tyrosyl hydrolysing activities is reported. Salt (60 g/l) showed a powerful inhibitory effect, especially on cathepsin D and aminopeptidase activities where less than 13% of the original activity was recovered. Cathepsin H was also affected (38% of the original activity) while cathepsins B and B+L recovered 72.5 and 63.0%, respectively. Nitrate (0.2-0.25 g/l) and ascorbic acid (0.2-0.4 g/l) did not significantly affect the enzyme activities. On the other hand, 0.5-2 g/l of glucose activated both cathepsins B and D with an increase of 39.5 and 28.5% and also leucyl and arginyl hydrolysing activities which were 75.0 and 24.0%, respectively. No aminopeptidase activity was detected when assayed in 100 mM sodium citrate buffer, pH 5.1. Cathepsin H was also very affected at that pH and only 12.0% of activity was recovered. A decrease in water activity, especially below 0.84, also affected the enzyme activities which were found below 50%. Temperatures in the usual range of the drying process (22 and 30 degrees C) gave substantial enzyme activities (around 40-50 and 80%, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Introduction of African Swine Fever into the European Union through Illegal Importation of Pork and Pork Products

    PubMed Central

    Costard, Solenne; Jones, Bryony Anne; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Mur, Lina; de la Torre, Ana; Martínez, Marta; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Fernando; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Jose-Manuel; Pfeiffer, Dirk Udo; Wieland, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Transboundary animal diseases can have very severe socio-economic impacts when introduced into new regions. The history of disease incursions into the European Union suggests that initial outbreaks were often initiated by illegal importation of meat and derived products. The European Union would benefit from decision-support tools to evaluate the risk of disease introduction caused by illegal imports in order to inform its surveillance strategy. However, due to the difficulty in quantifying illegal movements of animal products, very few studies of this type have been conducted. Using African swine fever as an example, this work presents a novel risk assessment framework for disease introduction into the European Union through illegal importation of meat and products. It uses a semi-quantitative approach based on factors that likely influence the likelihood of release of contaminated smuggled meat and products, and subsequent exposure of the susceptible population. The results suggest that the European Union is at non-negligible risk of African swine fever introduction through illegal importation of pork and products. On a relative risk scale with six categories from negligible to very high, five European Union countries were estimated at high (France, Germany, Italy and United Kingdom) or moderate (Spain) risk of African swine fever release, five countries were at high risk of exposure if African swine fever were released (France, Italy, Poland, Romania and Spain) and ten countries had a moderate exposure risk (Austria, Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Portugal, Sweden and United Kingdom). The approach presented here and results obtained for African swine fever provide a basis for the enhancement of risk-based surveillance systems and disease prevention programmes in the European Union. PMID:23613795

  1. Metagenomic assessment of the microbial diversity in ground pork products from markets in the North Central Region of South Korea.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ok-Kyung; Baker, Christopher A; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Si Hong; Ricke, Steven C

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial community in ground pork using molecular approaches. Forty six ground pork products were purchased from local stores in the north central area of South Korea. Aerobic plate counts varied 4.23 ± 5.14 × 10(5) CFU/g with the range between 5.00 × 10(3) and 1.85 × 10(6) CFU/g for ground pork samples. Four ground meat samples were further processed for metagenomic analysis. Pseudomonas species was the most relative abundant with a wide range occurring (1.72 to 77.7%) as part of the microbial genera in ground pork. Bacteria such as Carnobacterium, Yersinia, Photobacterium were also identified in ground pork. Despite the prominence of certain genera across all samples there was still extensive microbial diversity among ground pork products that originated from different slaughter houses and were processed in different markets. Such diversity indicates that designing interventions to extend shelf life may be hampered by the extensive variability in the microbial consortia associated with pork products. However, this diversity may be useful for developing microbial traceability signatures unique to a slaughter house or a particular market.

  2. Metagenomic assessment of the microbial diversity in ground pork products from markets in the North Central Region of South Korea.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ok-Kyung; Baker, Christopher A; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Si Hong; Ricke, Steven C

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial community in ground pork using molecular approaches. Forty six ground pork products were purchased from local stores in the north central area of South Korea. Aerobic plate counts varied 4.23 ± 5.14 × 10(5) CFU/g with the range between 5.00 × 10(3) and 1.85 × 10(6) CFU/g for ground pork samples. Four ground meat samples were further processed for metagenomic analysis. Pseudomonas species was the most relative abundant with a wide range occurring (1.72 to 77.7%) as part of the microbial genera in ground pork. Bacteria such as Carnobacterium, Yersinia, Photobacterium were also identified in ground pork. Despite the prominence of certain genera across all samples there was still extensive microbial diversity among ground pork products that originated from different slaughter houses and were processed in different markets. Such diversity indicates that designing interventions to extend shelf life may be hampered by the extensive variability in the microbial consortia associated with pork products. However, this diversity may be useful for developing microbial traceability signatures unique to a slaughter house or a particular market. PMID:27192496

  3. Acceptability of entire male pork with various levels of androstenone and skatole by consumers according to their sensitivity to androstenone.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, M; Chevillon, P

    2012-02-01

    Consumer acceptability of entire male pork at eating was assessed in three experiments. The 140 consumers involved in each experiment were classified as insensitive (INSENS) to the odor of pure androstenone or sensitive perceiving it as pleasant (SENS-PLEA) or unpleasant (SENS-UNPL). Entire male pork with very low skatole and androstenone levels (LS-LA) was as well accepted as gilt pork, whatever the consumer category. Entire male pork with elevated levels in both skatole and androstenone (HS-HA) was clearly differentiated from LS-LA pork by SENS-UNPL, but not by SENS-PLEA or INSENS consumers. Whatever the consumer category, entire male pork with elevated levels of androstenone and very low levels of skatole (LS-HA and LS-HHA) were not significantly differentiated from LS-LA pork. The results suggest that, in the conditions of the present experiment, androstenone and skatole totally explain boar taint at eating and that the acceptability threshold for androstenone, in the absence of skatole, is in the range of 2-3 μg/g liquid fat. PMID:21862238

  4. Effect of dietary linseed on the nutritional value and quality of pork and pork products: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Corino, Carlo; Rossi, Raffaella; Cannata, Susanna; Ratti, Sabrina

    2014-12-01

    Nutritional quality of pork is a significant factor for consumers' health. Feeding n-3 PUFA to pigs, using linseed, improves pork nutritional quality. A meta-analysis involving 1006 pigs reported in 24 publications was carried out to assess the effects of dietary linseed on alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) content in muscle and adipose tissue. Data showed positive effects of n-3 PUFA on muscle fatty acid composition: ALA+137%, EPA+188%, DPA+51% and DHA+12%. Same results were observed in adipose tissue: ALA+297%, EPA+149%, DPA+88% and DHA+18%. A positive correlation between dietary treatment and ALA and EPA content in muscle (P<0.001) and adipose tissue (P=0.036) was observed. A significant association between DPA (P=0.04) and DHA (P=0.011) and live weight in muscle was observed. Feeding linseed to pig improves the nutritional pork quality, raising the n-3 PUFA content in muscle and adipose tissue.

  5. Alteration of Porcine Serum Albumin Levels in Pork Meat by Marination in Kiwi or Pineapple Juice and Subsequent Pan Broiling

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung-Sil; Kim, Il-Suk; Ham, Jun-Sang; Park, Beom-Young

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the changes in porcine serum albumin (PSA), a major allergen, which occur when raw pork ham is marinated with kiwi or pineapple juice, and/or when the ham is pan broiled at 300℃ for 4 min after marination. In this study, raw pork ham was soaked for 4 h or 8 h in marinades containing commercial marinating sauce only, commercial marinating sauce and 7% kiwi juice, or commercial marinating sauce and 7% pineapple juice. When the meat was marinated and then pan-broiled, pork ham meat protein was significantly denatured and hydrolyzed, and the level of PSA in the meat was significantly reduced. The PSA contents of pork broiled without marination, pork that had been marinated in commercial marinating sauce alone, pork that had been marinated in commercial marinating sauce with kiwi juice, and pork that had been marinated in commercial marinating sauce with pineapple juice, were 95.4, 43.3, 14.3, and 5.4 ng/mL, respectively (p<0.05). Marinating with pineapple juice was more effective than marinating with kiwi juice; and marination for 8 h was more effective than marinating for 4 h. These results indicate that the level of PSA in pork ham is effectively reduced, when the meat is first marinated in sauces that contain kiwi or pineapple extracts for 8 h, rather than 4 h, and then cooked. Further study is needed to determine whether marinated pork meat reduces allergenicity in vivo, as well. PMID:26761177

  6. Effect of hydrodynamic pressure processing on the tenderness and drip loss of pork loins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tenderness and water-holding capacity are meat quality characteristics important to both consumers and processors. Hydrodynamic pressure processing (HDP) is a novel technique for tenderizing meat using high pressure shockwaves. The effects of combining HDP and postmortem aging treatments on pork qua...

  7. Use of visible and near-infrared spectroscopy to predict pork longissimus lean color stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated using visible and near-infrared (VIS/NIR) spectroscopy to predict lean color stability in pork loin chops. Spectra were collected immediately following and approximately 1 h after rib removal from 1,208 loins. Loins were aged for 14 d before a 2.54-cm chop was placed in simula...

  8. Antioxidant Activity of Brown Soybean Ethanolic Extracts and Application to Cooked Pork Patties

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Choi, Yun-Sang

    2016-01-01

    The brown soybean extract (BE, extracted by distilled water, 50%, 75%, and 95% ethanol) were analyzed for their total phenol, flavonoid, anthocyanin content, and DPPH radical-scavenging activity to determine antioxidant activities. Brown soybean extract with 75% ethanol showed significantly higher DPPH radical scavenging activity, total phenol and anthocyanin content compared to the other treatments (p<0.05). Then, brown soybean extract with 75% ethanol was applied to pork patties at different concentration (0.05%, 0.1%, and 0.2%) and lipid oxidation was evaluated during 15 d of refrigerated storage. Addition of BE significantly increased redness and pH values, respectively (p<0.05). Moreover, TBARS value of pork patties decreased significantly (p<0.05) as BE concentration increased. In sensory evaluation, pork patties with 0.1% BE had significantly higher score than other treatments in flavor and overall acceptability (p<0.05). Consequently, these results indicate that 0.1% BE could be an effective natural antioxidant to inhibit lipid oxidation in pork patties. PMID:27433107

  9. Growth Modelling of Listeria monocytogenes in Korean Pork Bulgogi Stored at Isothermal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na-Kyoung; Ahn, Sin Hye; Lee, Joo-Yeon; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop predictive models for the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in pork Bulgogi at various storage temperatures. A two-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes (ATCC 15313 and isolated from pork Bulgogi) was inoculated on pork Bulgogi at 3 Log CFU/g. L. monocytogenes strains were enumerated using general plating method on Listeria selective medium. The inoculated samples were stored at 5, 15, and 25℃ for primary models. Primary models were developed using the Baranyi model equations, and the maximum specific growth rate was shown to be dependent on storage temperature. A secondary model of growth rate as a function of storage temperature was also developed. As the storage temperature increased, the lag time (LT) values decreased dramatically and the specific growth rate of L. monocytogenes increased. The mathematically predicted growth parameters were evaluated based on the modified bias factor (Bf), accuracy factor (Af), root mean square error (RMSE), coefficient of determination (R2), and relative errors (RE). These values indicated that the developed models were reliably able to predict the growth of L. monocytogenes in pork Bulgogi. Hence, the predictive models may be used to assess microbiological hygiene in the meat supply chain as a function of storage temperature. PMID:26761807

  10. The relationship between quality measurement techniques of pork loins and chops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: Assessment of boneless pork loin quality under industrial conditions is used in plants for segregation of product into programs and for export as well as for routine quality control and research. This assessment is usually made on the exposed longissimus on the ventral side of the muscle...

  11. Growth potential of Clostridium perfringens from spores in acidified beef, pork and poultry products during chilling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of C. perfringens to germinate and grow in acidified ground beef as well as in ten commercially prepared acidified beef, pork and poultry products was assessed. The pH of ground beef was adjusted using organic vinegar to achieve various pH values between 5.0 and 5.6; the pH of the commer...

  12. Combined detection and strain typing of Yersinia enterocolitica directly from pork and poultry enrichments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Yersinia enterocolitica is responsible for an estimated 98,000 cases of foodborne illness per year in the U.S. causing both intestinal and extraintestinal diseases. Its prevalence in retail pork and poultry, believed to the primary sources of these infections, ranges widely from 0 to 6...

  13. 9 CFR 327.23 - Compliance procedure for cured pork products offered for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... procedure for cured pork products offered for entry. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: (1... group. (5) The Absolute Minimum PFF Requirement is that no laboratory result of an individual sample for... pending laboratory results during the monitoring phase. The PFF percentage for each sample shall...

  14. 9 CFR 327.23 - Compliance procedure for cured pork products offered for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... procedure for cured pork products offered for entry. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: (1... group. (5) The Absolute Minimum PFF Requirement is that no laboratory result of an individual sample for... pending laboratory results during the monitoring phase. The PFF percentage for each sample shall...

  15. Implementing meta-analysis from genome-wide association studies for pork quality traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pork quality plays an important role in the meat processing industry, thus different methodologies have been implemented to elucidate the genetic architecture of traits affecting meat quality. One of the most common and widely used approaches is to perform genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Howe...

  16. Antioxidant Activity of Brown Soybean Ethanolic Extracts and Application to Cooked Pork Patties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choong-Hee; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Song, Dong-Heon; Kim, Yong-Jae; Ham, Youn-Kyung; Choi, Yun-Sang; Jang, Sung-Jin; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2016-01-01

    The brown soybean extract (BE, extracted by distilled water, 50%, 75%, and 95% ethanol) were analyzed for their total phenol, flavonoid, anthocyanin content, and DPPH radical-scavenging activity to determine antioxidant activities. Brown soybean extract with 75% ethanol showed significantly higher DPPH radical scavenging activity, total phenol and anthocyanin content compared to the other treatments (p<0.05). Then, brown soybean extract with 75% ethanol was applied to pork patties at different concentration (0.05%, 0.1%, and 0.2%) and lipid oxidation was evaluated during 15 d of refrigerated storage. Addition of BE significantly increased redness and pH values, respectively (p<0.05). Moreover, TBARS value of pork patties decreased significantly (p<0.05) as BE concentration increased. In sensory evaluation, pork patties with 0.1% BE had significantly higher score than other treatments in flavor and overall acceptability (p<0.05). Consequently, these results indicate that 0.1% BE could be an effective natural antioxidant to inhibit lipid oxidation in pork patties. PMID:27433107

  17. Growth Modelling of Listeria monocytogenes in Korean Pork Bulgogi Stored at Isothermal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Na-Kyoung; Ahn, Sin Hye; Lee, Joo-Yeon; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop predictive models for the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in pork Bulgogi at various storage temperatures. A two-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes (ATCC 15313 and isolated from pork Bulgogi) was inoculated on pork Bulgogi at 3 Log CFU/g. L. monocytogenes strains were enumerated using general plating method on Listeria selective medium. The inoculated samples were stored at 5, 15, and 25℃ for primary models. Primary models were developed using the Baranyi model equations, and the maximum specific growth rate was shown to be dependent on storage temperature. A secondary model of growth rate as a function of storage temperature was also developed. As the storage temperature increased, the lag time (LT) values decreased dramatically and the specific growth rate of L. monocytogenes increased. The mathematically predicted growth parameters were evaluated based on the modified bias factor (B f ), accuracy factor (A f ), root mean square error (RMSE), coefficient of determination (R (2)), and relative errors (RE). These values indicated that the developed models were reliably able to predict the growth of L. monocytogenes in pork Bulgogi. Hence, the predictive models may be used to assess microbiological hygiene in the meat supply chain as a function of storage temperature. PMID:26761807

  18. Oxidative stability of pork emulsion containing tomato products and pink guava pulp during refrigerated aerobic storage.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Serlene; Chatli, Manish K; Biswas, Ashim K; Sahoo, Jhari

    2014-11-01

    Lipid oxidation-induced quality problems can be minimized with the use of natural antioxidants. Antioxidant potential of tomato puree (10 %; T-1), tomato pulp (12.5 %; T-2), lyophilized tomato peel (6 %; T-3), and pink guava pulp (10 %; T-4) was evaluated in raw pork emulsion during refrigerated storage for 9 days under aerobic packaging. The lycopene and β-carotene content varied in pork emulsion as T-3 > T-1 > T-2 > T-4 and decreased (P < 0.05) during storage. The surface redness (a* value) increased (P < 0.05) with the incorporation of tomato products and pink guava pulp. Furthermore, metmyoglobin formation and lipid oxidation were lower (P < 0.05) in tomato- and guava-treated emulsions than in control. Overall, incorporation of tomato products and pink guava pulp improved the visual colour and odour scores of raw pork emulsion. These results indicated that tomato products and guava pulp can be utilized as sources of natural antioxidants in raw pork products to minimize lipid oxidation, off-odour development, and surface discolouration. PMID:26396313

  19. 9 CFR 327.23 - Compliance procedure for cured pork products offered for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... products offered for entry. 327.23 Section 327.23 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... procedure for cured pork products offered for entry. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: (1... products which have been water cooked. Any product that does not fit into Group I but does fit into...

  20. 9 CFR 319.312 - Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce. 319.312 Section 319.312 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS...

  1. 9 CFR 318.19 - Compliance procedure for cured pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., consisting of cured pork products which have been water cooked. Any product which does not fit into Group I... production rate is frequency of production, expressed in days per week. (5) Protein fat free percentage, protein fat free content, PFF percentage, PFF content or PFF of a product means the meat...

  2. 9 CFR 318.19 - Compliance procedure for cured pork products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., consisting of cured pork products which have been water cooked. Any product which does not fit into Group I... production rate is frequency of production, expressed in days per week. (5) Protein fat free percentage, protein fat free content, PFF percentage, PFF content or PFF of a product means the meat...

  3. The Future of Pork Production in the World: Towards Sustainable, Welfare-Positive Systems

    PubMed Central

    McGlone, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary More pork is eaten in the world than any other meat. Making production systems and practices more sustainable will benefit the animals, the planet and people. A system is presented by which production practices are evaluated using a sustainability matrix. The matrix shows why some practices are more common in some countries and regions and the impediments to more sustainable systems. This method can be used to assess the sustainability of production practices in the future where objective, science-based information is presented alongside ethical and economic information to make the most informed decisions. Finally, this paper points to current pork production practices that are more and less sustainable. Abstract Among land animals, more pork is eaten in the world than any other meat. The earth holds about one billion pigs who deliver over 100 mmt of pork to people for consumption. Systems of pork production changed from a forest-based to pasture-based to dirt lots and finally into specially-designed buildings. The world pork industry is variable and complex not just in production methods but in economics and cultural value. A systematic analysis of pork industry sustainability was performed. Sustainable production methods are considered at three levels using three examples in this paper: production system, penning system and for a production practice. A sustainability matrix was provided for each example. In a comparison of indoor vs. outdoor systems, the food safety/zoonoses concerns make current outdoor systems unsustainable. The choice of keeping pregnant sows in group pens or individual crates is complex in that the outcome of a sustainability assessment leads to the conclusion that group penning is more sustainable in the EU and certain USA states, but the individual crate is currently more sustainable in other USA states, Asia and Latin America. A comparison of conventional physical castration with immunological castration shows that the less

  4. Inactivation of pathogens on pork by steam-ultrasound treatment.

    PubMed

    Morild, Rikke K; Christiansen, Pia; Sørensen, Anders H; Nonboe, Ulf; Aabo, Søren

    2011-05-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate a new pathogen inactivation concept that combines application of pressurized steam simultaneously with high-power ultrasound through a series of nozzles. On skin and meat surfaces of pork jowl samples, counts of total viable bacteria were reduced by 1.1 log CFU/cm(2) after treatment for 1 s and by 3.3 log CFU/cm(2) after treatment for 4 s. The mean reduction of 1.7 to 3.3 log CFU/cm(2) on the skin surface was significantly higher than the reduction of 1.1 to 2.5 log CFU/cm(2) on the meat surface. The inactivation of Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Derby, Salmonella Infantis, Yersinia enterocolitica, and a nonpathogenic Escherichia coli was studied on inoculated samples that were treated for 0.5 to 2.0 s. With one exception, no significant differences in reduction were observed among the bacterial types. After treatment for 0.5 s, the 0.9-to 1.5-log reductions of E. coli were significantly higher than the 0.4- to 1.1-log reductions for Salmonella and Y. enterocolitica. Overall, reductions increased by increasing treatment time; reductions were 0.4 to 1.5 log CFU/cm(2) after treatment for 0.5 s and 2.0 to 3.6 log CFU/cm(2) after treatment for 2 s. Reductions on the skin (1 to 3.6 log CFU/cm(2)) were significantly higher than reductions on the meat surface (1 to 2.5 log CFU/cm(2)). The reduced effect on the meat surface may be explained by greater protection of bacteria in deep structures at the muscle surface. No significant difference in reduction was observed between samples inoculated with 10(4) CFU/cm(2) and those inoculated with 10(7) CFU/cm(2), and cold storage of samples for 24 h at 5°C after steam-ultrasound treatment did not lead to changes in recovery of bacteria.

  5. Comparison of protein degradation, protein oxidation, and μ-calpain activation between pale, soft, and exudative and red, firm, and nonexudative pork during postmortem aging.

    PubMed

    Yin, Y; Zhang, W G; Zhou, G H; Guo, B

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the differences in protein modifications between pale, soft, and exudative (PSE) and red, firm, and nonexudative (RFN) pork during postmortem (PM) aging. Longissimus dorsi (LD) including 8 PSE and 8 RFN muscles were individually removed from 16 carcasses. These 16 LD muscles were vacuum packaged at 24 h after slaughter and stored at 4°C for 1, 3, and 5 d. The centrifugation loss, drip loss, color, protein solubility, protein oxidation, protein degradation including desmin, troponin T, and integrin, and μ-calpain activation were determined. The pH of PSE samples was significantly lower than that of RFN samples at both 1 and 24 h PM (P < 0.05). The L* values of PSE pork were significantly greater than that of RFN pork at different time point during PM storage (P < 0.01). The centrifugation loss of PSE samples at d 1 was extremely greater than samples from RFN pork (P < 0.01). The cumulative drip loss for d 0 to 1, d 0 to 3, and d 0 to 5 in PSE pork were significantly greater than that from RFN pork (P < 0.05). The carbonyl content of myofibrillar proteins was not significantly different between PSE and RFN pork samples (P > 0.05). In addition, PSE pork presented a lower solubility of sarcoplasmic protein, myofibrillar protein, and total protein than RFN pork except the solubility of myofibrillar protein at d 1 (P < 0.05). The intensity of intact desmin and troponin T 2 in PSE pork at d 3 and 5 were significantly greater than that in RFN pork (P < 0.05), whereas no significant difference was detected at d 1. The intensity of intact troponin T 1 in PSE pork at d 5 was greater than that in RFN pork (P < 0.05). However, more degradation products of integrin were detected in PSE pork compared to that of RFN pork at d 1 (P < 0.05). Red, firm, and nonexudative pork presented lower intensity of intact 80 kDa calpain and greater intensity of autolyzed 76 kDa product compared to PSE pork (P < 0.01). The results indicate that the

  6. Carbon and water footprint of pork supply chain in Catalonia: From feed to final products.

    PubMed

    Noya, Isabel; Aldea, Xavier; Gasol, Carles M; González-García, Sara; Amores, Maria José; Colón, Joan; Ponsá, Sergio; Roman, Isabel; Rubio, Miguel A; Casas, Eudald; Moreira, María Teresa; Boschmonart-Rives, Jesús

    2016-04-15

    A systematic tool to assess the Carbon Footprint (CF) and Water Footprint (WF) of pork production companies was developed and applied to representative Catalan companies. To do so, a cradle-to-gate environmental assessment was carried out by means of the LCA methodology, taking into account all the stages involved in the pork chain, from feed production to the processing of final products, ready for distribution. In this approach, the environmental results are reported based on eight different functional units (FUs) according to the main pork products obtained. With the aim of ensuring the reliability of the results and facilitating the comparison with other available reports, the Product Category Rules (PCR) for Catalan pork sector were also defined as a basis for calculations. The characterization results show fodder production as the main contributor to the global environmental burdens, with contributions higher than 76% regardless the environmental indicator or the life cycle stage considered, which is in agreement with other published data. In contrast, the results in terms of CF and WF lay above the range of values reported elsewhere. However, major discrepancies are mainly due to the differences in the co-products allocation criteria. In this sense, economic/physical allocation and/or system expansion have been mostly considered in literature. In contrast, no allocation was considered appropriate in this study, according to the characteristics of the industries and products under assessment; thus, the major impacts fall on the main product, which derives on comparatively higher environmental burdens. Finally, due to the relevance of fodder production in the overall impact assessment results, strategies to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions as well as water use associated to this stage were proposed in the pork supply chain. PMID:26861226

  7. Contamination patterns of Listeria monocytogenes in cold-smoked pork processing.

    PubMed

    Bērziņš, Aivars; Hellström, Sanna; Siliņš, Indulis; Korkeala, Hannu

    2010-11-01

    Contamination patterns of Listeria monocytogenes were studied in a cold-smoked pork processing plant to identify the sources and possible reasons for the contamination. Environmental sampling combined with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) subtyping and serotyping were applied to investigate the genetic diversity of L. monocytogenes in the plant environment and ready-to-eat (RTE) cold-smoked pork products. A total of 183 samples were collected for contamination analyses, including samples of the product at different stages during manufacture (n = 136) and environmental samples (n = 47) in 2009. L. monocytogenes isolates, previously recovered from 73 RTE cold-smoked pork samples and collected from the same meat processing plant in 2004, were included in this study. The brining machine and personnel working with brining procedures were the most contaminated places with L. monocytogenes. The overall prevalence of L. monocytogenes in raw pork (18%) increased to 60% after the brining injections. The brining machine harbored six different PFGE types belonging to serotypes 1/2a, 1/2c, 4b, and 4d, which were found on the feeding teeth, smooth surfaces, and spaces of the machine, thus potentially facilitating dissemination of L. monocytogenes contamination. Two PFGE types (2 and 8) belonging to serotypes 1/2a and 1/2c were recovered from RTE cold-smoked pork collected in 2004, and from surfaces of the brining machine sampled in 2009, and may indicate the presence of persistent L. monocytogenes strains in the plant. Due to poor hygiene design, removal of the brining machine from the production of cold-smoked meat products should be considered to reduce L. monocytogenes contamination in the finished products. PMID:21219726

  8. Antioxidant properties of dried plum ingredients in raw and precooked pork sausage.

    PubMed

    Nuñez de Gonzalez, M T; Boleman, R M; Miller, R K; Keeton, J T; Rhee, K S

    2008-06-01

    Raw pork sausages with no antioxidant (control), 3% or 6% dried plum puree (DP), 3% or 6% dried plum and apple puree (DPA), or 0.02% butylated hydroxytoluene and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA/BHT) were (1) stored raw in chubs at 4 degrees C (RR) and evaluated weekly over 28 d, (2) cooked as patties, vacuum packaged, and stored at 4 degrees C (PR) for weekly evaluation over 28 d, or (3) cooked, vacuum packaged, and stored at -20 degrees C (PF) and evaluated monthly over 90 d. DP at 3% or 6% levels was as effective as BHA/BHT for retarding lipid oxidation in PR sausage patties. Likewise, DP at 3% was equally as effective in PF patties, but DP at 6% was even more effective (lower TBARS values) than BHA/BHT for retarding oxidative rancidity. All treatments decreased the fat and increased moisture content of raw sausages but only 6% DP reduced cooking yields. Inclusion of 6% DP decreased internal redness while both 6% DP and DPA increased yellowness of raw sausage. Trained panel sensory evaluations indicated that DP enhanced sweet taste, decreased salt and bitter tastes, and masked cooked pork/brothy, cooked pork fat, spicy/peppery, and sage flavors. In general, warmed-over flavor notes were not affected by storage treatments. Overall, pork sausage with 3% DP or DPA was as acceptable to consumers as the control or those patties with BHA/BHT, but patties with 6% of either plum product were less desirable. Inclusion of 3% DP was effective as a natural antioxidant for suppressing lipid oxidation in precooked pork sausage patties. PMID:18576997

  9. Effects of Drying Temperature on Antioxidant Activities of Tomato Powder and Storage Stability of Pork Patties

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of oven-dried tomato powder (OTP) as affected by drying temperature and the effect of OTP on the product quality of pork patties. Three OTP products were obtained by drying of fresh tomato at 60, 80 and 100℃ oven until constant weight was obtained. Total phenolic content of three kinds of OTPs ranged from 1.95 to 5.94 g/100 g. The highest amount of total phenolic compound was observed in OTP dried at 100℃. Antioxidant activity of three kinds of OTPs was measured by 1,1-diphenyl-2-pycrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-radical scavenging activity, iron chelating ability, reducing power and measurement of lipid peroxide in linoleic acid emulsion system. In all parameters, OTP at 100℃ showed the higher antioxidant activity than other temperatures (p<0.05). Based on the model study, the physicochemical properties, and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of pork patties containing 1% OTP were measured. Redness of pork patties were increased with the addition of OTPs (p<0.05). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values of raw pork patties containing OTPs were lower than those of control (CTL) until 7 d of storage, regardless of drying temperatures (p<0.05). Peroxide values of pork patties made with OTP (1%) were lower than those of CTL until the end of storage time (p<0.05). However, no antimicrobial activities were observed among the treatments (p>0.05). Therefore, OTPs could be used as a natural antioxidant in meat products. PMID:27499664

  10. On-line determination of pork color and intramuscular fat by computer vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yi-Tao; Fan, Yu-Xia; Wu, Xue-Qian; Xie, Li-juan; Cheng, Fang

    2010-04-01

    In this study, the application potential of computer vision in on-line determination of CIE L*a*b* and content of intramuscular fat (IMF) of pork was evaluated. Images of pork chop from 211 pig carcasses were captured while samples were on a conveyor belt at the speed of 0.25 m•s-1 to simulate the on-line environment. CIE L*a*b* and IMF content were measured with colorimeter and chemical extractor as reference. The KSW algorithm combined with region selection was employed in eliminating the surrounding fat of longissimus dorsi muscle (MLD). RGB values of the pork were counted and five methods were applied for transforming RGB values to CIE L*a*b* values. The region growing algorithm with multiple seed points was applied to mask out the IMF pixels within the intensity corrected images. The performances of the proposed algorithms were verified by comparing the measured reference values and the quality characteristics obtained by image processing. MLD region of six samples could not be identified using the KSW algorithm. Intensity nonuniformity of pork surface in the image can be eliminated efficiently, and IMF region of three corrected images failed to be extracted. Given considerable variety of color and complexity of the pork surface, CIE L*, a* and b* color of MLD could be predicted with correlation coefficients of 0.84, 0.54 and 0.47 respectively, and IMF content could be determined with a correlation coefficient more than 0.70. The study demonstrated that it is feasible to evaluate CIE L*a*b* values and IMF content on-line using computer vision.

  11. Effects of Drying Temperature on Antioxidant Activities of Tomato Powder and Storage Stability of Pork Patties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeong Sang; Chin, Koo Bok

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of oven-dried tomato powder (OTP) as affected by drying temperature and the effect of OTP on the product quality of pork patties. Three OTP products were obtained by drying of fresh tomato at 60, 80 and 100℃ oven until constant weight was obtained. Total phenolic content of three kinds of OTPs ranged from 1.95 to 5.94 g/100 g. The highest amount of total phenolic compound was observed in OTP dried at 100℃. Antioxidant activity of three kinds of OTPs was measured by 1,1-diphenyl-2-pycrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-radical scavenging activity, iron chelating ability, reducing power and measurement of lipid peroxide in linoleic acid emulsion system. In all parameters, OTP at 100℃ showed the higher antioxidant activity than other temperatures (p<0.05). Based on the model study, the physicochemical properties, and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of pork patties containing 1% OTP were measured. Redness of pork patties were increased with the addition of OTPs (p<0.05). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values of raw pork patties containing OTPs were lower than those of control (CTL) until 7 d of storage, regardless of drying temperatures (p<0.05). Peroxide values of pork patties made with OTP (1%) were lower than those of CTL until the end of storage time (p<0.05). However, no antimicrobial activities were observed among the treatments (p>0.05). Therefore, OTPs could be used as a natural antioxidant in meat products. PMID:27499664

  12. Impact of foot-and-mouth disease on pork and chicken prices in Central Luzon, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Abao, Lary Nel B; Kono, Hiroichi; Gunarathne, Anoma; Promentilla, Rolando R; Gaerlan, Manolita Z

    2014-03-01

    Central Luzon is the number one pig-producing region in the Philippines and was affected by Foot-and-Mouth disease (FMD) in 1995. In this paper, the impact of FMD on the Central Luzon meat market from 1995 to 1999 was examined. Employing the error correction model (ECM) and historical decomposition, the impact of FMD on the Central Luzon pork and chicken meat market was quantified. The following findings were observed: (a) pig farm and pork wholesale prices dropped 11.8% and 15.7%, respectively, after the initial FMD outbreaks in January, 1995; (b) in February, 1995, chicken farm and wholesale prices declined by 21.1% and 14.2%, respectively (while chicken retail prices also went down by 10.5%); (c) the margins of pig and chicken traders were also adversely affected at some point; and (d) FMD caused changes of dynamic interdependence among prices by meat type at different levels of the meat supply chain. This study makes several contributions to the literature on the impact of FMD outbreaks. This study is the first that simultaneously investigates the impact of FMD outbreaks on meat prices, price margins along the supply chain, and price interdependence in the meat system in Central Luzon, Philippines. Also, the Philippine pork industry is dominated by backyard farmers rather than the predominantly large commercial pig farmers existing in developed countries. Secondly, it yielded the novel finding of price decline in both pig and chicken prices as a result of the FMD outbreaks. And lastly, the study showed that the profit margins of the pig traders, pork traders, chicken traders and chicken meat traders were also negatively affected by the FMD outbreaks in January 1995. However, over the long term, the price margins of pork traders were more severely affected in contrast to that of the other traders' profits. PMID:24433637

  13. Predicting quality and sensory attributes of pork using near-infrared hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Barbin, Douglas F; ElMasry, Gamal; Sun, Da-Wen; Allen, Paul

    2012-03-16

    Many subjective assessment methods for fresh meat quality are still widely used in the meat industry, making the development of an objective and non-destructive technique for assessing meat quality traits a vital need. In this study, a hyperspectral imaging technique was investigated for objective determination of pork quality attributes. Hyperspectral images in the near infrared region (900-1700 nm) were acquired for pork samples from the longissimus dorsi muscle, and the representative spectral information was extracted from the loin eye area. Several mathematical pre-treatments including first and second derivatives, standard normal variate (SNV) and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were applied to examine the influence of spectral variations in predicting pork quality characteristics. Spectral information was used for predicting color features (L, a, b, chroma and hue angle), drip loss, pH and sensory characteristics by partial least-squares regression (PLS-R) models. Independent sets of feature-related wavelengths were selected for predicting each quality attribute. The results showed that color reflectance (L), pH and drip loss of pork meat could be predicted with determination coefficients (R(CV)(2)) of 0.93, 0.87 and 0.83, respectively. The regression coefficients from the PLS-R models at the selected optimal wavelengths were applied in a pixel-wise manner to convert spectral images to prediction maps that display the distribution of attributes within the sample. Results indicated that this technique is a potential tool for rapid assessment of pork quality. PMID:22340528

  14. The Future of Pork Production in the World: Towards Sustainable, Welfare-Positive Systems.

    PubMed

    McGlone, John J

    2013-01-01

    Among land animals, more pork is eaten in the world than any other meat. The earth holds about one billion pigs who deliver over 100 mmt of pork to people for consumption. Systems of pork production changed from a forest-based to pasture-based to dirt lots and finally into specially-designed buildings. The world pork industry is variable and complex not just in production methods but in economics and cultural value. A systematic analysis of pork industry sustainability was performed. Sustainable production methods are considered at three levels using three examples in this paper: production system, penning system and for a production practice. A sustainability matrix was provided for each example. In a comparison of indoor vs. outdoor systems, the food safety/zoonoses concerns make current outdoor systems unsustainable. The choice of keeping pregnant sows in group pens or individual crates is complex in that the outcome of a sustainability assessment leads to the conclusion that group penning is more sustainable in the EU and certain USA states, but the individual crate is currently more sustainable in other USA states, Asia and Latin America. A comparison of conventional physical castration with immunological castration shows that the less-common immunological castration method is more sustainable (for a number of reasons). This paper provides a method to assess the sustainability of production systems and practices that take into account the best available science, human perception and culture, animal welfare, the environment, food safety, worker health and safety, and economics (including the cost of production and solving world hunger). This tool can be used in countries and regions where the table values of a sustainability matrix change based on local conditions. The sustainability matrix can be used to assess current systems and predict improved systems of the future. PMID:26487410

  15. Carbon and water footprint of pork supply chain in Catalonia: From feed to final products.

    PubMed

    Noya, Isabel; Aldea, Xavier; Gasol, Carles M; González-García, Sara; Amores, Maria José; Colón, Joan; Ponsá, Sergio; Roman, Isabel; Rubio, Miguel A; Casas, Eudald; Moreira, María Teresa; Boschmonart-Rives, Jesús

    2016-04-15

    A systematic tool to assess the Carbon Footprint (CF) and Water Footprint (WF) of pork production companies was developed and applied to representative Catalan companies. To do so, a cradle-to-gate environmental assessment was carried out by means of the LCA methodology, taking into account all the stages involved in the pork chain, from feed production to the processing of final products, ready for distribution. In this approach, the environmental results are reported based on eight different functional units (FUs) according to the main pork products obtained. With the aim of ensuring the reliability of the results and facilitating the comparison with other available reports, the Product Category Rules (PCR) for Catalan pork sector were also defined as a basis for calculations. The characterization results show fodder production as the main contributor to the global environmental burdens, with contributions higher than 76% regardless the environmental indicator or the life cycle stage considered, which is in agreement with other published data. In contrast, the results in terms of CF and WF lay above the range of values reported elsewhere. However, major discrepancies are mainly due to the differences in the co-products allocation criteria. In this sense, economic/physical allocation and/or system expansion have been mostly considered in literature. In contrast, no allocation was considered appropriate in this study, according to the characteristics of the industries and products under assessment; thus, the major impacts fall on the main product, which derives on comparatively higher environmental burdens. Finally, due to the relevance of fodder production in the overall impact assessment results, strategies to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions as well as water use associated to this stage were proposed in the pork supply chain.

  16. The Future of Pork Production in the World: Towards Sustainable, Welfare-Positive Systems.

    PubMed

    McGlone, John J

    2013-05-15

    Among land animals, more pork is eaten in the world than any other meat. The earth holds about one billion pigs who deliver over 100 mmt of pork to people for consumption. Systems of pork production changed from a forest-based to pasture-based to dirt lots and finally into specially-designed buildings. The world pork industry is variable and complex not just in production methods but in economics and cultural value. A systematic analysis of pork industry sustainability was performed. Sustainable production methods are considered at three levels using three examples in this paper: production system, penning system and for a production practice. A sustainability matrix was provided for each example. In a comparison of indoor vs. outdoor systems, the food safety/zoonoses concerns make current outdoor systems unsustainable. The choice of keeping pregnant sows in group pens or individual crates is complex in that the outcome of a sustainability assessment leads to the conclusion that group penning is more sustainable in the EU and certain USA states, but the individual crate is currently more sustainable in other USA states, Asia and Latin America. A comparison of conventional physical castration with immunological castration shows that the less-common immunological castration method is more sustainable (for a number of reasons). This paper provides a method to assess the sustainability of production systems and practices that take into account the best available science, human perception and culture, animal welfare, the environment, food safety, worker health and safety, and economics (including the cost of production and solving world hunger). This tool can be used in countries and regions where the table values of a sustainability matrix change based on local conditions. The sustainability matrix can be used to assess current systems and predict improved systems of the future.

  17. Recovery of spores of Clostridium botulinum in yeast extract agar and pork infusion agar after heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Odlaug, T E; Pflug, I J

    1977-10-01

    Yeast extract agar, pork infusion agar, and modifications of these media were used to recover heated Clostridium botulinum spores. The D- and z-values were determined. Two type A strains and one type B strain of C. botulinum were studied. In all cases the D-values were largest when the spores were recovered in yeast extract agar, compared to the D-values for spores recovered in pork infusion agar. The z-values for strains 62A and A16037 were largest when the spores were recovered in pork infusion agar. The addition of sodium bicarbonate and sodium thioglycolate to pork infusion agar resulted in D-values for C. botulinum 62A spores similar to those for the same spores recovered in yeast extract agar. The results suggest that sodium bicarbonate and sodium thioglycolate should be added to recovery media for heated C. botulinum spores to obtain maximum plate counts. PMID:335970

  18. Effect of oxygen level on the oxidative stability of two different retail pork products stored using modified atmosphere packaging (MAP).

    PubMed

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Tørngren, Mari Ann; Christensen, Mette; Baron, Caroline P

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics and the oxidative stability of pork steaks and of pork mince were investigated during 2, 5 and 7days of refrigerated storage using oxygen (O2) levels of 0%, 20%, 50% and 80% in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). Steaks stored during 7days were not affected by an increase in O2 concentration, as revealed by lipid and protein oxidation markers. In contrast, the mince was characterised by an altered protein profile, loss of free thiol groups and increased protein oxidation, early during storage. The oxidative stability of pork mince was improved by using intermediate (50%) O2 MAP. The results show that fresh pork products are affected differently by the MAP O2 concentration and strongly indicate that optimisation of MAP based on the retail product type would be of considerable benefit to their oxidative stability.

  19. Effect of oxygen level on the oxidative stability of two different retail pork products stored using modified atmosphere packaging (MAP).

    PubMed

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Tørngren, Mari Ann; Christensen, Mette; Baron, Caroline P

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics and the oxidative stability of pork steaks and of pork mince were investigated during 2, 5 and 7days of refrigerated storage using oxygen (O2) levels of 0%, 20%, 50% and 80% in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). Steaks stored during 7days were not affected by an increase in O2 concentration, as revealed by lipid and protein oxidation markers. In contrast, the mince was characterised by an altered protein profile, loss of free thiol groups and increased protein oxidation, early during storage. The oxidative stability of pork mince was improved by using intermediate (50%) O2 MAP. The results show that fresh pork products are affected differently by the MAP O2 concentration and strongly indicate that optimisation of MAP based on the retail product type would be of considerable benefit to their oxidative stability. PMID:26658011

  20. Tracking the Salmonella status of pigs and pork from lairage through the slaughter process in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Duggan, S J; Mannion, C; Prendergast, D M; Leonard, N; Fanning, S; Gonzales-Barron, U; Egan, J; Butler, F; Duffy, G

    2010-12-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is the predominant serotype isolated from humans in Europe. Pork and pork products are recognized vehicles of Salmonella and are responsible for outbreaks of human salmonellosis. Pigs can become infected with Salmonella on the breeding or fattening farm and during transport, lairage, and slaughter. The aim of this study was to investigate selected points of Salmonella contamination from the time pigs entered the lairage to the time the carcass was processed in the boning hall and to determine the importance of different sources of Salmonella along the Irish pork production chain. A second objective was to evaluate whether the serological status or category of a herd influenced the levels of bacteriological contamination detected on individual carcasses and pork cuts during slaughter and dressing operations. All samples were tested for the presence and numbers of Salmonella. Enterobacteriaceae numbers were also determined. Serotype, phage type, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were utilized to determine similarity among Salmonella isolates. Lairage was a major source of cross-contamination with Salmonella as were the hands of evisceration operatives, conveyor belts, and equipment in the boning hall. Cross-contamination within the slaughter plant environment accounted for up to 69 % of Salmonella carcass contamination. In general, herd category reflected the bacteriological status of carcasses and pork cuts. Major findings were a strong association (P < 0.01) between Enterobacteriaceae counts and Salmonella occurrence on prechill carcasses and a significant association (P < 0.05) between Enterobacteriaceae counts and Salmonella occurrence on pork cut samples.

  1. Storage of pork meat under modified atmospheres containing vapors from commercial alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Kapetanakou, A E; Agathaggelou, E I; Skandamis, P N

    2014-05-16

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of AB vapors on microbial, physicochemical, and sensory profile of pork meat stored in different MAP conditions. Pork pieces (10g) and cotton/cellulose absorbent cloths (2×2cm) were placed into compartmentalized Petri-dishes in two sections. Aliquots (1mL) of water (control), 30% v/v and 40% v/v ethanol, whisky, brandy, tsipouro, raki, and ouzo were added separately to the cotton/cellulose absorbent cloths. Each pork sample was placed in one compartment and cotton/cellulose absorbent cloths supplemented with different ABs were placed in a separate compartment of each Petri-dish. Samples were packaged in 40% CO2: 30% O2: 30% N2 and 80% O2: 20% CO2 and stored at 4 and 10°C. Total viable counts, Pseudomonas sp., Brochothrix thermosphacta, lactic acid bacteria, yeasts and molds, and Enterobacteriaceae, were enumerated during storage. Changes in pH, color (L*, a*, b*), odor, taste, and overall appearance of pork meat were also evaluated along with changes in organic acid levels via HPLC. At 4°C, lactic acid bacteria and B. thermosphacta were the dominant organisms under 40% CO2: 30% N2: 30% O2 and 80% O2: 20% CO2, respectively, while at 10°C, lactic acid bacteria dominated in both MAP conditions. All applied ABs were effective (p<0.05) against lactic acid bacteria, pseudomonads, and B. thermosphacta. The inhibitory effect of ABs was also reflected through lower levels of glucose consumption or accumulation of lactic, acetic, succinic, and formic acid compared to controls. Moreover, packaged samples in 40% CO2: 30% O2: 30% N2 exhibited a significant increase (p<0.05) of acetic acid during storage at 4°C, but the concentrations of acetic acid in samples exposed to AB vapors were lower than those in controls. Both antimicrobial active MAPs extended the shelf-life of pork meat by ca. 2-fold, while samples exposed to alcoholic beverages (especially ouzo) under 80% O2: 20% CO2 resulted in better (p<0.05) sensory properties

  2. Quantitative detection of pork in commercial meat products by TaqMan® real-time PCR assay targeting the mitochondrial D-loop region.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miju; Yoo, Insuk; Lee, Shin-Young; Hong, Yeun; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2016-11-01

    The TaqMan® real-time PCR assay using the mitochondrial D-loop region was developed for the quantitative detection of pork in processed meat products. The newly designed primers and probe specifically amplified pork without any cross-reactivity with non-target animal species. The limit of detection of the real-time PCR assay was 0.1pg of heat-treated pork meat and 0.1% (w/w) pork meat in beef and chicken meat mixtures. The quantitative real-time PCR assay was applied to analyze the pork meat content in 22 commercial processed meat products including jerkies, press hams, sausages, hamburger patties and steaks, grilled short rib patties, and nuggets. The developed real-time PCR method was able to detect pork meat in various types of processed meat products that declared the use of pork meat on their label. All processed meat products that declared no use of pork meat showed a negative result in the assay. The method developed in this study showed sensitivity and specificity in the quantification of pork meat in commercial processed meat products.

  3. Consumer perceptions: pork and pig production. Insights from France, England, Sweden and Denmark.

    PubMed

    Ngapo, T M; Dransfield, E; Martin, J-F; Magnusson, M; Bredahl, L; Nute, G R

    2004-01-01

    Consumer focus groups in France, England, Sweden and Denmark were used to obtain insights into the decision-making involved in the choice of fresh pork and attitudes towards today's pig production systems. Many positive perceptions of pork meat were evoked. Negative images of the production systems in use today were expressed, but rationalised in terms of consumer demands, market competition and by comparisons to previous systems of production. Knowledge of production systems appeared of little consequence in terms of any meat market potential as several groups freely remarked that there was no link between the negative images of production methods and their purchase behaviour. The groups were clearly confused and mistrusted the limited information available at the point of purchase. Careful consideration should be given to meat labelling, in particular taking account of the evident consumer ethnocentrism, to assure that such information is targeted to enhance consumer confidence. PMID:22063940

  4. Feasibility assessment of vacuum cooling followed by immersion vacuum cooling on water-cooked pork.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoguang; Chen, Hui; Liu, Yi; Dai, Ruitong; Li, Xingmin

    2012-01-01

    Vacuum cooling followed by immersion vacuum cooling was designed to cool water-cooked pork (1.5±0.05 kg) compared with air blast cooling (4±0.5°C, 2 m/s), vacuum cooling (10 mbar) and immersion vacuum cooling. This combined cooling method was: vacuum cooling to an intermediate temperature of 25°C and then immersion vacuum cooling with water of 10°C to the final temperature of 10°C. It was found that the cooling loss of this combined cooling method was significantly lower (P<0.05) than those of air blast cooling and vacuum cooling. This combined cooling was faster (P<0.05) than air blast cooling and immersion vacuum cooling in terms of cooling rate. Moreover, the pork cooled by combined cooling method had significant differences (P<0.05) in water content, color and shear force.

  5. Comparison of water gel desserts from fish skin and pork gelatins using instrumental measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Regenstein, Joe M

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare water gel desserts from various gelatins using instrumental measurements. The puncture test and texture profile analysis (TPA) with compression were determined at 25% and 75% deformation; the melting properties were determined rheologically by monitoring the change of storage modulus (G') with increasing temperature. The measurements with 25% deformation were always nondestructive, while measurements with 75% deformation were mostly destructive. Desserts made from Alaska pollock gelatin (AG) or gelatin mixtures containing AG were more resistant to the destruction caused by the large deformation than tilapia gelatin and pork gelatins. In addition, the gel dessert made from AG melted at a lower temperature than those from tilapia skin gelatin and pork gelatins, while desserts made from gelatin mixtures reflected the melting properties of the separate gelatins.

  6. Antihypertensive activity of peptides identified in the in vitro gastrointestinal digest of pork meat.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Elizabeth; Toldrá, Fidel; Sentandreu, Miguel Angel; Nishimura, Hitoshi; Arihara, Keizo

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the in vivo antihypertensive activity of three novel peptides identified in the in vitro digest of pork meat. These peptides were RPR, KAPVA and PTPVP and all of them showed significant antihypertensive activity after oral administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats, RPR being the peptide with the greatest in vivo activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the in vivo antihypertensive action of the three peptides from nebulin (RPR) and titin (KAPVA and PTPVP), thus confirming their reported in vitro angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. These findings suggest that pork meat could constitute a source of bioactive constituents that could be utilized in functional foods or nutraceuticals.

  7. The effect of skatole and androstenone on consumer response towards streaky bacon and pork belly roll.

    PubMed

    Aaslyng, Margit D; De Lichtenberg Broge, Eva Honnens; Brockhoff, Per B; Christensen, Rune Haubo

    2015-12-01

    Consumer liking was assessed for streaky bacon and pork belly roll from entire male pigs with an androstenone (AND) content of up to 9.4 ppm and a skatole (SKA) content of up to 0.92 ppm in the back fat and castrates. No clear effect of either AND or SKA was seen in consumer liking, although an insignificant tendency was seen for SKA. A sensory profile analysis showed that AND increased the boar taint of bacon, while both AND and SKA increased the boar taint of the pork belly roll. Consumer sensitivity towards AND and SKA did not affect liking of the meat products. The lack of effect of AND and SKA on consumer liking could be due to a masking effect of the spices and smoke. Three consecutive weeks' exposure to bacon did not change the liking score, irrespective of the AND and SKA content. This indicates that the consumers did not become more sensitive towards boar taint.

  8. Multifractal analysis application to the characterization of fatty infiltration in Iberian and White pork sirloins.

    PubMed

    Serrano, S; Perán, F; Jiménez-Hornero, F J; Gutiérrez de Ravé, E

    2013-03-01

    This paper applies the multifractal analysis based on the sandbox method to describe the distribution of fatty infiltration in Iberian and White pork meat with the aim of characterization and classification. This work was carried out by making photographs of sirloin cuts of both breeds and then treated with image analysis software. The obtained image data were stored in text format and constituted the input for multifractal analysis. The results obtained show that pork sirloin connective fatty tissue exhibits a multifractal type of scaling. Significant correlations were found between some of the parameters governing the multifractal behavior and fat percentage, especially in the case of Iberian sirloin. The differences found for the relationships between the generalized fractal dimensions and fat percentage provide information for the categorization of the studied meat pieces.

  9. Consumers dislike boar taint related off-flavours in pork chops regardless of a meal context.

    PubMed

    Meier-Dinkel, Lisa; Strack, Micha; Höinghaus, Kathrin; Mörlein, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the acceptance of pork with varying levels boar-taint related off-flavours both, within a meat-alone (pure) and a meal context. In total, backfat samples of n=24 animals were evaluated by a trained panel. The fat score was then related to the consumer liking of the pork chops. Repeated ANOVA of chop liking with consumer as a random factor (n=37) and fat score as an interval predictor shows neither a main effect of context (dwithin=0.015) nor the interactions of context with linear and quadratic coefficient of the fat score. The linear (b=-0.20) and quadratic (b=-0.24) coefficients of the fat score main effect demonstrate the necessity and effectiveness of sensory quality control at slaughter. The quadratic coefficient showed a distinct penalty for higher fat scores. Sensory defects detected by trained panellists may not be noticed by usually less sensitive consumers. PMID:27521500

  10. Precision pork production: predicting the impact of nutritional strategies on carcass quality.

    PubMed

    van Milgen, J; Noblet, J; Dourmad, J Y; Labussière, E; Garcia-Launay, F; Brossard, L

    2012-11-01

    Variation is inherent to living systems. Because feeding strategies are applied to groups of pigs, it contributes to the inefficient use of natural resources and may even amplify the variation among pigs at slaughter. Precision pork production and precision feeding, through management of the variation among individuals, may contribute to improving the efficiency of animal production systems. This approach relies on the prediction of the response of the animal to the nutrient supply, the continuous monitoring of the response, and a system to control nutrient supply. Most nutritional models of pig growth are based on the partitioning of nutrients between energy expenditure, and protein and lipid deposition. However, the link between chemical body composition and tissue growth, tissue composition and thus carcass quality remains a challenge in modeling. The potential of precision pork production also depends on the (real-time) information that can be obtained to control growth and carcass quality.

  11. Mars Science Laboratory Launch-Arrival Space Study: A Pork Chop Plot Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cianciolo, Alicia Dwyer; Powell, Richard; Lockwood, Mary Kae

    2006-01-01

    Launch-Arrival, or "pork chop", plot analysis can provide mission designers with valuable information and insight into a specific launch and arrival space selected for a mission. The study begins with the array of entry states for each pair of selected Earth launch and Mars arrival dates, and nominal entry, descent and landing trajectories are simulated for each pair. Parameters of interest, such as maximum heat rate, are plotted in launch-arrival space. The plots help to quickly identify launch and arrival regions that are not feasible under current constraints or technology and also provide information as to what technologies may need to be developed to reach a desired region. This paper provides a discussion of the development, application, and results of a pork chop plot analysis to the Mars Science Laboratory mission. This technique is easily applicable to other missions at Mars and other destinations.

  12. Pre-slaughter rectal temperature as an indicator of pork meat quality.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, L; Van de Perre, V; Permentier, L; De Bie, S; Geers, R

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates whether rectal temperature of pigs, prior to slaughter, can give an indication of the risk of developing pork with PSE characteristics. A total of 1203 pigs were examined, measuring the rectal temperature just before stunning, of which 794 rectal temperatures were measured immediately after stunning. pH30LT (M. Longissimus thoracis) and temperature of the ham (Temp30Ham) were collected from about 530 carcasses, 30 min after sticking. The results present a significant positive linear correlation between rectal temperature just before and after slaughter, and Temp30Ham. Moreover, pH30LT is negatively correlated with rectal temperature and Temp30Ham. Finally, a linear mixed model for pH30LT was established with the rectal temperature of the pigs just before stunning and the lairage time. This model defines that measuring rectal temperature of pigs just before slaughter allows discovery of pork with PSE traits, taking into account pre-slaughter conditions.

  13. The effects of high pressure processing on pork quality, palatability, and further processed products.

    PubMed

    Souza, C M; Boler, D D; Clark, D L; Kutzler, L W; Holmer, S F; Summerfield, J W; Cannon, J E; Smit, N R; McKeith, F K; Killefer, J

    2011-04-01

    The objective was to evaluate high pressure processing (HPP) on postmortem metabolism and pork quality. Six pigs were randomly selected immediately after slaughter. After splitting, one side was randomly designated for HPP of 215 MPa for 15 s with water temperature at 33 °C and the other side (non-pressure treated) served as the control. Chilled sides were fabricated into loins, boneless picnic, boneless Boston butt, and ham. Samples were cut from the loin, inside portion of the ham and cushion (M. triceps brachii). Pork quality, lipid oxidation, connective tissue solubility, protein functionality, sensory analysis, and processed characteristics of restructured hams were evaluated. HPP partially inhibits postmortem metabolism, indicated by lower muscle lactate levels and higher ultimate pH values. Cook and drip loss were both reduced in HPP treated muscles compared to controls. HPP treated sides were more tender than controls. Collagen content was not different between HPP and control groups. PMID:21172731

  14. What is for dinner? Viral metagenomics of US store bought beef, pork, and chicken.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Li, Linlin; Deng, Xutao; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Delwart, Eric

    2014-11-01

    We describe here the metagenomics-derived viral sequences detected in beef, pork, and chicken purchased from stores in San Francisco. In beef we detected four previously reported viruses (two parvoviruses belonging to different genera, an anellovirus, and one circovirus-like virus) and one novel bovine polyomavirus species (BPyV2-SF) whose closest relatives infect primates. Detection of porcine hokovirus in beef indicated that this parvovirus can infect both ungulate species. In pork we detected four known parvoviruses from three genera, an anellovirus, and pig circovirus 2. Chicken meat contained numerous gyrovirus sequences including those of chicken anemia virus and of a novel gyrovirus species (GyV7-SF). Our results provide an initial characterization of some of the viruses commonly found in US store-bought meats which included a diverse group of parvoviruses and viral families with small circular DNA genomes. Whether any of these viruses can infect humans will require testing human sera for specific antibodies.

  15. Activity and expression of nitric oxide synthase in pork skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Li, Yu-pin; Zhang, Wan-gang; Fu, Qing-quan; Liu, Nian; Zhou, Guang-hong

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biochemical changes of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in pork skeletal muscles during postmortem storage. Longissimus thoracis (LT), psoas major (PM) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles of pork were removed immediately after slaughter and stored under vacuum condition at 4°C for 0, 1 and 3d. Results showed that all three muscles exhibited NOS activity until 1d while SM muscle retained NOS activity after 3d of storage. The content of nNOS in SM muscle was stable across 3d of storage while decreased intensity of nNOS was detected at 1 and 3d of aging in PM and LT muscles due to the degradation of calpain. Immunostaining showed that nNOS was located at not only sarcolemma but also cytoplasm at 0 and 1d of storage. Our data suggest that postmortem muscles possess NOS activity and nNOS expression depends on muscle type.

  16. Microbial pathogens in raw pork, chicken, and beef: benefit estimates for control using irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, T.

    1985-12-01

    Various control procedures have been suggested for reducing foodborne infectious diseases. Receiving considerable attention is irradiation. This report estimates the medical and wage (or productivity) benefits associated with prevention of five human diseases transmitted by beef, pork, and chicken. (These diseases can also be transmitted by other vectors, such as eggs, milk, and pets. But these sources are not included in the analysis.) All of these foodborne infectious diseases - salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis, trichinosis, tapeworm, and toxoplasmosis - could be significantly reduced by irradiating meat and poultry. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just approved irradiation of pork to prevent trichinosis (50FR 29658-59) and is considering approval of irradiation of chicken to kill Salmonella. 22 references.

  17. Microbiological Evaluation of Pork and Chicken By-Products in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Jung, Hae-In; Kuk, Min; Lim, Jong-Soo; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the microbiological risk of pork and chicken by-products by enumerating indicator bacteria (total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and Escherichia coli) and identifying pathogens such as Campylobacter and Salmonella. The antibiotic resistance of pathogenic isolates was determined, and molecular subtyping was performed using automated repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR). Pork and chicken by-products were collected from 10 processing plants. The mean numbers of total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and E. coli from 95 pork by-product samples and 64 chicken by-product samples were 5.1, 3.6, and 2.4 log CFU/g and 4.5, 3.0, and 1.8 log CFU/g, respectively. The numbers of indicator bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (small intestine, large intestine, and gizzard) were significantly higher than those in other organs. Salmonella and Campylobacter species were detected in 3 and 5 of 95 pork by-product samples and in 6 and 3 of 64 chicken by-product samples, respectively. Four of 9 Salmonella isolates examined were resistant to eight antibiotics, and each of these resistant strains produced an extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Most Campylobacter isolates were resistant to tetracycline (7 of 8 strains) and quinolones (7 of 8 strains). The similarity in rep-PCR patterns among Salmonella isolates was more closely associated with serotype than with the processing plant and type of meat. Conversely, the rep-PCR patterns of Campylobacter isolates were specific to the processing plant. Our findings could help agencies develop regulations for protection from foodborne bacterial infections arising from animal by-products.

  18. Sensitivity of three methods used in the isolation of Arcobacter spp. in raw ground pork.

    PubMed

    Ohlendorf, Dawn S; Murano, Elsa A

    2002-11-01

    Arcobacter, an aerotolerant Campylobacter-like organism, has been designated an emerging pathogen because of its newly recognized ability to cause diarrheal illness in both humans and animals and its presence in the human food supply. Because there is no standard isolation method for its detection, the true occurrence of this pathogen is largely unknown. In addition, the lack of a standardized isolation protocol limits the ability of investigators to compare field data. Arcobacter has been detected in whole muscle and ground pork at various levels by two different isolation methods (those of deBoer and Collins). In this study, these methods were tested along with the Johnson-Murano (JM) method, developed in our laboratory. The sensitivity of each method was tested for ground pork inoculated with Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus IA at levels of 10(4), 10(3), 10(2), and 10(1) CFU/g. Controls included tubes with uninoculated pork and broth tubes without pork. All samples that were morphologically similar to Arcobacter were analyzed by Gram staining and by catalase and oxidasereactions. Presumptive positive samples were confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction. The JM method was determined to be the most sensitive, detecting A. butzleri down to a level of 10(1) CFU/g in 100% of the samples and detecting A. cryaerophilus IA at a level of 10(1) CFU/g in 75% of samples. In a pure buffer system, the Collins method was as effective as the JM method in isolating both organisms to levels of 10(1) cells per g.

  19. Sulfonated polystyrene magnetic nanobeads coupled with immunochromatographic strip for clenbuterol determination in pork muscle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kesheng; Guo, Liang; Xu, Wei; Xu, Hengyi; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Xu, Guomao; Lai, Weihua; Xiong, Yonghua; Wan, Yiqun

    2014-11-01

    A magnetic solid-phase extraction method (MSPE) was developed to pre-concentrate and cleanup clenbuterol (CLE) from pork muscle. Novel sulfonated polystyrene magnetic nanobeads (spMNBs) were synthesized via a one-pot emulsion copolymerization method by using divinylbenzene, styrene, and sodium styrene sulfonate in the presence of oleic acid-modified and 10-undecylenic acid-modified magnetic ferrofluid. The resulting spMNBs exhibited high adsorption efficiency for CLE and for 10 other common beta-adrenergic agonists, namely, brombuterol, ractopamine, tulobuterol, bambuterol, cimbuterol, mabuterol, clorprenaline, penbutolol, salbutamol, and cimaterol. The adsorption behavior of the spMNBs for CLE was described by the Langmuir equation with a maximum adsorption capacity of 0.41 mg/g. Under the optimized parameters, the extraction of CLE from 0.5 g of pork muscle required 25mg of the spMNBs at a shortened adsorption time (0.5 min). The proposed MSPE was coupled with colloidal gold nanoparticle-based immunochromatographic assay (MSPE-AuNPIA) for the quantitative detection of CLE residue in pork muscle. The limit of detection and limit of quantification for the pork muscle were 0.10 and 0.24 ng/g, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day assay recoveries at three CLE spiked concentrations ranged from 92.5% to 98.1%, with relative standard deviations ranging from 3.2% to 13.0%. The results of MSPE-AuNPIA were confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The CLE values obtained with MSPE-AuNPIA agreed with those obtained with LC-MS/MS.

  20. Studies on tenderization and preparation of enrobed pork chunks in microwave oven.

    PubMed

    Garg, Vasudev; Mendiratta, S K

    2006-12-01

    This study was conducted to develop technology for tenderization and production of enrobed pork chunks in a microwave oven. Meat chunks from shoulder cuts of pork were cured in a solution containing salt, sodium tripolyphosphate and sugar for 48h at 4±1°C, enrobed with cream based batter and cooked in a microwave oven at 900MHz. These enrobed chunks (control) were compared with tenderized (treated) enrobed chunks, for which 7.5% cucumis extract, 9% ginger extract and 0.50% papain powder were incorporated in the standard curing solution. Ginger and papain treatments caused significant (P<0.01) increases in the moisture content and pH of the cooked products compared to the control and cucumis treated samples. Shear force values were significantly (P<0.01) lower and overall acceptability scores were significantly (P<0.01) higher in all treated samples compared to the control. During storage at 4±1°C, the moisture contents and sensory qualities decreased, but TBARS values and microbial counts increased significantly (P<0.01). Although all products were acceptable up to 15 days of storage, the ginger treated samples had significantly (P<0.01) lower TBARS and microbial loads and higher sensory attributes than the control, cucumis and papain treated samples. The magnitude of the storage changes were less and acceptability ranking was higher for the ginger treated samples compared with the others. The results indicated that microwaves could be used for the preparation of enrobed pork chunks. The overall acceptability and shelf life of microwave cooked enrobed pork chunk can be further improved using ginger extract in the curing solution. PMID:22063229

  1. Microbiological Evaluation of Pork and Chicken By-Products in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Jung, Hae-In; Kuk, Min; Lim, Jong-Soo; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the microbiological risk of pork and chicken by-products by enumerating indicator bacteria (total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and Escherichia coli) and identifying pathogens such as Campylobacter and Salmonella. The antibiotic resistance of pathogenic isolates was determined, and molecular subtyping was performed using automated repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR). Pork and chicken by-products were collected from 10 processing plants. The mean numbers of total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and E. coli from 95 pork by-product samples and 64 chicken by-product samples were 5.1, 3.6, and 2.4 log CFU/g and 4.5, 3.0, and 1.8 log CFU/g, respectively. The numbers of indicator bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (small intestine, large intestine, and gizzard) were significantly higher than those in other organs. Salmonella and Campylobacter species were detected in 3 and 5 of 95 pork by-product samples and in 6 and 3 of 64 chicken by-product samples, respectively. Four of 9 Salmonella isolates examined were resistant to eight antibiotics, and each of these resistant strains produced an extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Most Campylobacter isolates were resistant to tetracycline (7 of 8 strains) and quinolones (7 of 8 strains). The similarity in rep-PCR patterns among Salmonella isolates was more closely associated with serotype than with the processing plant and type of meat. Conversely, the rep-PCR patterns of Campylobacter isolates were specific to the processing plant. Our findings could help agencies develop regulations for protection from foodborne bacterial infections arising from animal by-products. PMID:27296417

  2. Sulfonated polystyrene magnetic nanobeads coupled with immunochromatographic strip for clenbuterol determination in pork muscle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kesheng; Guo, Liang; Xu, Wei; Xu, Hengyi; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Xu, Guomao; Lai, Weihua; Xiong, Yonghua; Wan, Yiqun

    2014-11-01

    A magnetic solid-phase extraction method (MSPE) was developed to pre-concentrate and cleanup clenbuterol (CLE) from pork muscle. Novel sulfonated polystyrene magnetic nanobeads (spMNBs) were synthesized via a one-pot emulsion copolymerization method by using divinylbenzene, styrene, and sodium styrene sulfonate in the presence of oleic acid-modified and 10-undecylenic acid-modified magnetic ferrofluid. The resulting spMNBs exhibited high adsorption efficiency for CLE and for 10 other common beta-adrenergic agonists, namely, brombuterol, ractopamine, tulobuterol, bambuterol, cimbuterol, mabuterol, clorprenaline, penbutolol, salbutamol, and cimaterol. The adsorption behavior of the spMNBs for CLE was described by the Langmuir equation with a maximum adsorption capacity of 0.41 mg/g. Under the optimized parameters, the extraction of CLE from 0.5 g of pork muscle required 25mg of the spMNBs at a shortened adsorption time (0.5 min). The proposed MSPE was coupled with colloidal gold nanoparticle-based immunochromatographic assay (MSPE-AuNPIA) for the quantitative detection of CLE residue in pork muscle. The limit of detection and limit of quantification for the pork muscle were 0.10 and 0.24 ng/g, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day assay recoveries at three CLE spiked concentrations ranged from 92.5% to 98.1%, with relative standard deviations ranging from 3.2% to 13.0%. The results of MSPE-AuNPIA were confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The CLE values obtained with MSPE-AuNPIA agreed with those obtained with LC-MS/MS. PMID:25127616

  3. Determination of α-keto acids in pork meat and Iberian ham via tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; Navarro, José L; Delgado, Rosa M; Zamora, Rosario

    2013-09-01

    An analytical method which offers accurate determination and identification of eight α-keto acids (α-ketoglutaric acid, pyruvic acid, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid, 3-methyl-2-oxobutyric acid, α-keto-γ-methylthiobutyric acid, 4-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid, 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid, and phenylpyruvic acid) in pork meat and Iberian ham samples is reported. The method utilises a highly selective and sensitive method of multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) by mass spectrometry. The analytical method is simple (although the chemical derivatisation of the α-keto acids with dansylhydrazine is required), precise (<18% RSD), accurate (90-110%), sensitive (0.01-0.34 mg/kg of defatted and freeze-dried meat depending on the α-keto acid) and linear (R>0.99) over several orders of magnitude (until 0.01-146.1 mg/kg of defatted and freeze-dried meat depending on the α-keto acid). Using this methodology, α-keto acids were found to be present in pork meat to a low extent, and their concentration increased when they were determined in Iberian ham. This is the first report of the presence of α-keto acids in both pork meats and Iberian hams.

  4. Effects of Edible Films Containing Procyanidin on the Preservation of Pork Meat during Chilled Storage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Procyanidins, which are natural antioxidants and antimicrobials found in grapes, enhance the quality and extend the shelf life of meat. We explored the effects of edible films incorporating procyanidins on pork loin stored for various times. Procyanidins (0, 0.1, and 0.3%, w/w) were incorporated into the edible films. We assessed meat color, pH, levels of volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) and 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and microbial populations for 14 d. The chromaticities and pH values of pork loin wrapped in film containing procyanidins (0.1% and 0.3%) generally increased (p<0.05) with storage time. VBN and TBARS levels, and total bacterial and Escherichia coli (E. coli) counts, significantly decreased (p<0.05) in the procyanidin groups. In particular, procyanidins strongly inhibited TBARS formation. Thus, our findings suggest that edible film impregnated with procyanidins inhibits lipid oxidation and microbial growth, thereby enhancing the quality and shelf life of pork meat. PMID:27194932

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Pork and Chicken Products by Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yicun; Li, Xiang; Lv, Rong; Yang, Jielin; Li, Jian; He, Yuping; Pan, Liangwen

    2014-01-01

    In this project, a highly precise quantitative method based on the digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) technique was developed to determine the weight of pork and chicken in meat products. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is currently used for quantitative molecular analysis of the presence of species-specific DNAs in meat products. However, it is limited in amplification efficiency and relies on standard curves based Ct values, detecting and quantifying low copy number target DNA, as in some complex mixture meat products. By using the dPCR method, we find the relationships between the raw meat weight and DNA weight and between the DNA weight and DNA copy number were both close to linear. This enabled us to establish formulae to calculate the raw meat weight based on the DNA copy number. The accuracy and applicability of this method were tested and verified using samples of pork and chicken powder mixed in known proportions. Quantitative analysis indicated that dPCR is highly precise in quantifying pork and chicken in meat products and therefore has the potential to be used in routine analysis by government regulators and quality control departments of commercial food and feed enterprises. PMID:25243184

  6. Pork carcass composition derived from a neural network model of electromagnetic scans.

    PubMed

    Berg, E P; Engel, B A; Forrest, J C

    1998-01-01

    We used an advanced computer logic system (NETS 3.0) to decipher electromagnetic (EM) scans in lieu of traditional linear regression for estimation of pork carcass composition. Fifty EM scans of pork carcasses were obtained on-line (prerigor) at a swine slaughter facility. Right sides were cut into wholesale parts and dissected into fat, lean, and bone to obtain total dissected carcass and primal cut lean. In this study, the input layer consisted of 81 nodes (80-point EM scan curve and warm carcass weight), one hidden layer of 42 nodes, and an output layer consisting of one node, which were run separately for outputs of ham, loin, or shoulder lean. The hidden layer connected to the output of total lean contained 50 nodes. Thirty-five scans were used for training of the network. The new network was then tested with 15 previously unseen input/output pairs. Separate neural networks were developed for the estimation of dissected total carcass, ham, loin, and shoulder lean. The NETS configuration improved on linear regression equations for estimation of total carcass lean by .31 kg, ham lean by .284 kg, and shoulder lean by .148 kg. Our results show that advanced computer logic systems have the capacity to improve upon traditional linear regression equations for prediction of pork carcass composition.

  7. Rapid non-destructive assessment of pork edible quality by using VIS/NIR spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leilei; Peng, Yankun; Dhakal, Sagar; Song, Yulin; Zhao, Juan; Zhao, Songwei

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this research were to develop a rapid non-destructive method to evaluate the edible quality of chilled pork. A total of 42 samples were packed in seal plastic bags and stored at 4°C for 1 to 21 days. Reflectance spectra were collected from visible/near-infrared spectroscopy system in the range of 400nm to 1100nm. Microbiological, physicochemical and organoleptic characteristics such as the total viable counts (TVC), total volatile basic-nitrogen (TVB-N), pH value and color parameters L* were determined to appraise pork edible quality. Savitzky-Golay (SG) based on five and eleven smoothing points, Multiple Scattering Correlation (MSC) and first derivative pre-processing methods were employed to eliminate the spectra noise. The support vector machines (SVM) and partial least square regression (PLSR) were applied to establish prediction models using the de-noised spectra. A linear correlation was developed between the VIS/NIR spectroscopy and parameters such as TVC, TVB-N, pH and color parameter L* indexes, which could gain prediction results with Rv of 0.931, 0.844, 0.805 and 0.852, respectively. The results demonstrated that VIS/NIR spectroscopy technique combined with SVM possesses a powerful assessment capability. It can provide a potential tool for detecting pork edible quality rapidly and non-destructively.

  8. Aitchbone hanging and ageing period are additive factors influencing pork eating quality.

    PubMed

    Channon, H A; Taverner, M R; D'Souza, D N; Warner, R D

    2014-01-01

    The effects of abattoir, carcase weight (60 or 80 kg HCW), hanging method (Achilles or aitchbone) and ageing period (2 or 7 day post-slaughter) on eating quality attributes of pork were investigated in this 3×2×2×2 factorial study. A total of 144 Large White×Landrace female pigs were slaughtered at one of three abattoirs and sides hung from either the Achilles tendon or the aitchbone. After 24 h chilling, loin (M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum) and topside (M. semimembranosus) muscles were individually vacuum packaged and aged for 2 or 7 days post-slaughter. Consumers (n=852) evaluated eating quality. Neither abattoir nor carcase weight influenced tenderness, flavour or overall liking of pork. Improvements in tenderness, flavour and overall liking were found due to aitchbone hanging (P<0.001) and ageing (P<0.001) for 7 days compared with Achilles-hung carcases and pork aged for 2 days, respectively. This study demonstrated that aitchbone hanging and 7 day ageing can improve eating quality, but these effects were additive as the interaction term was not significant. PMID:24013699

  9. Characterization of peptides released by in vitro digestion of pork meat.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Elizabeth; Sentandreu, Miguel Angel; Toldrá, Fidel

    2010-04-28

    The main objective of this work was to identify and characterize the peptides generated by simulated gastrointestinal digestion of pork meat (longissimus dorsi) by the sequential action of pepsin and pancreatin. The obtained hydrolysate was analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with a nanoelectrospray ionization source (nano LC-ESI-MS/MS). Using this technique 51 different peptides were identified in the hydrolysate, corresponding to fragments of the main structural muscle proteins and some well-known sarcoplasmic proteins. To the best of our knowledge, this constitutes the highest number of peptides identified in pork meat digests. Peptide fragment size ranged from six to sixteen amino acids, being rich in proline residues and thus making them more resistant to further degradation by digestive enzymes. The present study constitutes a clear evidence of the extensive degradation that pork muscle proteins would undergo after gastrointestinal digestion, giving rise to a wide variety of short peptides. So, the use of in vitro digestion contributes to a better knowledge about the generation of peptides from diets with high protein quality.

  10. Effects of Edible Films Containing Procyanidin on the Preservation of Pork Meat during Chilled Storage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoun Wook; Jeong, Jin Young; Seol, Kuk-Hwan; Seong, Pil-Nam; Ham, Jun-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Procyanidins, which are natural antioxidants and antimicrobials found in grapes, enhance the quality and extend the shelf life of meat. We explored the effects of edible films incorporating procyanidins on pork loin stored for various times. Procyanidins (0, 0.1, and 0.3%, w/w) were incorporated into the edible films. We assessed meat color, pH, levels of volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) and 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and microbial populations for 14 d. The chromaticities and pH values of pork loin wrapped in film containing procyanidins (0.1% and 0.3%) generally increased (p<0.05) with storage time. VBN and TBARS levels, and total bacterial and Escherichia coli (E. coli) counts, significantly decreased (p<0.05) in the procyanidin groups. In particular, procyanidins strongly inhibited TBARS formation. Thus, our findings suggest that edible film impregnated with procyanidins inhibits lipid oxidation and microbial growth, thereby enhancing the quality and shelf life of pork meat. PMID:27194932

  11. Antibiotic residue monitoring results for pork, chicken, and beef samples in Vietnam in 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Okihashi, Masahiro; Harada, Kazuo; Konishi, Yoshimasa; Uchida, Kotaro; Do, Mai Hoang Ngoc; Bui, Huong Dang Thien; Nguyen, Thinh Duc; Nguyen, Phuc Do; Chau, Vien Van; Dao, Khanh Thi Van; Nguyen, Hue Thi Ngoc; Kajimura, Keiji; Kumeda, Yuko; Bui, Chien Trong; Vien, Mai Quang; Le, Ninh Hoang; Hirata, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2015-06-01

    A monitoring plan of residual antibiotics in food of animal origin was conducted in Vietnam from 2012 to 2013. Meat samples were collected from slaughterhouses and retail stores in Ho Chi Minh City and Nha Trang. A total of 28 antibiotics were analyzed using a LC-MS/MS screening method. Sulfonamides, fluoroquinolones, and tilmicosin were detected in some of the samples. Sulfaclozine and fluoroquinolones were mainly detected in chicken samples, and sulfamethazine was mainly detected in pork samples. High levels of sulfonamide residues, ranging between 2500 and 2700 μg/kg sulfaclozine and between 1300 and 3600 μg/kg sulfamethazine, were present in two chicken and three pork samples, respectively. Tilmicosin was detected at ranges of 150-450 μg/kg in 10 chicken samples. Positive percentages were 17.3, 8.8, and 7.4% for chicken, pork, and beef, respectively, for an average of 11.9%. The results suggest an appropriate withdrawal period after drug administration had not been observed in some livestock. PMID:25601049

  12. Staphylococcus xylosus fermentation of pork fatty waste: raw material for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Marques, Roger Vasques; Paz, Matheus Francisco da; Duval, Eduarda Hallal; Corrêa, Luciara Bilhalva; Corrêa, Érico Kunde

    2016-01-01

    The need for cleaner sources of energy has stirred research into utilising alternate fuel sources with favourable emission and sustainability such as biodiesel. However, there are technical constraints that hinder the widespread use of some of the low cost raw materials such as pork fatty wastes. Currently available technology permits the use of lipolytic microorganisms to sustainably produce energy from fat sources; and several microorganisms and their metabolites are being investigated as potential energy sources. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterise the process of Staphylococcus xylosus mediated fermentation of pork fatty waste. We also wanted to explore the possibility of fermentation effecting a modification in the lipid carbon chain to reduce its melting point and thereby act directly on one of the main technical barriers to obtaining biodiesel from this abundant source of lipids. Pork fatty waste was obtained from slaughterhouses in southern Brazil during evisceration of the carcasses and the kidney casing of slaughtered animals was used as feedstock. Fermentation was performed in BHI broth with different concentrations of fatty waste and for different time periods which enabled evaluation of the effect of fermentation time on the melting point of swine fat. The lowest melting point was observed around 46°C, indicating that these chemical and biological reactions can occur under milder conditions, and that such pre-treatment may further facilitate production of biodiesel from fatty animal waste. PMID:27266633

  13. The Quality Characteristics of Salted Ground Pork Patties Containing Various Fat Levels by Microwave Cooking.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Youn; Lim, Seung Taek; Kim, Cheon Jei

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of fat level on the microwave cooking properties of ground pork patties with NaCl (1.5%). Ground pork patties were processed from pork hams to achieve fat levels of 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%, respectively. Each patty was cooked from a thawed state to 75℃ in a microwave oven at full power (700 W). After microwave cooking, protein content, moisture content, fat retention, and shear force values in patties decreased as fat level increased from 10 to 25%. As fat level increased, cooking time decreased but total cooking loss and drip loss were increased, whereas slight differences in diameter reduction and thickness of patties were observed. In raw patties, 10% fat patties had lower L* values and higher a* values compared to patties with more fat, but these differences were reduced when patties were cooked. Patties with 10% fat showed a more pink color on the surface and interior than patties with a higher fat content but more air pockets were noted in higher-fat patties. Higher-fat patties were more tender, juicy, and oily than lower-fat patties. PMID:27621696

  14. Antioxidant protection of proteins and lipids in processed pork loin chops through feed supplementation with avocado.

    PubMed

    Hernández-López, Silvia H; Rodríguez-Carpena, Javier G; Lemus-Flores, Clemente; Galindo-García, Jorge; Estévez, Mario

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to analyze the impact of dietary avocado on the oxidative stability of lipids and proteins during pork processing. Loins from control (fed basic diet) and treated pigs (fed on avocado-supplemented diet) were roasted (102 °C/20 min) and subsequently packed in trays wrapped with oxygen-permeable films and chilled at 4 °C for 12 days. At each processing stage (raw, cooked and cooked & chilled), pork samples from both groups were analyzed for the concentration of TBARS, the loss of tryptophan and free thiols, and the formation of protein carbonyls, disulphide bonds and Schiff bases. Processing led to a depletion of tryptophan and sulfur-containing amino acids and an increase of lipid and protein oxidation products. Dietary avocado was not able to protect against the oxidation of tryptophan and thiols but cooked & chilled loins from treated pigs had significantly lower concentration of lipid and protein carbonyls than control counterparts. Likewise, dietary avocado alleviated the formation of Schiff bases during cooking. These results illustrate the benefits of dietary avocado on the oxidative stability of processed pork loins. PMID:27478235

  15. Theoretical analysis on pulsed microwave heating of pork meat supported on ceramic plate.

    PubMed

    Basak, Tanmay; Rao, Badri S

    2010-11-01

    Theoretical analysis has been carried out to study the role of ceramic plates (alumina and SiC) and pulsed microwave heating of pork meat (Pork Luncheon Roll (PLR) and White Pudding (WP)) samples. Spatial hot spots occur either at the center of the sample or at the outer face or at the face attached with alumina plate and application of pulsing minimizes formation of hot spots within meat samples. Pulsing of microwave is characterized by set point for temperature difference (ΔTS) and on-off constraints for temperature (T'). It is found that alumina plate with higher ΔTS and lower T' may be recommended for thick meat samples (both WP and PLR) whereas for thin meat samples, lower ΔTS with alumina plate/without plate may be preferred. It is also observed that SiC plate may be selectively used with ΔTS=20K for both the pork meats. The distributed microwave incidence is found to be effective due to lesser degree of thermal runaway in absence of pulsing for both meat samples.

  16. Pork loin color relative to sensory and instrumental tenderness and consumer acceptance.

    PubMed

    Norman, J L; Berg, E P; Heymann, H; Lorenzen, C L

    2003-10-01

    Pork loin color categories were established with the intent of demonstrating differences in eating quality between them. Center-cut boneless pork loins (n=64) were divided into three color classifications. Category A included National Pork Producers Council color standards 1 and 2; category B, 3 and 4; and category C, 5 and 6. L* means for categories A, B, and C were 57.00, 50.24, and 45.54, respectively. Warner-Bratzler shear force values were not affected by category (P>0.05), but were negatively correlated with a* and b* values (P<0.05). The "in-home" portion of this study consisted of 47 households that prepared and evaluated chops randomly distributed by category. Consumers reported differences in liking of juiciness and liking of tenderness (P<0.05) due to color category. Eighty-nine percent of the households participated in a simulated retail display where, 20.8% chose chops from category A, 26.4% from category B, and 52.8% from category C. A trained panel evaluated the cooked chops and perceived category C to be more tender, more juicy, and less dry than both A and B (P<0.05). Consumers responded similarly to the trained panel in their perceptions of tenderness and juiciness.

  17. Prediction of color and pH measurement throughout boneless center-cut pork loins.

    PubMed

    Norman, J L; Berg, E P; Ellersieck, M R; Lorenzen, C L

    2004-02-01

    Boneless pork loins (N=95) divided into three groupings based on National Pork Producers Council color standards were utilized to characterize changes in color and pH throughout the loin. CIE L(∗), CIE a(∗), CIE b(∗), saturation, and hue angle differed (P<0.05) for color category and chop position. A color category by position interaction (P<0.05) existed only for pH values. These differences in color and pH measures throughout the loin indicate that one measurement may not characterize the entire boneless loin. For all color and pH measures significant orthogonal and polynomial contrasts existed, therefore, separate regression equations were developed for each color category to predict position response. Multiple regression equations were significant for most objective measures of color and pH, but the low R(2) values indicate that these models provide little information as to changes in color and pH throughout the boneless pork loin.

  18. The Quality Characteristics of Salted Ground Pork Patties Containing Various Fat Levels by Microwave Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong Youn; Lim, Seung Taek; Kim, Cheon Jei

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of fat level on the microwave cooking properties of ground pork patties with NaCl (1.5%). Ground pork patties were processed from pork hams to achieve fat levels of 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%, respectively. Each patty was cooked from a thawed state to 75℃ in a microwave oven at full power (700 W). After microwave cooking, protein content, moisture content, fat retention, and shear force values in patties decreased as fat level increased from 10 to 25%. As fat level increased, cooking time decreased but total cooking loss and drip loss were increased, whereas slight differences in diameter reduction and thickness of patties were observed. In raw patties, 10% fat patties had lower L* values and higher a* values compared to patties with more fat, but these differences were reduced when patties were cooked. Patties with 10% fat showed a more pink color on the surface and interior than patties with a higher fat content but more air pockets were noted in higher-fat patties. Higher-fat patties were more tender, juicy, and oily than lower-fat patties.

  19. Virulence Factors of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Korean Pork bulgogi: Enterotoxin Production and Antimicrobial Resistance.

    PubMed

    Jung, Byeong Su; Lee, Yong Ju; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Kim, Hyoun Wook; Oh, Mi-Hwa; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance profiles of and the enterotoxin gene distribution in 4 strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S10-2, S10-3, S12-2, and S13-2) isolated from 90 bulgogi samples. The S. aureus enterotoxin H gene (seh) was found in all the strains, while the S. aureus enterotoxin A gene (sea) was found only in 3 of the 4 strains. The S10-2 strain expressed a combination of enterotoxin genes - seg, seh, sei, sej, selm, and seln. The strains S10-2 and S13-2 were resistant to ampicillin and penicillin G, and all the isolated strains were resistant to tetracycline. The S10-2 strain was the only mecA-positive strain; it was also resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Thus, genes encoding enterotoxin as well as those conferring antibiotic resistance were identified in the S. aureus strains isolated from pork bulgogi. These results represents the potential occurrence of MRSA in pork bulgogi, and the need for a monitoring system for pork bulgogi in order to prevent an outbreak of staphylococcal food poisoning.

  20. A cost-benefit analysis of Salmonella-control strategies in Danish pork production.

    PubMed

    Goldbach, Stine Gissel; Alban, Lis

    2006-11-17

    In Denmark, it was agreed to lower the Salmonella prevalence in pork to 1.2% before the end of 2006. The current control did not seem to be sufficient to attain this goal. Therefore, four alternatives to the existing Danish control strategy for Salmonella in pork were compared in a cost-benefit analysis: (1) hot-water decontamination of all pigs at slaughter, (2) sanitary slaughter of pigs from herds with high levels of Salmonella, (3) use of home-mixed feed in herds with slaughter pigs and (4) use of acidified feed for slaughter pigs. The data originated from official statistics, published papers as well as expert opinion. The partial cost-benefit analysis was restricted to slaughterhouses affiliated with the Danish Meat Association and Danish human cases ascribable to pork from these slaughterhouses. Only hot-water decontamination was socio-economically profitable. Hot-water decontamination had a net present value over 15 years of 3.5 million euros. For sanitary slaughter the net present value was - 43.6 million euros, for home-mixed feed it was - 262.3 million euros and for acidified feed it was - 79.9 million euros. For all alternatives the costs were born solely by the pig sector, whereas primarily the consumers and public authorities received the benefits. The conclusions were robust in sensitivity analyses.

  1. The Quality Characteristics of Salted Ground Pork Patties Containing Various Fat Levels by Microwave Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong Youn; Lim, Seung Taek; Kim, Cheon Jei

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of fat level on the microwave cooking properties of ground pork patties with NaCl (1.5%). Ground pork patties were processed from pork hams to achieve fat levels of 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%, respectively. Each patty was cooked from a thawed state to 75℃ in a microwave oven at full power (700 W). After microwave cooking, protein content, moisture content, fat retention, and shear force values in patties decreased as fat level increased from 10 to 25%. As fat level increased, cooking time decreased but total cooking loss and drip loss were increased, whereas slight differences in diameter reduction and thickness of patties were observed. In raw patties, 10% fat patties had lower L* values and higher a* values compared to patties with more fat, but these differences were reduced when patties were cooked. Patties with 10% fat showed a more pink color on the surface and interior than patties with a higher fat content but more air pockets were noted in higher-fat patties. Higher-fat patties were more tender, juicy, and oily than lower-fat patties. PMID:27621696

  2. A cost-benefit analysis of Salmonella-control strategies in Danish pork production.

    PubMed

    Goldbach, Stine Gissel; Alban, Lis

    2006-11-17

    In Denmark, it was agreed to lower the Salmonella prevalence in pork to 1.2% before the end of 2006. The current control did not seem to be sufficient to attain this goal. Therefore, four alternatives to the existing Danish control strategy for Salmonella in pork were compared in a cost-benefit analysis: (1) hot-water decontamination of all pigs at slaughter, (2) sanitary slaughter of pigs from herds with high levels of Salmonella, (3) use of home-mixed feed in herds with slaughter pigs and (4) use of acidified feed for slaughter pigs. The data originated from official statistics, published papers as well as expert opinion. The partial cost-benefit analysis was restricted to slaughterhouses affiliated with the Danish Meat Association and Danish human cases ascribable to pork from these slaughterhouses. Only hot-water decontamination was socio-economically profitable. Hot-water decontamination had a net present value over 15 years of 3.5 million euros. For sanitary slaughter the net present value was - 43.6 million euros, for home-mixed feed it was - 262.3 million euros and for acidified feed it was - 79.9 million euros. For all alternatives the costs were born solely by the pig sector, whereas primarily the consumers and public authorities received the benefits. The conclusions were robust in sensitivity analyses. PMID:16879887

  3. Antioxidant protection of proteins and lipids in processed pork loin chops through feed supplementation with avocado.

    PubMed

    Hernández-López, Silvia H; Rodríguez-Carpena, Javier G; Lemus-Flores, Clemente; Galindo-García, Jorge; Estévez, Mario

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to analyze the impact of dietary avocado on the oxidative stability of lipids and proteins during pork processing. Loins from control (fed basic diet) and treated pigs (fed on avocado-supplemented diet) were roasted (102 °C/20 min) and subsequently packed in trays wrapped with oxygen-permeable films and chilled at 4 °C for 12 days. At each processing stage (raw, cooked and cooked & chilled), pork samples from both groups were analyzed for the concentration of TBARS, the loss of tryptophan and free thiols, and the formation of protein carbonyls, disulphide bonds and Schiff bases. Processing led to a depletion of tryptophan and sulfur-containing amino acids and an increase of lipid and protein oxidation products. Dietary avocado was not able to protect against the oxidation of tryptophan and thiols but cooked & chilled loins from treated pigs had significantly lower concentration of lipid and protein carbonyls than control counterparts. Likewise, dietary avocado alleviated the formation of Schiff bases during cooking. These results illustrate the benefits of dietary avocado on the oxidative stability of processed pork loins.

  4. Pork carcass composition derived from a neural network model of electromagnetic scans.

    PubMed

    Berg, E P; Engel, B A; Forrest, J C

    1998-01-01

    We used an advanced computer logic system (NETS 3.0) to decipher electromagnetic (EM) scans in lieu of traditional linear regression for estimation of pork carcass composition. Fifty EM scans of pork carcasses were obtained on-line (prerigor) at a swine slaughter facility. Right sides were cut into wholesale parts and dissected into fat, lean, and bone to obtain total dissected carcass and primal cut lean. In this study, the input layer consisted of 81 nodes (80-point EM scan curve and warm carcass weight), one hidden layer of 42 nodes, and an output layer consisting of one node, which were run separately for outputs of ham, loin, or shoulder lean. The hidden layer connected to the output of total lean contained 50 nodes. Thirty-five scans were used for training of the network. The new network was then tested with 15 previously unseen input/output pairs. Separate neural networks were developed for the estimation of dissected total carcass, ham, loin, and shoulder lean. The NETS configuration improved on linear regression equations for estimation of total carcass lean by .31 kg, ham lean by .284 kg, and shoulder lean by .148 kg. Our results show that advanced computer logic systems have the capacity to improve upon traditional linear regression equations for prediction of pork carcass composition. PMID:9464879

  5. Quantification of pork belly and boston butt quality attribute preferences of South Korean customers.

    PubMed

    Vonada, M L; Bidner, B S; Belk, K E; McKeith, F K; Lloyd, W R; O'Connor, M E; Smith, G C

    2000-10-01

    U.S. packers must have quantitative criteria for selection of pork bellies and Boston butts for export to South Korea. Pork bellies (IMPS 409A) and Boston butts (IMPS 409A, 406B, 407) were selected from normal production in a U.S. pork packing plant and transported to Seoul, South Korea, via seafreighter in refrigerated containers (frozen < -5 degrees C) or via air freight (fresh > 0 degrees C; frozen < -5 degrees C). Participants at the Seoul Food Show were surveyed about their preferences for specific quality attributes of these cuts. Bellies were selected to differ in seam fat content (low = < 20%, moderate = 20 to 40%, high = > 40% extractable fat), lean color (pale = L* > 50, medium = L* 48-50, dark = L* < 48), weight (3.36, 4.04, or 5.36 kg), state of refrigeration and packaging (frozen, poly-wrapped; chilled, poly-wrapped; frozen, vacuum-packaged; chilled, vacuum-packaged), shape (round, wavy, square), and belly thickness (3.81, 4.32, or 4.90 cm). Boston butts were selected to differ in USDA marbling score (Slight, Small, Modest, Moderate, and Slightly Abundant), seam fat content (low = < 10%, moderate = 10 to 20% fat, high = > 20% extractable fat), lean color (pale = L* > 44, medium = L* 40-42, dark = L* < 38), weight (2.91, 3.82, or 4.66 kg), state of refrigeration and packaging (frozen, poly-wrapped; chilled, poly-wrapped; frozen, vacuum-packaged; chilled, vacuum-packaged), and shape (square, oblong, round). In Seoul, pork subprimals were tempered (if frozen), sliced, and arrayed by quality attribute and category in a retail display case. Over 4 d of testing, attendees (n = 210) of the food show were asked to rate the displayed samples for each quality attribute on a standardized ballot. Mid-weight (3.82 kg) Boston butts that displayed Moderate or higher USDA marbling scores with moderate amounts of seam fat, Japanese lean color scores of 2 or 4, round geometric shape, and that were vacuum-packaged and transported to Korea in the freshly chilled state

  6. Predictive Model for Growth of Staphylococcus aureus on Raw Pork, Ham, and Sausage.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Ahmad Rois; Park, Joong-Hyun; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Recent Staphylococcus aureus outbreaks linked to meat and poultry products underscore the importance of understanding the growth kinetics of S. aureus in these products at different temperatures. Raw pork, ham, and sausage (each 10 ± 0.3 g) were inoculated with a three-strain cocktail of S. aureus, resulting in an initial level of ca. 3 log CFU/g. Samples were stored isothermally at 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40°C, and S. aureus was enumerated at appropriate time intervals. The square root model was developed using experimental data collected from S. aureus grown on all samples (where data from raw pork, ham, and sausage were combined) so as to describe the growth rate of S. aureus as a function of temperature. The model was then compared with models for S. aureus growth on each individual sample in the experiments (raw pork, ham, or sausage) and the S. aureus ComBase models, as well as models for the growth of different types of pathogens (S. aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Clostridium perfringens, Salmonella serovars, and Salmonella Typhimurium) on various types of meat and poultry products. The results show that the S. aureus model developed here based on the pooled data from all three pork products seems suitable for the prediction of S. aureus growth on different pork products under isothermal conditions from 10 to 25°C, as well as for S. aureus growth on different meat and poultry products at higher temperatures between 20 and 35°C. Regardless of some high deviations observed at temperatures between 25 and 40°C, the developed model still seems suitable to predict the growth of other pathogens on different types of meat and poultry products over the temperature ranges used here, especially for E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium. The developed model, therefore, may be useful for estimating the effects of storage temperature on the behavior of pathogens in different meat and poultry products and for microbial risk assessments evaluating meat

  7. Impressions and purchasing intentions of Japanese consumers regarding pork produced by 'Ecofeed,' a trademark of food-waste or food co-product animal feed certified by the Japanese government.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Keisuke; Aizaki, Hideo; Motoyama, Michiyo; Ohmori, Hideyuki; Kawashima, Tomoyuki

    2011-02-01

    Impressions and purchasing intentions of Japanese consumers regarding pork produced by 'Ecofeed', a trademark of food-waste or co-product animal feeds certified by the Japanese government, were investigated by a questionnaire on the Internet. 'Ecofeed' did not elicit specific impressions as compared to domestic, imported, Kurobuta (in Japan), and specific pathogen-free (SPF) pork. Purchasing intent for 'Ecofeed' pork was the second lowest of the five pork products. Knowledge and purchasing experience regarding 'Ecofeed' pork was the lowest of the five pork products. Respondents were classified into four categories according to their impressions of 'Ecofeed' pork. The largest category of respondents did not have any specific impression of 'Ecofeed' pork and had little knowledge of pork farming. A category that had a positive impression for 'Ecofeed' pork had high knowledge of the pork farming system. In order to establish 'Ecofeed' pork in Japan, our results suggest that information disclosure and education about 'Ecofeed', its certification system, environmental benefits and the current self-efficiency ratio of animal feed, are needed. PMID:21269377

  8. An Outbreak of Human Listeriosis in England between 2010 and 2012 Associated with the Consumption of Pork Pies.

    PubMed

    Awofisayo-Okuyelu, A; Arunachalam, N; Dallman, T; Grant, K A; Aird, H; McLauchlin, J; Painset, A; Amar, C

    2016-05-01

    An outbreak of listeriosis in England affecting 14 people between 2010 and 2012 and linked to the consumption of pork pies was investigated. All 14 individuals were older than 55 years, 12 were men, and 10 reported the presence of an underlying condition. All were resident in or had visited either of two English regions and were infected with the same strain of Listeria monocytogenes. In interviews with 12 patients, 9 reported eating pork pies, and individuals that consumed pork pies were significantly more likely to be infected with an outbreak strain than were individuals with sporadic cases of listeriosis infections in England from 2010 to 2012. Pork pies were purchased from seven retailers in South Yorkshire or the East Midlands, and the outbreak strain was recovered from pork pies supplied by only the producer in South Yorkshire. The outbreak strain was also recovered from samples of finished product and from environmental samples collected from the manufacturer. The likely source of contamination was environmental sites within the manufacturing environment, and the contamination was associated with the process of adding gelatin to the pies after cooking. Inadequate temperature control and poor hygienic practices at one of the retailers were also identified as possible contributory factors allowing growth of the pathogen. Following improvements in manufacturing practices and implementation of additional control measures at the retailers' premises, L. monocytogenes was not recovered from subsequent food and environmental samples, and the outbreak strain was not detected in further individuals with listeriosis in England.

  9. Effect of Mixing Ratio between Pork Loin and Chicken Breast on Textural and Sensory Properties of Emulsion Sausages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study is conducted to evaluate the effects of the mixing ratio between pork loin and chicken breast for textural and sensory properties of emulsion sausages. Meat homogenates are prepared by using five mixing ratios between pork loin and chicken breast (100:0, 70:30, 50:50, 30:70, and 0:100), and the emulsion sausages are also formulated with five mixing ratios. The additions of chicken breast increase the salt soluble protein solubility due to high pH levels of chicken breast, thereby resulting in the reduction of cooking losses. In addition, the apparent viscosity of meat homogenates increase with increasing amounts of chicken breast. In terms of emulsion sausages formulated with pork loin and chicken breast, the addition of chicken breast above 50% may contribute to a softer and more flexible texture of emulsion sausages. For sensory evaluations, an increase in the added amount of chicken breast contributes to a rich umami taste and deeper flavor within the emulsion sausages, resulting in the high overall acceptance score for the formulation of 0-30% pork loin and 70-100% chicken breast. Therefore, the optimal mixing ratios between pork loin and chicken breast are 0-30% and 70-100% for enhancing the textural and sensory properties of emulsion sausages. PMID:26760930

  10. Physicochemical properties, fatty acid profile and sensory characteristics of sheep and goat meat sausages manufactured with different pork fat levels.

    PubMed

    Leite, Ana; Rodrigues, Sandra; Pereira, Etelvina; Paulos, Kátia; Oliveira, António Filipe; Lorenzo, José Manuel; Teixeira, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    The effect of three pork backfat levels (0% vs. 10% vs. 30%) on chemical composition, fatty acid profile and sensory properties on sheep and goat meat sausages was studied. All physicochemical parameters were affected by the addition of pork backfat in both types of sausages. Sausages manufactured with 30% of pork backfat showed the lowest moisture and protein contents and the highest total fat content. The lower a(w) values in sausages manufactured with higher fat content while in pH happened the reverse situation. The addition of pork backfat modified the total fatty acid profile, prompting a significant drop in the relative percentages of C14:0, C16:0, C17:0, C17:1, C18:0 and TVA (trans-vaccenic acid), together with a marked increase in oleic and linoleic acids. Finally, in goat sausages, the fat content significantly affected sensory parameters: taste, texture and overall acceptability (P<0.05). As expected, all physicochemical parameters were affected by the addition of pork backfat in both types of sausages. PMID:25839884

  11. Quality Properties of Sausages Made with Replacement of Pork with Corn Starch, Chicken Breast and Surimi during Refrigerated Storage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This effect of replacing pork with corn starch, chicken breast and surimi on the chemical composition, physical, texture and sensory properties of sausage were investigated during storage. Five treatments of sausage such as; T1 (10:0:0, %), T2 (10:5:0, %), T3 (10:10:5, %), T4 (10:15:10, %) and T5 (10:20:15, %) were prepared with replacement of pork with corn starch, chicken breast and surimi. The sausage made with pork meat served as control (C). The sausage in the control had higher moisture and fat contents, but lower protein content than the treatments (p<0.05). The sausages in the T2 and T5 had decreased pH values after 3 wk storage (p<0.05). The lightness value was lowest in the T3, while the yellowness values were lowest in the T5 during the storage. The TBARS (2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substance) values were lowest in the control in all storage times (p<0.05). However, the sausage in the control had higher VBN (volatile basic nitrogen) value than the treatments during the 1 wk storage (p<0.05). All treatments had significantly higher hardness, cohesiveness, springiness, gumminess and chewiness values (p<0.05) than the control. The results indicated that corn starch, chicken breast and surimi can used as a pork replacer, that it also improves the physicochemical and texture properties of pork sausages. PMID:26761892

  12. Combined Effects of Mugwort Herb and Vitamin C on Shelf-Life of Vacuum-Packed Seasoned Pork

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Wook

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the possibility of the addition of mugwort herb extract (MH) and vitamin C (VC) alone (0.05%) and in combination (0.05% each) on shelf-life of seasoned pork. The combination of VC+MH demonstrated a significant reduction in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and volatile basic nitrogen in seasoned pork. Also, the pH values, total lactic acid concentration, lactic acid bacteria count, and the sensory properties (discoloration, flavor, and overall acceptability) of seasoned pork were not significantly affected by adding MH and/or VC. All seasoned pork were rejected by sensory panel when LAB count reached levels of 5-6 Log CFU/g, TLA concentration has been above a level of 3.6-3.9 mg lactic acid/g, and pH values ranged from 5.31-5.51 (15 d). Therefore, the findings showed that spoilage of seasoned pork does not appear to be the result of lipid oxidation, but is caused by lactic acid producing bacteria which result in sour odor. PMID:26761862

  13. Application of Electronic Nose for Measuring Total Volatile Basic Nitrogen and Total Viable Counts in Packaged Pork During Refrigerated Storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Miaoyun; Wang, Haibiao; Sun, Lingxia; Zhao, Gaiming; Huang, Xianqing

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to predict the total viable counts (TVC) and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) in pork using an electronic nose (E-nose), and to assess the freshness of chilled pork during storage using different packaging methods, including pallet packaging (PP), vacuum packaging (VP), and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP, 40% O2 /40% CO2 /20% N2 ). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the E-nose signals, and the results showed that the relationships between the freshness of chilled pork and E-nose signals could be distinguished in the loadings plots, and the freshness of chilled pork could be distributed along 2 first principal components. Multiple linear regression (MLR) was used to correlate TVC and TVB-N to E-nose signals. High F and R2 values were obtained in the MLR output of TVB-N (F = 32.1, 21.6, and 24.2 for PP [R2 = 0.93], VP [R2 = 0.94], and MAP [R2 = 0.95], respectively) and TVC (F = 34.2, 46.4, and 7.8 for PP [R2 = 0.98], VP [R2 = 0.89], and MAP [R2 = 0.85], respectively). The results of this study suggest that it is possible to use the E-nose technology to predict TVB-N and TVC for assessing the freshness of chilled pork during storage. PMID:26954724

  14. Impact of Cooking, Storage, and Reheating Conditions on the Formation of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Pork Loin.

    PubMed

    Min, Joong-Seok; Khan, Muhammad I; Lee, Sang-Ok; Yim, Dong Gyun; Seol, Kuk Hwan; Lee, Mooha; Jo, Cheorun

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of cooking, storage, and reheating conditions on the formation of cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) in pork loin. Samples of pork loin procured 24 h postmortem were initially processed and assessed for total fat and cholesterol content. The cooking methods evaluated were pan roasting, steaming, oven grilling, and microwaving. Cooked pork loin samples were stored at 4℃ and reheated after 3 and 6 d of storage using the original method of preparation or alternately, microwaving. Fat content increased significantly with cooking as a result of the loss in moisture but cholesterol content remained unchanged. Pan roasting and microwave cooking caused a significantly higher production of COPs, as with the process of reheating using microwave, pan roasting, and oven grilling methods. The major COPs found in pork loin were cholestanetriol, 20-hydroxycholesterol, and 25-hydroxycholesterol, whose concentrations varied according to the different cooking and reheating methods used. Moreover, the aerobic storage of cooked pork loin under a refrigerated condition also increased the formation of cholesterol oxides on reheating. PMID:27499660

  15. Food-safety hazards in the pork chain in Nagaland, North East India: implications for human health.

    PubMed

    Fahrion, Anna Sophie; Jamir, Lanu; Richa, Kenivole; Begum, Sonuwara; Rutsa, Vilatuo; Ao, Simon; Padmakumar, Varijaksha P; Deka, Ram Pratim; Grace, Delia

    2014-01-01

    Pork occupies an important place in the diet of the population of Nagaland, one of the North East Indian states. We carried out a pilot study along the pork meat production chain, from live animal to end consumer. The goal was to obtain information about the presence of selected food borne hazards in pork in order to assess the risk deriving from these hazards to the health of the local consumers and make recommendations for improving food safety. A secondary objective was to evaluate the utility of risk-based approaches to food safety in an informal food system. We investigated samples from pigs and pork sourced at slaughter in urban and rural environments, and at retail, to assess a selection of food-borne hazards. In addition, consumer exposure was characterized using information about hygiene and practices related to handling and preparing pork. A qualitative hazard characterization, exposure assessment and hazard characterization for three representative hazards or hazard proxies, namely Enterobacteriaceae, T. solium cysticercosis and antibiotic residues, is presented. Several important potential food-borne pathogens are reported for the first time including Listeria spp. and Brucella suis. This descriptive pilot study is the first risk-based assessment of food safety in Nagaland. We also characterise possible interventions to be addressed by policy makers, and supply data to inform future risk assessments. PMID:24368430

  16. Impact of Cooking, Storage, and Reheating Conditions on the Formation of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Pork Loin

    PubMed Central

    Min, Joong-Seok; Khan, Muhammad I.; Lee, Sang-Ok; Yim, Dong Gyun; Seol, Kuk Hwan; Lee, Mooha; Jo, Cheorun

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of cooking, storage, and reheating conditions on the formation of cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) in pork loin. Samples of pork loin procured 24 h postmortem were initially processed and assessed for total fat and cholesterol content. The cooking methods evaluated were pan roasting, steaming, oven grilling, and microwaving. Cooked pork loin samples were stored at 4℃ and reheated after 3 and 6 d of storage using the original method of preparation or alternately, microwaving. Fat content increased significantly with cooking as a result of the loss in moisture but cholesterol content remained unchanged. Pan roasting and microwave cooking caused a significantly higher production of COPs, as with the process of reheating using microwave, pan roasting, and oven grilling methods. The major COPs found in pork loin were cholestanetriol, 20-hydroxycholesterol, and 25-hydroxycholesterol, whose concentrations varied according to the different cooking and reheating methods used. Moreover, the aerobic storage of cooked pork loin under a refrigerated condition also increased the formation of cholesterol oxides on reheating. PMID:27499660

  17. The impact of short-term feeding of magnesium supplements on the quality of pork packaged in modified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Verónica; Provincial, Laura; Gil, Mario; Guillén, Elena; Roncalés, Pedro; Beltrán, José A

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the effect of dietary magnesium (Mg) supplementation on pork quality during 13 days of storage at 4±1°C under modified atmosphere. The experiment was conducted with 40 gilts (Pietrain×(Landrace×Large White)) which were fed one of four diets five days prior to slaughter: 1) control diet; 2) Mg oxide; 3) Mg sulphate; or 4) Mg chelate. Dietary Mg supplementation did not affect 24-h pH, colour, and Warner-Bratzler shear force values. Pork from pigs fed the Mg chelate-supplemented diet had the lowest (P≤0.05) drip, exudative, and cooking losses. Furthermore, pork from pig supplemented with Mg oxide had the lowest TBARS values. Visual assessment of pork from pigs supplemented with Mg chelate received higher colour and lower exudative scores, as well as overall acceptability scores, throughout display. Thus, Mg chelated supplementation could be effective in improving pork quality during 13 days of storage under modified atmosphere conditions. PMID:21696893

  18. Physicochemical properties, fatty acid profile and sensory characteristics of sheep and goat meat sausages manufactured with different pork fat levels.

    PubMed

    Leite, Ana; Rodrigues, Sandra; Pereira, Etelvina; Paulos, Kátia; Oliveira, António Filipe; Lorenzo, José Manuel; Teixeira, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    The effect of three pork backfat levels (0% vs. 10% vs. 30%) on chemical composition, fatty acid profile and sensory properties on sheep and goat meat sausages was studied. All physicochemical parameters were affected by the addition of pork backfat in both types of sausages. Sausages manufactured with 30% of pork backfat showed the lowest moisture and protein contents and the highest total fat content. The lower a(w) values in sausages manufactured with higher fat content while in pH happened the reverse situation. The addition of pork backfat modified the total fatty acid profile, prompting a significant drop in the relative percentages of C14:0, C16:0, C17:0, C17:1, C18:0 and TVA (trans-vaccenic acid), together with a marked increase in oleic and linoleic acids. Finally, in goat sausages, the fat content significantly affected sensory parameters: taste, texture and overall acceptability (P<0.05). As expected, all physicochemical parameters were affected by the addition of pork backfat in both types of sausages.

  19. Food-safety hazards in the pork chain in Nagaland, North East India: implications for human health.

    PubMed

    Fahrion, Anna Sophie; Jamir, Lanu; Richa, Kenivole; Begum, Sonuwara; Rutsa, Vilatuo; Ao, Simon; Padmakumar, Varijaksha P; Deka, Ram Pratim; Grace, Delia

    2013-12-24

    Pork occupies an important place in the diet of the population of Nagaland, one of the North East Indian states. We carried out a pilot study along the pork meat production chain, from live animal to end consumer. The goal was to obtain information about the presence of selected food borne hazards in pork in order to assess the risk deriving from these hazards to the health of the local consumers and make recommendations for improving food safety. A secondary objective was to evaluate the utility of risk-based approaches to food safety in an informal food system. We investigated samples from pigs and pork sourced at slaughter in urban and rural environments, and at retail, to assess a selection of food-borne hazards. In addition, consumer exposure was characterized using information about hygiene and practices related to handling and preparing pork. A qualitative hazard characterization, exposure assessment and hazard characterization for three representative hazards or hazard proxies, namely Enterobacteriaceae, T. solium cysticercosis and antibiotic residues, is presented. Several important potential food-borne pathogens are reported for the first time including Listeria spp. and Brucella suis. This descriptive pilot study is the first risk-based assessment of food safety in Nagaland. We also characterise possible interventions to be addressed by policy makers, and supply data to inform future risk assessments.

  20. Combined Effects of Mugwort Herb and Vitamin C on Shelf-Life of Vacuum-Packed Seasoned Pork.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ko-Eun; Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Choi, Min-Sung; Song, Dong-Heon; Kim, Yong-Jae; Ham, Youn-Kyung; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the possibility of the addition of mugwort herb extract (MH) and vitamin C (VC) alone (0.05%) and in combination (0.05% each) on shelf-life of seasoned pork. The combination of VC+MH demonstrated a significant reduction in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and volatile basic nitrogen in seasoned pork. Also, the pH values, total lactic acid concentration, lactic acid bacteria count, and the sensory properties (discoloration, flavor, and overall acceptability) of seasoned pork were not significantly affected by adding MH and/or VC. All seasoned pork were rejected by sensory panel when LAB count reached levels of 5-6 Log CFU/g, TLA concentration has been above a level of 3.6-3.9 mg lactic acid/g, and pH values ranged from 5.31-5.51 (15 d). Therefore, the findings showed that spoilage of seasoned pork does not appear to be the result of lipid oxidation, but is caused by lactic acid producing bacteria which result in sour odor. PMID:26761862

  1. Food-Safety Hazards in the Pork Chain in Nagaland, North East India: Implications for Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Fahrion, Anna Sophie; Jamir, Lanu; Richa, Kenivole; Begum, Sonuwara; Rutsa, Vilatuo; Ao, Simon; Padmakumar, Varijaksha P.; Deka, Ram Pratim; Grace, Delia

    2013-01-01

    Pork occupies an important place in the diet of the population of Nagaland, one of the North East Indian states. We carried out a pilot study along the pork meat production chain, from live animal to end consumer. The goal was to obtain information about the presence of selected food borne hazards in pork in order to assess the risk deriving from these hazards to the health of the local consumers and make recommendations for improving food safety. A secondary objective was to evaluate the utility of risk-based approaches to food safety in an informal food system. We investigated samples from pigs and pork sourced at slaughter in urban and rural environments, and at retail, to assess a selection of food-borne hazards. In addition, consumer exposure was characterized using information about hygiene and practices related to handling and preparing pork. A qualitative hazard characterization, exposure assessment and hazard characterization for three representative hazards or hazard proxies, namely Enterobacteriaceae, T. solium cysticercosis and antibiotic residues, is presented. Several important potential food-borne pathogens are reported for the first time including Listeria spp. and Brucella suis. This descriptive pilot study is the first risk-based assessment of food safety in Nagaland. We also characterise possible interventions to be addressed by policy makers, and supply data to inform future risk assessments. PMID:24368430

  2. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... shoulder, or pork loin came from a swine that was never out of the region in which the dry-cured ham, pork... the Federal Meat Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) and regulations thereunder (9 CFR, chapter III... (i)(2), (i)(3), or (i)(4) of this section, those that have progressed beyond salting; and (3) In...

  3. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... shoulder, or pork loin came from a swine that was never out of the region in which the dry-cured ham, pork... the Federal Meat Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) and regulations thereunder (9 CFR, chapter III... (i)(2), (i)(3), or (i)(4) of this section, those that have progressed beyond salting; and (3) In...

  4. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... shoulder, or pork loin came from a swine that was never out of the region in which the dry-cured ham, pork... the Federal Meat Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) and regulations thereunder (9 CFR, chapter III... (i)(2), (i)(3), or (i)(4) of this section, those that have progressed beyond salting; and (3) In...

  5. 9 CFR 94.17 - Dry-cured pork products from regions where foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... shoulder, or pork loin came from a swine that was never out of the region in which the dry-cured ham, pork... the Federal Meat Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) and regulations thereunder (9 CFR, chapter III... (i)(2), (i)(3), or (i)(4) of this section, those that have progressed beyond salting; and (3) In...

  6. A 90-day subchronic study of rats fed lean pork from genetically modified pigs with muscle-specific expression of recombinant follistatin.

    PubMed

    Zou, Shiying; Tang, Min; He, Xiaoyun; Cao, Yuan; Zhao, Jie; Xu, Wentao; Liang, Zhihong; Huang, Kunlun

    2015-11-01

    Because cardiovascular disease incidence has rapidly increased in recent years, people are choosing relatively healthier diets with low animal fat. A transgenic pig with low fat and a high percentage of lean meat was created in 2011; this pig overexpresses the follistatin (FST) gene. To evaluate the safety of lean pork derived from genetically modified (GM) pigs, a subchronic oral toxicity study was conducted using Sprague-Dawley rats. GM pork and non-GM pork were incorporated into the diet at levels of 3.75%, 7.5%, and 15% (w/w), and the main nutrients of the various diets were subsequently balanced. The safety of GM pork was assessed by comparison of the toxicology response variables in Sprague-Dawley rats consuming diets containing GM pork with those consuming non-GM pork. No treatment-related adverse or toxic effects were observed based on an examination of the daily clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, hematology, serum biochemistry, and organ weight or based on gross and histopathological examination. The results demonstrate that GM pork is as safe for consumption as conventional pork.

  7. Effect of storage and cooking on the fatty acid profile of omega-3 enriched eggs and pork meat marketed in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Douny, Caroline; El Khoury, Rawad; Delmelle, Julien; Brose, François; Degand, Guy; Moula, Nassim; Farnir, Frédéric; Clinquart, Antoine; Maghuin-Rogister, Guy; Scippo, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The fatty acids (FA) profile was determined in n-3 enriched (Columbus™) Belgian eggs and pork in order to evaluate to what extent the n-3 fatty acids, which are very sensitive to oxidation, are resistant to storage or cooking. In standard eggs or pork, no change of the fatty acid profile was observed after storage or cooking without culinary fat, as well as in Columbus™ eggs and pork after storage. Some cooking processes (eggs in custard and meat in oven) induced a slight significant loss of n-3 fatty acids in Columbus™ eggs or pork (11.1% in fat from eggs cooked in custard vs. 15.3% in raw Columbus™ eggs and 11.0% in fat from oven cooked meat vs. 11.6% in raw Columbus™ meat). As expected, when Columbus™ pork is cooked with culinary fat, its fatty acid profile is modified according to the nature of the fat used. PMID:25838892

  8. Expected effects on carcass and pork quality when surgical castration is omitted--results of a meta-analysis study.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Carine; Luginbühl, Werner; Ampuero, Silvia; Bee, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    Alternatives to the common castration (C) practice of piglets are surgical castration under anaesthesia and rearing entire males (EM) or immunocastrates (IC). It is well established that boar taint hinders the breakthrough of these options. Less is known how avoiding surgical castration would affect carcass characteristics and pork quality. The objective of this meta-analysis was to estimate the impact of lack of castration on quality traits besides boar taint. The most marked effect of castration method and gender was found in lean meat and intramuscular fat percentage. Compared to EM, carcass leanness was estimated to be greater (P<0.05) and intramuscular fat level lower (P<0.05) than in C, IC and females. Regarding pork quality traits only the difference in shear force between IC and EM was of relevant magnitude. This meta-analysis revealed that the implementation of EM production should not be hindered by pork quality concerns.

  9. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR for the rapid and sensitive detection of Salmonella typhimurium from pork.

    PubMed

    Techathuvanan, Chayapa; Draughon, Frances Ann; D'Souza, Doris Helen

    2010-03-01

    Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) detects the presence of mRNA and has a greater potential for detecting viable pathogens than do DNA-based PCR assays, with improved speed and sensitivity compared with traditional methods. Our objective was to rapidly and sensitively detect Salmonella Typhimurium from pork within two 8-h work shifts using a SYBR Green I real-time RT-PCR (rt-RT-PCR) assay. Pork chop and sausage samples (25 g) were inoculated with 10(8) to 10(0) CFU of Salmonella Typhimurium and stomached in 225 ml of tetrathionate broth. Serial dilutions were spread plated on xylose lysine Tergitol 4 agar either immediately or after 10 h of selective preenrichment or preenrichment followed by 12 h of selective enrichment (for stressed cells) at 37 degrees C for standard cultural enumeration. RNA was extracted using the TRIzol method. The rt-RT-PCR assay was carried out in a Bio-Rad iCycler using a SYBR Green I one-step RT-PCR kit and Salmonella specific invA gene primers with an internal amplification control (IAC). The PCR was followed by melting temperature (T(m)) analysis to determine specific Salmonella invA (T(m) = 87.5 degrees C) and IAC (T(m) = 82 degrees C) products. Improved Salmonella detection up to 10(1) CFU/25 g of pork and 10(0) CFU/25 g of sausages was obtained after 10 h of enrichment within approximately 24 h. Even without enrichment, Salmonella could be detected from both pork chop and sausage at 10(6) CFU/25 g within 1 day. This robust rt-RT-PCR detects and confirms Salmonella in pork within approximately 24 h and thus is significantly faster than traditional methods that take >/=1 week. This assay shows promise for routine testing and monitoring of Salmonella by the pork industry.

  10. Chitosan boosts the antimicrobial activity of Origanum vulgare essential oil in modified atmosphere packaged pork.

    PubMed

    Paparella, Antonello; Mazzarrino, Giovanni; Chaves-López, Clemencia; Rossi, Chiara; Sacchetti, Giampiero; Guerrieri, Oana; Serio, Annalisa

    2016-10-01

    The potential of chitosan as a possible booster of the antimicrobial activity of Origanum vulgare EO (OEO) against spoilage bacteria and Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in fresh pork meat. Pork fillets were inoculated with 3 L. monocytogenes strains, dipped either in Origanum vulgare (oregano) Essential Oil (OEO) at 2 and 4%, or in chitosan 1% alone or added with 2 and 4% OEO, then packed under modified atmosphere (70% O2, 20% CO2, 10% N2) and stored at 4 °C for 15 days. OEO did not reduce L. monocytogenes growth, while 2 Log decrease was obtained after 2 days of storage in treatments with chitosan alone or with OEO, with growth inhibition up to day 15 in samples with chitosan and OEO 4%. When OEO was combined with chitosan, total viable counts and spoilage bacteria were reduced and contained over time, particularly Pseudomonas (2.0 Log CFU/g at day 15) and Brochothrix thermosphacta (undetectable). All the treatments applied extended meat shelf-life with respect to control, whose commercial shelf-life was 10 days. Chitosan treatments enhanced L* and maintained a* values almost stable during storage. Chitosan and OEO singly applied reduced lipid oxidation (0.62-0.75 mg malondialdehyde/Kg meat) compared to control (0.99 mg malondialdehyde/Kg meat). Finally, chitosan treated samples were not recognized with respect to the control, whereas OEO gave bitter taste; chitosan with OEO instead mitigated the effect of OEO addition to meat. Chitosan combined with OEO boosts its antimicrobial activity and shows a potential for application in industrial production of fresh pork in MAP, to achieve shelf-life extension, control of L. monocytogenes growth, stability of color and protective effect from oxidation, with low sensory impact. PMID:27375241

  11. Emulsion Mapping in Pork Meat Emulsion Systems with Various Lipid Types and Brown Rice Fiber.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Park, Jinhee; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate emulsion mapping between emulsion stability and cooking yields, apparent viscosity, and hardness of reduced-fat pork emulsion systems. The reduced-fat emulsion systems were supplemented with different lipid types and brown rice bran fiber (BRF) concentrations. Compared to the control with 30% back fat, lower emulsion stability and higher cooking yield of meat emulsion systems were observed in T1 (30% back fat+1% BRF), T2 (30% back fat+2% BRF), T3 (30% back fat+3% BRF), T4 (30% back fat+6% BRF), and T15 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF). Lower emulsion stability and higher apparent viscosity were observed in T1, T2, T3, T4, and T8 (20% back fat+3% BRF) compared to the control. Lower emulsion stability and higher hardness was detected in all treatments compared with the control, except T5 (20% back fat), T10 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF), T11 (10% back fat+10% olive oil+2% BRF), T12 (10% back fat+10% grape seed oil+2% BRF), and T13 (10% back fat+10% soybean oil+2% BRF). This approach has been found particularly useful for highlighting differences among the emulsified properties in emulsion meat products. Thus, the results obtained with emulsion mapping are useful in making emulsified meat products of desired quality characteristics, partially replacing pork back fat with a mix of 10% back fat, 10% canola oil and 2% BRF was most similar to the control with 30% pork back fat. PMID:26761836

  12. Concentration of Umami Compounds in Pork Meat and Cooking Juice with Different Cooking Times and Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rotola-Pukkila, Minna K; Pihlajaviita, Seija T; Kaimainen, Mika T; Hopia, Anu I

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the concentrations of umami compounds in pork loins cooked at 3 different temperatures and 3 different lengths of cooking times. The pork loins were cooked with the sous vide technique. The free amino acids (FAAs), glutamic acid and aspartic acid; the 5'-nucleotides, inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) and adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP); and corresponding nucleoside inosine of the cooked meat and its released juice were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under the experimental conditions used, the cooking temperature played a more important role than the cooking time in the concentration of the analyzed compounds. The amino acid concentrations in the meat did not remain constant under these experimental conditions. The most notable effect observed was that of the cooking temperature and the higher amino acid concentrations in the released juice of meat cooked at 80 °C compared with 60 and 70 °C. This is most likely due to the heat induced hydrolysis of proteins and peptides releasing water soluble FAAs from the meat into the cooking juice. In this experiment, the cooking time and temperature had no influence on the IMP concentrations observed. However, the AMP concentrations increased with the increasing temperature and time. This suggests that the choice of time and temperature in sous vide cooking affects the nucleotide concentration of pork meat. The Sous vide technique proved to be a good technique to preserve the cooking juice and the results presented here show that cooking juice is rich in umami compounds, which can be used to provide a savory or brothy taste. PMID:26524113

  13. Effect of Grape Pomace Powder Addition on TBARS and Color of Cooked Pork Sausages during Storage

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Kyeong Seon; Shim, Kwan Seob; Shin, Daekeun

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effects of grape skin and seed pomace (GSP) additions on the lipid oxidation susceptibility and the color change of cooked pork sausages, the chemical characteristics of GSP itself and the addition for two different levels of GSP (0.5 and 1.0% GSP, respectively) to sausages were examined. Both the redness and blueness of the GSP were significantly reduced as the pH level was increased from 5 to 7, but a reverse result was determined in the color tint and yellowness (p<0.05). The GSP polyphenol and flavonoid contents were influenced by the percentages of methanol solvents, and more flavonoids were established when 100% of methanol was applied as a solvent to the GSP. But, similar results were not observed in the polyphenol of GSP. In cooked pork sausages, significant decreases in the lightness and redness were found in both the 0.5% and 1.0% of GSP sausages during the storage period (p<0.05). However, an incompatible effect was observed in terms of yellowness, which increased as compared to the control sausage after 6 days of storage. The 0.5% addition of GSP decreased the levels of TBARS (p<0.05), but the ability of GSP to minimize lipid oxidation was not dose dependent. Therefore, the results indicated that the GSP is an efficient suppressor of lipid oxidation and has latent effects as a natural antioxidant when 0.5% of GSP is added to the cooked pork sausages. PMID:26760939

  14. Concentration of Umami Compounds in Pork Meat and Cooking Juice with Different Cooking Times and Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rotola-Pukkila, Minna K; Pihlajaviita, Seija T; Kaimainen, Mika T; Hopia, Anu I

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the concentrations of umami compounds in pork loins cooked at 3 different temperatures and 3 different lengths of cooking times. The pork loins were cooked with the sous vide technique. The free amino acids (FAAs), glutamic acid and aspartic acid; the 5'-nucleotides, inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) and adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP); and corresponding nucleoside inosine of the cooked meat and its released juice were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under the experimental conditions used, the cooking temperature played a more important role than the cooking time in the concentration of the analyzed compounds. The amino acid concentrations in the meat did not remain constant under these experimental conditions. The most notable effect observed was that of the cooking temperature and the higher amino acid concentrations in the released juice of meat cooked at 80 °C compared with 60 and 70 °C. This is most likely due to the heat induced hydrolysis of proteins and peptides releasing water soluble FAAs from the meat into the cooking juice. In this experiment, the cooking time and temperature had no influence on the IMP concentrations observed. However, the AMP concentrations increased with the increasing temperature and time. This suggests that the choice of time and temperature in sous vide cooking affects the nucleotide concentration of pork meat. The Sous vide technique proved to be a good technique to preserve the cooking juice and the results presented here show that cooking juice is rich in umami compounds, which can be used to provide a savory or brothy taste.

  15. Anti-Oxidative and Anti-Inflammation Activities of Pork Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seok-Ki; Ham, Jun-Sang

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of boiled pork powder (BPP) and hot water extract powder (HWEP) from 4 cuts of meat from Landrace × Yorkshire × Duroc (LYD). The highest DPPH radical scavenging activities determined were from BPP of Boston butt (13.65 M TE) and HWEP of loin (19.40 M TE) and ham (21.45 M TE). The 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging activities of BPP from shoulder ham (39.28 M TE) and ham (39.43 M TE) were higher than those of other meat cuts, while HWEP of ham exhibited the highest ABTS radical scavenging activity. A higher oxygen radical absorbance capacity was determined for BPP from ham (198.35 M TE) and in HWEP from loin (204.07 M TE), Boston butt (192.85 M TE), and ham (201.36 M TE). Carnosine content of BPP and HWEP from loin and were determined to be 106.68 and 117.77 mg/g on a dry basis, respectively. The anserine content of BPP (5.26 mg/g, dry basis) and HWEP (6.79 mg/g, dry basis) of shoulder ham exhibited the highest value as compared to the extracts from the other meat cuts. The viability of RAW 264.7 cells was increased with increasing HWEP from loin and ham treatment. In addition, the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α was significantly reduced by HWEP from loin and ham, in a dose dependent manner. These results suggested that boiled pork and hot water extract of pork have antioxidative and cytokine inhibitory effects. PMID:27194938

  16. Anti-Oxidative and Anti-Inflammation Activities of Pork Extracts.

    PubMed

    Gil, Juae; Kim, Dongwook; Yoon, Seok-Ki; Ham, Jun-Sang; Jang, Aera

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of boiled pork powder (BPP) and hot water extract powder (HWEP) from 4 cuts of meat from Landrace × Yorkshire × Duroc (LYD). The highest DPPH radical scavenging activities determined were from BPP of Boston butt (13.65 M TE) and HWEP of loin (19.40 M TE) and ham (21.45 M TE). The 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging activities of BPP from shoulder ham (39.28 M TE) and ham (39.43 M TE) were higher than those of other meat cuts, while HWEP of ham exhibited the highest ABTS radical scavenging activity. A higher oxygen radical absorbance capacity was determined for BPP from ham (198.35 M TE) and in HWEP from loin (204.07 M TE), Boston butt (192.85 M TE), and ham (201.36 M TE). Carnosine content of BPP and HWEP from loin and were determined to be 106.68 and 117.77 mg/g on a dry basis, respectively. The anserine content of BPP (5.26 mg/g, dry basis) and HWEP (6.79 mg/g, dry basis) of shoulder ham exhibited the highest value as compared to the extracts from the other meat cuts. The viability of RAW 264.7 cells was increased with increasing HWEP from loin and ham treatment. In addition, the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α was significantly reduced by HWEP from loin and ham, in a dose dependent manner. These results suggested that boiled pork and hot water extract of pork have antioxidative and cytokine inhibitory effects. PMID:27194938

  17. Emulsion Mapping in Pork Meat Emulsion Systems with Various Lipid Types and Brown Rice Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Park, Jinhee

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate emulsion mapping between emulsion stability and cooking yields, apparent viscosity, and hardness of reduced-fat pork emulsion systems. The reduced-fat emulsion systems were supplemented with different lipid types and brown rice bran fiber (BRF) concentrations. Compared to the control with 30% back fat, lower emulsion stability and higher cooking yield of meat emulsion systems were observed in T1 (30% back fat+1% BRF), T2 (30% back fat+2% BRF), T3 (30% back fat+3% BRF), T4 (30% back fat+6% BRF), and T15 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF). Lower emulsion stability and higher apparent viscosity were observed in T1, T2, T3, T4, and T8 (20% back fat+3% BRF) compared to the control. Lower emulsion stability and higher hardness was detected in all treatments compared with the control, except T5 (20% back fat), T10 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF), T11 (10% back fat+10% olive oil+2% BRF), T12 (10% back fat+10% grape seed oil+2% BRF), and T13 (10% back fat+10% soybean oil+2% BRF). This approach has been found particularly useful for highlighting differences among the emulsified properties in emulsion meat products. Thus, the results obtained with emulsion mapping are useful in making emulsified meat products of desired quality characteristics, partially replacing pork back fat with a mix of 10% back fat, 10% canola oil and 2% BRF was most similar to the control with 30% pork back fat. PMID:26761836

  18. Chitosan boosts the antimicrobial activity of Origanum vulgare essential oil in modified atmosphere packaged pork.

    PubMed

    Paparella, Antonello; Mazzarrino, Giovanni; Chaves-López, Clemencia; Rossi, Chiara; Sacchetti, Giampiero; Guerrieri, Oana; Serio, Annalisa

    2016-10-01

    The potential of chitosan as a possible booster of the antimicrobial activity of Origanum vulgare EO (OEO) against spoilage bacteria and Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in fresh pork meat. Pork fillets were inoculated with 3 L. monocytogenes strains, dipped either in Origanum vulgare (oregano) Essential Oil (OEO) at 2 and 4%, or in chitosan 1% alone or added with 2 and 4% OEO, then packed under modified atmosphere (70% O2, 20% CO2, 10% N2) and stored at 4 °C for 15 days. OEO did not reduce L. monocytogenes growth, while 2 Log decrease was obtained after 2 days of storage in treatments with chitosan alone or with OEO, with growth inhibition up to day 15 in samples with chitosan and OEO 4%. When OEO was combined with chitosan, total viable counts and spoilage bacteria were reduced and contained over time, particularly Pseudomonas (2.0 Log CFU/g at day 15) and Brochothrix thermosphacta (undetectable). All the treatments applied extended meat shelf-life with respect to control, whose commercial shelf-life was 10 days. Chitosan treatments enhanced L* and maintained a* values almost stable during storage. Chitosan and OEO singly applied reduced lipid oxidation (0.62-0.75 mg malondialdehyde/Kg meat) compared to control (0.99 mg malondialdehyde/Kg meat). Finally, chitosan treated samples were not recognized with respect to the control, whereas OEO gave bitter taste; chitosan with OEO instead mitigated the effect of OEO addition to meat. Chitosan combined with OEO boosts its antimicrobial activity and shows a potential for application in industrial production of fresh pork in MAP, to achieve shelf-life extension, control of L. monocytogenes growth, stability of color and protective effect from oxidation, with low sensory impact.

  19. Structural Insights into the PorK and PorN Components of the Porphyromonas gingivalis Type IX Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Gorasia, Dhana G.; Veith, Paul D.; Hanssen, Eric G.; Glew, Michelle D.; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Nakayama, Koji; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    The type IX secretion system (T9SS) has been recently discovered and is specific to Bacteroidetes species. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen for periodontitis, utilizes the T9SS to transport many proteins including the gingipain virulence factors across the outer membrane and attach them to the cell surface via a sortase-like mechanism. At least 11 proteins have been identified as components of the T9SS including PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN and PorP, however the precise roles of most of these proteins have not been elucidated and the structural organization of these components is unknown. In this study, we purified PorK and PorN complexes from P. gingivalis and using electron microscopy we have shown that PorN and the PorK lipoprotein interact to form a 50 nm diameter ring-shaped structure containing approximately 32–36 subunits of each protein. The formation of these rings was dependent on both PorK and PorN, but was independent of PorL, PorM and PorP. PorL and PorM were found to form a separate stable complex. PorK and PorN were protected from proteinase K cleavage when present in undisrupted cells, but were rapidly degraded when the cells were lysed, which together with bioinformatic analyses suggests that these proteins are exposed in the periplasm and anchored to the outer membrane via the PorK lipid. Chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed the interaction between PorK and PorN and further revealed that they interact with the PG0189 outer membrane protein. Furthermore, we established that PorN was required for the stable expression of PorK, PorL and PorM. Collectively, these results suggest that the ring-shaped PorK/N complex may form part of the secretion channel of the T9SS. This is the first report showing the structural organization of any T9SS component. PMID:27509186

  20. Structural Insights into the PorK and PorN Components of the Porphyromonas gingivalis Type IX Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Gorasia, Dhana G; Veith, Paul D; Hanssen, Eric G; Glew, Michelle D; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Nakayama, Koji; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-08-01

    The type IX secretion system (T9SS) has been recently discovered and is specific to Bacteroidetes species. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen for periodontitis, utilizes the T9SS to transport many proteins including the gingipain virulence factors across the outer membrane and attach them to the cell surface via a sortase-like mechanism. At least 11 proteins have been identified as components of the T9SS including PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN and PorP, however the precise roles of most of these proteins have not been elucidated and the structural organization of these components is unknown. In this study, we purified PorK and PorN complexes from P. gingivalis and using electron microscopy we have shown that PorN and the PorK lipoprotein interact to form a 50 nm diameter ring-shaped structure containing approximately 32-36 subunits of each protein. The formation of these rings was dependent on both PorK and PorN, but was independent of PorL, PorM and PorP. PorL and PorM were found to form a separate stable complex. PorK and PorN were protected from proteinase K cleavage when present in undisrupted cells, but were rapidly degraded when the cells were lysed, which together with bioinformatic analyses suggests that these proteins are exposed in the periplasm and anchored to the outer membrane via the PorK lipid. Chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed the interaction between PorK and PorN and further revealed that they interact with the PG0189 outer membrane protein. Furthermore, we established that PorN was required for the stable expression of PorK, PorL and PorM. Collectively, these results suggest that the ring-shaped PorK/N complex may form part of the secretion channel of the T9SS. This is the first report showing the structural organization of any T9SS component. PMID:27509186

  1. Structural Insights into the PorK and PorN Components of the Porphyromonas gingivalis Type IX Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Gorasia, Dhana G; Veith, Paul D; Hanssen, Eric G; Glew, Michelle D; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Nakayama, Koji; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-08-01

    The type IX secretion system (T9SS) has been recently discovered and is specific to Bacteroidetes species. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen for periodontitis, utilizes the T9SS to transport many proteins including the gingipain virulence factors across the outer membrane and attach them to the cell surface via a sortase-like mechanism. At least 11 proteins have been identified as components of the T9SS including PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN and PorP, however the precise roles of most of these proteins have not been elucidated and the structural organization of these components is unknown. In this study, we purified PorK and PorN complexes from P. gingivalis and using electron microscopy we have shown that PorN and the PorK lipoprotein interact to form a 50 nm diameter ring-shaped structure containing approximately 32-36 subunits of each protein. The formation of these rings was dependent on both PorK and PorN, but was independent of PorL, PorM and PorP. PorL and PorM were found to form a separate stable complex. PorK and PorN were protected from proteinase K cleavage when present in undisrupted cells, but were rapidly degraded when the cells were lysed, which together with bioinformatic analyses suggests that these proteins are exposed in the periplasm and anchored to the outer membrane via the PorK lipid. Chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed the interaction between PorK and PorN and further revealed that they interact with the PG0189 outer membrane protein. Furthermore, we established that PorN was required for the stable expression of PorK, PorL and PorM. Collectively, these results suggest that the ring-shaped PorK/N complex may form part of the secretion channel of the T9SS. This is the first report showing the structural organization of any T9SS component.

  2. Protein oxidation and proteolysis during storage and in vitro digestion of pork and beef patties.

    PubMed

    Rysman, Tine; Van Hecke, Thomas; Van Poucke, Christof; De Smet, Stefaan; Van Royen, Geert

    2016-10-15

    The effect of protein oxidation on proteolysis during meat digestion was investigated following storage and subsequent in vitro digestion of beef and pork patties. Protein oxidation was evaluated as thiol oxidation, total carbonylation, and specific carbonylation (α-amino adipic and γ-glutamic semialdehyde). Furthermore, 4-hydroxyphenylalanine, a hydroxylation product of phenylalanine, was identified and quantified as a new protein oxidation marker. After 7days of chilled illuminated storage (4°C), significant oxidative modifications were quantified and the oxidative degradation was continued during in vitro digestion. The observed effects were more abundant in beef patties. Protein oxidation before digestion resulted in impaired proteolysis during digestion.

  3. Effects of Kaolinite (Macsumsuk) and Herb Mixtures on the Quality and Physicochemical Properties of Pork

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Ki; Hwang, Eun Gyeong; Jung, Dae Jin; Ha, Jae Jung; Oh, Dong Yep

    2014-01-01

    The current study was conducted to identify technology for the production of high quality pork, based on the meat consumption habits of consumers. Macsumsuk, a type of kaolinite (a clay mineral), and/or a mixture of herbs (Mori Folium, Sophorae Radix, Glycyrrhizae Radix, Citri Leiocarpae Exocarpium, and Pogostemi Herba) were added to the diets of fattening pigs. Sixty barrow pigs (4 kinds of treatment × 5 pigs/treatment × 3 replicates) were randomly assigned to either the Control (no additives), T1 (3% Macsumsuk), T2 (3% Herb mixtures), or T3 (3% Macsumsuk + 3% Herb mixtures) groups, and were fed the diets for 60 d. Dressed weights were in the order of T1 (93.40±4.68kg) > T2 (91.40±6.52kg) > Control (88.80±1.57kg) > T3 (86.80±2.01kg). Back-fat thickness of the Control animals (23.2±1.03) was significantly greater than that of the various treatment groups (p<0.01). Numeric values representing the carcass yield and quality grade were higher for all the treated groups than the Control group, thought the difference was not statistically significant. Crude fat content was significantly higher in the Control group (2.23±0.34%) than in the treated groups (p<0.05). The addition of both Macsumsuk and herb mixtures into the diets of the pigs significantly reduced cooking loss of the pork compared to the Control (p<0.05). No statistically significant changes were observed in the shear force (average 5.87±0.54 kg/cm2), water holding capacity (average 54.59±3.16%), or CIE values of the pork, whereas cholesterol levels significantly decreased (p<0.01) in those fed Macsumsuk and/or the herb mixtures. No significant changes in fatty acid composition, total saturated fatty acid (SFA), total unsaturated fatty acid (UFA), or UFA/SFA ratios were observed by any of the treatments. In conclusion, the results obtained from this study suggest that the addition of Macsumsuk and/or herb mixtures into the diets of growing and fattening pigs improves the pork quality by reducing

  4. Nondestructive detection of pork quality based on dual-band VIS/NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenxiu; Peng, Yankun; Li, Yongyu; Tang, Xiuying; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2015-05-01

    With the continuous development of living standards and the relative change of dietary structure, consumers' rising and persistent demand for better quality of meat is emphasized. Colour, pH value, and cooking loss are important quality attributes when evaluating meat. To realize nondestructive detection of multi-parameter of meat quality simultaneously is popular in production and processing of meat and meat products. The objectives of this research were to compare the effectiveness of two bands for rapid nondestructive and simultaneous detection of pork quality attributes. Reflectance spectra of 60 chilled pork samples were collected from a dual-band visible/near-infrared spectroscopy system which covered 350-1100 nm and 1000-2600 nm. Then colour, pH value and cooking loss were determined by standard methods as reference values. Standard normal variables transform (SNVT) was employed to eliminate the spectral noise. A spectrum connection method was put forward for effective integration of the dual-band spectrum to make full use of the whole efficient information. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) and Principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to establish prediction models using based on single-band spectrum and dual-band spectrum, respectively. The experimental results showed that the PLSR model based on dual-band spectral information was superior to the models based on single band spectral information with lower root means quare error (RMSE) and higher accuracy. The PLSR model based on dual-band (use the overlapping part of first band) yielded the best prediction result with correlation coefficient of validation (Rv) of 0.9469, 0.9495, 0.9180, 0.9054 and 0.8789 for L*, a*, b*, pH value and cooking loss, respectively. This mainly because dual-band spectrum can provide sufficient and comprehensive information which reflected the quality attributes. Data fusion from dual-band spectrum could significantly improve pork quality parameters prediction

  5. Measurement of Multiple Vitamin K Forms in Processed and Fresh-Cut Pork Products in the U.S. Food Supply.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xueyan; Shen, Xiaohua; Finnan, Emily G; Haytowitz, David B; Booth, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin K food composition data have historically been limited to plant-based phylloquinone (vitamin K1). The purpose of this study was to expand analysis of vitamin K to animal products and to measure phylloquinone and 10 forms of menaquinones (vitamin K2) in processed and fresh-cut pork products. Nationally representative samples of processed pork products (n = 28) were obtained through USDA's National Food and Nutrition Analysis Program, and fresh pork (six cuts; n = 5 per cut) and bacon (n = 4) were purchased from local retail outlets. All samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (phylloquinone and menaquinone-4) and atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (menaquinone-5 to menaquinone-13). Although low in phylloquinone (<2.1 ± 0.5 μg of phylloquinone per 100 g), all processed pork products and fresh pork cuts contained menaquinone-4, menaquinone-10, and menaquinone-11 (range: [35.1 ± 11.0]-[534 ± 89.0] μg of menaquinones per 100 g). The total menaquinone contents of processed pork products were correlated with fat contents (r = 0.935). In summary, processed and fresh-cut pork products are a rich dietary source of menaquinones that are currently unaccounted for in assessment of vitamin K in the food supply.

  6. Taenia solium metacestode viability in infected pork after preparation with salt pickling or cooking methods common in Yucatán, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Canul, R; Argaez-Rodriguez, F; de, la Gala D Pacheco; Villegas-Perez, S; Fraser, A; Craig, P S; Cob-Galera, L; Dominguez-Alpizar, J L

    2002-04-01

    The cestode parasite Taenia solium is an important cause of foodborne infection throughout tropical and subtropical regions. Ingestion of pork meat infected with T. solium larvae can lead to taeniasis infection in humans. With tourism and the consumption of native food increasing, it is important to investigate potential risks of transmission associated with food preparation methods. In this study, traditional Mexican salt pickling and two methods of pork preparation (as roast pork [cochinita pibil] and in pork and beans [frijol con puerco]) were evaluated in order to determine their effects on T. solium cyst viability in infected tissue. In the control groups, all metacestodes isolated were 100% viable, and only small changes in pH (from 6.0 to 5.9) and temperature (29 to 30 degrees C) were recorded. No viable cysts were detected after 12 and 24 h of salt pickling. The pH of the meat during salting dropped from 6.0 to 5.3. Osmotic changes and dehydration from the salting, rather than a change in pH, could be considered the main cause of cyst death. Temperatures of >65 degrees C damaged T. solium metacestodes in roast pork and in pork and beans. The results of this study indicate that if traditional pork dishes are prepared properly, T. solium cysts are destroyed. The criteria used in this study to evaluate the viability of tissue cysts are discussed. PMID:11952216

  7. Mortadella sausage manufactured with Caiman yacare (Caiman crocodilus yacare) meat, pork backfat, and soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Morais, C S N; Morais Júnior, N N; Vicente-Neto, J; Ramos, E M; Almeida, J; Roseiro, C; Santos, C; Gama, L T; Bressan, M C

    2013-10-01

    Mortadellas manufactured using Caiman yacare meat (70%) and pork fat (30%) were reformulated by substituting pork fat with increasing amounts of soybean oil (25%, 50%, and 100%) and evaluated 7, 30, and 60 days post-manufacture. The substitutions resulted in an increase in fat content and in the percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids (total PUFA; 18:2 n-6 and 18:3 n-3), and a reduction in saturated fatty acids (total SFA; 14:0 and 16:0). These alterations reduced (P<0.01) the indices of atherogenicity and thrombogenicity by 4- to 5-fold in the formulation with 100% soybean oil compared to the original formulation. The levels of TBARS obtained at day 7 were positively correlated (P<0.01) with 18:2 n-6 and 18:3 n-3 (r=0.83 and 0.84, respectively) and negatively correlated with 17:0 and 17:1 (r=-0.91 and -0.89, respectively). All formulations received favourable overall acceptability by the sensory panel.

  8. Building phenomenological models that relate proteolysis in pork muscles to temperature, water and salt content.

    PubMed

    Harkouss, Rami; Safa, Hassan; Gatellier, Philippe; Lebert, André; Mirade, Pierre-Sylvain

    2014-05-15

    Throughout dry-cured ham production, salt and water content, pH and temperature are key factors affecting proteolysis, one of the main biochemical processes influencing sensory properties and final quality of the product. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of these variables (except pH) on the time course of proteolysis in laboratory-prepared pork meat samples. Based on a Doehlert design, samples of five different types of pork muscle were prepared, salted, dried and placed at different temperatures, and sampled at different times for quantification of proteolysis. Statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the proteolysis index (PI) was correlated positively with temperature and water content, but negatively with salt content. Applying response surface methodology and multiple linear regressions enabled us to build phenomenological models relating PI to water and salt content, and to temperature. These models could then be integrated into a 3D numerical ham model, coupling salt and water transfers to proteolysis. PMID:24423495

  9. Effect of extracted housefly pupae peptide mixture on chilled pork preservation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yansheng; Dang, Xiangli; Zheng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Wenqing

    2010-08-01

    The peptide mixture from housefly pupae has broad spectrum antimicrobial activity but has not previously been reported as a food preservative. In this study, the preservation effects of a housefly pupae peptide mixture, nisin, and sodium dehydroacetate (DHA-S) on the number of mesophilic aerobic bacteria (MAB), total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), and pH value of chilled pork were compared. All results showed that a good preservation effect was observed among 3 treatments with the peptide mixture of housefly pupae, nisin, and DHA-S and that there was no significant difference among them. These results indicate that housefly peptide mixture has a great potential as a food preservative. The results of scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscopy suggest that the primary mechanism of housefly pupae peptide mixture may be bacterial cytoplasmic membrane lysis and pores induced in the membranes. Practical Applications: Peptide mixture extracted from housefly pupae using low-cost and simple method has broad spectrum antimicrobial activity. According to the effect on chilled pork preservation, extracted housefly peptide mixture has a great potential as a food preservative.

  10. Development and validation of a rapid test system for detection of pork meat and collagen residues.

    PubMed

    Masiri, J; Benoit, L; Barrios-Lopez, B; Thienes, C; Meshgi, M; Agapov, A; Dobritsa, A; Nadala, C; Samadpour, M

    2016-11-01

    Mislabeling, contamination, and economic adulteration of meat products with undeclared pork tissues are illegal under regulations promulgated by numerous regulatory agencies. Nonetheless, analysis of the European meat industry has revealed pervasive meat adulteration, necessitating more extensive application of meat authentication testing. As existing methods for meat speciation require specialized equipment and/or training, we developed a detection system based on a lateral flow device (LFD) assay format capable of rapidly (~35min) identifying porcine residues derived from raw meat, cooked meat, and gelatin down to 0.01%, 1.0%, and 2.5% contamination, respectively. Specificity analysis revealed no cross-reactivity with meat derived from chicken, turkey, horse, beef, lamb, or goat. Comparison with a commercial ELISA kit and PCR method revealed similar if not improved sensitivity, with the added feature that the LFD-based system required considerably less time to perform. Accordingly, this test system should aid the food industry and food control authorities in monitoring for adulteration with pork.

  11. The Impact of Proteolytic Pork Hydrolysate on Microbial, Flavor and Free Amino Acids Compounds of Yogurt.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinzhong; Hua, Baozhen; Xu, Zhiping; Li, Sha; Ma, Chengjie

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of proteolytic pork hydrolysate (PPH) on yoghurt production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. Fresh lean pork was cut into pieces and mixed with deionized water and dealt with protease, then the resulting PPH was added to milk to investigate the effects of PPH on yoghurt production. The fermentation time, the viable cell counts, the flavor, free amino acids compounds, and sensory evaluation of yoghurt were evaluated. These results showed that PPH significantly stimulated the growth and acidification of the both bacterial strains. When the content of PPH reached 5% (w/w), the increased acidifying rate occurred, which the fermentation time was one hour less than that of the control, a time saving of up to 20% compared with the control. The viable cell counts, the total free amino acids, and the scores of taste, flavor and overall acceptability in PPH-supplemented yoghurt were higher than the control. Furthermore, the contents of some characteristic flavor compounds including acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and esters were richer than the control. We concluded that the constituents of PPH such as small peptide, vitamins, and minerals together to play the stimulatory roles and result in beneficial effect for the yoghurt starter cultures growth. PMID:27621698

  12. Effect of extracted housefly pupae peptide mixture on chilled pork preservation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yansheng; Dang, Xiangli; Zheng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Wenqing

    2010-08-01

    The peptide mixture from housefly pupae has broad spectrum antimicrobial activity but has not previously been reported as a food preservative. In this study, the preservation effects of a housefly pupae peptide mixture, nisin, and sodium dehydroacetate (DHA-S) on the number of mesophilic aerobic bacteria (MAB), total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), and pH value of chilled pork were compared. All results showed that a good preservation effect was observed among 3 treatments with the peptide mixture of housefly pupae, nisin, and DHA-S and that there was no significant difference among them. These results indicate that housefly peptide mixture has a great potential as a food preservative. The results of scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscopy suggest that the primary mechanism of housefly pupae peptide mixture may be bacterial cytoplasmic membrane lysis and pores induced in the membranes. Practical Applications: Peptide mixture extracted from housefly pupae using low-cost and simple method has broad spectrum antimicrobial activity. According to the effect on chilled pork preservation, extracted housefly peptide mixture has a great potential as a food preservative. PMID:20722941

  13. What is for dinner? Viral metagenomics of US store bought beef, pork, and chicken.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Li, Linlin; Deng, Xutao; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Delwart, Eric

    2014-11-01

    We describe here the metagenomics-derived viral sequences detected in beef, pork, and chicken purchased from stores in San Francisco. In beef we detected four previously reported viruses (two parvoviruses belonging to different genera, an anellovirus, and one circovirus-like virus) and one novel bovine polyomavirus species (BPyV2-SF) whose closest relatives infect primates. Detection of porcine hokovirus in beef indicated that this parvovirus can infect both ungulate species. In pork we detected four known parvoviruses from three genera, an anellovirus, and pig circovirus 2. Chicken meat contained numerous gyrovirus sequences including those of chicken anemia virus and of a novel gyrovirus species (GyV7-SF). Our results provide an initial characterization of some of the viruses commonly found in US store-bought meats which included a diverse group of parvoviruses and viral families with small circular DNA genomes. Whether any of these viruses can infect humans will require testing human sera for specific antibodies. PMID:25217712

  14. Influence of Duroc breed inclusion into Polish Landrace maternal line on pork meat quality traits.

    PubMed

    Guzek, Dominika; Głąbska, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-05-31

    Crossbreeding with Duroc breed allows to improve meat quality, but no data is available regarding specific influence of Duroc breed on characteristics of meat in the case of crossbreeding with various breeds. The aim of the present research was to evaluate the effect of crossbreeding Polish Landrace dames with Duroc sires on quality features of meat in reference to Polish Landrace breed. The objects of the study were Longissimus dorsi lumborum pork muscles obtained from Polish Landrace breed and Polish Landrace x Duroc crossbreed animals. Sarcomere length measurements were conducted using microscopic method and basic chemical composition measurement was analyzed using spectrophotometric scanning. Texture analysis of meat samples, performed after thermal treatment was expressed by Warner-Bratzler shear force and color analysis was obtained using CIE L*a*b* color system. No differences in sarcomere length, shear force as well as components of color values between pork meat originated from Polish Landrace breed and Polish Landrace x Duroc crossbreed were observed. Analysis of basic chemical composition revealed higher fat and lower ash contents in the case of meat of Polish Landrace breed animals. It was concluded that the actual impact of breed on meat characteristics is possibly altered by other factors. It may be suggested that influence of basic chemical composition on color of meat is breed-related. PMID:27254455

  15. Effect of incorporation of Moringa oleifera leaves extract on quality of ground pork patties.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, M; Naveena, B M; Vaithiyanathan, S; Sen, A R; Sureshkumar, K

    2014-11-01

    Present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of addition of different levels of Moringa oleifera leaves extract (MLE) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in raw and cooked pork patties during refrigerated storage. Five treatments evaluated include: Control (without MLE/BHT), MLE 300 (300 ppm equivalent M. oleifera leaves phenolics), MLE 450 (450 ppm equivalent M. oleifera leaves phenolics), MLE 600 (600 ppm equivalent M. oleifera leaves phenolics) and BHT 200 (200 ppm BHT). Total phenolic content ranged from 60.78 to 70.27 mg per gram. A concentration dependent increase in reducing power and 1,1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity of both MLE and BHT was noticed. Higher (P < 0.001) a* and lower thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values were observed in MLE 600 and BHT 200 compared to control. Addition of MLE did not affect the sensory attributes or microbial quality. These results showed that M. oleifera leaves can be used as a potential source of natural antioxidants to inhibit lipid oxidation in ground pork patties. PMID:26396309

  16. Quality traits of pork semimembranosus and triceps brachii muscles sourced from the United States and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Suárez, E J; Rubio-Lozano, M S; Toledo-López, V M; Torrescano-Urrutia, G R; Ponce-Alquicira, E; Huerta-Leidenz, N

    2016-12-01

    The study included fresh pork semimembranosus (SM, n=289) and triceps brachii (TB, n=283) muscles sourced from meat packers of Mexico and the USA. Samples were analyzed for moisture, protein, and fat content, pH, shear force (WBSF), cook loss, water holding capacity (WHC), instrumental color, emulsion capacity (EC) and stability (ES), and consumer sensory ratings. SM from the USA had lower WBSF (P<0.05) than that from Mexico (26.7 vs. 29.7N), higher WHC (44.7 vs. 38.4%; P<0.05) and a better appearance, as indicated by its lower h* (52.3 vs. 56.6; P<0.05) and higher C* (23.1 vs. 21.3; P<0.05). Consumer acceptance of SM was similar (P>0.05) across countries. TB from Mexico had higher (P<0.05) fat content (2.5 vs. 2.0%), lower (P<0.05) WBSF values (32.0 vs. 36.9N), and received more positive ratings by Mexican consumers (87.1 vs. 81.7%) than its US equivalent. In general, US pork exhibits better technological properties, while country of origin has less effect on consumer acceptability.

  17. Calibrations between the variables of microbial TTI response and ground pork qualities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunji; Choi, Dong Yeol; Kim, Hyun Chul; Kim, Keehyuk; Lee, Seung Ju

    2013-10-01

    A time-temperature indicator (TTI) based on a lactic acid bacterium, Weissella cibaria CIFP009, was applied to ground pork packaging. Calibration curves between TTI response and pork qualities were obtained from storage tests at 2°C, 10°C, and 13°C. The curves of the TTI vs. total cell number at different temperatures coincided to the greatest extent, indicating the highest representativeness of calibration, by showing the least coefficient of variance (CV=11%) of the quality variables at a given TTI response (titratable acidity) on the curves, followed by pH (23%), volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) (25%), and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) (47%). Similarity of Arrhenius activation energy (Ea) could also reflect the representativeness of calibration. The total cell number (104.9 kJ/mol) was found to be the most similar to that of the TTI response (106.2 kJ/mol), followed by pH (113.6 kJ/mol), VBN (77.4 kJ/mol), and TBARS (55.0 kJ/mol). PMID:23747630

  18. Determination of sulphonamides in pork meat extracts by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ackermans, M T; Beckers, J L; Everaerts, F M; Hoogland, H; Tomassen, M J

    1992-04-01

    For sixteen sulphonamides the effective mobility was measured as a function of pH and from the effective mobilities determined in two different electrolyte systems the pK value and mobility at infinite dilution were calculated. A pH of 7.0 was found to be the optimum pH for the separation for both standard mixtures and mixtures of sulphonamides dissolved in pork meat extracts. For the determination of the sulphonamides in pork meat only a very simple pretreatment consisting of extraction with acetonitrile and centrifugation is suitable, as the matrix effects at pH 7.0 do not affect the separation. Calibration graphs for five sulphonamides were constructed, and regression coefficients of at least 0.999 were obtained. The limit of detection for the method varies from 2 to 9 ppm for a pressure injection time of 10 s (injection volume ca. 18 nl) using a Polymicro Technology capillary of length 116.45 cm, distance between injection and detection 109.75 cm and I.D. 50 microns.

  19. Biogenic amine content, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration of pork in tuna sausage products.

    PubMed

    Kung, Hsien-Feng; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang; Chang, Shih-Chih; Hong, Tang-Yao

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-five tuna sausage products were purchased from retail markets in Taiwan. The rates of occurrence of biogenic amines, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration by pork and poultry were determined. The average content of various biogenic amines in all tested samples was less than 2.0 mg/100 g (<0.05 to 1.85 mg/100 g). Thirteen histamine-producing bacterial strains isolated from tested samples produced 12.1 to 1,261 ppm of histamine in Trypticase soy broth supplemented with 1.0% L-histidine. Among them, Raoultella ornithinolytica (one strain), Enterobacter aerogenes (one strain), and Staphylococcus pasteuri (two strains) were identified as prolific histamine formers. PCR assay revealed that the adulteration rates were 80% (20 of 25) and 4% (1 of 25) for pork and poultry, respectively, in tuna sausage. The fish species in the tuna sausage samples were identified as Thunnus albacares for 22 samples (88%), Thunnus alalunga for 1 sample (4%), and Thunnus thynnus for 1 sample (4%), whereas the remaining sample was identified as Makaira nigricans (blue marlin). PMID:23043830

  20. The effect of skatole and androstenone on consumer response towards streaky bacon and pork belly roll.

    PubMed

    Aaslyng, Margit D; De Lichtenberg Broge, Eva Honnens; Brockhoff, Per B; Christensen, Rune Haubo

    2015-12-01

    Consumer liking was assessed for streaky bacon and pork belly roll from entire male pigs with an androstenone (AND) content of up to 9.4 ppm and a skatole (SKA) content of up to 0.92 ppm in the back fat and castrates. No clear effect of either AND or SKA was seen in consumer liking, although an insignificant tendency was seen for SKA. A sensory profile analysis showed that AND increased the boar taint of bacon, while both AND and SKA increased the boar taint of the pork belly roll. Consumer sensitivity towards AND and SKA did not affect liking of the meat products. The lack of effect of AND and SKA on consumer liking could be due to a masking effect of the spices and smoke. Three consecutive weeks' exposure to bacon did not change the liking score, irrespective of the AND and SKA content. This indicates that the consumers did not become more sensitive towards boar taint. PMID:26186398

  1. Development and validation of a rapid test system for detection of pork meat and collagen residues.

    PubMed

    Masiri, J; Benoit, L; Barrios-Lopez, B; Thienes, C; Meshgi, M; Agapov, A; Dobritsa, A; Nadala, C; Samadpour, M

    2016-11-01

    Mislabeling, contamination, and economic adulteration of meat products with undeclared pork tissues are illegal under regulations promulgated by numerous regulatory agencies. Nonetheless, analysis of the European meat industry has revealed pervasive meat adulteration, necessitating more extensive application of meat authentication testing. As existing methods for meat speciation require specialized equipment and/or training, we developed a detection system based on a lateral flow device (LFD) assay format capable of rapidly (~35min) identifying porcine residues derived from raw meat, cooked meat, and gelatin down to 0.01%, 1.0%, and 2.5% contamination, respectively. Specificity analysis revealed no cross-reactivity with meat derived from chicken, turkey, horse, beef, lamb, or goat. Comparison with a commercial ELISA kit and PCR method revealed similar if not improved sensitivity, with the added feature that the LFD-based system required considerably less time to perform. Accordingly, this test system should aid the food industry and food control authorities in monitoring for adulteration with pork. PMID:27448193

  2. Determination of salt content in various depth of pork chop by electrical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenecker, P.; Szöllösi, D.; Friedrich, L.; Vozáry, E.

    2013-04-01

    The salt concentration was determined inside of pork chop both by electrical impedance spectroscopy and by a conventional chemical method (according to Mohr). The pork chop in various depths (4 mm, 10 mm, 20 mm and 25 mm) was punctured with two stainless steel electrodes. The length of electrodes was 60 mm, and they were insulated along the length except 1 cm section on the end, so the measurement of impedance was realized in various depths. The magnitude and phase angle of impedance were measured with a HP 4284A and a HP 4285A LCR meters from 30 Hz up to 1 MHz and from 75 kHz up to 30 MHz frequency range, respectively at 1 V voltage. The distance between the electrodes was 1 cm. The impedance magnitude decreased as the salt concentration increased. The magnitude of open-short corrected impedance values at various frequencies (10 kHz, 100 kHz, 125 kHz, 1.1 MHz and 8 MHz) showed a good correlation with salt content determined by chemical procedure. The electrical impedance spectroscopy seems a prospective method for determination the salt concentration inside the meat in various depths during the curing procedure.

  3. Simultaneously propagating voltage and pressure pulses in lipid monolayers of pork brain and synthetic lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesbauer, J.; Bössinger, S.; Wixforth, A.; Schneider, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrated interfaces are ubiquitous in biology and appear on all length scales from ions and individual molecules to membranes and cellular networks. In vivo, they comprise a high degree of self-organization and complex entanglement, which limits their experimental accessibility by smearing out the individual phenomenology. The Langmuir technique, however, allows the examination of defined interfaces, the controllable thermodynamic state of which enables one to explore the proper state diagrams. Here we demonstrate that voltage and pressure pulses simultaneously propagate along monolayers comprised of either native pork brain or synthetic lipids. The excitation of pulses is conducted by the application of small droplets of acetic acid and monitored subsequently employing time-resolved Wilhelmy plate and Kelvin probe measurements. The isothermal state diagrams of the monolayers for both lateral pressure and surface potential are experimentally recorded, enabling us to predict dynamic voltage pulse amplitudes of 0.1-3 mV based on the assumption of static mechanoelectrical coupling. We show that the underlying physics for such propagating pulses is the same for synthetic and natural extracted (pork brain) lipids and that the measured propagation velocities and pulse amplitudes depend on the compressibility of the interface. Given the ubiquitous presence of hydrated interfaces in biology, our experimental findings seem to support a fundamentally new mechanism for the propagation of signals and communication pathways in biology (signaling), which is based neither on protein-protein or receptor-ligand interaction nor diffusion.

  4. Salmonella in pork cuttings in supermarkets and butchers' shops in Denmark in 2002 and 2006.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T B; Christensen, B B; Aabo, S

    2010-11-01

    The prevalence of Salmonella in fresh pork cuttings in Denmark in the years 2002 and 2006 was investigated at retail and compared with the retail supply pattern. A total of 1025 and 3473 samples were taken in 2002 from butcher's shops and supermarkets, respectively. The corresponding numbers in 2006 were 259 from butchers' shops and 628 from supermarkets. In 2002, 1.2% of all samples were positive for Salmonella; butchers' shops and supermarkets had 1.8% and 1.0% positive samples, respectively. The overall prevalence in 2006 was 4.2%, with prevalence of 8.1% and 2.6% for butchers' shops and supermarkets, respectively. Hence, increases around 3- to 5-fold were found. There was neither observed any parallel increase in Salmonella positive carcasses in Danish slaughterhouses during the study period, nor were any changes in supply routes towards slaughterhouses with higher prevalence observed, which could explain the apparent increase. We hypothesize that hygiene levels and ability to avoid cross-contamination and prevent growth of the organism, in the meat processing chain after slaughter were the most likely responsible factors. Results from this study indicate that the hygiene performance, particularly at retail, has a significant impact on the occurrence of Salmonella. This implies that there is no direct link between slaughterhouse Salmonella surveillance data and the level of Salmonella contamination at retail. To improve risk assessment of Salmonella in fresh pork meat, this study underlines the need for comprehensive retail data. PMID:21083815

  5. Moisture absorption early postmortem predicts ultimate drip loss in fresh pork.

    PubMed

    Kapper, C; Walukonis, C J; Scheffler, T L; Scheffler, J M; Don, C; Morgan, M T; Forrest, J C; Gerrard, D E

    2014-02-01

    Water-holding capacity is the ability of meat to hold moisture and is subject to postmortem metabolism. The objective of this study was to characterize the loss of moisture from muscle postmortem and investigate whether these losses are useful in predicting the ultimate drip loss of fresh pork. Cotton-rayon absorptive-based devices were inserted in the longissimus dorsi muscles of pork carcasses (n = 51) postmortem and removed at various intervals for 24h. Greatest moisture absorption was observed at 105 min post exsanguination. Drip loss varied (0.6-15.3%) across carcasses. Individual absorption at 75 min correlated (r = 0.33) with final drip loss. Correlations improved using individual absorption values at 90 min (r = 0.48) and accumulated absorption values at 150 min (r = 0.41). Results show that significant moisture is lost from muscle tissue early postmortem and suggest that capture of this moisture may be useful in predicting final drip loss of fresh meat.

  6. Effect of cooking on in vitro digestion of pork proteins: a peptidomic perspective.

    PubMed

    Wen, Siying; Zhou, Guanghong; Li, Li; Xu, Xinglian; Yu, Xiaobo; Bai, Yun; Li, Chunbao

    2015-01-14

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of cooking on in vitro digestibility and peptide profiling of pork protein. We simulated gastrointestinal digestion of cooked pork that was treated with pepsin alone or followed by trypsin treatment. Digested products were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analyses. Cooking led to a reduction (p < 0.05) in digestibility and band intensities on sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels. Peptide profiling and identification analyses also showed significant difference (p < 0.05) in the m/z ranges and number of peptides from the pepsin-digested products between raw (4 °C) and very well done samples (100 °C). Peptides sequenced from pepsin-digested samples under lower degrees of doneness disappeared as the temperature increased. Meanwhile, the trypsin cleavages appeared more consistent among different degrees of cooking. Further work may be needed to evaluate the bioavailability of the digested products under different cooking temperatures.

  7. The Impact of Proteolytic Pork Hydrolysate on Microbial, Flavor and Free Amino Acids Compounds of Yogurt

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jinzhong; Hua, Baozhen; Xu, Zhiping; Li, Sha; Ma, Chengjie

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of proteolytic pork hydrolysate (PPH) on yoghurt production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. Fresh lean pork was cut into pieces and mixed with deionized water and dealt with protease, then the resulting PPH was added to milk to investigate the effects of PPH on yoghurt production. The fermentation time, the viable cell counts, the flavor, free amino acids compounds, and sensory evaluation of yoghurt were evaluated. These results showed that PPH significantly stimulated the growth and acidification of the both bacterial strains. When the content of PPH reached 5% (w/w), the increased acidifying rate occurred, which the fermentation time was one hour less than that of the control, a time saving of up to 20% compared with the control. The viable cell counts, the total free amino acids, and the scores of taste, flavor and overall acceptability in PPH-supplemented yoghurt were higher than the control. Furthermore, the contents of some characteristic flavor compounds including acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and esters were richer than the control. We concluded that the constituents of PPH such as small peptide, vitamins, and minerals together to play the stimulatory roles and result in beneficial effect for the yoghurt starter cultures growth.

  8. Salmonella in pork cuttings in supermarkets and butchers' shops in Denmark in 2002 and 2006.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T B; Christensen, B B; Aabo, S

    2010-11-01

    The prevalence of Salmonella in fresh pork cuttings in Denmark in the years 2002 and 2006 was investigated at retail and compared with the retail supply pattern. A total of 1025 and 3473 samples were taken in 2002 from butcher's shops and supermarkets, respectively. The corresponding numbers in 2006 were 259 from butchers' shops and 628 from supermarkets. In 2002, 1.2% of all samples were positive for Salmonella; butchers' shops and supermarkets had 1.8% and 1.0% positive samples, respectively. The overall prevalence in 2006 was 4.2%, with prevalence of 8.1% and 2.6% for butchers' shops and supermarkets, respectively. Hence, increases around 3- to 5-fold were found. There was neither observed any parallel increase in Salmonella positive carcasses in Danish slaughterhouses during the study period, nor were any changes in supply routes towards slaughterhouses with higher prevalence observed, which could explain the apparent increase. We hypothesize that hygiene levels and ability to avoid cross-contamination and prevent growth of the organism, in the meat processing chain after slaughter were the most likely responsible factors. Results from this study indicate that the hygiene performance, particularly at retail, has a significant impact on the occurrence of Salmonella. This implies that there is no direct link between slaughterhouse Salmonella surveillance data and the level of Salmonella contamination at retail. To improve risk assessment of Salmonella in fresh pork meat, this study underlines the need for comprehensive retail data.

  9. Biogenic amine content, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration of pork in tuna sausage products.

    PubMed

    Kung, Hsien-Feng; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang; Chang, Shih-Chih; Hong, Tang-Yao

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-five tuna sausage products were purchased from retail markets in Taiwan. The rates of occurrence of biogenic amines, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration by pork and poultry were determined. The average content of various biogenic amines in all tested samples was less than 2.0 mg/100 g (<0.05 to 1.85 mg/100 g). Thirteen histamine-producing bacterial strains isolated from tested samples produced 12.1 to 1,261 ppm of histamine in Trypticase soy broth supplemented with 1.0% L-histidine. Among them, Raoultella ornithinolytica (one strain), Enterobacter aerogenes (one strain), and Staphylococcus pasteuri (two strains) were identified as prolific histamine formers. PCR assay revealed that the adulteration rates were 80% (20 of 25) and 4% (1 of 25) for pork and poultry, respectively, in tuna sausage. The fish species in the tuna sausage samples were identified as Thunnus albacares for 22 samples (88%), Thunnus alalunga for 1 sample (4%), and Thunnus thynnus for 1 sample (4%), whereas the remaining sample was identified as Makaira nigricans (blue marlin).

  10. Noninvasive Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Spoilage Attributes of Chilled Pork Using Hyperspectral Scattering Technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leilei; Peng, Yankun

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a rapid noninvasive method for quantitative and qualitative determination of chilled pork spoilage. Microbiological, physicochemical, and organoleptic characteristics such as the total viable count (TVC), Pseudomonas spp., total volatile basic-nitrogen (TVB-N), pH value, and color parameter L* were determined to appraise pork quality. The hyperspectral scattering characteristics from 54 meat samples were fitted by four-parameter modified Gompertz function accurately. Support vector machines (SVM) was applied to establish quantitative prediction model between scattering fitting parameters and reference values. In addition, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and Bayesian analysis were utilized as supervised and unsupervised techniques for the qualitative identification of meat spoilage. All stored chilled meat samples were classified into three grades: "fresh," "semi-fresh," and "spoiled." Bayesian classification model was superior to PLS-DA with overall classification accuracy of 92.86%. The results demonstrated that hyperspectral scattering technique combined with SVM and Bayesian possessed a powerful capability for meat spoilage assessment rapidly and noninvasively.

  11. The inclusion of Duroc breed in maternal line affects pork quality and fatty acid profile.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Verónica; Muela, Erica; Gutiérrez, Beatriz; Calanche, Juan Benito; Roncalés, Pedro; Beltrán, José A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of including different percentages of Duroc (D) breed in maternal line [Landrace (LR) × Large White (LW); LR × (LW × D); LR × D] and gender on meat quality and intramuscular (IMF) and subcutaneous (SCF) fatty acid composition. No significant differences were found among dam lines in ultimate pH, L* values and drip and cooking losses. There were higher percentages of saturated fatty acids in LR × D and LR × (LW × D) lines and higher percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids in LR × LW line in IMF and SCF. Also, LR × D line produced pork with a lower Warner-Bratzler shear force values and higher IMF content and potential of lipid oxidation. Furthermore, the L*, a* and b* values and drip loss were greater in pork from entire males than females. The IMF and SCF of females were more monounsaturated and less polyunsaturated than those from entire males. PMID:25938812

  12. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry can be used for dose estimation in irradiated pork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oca, M. C.; Bartolotta, A.; Cammilleri, M. C.; Giuffrida, S. A.; Parlato, A.; Di Noto, A. M.; Caracappa, S.

    2009-07-01

    Food safety can be improved using ionizing radiation to reduce food spoilage and to extend its shelf life. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been validated by the European Community as a powerful method to identify irradiated food containing fat. The preliminary goals of our research were: (i) to set up this method, based on the detection of radiation induced 2-dodecylcyclobutanones (2-DCB) in pork muscle samples and (ii) to check the microbiological efficacy of the treatment. The main objective was to render the GC/MS a quantitative technique for dose estimation, through the measurement of the 2-DCB concentration in the irradiated sample. Our results show that the reduction of the microbial population is substantially reduced even at 2 kGy, and that a clear identification of irradiated samples can be achieved also one month after irradiation at 2 kGy in frozen-stored samples. The 2-DCB concentration showed a linear dependence on dose in the range 1-10 kGy, no matter the origin of the sample; a unique calibration function was obtained, that allowed dose estimation in irradiated pork samples. A retrospective evaluation on the quality of the treatment could be carried out this way.

  13. Use of e-beam for shelf-life extension and sanitizing of marinated pork loin.

    PubMed

    García-Márquez, I; Ordóñez, J A; Cambero, M I; Cabeza, M C

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of E-beam radiation to extend the shelf-life of marinated pork loin slices stored at 4 and 8°C (temperature abuse) has been studied. The shelf-life was extended from 7 to 16 and >20 days after the application of 1 and 2 kGy, respectively. In the event of a temperature abuse occuring during the product distribution (e.g., increase to 8°C), the shelf-life would be extended from 5 to 10 and 16 days, respectively, when applying the doses mentioned previously. From a public health point of view, the irradiation of marinated pork loin may be marketable for a longer period of time of up to two weeks, and guarantees a practically Salmonella and Listeria-free product. Minor changes are produced by the E-beam treatment in the main sensory and rheological characteristics. The odor was the most affected feature, but the off-odors diminished with increased storage. In any case, testers judged the samples to be adequate for marketing.

  14. Use of E-Beam for Shelf-Life Extension and Sanitizing of Marinated Pork Loin

    PubMed Central

    García-Márquez, I.; Ordóñez, J. A.; Cambero, M. I.; Cabeza, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of E-beam radiation to extend the shelf-life of marinated pork loin slices stored at 4 and 8°C (temperature abuse) has been studied. The shelf-life was extended from 7 to 16 and >20 days after the application of 1 and 2 kGy, respectively. In the event of a temperature abuse occuring during the product distribution (e.g., increase to 8°C), the shelf-life would be extended from 5 to 10 and 16 days, respectively, when applying the doses mentioned previously. From a public health point of view, the irradiation of marinated pork loin may be marketable for a longer period of time of up to two weeks, and guarantees a practically Salmonella and Listeria-free product. Minor changes are produced by the E-beam treatment in the main sensory and rheological characteristics. The odor was the most affected feature, but the off-odors diminished with increased storage. In any case, testers judged the samples to be adequate for marketing. PMID:23227053

  15. Activity and expression of nitric oxide synthase in pork skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Li, Yu-pin; Zhang, Wan-gang; Fu, Qing-quan; Liu, Nian; Zhou, Guang-hong

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biochemical changes of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in pork skeletal muscles during postmortem storage. Longissimus thoracis (LT), psoas major (PM) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles of pork were removed immediately after slaughter and stored under vacuum condition at 4°C for 0, 1 and 3d. Results showed that all three muscles exhibited NOS activity until 1d while SM muscle retained NOS activity after 3d of storage. The content of nNOS in SM muscle was stable across 3d of storage while decreased intensity of nNOS was detected at 1 and 3d of aging in PM and LT muscles due to the degradation of calpain. Immunostaining showed that nNOS was located at not only sarcolemma but also cytoplasm at 0 and 1d of storage. Our data suggest that postmortem muscles possess NOS activity and nNOS expression depends on muscle type. PMID:25280359

  16. Noninvasive Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Spoilage Attributes of Chilled Pork Using Hyperspectral Scattering Technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leilei; Peng, Yankun

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a rapid noninvasive method for quantitative and qualitative determination of chilled pork spoilage. Microbiological, physicochemical, and organoleptic characteristics such as the total viable count (TVC), Pseudomonas spp., total volatile basic-nitrogen (TVB-N), pH value, and color parameter L* were determined to appraise pork quality. The hyperspectral scattering characteristics from 54 meat samples were fitted by four-parameter modified Gompertz function accurately. Support vector machines (SVM) was applied to establish quantitative prediction model between scattering fitting parameters and reference values. In addition, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and Bayesian analysis were utilized as supervised and unsupervised techniques for the qualitative identification of meat spoilage. All stored chilled meat samples were classified into three grades: "fresh," "semi-fresh," and "spoiled." Bayesian classification model was superior to PLS-DA with overall classification accuracy of 92.86%. The results demonstrated that hyperspectral scattering technique combined with SVM and Bayesian possessed a powerful capability for meat spoilage assessment rapidly and noninvasively. PMID:27340214

  17. The Impact of Proteolytic Pork Hydrolysate on Microbial, Flavor and Free Amino Acids Compounds of Yogurt

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jinzhong; Hua, Baozhen; Xu, Zhiping; Li, Sha; Ma, Chengjie

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of proteolytic pork hydrolysate (PPH) on yoghurt production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. Fresh lean pork was cut into pieces and mixed with deionized water and dealt with protease, then the resulting PPH was added to milk to investigate the effects of PPH on yoghurt production. The fermentation time, the viable cell counts, the flavor, free amino acids compounds, and sensory evaluation of yoghurt were evaluated. These results showed that PPH significantly stimulated the growth and acidification of the both bacterial strains. When the content of PPH reached 5% (w/w), the increased acidifying rate occurred, which the fermentation time was one hour less than that of the control, a time saving of up to 20% compared with the control. The viable cell counts, the total free amino acids, and the scores of taste, flavor and overall acceptability in PPH-supplemented yoghurt were higher than the control. Furthermore, the contents of some characteristic flavor compounds including acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and esters were richer than the control. We concluded that the constituents of PPH such as small peptide, vitamins, and minerals together to play the stimulatory roles and result in beneficial effect for the yoghurt starter cultures growth. PMID:27621698

  18. Quality traits of pork semimembranosus and triceps brachii muscles sourced from the United States and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Suárez, E J; Rubio-Lozano, M S; Toledo-López, V M; Torrescano-Urrutia, G R; Ponce-Alquicira, E; Huerta-Leidenz, N

    2016-12-01

    The study included fresh pork semimembranosus (SM, n=289) and triceps brachii (TB, n=283) muscles sourced from meat packers of Mexico and the USA. Samples were analyzed for moisture, protein, and fat content, pH, shear force (WBSF), cook loss, water holding capacity (WHC), instrumental color, emulsion capacity (EC) and stability (ES), and consumer sensory ratings. SM from the USA had lower WBSF (P<0.05) than that from Mexico (26.7 vs. 29.7N), higher WHC (44.7 vs. 38.4%; P<0.05) and a better appearance, as indicated by its lower h* (52.3 vs. 56.6; P<0.05) and higher C* (23.1 vs. 21.3; P<0.05). Consumer acceptance of SM was similar (P>0.05) across countries. TB from Mexico had higher (P<0.05) fat content (2.5 vs. 2.0%), lower (P<0.05) WBSF values (32.0 vs. 36.9N), and received more positive ratings by Mexican consumers (87.1 vs. 81.7%) than its US equivalent. In general, US pork exhibits better technological properties, while country of origin has less effect on consumer acceptability. PMID:27521501

  19. Moisture absorption early postmortem predicts ultimate drip loss in fresh pork.

    PubMed

    Kapper, C; Walukonis, C J; Scheffler, T L; Scheffler, J M; Don, C; Morgan, M T; Forrest, J C; Gerrard, D E

    2014-02-01

    Water-holding capacity is the ability of meat to hold moisture and is subject to postmortem metabolism. The objective of this study was to characterize the loss of moisture from muscle postmortem and investigate whether these losses are useful in predicting the ultimate drip loss of fresh pork. Cotton-rayon absorptive-based devices were inserted in the longissimus dorsi muscles of pork carcasses (n = 51) postmortem and removed at various intervals for 24h. Greatest moisture absorption was observed at 105 min post exsanguination. Drip loss varied (0.6-15.3%) across carcasses. Individual absorption at 75 min correlated (r = 0.33) with final drip loss. Correlations improved using individual absorption values at 90 min (r = 0.48) and accumulated absorption values at 150 min (r = 0.41). Results show that significant moisture is lost from muscle tissue early postmortem and suggest that capture of this moisture may be useful in predicting final drip loss of fresh meat. PMID:24225387

  20. Effect of high pressure and salt on pork meat quality and microstructure.

    PubMed

    Duranton, Frédérique; Simonin, Hélène; Chéret, Romuald; Guillou, Sandrine; de Lamballerie, Marie

    2012-08-01

    The interaction of salt (0%, 1.5%, and 3% in the final product) and a high-pressure treatment (500 MPa, 20 °C, 6 min) was investigated using pork biceps femoris muscle. The Warner-Bratzler shear force and the water holding capacity (WHC) were assessed and linked to the microstructure evaluation by environmental scanning electronic microscopy (ESEM). Pressure-treated and cooked samples showed a high Warner-Bratzler shear force with a low WHC compared to control cooked samples. These negative effects could be linked to the general shrinkage of the structure as observed by ESEM. The addition of 1.5% salt was sufficient to improve the technological properties of the high-pressure-treated samples and to counteract the negative effect of high pressure on texture and WHC. This phenomenon could be linked to the breakdown in structure observed by ESEM. This study states that it is possible to produce pressurized pork products of good eating quality by adding limited salt levels. PMID:22860583

  1. Role of slaughtering in Salmonella spreading and control in pork production.

    PubMed

    Arguello, Hector; Alvarez-Ordoñez, Avelinó; Carvajal, Ana; Rubio, Pedro; Prieto, Miguel

    2013-05-01

    Salmonella is one of the major foodborne pathogens worldwide. Pork products are among the main sources of Salmonella infection in humans, and several countries have established Salmonella surveillance and control programs. The role of slaughtering in carcass contamination has been indicated by studies focused on the slaughterhouse environment. In this review, we examine and discuss the information available regarding the influence that farm status, pig transport, and lairage have on the carriage of Salmonella by pigs entering the slaughter line. The evolution of carcass contamination throughout the slaughtering process, the main sources of contamination in the dirty and clean zones of the slaughter line, and previously reported prevalence of Salmonella on carcasses and factors affecting this prevalence also are discussed. The importance of implementing interventions at the slaughter level is discussed briefly. Consistent with the information available, pigs from infected farms and newly acquired or recrudescent infections in pigs at the subsequent stages of transport and lairage are important sources of Salmonella at the slaughtering plant. The continuous introduction of Salmonella into the slaughterhouse and the potential for resident flora constitute a risk for carcass contamination. At the slaughterhouse, some dressing activities can reduce carcass contamination, but others are critical control points that jeopardize carcass hygiene. This information indicates the importance of considering slaughter and previous stages in the pork production chain for controlling Salmonella in swine production.

  2. Spectral absorption index in hyperspectral image analysis for predicting moisture contents in pork longissimus dorsi muscles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Sun, Da-Wen; Pu, Hongbin

    2016-04-15

    Spectral absorption index was proposed to extract the morphological features of the spectral curves in pork meat samples (longissimus dorsi) under the conditions including fresh, frozen-thawed, heated-dehydrated and brined-dehydrated. Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were used for calibrating both the spectral reflectance and absorbance values. The absorption values were better than the reflectance values and the calibrated spectra by MSC were better than the raw and SG smoothing corrected spectra in building moisture content predictive models. The optimized partial least square regression (PLSR) model attained good results with the MSC calibrated spectral absorption values based on the spectral absorption index features (R(2)P=0.952, RMSEP=1.396) and the optimal wavelengths selected by regression coefficients (R(2)P=0.966, RMSEP=0.855), respectively. The models proved spectral absorption index was promising in spectral analysis to predict moisture content in pork samples using HSI techniques for the first time.

  3. Effect of cooking bag and netting packaging on the quality of pork ham during water cooking.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiaofen; Sun, Da-Wen

    2007-02-01

    As a preliminary test for combining water cooking with vacuum cooling in soup of pork ham, three package treatments were designed to study the effect of cooking bag and netting on the quality of water cooked ham, i.e. ham cooked with a cooking bag and without a cooking bag (single netting and double netting). For treatments without a cooking bag, the results indicated that there was no significant superiority of ham cooked with double netting compared with ham cooked with single netting on the processing efficiency and quality characteristics. Although the hams cooked with a bag performed better in some chemical retentions and pigment, the water contents were significantly lower than those hams cooked in single netting (P<0.05), and there was a higher shrinkage tendency compared with the hams cooked without a bag. For the processing characteristics and texture properties of pork ham, there were no significant differences observed among the treatments with and without a cooking bag in terms of the combined effect of cooking and cooling (P>0.05). By considering the safety, convenience, cost, and the recovery effect on the quality changes of ham during vacuum cooling in soup, cooking with single netting is a better choice for future research.

  4. Level of Adoption of Quality Management Systems Into the Mexican Pork Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Siman, Em; Ruíz-Flores, Agustín; Núñez-Domínguez, Rafael; González-Alcorta, Mariano; Hernández-Rodríguez, Bertha Alicia

    This research studies the characteristics of the Mexican pork sector; adoption status of quality management systems, and product destinations. Ninety six percent of fifty enterprises have fully answered a questionnaire. Ninety percent are small and medium-sized, the rest are large-sized firms. Nineteen percent of them have totally adopted HACCP, sixty three percent are implementing or planning to do it, the rest have no plans to adopt it. Thirteen percent of the enterprises had ISO 9000. Thirty four percent of their sales go to supermarkets, 57% to other retail chains and 9% to exportation. Product destinations are mainly Central America, United States of America, Asia and Mexico. To improve efficiency and the quality of process it is necessary to implement HACCP. Besides, customers and legal requirements are the external factors, which result in this adoption. In the process of implementing, there are some problems, such as staff motivation and training. The results suggest that HACCP system operating is important for the Mexican pork industry. It also has relevant implications in domestic trade. It is necessary to encourage adoption of quality management systems in the sector.

  5. Effect of tiger nut fibre on quality characteristics of pork burger.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Zapata, E; Muñoz, C M; Fuentes, E; Fernández-López, J; Sendra, E; Sayas, E; Navarro, C; Pérez-Alvarez, J A

    2010-05-01

    Horchata is a refreshing beverage obtained from tiger nut tubers that yields high amount of by-products. These by-products have a high content of fibre that allows its application in the development of dietary fibre rich foods. The utilization of increasing levels (0%-control, 5%, 10% and 15%) of tiger nut fibre (TNF), in the formulation of pork burgers was evaluated. This evaluation was based on: chemical composition, physicochemical, cooking characteristics and sensory properties of burgers. Pork burgers elaborated with TNF had higher nutritional value (higher fibre content) and better cooking characteristics (higher cooking yield, fat retention and moisture retention) than control burgers. Some of the negative changes in colour (a* decrease and b* increase) and texture (chewiness and springiness increase) parameters due to TNF addition observed in raw burgers were masked by the stronger modifications due to the cooking process. Burgers with TNF were perceived as less greasy, less juicy, more grainy and with less meaty flavour than controls; although this perception did not reduce the overall acceptability of burgers. Overall acceptability scores were slightly lower in burgers with 15% TNF, although no significant differences were detected with the scores of control, 5% and 10% TNF burgers. TNF addition to burgers is a promising and convenient application as dietary fibre of burgers was significantly increased without changes in sensory acceptance. PMID:20374867

  6. Different physicochemical, structural and digestibility characteristics of myofibrillar protein from PSE and normal pork before and after oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Li, Chenyi; Ullah, Niamat; Guo, Yan; Sun, Xuchun; Wang, Xuejiao; Xu, Xinglian; Hackman, Robert M; Zhou, Guanghong; Feng, Xianchao

    2016-11-01

    PSE pork has a weaker texture than normal pork due to the denaturation by endogenous protease. Changes in the nutritional quality and characteristics of myofibrillar protein (MP) from PSE pork have been scarcely documented. MPs were isolated from both PSE (MPP) and normal pork (MPN) and were oxidized for 12h at 4°C by a hydroxyl radical generating system (10μM FeCl3, 100μM ascorbic acid, 0.1, 1, and 10mM H2O2). The MPP had less aggregation and looser structure with higher surface hydrophobicity. The MPP was also less polymeric, as evidenced by intenser bands on SDS-PAGE and fewer carbonyl-NH2 interactions. The MPP particles were of smaller size, caused by the endogenous protease and oxidation, and reached the critical concentration to enhance the solubility. The altered characteristics of MPP enhanced its in vitro digestion rate and overall digestibility. In addition, the in vitro digestion rate of MPN can be enhanced if the oxidative stress is strong enough (10mM H2O2). PMID:27348321

  7. In Vitro Effects of Cooking Methods on Digestibility of Lipids and Formation of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Pork

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung Sil

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of cooking methods on the digestibility of lipids and formation of cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) in pork, during in vitro human digestion. Pork patties were cooked using four different methods (oven cooking, pan frying, boiling, and microwaving), to an internal temperature of approximately 85℃. The digestibility of pork patties were then evaluated, using the in vitro human digestion model that simulated the composition (pH, minerals, surfaceactive components, and enzymes) of digestive juices in the human mouth, stomach, and small intestine. The total lipid digestibility was higher after microwave cooking, whereas pan-frying resulted in lower in vitro digestibility, compared to the other cooking methods. The microwaving method followed by in vitro digestion also showed significantly higher content of free fatty acids and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), compared to the other cooking methods; whereas, the pan frying and boiling methods showed the lowest. Cholesterol content was not significantly different among the cooked samples before, and after in vitro human digestion. The formation of COPs was significantly higher in the microwave-treated pork samples, compared to those cooked by the other methods, which was consistent with the trend for lipid peroxidation (TBARS). We propose that from the point of view of COPs formation and lipid oxidation, the pan-frying or boiling methods would be useful. PMID:26761168

  8. Effects of Procyanidin on Meat Quality and Shelf-Life for Preserving Pork Patties during Chilled Storage.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Young; Seol, Kuk-Hwan; Seong, Pil-Nam; Park, Beom-Young; Kim, Hyoun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Grape seeds and pericarp are rich in procyanidins, a class of natural antioxidants and antimicrobials that can provide phytonutrients for healthy eating and extend food shelf life. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of procyanidins as preservatives in pork meat patties for 14 d. Pork patties were treated with 0, 0.1, or 0.3% procyanidin, and meat color, pH, volatile basic nitrogen (VBN), 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values, and microbial populations were determined during storage at 4℃ for 14 d. The color of pork patties treated with procyanidin showed lower lightness and higher redness values than untreated controls, and procyanidin treatment reduced pH values significantly (p<0.05). VBN values decreased significantly (p<0.05) with the 0.3% procyanidin treatment and increased significantly (p<0.05) during storage. TBARS values were markedly lower in procyanidin-treated meat than in the untreated control. In addition, procyanidin suppressed total bacterial colony and Escherichia coli counts significantly (p<0.05) relative to the control samples. Our findings suggest that procyanidin could be used as a food preservative in pork patties due to its natural antioxidation and antimicrobial activities, and that it may contribute to an improved healthy diet. PMID:26761880

  9. Effects of Procyanidin on Meat Quality and Shelf-Life for Preserving Pork Patties during Chilled Storage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Grape seeds and pericarp are rich in procyanidins, a class of natural antioxidants and antimicrobials that can provide phytonutrients for healthy eating and extend food shelf life. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of procyanidins as preservatives in pork meat patties for 14 d. Pork patties were treated with 0, 0.1, or 0.3% procyanidin, and meat color, pH, volatile basic nitrogen (VBN), 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values, and microbial populations were determined during storage at 4℃ for 14 d. The color of pork patties treated with procyanidin showed lower lightness and higher redness values than untreated controls, and procyanidin treatment reduced pH values significantly (p<0.05). VBN values decreased significantly (p<0.05) with the 0.3% procyanidin treatment and increased significantly (p<0.05) during storage. TBARS values were markedly lower in procyanidin-treated meat than in the untreated control. In addition, procyanidin suppressed total bacterial colony and Escherichia coli counts significantly (p<0.05) relative to the control samples. Our findings suggest that procyanidin could be used as a food preservative in pork patties due to its natural antioxidation and antimicrobial activities, and that it may contribute to an improved healthy diet. PMID:26761880

  10. Effect of Different Tumbling Marination Methods and Time on the Water Status and Protein Properties of Prepared Pork Chops

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tian; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Jiang, Yun; Yin, Maowen; Liu, Yang; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    The combined effect of tumbling marination methods (vacuum continuous tumbling marination, CT; vacuum intermittent tumbling marination, IT) and effective tumbling time (4, 6, 8, and 10 h) on the water status and protein properties of prepared pork chops was investigated. Results showed that regardless of tumbling time, CT method significantly decreased the muscle fiber diameter (MD) and significantly increased the total moisture content, product yield, salt soluble proteins (SSP) solubility, immobilized water component (p<0.05) compared with IT method. With the effective tumbling time increased from 4 h to 10 h, the fat content and the MD were significantly decreased (p<0.05), whereas the SSP solubility of prepared pork chops increased firstly and then decreased. Besides, an interactive effect between CT method and effective tumbling time was also observed for the chemical composition and proportion of immobilized water (p<0.05). These results demonstrated that CT method of 8 h was the most beneficial for improving the muscle structure and water distribution status, increasing the water-binding capacity and accelerating the marinade efficiency of pork chops; and thus, it should be chosen as the most optimal treatment method for the processing production of prepared pork chops. PMID:26104408

  11. A portable nondestructive real-time detection system for inspection of pork quality attributes using Vis/NIR spectral technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Peng, Yankun

    2016-05-01

    There are many preferences expressing the quality of pork: color, pH, especially TVB-N content. Different quality pork has different spectral feature (in range of 400 to 1000nm). To detect quality attributes of pork easily, real-time, nondestructively, a portable device based on Vis/NIR spectral technique was developed. The device is mainly made up of four units: light source, spectrometer, controller and display screen. After hardware platform established, reflectance spectra of 44 samples were collected from this system. And their physicochemical characteristics such as color parameters, pH value and the content of total volatile basic-nitrogen (TVB-N) were measured in standard methods. Spectrum data acquired were processed by Savitzky-Golay filter(S-G) for noise removal, and then operated by standard normal variable transformation (SNV) for baseline drifts relieving. The partial least squares regression (PLSR) was used to build prediction models for L*, a*, b* pH* and TVB-N content, which could gain good prediction results with Rp of 0.92, 0.91, 0.92, 0.95 and 0.96 respectively. The results demonstrated that this device could be a promising tool applied to detecting pork quality attributes portably, real-time and nondestructively.

  12. 78 FR 15645 - Mandatory Country of Origin Labeling of Beef, Pork, Lamb, Chicken, Goat Meat, Wild and Farm...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... Country of Origin Labeling of Beef, Pork, Lamb, Chicken, Goat Meat, Wild and Farm-Raised Fish and... Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) regulations to change the labeling provisions for muscle cut covered... is issuing this rule to propose changes to the labeling provisions for muscle cut covered...

  13. 77 FR 14724 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Importation of Pork...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... products to prevent the introduction into and dissemination within the United States of animal diseases and...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Importation of Pork-filled Pasta Products AGENCY: Animal and...

  14. Discrimination of in vitro and in vivo digestion products of meat proteins from pork, beef, chicken, and fish.

    PubMed

    Wen, Siying; Zhou, Guanghong; Song, Shangxin; Xu, Xinglian; Voglmeir, Josef; Liu, Li; Zhao, Fan; Li, Mengjie; Li, Li; Yu, Xiaobo; Bai, Yun; Li, Chunbao

    2015-11-01

    In vitro digestion products of proteins were compared among beef, pork, chicken, and fish. Gastric and jejunal contents from the rats fed these meat proteins were also compared. Cooked pork, beef, chicken, and fish were homogenized and incubated with pepsin alone or followed by trypsin. The digestion products with molecular weights of less than 3000 Da were identified with MALDI-TOF-MS and nano-LC-MS/MS. Gastric and jejunal contents obtained from the rats fed the four meat proteins for 7 days were also analyzed. After pepsin digestion, pork, and beef samples had a greater number of fragments in similarity than chicken and fish samples, but the in vitro digestibility was the greatest (p < 0.05) for pork and the smallest for beef samples. After trypsin digestion, the species differences were less pronounced (p > 0.05). A total of 822 and 659 peptides were identified from the in vitro and in vivo digestion products, respectively. Our results could interpret for the differences in physiological functions after the ingestion of different species of meat.

  15. Rapid Determination of Clenbuterol in Pork by Direct Immersion Solid-Phase Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Diru; Wu, Susu; Xu, Jianqiao; Jiang, Ruifen; Zhu, Fang; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2016-02-01

    Direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for rapid analysis of clenbuterol in pork for the first time. In this work, a low-cost homemade 44 µm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SPME fiber was employed to extract clenbuterol in pork. After extraction, derivatization was performed by suspending the fiber in the headspace of the 2 mL sample vial saturated with a vapor of 100 µL hexamethyldisilazane. Lastly, the fiber was directly introduced to GC-MS for analysis. All parameters that influenced absorption (extraction time), derivatization (derivatization reagent, time and temperature) and desorption (desorption time) were optimized. Under optimized conditions, the method offered a wide linear range (10-1000 ng g(-1)) and a low detection limit (3.6 ng g(-1)). Finally, the method was successfully applied in the analysis of pork from the market, and recoveries of the method for spiked pork were 97.4-105.7%. Compared with the traditional solvent extraction method, the proposed method was much cheaper and fast.

  16. Effect of Dietary Processed Sulfur Supplementation on Water-holding Capacity, Color, and Lipid Profiles of Pork.

    PubMed

    Yang, FengQi; Kim, Ji-Han; Yeon, Su Jung; Hong, Go-Eun; Park, Woojoon; Lee, Chi-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of dietary processed sulfur supplementation on water-holding capacity, color, and lipid profiles of pork according to the level of dietary processed sulfur (0%, CON; 0.3%, S). The pigs were slaughtered at an average final weight of 120 kg, and the longissimus dorsi muscles were collected from the carcasses. As results, pork processed with sulfur had significantly higher moisture and ash contents compared to those of CON but lower crude fat, pH, expressible drip, lower redness and yellowness, and greater lightness. Pork processed with sulfur showed significantly lower total lipid content, triglycerides, and atherosclerosis index but significantly higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Feeding processed sulfur significantly lowered myristic acid, heptadecanoic acid, and stearic acid contents, whereas monounsaturated fatty acids and oleic acids were significantly higher compared to those in the CON. Higher amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids and n-6 fatty acids were observed in the pork processed with sulfur than that of the CON. Therefore, supplementing pigs with dietary sulfur improved nutrient and meat quality. PMID:26877643

  17. Effect of natural microbiota on growth of Salmonella spp. in fresh pork--a predictive microbiology approach.

    PubMed

    Møller, C O A; Ilg, Y; Aabo, S; Christensen, B B; Dalgaard, P; Hansen, T B

    2013-06-01

    This study was undertaken to model and predict growth of Salmonella and the dominating natural microbiota, and their interaction in ground pork. Growth of Salmonella in sterile ground pork at constant temperatures between 4 °C and 38 °C was quantified and used for developing predictive models for lag time, max. specific growth rate and max. population density. Data from literature were used to develop growth models for the natural pork microbiota. Challenge tests at temperatures from 9.4 to 24.1 °C and with Salmonella inoculated in ground pork were used for evaluation of interaction models. The existing Jameson-effect and Lotka-Volterra species interaction models and a new expanded Jameson-effect model were evaluated. F-test indicated lack-of-fit for the classical Jameson-effect model at all of the tested temperatures and at 14.1-20.2 °C this was caused by continued growth of Salmonella after the natural microbiota had reached their max. population density. The new expanded Jameson-effect model and the Lotka-Volterra model performed better and appropriately described the continued but reduced growth of Salmonella after the natural microbiota had reached their max. population density. The expanded Jameson-effect model is a new and simple species interaction model, which performed as well as the more complex Lotka-Volterra model.

  18. Dynamic kinetic analysis of growth of Listeria monocytogenes in a simulated comminuted, non-cured cooked pork product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to directly construct a tertiary growth model for Listeria monocytogenes in cooked pork and simultaneously determine the kinetic parameters using a combination of dynamic and isothermal growth curves. Growth studies were conducted using a cocktail of 5 strains of L. ...

  19. Effect of phosphate and meat (pork) types on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores during abusive chilling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of blends of phosphates and the pork meat type (pale, soft and exudative, PSE; normal; and dark, firm and dry, DFD) on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens during abusive exponential chilling times was evaluated. Two different phosphates, tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSP...

  20. Combined Effect of Kimchi Powder and Onion Peel Extract on Quality Characteristics of Emulsion Sausages Prepared with Irradiated Pork.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Yoen; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Choi, Min-Sung; Ham, Youn-Kyung; Choi, Yun-Sang; Lee, Ju-Woon; Lee, Si-Kyung; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of kimchi powder and onion peel extract on the quality characteristics of emulsion sausage manufactured with irradiated pork. The emulsion sausages were formulated with 2% kimchi powder and/or 0.05% onion peel extract. The changes in pH value of all treatments were similar, depending on storage periods. The addition of kimchi powder increased the redness and yellowness of the emulsion sausage. The addition of onion peel extract decreased the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances value of the emulsion sausages prepared with irradiated pork. The volatile basic nitrogen value of the emulsion sausage prepared with kimchi powder was the highest, whereas that of the emulsion sausage prepared with onion peel extract was the lowest. The treatment without kimchi powder or onion peel extract and the treatments prepared with onion peel extract showed lower microbial populations than the other treatment. Sensory evaluations indicated that a higher acceptability was attained when kimchi powder was added to the emulsion sausages manufactured with irradiated pork. In conclusion, our results suggest that combined use of kimchi powder and onion peel extract could improve quality characteristics and shelf stability of the emulsion sausage formulated with irradiated pork during chilled storage. PMID:26761840

  1. Development of a system for classification of pork loins for tenderness using visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boneless pork loins (n = 901) were evaluated either on the loin boning and trimming line of large-scale commercial plants (n = 465) or at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center abattoir (n = 436). Exposed LM on the ventral side of boneless loins was evaluated with visible and near-infrared spectrosco...

  2. In Vitro Effects of Cooking Methods on Digestibility of Lipids and Formation of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Pork.

    PubMed

    Hur, Sun Jin; Lee, Seung Yuan; Moon, Sung Sil; Lee, Seung Jae

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of cooking methods on the digestibility of lipids and formation of cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) in pork, during in vitro human digestion. Pork patties were cooked using four different methods (oven cooking, pan frying, boiling, and microwaving), to an internal temperature of approximately 85℃. The digestibility of pork patties were then evaluated, using the in vitro human digestion model that simulated the composition (pH, minerals, surfaceactive components, and enzymes) of digestive juices in the human mouth, stomach, and small intestine. The total lipid digestibility was higher after microwave cooking, whereas pan-frying resulted in lower in vitro digestibility, compared to the other cooking methods. The microwaving method followed by in vitro digestion also showed significantly higher content of free fatty acids and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), compared to the other cooking methods; whereas, the pan frying and boiling methods showed the lowest. Cholesterol content was not significantly different among the cooked samples before, and after in vitro human digestion. The formation of COPs was significantly higher in the microwave-treated pork samples, compared to those cooked by the other methods, which was consistent with the trend for lipid peroxidation (TBARS). We propose that from the point of view of COPs formation and lipid oxidation, the pan-frying or boiling methods would be useful.

  3. Discrimination of in vitro and in vivo digestion products of meat proteins from pork, beef, chicken, and fish

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Siying; Zhou, Guanghong; Song, Shangxin; Xu, Xinglian; Voglmeir, Josef; Liu, Li; Zhao, Fan; Li, Mengjie; Li, Li; Yu, Xiaobo; Bai, Yun

    2015-01-01

    In vitro digestion products of proteins were compared among beef, pork, chicken, and fish. Gastric and jejunal contents from the rats fed these meat proteins were also compared. Cooked pork, beef, chicken, and fish were homogenized and incubated with pepsin alone or followed by trypsin. The digestion products with molecular weights of less than 3000 Da were identified with MALDI‐TOF‐MS and nano‐LC‐MS/MS. Gastric and jejunal contents obtained from the rats fed the four meat proteins for 7 days were also analyzed. After pepsin digestion, pork, and beef samples had a greater number of fragments in similarity than chicken and fish samples, but the in vitro digestibility was the greatest (p < 0.05) for pork and the smallest for beef samples. After trypsin digestion, the species differences were less pronounced (p > 0.05). A total of 822 and 659 peptides were identified from the in vitro and in vivo digestion products, respectively. Our results could interpret for the differences in physiological functions after the ingestion of different species of meat. PMID:26227428

  4. Effect of Dietary Processed Sulfur Supplementation on Water-holding Capacity, Color, and Lipid Profiles of Pork

    PubMed Central

    Yang, FengQi; Kim, Ji-Han; Yeon, Su Jung; Hong, Go-Eun; Park, Woojoon; Lee, Chi-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of dietary processed sulfur supplementation on water-holding capacity, color, and lipid profiles of pork according to the level of dietary processed sulfur (0%, CON; 0.3%, S). The pigs were slaughtered at an average final weight of 120 kg, and the longissimus dorsi muscles were collected from the carcasses. As results, pork processed with sulfur had significantly higher moisture and ash contents compared to those of CON but lower crude fat, pH, expressible drip, lower redness and yellowness, and greater lightness. Pork processed with sulfur showed significantly lower total lipid content, triglycerides, and atherosclerosis index but significantly higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Feeding processed sulfur significantly lowered myristic acid, heptadecanoic acid, and stearic acid contents, whereas monounsaturated fatty acids and oleic acids were significantly higher compared to those in the CON. Higher amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids and n-6 fatty acids were observed in the pork processed with sulfur than that of the CON. Therefore, supplementing pigs with dietary sulfur improved nutrient and meat quality. PMID:26877643

  5. Synergistic Effects of Electron-beam Irradiation and Leek Extract on the Quality of Pork Jerky during Ambient Storage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Joo; Kang, Mingu; Yong, Hae In; Bae, Young Sik; Jung, Samooel; Jo, Cheorun

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the synergistic effect(s) of electron-beam (EB) irradiation and leek (Allium tuberosum Rottler) extract on the quality of pork jerky during ambient storage, we irradiated prepared pork jerky samples (control and samples with 0.5% and 1.0% leek extract) with EB technology at doses of 0, 1, 2, and 4 kGy, stored them for 2 months at 25°C, and analyzed them. Water activity was 0.73 to 0.77 in non-irradiated samples, and no significant difference in the water activity was observed between the samples treated with leek and the control. The total aerobic bacterial count was significantly decreased with an increase in the irradiation dose and leek extract addition when compared to that of the control (4.54±0.05 log CFU/g). Further, the Hunter color values (L*, a*, and b*) were found to be significantly decreased following leek extract addition and EB irradiation. However, the color values, especially the a* value of the irradiated samples significantly increased during storage. Notably, increasing the EB irradiation dose enhanced the peroxide value. Sensory evaluation revealed that irradiation decreased flavor and overall acceptability. Our findings suggest the use of EB irradiation in combination with leek extract to improve the microbiological safety of pork jerky. However, in order to meet market requirements, novel methods to enhance the sensory quality of pork jerky are warranted. PMID:25049828

  6. Combined Effect of Kimchi Powder and Onion Peel Extract on Quality Characteristics of Emulsion Sausages Prepared with Irradiated Pork

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Lee, Ju-Woon; Lee, Si-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of kimchi powder and onion peel extract on the quality characteristics of emulsion sausage manufactured with irradiated pork. The emulsion sausages were formulated with 2% kimchi powder and/or 0.05% onion peel extract. The changes in pH value of all treatments were similar, depending on storage periods. The addition of kimchi powder increased the redness and yellowness of the emulsion sausage. The addition of onion peel extract decreased the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances value of the emulsion sausages prepared with irradiated pork. The volatile basic nitrogen value of the emulsion sausage prepared with kimchi powder was the highest, whereas that of the emulsion sausage prepared with onion peel extract was the lowest. The treatment without kimchi powder or onion peel extract and the treatments prepared with onion peel extract showed lower microbial populations than the other treatment. Sensory evaluations indicated that a higher acceptability was attained when kimchi powder was added to the emulsion sausages manufactured with irradiated pork. In conclusion, our results suggest that combined use of kimchi powder and onion peel extract could improve quality characteristics and shelf stability of the emulsion sausage formulated with irradiated pork during chilled storage. PMID:26761840

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterococcus hirae R17, a Daptomycin-Resistant Bacterium Isolated from Retail Pork in China

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zixin; Wang, Wei; Hu, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Daptomycin-resistant Enterococcus hirae R17 was isolated from retail pork sold at a free-trade market in Beijing, China. The complete genome sequence of R17 contains a circular 2,886,481-bp chromosome and a circular 73,574-bp plasmid. Genes involved in cell envelope homeostasis of this bacterium were identified by whole-genome analysis. PMID:27340071

  8. The prevalence of Salmonella from cheek meat and head trim in a pork processing plant in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a preliminary survey, a large pork processing plant in the United States was sampled bimonthly from January to July of 2015 to determine the prevalence, seasonality, and serotype diversity of Salmonella enterica (SE) isolated from cheek meat and head trim of swine carcasses. Each cheek meat and ...

  9. Meta-analysis of effects of gender in combination with carcass weight and breed on pork quality.

    PubMed

    Trefan, L; Doeschl-Wilson, A; Rooke, J A; Terlouw, C; Bünger, L

    2013-03-01

    Meta-analysis was performed to quantify the effects of gender in combination with carcass weight and breed on pork quality. Altogether published results from 43 references were used. The traits analyzed were pH at 45 min (pH45min) and pH at 24 h (pH24hr) postmortem, objective color attributes lightness (L*), redness (a*), and yellowness (b*; CIE color system), color and marbling scores, drip loss, intramuscular fat content (IMF), and backfat thickness (P2), as well as sensory scores of juiciness and tenderness. Data for 2 muscle types, LM and Musculus semimembranosus (SMM), were used for the analysis. Swine genders were defined as intact/entire male (EM), surgically castrated male (SM), immunocastrated male (IM), and entire female (EF). After standardization of scaled traits (color, marbling scores, juiciness, tenderness) and accounting for cold carcass weight (CW), statistical analysis was performed using mixed models where breed was included as random effect. The analysis found a general effect of gender on each trait and multiple comparisons identified significant differences among the individual genders for L* (lightness), marbling scores, IMF, P2 in LM, and pH24hr in SMM. For these traits, when genders were grouped into gender categories as "castrates" (IM, SM) and "natural genders" (EM, EF), significant differences were found among estimates related to these categories. Furthermore, significant differences were found between castrates and individual gender types, indicating that castrated animals statistically segregated regarding their pork quality and regardless of type of castration. Pork of SM/EM animals has been found to be the fattest/leanest and there is indication that IM pork has the lightest meat color. Carcass weight dependence was found to be nonlinear (quadratic) for a*, P2, and marbling scores, and linear for b* and color scores in LM and pH24hr in SMM. The analysis identified significant breed effects for all traits, with large variation in the

  10. Effect of phosphate and meat (pork) types on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores during abusive chilling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aikansh; Korasapati, Nageswara Rao; Juneja, Vijay K; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan

    2010-05-01

    The effect of phosphate blends and pork meat type (pale, soft, and exudative [PSE]; normal; and dark, firm, and dry [DFD]) on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens during abusive exponential chilling times was evaluated. Two phosphates were used: tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSPP) and sodium acid pyrophosphate (SAPP; from two different sources, SAPP(1) and SAPP(2)). The pork loins representing each meat type were ground (1/8-in. [0.3-cm] plate), and one of the three phosphate blends (SAPP(1)+SAPP(2), TSPP+SAPP(1), or TSPP+SAPP(2)) was added (0.3% total, equal proportions of 0.15% each type) with salt (1.0%). The pork was then mixed with a three-strain C. perfringens spore cocktail to obtain a final concentration of ca. 2.0 to 2.5 log spores per g. The inoculated product was heat shocked for 20 min at 75 degrees C and chilled exponentially from 54.4 to 4 degrees C in a period of 6.5, 9, 12, 15, 18, or 21 h. In control samples (PSE, normal, and DFD), the increase in C. perfringens population was <1 log CFU/g within the 6.5-h chilling period, and longer chilling times resulted in greater increases. C. perfringens population increases of 5.95, 4.73, and 5.95 log CFU/g of meat were observed in normal, PSE, and DFD pork, respectively, during the 21-h abusive chilling period. The combination of SAPP(1)+SAPP(2) was more effective than the other treatments for inhibiting C. perfringens. The types of phosphate and their blends and the meat type affected the germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens spores in cooked pork during abusive chilling periods.

  11. Effect of betaine and arginine in lysine-deficient diets on growth, carcass traits, and pork quality.

    PubMed

    Madeira, M S; Alfaia, C M; Costa, P; Lopes, P A; Martins, S V; Lemos, J P C; Moreira, O; Santos-Silva, J; Bessa, R J B; Prates, J A M

    2015-10-01

    Forty entire male pigs from a commercial crossbreed (Duroc × Large White × Landrace) were used to investigate the individual or combined effects of betaine and Arg supplementation in Lys-deficient diets on growth performance, carcass traits, and pork quality. Pigs with 59.9 ± 1.65 kg BW were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 dietary treatments ( = 8). The 5 dietary treatments were normal Lys and CP diet (0.51% Lys and 16% CP; control), reduced Lys and CP diet (0.35% Lys and 13% CP), reduced Lys and CP diet with betaine supplementation (0.33%), reduced Lys and CP diet with Arg supplementation (1.5%), and reduced Lys and CP diet with betaine and Arg supplementation (0.33% betaine and 1.5% Arg). Pigs were slaughtered at 92.7 ± 2.54 kg BW. The Lys-deficient diets (-35% Lys) increased intramuscular fat (IMF) content by 25% ( = 0.041) and meat juiciness by 12% ( = 0.041) but had a negative effect on growth performance ( < 0.05) of pigs. In addition, Lys-deficient diets increased L* ( = 0.005) and b* ( = 0.010) muscle color parameters and perirenal fat deposition ( < 0.001) and decreased both HCW ( = 0.015) and loin weight ( = 0.023). Betaine and Arg supplementation of Lys-deficient diets had no effect on IMF content but increased ( < 0.05) overall pork acceptability. Arginine supplementation also increased ( = 0.003) meat tenderness. Differences in fatty acid composition of pork were not detected among dietary treatment groups. However, oleic acid was positively correlated ( < 0.05) with IMF content, juiciness, flavor, and overall acceptability of meat. Data confirm that dietary CP reduction enhances pork eating quality but negatively affects pigs' growth performance. Moreover, it is suggested that betaine and Arg supplementation of Lys-deficient diets does not further increase IMF content but improves some pork sensory traits, including overall acceptability.

  12. Antioxidant Activity of Allium hookeri Root Extract and Its Effect on Lipid Stability of Sulfur-fed Pork Patties

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the antioxidant activity of Allium hookeri root extract (AHE) on lipid oxidation of raw sulfur-fed pork patties for 14 d of refrigerated storage. Different concentration of ethanol (0-100%) and time (1-12 h) were applied to determine the extraction condition. Water (0% ethanol) extraction for 1 h was selected as an optimal extraction condition of AHE for the following study showing the highest total phenolic content and total flavonoid content, as well as the strongest antioxidant activity. The 1% AHE (SP1), 3% AHE (SP2), and 0.05% ascorbic acid (SP3) were added into sulfur-fed pork patties against controls; SP0 (sulfur-fed pork patties with no AHE) and P0 (normal pork patties with no AHE). The pH values of P0 and SP0 significantly increased (p<0.05) than others on 14 d and redness of P0 showed the largest decrement during storage. P0 and SP0 showed higher production of conjugated dienes on d 7 than others (p<0.05). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values were decreased in proportion to the increased level of AHE on 14 d (p<0.05) resulting in higher TBARS values on P0 and SP0 (p<0.05) and the negative correlation between AHE level and TBARS were also demonstrated (r=-0.910, p=0.001). Therefore, the results suggest that AHE effectively retarded the lipid oxidation rate of sulfur-fed pork patties indicating the potential usage of AHE as a natural preservative. PMID:26761799

  13. Effect of partial replacement of pork meat with an olive oil organogel on the physicochemical and sensory quality of dry-ripened venison sausages.

    PubMed

    Utrilla, M C; García Ruiz, A; Soriano, A

    2014-08-01

    A venison salchichon was made using varying proportions of olive oil to replace the traditional pork meat and to obtain a healthier product. Six types of salchichon were produced. The control type contained 75% lean venison and 25% pork meat; in the other types, 15%, 25%, 35%, 45% and 55% of the pork meat were replaced by olive oil introduced in the form of an organogel (olive oil emulsified with soy protein and water). All types were satisfactory in terms of physicochemical characteristics (pH, a(w), moisture loss) and instrumental colour throughout ripening, and displayed acceptable levels of lipolysis (acidity index) and lipid oxidation (TBARS). Higher proportions of olive oil prompted an increase in monounsaturated fatty acid content (mainly C18:1). All six types of salchichon were judged acceptable by consumers, the highest scores being given to those in which no more than 25% of the pork meat was replaced by olive oil.

  14. A highly sensitive and specific tetraplex PCR assay for soybean, poultry, horse and pork species identification in sausages: development and validation.

    PubMed

    Safdar, M; Junejo, Y; Arman, Kaifee; Abasıyanık, M F

    2014-10-01

    A tetraplex PCR assay was developed for a rapid and reliable identification of horse, soybean, poultry, and pork species in sausages simultaneously. The method merges the use of horse (Equus caballus), soybean (Glycine max), poultry (Gallus gallus), and pork (Sus scrofa) specific primers that amplify small fragments (horse; 85bp, soybean; 100bp, poultry; 183bp and pork; 212bp) of the mitochondrial cyt b, lectin, 12S rRNA and ATPase subunit 6 genes respectively. Good quality DNA was isolated from reference sausage to optimize the assay. Tetraplex analysis of the reference sausage samples showed that the detection limit of the assay was 0.01% for each species. Taken together, all data indicated that this tetraplex PCR assay was a simple, rapid, sensitive, specific, and cost-effective detection method for horse, soybean, poultry, and pork species in commercial sausages.

  15. Enhancement of the nutritional status and quality of fresh pork sausages following the addition of linseed oil, fish oil and natural antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Valencia, I; O'Grady, M N; Ansorena, D; Astiasarán, I; Kerry, J P

    2008-12-01

    Fresh pork sausages (pork shoulder, pork back fat, water, rusk and seasoning) were manufactured where 15% of the pork back fat was substituted with linseed oil (LO) or fish oil (FO). Green tea catechins (GTC) and green coffee antioxidant (GCA) were added to both LO (LGTC 200 and LGCA 200) and FO (FGTC 200 and FGCA 200) substituted sausages at a level of 200mg/kg. Raw and cooked pork sausages were either over-wrapped with oxygen permeable film (aerobic storage) or stored in modified atmosphere packages (MAP) containing 80% O(2):20% CO(2) or 70% N(2):30% CO(2), respectively for 7 days at 4°C. Effects on fatty acid profiles, lipid oxidation, colour and sensorial properties were investigated. α-Linolenic acid increased from 1.34% (control) to 8.91% (LO) and up to 11.2% (LGTC 200 and LGCA 200). Addition of fish oil increased levels of EPA from 0.05% (control) to 2.83% (FO), 3.02% (FGTC 200) and 2.87% (FGCA 200) and DHA levels increased from 0.04% (control) to a maximum of 1.93% (FGTC 200). Lipid oxidation was low in raw and cooked linseed oil containing sausages. GTC (200mg/kg) significantly (P<0.05) reduced lipid oxidation in raw fish oil containing sausages after 7 days of storage. Colour parameters in raw pork sausages were unaffected by the packaging atmosphere. L(∗) lightness values were lower (P<0.05) in LGTC 200 and a(∗) redness values lower (P<0.05) in LGTC 200 and FGTC 200 after 7 days of storage. Sensory scores of cooked pork sausages were unaffected by linseed oil addition. Flavour and overall acceptability scores in cooked fish oil containing sausages were improved by GTC addition. Results obtained demonstrate potential for the production of nutritionally enhanced fresh pork sausages.

  16. Detection of pork adulteration in processed meat by species-specific PCR-QIAxcel procedure based on D-loop and cytb genes.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Hassan; El-Garhy, Hoda A S; Moustafa, Mahmoud M A

    2014-12-01

    Detection of pork meat adulteration in "halal" meat products is a crucial issue in the fields of modern food inspection according to implementation of very strict procedures for halal food labelling. Present study aims at detecting and quantifying pork adulteration in both raw and cooked manufactured sausages. This is by applying an optimized species-specific PCR procedure followed by QIAxcel capillary electrophoresis system. Manufacturing experiment was designed by incorporating pork with beef meat at 0.01 to 10 % substitution levels beside beef and pork sausages as negative and positive controls, respectively. Subsequently, sausages were divided into raw and cooked sausages then subjected to DNA extraction. Results indicated that PCR amplifications of mitochondrial D-loop and cytochrome b (cytb) genes by porcine-specific primers produced 185 and 117 bp pork-specific DNA fragments in sausages, respectively. No DNA fragments were detected when PCR was applied on beef sausage DNA confirming primers specificity. For internal control, a 141-bp DNA fragment of eukaryotic 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was amplified from pork and beef DNA templates. Although PCR followed by either QIAxcel or agarose techniques were efficient for targeted DNA fragments differentiation even as low as 0.01 % (pork/meat: w/w). For proficiency, adequacy, and performance, PCR-QIA procedure is highly sensitive, a time-saver, electronically documented, mutagenic-reagent free, of little manual errors, accurate in measuring PCR fragments length, and quantitative data supplier. In conclusion, it can be suggested that optimized PCR-QAI is considered as a rapid and sensitive method for routine pork detection and quantification in raw or processed meat.

  17. Use of carbon monoxide combined with carbon dioxide for modified atmosphere packaging of pre- and postrigor fresh pork sausage to improve shelf life.

    PubMed

    Laury, Angela; Sebranek, Joseph G

    2007-04-01

    Fresh pre- and postrigor pork sausage patties were manufactured in the Iowa State University Meat Laboratory and packaged either in modified atmosphere (MAP) with 0.4% carbon monoxide (CO) and 99.6% carbon dioxide (CO2) or on foam trays overwrapped with oxygen-permeable film (OW). Packages were stored at 2 to 40C under fluorescent lights for up to 31 days. Aerobic, anaerobic, and psychrotrophic plate counts, raw and cooked color, purge, and lipid oxidation were measured during storage. Results indicated that both pork sausage products in MAP had lower aerobic and psychrotrophic counts and less lipid oxidation throughout storage (P < 0.05). Raw color of both products in MAP was redder than the OW patties (P < 0.05), but the prerigor pork sausage in MAP benefited more from the CO atmosphere in terms of raw color than the postrigor pork sausage in MAP. Cooked color of the prerigor pork sausage in MAP was significantly redder than cooked color of the postrigor pork sausage. Both pork sausage products in MAP were also lighter (L* value) than the OW patties for raw and cooked color. Therefore, the combination of CO and CO2 in MAP was beneficial in extending the shelf life of pre-and postrigor fresh pork sausage by reducing aerobic and psychrotrophic microbial growth and improving oxidative stability and color, compared to conventional OW packaging. However, increased purge, increased anaerobic growth, and changes in cooking behavior were also observed for the products in MAP during storage (P < 0.05).

  18. Iron(II) Initiation of Lipid and Protein Oxidation in Pork: The Role of Oxymyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feibai; Jongberg, Sisse; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Weizheng; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-01

    Iron(II), added as FeSO4·7H2O, was found to increase the rate of oxygen depletion as detected electrochemically in a pork homogenate from Longissimus dorsi through an initial increase in metmyoglobin formation from oxymyoglobin and followed by formation of primary and secondary lipid oxidation products and protein oxidation as detected as thiol depletion in myofibrillar proteins. Without added iron(II), under the same conditions at 37 °C, oxygen consumption corresponded solely to the slow oxymyoglobin autoxidation. Long-lived myofibrillar protein radicals as detected by ESR spectroscopy in the presence of iron(II) were formed subsequently to oxymyoglobin oxidation, and their level was increased by lipid oxidation when oxygen was completely depleted. Similarly, the time profile for formation of lipid peroxide indicated that oxymyoglobin oxidation initiates both protein oxidation and lipid oxidation.

  19. Effects of lactobacillus plantarum ZJ316 on pig growth and pork quality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus plantarum is a plant-associated bacterial species but it has also been found in human, mouse and porcine gastrointestinal tracts. It can ferment a broad spectrum of plant carbohydrates; it is tolerant of bile salts and low pH, and it has antagonistic potential against intestinal pathogens. However, experiments reporting the use of L. plantarum as a probiotic are limited. In this study, the effects of L. plantarum ZJ316 isolated from infant fecal samples on pig growth and pork quality were investigated. Results One hundred and fifty newly weaned pigs were selected randomly and divided into five groups. Group 1 was fed a diet supplemented with the antibiotic mequindox; Groups 2, 3 and 4 were fed a diet supplemented with L. plantarum and no antibiotic; and Group 5 was fed a mixture of mequindox and L. plantarum. After a 60 days initial treatment, samples were collected for evaluation. The results showed that, the L. plantarum ZJ316 has probiotic effects on pig growth and that these effects are dose dependent. The effects of a dose of 1 × 109 CFU/d were more pronounced than those of a dose of 5 × 109 CFU/d or 1 × 1010 CFU/d. In Group 2 (1 × 109 CFU/d), the diarrhea (p = 0.000) and mortality rates (p = 0.448) were lower than in antibiotic-treated pigs (Group 1), and the daily weight gain (p = 0.001) and food conversion ratios were better (p = 0.005). Improved pork quality was associated with Lactobacillus treatment. pH (45 min, p = 0.020), hardness (p = 0.000), stickiness (p = 0.044), chewiness (p = 0.000), gumminess (p = 0.000) and restoring force (p = 0.004) were all significantly improved in Lactobacillus-treated pigs (Group 2). Although we found that L. plantarum exerted probiotic effects on pig growth and pork quality, the mechanisms underlying its action require further study. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis results showed that the gut

  20. The effect of high pressure on the functional properties of pork myofibrillar proteins.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Alberto; Olsen, Karsten; Bolumar, Tomas; Rinnan, Åsmund; Øgendal, Lars H; Orlien, Vibeke

    2016-04-01

    Complementary methodologies were used to analyse the pressure-induced modification and functionality of myofibrillar proteins from pork meat pressurised at 200, 400, 600, or 800 MPa (10 min, 5 or 20 °C). Pressure at 400 MPa was found to be the threshold for loss of solubility, and the structural proteins, myosin and actin, lost their native solubility due to aggregation. The results from the extraction of proteins with different reagents targeting the disruption of specific molecular interactions suggested that pressure-induced aggregation was caused mainly by hydrogen bonding during pressurisation and not hydrophobic interactions nor disulphide cross-links. Furthermore, the soluble proteins were exposed to remarkable structural changes already at 200 MPa and lost their native functionality. The modification of the proteins in pressurised meat affected the water binding sites of the myofibrillar proteins and, thereby, the interactions between proteins and water molecules, and distribution between myofibrillar and extra-myofibrillar compartments. PMID:26593583

  1. PCR identification of beef, sheep, goat, and pork in raw and heat-treated meat mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Miguel A; García, Teresa; González, Isabel; Asensio, Luis; Hernández, Pablo E; Martín, Rosario

    2004-01-01

    A PCR assay has been developed for the specific and qualitative detection of pork (Sus scrofa domesticus), beef (Bos taurus), sheep (Ovis aries), and goat (Capra hircus) in raw and heat-treated meat mixtures. A forward common primer was designed on a conserved DNA sequence in the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA), and reverse primers were designed to hybridize on species-specific DNA sequences of each species considered. The different sizes of the species-specific amplicons, separated by agarose gel electrophoresis, allowed clear species identification. Analysis of experimental meat mixtures demonstrated that the detection limit of the assay was 1% (wt/wt) for each species analyzed. This assay can be useful for the accurate identification of these species, avoiding mislabeling or fraudulent species substitution in meat mixtures.

  2. Freezing rate and frozen storage effects on the ultrastructure of samples of pork.

    PubMed

    Ngapo, T M; Babare, I H; Reynolds, J; Mawson, R F

    1999-11-01

    Cryo-scanning electron microscopy was used to study the ultrastructure of small samples (approximately 6 g) of pork. Combinations of six freezing rates, two storage times and three thawing rates were used. Cavities created after sublimation of the ice crystals were quantitatively analysed using an image analysis software package. The cross-sectional areas of cavities of meat samples in the frozen state were approximately ten times the areas of the cavities of the fresh and thawed samples. The large cavities in the frozen state grossly distorted the muscle cell structures. Upon thawing, the meat structure had almost completely recovered. No significant freezing rate effects were observed, however, trends were evident. Significant storage time effects were observed. In the frozen state, at the 90th percentile level, the hole area fraction was greater in stored samples for intermediate cavity areas. In thawed samples, hole area fractions of stored samples were greater than in samples without storage.

  3. A preliminary investigation of the effects of frozen storage on samples of pork.

    PubMed

    Ngapo, T M; Babare, I H; Reynolds, J; Mawson, R F

    1999-11-01

    The effects of combinations of freezing, thawing and frozen storage on the drip loss and ultrastructure of small samples (approximately 6 g) of pork were studied. Samples were stored for up to 12 weeks at -20°C or for up to 4 weeks at temperatures fluctuating between -10 and -3°C. Drip was collected by centrifugal extraction. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy was used to study the ultrastructure of the meat. Sizes of cavities created after sublimation of the ice crystals were quantitatively analysed using an image analysis software package. Freezing rate by storage time interactions were observed in drip loss analyses. No differences were observed in the drip protein concentration or electrophoretic patterns. Ultrastructural differences were only observed after thawing samples stored at the higher temperatures. The effects being investigated were subtle.

  4. Relationship between oxygen concentration, shear force and protein oxidation in modified atmosphere packaged pork.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yulong; Ertbjerg, Per

    2015-12-01

    Pork loins were stored at 5°C for 14 days to investigate the effect of oxygen concentration in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on shear force and oxidation of lipids and proteins. The modified atmosphere contained 0 to 80% O2, 20% CO2, and balanced with N2. The results showed that shear force and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) values increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Protein oxidation when measured as loss of free thiol groups, was greater in meat packaged under oxygen (20-80%). Myosin heavy chain (MHC) cross-linking, another marker of protein oxidation, was greater in MAP with 80% oxygen than 0% and 20% oxygen. Desmin degradation was not affected by the presence of oxygen, suggesting that the mechanism of oxygen-induced toughening of meat is through protein oxidation leading to cross-linking of structural proteins rather than through inactivation of proteolytic enzymes leading to reduced proteolysis.

  5. Lactic acid bacteria as protective cultures in fermented pork meat to prevent Clostridium spp. growth.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Diana; Mazzola, Giuseppe; Nikodinoska, Ivana; Aloisio, Irene; Langerholc, Tomaz; Rossi, Maddalena; Raimondi, Stefano; Melero, Beatriz; Rovira, Jordi

    2016-10-17

    In meat fermented foods, Clostridium spp. growth is kept under control by the addition of nitrite. The growing request of consumers for safer products has led to consider alternative bio-based approaches, the use of protective cultures being one of them. This work is aimed at checking the possibility of using two Lactobacillus spp. strains as protective cultures against Clostridium spp. in pork ground meat for fermented salami preparation. Both Lactobacillus strains displayed anti-clostridia activity in vitro using the spot agar test and after co-culturing them in liquid medium with each Clostridium strain. Only one of them, however, namely L. plantarum PCS20, was capable of effectively surviving in ground meat and of performing anti-microbial activity in carnis in a challenge test where meat was inoculated with the Clostridium strain. Therefore, this work pointed out that protective cultures can be a feasible approach for nitrite reduction in fermented meat products. PMID:27400453

  6. Influence of natural extracts on the shelf life of modified atmosphere-packaged pork patties.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, José M; Sineiro, Jorge; Amado, Isabel R; Franco, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this study four natural extracts from tea (TEA), grape (GRA), chestnut (CHE) and seaweed (SEA) with potential antioxidant activity were evaluated in pork patties. During 20 days of storage in modified atmosphere packs at 2°C, pH, colour, lipid oxidation and microbial spoilage parameters of raw minced porcine patties were examined and compared with a synthetic antioxidant (BHT) and control (CON) batch. Due to their higher polyphenol content, GRA and TEA extracts were the most effective antioxidants against lipid oxidation, also limiting colour deterioration. In addition, both natural extracts led to a decrease of total viable counts (TVC), lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Pseudomonas and psychotropic aerobic bacteria compared to the control. Among the four natural compounds tested, tea and grape extracts showed the most potential as alternatives to commercial antioxidants, for increasing the quality and extending the shelf-life of porcine patties.

  7. Relationship between oxygen concentration, shear force and protein oxidation in modified atmosphere packaged pork.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yulong; Ertbjerg, Per

    2015-12-01

    Pork loins were stored at 5°C for 14 days to investigate the effect of oxygen concentration in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on shear force and oxidation of lipids and proteins. The modified atmosphere contained 0 to 80% O2, 20% CO2, and balanced with N2. The results showed that shear force and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) values increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Protein oxidation when measured as loss of free thiol groups, was greater in meat packaged under oxygen (20-80%). Myosin heavy chain (MHC) cross-linking, another marker of protein oxidation, was greater in MAP with 80% oxygen than 0% and 20% oxygen. Desmin degradation was not affected by the presence of oxygen, suggesting that the mechanism of oxygen-induced toughening of meat is through protein oxidation leading to cross-linking of structural proteins rather than through inactivation of proteolytic enzymes leading to reduced proteolysis. PMID:26241463

  8. Lactic acid bacteria as protective cultures in fermented pork meat to prevent Clostridium spp. growth.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Diana; Mazzola, Giuseppe; Nikodinoska, Ivana; Aloisio, Irene; Langerholc, Tomaz; Rossi, Maddalena; Raimondi, Stefano; Melero, Beatriz; Rovira, Jordi

    2016-10-17

    In meat fermented foods, Clostridium spp. growth is kept under control by the addition of nitrite. The growing request of consumers for safer products has led to consider alternative bio-based approaches, the use of protective cultures being one of them. This work is aimed at checking the possibility of using two Lactobacillus spp. strains as protective cultures against Clostridium spp. in pork ground meat for fermented salami preparation. Both Lactobacillus strains displayed anti-clostridia activity in vitro using the spot agar test and after co-culturing them in liquid medium with each Clostridium strain. Only one of them, however, namely L. plantarum PCS20, was capable of effectively surviving in ground meat and of performing anti-microbial activity in carnis in a challenge test where meat was inoculated with the Clostridium strain. Therefore, this work pointed out that protective cultures can be a feasible approach for nitrite reduction in fermented meat products.

  9. Epidemiology of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae infection in pigs: a survey of Ontario Pork Producers, 1981.

    PubMed Central

    Rosendal, S; Mitchell, W R

    1983-01-01

    Information about factors associated with the spread and the effect of pleuropneumonia was obtained from 418 pork producers in Ontario, who returned a mailed questionnaire. The overall herd prevalence of pleuropneumonia was 23.2%. The prevalence among herds with feeder pigs only was 34.3% and 16% among sow herds. The chance of pleuropneumonia breaking out in a herd was increased with increased traffic of pigs into the herd. The source of supplementary stock had an important effect on the chance of pleuropneumonia occurring. The highest risk resulted from introducing stock from salesbarns and the lowest from stock of health status known to the purchaser and supplied by one breeder only. Mortality, primarily among feeder pigs, and unthriftiness were the major effects of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae infection. Stress, such as crowding or inclement climatic conditions, was associated with outbreaks of pleuropneumonia. This would suggest that the infection with H. pleuropneumoniae can be subclinical until stress precipitates the disease. PMID:6831302

  10. A rapid method for the nonselective enumeration of Yersinia enterocolitica, a foodborne pathogen associated with pork.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoran; Palmer, Jon; Flint, Steve

    2016-03-01

    An impedance method was developed as a rapid, convenient method to enumerate pure culture of Yersinia enterocolitica. Cultures were incubated in trypticase soy broth (TSB) at 30°C. The BacTrac™ 4000 microorganism growth analyser was used to detect impedance change of TSB representing bacteria cell numbers in the samples. Good correlations with standard plate counts were obtained (r(2)>0.95). This method is also reliable to enumerate Y. enterocolitica growing in biofilms attached to stainless steel. Compared with a standard plate count which involves dislodging biofilms from surfaces, this method is more convenient saving both time and effort. Therefore, it will be useful to study the conditions required for the biofilm growth and control of Y. enterocolitica that could be applied to the pork industry.

  11. The effect of high pressure on the functional properties of pork myofibrillar proteins.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Alberto; Olsen, Karsten; Bolumar, Tomas; Rinnan, Åsmund; Øgendal, Lars H; Orlien, Vibeke

    2016-04-01

    Complementary methodologies were used to analyse the pressure-induced modification and functionality of myofibrillar proteins from pork meat pressurised at 200, 400, 600, or 800 MPa (10 min, 5 or 20 °C). Pressure at 400 MPa was found to be the threshold for loss of solubility, and the structural proteins, myosin and actin, lost their native solubility due to aggregation. The results from the extraction of proteins with different reagents targeting the disruption of specific molecular interactions suggested that pressure-induced aggregation was caused mainly by hydrogen bonding during pressurisation and not hydrophobic interactions nor disulphide cross-links. Furthermore, the soluble proteins were exposed to remarkable structural changes already at 200 MPa and lost their native functionality. The modification of the proteins in pressurised meat affected the water binding sites of the myofibrillar proteins and, thereby, the interactions between proteins and water molecules, and distribution between myofibrillar and extra-myofibrillar compartments.

  12. Effect of beer marinades on formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in charcoal-grilled pork.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Olga; Yebra-Pimentel, Iria; Martínez-Carballo, Elena; Simal-Gandara, Jesus; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O

    2014-03-26

    The effect of marinating meat with Pilsner beer, nonalcoholic Pilsner beer, and Black beer (coded respectively PB, P0B, and BB) on the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in charcoal-grilled pork was evaluated and compared with the formation of these compounds in unmarinated meat. Antiradical activity of marinades (DPPH assay) was assayed. BB exhibited the strongest scavenging activity (68.0%), followed by P0B (36.5%) and PB (29.5%). Control and marinated meat samples contained the eight PAHs named PAH8 by the EFSA and classified as suitable indicators for carcinogenic potency of PAHs in food. BB showed the highest inhibitory effect in the formation of PAH8 (53%), followed by P0B (25%) and PB (13%). The inhibitory effect of beer marinades on PAH8 increased with the increase of their radical-scavenging activity. BB marinade was the most efficient on reduction of PAH formation, providing a proper mitigation strategy.

  13. Proteomic analysis of pork meat in the production of cooked ham.

    PubMed

    Pioselli, Barbara; Paredi, Gianluca; Mozzarelli, Andrea

    2011-07-01

    The industrial production of cooked ham from pork meat involves, as initial steps, the injection of brine and a prolonged meat massage. These processes strongly affect the quality of the final product because they determine the breakage of muscle cells and the release of their protein content. The produced dense exudates act as a glue in the final cooked ham. In order to exploit modern tools to direct the technological process, still mainly based on empirical observations and traditional recipes, we have carried out a comprehensive proteomic analysis of the exudates as a function of brine concentration, temperature, and length of meat massage. Each condition was found to generate specific protein patterns. Peptide mass fingerprinting analysis was applied allowing the identification of proteins, whose presence and/or quantity can be defined as biomarkers of meat processing, and, potentially, of final product quality.

  14. Detection of Clenbuterol Hydrochloride Residuals in Pork Liver Using a Customized Surface Plasmon Resonance Bioanalyzer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiandong; Chen, Ruipeng; Wang, Shun; Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Li, Jianwei; Hu, Xinran; Liang, Hao; Zhu, Juanhua; Sun, Xiaohui; Ma, Liuzheng; Jiang, Min

    2015-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunoassay with an immobilization of self-assembled molecular identification membrane for the detection of residual Clenbuterol Hydrochloride (CLB) in pork liver was systematically investigated and experimentally validated for its high performance. SPR immunoassay with a regular competitive inhibition assay cannot be directly verified to detect CLB residuals. In this study, the binding of Au film with mercaptopropionic acid was investigated using the known form of the strong S-Au covalent bonds formed by the chemical radical of the mercaptopropionic acid and the Au film. After that, the immunoglobulin IgG of swine (SwIgG-CLB) was bonded with the mercaptopropionic acid by covalent -CO-NH- amide bonding. The modified comprehensive analysis of how the membrane structure works was introduced together with the customized SPR bioanalyzer. In order to evaluate the performance of this biomembrane structure, the concentrations of CLB-contained solutions of 0 ng•mL-1, 10 ng•mL-1, 20 ng•mL-1, 33.3 ng•mL-1, and 40 ng•mL-1 were prepared by adding CLB reagents into the solutions of CLB antibody (Clenbuterol Hydrochloride Antibody, CLB-Ab), successively and then the response unit (RU) was measured individually. Using the data collected from the linear CCD array, the fitting curve was established with the R-Square value of 0.9929. Correspondingly, the recovery rate ranged from 88.48% to 103.21% was experimented and the limit of detection of CLB in 1.26 ng•mL-1 was obtained efficiently. It was concluded that the detection method associated with biomembrane properties is expected to contribute much to the determination of residual CLB in pork liver quantitatively by using the customized SPR bioanalyzer. PMID:25799327

  15. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from pork and chicken carcasses in Taiwan: prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jyhshiun; Yeh, Kuang-Sheng; Liu, Hsueh-Tao; Lin, Jiunn-Horng

    2009-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a cause of many diseases in both humans and animals. This pathogen is also a major target in the screening of slaughterhouse carcasses to monitor hygienic conditions during slaughter. During 2004 to 2006, S. aureus was recovered from 8.8% (38 of 430), 11.3% (77 of 680), and 4.3% (13 of 300) of pork carcass samples, respectively, collected at 53 slaughterhouses in Taiwan. During 2003 to 2005, it was recovered from 0.3% (1 of 305), 0.4% (1 of 260), and 7.8% (31 of 395) of rinse fluids from chicken carcasses, respectively, collected at 17 meat processing plants. The minimum dilution method was used to determine antimicrobial susceptibility (MICs) of these strains (n = 103) as well as those collected from pork and chicken carcasses (n = 104) in a previous study beginning in 2000. All 207 strains were sensitive to nitrofurantoin and vancomycin. Over 50% were resistant to clindamycin (MIC that inhibited 90% of strains [MIC90] = 32 microg/ml) and tetracycline (MIC90 = 64 microg/ml). The percentages resistant to methicillin (oxacillin), chloramphenicol, erythromycin, and tylosin were 19.4% (40 of 207), 18.8% (39 of 207), 23.2% (48 of 207), and 20.8% (43 of 207) with MIC90s of 8, 64, > or = 64, and > or = 128 microg/ml, respectively. The methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains exhibited resistance to more antibiotics than did the methicillin-susceptible strains, and 87.5% (35 of 40) of the MRSA strains carried the mecA gene sequence. Since MRSA infections have become a public health concern in both communities and hospitals, testing for the presence of MRSA in animal carcasses during slaughtering operations is warranted. PMID:19343951

  16. Effect of Modified Wheat Gluten on Boiling Resistance Capacity of Pork Meatballs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Qiang; Luo, Shui-Zhong; Zhong, Xi-Yang; Cai, Ke-Zhou; Cai, Jing; Jiang, Shao-Tong; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the modified wheat gluten (MWG) extender, prepared by alcalase-based hydrolysis and transglutaminase cross-linking, on meatballs was analyzed in this study. Here, we studied the effect of MWG addition on the boiling resistance capacity of pork meatballs (MB-MWG) at high temperature (100 °C) and increasing cooking time; meatballs with added soy protein isolates (MB-SPI) and raw wheat gluten (MB-WG) were used as references. The cooking loss, water-holding capacity (WHC), and textural properties of meatballs were investigated. The results revealed that MB-MWG showed lower cooking loss, which decreased by 49.16% compared to meatballs without added extenders when treated for 30 min. The WHC of MB-MWG significantly increased from 80.68% to 95.42%. The hardness, springiness, and chewiness (textural properties) of MB-MWG were also significantly increased by 97.05%, 6.68%, and 121.96%, respectively. The addition of MWG increased the cross-linking in meatballs during the cooking process, as indicated by the higher G'. SDS-PAGE indicated an obvious decrease in myosin heavy chain in MB-MWG cooked for 30 min at 100 °C, which was attributed to the interaction of myofibrillar proteins in pork meat with MWG. The nuclear magnetic resonance T2 relaxation time patterns indicated that MWG addition caused an increase in the bound water content, and decrease in the free water content, of meatballs. An analysis of the microstructures revealed that the MB-MWG formed the most regular and compact network. Therefore, MWG could be used as an ingredient to facilitate the processing of meat products.

  17. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides generated from in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of pork meat.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Elizabeth; Sentandreu, Miguel Angel; Arihara, Keizo; Toldrá, Fidel

    2010-03-10

    The main purpose of this work was to study the generation of Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory (ACEI) peptides after gastrointestinal digestion of pork meat by the action of pepsin and pancreatin at simulated gut conditions. The hydrolysate was further subjected to reverse phase chromatography in order to separate the fractions with ACEI activity. Using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry, 12 peptides were identified in these fractions. It is worth highlighting the novel peptides ER, KLP, and RPR with IC(50) values of 667 microM, 500 microM, and 382 microM, respectively. Results obtained by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry were complemented by a second approach consisting of the analysis of the hydrolysate directly by nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS followed by a study of the obtained sequences and comparison with known ACEI peptide sequences. By using these two approaches, a total of 22 peptides were selected for its synthesis and further in vitro assay of ACEI activity. The strongest ACE inhibition was observed for peptide KAPVA (IC(50) = 46.56 microM) followed by the sequence PTPVP (IC(50) = 256.41 microM). Sequence similarity searches revealed that these two peptides derive from muscle titin, constituting the first identified ACEI peptides coming from this protein. This is also the first time that ACEI sequences MYPGIA and VIPEL have been reported. Other identified and synthesized sequences showed less ACEI activity. The obtained results evidence the potential of pork meat proteins as a source of antihypertensive peptides after gastrointestinal digestion.

  18. Microwave heating of cooked pork patties as a function of fat content.

    PubMed

    Picouet, P A; Fernández, A; Serra, X; Suñol, J J; Arnau, J

    2007-03-01

    In this study, the parameters heating rate, dielectric factors, and specific heat capacity, which determine the heating profiles and the dissipation of energy during microwave heating, were obtained for precooked pork patties. The pork patties studied were lean meat, pure back fat, and several lean meat/back fat mixtures. Microwave heating at 798 W power was not sufficient to accelerate the heating rates in 100% lean meat compared to 415 W. However, samples were able to heat up faster and dissipate more energy at 798 W power as fat content increased and moisture content decreased. The recorded differences in the specific heat capacity of the studied materials as a function of temperature seemed not to be the key factor to explain the observed temperature rises. Temperature rise seemed to have more to do with the interactions of fat with the electromagnetic field, and with viscosity changes during phase transitions. Trends found for the dielectric properties over microwave heating of meat products agree with data from other authors, but the influence of parameters related to the sample composition and structure should be taken into account. The dissipation factors (epsilon''/epsilon') provided a good approximation to the capacity of the samples containing lean meat and the lean meat/fat mixtures to transform the electromagnetic energy into heat. Neither the dielectric constant nor the loss or dissipation factors were able to clarify the high amount of energy transformed into heat in 100% back fat. Penetration depth and reflected power indicated that back fat allowed microwave energy to be repeatedly redirected to the material.

  19. Systems of attitudes towards production in the pork industry. A cross-national study.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Bjarne Taulo; Barcellos, Marcia Dutra de; Olsen, Nina Veflen; Verbeke, Wim; Scholderer, Joachim

    2012-12-01

    Existing research on public attitudes towards agricultural production systems is largely descriptive, abstracting from the processes through which members of the general public generate their evaluations of such systems. The present paper adopts a systems perspective on such evaluations, understanding them as embedded into a wider attitude system that consists of attitudes towards objects of different abstraction levels, ranging from personal value orientations over general socio-political attitudes to evaluations of specific characteristics of agricultural production systems. It is assumed that evaluative affect propagates through the system in such a way that the system becomes evaluatively consistent and operates as a schema for the generation of evaluative judgments. In the empirical part of the paper, the causal structure of an attitude system from which people derive their evaluations of pork production systems was modelled. The analysis was based on data from a cross-national survey involving 1931 participants from Belgium, Denmark, Germany and Poland. The survey questionnaire contained measures of personal value orientations and attitudes towards environment and nature, industrial food production, food and the environment, technological progress, animal welfare, local employment and local economy. In addition, the survey included a conjoint task by which participants' evaluations of the importance of production system attributes were measured. The data were analysed by means of causal search algorithms and structural equation models. The results suggest that evaluative judgments of the importance of pork production system attributes are generated in a schematic manner, driven by personal value orientations. The effect of personal value orientations was strong and largely unmediated by attitudes of an intermediate level of generality, suggesting that the dependent variables in the particular attitude system that was modelled here can be understood as value

  20. Rapid detection of frozen pork quality without thawing by Vis-NIR hyperspectral imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Xie, Anguo; Sun, Da-Wen; Xu, Zhongyue; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2015-07-01

    Quality determination of frozen food is a time-consuming and laborious work as it normally takes a long time to thaw the frozen samples before measurements can be carried out. In this research, a rapid and non-destructive determination technique for frozen pork quality was tested with a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system. In this study, 120 pieces of pork meat were frozen by four kinds of methods with various freezing temperatures from -20 to -120°C. The hyperspectral images of the samples were acquired at the frozen state. Quality indicators including drip loss, pH value, color, cooking loss and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) of the samples were measured after thawing. The spectral characteristics of the frozen meat samples were studied and it was revealed that the reflectance at 1100nm had a close relationship with the freezing temperature (R=-0.832, p<0.01). Partial least squares regression (PLSR) was applied to establish the spectral models, and the models were then optimized. Results showed that the improved region of interest (ROI) method could be used to extract effective spectral information to withstand the interference of freezing, and choosing appropriate spectral bands and spectral pretreatment techniques were crucial to develop robust mathematical model. The performances of the models established were diverse based on different quality indicators. The coefficients of determination for prediction (Rp(2)) for L*, cooking loss, b*, drip loss and a* were 0.907, 0.845, 0.814, 0.762, and 0.716, respectively. However there were low correlations (Rp(2)) for pH and WBSF measurements. The current study indicated that HSI had the potential for non-destructive determination of frozen meat quality without thawing. PMID:25882428

  1. Drip loss in pork: influencing factors and relation to further meat quality traits.

    PubMed

    Fischer, K

    2007-11-01

    The paper deals with some general features of drip loss and the most important factors influencing it. Moreover, it shows some exemplary results of an own investigation. Up to now there is no generally valid definition of drip loss available. Therefore measurement procedures have to be strongly standardized, otherwise they provide no comparable results. Drip loss depends on the shortening of sarcomeres which is regulated by the interaction of muscle temperature and rigour development. Hence, the chilling conditions are highly important. However, the main point is the velocity and the extent of the pH fall after slaughter. All factors influencing the occurrence of quality deviations like PSE, DFD, Acid meat, RSE, PFN will inevitably affect the degree of drip loss too. Under the conditions of an own study, investigating material of a progeny testing station, untypically, one third of the loins with higher-than-average wateriness were red rather than pale, and one third of the loins with higher-than-average brightness were only slightly exudative, which is untypical too. Pork with higher-than-average brightness and low wateriness exhibited, apart from the colour deviation, no crucial disadvantages. It showed only a marginally higher loss during storage, thawing and heating. Pork with higher-than-average drip loss - regardless of dark or pale colour - was predominantly combined with a pH(1) less than 6.2, an electrical conductivity 24 h p.m. higher than 5.0 and a loin area higher than 56 cm(2). PMID:17988246

  2. Identification of Pork Contamination in Meatballs of Indonesia Local Market Using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Erwanto, Yuny; Abidin, Mohammad Zainal; Sugiyono, Eko Yasin Prasetyo Muslim; Rohman, Abdul

    2014-10-01

    This research applied and evaluated a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using cytochrome b gene to detect pork contamination in meatballs from local markets in Surabaya and Yogyakarta regions, Indonesia. To confirm the effectiveness and specificity of this fragment, thirty nine DNA samples from different meatball shops were isolated and amplified, and then the PCR amplicon was digested by BseDI restriction enzyme to detect the presence of pork in meatballs. BseDI restriction enzyme was able to cleave porcine cytochrome b gene into two fragments (131 bp and 228 bp). Testing the meatballs from the local market showed that nine of twenty meatball shops in Yogyakarta region were detected to have pork contamination, but there was no pork contamination in meatball shops in Surabaya region. In conclusion, specific PCR amplification of cytochrome b gen and cleaved by BseDI restriction enzymes seems to be a powerful technique for the identification of pork presence in meatball because of its simplicity, specificity and sensitivity. Furthermore, pork contamination intended for commercial products of sausage, nugget, steak and meat burger can be checked. The procedure is also much cheaper than other methods based on PCR, immunodiffusion and other techniques that need expensive equipment.

  3. Comparing growth of pork- and venison-reared Phormia regina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) for the application of forensic entomology to wildlife poaching.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J M; Lafon, N W; Kreitlow, K L; Brewster, C C; Fell, R D

    2014-09-01

    Laboratory rearing of Phormia regina Meigen larvae on pork and venison was conducted as part of a study to determine whether forensic entomology approaches can be used in wildlife poaching investigations. Larvae were reared at 30 degrees C, 75% relative humidity, and a photoperiod of 14:10 (L:D) h on pork or venison diets, and samples were collected every 8 h until >90% of the maggots reached the third-instar wandering or prepupal stage. Significant differences were found in the distribution of lengths of the third instar and combined instars for maggots reared on the two different meat sources. Maggots reared on venison reached the prepupal wandering stage significantly faster (approximately 6 h) compared with maggots on the pork diet. Mean adult weight and wing length of venison-reared flies were significantly greater than for flies reared on pork. The lower crude fat content of venison appears to make this meat source a more suitable medium than pork for larvae of P. regina. The difference in growth rate could introduce error into PMImin estimations from third-instar maggots in deer poaching cases if estimates are based on data from studies in which maggots were reared on pork. PMID:25276938

  4. Trained sensory perception of pork eating quality as affected by fresh and cooked pork quality attributes and end-point cooked temperature.

    PubMed

    Moeller, S J; Miller, R K; Aldredge, T L; Logan, K E; Edwards, K K; Zerby, H N; Boggess, M; Box-Steffensmeier, J M; Stahl, C A

    2010-05-01

    The present study evaluated individual and interactive influences of pork loin (n=679) ultimate ph (pH), intramuscular fat (IMF), Minolta L* color (L*), Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), and internal cooked temperatures (62.8 degrees C, 68.3 degrees C, 73.9 degrees C, and 79.4 degrees C) on trained sensory perception of palatability. Logistical regression analyses were used, fitting sensory responses as dependent variables and quality and cooked temperature as independent variables, testing quadratic and interactive effects. Incremental increases in cooked temperature reduced sensory juiciness and tenderness scores by 3.8% and 0.9%, respectively, but did not influence sensory flavor or saltiness scores. An increase of 4.9N in WBSF, from a base of 14.7N (lowest) to 58.8N (greatest) was associated with a 3.7% and 1.8% reduction in sensory tenderness and juiciness scores, respectively, with predicted sensory tenderness scores reduced by 3.55 units when comparing ends of the WBSF range. Modeled sensory responses for loins with pH of 5.40 and 5.60 had reduced tenderness, chewiness, and fat flavor ratings when compared with responses for loins with pH of 5.80 to 6.40, the range indicative of optimal sensory response. Loin IMF and L* were significant model effects; however, their influence on sensory attributes was small, with predicted mean sensory responses measurably improved only when comparing 6% and 1% IMF and L* values of 46.9 (dark) when compared with 65.0 (pale). Tenderness and juiciness scores, were related to a greater extent to loin WBSF and pH, and to a lesser extent to cooked temperature, IMF and L*.

  5. Trained sensory perception of pork eating quality as affected by fresh and cooked pork quality attributes and end-point cooked temperature.

    PubMed

    Moeller, S J; Miller, R K; Aldredge, T L; Logan, K E; Edwards, K K; Zerby, H N; Boggess, M; Box-Steffensmeier, J M; Stahl, C A

    2010-05-01

    The present study evaluated individual and interactive influences of pork loin (n=679) ultimate ph (pH), intramuscular fat (IMF), Minolta L* color (L*), Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), and internal cooked temperatures (62.8 degrees C, 68.3 degrees C, 73.9 degrees C, and 79.4 degrees C) on trained sensory perception of palatability. Logistical regression analyses were used, fitting sensory responses as dependent variables and quality and cooked temperature as independent variables, testing quadratic and interactive effects. Incremental increases in cooked temperature reduced sensory juiciness and tenderness scores by 3.8% and 0.9%, respectively, but did not influence sensory flavor or saltiness scores. An increase of 4.9N in WBSF, from a base of 14.7N (lowest) to 58.8N (greatest) was associated with a 3.7% and 1.8% reduction in sensory tenderness and juiciness scores, respectively, with predicted sensory tenderness scores reduced by 3.55 units when comparing ends of the WBSF range. Modeled sensory responses for loins with pH of 5.40 and 5.60 had reduced tenderness, chewiness, and fat flavor ratings when compared with responses for loins with pH of 5.80 to 6.40, the range indicative of optimal sensory response. Loin IMF and L* were significant model effects; however, their influence on sensory attributes was small, with predicted mean sensory responses measurably improved only when comparing 6% and 1% IMF and L* values of 46.9 (dark) when compared with 65.0 (pale). Tenderness and juiciness scores, were related to a greater extent to loin WBSF and pH, and to a lesser extent to cooked temperature, IMF and L*. PMID:20374871

  6. Modeling microbial competition in food: application to the behavior of Listeria monocytogenes and lactic acid flora in pork meat products.

    PubMed

    Cornu, M; Billoir, E; Bergis, H; Beaufort, A; Zuliani, V

    2011-06-01

    Competition between background microflora and microbial pathogens raises questions about the application of predictive microbiology in situ, i.e., in non-sterile naturally contaminated foods. In this article, we present a review of the models developed in predictive microbiology to describe interactions between microflora in foods, with a special focus on two approaches: one based on the Jameson effect (simultaneous deceleration of all microbial populations) and one based on the Lotka-Volterra competition model. As an illustration of the potential of these models, we propose various modeling examples in estimation and in prediction of microbial growth curves, all related to the behavior of Listeria monocytogenes with lactic acid bacteria in three pork meat products (fresh pork meat and two types of diced bacon).

  7. Antioxidant activity of spice extracts in a liposome system and in cooked pork patties and the possible mode of action.

    PubMed

    Kong, Baohua; Zhang, Huiyun; Xiong, Youling L

    2010-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted to assess the antioxidant efficacy of spice extracts in cooked meat. In experiment 1, antioxidant activity of 13 common spice extracts was screened in a liposome system. Six of the extracts (clove, rosemary, cassia bark, liquorice, nutmeg, and round cardamom), identified to have the greatest total phenolic contents, were strongly inhibitory of TBARS formation. In experiment 2, 2,2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, ferric-reducing power, and metal chelation of these six spice extracts were evaluated. Clove exhibited the greatest reducing power, and all had strong DPPH scavenging activity. In experiment 3, clove, rosemary, and cassia bark extracts were further tested for in situ antioxidant efficacy. Cooked pork patties containing these spice extracts had markedly reduced TBARS formation and off-flavour scores but a more stable red colour, during storage. The results demonstrated strong potential of spice extracts as natural antioxidants in cooked pork products. PMID:20430533

  8. Myoglobin as marker in meat adulteration: a UPLC method for determining the presence of pork meat in raw beef burger.

    PubMed

    Giaretta, Nicola; Di Giuseppe, Antonella M A; Lippert, Martina; Parente, Augusto; Di Maro, Antimo

    2013-12-01

    The identification of meat animal species used in raw burgers is very important with respect to economic and religious considerations. Therefore, international supervisory bodies have implemented procedures to control the employed meat species. In this paper we propose myoglobin as a powerful molecular marker to evaluate the presence of non-declared meat addition in raw beef burgers by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) for the separation and identification of edible animal species (beef, chicken, horse, ostrich, pig and water buffalo). Meat samples were pre-treated with sodium nitrite to transform oxymyoglobin and deoxymyoglobin to the more stable metmyoglobin. The developed method was validated, preparing mixtures with different percentages of pork and beef minced meat. The obtained results show that using myoglobin as marker, 5% (25 mg/500 mg) of pork or beef meat can be detected in premixed minced meat samples.

  9. Papain-hydrolyzed pork meat reduces serum cholesterol level and premature atherosclerosis in dietary-induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Katsuda, S; Ito, M; Waseda, Y; Morimatsu, F; Taguichi, Y; Hasegawa, M; Takaichi, S; Yamada, R; Furukawa, Y; Shimizu, T

    2000-08-01

    The effects of the low-molecular-weight fraction of papain-hydrolyzed pork meat (LMF) on the plasma cholesterol level and the generation of atherosclerosis were studied in rabbits fed a cholesterol-enriched diet. In LMF-fed rabbits, the plasma and liver cholesterol concentrations were both significantly lower (p<0.0 1) than in rabbits fed untreated pork meat (PM). Similarly, the cholesterol concentrations of the chylomicron and VLDL fractions were significantly lower in LMF-fed rabbits than in rabbits fed PM. Deposition of lipid in transverse sections of the aortic arch was significantly less in rabbits fed LMF than in those fed PM. Electron microscopic studies revealed preventive effects against premature atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta of rabbits fed LME These results indicate that LMF has a hypocholesterolemic action and preventive effects against premature atherosclerosis. PMID:11185655

  10. Antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of kordoi (Averrhoa carambola) fruit juice and bamboo (Bambusa polymorpha) shoot extract in pork nuggets.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R; Jebin, N; Saha, R; Sarma, D K

    2016-01-01

    Pork nuggets with 'very good' acceptability was processed by incorporating kordoi (Averrhoa carambola) fruit juice and bamboo (Bambusa polymorpha) shoot extract, and their physical, chemical, microbiological and sensorial characteristics were evaluated during 35 days storage under refrigeration. Addition of kordoi fruit juice (4%) and bamboo shoot extract (6%) had a significant effect on the pH, moisture, protein, fat, fiber, instrumental color values and texture profiles of nuggets. Nuggets with juice and extract had significantly lower TBARS values towards the end of the storage period compared to the control. Microbial and sensory qualities of nuggets were significantly improved by the addition of juice and extract. Incorporation of juice and extract at 4% and 6% levels, respectively, increased the storage life of pork nuggets by at least two weeks, i.e. from 21 days to 35 days at 4 ± 1 °C compared to the control.

  11. Antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of kordoi (Averrhoa carambola) fruit juice and bamboo (Bambusa polymorpha) shoot extract in pork nuggets.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R; Jebin, N; Saha, R; Sarma, D K

    2016-01-01

    Pork nuggets with 'very good' acceptability was processed by incorporating kordoi (Averrhoa carambola) fruit juice and bamboo (Bambusa polymorpha) shoot extract, and their physical, chemical, microbiological and sensorial characteristics were evaluated during 35 days storage under refrigeration. Addition of kordoi fruit juice (4%) and bamboo shoot extract (6%) had a significant effect on the pH, moisture, protein, fat, fiber, instrumental color values and texture profiles of nuggets. Nuggets with juice and extract had significantly lower TBARS values towards the end of the storage period compared to the control. Microbial and sensory qualities of nuggets were significantly improved by the addition of juice and extract. Incorporation of juice and extract at 4% and 6% levels, respectively, increased the storage life of pork nuggets by at least two weeks, i.e. from 21 days to 35 days at 4 ± 1 °C compared to the control. PMID:26212939

  12. Screening of Lactobacillus isolated from pork sausages for potential probiotic use and evaluation of the microbiological safety of fermented products.

    PubMed

    Dias, Francesca Silva; Duarte, Whasley Ferreira; Santos, Marianna Rabelo Rios Martins; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to select strains of Lactobacillus isolated from pork sausage for use as probiotics. Lactobacillus isolates were evaluated in tests based on probiotic characteristics and microbiological safety. The UFLA SAU 14, 52, and 91 isolates were differentiated by coaggregation with Listeria monocytogenes, production of lactic acid, and survival at pH 2. UFLA SAU 172 and 187 isolates had high levels of coaggregation with Salmonella Typhi and Escherichia coli, tolerance to pancreatic fluid, and adhesion to chloroform. UFLA SAU 20 and 34 isolates were characterized by exopolysaccharide production, autoaggregation, and resistance to simulated intestinal fluid. UFLA SAU 185, 238, and 258 isolates exhibited resistance to bile and adhesion to xylene. A cocktail of these 10 Lactobacillus isolates with potential probiotic properties was inoculated into pork sausage and inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes.

  13. Effect of Soy Protein Hydrolysates Prepared by Subcritical Water Processing on the Physicochemical Properties of Pork Patty during Chilled Storage

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sang-Gi

    2015-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of soy protein hydrolysates (SPHs) addition on the quality characteristics of pork patties. The SPHs was prepared by subcritical water process (SWP) at 180℃ without holding time and mixed with the pork patty components at varying concentrations (0-3%), and the patties were stored at 4℃ for 14 d. As quality parameters, instrumental color, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), pH, water holding capacity (WHC) and shear force were measured at the end of storage. Regardless of SPHs concentration, the addition of SPHs significantly manifested low L* and high a* values compared to those of untreated control (p<0.05). For b* value, addition of SPHs in the 0.5-1.5% was unaffected, while >2.0% of SPHs caused significantly lower b* than control (p<0.05). The color changes in pork patties with and without SPHs were also identified in visual appearance where the pork patties containing 0.5-2.0% showed bright red color which was comparable to brownish color of control and patties containing >2.5% SPHs. Lipid oxidation was delayed by the addition of 0.5-1.5% SPHs, while it was accelerated by the addition of 3% SPHs. The pH of patties increased with increasing concentration of SPHs, whereas there were no significant differences in WHC and shear force of patties. Consequently, the results indicated that the addition of 0.5-1.5% SPHs had a potential advantage in suppressing oxidative deterioration of fat-containing meat products during chilled storage. PMID:26761879

  14. Effect of several food ingredients on radiation inactivation of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated into ground pork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Hyejeong; Lacroix, Monique; Jung, Samooel; Kim, Keehyuk; Lee, Ju Woon; Jo, Cheorun

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of several food ingredients on the relative radiation sensitivity (RRS) of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto ground pork. Garlic, leek, onion, and ginger were prepared in 3 different forms; pressurized, freeze-dried, and 70% ethanol extracted. The prepared food ingredients were subdivided into 2 groups, non-irradiated and irradiated with 5 kGy of gamma irradiation, before addition to ground pork. The prepared food ingredients were added at concentrations of 1% and 5% (w/w) into radiation-sterilized ground pork and inoculated with E. coli and L. monocytogenes (10 6 CFU/mL). For E. coli inoculated pork, the most efficient ingredient was ethanol extracted leek (RRS=3.89), followed by freeze-dried ginger and leek (RRS=3.66 and 3.63, respectively) when used without pasteurization. However, when the food ingredients were irradiation-pasteurized, the freeze-dried ginger showed the highest RRS (4.10). When 5% natural materials were added, RRS was the highest for freeze-dried and ethanol extracted onion (4.44 and 4.65, respectively). For L. monocytogenes, the RRS was relatively lower than E. coli in general. The most efficient material was pressurized and freeze-dried onion (RRS=2.13 and 2.08, respectively) at a concentration of 1%. No increase in RRS was observed at increased concentration of food ingredients. These results suggest that the addition of particular food ingredients increased the efficiency of radiation-sterilization. However, changes in RRS were dependent on the species of microorganism as well as the form of the food ingredients.

  15. Protein carbonylation and water-holding capacity of pork subjected to frozen storage: effect of muscle type, premincing, and packaging.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Mario; Ventanas, Sonia; Heinonen, Marina; Puolanne, Eero

    2011-05-25

    The present work aimed to study the relationship between protein carbonylation and the loss of water-holding capacity (WHC) occurring during frozen storage of porcine muscles. Pork samples corresponding to two different muscle types, glycolytic M. longissimus dorsi (LD) and oxidative M. psoas major (PM), and subjected to two different premincing, minced (MINCED) and intact pork pieces (INTACT), and packaging, vacuum packaged (VACUUM) and packed in oxygen-permeable bags (OXYGEN), procedures were frozen (-18 °C/12 weeks) and analyzed at sampling times upon thawing (weeks 1, 4, 8, and 12) for the relative amount of specific protein carbonyls, α-aminoadipic and γ-glutamic semialdehydes (AAS and GGS, respectively), and their ability to hold water using two different techniques. The formation of protein carbonyls occurred concomitantly with the loss of WHC, and both phenomena were found to be more intense in LD muscles and in MINCED and OXYGEN pork samples. The loss in WHC was from ca. 10 to 30% in 12 weeks, depending on the method of determination. Plausible mechanisms by which protein carbonylation may decrease the WHC of pork samples are thoroughly discussed in the present paper. Besides the likely impact of protein carbonylation in the water-myofibrillar protein relationships, the implication of AAS and GGS in further reactions including plausible cross-linking would explain the decrease of these semialdehydes by the end of frozen storage and would reinforce their liability in the loss of WHC of porcine muscles. The exact nature of these reactions, however, should be investigated in further studies.

  16. Relationships between ultimate pH and microbial, chemical, and physical characteristics of vacuum-packaged pork loins.

    PubMed

    Knox, B L; van Laack, R L J M; Davidson, P M

    2008-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of ultimate pH (pHu) of pork on shelf life based upon microbial growth, drip loss, and oxidative rancidity (2-thiobarbituric acid [TBA] procedure) in vacuum-packaged loins stored at 4 degrees C. Glucose and lactate concentrations of the pork loins were also measured. Thirty-six pork loins (pH = 5.56 to 6.57) were collected at a commercial slaughter facility 1-d postslaughter. All pigs were from the same genetic line. Loins were grouped by pH (group: pH range): A: 5.55 to 5.70, B: 5.71 to 5.85, C: 5.86 to 6.00, D: 6.01 to 6.15, and E: > 6.16. They were analyzed at days 0, 6, 14, 24, and 34. For aerobic plate counts, groups A and B were significantly lower than C through E, while psychrotrophic or Enterobacteriaceae counts of groups A and A through C were significantly lower than groups B through E and D and E, respectively. Lactic acid bacteria counts were not significantly influenced by pHu. Group A had higher glucose concentrations than groups C through E and higher lactate concentrations than groups D through E on most sampling days. Group A had a higher TBA value than group E at days 0 and 34. Group A displayed greater drip loss than groups D and E at day 6 and groups B through D on days 24 and 34. Based on the microbial and drip loss results, a pork loin pHu of 5.8 to 5.9 appears to be optimum to provide a vacuum-packaged shelf life of at least 24 d with minimum drip loss. PMID:18387112

  17. Effects of replacing pork backfat with emulsified vegetable oil on fatty acid composition and quality of UK-style sausages.

    PubMed

    Asuming-Bediako, N; Jaspal, M H; Hallett, K; Bayntun, J; Baker, A; Sheard, P R

    2014-01-01

    Rapeseed and sunflower oil were used to replace pork backfat in UK-style sausages by incorporating the oils as pre-formed emulsions. Replacing the pork backfat emulsion with rapeseed emulsion at total fat content of about 12%, reduced total saturated fatty acid (SFA) composition from 38% to 14% (4.5 to 1.8 g/100 g), increased monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) composition from 45% to 59% and increased polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition from 15% to 25%. Partial replacement of pork backfat with rapeseed at a fat content of about 20% reduced SFA from 38% to 24% (7.2 to 4.8 g/100 g). There were no significant differences in eating quality and overall liking other than slight differences in the attributes 'firmness' and 'particle size'. Improvement in the fatty acid composition was achieved without adversely affecting colour shelf life or lipid oxidation. The study suggests that a substantial reduction in SFA can be achieved by incorporating 'healthy' oils in UK-style sausages without adversely affecting eating quality or shelf life.

  18. Effect of high-pressure processing at elevated temperatures on thiamin and riboflavin in pork and model systems.

    PubMed

    Butz, Peter; Bognar, Antal; Dieterich, Sepp; Tauscher, Bernhard

    2007-02-21

    High-pressure/high-temperature properties of vitamins in food are important with respect to the new pressure-assisted thermal sterilization method utilizing pressure-induced adiabatic temperature changes. Riboflavin, thiamin, and thiamin monophosphate (TMP) stabilities were assayed in the temperature range from 25 to 100 degrees C under normal pressure (0.1 MPa) and high pressure (600 MPa) in acetate-buffered (pH 5.5) model solutions, some with added fructose, hemoglobin, or ascorbic acid. Thiamin and riboflavin stabilities were also assayed in minced fresh pork fillet and in rehydrated pork reference material with and without pressure treatment at 600 MPa in the temperature range from 20 to 100 degrees C. In pork, the vitamins proved to be sufficiently stabile for high-pressure/high-temperature processing. Under similar conditions, vitamin decay in model solutions was up to 30 times faster, especially that of TMP. Thus, it appears that it may not be possible to draw conclusions for the pressure behavior of real food matrices from the results of investigations in food models. A further consequence is that caution is necessary when supplementing foods with synthetic B vitamins preceding high-pressure/high-temperature processing.

  19. Effects of Soy Protein Hydrolysates Prepared by Varying Subcritical Media on the Physicochemical Properties of Pork Patties

    PubMed Central

    Davaatseren, Munkhtugs

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of soy protein hydrolysates (SPH) prepared by varying subcritical media on the physicochemical properties of pork patties. For resource of SPH, two different soybean species (Glycine max Merr.) of Daewonkong (DWK) and Saedanbaek (SDB) were selected. SPH was prepared by subcritical processing at 190℃ and 25 MPa under three different of media (water, 20% ethanol and 50% ethanol). Solubility and free amino group content revealed that water was better to yield larger amount of SPH than ethanol/water mixtures, regardless of species. Molecular weight (Mw) distribution of SPH was also similar between two species, while slightly different Mw distribution was obtained by subcritical media. For pork patty application, 50% ethanol treatment showed clear red color comparing to control after 14 d of storage. In addition, ethanol treatment had better oxidative stability than control and water treatment based on thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) analysis. For eating quality, although 20% ethanol treatment in SDB showed slightly higher cooking loss than control, generally addition of SPH did not affect the water-binding properties and hardness of pork patties. Consequently, the present study indicated that 50% ethanol was the best subcritical media to produce SPH possessing antioxidant activity, and the SPH produced from DWK exhibited better antioxidant activity than that produced SDB. PMID:27499657

  20. Evaluation of natural antimicrobials on typical meat spoilage bacteria in vitro and in vacuum-packed pork meat.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Bjørn Christian; Langsrud, Solveig

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of natural antimicrobials on the growth of typical spoilage bacteria from marinated pork. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of thymol, cinnamaldehyde, allyl isothiocyanate, citric acid, ascorbic acid, a rosemary extract, and a grapefruit seed extract against Lactobacillus algidus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Leuconostoc carnosum, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Carnobacterium divergens, Brochothrix thermosphacta, and Serratia proteamaculans were determined in a microplate assay. Combinations of antimicrobials were tested and several combinations showed synergistic effects in inhibiting bacterial growth. Single and combined antimicrobials were added to vacuum-packed pork meat to evaluate preserving effects. Antimicrobial concentrations of up to 10 times the MIC values showed no effect on total bacterial growth in vacuum packed pork meaning that although most antimicrobials inhibited the growth of spoilage bacteria in vitro, results from the microplate assay could not be transferred to the meat system. Most natural antimicrobials possess strong odor and flavor that limit their use as a food preservative. In conclusion, this study showed that the use of natural antimicrobials in meat products is limited and that bacterial quality and shelf life was not enhanced under the chosen conditions. PMID:20492248

  1. Influence of beer marinades on the reduction of carcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amines in charcoal-grilled pork meat.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Olga; Moreira, Patrícia S; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O

    2015-01-01

    The effect of beer marinades on the formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAs) was examined in charcoal-grilled pork. Pilsner, non-alcoholic pilsner and black beers (coded respectively as PB, P0B and BB) were assayed and unmarinated samples cooked under similar conditions provided reference HAs levels. Two thermic (PhIP and 4,8-DiMeIQx) and three pyrolytic HAs (Trp-P-1, AαC, MeAαC) were quantified in unmarinated meat samples. Marinating meat in beer resulted in a significant decrease of PhIP, Trp-P-1 and AαC (p < 0.05). 4,8-DiMeIQx formation was inhibited only by BB marinade. No significant effect was observed on MeAαC formation. All beers reduced total HA formation in charcoal-grilled pork, black beer being the most efficient with a level of 90% inhibition. A strong positive correlation was observed between the inhibitory effect of beer on total HA formation and their antioxidant activity. Beer marinades mitigate the impact of consumption of well-done grilled pork meat reducing the formation of cooking carcinogens.

  2. Volatile compounds profile of sous-vide cooked pork cheeks as affected by cooking conditions (vacuum packaging, temperature and time).

    PubMed

    del Pulgar, Jose Sanchez; Roldan, Mar; Ruiz-Carrascal, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) profile of pork cheeks as affected by the cooking conditions was investigated. Pork cheeks were cooked under different combinations of temperature (60 °C or 80 °C), time (5 or 12 h) and vacuum (vacuum or air-packaged). As a general rule, the VOCs originating from lipid degradation were positively affected by the cooking temperature and negatively by the cooking time, reaching the highest amounts in pork cheeks cooked at 80 °C during 5 h and the lowest in samples cooked at 80 °C during 12 h. On the contrary, VOCs originated from amino acids and Maillard reactions were positively affected by both factors. The proportion between lipid degradation and amino acids reactions was estimated by the hexanal/3-methylbutanal ratio, which reached its highest values in samples cooked at 60 °C during 5 h in the presence of air and the lowest values in samples cooked at 80 °C during 12 h, regardless of the vacuum status. PMID:24152673

  3. Lipid oxidation and volatile production in irradiated raw pork batters prepared with commercial soybean oil containing vitamin E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Cheorun; Ahn, Dong Uk; Byun, Myung Woo

    2001-04-01

    An emulsion-type raw pork batter was prepared using 10% (meat weight) of backfat or commercial soybean oil enriched with vitamin E to determine the effect of irradiation on lipid oxidation and volatile production during storage. Batters (approximately 100 g) were vacuum- or aerobically packaged and irradiated at 0, 2.5 or 4.5 kGy. Irradiation increased lipid oxidation of aerobically packaged raw pork batters prepared with both backfat and soybean oil. Lipid oxidation of vacuum-packaged pork batters was not influenced by irradiation except for the batter prepared with backfat at day 0. Aerobically packaged batters prepared with soybean oil had lower ( P<0.05) TBARS than that with backfat, but vacuum-packaged ones were not different. The sum of volatile compounds with short retention time (<1.80) increased by irradiation, and with storage time except for aerobic packaging at day 7. The amount of total volatile compounds had an increasing trend until day 3, but not at day 7. Irradiation increased the production of total volatile compounds in the batters prepared with soybean oil and vacuum packaged, but irradiation effect on volatile production was not consistent with other treatments.

  4. Evaluation of natural antimicrobials on typical meat spoilage bacteria in vitro and in vacuum-packed pork meat.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Bjørn Christian; Langsrud, Solveig

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of natural antimicrobials on the growth of typical spoilage bacteria from marinated pork. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of thymol, cinnamaldehyde, allyl isothiocyanate, citric acid, ascorbic acid, a rosemary extract, and a grapefruit seed extract against Lactobacillus algidus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Leuconostoc carnosum, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Carnobacterium divergens, Brochothrix thermosphacta, and Serratia proteamaculans were determined in a microplate assay. Combinations of antimicrobials were tested and several combinations showed synergistic effects in inhibiting bacterial growth. Single and combined antimicrobials were added to vacuum-packed pork meat to evaluate preserving effects. Antimicrobial concentrations of up to 10 times the MIC values showed no effect on total bacterial growth in vacuum packed pork meaning that although most antimicrobials inhibited the growth of spoilage bacteria in vitro, results from the microplate assay could not be transferred to the meat system. Most natural antimicrobials possess strong odor and flavor that limit their use as a food preservative. In conclusion, this study showed that the use of natural antimicrobials in meat products is limited and that bacterial quality and shelf life was not enhanced under the chosen conditions.

  5. Formation of biogenic amines and growth of spoilage-related microorganisms in pork stored under different packaging conditions applying PCA.

    PubMed

    Li, Miaoyun; Tian, Lu; Zhao, Gaiming; Zhang, Qiuhui; Gao, Xiaoping; Huang, Xianqing; Sun, Lingxia

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the evolution of biogenic amines and spoilage-related microorganisms of chilled pork stored at 5 °C under various atmospheric conditions. The experimental packaging systems were pallet packaging, vacuum packaging (VP) and modified atmosphere packaging methods (MAP, 40%O2+40%CO2+20%N2), respectively. The results showed that about 74.26% of the variability could be explained by two first principal components analyzed by PCA in the pallet packaging, while in the vacuum and modified atmosphere packagings were about 85.21% and 79.14%, respectively. PC1 differentiated the indicators from packaging conditions. All the five microbial indicators and partial biogenic amines, gathering together, had high values at the positive side of PC1. Putrescine and cadaverine could reflect the spoilage evolution of fresh pork except for those in the pallet. Therefore, putrescine and cadaverine could be used as the spoilage indicators of chilled pork, of which the contents might reflect the spoilage degree. PMID:24200579

  6. Volatile compounds profile of sous-vide cooked pork cheeks as affected by cooking conditions (vacuum packaging, temperature and time).

    PubMed

    del Pulgar, Jose Sanchez; Roldan, Mar; Ruiz-Carrascal, Jorge

    2013-10-10

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) profile of pork cheeks as affected by the cooking conditions was investigated. Pork cheeks were cooked under different combinations of temperature (60 °C or 80 °C), time (5 or 12 h) and vacuum (vacuum or air-packaged). As a general rule, the VOCs originating from lipid degradation were positively affected by the cooking temperature and negatively by the cooking time, reaching the highest amounts in pork cheeks cooked at 80 °C during 5 h and the lowest in samples cooked at 80 °C during 12 h. On the contrary, VOCs originated from amino acids and Maillard reactions were positively affected by both factors. The proportion between lipid degradation and amino acids reactions was estimated by the hexanal/3-methylbutanal ratio, which reached its highest values in samples cooked at 60 °C during 5 h in the presence of air and the lowest values in samples cooked at 80 °C during 12 h, regardless of the vacuum status.

  7. A prolonged outbreak of Salmonella Infantis associated with pork products in central Germany, April-October 2013.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, S; Harries, M; Prager, R; Höfig, A; Ahrens, B; Hoffmann, L; Rabsch, W; Mertens, E; Rimek, D

    2016-05-01

    One of the largest and longest Salmonella outbreaks in Germany within the last 10 years occurred in central Germany in 2013. To identify vehicles of infection, we analysed surveillance data, conducted a case-control study and food traceback. We identified 267 cases infected with Salmonella Infantis with symptom onset between 16 April and 26 October 2013 in four neighbouring federal states. Results of our study indicated that cases were more likely to have eaten raw minced pork from local butcher's shops [odds ratio (OR) 2·5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·1-5·8] and have taken gastric acid-reducing or -neutralizing medication (OR 3·8, 95% CI 1·3-13) than controls. The outbreak was traced back to contaminated raw pork products found in different butcher's shops supplied by one slaughterhouse, to pigs at one farm and to an animal feed producer. Characterization of isolates of human, food, animal, feed, and environmental origin by phage-typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis confirmed the chain of infection. Insufficient hygiene standards in the slaughterhouse were the most probable cause of the ongoing transmission. We recommend that persons taking gastric acid suppressants should refrain from consuming raw pork products. Improving and maintaining adequate hygiene standards and process controls during slaughter is important to prevent future outbreaks.

  8. Hepatitis E virus in England and Wales: indigenous infection is associated with the consumption of processed pork products.

    PubMed

    Said, B; Ijaz, S; Chand, M A; Kafatos, G; Tedder, R; Morgan, D

    2014-07-01

    Indigenously acquired hepatitis E infections have increased substantially in England and Wales since 2010. Epidemiological investigations were undertaken to determine risk factors for the acquisition of infection. A case-control study (25 cases, 75 controls) was used to test the hypothesis that hepatitis E infection was related to consumption of pork products. In a multivariable model, consumption of pork pie [odds ratio (OR) 6·33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·41-28·48, P = 0·009] and consumption of ham and sausages purchased from a major UK supermarket chain (OR 10·12, 95% CI 1·68-60·81, P = 0·023) were significantly associated with indigenous infection. The consumption of sausages and ham purchased from the supermarket was highly correlated; however. separate models showed that each variable was significantly associated with infection (OR 7·59, 95% CI 1·81-31·84, P = 0·004 and OR 10·98, 95% CI 1·84-65·35, P = 0·003, respectively). Although contamination of sausages with HEV has previously been shown this study also raises concerns about other processed pork products and whether current practice in preparing these products is sufficient to prevent transmission of HEV.

  9. Effect of Caesalpinia sappan L. extract on physico-chemical properties of emulsion-type pork sausage during cold storage.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang-Keun; Ha, So-Ra; Choi, Jung-Seok

    2015-12-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of extract from heart wood of Caesalpinia sappan on the physico-chemical properties and to find the appropriate addition level in the emulsion-type pork sausage during cold storage. The pH of treatments with C. sappan extract was significantly lower than control and T1 during cold storage periods (P<0.05). Also, the reduction of moisture content, and the increase of cooking loss significantly occurred by the addition of 0.2% C. sappan extract. Also, the texture properties and sensory of sausages containing C. sappan extract were decreased compared to control. Inclusion of the C. sappan extract in sausages resulted in lower lightness and higher yellowness, chroma and hue values. However, the antioxidant, antimicrobial activity, and volatile basic nitrogen in the emulsion-type pork sausages with C. sappan extract showed increased quality characteristics during cold storage. In conclusion, the proper addition level of C. sappan extract was 0.1% on the processing of emulsion-type pork sausage. PMID:26283171

  10. Effects of Soy Protein Hydrolysates Prepared by Varying Subcritical Media on the Physicochemical Properties of Pork Patties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Kyung; Ko, Bo-Bae; Davaatseren, Munkhtugs; Hong, Geun-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of soy protein hydrolysates (SPH) prepared by varying subcritical media on the physicochemical properties of pork patties. For resource of SPH, two different soybean species (Glycine max Merr.) of Daewonkong (DWK) and Saedanbaek (SDB) were selected. SPH was prepared by subcritical processing at 190℃ and 25 MPa under three different of media (water, 20% ethanol and 50% ethanol). Solubility and free amino group content revealed that water was better to yield larger amount of SPH than ethanol/water mixtures, regardless of species. Molecular weight (Mw) distribution of SPH was also similar between two species, while slightly different Mw distribution was obtained by subcritical media. For pork patty application, 50% ethanol treatment showed clear red color comparing to control after 14 d of storage. In addition, ethanol treatment had better oxidative stability than control and water treatment based on thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) analysis. For eating quality, although 20% ethanol treatment in SDB showed slightly higher cooking loss than control, generally addition of SPH did not affect the water-binding properties and hardness of pork patties. Consequently, the present study indicated that 50% ethanol was the best subcritical media to produce SPH possessing antioxidant activity, and the SPH produced from DWK exhibited better antioxidant activity than that produced SDB. PMID:27499657

  11. Comparison of antioxidant effects of milk mineral, butylated hydroxytoluene and sodium tripolyphosphate in raw and cooked ground pork.

    PubMed

    Jayasingh, Preetha; Cornforth, Daren P

    2004-01-01

    The antioxidant effects of 0.5-2.0% milk mineral (MM) was tested in raw and cooked ground pork stored at 2 °C or -20 °C, compared to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and sodium tripolyphosphate (STP). TBA numbers were low and not different between raw meat treatments. TBA numbers were lower (P<0.01) for cooked treatments with MM or STP compared to controls or treatments with BHT. Experiments were also done to determine acceptability of pork samples with various TBA values, and to determine effect of holding time before serving on TBA values. Cooked pork patties held at 71 °C for 90 or 120 min had higher (P<0.05) TBA values than patties held for 0-60 min. Thus patties could be warmed for 60 min after cooking without significantly increasing TBA number. For paired-preference sensory testing, patties were cooked and stored at 2 °C for 0, 1, 2 and 3 days to obtain TBA numbers of 0.4, 1.5, 3.4 and 3.9 respectively. Panelists preferred (P<0.001) patties with TBA number <0.5, compared to patties with TBA numbers >1.4.

  12. Comparison of Quality of Bologna Sausage Manufactured by Electron Beam or X-Ray Irradiated Ground Pork.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mee-Hye; Lee, Ju-Woon; Yoon, Young-Min; Kim, Jong Heon; Moon, Byeong-Geum; Kim, Jae-Hun; Song, Beom-Suk

    2014-01-01

    Ground lean pork was irradiated by an electron beam or X-rays to compare the effects of two types of radiation generated by a linear accelerator on the quality of Bologna sausage as a model meat product. Raw ground lean pork was vacuum packaged at a thickness of 1.5 cm and irradiated at doses of 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 kGy by an electron beam (2.5 MeV) or X-rays (5 MeV). Solubility of myofibrillar proteins, bacterial counts, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values were determined for raw meat samples. Bologna sausage was manufactured using the irradiated lean pork, and total bacterial counts, TBARS values, and quality properties (color differences, cooking yield, texture, and palatability) were determined. Irradiation increased the solubility of myofibrillar proteins in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). Bacterial contamination of the raw meat was reduced as the absorbed dose increased, and the reduction was the same for both radiation types. Differences were observed only between irradiated and non-irradiated samples (p<0.05). X-ray irradiation may serve as an alternative to gamma irradiation and electron beam irradiation.

  13. Effect of Caesalpinia sappan L. extract on physico-chemical properties of emulsion-type pork sausage during cold storage.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang-Keun; Ha, So-Ra; Choi, Jung-Seok

    2015-12-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of extract from heart wood of Caesalpinia sappan on the physico-chemical properties and to find the appropriate addition level in the emulsion-type pork sausage during cold storage. The pH of treatments with C. sappan extract was significantly lower than control and T1 during cold storage periods (P<0.05). Also, the reduction of moisture content, and the increase of cooking loss significantly occurred by the addition of 0.2% C. sappan extract. Also, the texture properties and sensory of sausages containing C. sappan extract were decreased compared to control. Inclusion of the C. sappan extract in sausages resulted in lower lightness and higher yellowness, chroma and hue values. However, the antioxidant, antimicrobial activity, and volatile basic nitrogen in the emulsion-type pork sausages with C. sappan extract showed increased quality characteristics during cold storage. In conclusion, the proper addition level of C. sappan extract was 0.1% on the processing of emulsion-type pork sausage.

  14. Effects of replacing pork backfat with emulsified vegetable oil on fatty acid composition and quality of UK-style sausages.

    PubMed

    Asuming-Bediako, N; Jaspal, M H; Hallett, K; Bayntun, J; Baker, A; Sheard, P R

    2014-01-01

    Rapeseed and sunflower oil were used to replace pork backfat in UK-style sausages by incorporating the oils as pre-formed emulsions. Replacing the pork backfat emulsion with rapeseed emulsion at total fat content of about 12%, reduced total saturated fatty acid (SFA) composition from 38% to 14% (4.5 to 1.8 g/100 g), increased monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) composition from 45% to 59% and increased polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition from 15% to 25%. Partial replacement of pork backfat with rapeseed at a fat content of about 20% reduced SFA from 38% to 24% (7.2 to 4.8 g/100 g). There were no significant differences in eating quality and overall liking other than slight differences in the attributes 'firmness' and 'particle size'. Improvement in the fatty acid composition was achieved without adversely affecting colour shelf life or lipid oxidation. The study suggests that a substantial reduction in SFA can be achieved by incorporating 'healthy' oils in UK-style sausages without adversely affecting eating quality or shelf life. PMID:23906753

  15. Determination of clenbuterol from pork samples using surface molecularly imprinted polymers as the selective sorbents for microextraction in packed syringe.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Lei, Chunmei; Zhang, Siruo; Bai, Gang; Zhou, Huiyan; Sun, Min; Fu, Qiang; Chang, Chun

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a selective sample pretreatment procedure combing surface molecularly imprinted polymers and microextraction in packed syringe (SMIPs-MEPS) was developed for the analysis of clenbuterol (CLB) from pork samples. SMIPs for CLB were synthesized on silica gel particles through a sol-gel process. A series of characterization and adsorption experiments revealed that the SMIPs exhibited porous structures, good thermal stability, high adsorption capacity and a fast mass transfer rate. The obtained SMIPs were employed as selective sorbents of SMIPs-MEPS for extraction of CLB from pork samples. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated, including the pH of sample solution, number of draw-eject cycles, volume of sample, type and volume of washing solution, and the type and volume of elution solution. Under the optimized conditions, a simple and rapid method for the determination of CLB from pork samples was established by coupling with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The whole pretreatment process was rapid and it can be accomplished with 2min. The limit of quantitation and the limit of detection for CLB were 0.02 and 0.009μgkg(-1), respectively. The average recoveries of CLB at three spiked levels ranged from 86.5% to 91.2% with the relative standard deviations (RSD) ≤6.3%. PMID:24463040

  16. Konjac-based oil bulking system for development of improved-lipid pork patties: technological, microbiological and sensory assessment.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Sandoval, Lorena; Cofrades, Susana; Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Carballo, José; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    Improved-lipid pork patties were manufactured following two different reformulation strategies: fat reduction by replacement of pork backfat with konjac gel (KG), and fat reduction/lipid improvement by replacement of pork backfat with an improved oil combination (olive, linseed and fish oils) bulking system based on konjac gel (O-KG). Technological, microbiological and sensory properties were analyzed as affected by the type of formulation and by chilled storage (9days, 2°C). Fat was reduced by between 30 and 86%. In the cases where O-KG was incorporated, 12 and 41% of total fat in patties came from the oil combination. There was no observable effect on color parameters in samples with O-K. Higher KG levels produced harder cooked patties. Animal fat replacement in patties promoted an increase in lipid oxidation, which was more pronounced in samples with an oil combination. In general, during chilled storage no major changes were observed in the studied properties as a result of the different treatments. PMID:25485511

  17. Estimation of Sensory Pork Loin Tenderness Using Warner-Bratzler Shear Force and Texture Profile Analysis Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Jee-Hwan; Choi, Mi-Hee; Rhee, Min-Suk; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the degree to which instrumental measurements explain the variation in pork loin tenderness as assessed by the sensory evaluation of trained panelists. Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBS) had a significant relationship with the sensory tenderness variables, such as softness, initial tenderness, chewiness, and rate of breakdown. In a regression analysis, WBS could account variations in these sensory variables, though only to a limited proportion of variation. On the other hand, three parameters from texture profile analysis (TPA)—hardness, gumminess, and chewiness—were significantly correlated with all sensory evaluation variables. In particular, from the result of stepwise regression analysis, TPA hardness alone explained over 15% of variation in all sensory evaluation variables, with the exception of perceptible residue. Based on these results, TPA analysis was found to be better than WBS measurement, with the TPA parameter hardness likely to prove particularly useful, in terms of predicting pork loin tenderness as rated by trained panelists. However, sensory evaluation should be conducted to investigate practical pork tenderness perceived by consumer, because both instrumental measurements could explain only a small portion (less than 20%) of the variability in sensory evaluation. PMID:26954174

  18. Alignment between chain quality management and chain governance in EU pork supply chains: a Transaction-Cost-Economics perspective.

    PubMed

    Wever, Mark; Wognum, Nel; Trienekens, Jacques; Omta, Onno

    2010-02-01

    Although inter-firm coordination of quality management is increasingly important for meeting end-customer demand in agri-food chains, few researchers focus on the relation between inter-firm quality management systems (QMS) and inter-firm governance structures (GS). However, failure to align QMSs and GSs may lead to inefficiencies in quality management because of high transaction-costs. In addition, misalignment is likely to reduce the quality of end-customer products. This paper addresses this gap in research by empirically examining the relation between QMSs and GSs in pork meat supply chains. Transaction-Cost-Economic theory is used to develop propositions about the relation between three aspects of QMSs--ownership, vertical scope and scale of adoption--and the use of different types of GSs in pork meat supply chains. To validate the propositions, seven cases are examined from four different countries. The results show that the different aspects of QMSs largely relate to specific GSs used in chains in the manner predicted by the propositions. This supports the view that alignment between QMSs and GSs is important for the efficient coordination of quality management in (pork meat) supply chains.

  19. Formation of biogenic amines and growth of spoilage-related microorganisms in pork stored under different packaging conditions applying PCA.

    PubMed

    Li, Miaoyun; Tian, Lu; Zhao, Gaiming; Zhang, Qiuhui; Gao, Xiaoping; Huang, Xianqing; Sun, Lingxia

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the evolution of biogenic amines and spoilage-related microorganisms of chilled pork stored at 5 °C under various atmospheric conditions. The experimental packaging systems were pallet packaging, vacuum packaging (VP) and modified atmosphere packaging methods (MAP, 40%O2+40%CO2+20%N2), respectively. The results showed that about 74.26% of the variability could be explained by two first principal components analyzed by PCA in the pallet packaging, while in the vacuum and modified atmosphere packagings were about 85.21% and 79.14%, respectively. PC1 differentiated the indicators from packaging conditions. All the five microbial indicators and partial biogenic amines, gathering together, had high values at the positive side of PC1. Putrescine and cadaverine could reflect the spoilage evolution of fresh pork except for those in the pallet. Therefore, putrescine and cadaverine could be used as the spoilage indicators of chilled pork, of which the contents might reflect the spoilage degree.

  20. SEROTYPES AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA ISOLATED FROM PORK, CHICKEN MEAT AND LETTUCE, BANGKOK AND CENTRAL THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Niyomdecha, Nattamon; Mungkornkaew, Narissara; Samosornsuk, Worada

    2016-01-01

    Food of animal origins, particularly pork and chicken meat, has long been recognized as major sources of human salmonellosis. There have been recent reports of human salmonellosis outbreaks due to consumption of leafy green vegetables such as lettuce. In this study, 120 (40 pork, 40 chicken meat and 40 lettuce) samples were randomly collected from retail markets in Bangkok and central Thailand during June to August 2015 for Salmonella serotype identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Salmonella was found in 82%, 62% and 20% of pork, chicken meat and lettuce samples, respectively. The top 5 most common Salmonella serotypes were Panama (15%), Schwarzengrund (12%), Rissen, Anatum, and Stanley (11% each), Albany (9%), and Indiana (8%). A high percentage of Salmonella isolated from food of animal origin were resistant to multiple antimicrobial drugs, including ampicillin, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. From antibiogram pattern analysis, the most common serotypes constituted isolates that were multidrug resistant. The study indicates that Salmonella was still present in various kinds of food and that certain serotypes have become predominant, a phenomenon not previously reported in Thailand.

  1. Comparison of Quality of Bologna Sausage Manufactured by Electron Beam or X-Ray Irradiated Ground Pork

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mee-Hye

    2014-01-01

    Ground lean pork was irradiated by an electron beam or X-rays to compare the effects of two types of radiation generated by a linear accelerator on the quality of Bologna sausage as a model meat product. Raw ground lean pork was vacuum packaged at a thickness of 1.5 cm and irradiated at doses of 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 kGy by an electron beam (2.5 MeV) or X-rays (5 MeV). Solubility of myofibrillar proteins, bacterial counts, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values were determined for raw meat samples. Bologna sausage was manufactured using the irradiated lean pork, and total bacterial counts, TBARS values, and quality properties (color differences, cooking yield, texture, and palatability) were determined. Irradiation increased the solubility of myofibrillar proteins in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). Bacterial contamination of the raw meat was reduced as the absorbed dose increased, and the reduction was the same for both radiation types. Differences were observed only between irradiated and non-irradiated samples (p<0.05). X-ray irradiation may serve as an alternative to gamma irradiation and electron beam irradiation. PMID:26761284

  2. SEROTYPES AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA ISOLATED FROM PORK, CHICKEN MEAT AND LETTUCE, BANGKOK AND CENTRAL THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Niyomdecha, Nattamon; Mungkornkaew, Narissara; Samosornsuk, Worada

    2016-01-01

    Food of animal origins, particularly pork and chicken meat, has long been recognized as major sources of human salmonellosis. There have been recent reports of human salmonellosis outbreaks due to consumption of leafy green vegetables such as lettuce. In this study, 120 (40 pork, 40 chicken meat and 40 lettuce) samples were randomly collected from retail markets in Bangkok and central Thailand during June to August 2015 for Salmonella serotype identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Salmonella was found in 82%, 62% and 20% of pork, chicken meat and lettuce samples, respectively. The top 5 most common Salmonella serotypes were Panama (15%), Schwarzengrund (12%), Rissen, Anatum, and Stanley (11% each), Albany (9%), and Indiana (8%). A high percentage of Salmonella isolated from food of animal origin were resistant to multiple antimicrobial drugs, including ampicillin, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. From antibiogram pattern analysis, the most common serotypes constituted isolates that were multidrug resistant. The study indicates that Salmonella was still present in various kinds of food and that certain serotypes have become predominant, a phenomenon not previously reported in Thailand. PMID:27086423

  3. Alignment between chain quality management and chain governance in EU pork supply chains: a Transaction-Cost-Economics perspective.

    PubMed

    Wever, Mark; Wognum, Nel; Trienekens, Jacques; Omta, Onno

    2010-02-01

    Although inter-firm coordination of quality management is increasingly important for meeting end-customer demand in agri-food chains, few researchers focus on the relation between inter-firm quality management systems (QMS) and inter-firm governance structures (GS). However, failure to align QMSs and GSs may lead to inefficiencies in quality management because of high transaction-costs. In addition, misalignment is likely to reduce the quality of end-customer products. This paper addresses this gap in research by empirically examining the relation between QMSs and GSs in pork meat supply chains. Transaction-Cost-Economic theory is used to develop propositions about the relation between three aspects of QMSs--ownership, vertical scope and scale of adoption--and the use of different types of GSs in pork meat supply chains. To validate the propositions, seven cases are examined from four different countries. The results show that the different aspects of QMSs largely relate to specific GSs used in chains in the manner predicted by the propositions. This supports the view that alignment between QMSs and GSs is important for the efficient coordination of quality management in (pork meat) supply chains. PMID:20374780

  4. Predicting behavior of Staphylococcus aureus, salmonella serovars, and Escherichia coli O157: H7 in pork products during single and repeated temperature abuse periods.

    PubMed

    Ingham, Steven C; Vang, Song; Levey, Ben; Fahey, Lisa; Norback, John P; Fanslau, Melody A; Senecal, Andre G; Burnham, Greg M; Ingham, Barbara H

    2009-10-01

    Tools for predicting growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 (THERM; temperature history evaluation for raw meats) have been developed using ground pork and sausage. THERM tools have been tested with three types of pork sausage but not with other pork products or during sequential temperature abuse periods. We conducted inoculation studies (five strains each of S. aureus and/or Salmonella plus E. coli O157:H7) with simulated cooling of warm sausages, inprocess warming of bratwurst, isothermal temperature abuse of pork frankfurter batter, and two sequential periods of 13, 15.6, or 21.1 degrees C temperature abuse of breakfast sausage, natural (additive-free) chops, and enhanced (phosphate solution-injected) loins. In sequential temperature abuse studies, a temperature abuse period (> or =24 h) occurred before and after either refrigeration (5 degrees C for 24 h), or freezing (-20 degrees C for 24 h) and thawing (24 h at 5 degrees C). Pathogen growth predictions from THERM developed using ground pork and sausage were compared with experimental results of 0 to 3.0 log CFU of growth. Across all temperature abuse conditions, qualitative predictions (growth versus no growth) made using the pork tool (n = 133) and the sausage tool (n = 115) were accurate (51 and 50%, respectively), fail-safe (44 and 50%), or fail-dangerous (5 and 0%). Quantitative predictions from the two tools were accurate (29 and 22% , respectively), fail-safe (59 and 73%), or fail-dangerous (12 and 5%). Pathogen growth was greater during the second sequential temperature abuse period but not significantly so (P > 0.05). Both THERM tools provide useful qualitative predictions of pathogen growth in pork products during isolated or sequential temperature abuse events.

  5. Effects of pig age at market weight and magnesium supplementation through drinking water on pork quality.

    PubMed

    Frederick, B R; van Heugten, E; See, M T

    2006-06-01

    Thirty-two halothane-negative pigs (109 +/- 0.6 kg of BW) were used to determine the effect of pig age at marketing (and thus growth rate), and magnesium supplementation through drinking water, on pork quality. Two initial groups of 50 pigs that differed by 30 +/- 2 d of age were fed diets to meet or exceed nutrient requirements beginning at 28 kg of BW. Sixteen average, representative pigs were selected from each group to represent older, slow-growing pigs and younger, fast-growing pigs. For the duration of the study, pigs were individually penned, provided 2.7 kg of feed (0.12% Mg) daily, and allowed free access to water. After 7 d of adjustment, pigs were blocked by sex and BW and allotted to 0 or 900 mg of supplemental Mg/L as MgSO4 in drinking water for 2 d before slaughter. All 32 pigs were then transported (110 km) to a commercial abattoir on the same day and slaughtered 2.5 h after arrival. Longissimus and semimembranosus (SM) chops were packaged and stored to simulate display storage for fluid loss and Minolta color determinations at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 d. Two remaining sections of the LM were vacuum-packaged and stored at 4 degrees C for 25 or 50 d. Fast- (younger) and slow- (older) growing pigs differed by 27 +/- 0.3 d of age (153 and 180 +/- 0.3 d; P < 0.001) at similar BW (108 and 110 +/- 0.6 kg of BW; P = 0.13). Supplementation of Mg tended to increase plasma Mg concentration (24.1 vs. 21.8 +/- 0.8 ppm; P = 0.06) but did not affect Mg concentration in LM or SM. Fluid loss of displayed LM or SM, and purge loss, color, and oxidation of vacuum-packaged LM or SM were not affected by age or Mg (P > 0.10). Surface exudate of the SM from older pigs was lower than that of younger pigs (61 vs. 74 +/- 6 mg; P = 0.05) but was not different for the LM (P = 0.22). The LM from older pigs displayed for 4 and 8 d; P < 0.05) were less yellow (lower b*) than younger pigs. The SM from older pigs had lower lightness (L*) initially (47.9 vs. 49.5 +/- 0.4) and after 2 d (49

  6. Effect of betaine and arginine in lysine-deficient diets on growth, carcass traits, and pork quality.

    PubMed

    Madeira, M S; Alfaia, C M; Costa, P; Lopes, P A; Martins, S V; Lemos, J P C; Moreira, O; Santos-Silva, J; Bessa, R J B; Prates, J A M

    2015-10-01

    Forty entire male pigs from a commercial crossbreed (Duroc × Large White × Landrace) were used to investigate the individual or combined effects of betaine and Arg supplementation in Lys-deficient diets on growth performance, carcass traits, and pork quality. Pigs with 59.9 ± 1.65 kg BW were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 dietary treatments ( = 8). The 5 dietary treatments were normal Lys and CP diet (0.51% Lys and 16% CP; control), reduced Lys and CP diet (0.35% Lys and 13% CP), reduced Lys and CP diet with betaine supplementation (0.33%), reduced Lys and CP diet with Arg supplementation (1.5%), and reduced Lys and CP diet with betaine and Arg supplementation (0.33% betaine and 1.5% Arg). Pigs were slaughtered at 92.7 ± 2.54 kg BW. The Lys-deficient diets (-35% Lys) increased intramuscular fat (IMF) content by 25% ( = 0.041) and meat juiciness by 12% ( = 0.041) but had a negative effect on growth performance ( < 0.05) of pigs. In addition, Lys-deficient diets increased L* ( = 0.005) and b* ( = 0.010) muscle color parameters and perirenal fat deposition ( < 0.001) and decreased both HCW ( = 0.015) and loin weight ( = 0.023). Betaine and Arg supplementation of Lys-deficient diets had no effect on IMF content but increased ( < 0.05) overall pork acceptability. Arginine supplementation also increased ( = 0.003) meat tenderness. Differences in fatty acid composition of pork were not detected among dietary treatment groups. However, oleic acid was positively correlated ( < 0.05) with IMF content, juiciness, flavor, and overall acceptability of meat. Data confirm that dietary CP reduction enhances pork eating quality but negatively affects pigs' growth performance. Moreover, it is suggested that betaine and Arg supplementation of Lys-deficient diets does not further increase IMF content but improves some pork sensory traits, including overall acceptability. PMID:26523565

  7. Chilling rate effects on pork loin tenderness in commercial processing plants.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, S D; King, D A; Wheeler, T L

    2012-08-01

    The present experiment was conducted to provide a large-scale objective comparison of pork LM tenderness and other meat quality traits among packing plants that differ in stunning method and carcass chilling rate. For each of 2 replicates, pigs were sourced from a single barn of a commercial finishing operation that fed pigs from a single terminal crossbred line. On each day, 3 trucks were loaded, with each of those trucks delivering the pigs to a different plant. Plant A used CO(2) stunning and conventional spray chilling; Plant B used CO(2) stunning and blast chilling; and Plant C used electrical stunning and blast chilling. The boneless, vacuum-packaged loin was obtained from the left side of each carcass (n = 597; 100 · plant(-1) · replicate(-1)). As designed, HCW, LM depth, and LM intramuscular fat percentage did not differ among plants (P > 0.05). By 1.67 h postmortem (1 h after the carcasses exited the harvest floor), the average deep LM temperature was >10°C warmer for Plant A than Plants B and C (32.1°C, 21.6°C, and 19.3°C, for Plants A, B, and C, respectively) and deep LM temperature continued to be >10°C warmer for Plant A until 4.17 h or 6.33 h postmortem than for Plants C and B, respectively. Both plants that used blast chilling produced loins with greater LM slice shear force at 15 d postmortem than did the plant that used conventional spray chilling (P < 0.0001). The frequency of loins with excessively high (>25 kg) LM slice shear force values was greater for Plant B than Plant A (14.7% vs. 1%; P < 0.01). Among all the traits studied, including visual and instrumental evaluations of LM color, ultimate pH, marbling score, and lean color stability, the only other difference between Plants A and B was that purge loss during 13 d (from d 1 to 14) of vacuum-packaged storage was greater for Plant B (P < 0.05). That is, with this sample of pigs and CO(2) stunning, no loin quality advantages were detected for blast chilling. Regardless of chilling

  8. Characterization of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genotypes of Enterococcus faecalis recovered from a pork processing plant.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Mueen; Diarra, Moussa S; Masson, Luke

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the antimicrobial resistance and virulence genotypes of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from samples obtained from a commercial pork processing plant. A total of 200 samples were randomly obtained from carcasses after bleeding (BC; 50 samples) and pasteurization (PC; 100 samples) and from retail pork products (RP; 50 samples). One isolate from each E. faecalis -positive sample was analyzed for antimicrobial susceptibility and characterized using a enterococcal microarray for analysis of resistance and virulence genes. E. faecalis was isolated from 79.5% of BC samples, 2% of PC samples, and 72.7% of RP samples. Resistance to the clinically important drugs ciprofloxacin (one isolate each from BC and RP samples) and daptomycin (one isolate each from PC and RP samples) was found. Multiresistance (to five or more antimicrobials) was more common in E. faecalis isolates from BC (77.4% of isolates) samples than those from PC (25%) and RP (37.6%) samples. Resistance to kanamycin (43.5%) and streptomycin (69.2%) was noted mostly in E. faecalis from BC samples. The most common resistance genes (>5% prevalence) found in E. faecalis were those for aminoglycosides (aac(6), aphA3, and aadE), macrolides-lincosamide (ermB, ermA, sat(4), and linB), and tetracyclines (tetL, tetM, and tetO ). The virulence genes expressing adhesion (ace, efaAfs, and agrBfs), gelatinase (gelE), and pheromone (cAM, ccF10, cob, and cpd1) factors were found in the majority of isolates. Significant associations were found between resistance and virulence genes, suggesting their possible relationship. These data suggest that carcasses entering the final product processing area are mostly free of E. faecalis but are recontaminated with antimicrobial-resistant strains during processing. The source of these contaminants remains to be identified; however, these results underscore the importance of E. faecalis as a reservoir of resistance and virulence genes.

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance and Resistance Genes in Aerobic Bacteria Isolated from Pork at Slaughter.

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Heidemann Olsen, Rikke; Ye, Lei; Yan, He; Nie, Qing; Meng, Hecheng; Shi, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance, integrons, and transferability of resistance markers in 243 aerobic bacteria recovered from pork at slaughter in the People's Republic of China. The organisms belonged to 22 genera of gram-negative bacteria (92.2%) and gram-positive bacteria (7.8%). High levels of resistance were detected to tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and ampicillin (36.2 to 54.3%), and lower levels were detected to nitrofurantoin, cefotaxime, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and chloramphenicol (7.8 to 29.2%). Across species, genes conferring antimicrobial resistance were observed with the following frequencies: blaTEM, 40.7%; blaCMY-2, 15.2%; blaCTX-M, 11.5%; sul2, 27.2%; sul1, 14.4%; tet(A), 5.4%; tet(L), 5.4%; tet(M), 5.0%; tet(E), 3.7%; tet(C), 3.3%; tet(S), 2.5%; and tet(K), 0.8%. Various antimicrobial resistance genes were found in new carriers: blaTEM in Lactococcus garvieae, Myroides odoratimimus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Staphylococcus sciuri, Raoultella terrigena, Macrococcus caseolyticus, Acinetobacter ursingii, Sphingobacterium sp., and Oceanobacillus sp.; blaCMY-2 in Lactococcus lactis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia marcescens, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Myroides phaeus; tet(L) in M. caseolyticus; sul1 in Vibrio cincinnatiensis; sul2 in Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter johnsonii, and V. cincinnatiensis; and the class 1 integron and gene cassette aadA2 in V. cincinnatiensis. Approximately 6.6% of isolates contained class 1 integrons, and one isolate harbored class 2 integrons. Plasmid associated intI1 and androgen receptor- encoding genes were transferred into Escherichia coli J53 and E. coli DH5α by conjugation and transformation experiments, respectively. Our study highlights the importance of aerobic bacteria from pork as reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes and mobile genetic elements that can readily be transferred intra- and interspecies. PMID:27052863

  10. Assessment of high and low enterotoxin A producing Staphylococcus aureus strains on pork sausage.

    PubMed

    Zeaki, Nikoleta; Cao, Rong; Skandamis, Panagiotis N; Rådström, Peter; Schelin, Jenny

    2014-07-16

    Three Staphylococcus aureus strains representing different alleles of the Siphoviridae prophage-encoded enterotoxin A (SEA) gene, including two high-SEA-producing strains and one low-SEA-producing strain were studied to investigate sea expression and SEA formation on a frankfurter type of sausage. The effect of lactic acid, an antimicrobial compound used as a preservative in food, was also investigated on the same product. All three strains were grown on pork sausages at 15°C for 14days in the presence or absence of lactic acid (1 or 2% v/v). Growth, sea mRNA expression and SEA formation were regularly monitored and compared between non-treated and treated sausages. For all experiments performed, the extracellular SEA formation significantly differed between the high- and low-SEA-producing strains, although growth and viability were overall the same. For the low producer (Sa51), the accumulated amount of extracellular SEA formed after 14days was close to the detection limit (less than 1ng/g) in all conditions; while Sa21 and Sa17, the two high-producing strains, formed 250±25.37ng/g and 750±82.65ng/g in non-treated sausage and 150±75.75ng/g and 300±83.89ng/g when treated with 1% lactic acid, respectively, after 14days. Sausages treated with 2% lactic acid followed the same pattern as above, but with an extended lag phase to 4days and reduced levels of enterotoxin formed for all strains. The difference in the level of SEA between the two high-producing strains is most likely due to the different clonal lineages of the sea-encoded Siphoviridae phages where induction of the prophage potentially could be the reason for higher production of SEA in one of the lines. Furthermore, a prolonged expression of sea gene in the two high-producing strains was observed during the entire incubation period, while the sea expression was under the detection limit in the low-producing strain. This study indicates that the high-SEA-producing strains, especially the strains with the

  11. Behavior and Inactivation of Enterotoxin-Positive Clostridium perfringens in Pork Picadillo and Tamales Filled with Pork Picadillo under Different Cooking, Storage, and Reheating Conditions.

    PubMed

    Villarruel-López, A; Ruíz-Quezada, S L; Castro-Rosas, J; Gomez-Aldapa, C A; Olea-Rodríguez, M A; Nuño, K; Navarro-Hidalgo, V; Torres-Vitela, M R

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the behavior of Clostridium perfringens in individual ingredients and tamales containing different pathogen concentrations upon exposure to different temperatures and methods of cooking, storage, and reheating. In ground pork, C. perfringens cells were inactivated when exposed to 95°C for 30 min. Three lots of picadillo inoculated with 0, 3, and 5 log CFU/g C. perfringens cells, respectively, were exposed to different storage temperatures. At 20°C, cell counts increased 1 log in all lots, whereas at 8°C, counts decreased by 2 log. Four lots of tamales prepared with picadillo inoculated with 0, 2, 3, and 7 log CFU/g prior to the final cooking step exhibited no surviving cells (91°C for 90, 45, or 35 min). Four lots of tamales were inoculated after cooking with concentrations of 0, 0.6, 4, and 6 log CFU/g of the pathogen and then stored at different temperatures. In these preparations, after 24 h at 20°C, the count increased by 1.4, 1.7, and 1.8 log in the tamales inoculated with 0.6, 4, and 6 log inoculum, respectively. When they were stored at 8°C for 24 h, enumerations decreased to <1, 2.5, and 1.9 log in the tamales inoculated with 0.6, 4, and 6 log of C. perfringens cells, respectively. However, when the lots were exposed to 20°C and then 8°C, 0.8, 1.8, and 2.4 log changes were observed for the tamales inoculated with 0.6, 4, and 6 log, respectively. Microwaving, steaming, and frying to reheat tamales inoculated with 6 log CFU/g C. perfringens cells showed that the pathogen was inactivated after 2 min of exposure in the microwave and after 5 min of exposure to steam. In contrast, no inactivation was observed after 5 min of frying. The tamales inoculated with spores (7 log most probable number [MPN]/g) showed a decrease of 2 log after steaming or frying, and no survival was observed after microwaving. Tamales inoculated with spores (7 log MPN/g) after cooking were susceptible to microwaves, but 2.4 and 255 MPN/g remained after frying

  12. Definition, willingness-to-pay, and ranking of quality attributes of U.S. pork as defined by importers in Asia and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Murphy, R G L; Howard, S T; Woerner, D R; Pendell, D L; Dixon, C L; Desimone, T L; Green, M D; Igo, J L; Tatum, J D; Belk, K E

    2015-01-01

    A survey was conducted from November 2009 to April 2010 to determine how importers of pork define 7 predetermined quality categories (food safety, customer service, eating quality, product specification, packaging, visual characteristics, and production history) and to estimate willingness-to-pay (WTP) and establish best-worst (B/W) scaling (rank) for the 7 quality categories. Interviews were conducted in Hong Kong/China (n = 83), Japan (n = 48), Mexico (n = 70) and Russia (n = 54) with importers of U.S. pork or those who had purchased U.S. pork from distributors in the last 3 yr. Interviews used dynamic routing software and were structured such that economic factors for purchase were addressed first, allowing all responses to focus on quality. Questions about WTP and B/W were asked and then each respondent was asked to define what each quality category meant to them. Generalized linear mixed models were used to analyze frequency data. Over 70% of interviewees in Hong Kong/China, Japan, and Mexico responded that purchase price was influential in deciding whether or not to purchase imported pork. This number was lower in Russia, where respondents stated tariff rates were also important, indicating market access was a larger issue in Russia. Food safety was the most important quality category (price was not included as a part of quality) for imported pork followed by specifications. Respondents indicated some form of government inspection was how they defined food safety, whereas product size, weight, and subcutaneous fat were all included in the definition of specifications. Interviewees were more likely to pay premiums for customer service and less likely to pay premiums for packaging (P < 0.05). The premiums that were willing to be paid for guarantees of quality for imported pork variety meats were numerically lower than for whole muscle cuts or processed products. A guarantee associated with food safety of processed pork products was found to be the quality

  13. Genetic Diversity and Incidence of Virulence-Associated Genes of Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus Isolates from Pork, Beef, and Chicken Meat in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Zacharow, Iwona; Bystroń, Jarosław; Wałecka-Zacharska, Ewa; Podkowik, Magdalena; Bania, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of 9 virulence-associated genes and genetic diversity was determined in 79 A. butzleri and 6 A. cryaerophilus isolates from pork, beef, and chicken meat. All A. butzleri isolates harboured the tlyA gene, and most of them carried ciaB, mviN, pldA, cadF, and cj1349 genes. ciaB was found to occur with higher frequency in poultry if compared with pork (p = 0.0007), while irgA was more frequent in poultry than in beef (p = 0.007). All 6 A. cryaerophilus isolates harboured the ciaB gene, while mviN and tlyA were detected in 3 out of these isolates. Only one isolate carried the cadF gene. All beef-derived A. cryaerophilus isolates carried ciaB, mviN, and tlyA genes. A. cryaerophilus isolates from chicken meat harboured ciaB gene only. The pork-derived isolate harboured ciaB and cadF genes. Seventy-four genotypes were distinguished within 79 A. butzleri isolates. Nineteen from 21 isolates derived from beef and pork were found to be closely related to A. butzleri from chicken meat. Each of the 6 A. cryaerophilus isolates was found to have unique genotype. We demonstrated that closely related genotypes can spread within pork, beef, and chicken meat populations of A. butzleri but not A. cryaerophilus. PMID:26539546

  14. Microbial, physical-chemical and sensory spoilage during the refrigerated storage of cooked pork loin processed by the sous vide method.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Pedro; Nieto, Gema; Garrido, María Dolores; Bañón, Sancho

    2008-10-01

    The aim was to study spoilage during the refrigerated storage of cooked pork loin processed by the sous vide method. Samples were packaged under vacuum into polyamide-polypropylene pouches, cooked at an oven temperature/time of 70°C/12h, chilled at 3°C and stored at 2°C for 0, 5 or 10 weeks. Microbial (psychrotrophs, lactic acid bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, moulds and yeasts), physical-chemical (pH, water activity, TBARS, acidity, L(∗)a(∗)b(∗) colour, texture profile analysis and shear force) and sensory (appearance, odour, flavour, texture and acceptance) parameters were determined. The results showed that sensory spoilage preceded microbiological spoilage of sous vide pork loin. Counts bellow 1logcfu/g of psychrotrophs, anaerobic psychrotrophs, Enterobacteriaceae and lactic acid bacteria were detected in any control week, while moderate counts (2-3logcfu/g) of moulds and yeasts were found. Minor changes in water activity, lipid oxidation, CIELab colour, hardness, cohesiveness or gumminess were associated with spoilage of pork loin, only decreases of lactic acid, springiness and shear force were observed. The pork loin was unacceptable after 10 weeks. This loss of acceptance was mainly due to the deterioration of meaty flavour and odour, although the loss of appearance, juiciness and firmness also contributed. Moderate warmed-over and rancidity were detected. The sensory analysis was the most effective method for determining the shelf life of the sous vide pork-based dishes. PMID:22063333

  15. New sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection of horse and pork in halal beef.

    PubMed

    von Bargen, Christoph; Dojahn, Jörg; Waidelich, Dietmar; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Brockmeyer, Jens

    2013-12-11

    The accidental or fraudulent blending of meat from different species is a highly relevant aspect for food product quality control, especially for consumers with ethical concerns against species, such as horse or pork. In this study, we present a sensitive mass spectrometrical approach for the detection of trace contaminations of horse meat and pork and demonstrate the specificity of the identified biomarker peptides against chicken, lamb, and beef. Biomarker peptides were identified by a shotgun proteomic approach using tryptic digests of protein extracts and were verified by the analysis of 21 different meat samples from the 5 species included in this study. For the most sensitive peptides, a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method was developed that allows for the detection of 0.55% horse or pork in a beef matrix. To enhance sensitivity, we applied MRM(3) experiments and were able to detect down to 0.13% pork contamination in beef. To the best of our knowledge, we present here the first rapid and sensitive mass spectrometrical method for the detection of horse and pork by use of MRM and MRM(3).

  16. The Assessment of Red Beet as a Natural Colorant, and Evaluation of Quality Properties of Emulsified Pork Sausage Containing Red Beet Powder during Cold Storage.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang-Keun; Choi, Jung-Seok; Moon, Sung-Sil; Jeong, Jin-Yeon; Kim, Gap-Don

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess red beet as a natural colorant in emulsified pork sausage and to investigate the effect of red beet on quality characteristics of emulsified pork sausage during 20 d of cold storage. Red beet was prepared as a powder and a substitute with sodium nitrite at 0.5% and 1.0% levels in emulsified pork sausage. Red beet significantly increased the moisture content and pH (p<0.0001) and affected color traits. Lightness of emulsified pork sausage decreased by the addition of red beet powder (p<0.01), whereas lightness with red beet treatments slightly increased during 20 d of cold storage at 4℃ (p<0.05). Redness dramatically increased with red beet powder (p<0.0001). Color by sensory evaluation also showed a significant effect from red beet addition (p<0.05), whereas the other sensory properties such as flavor, tenderness, juiciness, and overall acceptability were not affected by the addition of red beet powder (p>0.05). Texture and 2-thiobabituric acid reactive substance were also not affected by red beet addition (p>0.05). Therefore, red beet could be a good natural colorant in emulsified pork sausage but it needs additional processing, such as betalain concentration and extraction as a juice, to be used as an antioxidant in meat products. PMID:26761285

  17. Ethanol Extracts from Mistletoe (Viscum album L.) Act as Natural Antioxidants and Antimicrobial Agents in Uncooked Pork Patties during Refrigerated Storage

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Suk-Nam

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant potential of mistletoe (Viscum album L. var. coloratum Ohwi; VAL) extract in uncooked pork patties was evaluated. Three concentrations of VAL extract (0.1 [T1], 0.5% [T2] and 1.0% [T3]) along with 0.02% ascorbic acid as a positive control (V) were added to ground pork and pork patties were prepared. Incorporation of VAL extract decreased (p<0.05) the pH of the pork patties throughout the storage time and reduced (p<0.01) the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance values after day 14 of storage. Total plate counts of the VAL extract-treated samples and V-treated samples were also significantly lower (p<0.01) than that of the control (C) throughout the storage period. In addition, odor scores of the VAL extract-treated patties were lower than those of the C- or V-treated samples on 3rd day of the storage period. These results demonstrated that the VAL extract acts as a natural antioxidant in uncooked pork products. PMID:26732334

  18. Genetic Diversity and Incidence of Virulence-Associated Genes of Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus Isolates from Pork, Beef, and Chicken Meat in Poland.

    PubMed

    Zacharow, Iwona; Bystroń, Jarosław; Wałecka-Zacharska, Ewa; Podkowik, Magdalena; Bania, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of 9 virulence-associated genes and genetic diversity was determined in 79 A. butzleri and 6 A. cryaerophilus isolates from pork, beef, and chicken meat. All A. butzleri isolates harboured the tlyA gene, and most of them carried ciaB, mviN, pldA, cadF, and cj1349 genes. ciaB was found to occur with higher frequency in poultry if compared with pork (p = 0.0007), while irgA was more frequent in poultry than in beef (p = 0.007). All 6 A. cryaerophilus isolates harboured the ciaB gene, while mviN and tlyA were detected in 3 out of these isolates. Only one isolate carried the cadF gene. All beef-derived A. cryaerophilus isolates carried ciaB, mviN, and tlyA genes. A. cryaerophilus isolates from chicken meat harboured ciaB gene only. The pork-derived isolate harboured ciaB and cadF genes. Seventy-four genotypes were distinguished within 79 A. butzleri isolates. Nineteen from 21 isolates derived from beef and pork were found to be closely related to A. butzleri from chicken meat. Each of the 6 A. cryaerophilus isolates was found to have unique genotype. We demonstrated that closely related genotypes can spread within pork, beef, and chicken meat populations of A. butzleri but not A. cryaerophilus.

  19. The Assessment of Red Beet as a Natural Colorant, and Evaluation of Quality Properties of Emulsified Pork Sausage Containing Red Beet Powder during Cold Storage.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang-Keun; Choi, Jung-Seok; Moon, Sung-Sil; Jeong, Jin-Yeon; Kim, Gap-Don

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess red beet as a natural colorant in emulsified pork sausage and to investigate the effect of red beet on quality characteristics of emulsified pork sausage during 20 d of cold storage. Red beet was prepared as a powder and a substitute with sodium nitrite at 0.5% and 1.0% levels in emulsified pork sausage. Red beet significantly increased the moisture content and pH (p<0.0001) and affected color traits. Lightness of emulsified pork sausage decreased by the addition of red beet powder (p<0.01), whereas lightness with red beet treatments slightly increased during 20 d of cold storage at 4℃ (p<0.05). Redness dramatically increased with red beet powder (p<0.0001). Color by sensory evaluation also showed a significant effect from red beet addition (p<0.05), whereas the other sensory properties such as flavor, tenderness, juiciness, and overall acceptability were not affected by the addition of red beet powder (p>0.05). Texture and 2-thiobabituric acid reactive substance were also not affected by red beet addition (p>0.05). Therefore, red beet could be a good natural colorant in emulsified pork sausage but it needs additional processing, such as betalain concentration and extraction as a juice, to be used as an antioxidant in meat products.

  20. Salmonella and Campylobacter contamination of ready-to-eat street-vended pork meat dishes in Antananarivo, Madagascar: a risk for the consumers?

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Eric; Abat, Cédric; Bénédicte, Contamin; Vincent, Porphyre; Michel, Rakotoharinome; Muriel, Maeder

    2015-03-01

    Street-food vending has been increasing in many developing countries and particularly in Madagascar since 2000. Gastroenteric diseases cause 37% of all deaths each year, and 50% of children <5 years are infected with intestinal pathogens. However, there has been little information regarding the incidence of street-food-related diseases, or foodborne pathogens in pork, which is the most commonly eaten meat, along with chicken. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the safety of traditional ready-to-eat street-vended pork dishes and to assess the association of restaurant characteristics and cooking practices with Salmonella and Campylobacter contamination of these meals. Sixty street-restaurants were studied from March 2012 to August 2012 in Antananarivo. A questionnaire was submitted to the managers, and samples of ready-to-eat pork dishes were bought. Salmonella spp. were isolated in 10% of the 60 street-restaurants studied and in 5% samples of pork dishes. The most prevalent serovars isolated were Salmonella Typhimurium (44%) and Senftenberg (33%). Campylobacter was not detected. Only 4 of the 43 variables tested in the screening analysis were significantly associated with Salmonella spp. contamination of the street-restaurants. The risk for a restaurant to be Salmonella positive decreased when there were specific premises for the restaurant and when the staff was wearing specific clothes when working. Conversely, that risk increased when the temperature of ready-to-eat pork was <52 °C and when tablecloths were used in the restaurant. PMID:25764444