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Sample records for porous composite materials

  1. Fabricating porous materials using interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gels

    DOEpatents

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Volosin, Alex

    2016-06-14

    Porous materials are fabricated using interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gels. A mixture or precursor solution including an inorganic gel precursor, an organic polymer gel precursor, and a solvent is treated to form an inorganic wet gel including the organic polymer gel precursor and the solvent. The inorganic wet gel is then treated to form a composite wet gel including an organic polymer network in the body of the inorganic wet gel, producing an interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gel. The composite wet gel is dried to form a composite material including the organic polymer network and an inorganic network component. The composite material can be treated further to form a porous composite material, a porous polymer or polymer composite, a porous metal oxide, and other porous materials.

  2. An Overview of Recent Development in Composite Catalysts from Porous Materials for Various Reactions and Processes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zaiku; Liu, Zhicheng; Wang, Yangdong; Yang, Qihua; Xu, Longya; Ding, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Catalysts are important to the chemical industry and environmental remediation due to their effective conversion of one chemical into another. Among them, composite catalysts have attracted continuous attention during the past decades. Nowadays, composite catalysts are being used more and more to meet the practical catalytic performance requirements in the chemical industry of high activity, high selectivity and good stability. In this paper, we reviewed our recent work on development of composite catalysts, mainly focusing on the composite catalysts obtained from porous materials such as zeolites, mesoporous materials, carbon nanotubes (CNT), etc. Six types of porous composite catalysts are discussed, including amorphous oxide modified zeolite composite catalysts, zeolite composites prepared by co-crystallization or overgrowth, hierarchical porous catalysts, host-guest porous composites, inorganic and organic mesoporous composite catalysts, and polymer/CNT composite catalysts. PMID:20559508

  3. An overview of recent development in composite catalysts from porous materials for various reactions and processes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zaiku; Liu, Zhicheng; Wang, Yangdong; Yang, Qihua; Xu, Longya; Ding, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Catalysts are important to the chemical industry and environmental remediation due to their effective conversion of one chemical into another. Among them, composite catalysts have attracted continuous attention during the past decades. Nowadays, composite catalysts are being used more and more to meet the practical catalytic performance requirements in the chemical industry of high activity, high selectivity and good stability. In this paper, we reviewed our recent work on development of composite catalysts, mainly focusing on the composite catalysts obtained from porous materials such as zeolites, mesoporous materials, carbon nanotubes (CNT), etc. Six types of porous composite catalysts are discussed, including amorphous oxide modified zeolite composite catalysts, zeolite composites prepared by co-crystallization or overgrowth, hierarchical porous catalysts, host-guest porous composites, inorganic and organic mesoporous composite catalysts, and polymer/CNT composite catalysts. PMID:20559508

  4. Strengthening of porous matrix materials with evaporation/condensation sintering for composite materials applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslam, Jeffery John

    1998-12-01

    The need for improved fuel economy and reduced environmental emissions from power turbines has prompted the development of high temperature fiber composite materials. One use of these materials is for liners of the hot combustion regions of jet engines and land based power turbines. Stability of the composite materials against oxidative damage during long term use at high temperatures has motivated recent research into fiber composite materials composed entirely of oxide ceramics. All-oxide fiber reinforced composites containing porous, strongly bonded matrices have become of interest. The porosity provides for crack deflection along the fibers to prevent catastrophic failure of the fiber reinforcements. A new application of a processing method that produces evaporation/condensation sintering was employed to prevent shrinkage of the matrix. This processing method and the properties of the matrix, fibers, and composite were evaluated in this work. Producing a matrix without shrinkage is important to prevent undesirable crack-like voids from forming in the matrix. These voids are caused by constraint against shrinkage by the fiber reinforcements. Dry hydrogen chloride gas produced a reactive gas atmosphere that was used to sinter the zirconia particles with minimal shrinkage because the gas promotes evaporation/condensation sintering with zirconia. Sintering of samples that did not contain fiber reinforcements was studied to evaluate the properties of the matrix material. The sintering of monoclinic, tetragonal, and cubic zirconias in the reactive gas atmosphere was compared. Additions of mullite (which did not sinter significantly at processing temperatures) further reduced the shrinkage. The effects of the processing conditions on the sintering shrinkage, microstructure development, and mechanical properties were studied. Cubic and monoclinic zirconia coarsened significantly in the HCl gas sintering atmosphere. The coarsening of the particles during the sintering

  5. Porous and Microporous Honeycomb Composites as Potential Boundary-Layer Bleed Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. O.; Willis, B. P.; Schoenenberger, M.

    1997-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation are presented in which the use of porous and microporous honeycomb composite materials is evaluated as an alternate to perforated solid plates for boundary-layer bleed in supersonic aircraft inlets. The terms "porous" and "microporous," respectively, refer to bleed orifice diameters roughly equal to and much less than the displacement thickness of the approach boundary-layer. A Baseline porous solid plate, two porous honeycomb, and three microporous honeycomb configurations are evaluated. The performance of the plates is characterized by the flow coefficient and relative change in boundary-layer profile parameters across the bleed region. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers of 1.27 and 1.98. The results show the porous honeycomb is not as efficient at removing mass compared to the baseline. The microporous plates were about equal to the baseline with one plate demonstrating a significantly higher efficiency. The microporous plates produced significantly fuller boundary-layer profiles downstream of the bleed region for a given mass flow removal rate than either the baseline or the porous honeycomb plates.

  6. Porous material neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Diawara, Yacouba; Kocsis, Menyhert

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector employs a porous material layer including pores between nanoparticles. The composition of the nanoparticles is selected to cause emission of electrons upon detection of a neutron. The nanoparticles have a maximum dimension that is in the range from 0.1 micron to 1 millimeter, and can be sintered with pores thereamongst. A passing radiation generates electrons at one or more nanoparticles, some of which are scattered into a pore and directed toward a direction opposite to the applied electrical field. These electrons travel through the pore and collide with additional nanoparticles, which generate more electrons. The electrons are amplified in a cascade reaction that occurs along the pores behind the initial detection point. An electron amplification device may be placed behind the porous material layer to further amplify the electrons exiting the porous material layer.

  7. Porous bioactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai

    Bioactive materials chemically bond to tissues through the development of biologically active apatite. Porous structures in biomaterials are designed to enhance bioactivity, grow artificial tissues and achieve better integration with host tissues in the body. The goal of this research is to design, fabricate and characterize novel porous bioactive materials. 3D ordered macroporous bioactive glasses (3DOM-BGs, pore size: 200--1000 nm) were prepared using a sol-gel process and colloidal crystal templates. 3DOM-BGs are more bioactive and degradable than mesoporous (pore size <50 nm) sol-gel BGs in simulated body fluid (SBF). Apatite formation and 3DOM-BG degradation rates increased with the decrease of soaking ratio. Apatite induction time in SBF increased with 3DOM-BG calcination temperature (600--800°C). Apatite formation and 3DOMBG degradation were slightly enhanced for a phosphate containing composition. Large 3DOM-BG particles formed less apatite and degraded less completely as compared with small particles. An increase in macropore size slowed down 3DOM-BG degradation and apatite formation processes. After heating the converted apatite at a temperature higher than 700°C, highly crystalline hydroxyapatite and a minor tri-calcium phosphate phase formed. 3DOM-BGs have potential applications as bone/periodontal fillers, and drugs and biological factors delivery agents. Anchoring artificial soft tissues (e.g., cartilage) to native bone presents a challenge. Porous polymer/bioactive glass composites are candidate materials for engineering artificial soft tissue/bone interfaces. Porous composites consisting of polymer matrices (e.g., polysulfone, polylactide, and polyurethane) and bioactive glass particles were prepared by polymer phase separation techniques adapted to include ceramic particles. Composites (thickness: 200--500 mum) have asymmetric structures with dense top layers and porous structures beneath. Porous structures consist of large pores (>100 mum) in a

  8. Hierarchical ZnO-Ag-C composite porous microspheres with superior electrochemical properties as anode materials for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qingshui; Ma, Yating; Zeng, Deqian; Zhang, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Laisen; Yue, Guanghui; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2014-11-26

    Hierarchical ZnO-Ag-C composite porous microspheres are successfully synthesized by calcination of the preproduced zinc-silver citrate porous microspheres in argon. The carbon derives from the in situ carbonization of carboxylic acid groups in zinc-silver citrate during annealing treatment. The average particle size of ZnO-Ag-C composite porous microspheres is approximate 1.5 μm. When adopted as the electrode materials in lithium ion batteries, the obtained composite porous microspheres display high specific capacity, excellent cyclability, and good rate capability. A discharge capacity as high as 729 mA h g(-1) can be retained after 200 cycles at 100 mA g(-1). The excellent electrochemical properties of ZnO-Ag-C are ascribed to its unique hierarchical porous configuration as well as the modification of silver and carbon.

  9. Composite material

    DOEpatents

    Hutchens, Stacy A.; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  10. Tailored Porous Materials

    SciTech Connect

    BARTON,THOMAS J.; BULL,LUCY M.; KLEMPERER,WALTER G.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCENANEY,BRIAN; MISONO,MAKOTO; MONSON,PETER A.; PEZ,GUIDO; SCHERER,GEORGE W.; VARTULI,JAMES C.; YAGHI,OMAR M.

    1999-11-09

    Tailoring of porous materials involves not only chemical synthetic techniques for tailoring microscopic properties such as pore size, pore shape, pore connectivity, and pore surface reactivity, but also materials processing techniques for tailoring the meso- and the macroscopic properties of bulk materials in the form of fibers, thin films and monoliths. These issues are addressed in the context of five specific classes of porous materials: oxide molecular sieves, porous coordination solids, porous carbons, sol-gel derived oxides, and porous heteropolyanion salts. Reviews of these specific areas are preceded by a presentation of background material and review of current theoretical approaches to adsorption phenomena. A concluding section outlines current research needs and opportunities.

  11. Multi-contrast 3D X-ray imaging of porous and composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, Adrian; Herzen, Julia; Ruiz-Yaniz, Maite; Zanette, Irene; Rack, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-04-13

    Grating-based X-ray computed tomography allows for simultaneous and nondestructive determination of the full X-ray complex index of refraction and the scattering coefficient distribution inside an object in three dimensions. Its multi-contrast capabilities combined with a high resolution of a few micrometers make it a suitable tool for assessing multiple phases inside porous and composite materials such as concrete. Here, we present quantitative results of a proof-of-principle experiment performed on a concrete sample. Thanks to the complementarity of the contrast channels, more concrete phases could be distinguished than in conventional attenuation-based imaging. The phase-contrast reconstruction shows high contrast between the hardened cement paste and the aggregates and thus allows easy 3D segmentation. Thanks to the dark-field image, micro-cracks inside the coarse aggregates are visible. We believe that these results are extremely interesting in the field of porous and composite materials studies because of unique information provided by grating interferometry in a non-destructive way.

  12. Facile synthesis of reduced graphene oxide-porous silicon composite as superior anode material for lithium-ion battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Lian-Sheng; Liu, Jin-Yu; Li, Hong-Yan; Wu, Tong-Shun; Li, Fenghua; Wang, Hao-Yu; Niu, Li

    2016-05-01

    We report a new method for synthesizing reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-porous silicon composite for lithium-ion battery anodes. Rice husks were used as a as a raw material source for the synthesis of porous Si through magnesiothermic reduction process. The as-obtained composite exhibits good rate and cycling performance taking advantage of the porous structure of silicon inheriting from rice husks and the outstanding characteristic of graphene. A considerably high delithiation capacity of 907 mA h g-1 can be retained even at a rate of 16 A g-1. A discharge capacity of 830 mA h g-1 at a current density of 1 A g-1 was delivered after 200 cycles. This may contribute to the further advancement of Si-based composite anode design.

  13. Porous block nanofiber composite filters

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Weiss, Alan J.; Paddock, Arnold

    2016-08-09

    Porous block nano-fiber composite (110), a filtration system (10) and methods of using the same are disclosed. An exemplary porous block nano-fiber composite (110) includes a porous block (100) having one or more pores (200). The porous block nano-fiber composite (110) also includes a plurality of inorganic nano-fibers (211) formed within at least one of the pores (200).

  14. Preparation of asymmetric porous materials

    DOEpatents

    Coker, Eric N.

    2012-08-07

    A method for preparing an asymmetric porous material by depositing a porous material film on a flexible substrate, and applying an anisotropic stress to the porous media on the flexible substrate, where the anisotropic stress results from a stress such as an applied mechanical force, a thermal gradient, and an applied voltage, to form an asymmetric porous material.

  15. Scalable preparation of porous micron-SnO2/C composites as high performance anode material for lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ming-Shan; Lei, Ming; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, Xing; Xu, Jun; Yang, Wei; Huang, Yun; Li, Xing

    2016-03-01

    Nano tin dioxide-carbon (SnO2/C) composites prepared by various carbon materials, such as carbon nanotubes, porous carbon, and graphene, have attracted extensive attention in wide fields. However, undesirable concerns of nanoparticles, including in higher surface area, low tap density, and self-agglomeration, greatly restricted their large-scale practical applications. In this study, novel porous micron-SnO2/C (p-SnO2/C) composites are scalable prepared by a simple hydrothermal approach using glucose as a carbon source and Pluronic F127 as a pore forming agent/soft template. The SnO2 nanoparticles were homogeneously dispersed in micron carbon spheres by assembly with F127/glucose. The continuous three-dimensional porous carbon networks have effectively provided strain relaxation for SnO2 volume expansion/shrinkage during lithium insertion/extraction. In addition, the carbon matrix could largely minimize the direct exposure of SnO2 to the electrolyte, thus ensure formation of stable solid electrolyte interface films. Moreover, the porous structure could also create efficient channels for the fast transport of lithium ions. As a consequence, the p-SnO2/C composites exhibit stable cycle performance, such as a high capacity retention of over 96% for 100 cycles at a current density of 200 mA g-1 and a long cycle life up to 800 times at a higher current density of 1000 mA g-1.

  16. Carbon-coated LiFePO4-porous carbon composites as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Ni, Haifang; Liu, Jinkun; Fan, Li-Zhen

    2013-03-01

    This work introduces a facile strategy for the synthesis of carbon-coated LiFePO(4)-porous carbon (C-LiFePO(4)-PC) composites as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries. The LiFePO(4) particles obtained are about 200 nm in size and homogeneously dispersed in porous carbon matrix. These particles are further coated with the carbon layers pyrolyzed from sucrose. The C-LiFePO(4)-PC composites display a high initial discharge capacity of 152.3 mA h g(-1) at 0.1 C, good cycling stability, as well as excellent rate capability (112 mA h g(-1) at 5 C). The likely contributing factors to the excellent electrochemical performance of the C-LiFePO(4)-PC composites could be related to the combined effects of enhancement of conductivity by the porous carbon matrix and the carbon coating layers. It is believed that further carbon coating is a facile and effective way to improve the electrochemical performance of LiFePO(4)-PC.

  17. Strong, Lightweight, Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, James C.; Fabrizio, Eve F.; Ilhan, Ulvi

    2007-01-01

    A new class of strong, lightweight, porous materials has been invented as an outgrowth of an effort to develop reinforced silica aerogels. The new material, called X-Aerogel is less hygroscopic, but no less porous and of similar density to the corresponding unmodified aerogels. However, the property that sets X-Aerogels apart is their mechanical strength, which can be as much as two and a half orders of magnitude stronger that the unmodified aerogels. X-Aerogels are envisioned to be useful for making extremely lightweight, thermally insulating, structural components, but they may also have applications as electrical insulators, components of laminates, catalyst supports, templates for electrode materials, fuel-cell components, and filter membranes.

  18. Porous composite materials ZrO2(MgO)-MgO for osteoimplantology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyakov, Ales; Litvinova, Larisa; Shupletsova, Valeria; Kulbakin, Denis; Kulkov, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    The pore structure and phase composition of ceramic composite material ZrO2(Mg)-MgO at different sintering temperatures were studied. The main mechanical characteristics of the material were determined and it was shown that they are close to the characteristics of natural bone tissues. It was shown that material structure has a positive effect on the pre-osteoblast cells proliferation. In-vitro studies of pre-osteoblast cells, cultivation on material surface showed a good cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of MMSC by osteogenic type.

  19. Metal-organic framework nanocrystals as sacrificial templates for hollow and exceptionally porous titania and composite materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Kruger, Paul E; Telfer, Shane G

    2015-10-01

    We report a strategy that employs metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals in two roles for the fabrication of hollow nanomaterials. In the first role the MOF crystals provide a template on which a shell of material can be deposited. Etching of the MOF produces a hollow structure with a predetermined size and morphology. In combination with this strategy, the MOF crystals, including guest molecules in their pores, can provide the components of a secondary material that is deposited inside the initially formed shell. We used this approach to develop a straightforward and reproducible method for constructing well-defined, nonspherical hollow and exceptionally porous titania and titania-based composite nanomaterials. Uniform hollow nanostructures of amorphous titania, which assume the cubic or polyhedral shape of the original template, are delivered using nano- and microsized ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 crystal templates. These materials exhibit outstanding textural properties including hierarchical pore structures and BET surface areas of up to 800 m(2)/g. As a proof of principle, we further demonstrate that metal nanoparticles such as Pt nanoparticles, can be encapsulated into the TiO2 shell during the digestion process and used for subsequent heterogeneous catalysis. In addition, we show that the core components of the ZIF nanocrystals, along with their adsorbed guests, can be used as precursors for the formation of secondary materials, following their thermal decomposition, to produce hollow and porous metal sulfide/titania or metal oxide/titania composite nanostructures.

  20. Polymer composites and porous materials prepared by thermally induced phase separation and polymer-metal hybrid methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Joonsung

    The primary objective of this research is to investigate the morphological and mechanical properties of composite materials and porous materials prepared by thermally induced phase separation. High melting crystallizable diluents were mixed with polymers so that the phase separation would be induced by the solidification of the diluents upon cooling. Theoretical phase diagrams were calculated using Flory-Huggins solution thermodynamics which show good agreement with the experimental results. Porous materials were prepared by the extraction of the crystallized diluents after cooling the mixtures (hexamethylbenzene/polyethylene and pyrene/polyethylene). Anisotropic structures show strong dependence on the identity of the diluents and the composition of the mixtures. Anisotropic crystal growth of the diluents was studied in terms of thermodynamics and kinetics using DSC, optical microscopy and SEM. Microstructures of the porous materials were explained in terms of supercooling and dendritic solidification. Dual functionality of the crystallizable diluents for composite materials was evaluated using isotactic polypropylene (iPP) and compatible diluents that crystallize upon cooling. The selected diluents form homogeneous mixtures with iPP at high temperature and lower the viscosity (improved processability), which undergo phase separation upon cooling to form solid particles that function as a toughening agent at room temperature. Tensile properties and morphology of the composites showed that organic crystalline particles have the similar effect as rigid particles to increase toughness; de-wetting between the particle and iPP matrix occurs at the early stage of deformation, followed by unhindered plastic flow that consumes significant amount of fracture energy. The effect of the diluents, however, strongly depends on the identity of the diluents that interact with the iPP during solidification step, which was demonstrated by comparing tetrabromobisphenol-A and

  1. Porous materials. Function-led design of new porous materials.

    PubMed

    Slater, Anna G; Cooper, Andrew I

    2015-05-29

    Porous solids are important as membranes, adsorbents, catalysts, and in other chemical applications. But for these materials to find greater use at an industrial scale, it is necessary to optimize multiple functions in addition to pore structure and surface area, such as stability, sorption kinetics, processability, mechanical properties, and thermal properties. Several different classes of porous solids exist, and there is no one-size-fits-all solution; it can therefore be challenging to choose the right type of porous material for a given job. Computational prediction of structure and properties has growing potential to complement experiment to identify the best porous materials for specific applications.

  2. Multi-physics computational grains (MPCGs) for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of piezoelectric composite/porous materials and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishay, Peter L.; Dong, Leiting; Atluri, Satya N.

    2014-11-01

    Conceptually simple and computationally most efficient polygonal computational grains with voids/inclusions are proposed for the direct numerical simulation of the micromechanics of piezoelectric composite/porous materials with non-symmetrical arrangement of voids/inclusions. These are named "Multi-Physics Computational Grains" (MPCGs) because each "mathematical grain" is geometrically similar to the irregular shapes of the physical grains of the material in the micro-scale. So each MPCG element represents a grain of the matrix of the composite and can include a pore or an inclusion. MPCG is based on assuming independent displacements and electric-potentials in each cell. The trial solutions in each MPCG do not need to satisfy the governing differential equations, however, they are still complete, and can efficiently model concentration of electric and mechanical fields. MPCG can be used to model any generally anisotropic material as well as nonlinear problems. The essential idea can also be easily applied to accurately solve other multi-physical problems, such as complex thermal-electro-magnetic-mechanical materials modeling. Several examples are presented to show the capabilities of the proposed MPCGs and their accuracy.

  3. Facile synthesis of porous Li2S@C composites as cathode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sheng; Liang, Chu; Xia, Yang; Xu, Haohui; Huang, Hui; Tao, Xinyong; Gan, Yongping; Zhang, Wenkui

    2016-02-01

    Lithium sulfide (Li2S) is regarded as a promising cathode material for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries in terms of its high theoretical specific capacity of 1166 mAh g-1 and good compatibility with lithium metal-free anodes. However, Li2S suffers from poor cycling stability and rate capability resulted from the serious shuttle effect of lithium polysulfides and its low electronic and ionic conductivity. Here, we present a facile ball milling combined with carbon coating method to synthesize porous carbon-coated Li2S (Li2S@C) composites with a high Li2S content by using polystyrene (PS) as a carbon precursor. The Li2S@C composites show a high reversible specific capacity of 676 mAh g-1 (equal to 971 mAh g-1 sulfur) after 3 cycles at the current density of 0.1 A g-1, superior cycling stability with an average decay rate of 0.18% per cycle over 200 cycles, and improved rate capability of 416 mAh g-1 at the current density of 1.0 A g-1. The enhanced electrochemical properties of Li2S can be attributed to the porosity and core-shell structure of the Li2S@C composites, which increased the electronic and ionic conductivity of Li2S and alleviated the shuttle effect of intermediate lithium polysulfides in the discharge/charge process.

  4. Interface shear strength and fracture behaviour of porous glass-fibre-reinforced composite implant and bone model material.

    PubMed

    Nganga, Sara; Ylä-Soininmäki, Anne; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-11-01

    Glass-fibre-reinforced composites (FRCs) are under current investigation to serve as durable bone substitute materials in load-bearing orthopaedic implants and bone implants in the head and neck area. The present form of biocompatible FRCs consist of non-woven E-glass-fibre tissues impregnated with varying amounts of a non-resorbable photopolymerisable bifunctional polymer resin with equal portions of both bis-phenyl-A-glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). FRCs with a total porosity of 10-70 vol% were prepared, more than 90 vol% of which being functional (open pores), and the rest closed. The pore sizes were greater than 100 μm. In the present study, the push-out test was chosen to analyse the shear strength of the interface between mechanically interlocked gypsum and a porous FRC implant structure. Gypsum was used as a substitute material for natural bone. The simulative in vitro experiments revealed a significant rise of push-out forces to the twofold level of 1147 ± 271 N for an increase in total FRC porosity of 43%. Pins, intended to model the initial mechanical implant fixation, did not affect the measured shear strength of the gypsum-FRC interface, but led to slightly more cohesive fracture modes. Fractures always occurred inside the gypsum, it having lower compressive strength than the porous FRC structures. Therefore, the largest loads were restricted by the brittleness of the gypsum. Increases of the FRC implant porosity tended to lead to more cohesive fracture modes and higher interfacial fracture toughness. Statistical differences were confirmed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. The differences between the modelled configuration showing gypsum penetration into all open pores and the real clinical situation with gradual bone ingrowth has to be considered. PMID:22098879

  5. Interface shear strength and fracture behaviour of porous glass-fibre-reinforced composite implant and bone model material.

    PubMed

    Nganga, Sara; Ylä-Soininmäki, Anne; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-11-01

    Glass-fibre-reinforced composites (FRCs) are under current investigation to serve as durable bone substitute materials in load-bearing orthopaedic implants and bone implants in the head and neck area. The present form of biocompatible FRCs consist of non-woven E-glass-fibre tissues impregnated with varying amounts of a non-resorbable photopolymerisable bifunctional polymer resin with equal portions of both bis-phenyl-A-glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). FRCs with a total porosity of 10-70 vol% were prepared, more than 90 vol% of which being functional (open pores), and the rest closed. The pore sizes were greater than 100 μm. In the present study, the push-out test was chosen to analyse the shear strength of the interface between mechanically interlocked gypsum and a porous FRC implant structure. Gypsum was used as a substitute material for natural bone. The simulative in vitro experiments revealed a significant rise of push-out forces to the twofold level of 1147 ± 271 N for an increase in total FRC porosity of 43%. Pins, intended to model the initial mechanical implant fixation, did not affect the measured shear strength of the gypsum-FRC interface, but led to slightly more cohesive fracture modes. Fractures always occurred inside the gypsum, it having lower compressive strength than the porous FRC structures. Therefore, the largest loads were restricted by the brittleness of the gypsum. Increases of the FRC implant porosity tended to lead to more cohesive fracture modes and higher interfacial fracture toughness. Statistical differences were confirmed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. The differences between the modelled configuration showing gypsum penetration into all open pores and the real clinical situation with gradual bone ingrowth has to be considered.

  6. Quantitative non-destructive evaluation of porous composite materials based on ultrasonic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1987-01-01

    Porosity in composite media using ultrasonic waves is characterized. The derivation of local approximations to the Kramers-Kronig relations are presented and it is shown that they may also be applicable to systems that could conceivably exhibit considerable dispersion such as composite laminates containing porosity.

  7. Facile synthesis and lithium storage properties of a porous NiSi2/Si/carbon composite anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haiping; Stock, Christoph; Kloepsch, Richard; He, Xin; Badillo, Juan Pablo; Fromm, Olga; Vortmann, Britta; Winter, Martin; Placke, Tobias

    2015-01-28

    In this work, a novel, porous structured NiSi2/Si composite material with a core-shell morphology was successfully prepared using a facile ball-milling method. Furthermore, the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method is deployed to coat the NiSi2/Si phase with a thin carbon layer to further enhance the surface electronic conductivity and to mechanically stabilize the whole composite structure. The morphology and porosity of the composite material was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and nitrogen adsorption measurements (BJH analysis). The as-prepared composite material consists of NiSi2, silicon, and carbon phases, in which the NiSi2 phase is embedded in a silicon matrix having homogeneously distributed pores, while the surface of this composite is coated with a carbon layer. The electrochemical characterization shows that the porous and core-shell structure of the composite anode material can effectively absorb and buffer the immense volume changes of silicon during the lithiation/delithiation process. The obtained NiSi2/Si/carbon composite anode material displays an outstanding electrochemical performance, which gives a stable capacity of 1272 mAh g(-1) for 200 cycles at a charge/discharge rate of 1C and a good rate capability with a reversible capacity of 740 mAh g(-1) at a rate of 5C.

  8. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  9. Quantitative non-destructive evaluation of porous composite materials based on ultrasonic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1988-01-01

    Two complementary ultrasonic techniques for characterizing porosity in fiber-reinforced composite laminates are evaluated. Five uniaxial graphite-fiber/epoxy-matrix composites having a range of 1 to 8 percent volume fraction of solid glass inclusions to model porosity were investigated. In one technique, signal loss was measured in transmission mode and slope of attenuation, obtained from the first order coefficient of a two-parameter polynomial fit about the center frequency of the useful bandwidth, was used as the ultrasonic parameter to characterize the porosity. The results of these transmission mode measurements displayed a good correlation between the volume fraction of porosity and the slope of attenuation. Integrated polar backscatter was used as a second ultrasonic parameter for the characterization of the porosity in these samples. A single transducer insonified the samples and measured the resulting backscatter at a polar angle of 30 deg with respect to the normal of the sample surface with the azimuthal angles centered at 0 deg with respect to the fiber orientation (i.e., along the fibers). Integrated polar backscatter also displayed good correlation with the volume fraction of porosity.

  10. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOEpatents

    Sturcken, Edward F.

    1992-01-01

    A method for recovering plutonium and other metals from materials by leaching comprising the steps of incinerating the materials to form a porous matrix as the residue of incineration, immersing the matrix into acid in a microwave-transparent pressure vessel, sealing the pressure vessel, and applying microwaves so that the temperature and the pressure in the pressure vessel increase. The acid for recovering plutonium can be a mixture of HBF.sub.4 and HNO.sub.3 and preferably the pressure is increased to at least 100 PSI and the temperature to at least 200.degree. C. The porous material can be pulverized before immersion to further increase the leach rate.

  11. Efficient reduced graphene oxide grafted porous Fe3O4 composite as a high performance anode material for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneswari, Subramani; Pratheeksha, Parakandy Muzhikara; Anandan, Srinivasan; Rangappa, Dinesh; Gopalan, Raghavan; Rao, Tata Narasinga

    2014-03-21

    Here, we report facile fabrication of Fe3O4-reduced graphene oxide (Fe3O4-RGO) composite by a novel approach, i.e., microwave assisted combustion synthesis of porous Fe3O4 particles followed by decoration of Fe3O4 by RGO. The characterization studies of Fe3O4-RGO composite demonstrate formation of face centered cubic hexagonal crystalline Fe3O4, and homogeneous grafting of Fe3O4 particles by RGO. The nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm shows presence of a porous structure with a surface area and a pore volume of 81.67 m(2) g(-1), and 0.106 cm(3) g(-1) respectively. Raman spectroscopic studies of Fe3O4-RGO composite confirm the existence of graphitic carbon. Electrochemical studies reveal that the composite exhibits high reversible Li-ion storage capacity with enhanced cycle life and high coulombic efficiency. The Fe3O4-RGO composite showed a reversible capacity ∼612, 543, and ∼446 mA h g(-1) at current rates of 1 C, 3 C and 5 C, respectively, with a coulombic efficiency of 98% after 50 cycles, which is higher than graphite, and Fe3O4-carbon composite. The cyclic voltammetry experiment reveals the irreversible and reversible Li-ion storage in Fe3O4-RGO composite during the starting and subsequent cycles. The results emphasize the importance of our strategy which exhibited promising electrochemical performance in terms of high capacity retention and good cycling stability. The synergistic properties, (i) improved ionic diffusion by porous Fe3O4 particles with a high surface area and pore volume, and (ii) increased electronic conductivity by RGO grafting attributed to the excellent electrochemical performance of Fe3O4, which make this material attractive to use as anode materials for lithium ion storage.

  12. On the influence of local fluctuations in volume fraction of constituents on the effective properties of nonlinear composites. Application to porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gărăjeu, M.; Suquet, P.

    2007-04-01

    Composite materials often exhibit local fluctuations in the volume fraction of their individual constituents. This paper studies the influence of such small fluctuations on the effective properties of composites. A general asymptotic expansion of these properties in terms of powers of the amplitude of the fluctuations is given first. Then, this general result is applied to porous materials. As is well-known, the effective yield surface of ductile voided materials is accurately described by Gurson's criterion. Suitable extensions for viscoplastic solids have also been proposed. The question addressed in the present study pertains to nonuniform distributions of voids in a typical volume element or in other words to the presence of matrix-rich and pore-rich zones in the material. It is shown numerically and analytically that such deviations from a uniform distribution result in a weakening of the macroscopic carrying capacity of the material.

  13. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOEpatents

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  14. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOEpatents

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1992-10-13

    A method is described for recovering plutonium and other metals from materials by leaching comprising the steps of incinerating the materials to form a porous matrix as the residue of incineration, immersing the matrix into acid in a microwave-transparent pressure vessel, sealing the pressure vessel, and applying microwaves so that the temperature and the pressure in the pressure vessel increase. The acid for recovering plutonium can be a mixture of HBF[sub 4] and HNO[sub 3] and preferably the pressure is increased to at least 100 PSI and the temperature to at least 200 C. The porous material can be pulverized before immersion to further increase the leach rate.

  15. Studies of acoustical properties of bulk porous flexible materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic prediction and measurement of bulk porous materials with flexible frames is investigated. The acoustic properties of Kevlar 29 are examined. Various acoustic tests are employed to determine impedance, sound wave propagation, and wave pressure equations for the highly porous fiber composites. The derivation of design equations and future research goals are included.

  16. Anatase TiO2@C composites with porous structure as an advanced anode material for Na ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaodong; Zhang, Zhian; Du, Ke; Lai, Yanqing; Fang, Jing; Li, Jie

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a facile strategy to synthesize the porous structure TiO2@C composites through a two-step method, in which the precursor of MIL-125(Ti) was firstly prepared by solvent thermal method and then calcined under inert atmosphere. When employed as anodes for Na ion batteries, TiO2@C composites can exhibit a superior cyclability with a reversible sodium storage capacity of 148 mAh g-1 at the current density 0.5 A g-1 after 500 cycles and an excellent rate performance with a capacity of 88.9 mAh g-1 even the current reached to 2.5 A g-1 due to the dispersion of anatase TiO2 throughout amorphous carbon matrix and the synergistic effect between the anatase TiO2 nanocrystals and carbon matrix, which can availably enhance the electric conductivity and alleviate the volumetric variation of TiO2 during the insertion/extraction process of Na+.

  17. Peculiarities of formation of phase composition, porous structure, and catalytic properties of tungsten oxide-based macroporous materials fabricated by sol–gel synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Papynov, Evgeniy Konstantinovich; Mayorov, Vitaliy Yurevich; Palamarchuk, Marina Sergeevna; Avramenko, Valentin Aleksandrovich

    2014-02-15

    The method of template sol–gel synthesis of tungsten oxide-based macroporous materials using ‘core–shell’ latex particles as colloid templates is described. The chemical composition and structural characteristics of the synthesized macroporous oxide systems have been investigated. The peculiarities of formation of material phase composition and macroporous structure under different template thermal destruction conditions have been revealed. An optimal method of a targeted synthesis of the crystalline tungsten(VI) oxide having a defect-free macroporous structure (average pore size 160 nm) and efficient catalytic properties under organic liquid phase oxidation conditions has been suggested. The prospects of the fabricated material application as catalysts of hydrothermal oxidation of radionuclide organic complexes at radioactive waste decontamination have been demonstrated. - Highlights: • Macroporous tungsten oxides were fabricated via sol–gel process. • The correlation between synthesis conditions and composition was determined. • Influence of synthesis conditions on porous structure has been explained. • The effects of template thermodestruction have been set up. • High potential of such materials for catalysis applications has been shown.

  18. Porous graphene materials for advanced electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices.

    PubMed

    Han, Sheng; Wu, Dongqing; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Fan; Feng, Xinliang

    2014-02-12

    Combining the advantages from both porous materials and graphene, porous graphene materials have attracted vast interests due to their large surface areas, unique porous structures, diversified compositions and excellent electronic conductivity. These unordinary features enable porous graphene materials to serve as key components in high-performance electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices such as lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells. This progress report summarizes the typical fabrication methods for porous graphene materials with micro-, meso-, and macro-porous structures. The structure-property relationships of these materials and their application in advanced electrochemical devices are also discussed.

  19. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Burrows, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  20. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1993-04-13

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  1. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1991-03-13

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent tc the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  2. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1992-12-31

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  3. Synthesis of SiO2/3D porous carbon composite as anode material with enhanced lithium storage performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhinan; Zhao, Naiqin; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; He, Chunnian; He, Fang

    2016-05-01

    A SiO2/porous carbon nanocomposite was synthesized by a facile combined heat and acid treatments method. The nanocomposite featured a 3D porous carbon structure with amorphous SiO2 nanoparticles embedded in the wall of the pores. The microstructure improved the electrical conductivity, shortened the diffusion distance of lithium ions, and alleviated the volume expansion of SiO2 during Li intercalation. Accordingly, the SiO2/porous carbon nanocomposite displayed excellent cyclic performance with a high reversible capacity of 434 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles at 0.1 A g-1 and rate capability delivering a capacity of 187.4 mAh g-1 even at 5 A g-1.

  4. Porous light-emitting compositions

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi; Bauer, Eve; Mueller, Alexander H.

    2012-04-17

    Light-emitting devices are prepared by coating a porous substrate using a polymer-assisted deposition process. Solutions of metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for metal precursor were coated onto porous substrates. The coated substrates were heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere. The result was a substrate with a conformal coating that did not substantially block the pores of the substrate.

  5. Carbon-Confined SnO2-Electrodeposited Porous Carbon Nanofiber Composite as High-Capacity Sodium-Ion Battery Anode Material.

    PubMed

    Dirican, Mahmut; Lu, Yao; Ge, Yeqian; Yildiz, Ozkan; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2015-08-26

    Sodium resources are inexpensive and abundant, and hence, sodium-ion batteries are promising alternative to lithium-ion batteries. However, lower energy density and poor cycling stability of current sodium-ion batteries prevent their practical implementation for future smart power grid and stationary storage applications. Tin oxides (SnO2) can be potentially used as a high-capacity anode material for future sodium-ion batteries, and they have the advantages of high sodium storage capacity, high abundance, and low toxicity. However, SnO2-based anodes still cannot be used in practical sodium-ion batteries because they experience large volume changes during repetitive charge and discharge cycles. Such large volume changes lead to severe pulverization of the active material and loss of electrical contact between the SnO2 and carbon conductor, which in turn result in rapid capacity loss during cycling. Here, we introduce a new amorphous carbon-coated SnO2-electrodeposited porous carbon nanofiber (PCNF@SnO2@C) composite that not only has high sodium storage capability, but also maintains its structural integrity while ongoing repetitive cycles. Electrochemical results revealed that this SnO2-containing nanofiber composite anode had excellent electrochemical performance including high-capacity (374 mAh g(-1)), good capacity retention (82.7%), and large Coulombic efficiency (98.9% after 100th cycle). PMID:26252051

  6. Carbon-Confined SnO2-Electrodeposited Porous Carbon Nanofiber Composite as High-Capacity Sodium-Ion Battery Anode Material.

    PubMed

    Dirican, Mahmut; Lu, Yao; Ge, Yeqian; Yildiz, Ozkan; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2015-08-26

    Sodium resources are inexpensive and abundant, and hence, sodium-ion batteries are promising alternative to lithium-ion batteries. However, lower energy density and poor cycling stability of current sodium-ion batteries prevent their practical implementation for future smart power grid and stationary storage applications. Tin oxides (SnO2) can be potentially used as a high-capacity anode material for future sodium-ion batteries, and they have the advantages of high sodium storage capacity, high abundance, and low toxicity. However, SnO2-based anodes still cannot be used in practical sodium-ion batteries because they experience large volume changes during repetitive charge and discharge cycles. Such large volume changes lead to severe pulverization of the active material and loss of electrical contact between the SnO2 and carbon conductor, which in turn result in rapid capacity loss during cycling. Here, we introduce a new amorphous carbon-coated SnO2-electrodeposited porous carbon nanofiber (PCNF@SnO2@C) composite that not only has high sodium storage capability, but also maintains its structural integrity while ongoing repetitive cycles. Electrochemical results revealed that this SnO2-containing nanofiber composite anode had excellent electrochemical performance including high-capacity (374 mAh g(-1)), good capacity retention (82.7%), and large Coulombic efficiency (98.9% after 100th cycle).

  7. Investigation of a porous NiSi2/Si composite anode material used for lithium-ion batteries by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dong; Jia, Haiping; Rana, Jatinkumar; Placke, Tobias; Klöpsch, Richard; Schumacher, Gerhard; Winter, Martin; Banhart, John

    2016-08-01

    Local structural changes in a porous NiSi2/Si composite anode material are investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. It is observed that the NiSi2 phase shows a strong metal-metal bond character and no clear changes can be observed in XANES during lithiation and de-lithiation. The variation of the number of nearest neighbors of the Ni atom for the 1st coordinate Ni-Si shell and σ2 in the 1st cycle, both determined by refinement, demonstrates that NiSi2 can partially react with lithium during discharge and charge. A partially reversible non-stoichiometric compound NiSi2-y is formed during cell operation, the crystal structure of which is the same as that of the NiSi2 phase. It can be concluded that NiSi2 in the composite not only accommodates the pronounced volume changes caused by the lithium uptake into silicon, but also contributes to the reversible capacity of the cell.

  8. Ordered porous materials for emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mark E

    2002-06-20

    "Space--the final frontier." This preamble to a well-known television series captures the challenge encountered not only in space travel adventures, but also in the field of porous materials, which aims to control the size, shape and uniformity of the porous space and the atoms and molecules that define it. The past decade has seen significant advances in the ability to fabricate new porous solids with ordered structures from a wide range of different materials. This has resulted in materials with unusual properties and broadened their application range beyond the traditional use as catalysts and adsorbents. In fact, porous materials now seem set to contribute to developments in areas ranging from microelectronics to medical diagnosis.

  9. Methane storage in advanced porous materials.

    PubMed

    Makal, Trevor A; Li, Jian-Rong; Lu, Weigang; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2012-12-01

    The need for alternative fuels is greater now than ever before. With considerable sources available and low pollution factor, methane is a natural choice as petroleum replacement in cars and other mobile applications. However, efficient storage methods are still lacking to implement the application of methane in the automotive industry. Advanced porous materials, metal-organic frameworks and porous organic polymers, have received considerable attention in sorptive storage applications owing to their exceptionally high surface areas and chemically-tunable structures. In this critical review we provide an overview of the current status of the application of these two types of advanced porous materials in the storage of methane. Examples of materials exhibiting high methane storage capacities are analyzed and methods for increasing the applicability of these advanced porous materials in methane storage technologies described.

  10. Porous polymer networks and ion-exchange media and metal-polymer composites made therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Katsoulidis, Alexandros

    2016-10-18

    Porous polymeric networks and composite materials comprising metal nanoparticles distributed in the polymeric networks are provided. Also provided are methods for using the polymeric networks and the composite materials in liquid- and vapor-phase waste remediation applications. The porous polymeric networks, are highly porous, three-dimensional structures characterized by high surface areas. The polymeric networks comprise polymers polymerized from aldehydes and phenolic molecules.

  11. Porous polymer networks and ion-exchange media and metal-polymer composites made therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Katsoulidis, Alexandros

    2015-03-10

    Porous polymeric networks and composite materials comprising metal nanoparticles distributed in the polymeric networks are provided. Also provided are methods for using the polymeric networks and the composite materials in liquid- and vapor-phase waste remediation applications. The porous polymeric networks, are highly porous, three-dimensional structures characterized by high surface areas. The polymeric networks comprise polymers polymerized from aldehydes and phenolic molecules.

  12. Porous materials produced from incineration ash using thermal plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Fu; Chiu, Wen-Tung; Wang, To-Mai; Chen, Ching-Ting; Tzeng, Chin-Ching

    2014-06-01

    This study presents a novel thermal plasma melting technique for neutralizing and recycling municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) ash residues. MSWI ash residues were converted into water-quenched vitrified slag using plasma vitrification, which is environmentally benign. Slag is adopted as a raw material in producing porous materials for architectural and decorative applications, eliminating the problem of its disposal. Porous materials are produced using water-quenched vitrified slag with Portland cement and foaming agent. The true density, bulk density, porosity and water absorption ratio of the foamed specimens are studied here by varying the size of the slag particles, the water-to-solid ratio, and the ratio of the weights of the core materials, including the water-quenched vitrified slag and cement. The thermal conductivity and flexural strength of porous panels are also determined. The experimental results show the bulk density and the porosity of the porous materials are 0.9-1.2 g cm(-3) and 50-60%, respectively, and the pore structure has a closed form. The thermal conductivity of the porous material is 0.1946 W m(-1) K(-1). Therefore, the slag composite materials are lightweight and thermal insulators having considerable potential for building applications.

  13. Tissue engineering scaffold material of porous nanohydroxyapatite/polyamide 66.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Lu, Hongyan; Zhang, Jingchao; Lu, Guoyu; Deng, Zhennan; Mo, Anchun

    2010-05-13

    The aim of the study was to investigate a porous nanohydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) scaffold material that was implanted into muscle and tibiae of 16 New Zealand white rabbits to evaluate the biocompatibility and osteogenesis and osteoinductivity of the materials in vivo. The samples were harvested at 2, 4, 12 and 26 weeks respectively, and subjected to histological analysis. At 2 weeks, the experiment showed that osteogenesis was detected in porous n-HA/PA66 composite and the density of new bone formation was similar to the surrounding host bone at 12 weeks. The study indicated that three-dimensional pore structures could facilitate cell adhesion, differentiation and proliferation, and help with fibrovascular and nerve colonization. In conclusion, porous n-HA/PA66 scaffold material could be a good candidate as a bone substitute material used in clinics due to its excellent histocompatibility, osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity.

  14. Magnetic and porous molecule-based materials.

    PubMed

    Roques, Nans; Mugnaini, Veronica; Veciana, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we give an overview of the recent state-of-the-art research of porous and magnetic molecule-based materials. The subject is introduced by a section devoted to the fundamentals of magnetism in molecular magnets, with special attention to the design strategies to prepare molecular magnetic materials. We will then focus on the two main families of materials combining porosity and magnetism: the purely organic and the metal-organic porous magnetic materials. For both families, a selection of the most representative examples has been made. A complete section is devoted to magnetic and porous materials with flexible frameworks, an area of emerging importance in this field, because of their wide range of applications. Finally, we conclude with a brief overview on the most recent approaches for the future development of these materials.

  15. Porous multi-component material for the capture and separation of species of interest

    DOEpatents

    Addleman, Raymond S.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Li, Xiaohong S.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Gerasimenko, Aleksandr A

    2016-06-21

    A method and porous multi-component material for the capture, separation or chemical reaction of a species of interest is disclosed. The porous multi-component material includes a substrate and a composite thin film. The composite thin film is formed by combining a porous polymer with a nanostructured material. The nanostructured material may include a surface chemistry for the capture of chemicals or particles. The composite thin film is coupled to the support or device surface. The method and material provides a simple, fast, and chemically and physically benign way to integrate nanostructured materials into devices while preserving their chemical activity.

  16. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia; Yuan, Shengwen; Yang, Junbing

    2013-04-02

    A porous polymer, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene and its derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 are prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  17. Porous silicon confers bioactivity to polycaprolactone composites in vitro.

    PubMed

    Henstock, J R; Ruktanonchai, U R; Canham, L T; Anderson, S I

    2014-04-01

    Silicon is an essential element for healthy bone development and supplementation with its bioavailable form (silicic acid) leads to enhancement of osteogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. Porous silicon (pSi) is a novel material with emerging applications in opto-electronics and drug delivery which dissolves to yield silicic acid as the sole degradation product, allowing the specific importance of soluble silicates for biomaterials to be investigated in isolation without the elution of other ionic species. Using polycaprolactone as a bioresorbable carrier for porous silicon microparticles, we found that composites containing pSi yielded more than twice the amount of bioavailable silicic acid than composites containing the same mass of 45S5 Bioglass. When incubated in a simulated body fluid, the addition of pSi to polycaprolactone significantly increased the deposition of calcium phosphate. Interestingly, the apatites formed had a Ca:P ratio directly proportional to the silicic acid concentration, indicating that silicon-substituted hydroxyapatites were being spontaneously formed as a first order reaction. Primary human osteoblasts cultured on the surface of the composite exhibited peak alkaline phosphatase activity at day 14, with a proportional relationship between pSi content and both osteoblast proliferation and collagen production over 4 weeks. Culturing the composite with J744A.1 murine macrophages demonstrated that porous silicon does not elicit an immune response and may even inhibit it. Porous silicon may therefore be an important next generation biomaterial with unique properties for applications in orthopaedic tissue engineering.

  18. New porous polycaprolactone-silica composites for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Plazas Bonilla, Clara E; Trujillo, Sara; Demirdögen, Bermali; Perilla, Jairo E; Murat Elcin, Y; Gómez Ribelles, José L

    2014-07-01

    Polycaprolactone porous membranes were obtained by freeze extraction of dioxane from polycaprolactone-dioxane solid solutions. Porosities as high as 90% with interconnected structures were obtained by this technique. A silica phase was synthesized inside the pores of the polymer membrane by sol-gel reaction using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as a silica precursor and catalyzed in acidic and basic conditions. Two different morphologies of the inorganic phase were obtained depending on the type of catalyst. In acid catalyzed sol-gel reaction, a homogeneous layer of silica was deposited on the pores, and discrete microspheres were synthesized on the pore walls when a basic catalyst was used. The morphology of the inorganic phase influenced the mechanical and thermal behavior, as well as the hydrophilic character of the composites. Bioactivity of the porous materials was tested in vitro by measuring the deposition of hydroxyapatite on the surfaces of the porous composite membranes. Polycaprolactone/silica composites revealed a superior bioactivity performance compared with that of the pure polymer; evidenced by the characteristic cauliflower structures on the material surface, increase in weight and Ca/P ratio of the hydroxyapatite layer. Also, the acid catalyzed composites presented better bioactivity than the base catalyzed composites, evidencing the importance in the morphology of the silica phase.

  19. Macroscopic strain potentials in nonlinear porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Liu; Zhuping, Huang

    2003-02-01

    By taking a hollow sphere as a representative volume element (RVE), the macroscopic strain potentials of porous materials with power-law incompressible matrix are studied in this paper. According to the principles of the minimum potential energy in nonlinear elasticity and the variational procedure, static admissible stress fields and kinematic admissible displacement fields are constructed, and hence the upper and the lower bounds of the macroscopic strain potential are obtained. The bounds given in the present paper differ so slightly that they both provide perfect approximations of the exact strain potential of the studied porous materials. It is also found that the upper bound proposed by previous authors is much higher than the present one, and the lower bounds given by Cocks is much lower. Moreover, the present calculation is also compared with the variational lower bound of Ponte Castañeda for statistically isotropic porous materials. Finally, the validity of the hollow spherical RVE for the studied nonlinear porous material is discussed by the difference between the present numerical results and the Cocks bound.

  20. Nanophase and Composite Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This talk will focus on accomplishments, current developments, and future directions of our work on composite optical materials for microgravity science and space exploration. This research spans the order parameter from quasi-fractal structures such as sol-gels and other aggregated or porous media, to statistically random cluster media such as metal colloids, to highly ordered materials such as layered media and photonic bandgap materials. The common focus is on flexible materials that can be used to produce composite or artificial materials with superior optical properties that could not be achieved with homogeneous materials. Applications of this work to NASA exploration goals such as terraforming, biosensors, solar sails, solar cells, and vehicle health monitoring, will be discussed.

  1. Gas sensing using porous materials for automotive applications.

    PubMed

    Wales, Dominic J; Grand, Julien; Ting, Valeska P; Burke, Richard D; Edler, Karen J; Bowen, Chris R; Mintova, Svetlana; Burrows, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Improvements in the efficiency of combustion within a vehicle can lead to reductions in the emission of harmful pollutants and increased fuel efficiency. Gas sensors have a role to play in this process, since they can provide real time feedback to vehicular fuel and emissions management systems as well as reducing the discrepancy between emissions observed in factory tests and 'real world' scenarios. In this review we survey the current state-of-the-art in using porous materials for sensing the gases relevant to automotive emissions. Two broad classes of porous material - zeolites and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) - are introduced, and their potential for gas sensing is discussed. The adsorptive, spectroscopic and electronic techniques for sensing gases using porous materials are summarised. Examples of the use of zeolites and MOFs in the sensing of water vapour, oxygen, NOx, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and hydrogen are then detailed. Both types of porous material (zeolites and MOFs) reveal great promise for the fabrication of sensors for exhaust gases and vapours due to high selectivity and sensitivity. The size and shape selectivity of the zeolite and MOF materials are controlled by variation of pore dimensions, chemical composition (hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity), crystal size and orientation, thus enabling detection and differentiation between different gases and vapours. PMID:25982991

  2. Gas sensing using porous materials for automotive applications.

    PubMed

    Wales, Dominic J; Grand, Julien; Ting, Valeska P; Burke, Richard D; Edler, Karen J; Bowen, Chris R; Mintova, Svetlana; Burrows, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Improvements in the efficiency of combustion within a vehicle can lead to reductions in the emission of harmful pollutants and increased fuel efficiency. Gas sensors have a role to play in this process, since they can provide real time feedback to vehicular fuel and emissions management systems as well as reducing the discrepancy between emissions observed in factory tests and 'real world' scenarios. In this review we survey the current state-of-the-art in using porous materials for sensing the gases relevant to automotive emissions. Two broad classes of porous material - zeolites and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) - are introduced, and their potential for gas sensing is discussed. The adsorptive, spectroscopic and electronic techniques for sensing gases using porous materials are summarised. Examples of the use of zeolites and MOFs in the sensing of water vapour, oxygen, NOx, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and hydrogen are then detailed. Both types of porous material (zeolites and MOFs) reveal great promise for the fabrication of sensors for exhaust gases and vapours due to high selectivity and sensitivity. The size and shape selectivity of the zeolite and MOF materials are controlled by variation of pore dimensions, chemical composition (hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity), crystal size and orientation, thus enabling detection and differentiation between different gases and vapours.

  3. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia; Yuan, Shengwen; Yang, Junbing

    2011-12-13

    Porous polymers, tribenzohexazatriphenylene, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene, poly-tetraphenyl methane and their derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  4. An adaptable peptide-based porous material.

    PubMed

    Rabone, J; Yue, Y-F; Chong, S Y; Stylianou, K C; Bacsa, J; Bradshaw, D; Darling, G R; Berry, N G; Khimyak, Y Z; Ganin, A Y; Wiper, P; Claridge, J B; Rosseinsky, M J

    2010-08-27

    Porous materials find widespread application in storage, separation, and catalytic technologies. We report a crystalline porous solid with adaptable porosity, in which a simple dipeptide linker is arranged in a regular array by coordination to metal centers. Experiments reinforced by molecular dynamics simulations showed that low-energy torsions and displacements of the peptides enabled the available pore volume to evolve smoothly from zero as the guest loading increased. The observed cooperative feedback in sorption isotherms resembled the response of proteins undergoing conformational selection, suggesting an energy landscape similar to that required for protein folding. The flexible peptide linker was shown to play the pivotal role in changing the pore conformation.

  5. Porous graphene materials for water remediation.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Li; Chen, Xiaodong

    2014-09-10

    Water remediation has been a critical issue over the past decades due to the expansion of wastewater discharge to the environment. Currently, a variety of functional materials have been successfully prepared for water remediation applications. Among them, graphene is an attractive candidate due to its high specific surface area, tunable surface behavior, and high strength. This Concept paper summarizes the design strategy of porous graphene materials and their applications in water remediation, such as the cleanup of oil, removal of heavy metal ions, and elimination of water soluble organic contaminants. The progress made so far will guide further development in structure design strategy of porous materials based on graphene and exploration of such materials in environmental remediation.

  6. Open-cell glass crystalline porous material

    DOEpatents

    Anshits, Alexander G.; Sharonova, Olga M.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana A.; Zykova, Irina D.; Revenko, Yurii A.; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Aloy, Albert S.; Lubtsev, Rem I.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Tranter, Troy J.; Macheret, Yevgeny

    2003-12-23

    An open-cell glass crystalline porous material made from hollow microspheres which are cenospheres obtained from fly ash, having an open-cell porosity of up to 90 vol. % is produced. The cenospheres are separated into fractions based on one or more of grain size, density, magnetic or non-magnetic, and perforated or non-perforated. Selected fractions are molded and agglomerated by sintering with a binder at a temperature below the softening temperature, or without a binder at a temperature about, or above, the softening temperature but below the temperature of liquidity. The porous material produced has an apparent density of 0.3-0.6 g/cm.sup.3, a compressive strength in the range of 1.2-3.5 MPa, and two types of openings: through-flow wall pores in the cenospheres of 0.1-30 micrometers, and interglobular voids between the cenospheres of 20-100 micrometers. The porous material of the invention has properties useful as porous matrices for immobilization of liquid radioactive waste, heat-resistant traps and filters, supports for catalysts, adsorbents and ion-exchangers.

  7. Open-cell glass crystalline porous material

    DOEpatents

    Anshits, Alexander G.; Sharonova, Olga M.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana A.; Zykova, Irina D.; Revenko, Yurii A.; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Aloy, Albert S.; Lubtsev, Rem I.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Tranter, Troy J.; Macheret, Yevgeny

    2002-01-01

    An open-cell glass crystalline porous material made from hollow microspheres which are cenospheres obtained from fly ash, having an open-cell porosity of up to 90 vol. % is produced. The cenospheres are separated into fractions based on one or more of grain size, density, magnetic or non-magnetic, and perforated or non-perforated. Selected fractions are molded and agglomerated by sintering with a binder at a temperature below the softening temperature, or without a binder at a temperature about, or above, the softening temperature but below the temperature of liquidity. The porous material produced has an apparent density of 0.3-0.6 g/cm.sup.3, a compressive strength in the range of 1.2-3.5 MPa, and two types of openings: through-flow wall pores in the cenospheres of 0.1-30 micrometers, and interglobular voids between the cenospheres of 20-100 micrometers. The porous material of the invention has properties useful as porous matrices for immobilization of liquid radioactive waste, heat-resistant traps and filters, supports for catalysts, adsorbents and ion-exchangers.

  8. Filter casting nanoscale porous materials

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, Joel Ryan; Nyce, Gregory Walker; Kuntz, Joshua David

    2012-07-24

    A method of producing nanoporous material includes the steps of providing a liquid, providing nanoparticles, producing a slurry of the liquid and the nanoparticles, removing the liquid from the slurry, and producing a monolith.

  9. Filter casting nanoscale porous materials

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, Joel Ryan; Nyce, Gregory Walker; Kuntz, Jushua David

    2013-12-10

    A method of producing nanoporous material includes the steps of providing a liquid, providing nanoparticles, producing a slurry of the liquid and the nanoparticles, removing the liquid from the slurry, and producing monolith.

  10. Filling Porous Microspheres With Magnetic Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium; Colvin, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    New process produces magnetic microspheres with controllable sizes, compositions, and properties for use in medical diagnostic tests, biological research, and chemical processes. Paramagnetic microspheres also made with process. Porous plastic microspheres prepared by polymerization of monomer in diluent by cross-linking agent. When diluent removed, it leaves tiny pores throughout polymerized spheres. Size and distribution of pores determined by amount and type of diluent and cross-linking agent.

  11. Gravitational Effects on Combustion Synthesis of Advanced Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, X.; Moore, J. J.; Schowengerdt, F. D.; Thorne, K.

    2000-01-01

    Combustion Synthesis (self-Propagating high-temperature synthesis-(SHS)) of porous Ti-TiB(x), composite materials has been studied with respect to the sensitivity to the SHS reaction parameters of stoichiometry, green density, gasifying agents, ambient pressure, diluents and gravity. The main objective of this research program is to engineer the required porosity and mechanical properties into the composite materials to meet the requirements of a consumer, such as for the application of bone replacement materials. Gravity serves to restrict the gas expansion and the liquid movement during SHS reaction. As a result, gravitational forces affect the microstructure and properties of the SHS products. Reacting these SHS systems in low gravity in the KC-135 aircraft has extended the ability to form porous products. This paper will emphasize the effects of gravity (low g, 1g and 2g) on the SHS reaction process, and the microstructure and properties of the porous composite. Some of biomedical results are also discussed.

  12. Activation of porous MOF materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2013-04-23

    A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area involves introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritical fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.

  13. Activation of porous MOF materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2014-04-01

    A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area involves introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritcal fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.

  14. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Various topics relating to composite structural materials for use in aircraft structures are discussed. The mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers, carbon fiber-epoxy interface bonds, composite fractures, residual stress in high modulus and high strength carbon fibers, fatigue in composite materials, and the mechanical properties of polymeric matrix composite laminates are among the topics discussed.

  15. Water-based technique to produce porous PZT materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galassi, C.; Capiani, C.; Craciun, F.; Roncari, E.

    2005-09-01

    Water based colloidal processing of PZT materials was investigated in order to reduce costs and employ more environmental friendly manufacturing. The technique addressed was the production of porous thick samples by the so called “starch consolidation”. PZT “soft” compositions were used. The “starch consolidation” process allows to obtain the green body by raising the temperature of a suspension of PZT powder, soluble starch and water, cast into a metal mould. The influence of the processing parameters and composition on the morphology, pore volumes, pore size distributions and piezoelectric properties are investigated. Zeta potential determination and titration with different deflocculants were essential tools to adjust the slurry formulation.

  16. Roughening of porous SiCOH materials in fluorocarbon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly, F.; David, T.; Chevolleau, T.; Darnon, M.; Posseme, N.; Bouyssou, R.; Ducote, J.; Joubert, O.; Cardinaud, C.

    2010-07-01

    Porous SiCOH materials integration for integrated circuits faces serious challenges such as roughening during the etch process. In this study, atomic force microscopy is used to investigate the kinetics of SiCOH materials roughening when they are etched in fluorocarbon plasmas. We show that the root mean square roughness and the correlation length linearly increase with the etched depth, after an initiation period. We propose that: (1) during the first few seconds of the etch process, the surface of porous SiCOH materials gets denser. (2) Cracks are formed, leading to the formation of deep and narrow pits. (3) Plasma radicals diffuse through those pits and the pore network and modify the porous material at the bottom of the pits. (4) The difference in material density and composition between the surface and the bottom of the pits leads to a difference in etch rate and an amplification of the roughness. In addition to this intrinsic roughening mechanism, the presence of a metallic mask (titanium nitride) can lead to an extrinsic roughening mechanism, such as micromasking caused by metallic particles originating form the titanium nitride mask.

  17. Porous material for protection from electromagnetic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmina, Olga E-mail: bdushkina89@mail.ru; Dushkina, Maria E-mail: bdushkina89@mail.ru; Suslyaev, Valentin; Semukhin, Boris

    2014-11-14

    It is shown that the porous glass crystalline material obtained by a low temperature technology can be used not only for thermal insulation, but also for lining of rooms as protective screens decreasing harmful effect of electromagnetic radiation as well as to establish acoustic chambers and rooms with a low level of electromagnetic background. The material interacts with electromagnetic radiation by the most effective way in a high frequency field (above 100 GHz). At the frequency of 260 GHz the value of the transmission coefficient decreases approximately in a factor times in comparison with foam glass.

  18. Porous Materials Reinforced by Statistically Oriented Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, Salvatore; Grillo, Alfio

    2010-09-01

    Hydrated soft biological tissues, such as articular cartilage, are well represented by a porous matrix saturated by a fluid and reinforced by a network of statistically oriented, impermeable collagen fibres. A previously developed homogenisation method for porous fibre-reinforced materials with an isotropic matrix, under small deformations, was capable of correctly predicting some specific aspects of the anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the permeability in the tissue. The aim of this work is to generalise this model to the case of large deformations. This is achieved by means of a rescaled pull-back of the structure tensor describing fibre orientation, and directional averaging methods allowing to account for the statistical distribution of the orientation. The resulting permeability tensor contains an integral term that must be implemented numerically, because of the explicit presence of the deformation in the integrand function.

  19. High Temperature Tolerant Ceramic Composites Having Porous Interphases

    DOEpatents

    Kriven, Waltraud M.; Lee, Sang-Jin

    2005-05-03

    In general, this invention relates to a ceramic composite exhibiting enhanced toughness and decreased brittleness, and to a process of preparing the ceramic composite. The ceramic composite comprises a first matrix that includes a first ceramic material, preferably selected from the group including alumina (Al2O3), mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2), yttrium aluminate garnet (YAG), yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), celsian (BaAl2Si2O8) and nickel aluminate (NiAl2O4). The ceramic composite also includes a porous interphase region that includes a substantially non-sinterable material. The non-sinterable material can be selected to include, for example, alumina platelets. The platelets lie in random 3-D orientation and provide a debonding mechanism, which is independent of temperature in chemically compatible matrices. The non-sinterable material induces constrained sintering of a ceramic powder resulting in permanent porosity in the interphase region. For high temperature properties, addition of a sinterable ceramic powder to the non-sinterable material provides sufficiently weak debonding interphases. The ceramic composite can be provided in a variety of forms including a laminate, a fibrous monolith, and a fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix. In the laminated systems, intimate mixing of strong versus tough microstructures were tailored by alternating various matrix-to-interphase thickness ratios to provide the bimodal laminate.

  20. Composite material dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  1. A hexangular ring-core NiCo2O4 porous nanosheet/NiO nanoparticle composite as an advanced anode material for LIBs and catalyst for CO oxidation applications.

    PubMed

    He, Yanyan; Xu, Liqiang; Zhai, Yanjun; Li, Aihua; Chen, Xiaoxia

    2015-10-11

    A porous hexangular ring-core NiCo2O4 nanosheet/NiO nanoparticle composite has been synthesized using a hydrothermal method followed by an annealing process in air. The as-obtained composite as an anode material exhibits a high initial discharge capacity of 1920.6 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) and the capacity is retained at 1567.3 mA h g(-1) after 50 cycles. When it is utilized as a catalyst for CO oxidation, complete CO conversion is achieved at 115 °C and a catalytic life test demonstrates the good stability of the composite.

  2. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse properties of fiber constituents in composites, fatigue in composite materials, matrix dominated properties of high performance composites, numerical investigation of moisture effects, numerical investigation of the micromechanics of composite fracture, advanced analysis methods, compact lug design, and the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes projects are discussed.

  3. A novel porous gelatin composite containing naringin for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuo-Yu; Lin, Kuen-Cherng; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Yao, Chun-Hsu

    2013-01-01

    As Gu-Sui-Bu (GSB) is a commonly used Chinese medical herb for therapeutic treatment of bone-related diseases, naringin is its main active component. This study elucidates how various concentrations of naringin solution affect the activities of bone cells, based on colorimetric, alkaline phosphatase activity, nodule formation, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity assays to determine the optimal concentration of naringin. GGT composite was obtained by combining genipin cross-linked gelatin and β-tricalcium phosphate. GGTN composite was prepared by mixing GGT composite with the predetermined concentration of naringin. Porous GGT and GGTN composites were then made using a salt-leaching procedure. The potential of the composites in repairing bone defects was evaluated and compared in vivo by using the biological response of rabbit calvarial bone to these composites. Consequently, the most effective concentration of naringin was 10 mg/mL, which significantly enhanced the proliferation of osteoblasts, osteoclast activity, and nodule formation without affecting the alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblasts and mitochondrial activity of mixed-bone cells. Radiographic analysis revealed greater new bone ingrowth in the GGTN composite than in the GGT composite at the same implantation time. Therefore, the GGTN composite is highly promising for use as a bone graft material.

  4. Tough Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vosteen, L. F. (Compiler); Johnson, N. J. (Compiler); Teichman, L. A. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries are presented which address composite material behavior and performance improvement. Topic areas include composite fracture toughness and impact characterization, constituent properties and interrelationships, and matrix synthesis and characterization.

  5. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology utilization of fiber reinforced composite materials is discussed in the areas of physical properties, and life prediction. Programs related to the Composite Aircraft Program are described in detail.

  6. Nano-composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  7. Mechanical properties of a porous mullite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viens, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Modulus of rupture specimens were used to determine crack growth parameters of a porous mullite material. Strength testing was performed in ambient and moist environments. The power law crack growth rate parameters n and 1n B in 50 percent relative humidity were found to be 44.98 and 0.94, respectively. The inert strength, fracture toughness, and elastic modulus were also determined and found to be 19 MPa, 055 MPa(m) exp 1/2, and 11.6 GPa, respectively.

  8. Designing and modeling doubly porous polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, H.-B.; Le Droumaguet, B.; Monchiet, V.; Grande, D.

    2015-07-01

    Doubly porous organic materials based on poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) are synthetized through the use of two distinct types of porogen templates, namely a macroporogen and a nanoporogen. Two complementary strategies are implemented by using either sodium chloride particles or fused poly(methyl methacrylate) beads as macroporogens, in conjunction with ethanol as a porogenic solvent. The porogen removal respectively allows for the generation of either non-interconnected or interconnected macropores with an average diameter of about 100-200 μm and nanopores with sizes lying within the 100 nm order of magnitude, as evidenced by mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. Nitrogen sorption measurements evidence the formation of materials with rather high specific surface areas, i.e. higher than 140 m2.g-1. This paper also addresses the development of numerical tools for computing the permeability of such doubly porous materials. Due to the coexistence of well separated scales between nanopores and macropores, a consecutive double homogenization approach is proposed. A nanoscopic scale and a mesoscopic scale are introduced, and the flow is evaluated by means of the Finite Element Method to determine the macroscopic permeability. At the nanoscopic scale, the flow is described by the Stokes equations with an adherence condition at the solid surface. At the mesoscopic scale, the flow obeys the Stokes equations in the macropores and the Darcy equation in the permeable polymer in order to account for the presence of the nanopores.

  9. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    A multifaceted program is described in which aeronautical, mechanical, and materials engineers interact to develop composite aircraft structures. Topics covered include: (1) the design of an advanced composite elevator and a proposed spar and rib assembly; (2) optimizing fiber orientation in the vicinity of heavily loaded joints; (3) failure mechanisms and delamination; (4) the construction of an ultralight sailplane; (5) computer-aided design; finite element analysis programs, preprocessor development, and array preprocessor for SPAR; (6) advanced analysis methods for composite structures; (7) ultrasonic nondestructive testing; (8) physical properties of epoxy resins and composites; (9) fatigue in composite materials, and (10) transverse thermal expansion of carbon/epoxy composites.

  10. Acoustical properties of highly porous fibrous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Highly porous, fibrous bulk sound absorbing materials are studied with a view toward understanding their acoustical properties and performance in a wide variety of applications including liners of flow ducts. The basis and criteria for decoupling of acoustic waves in the pores of the frame and compressional waves in the frame structure are established. The equations of motion are recast in a form that elucidates the coupling mechanisms. The normal incidence surface impedance and absorption coefficient of two types of Kevlar 29 and an open celled foam material are studied. Experimental values and theoretical results are brought into agreement when the structure factor is selected to provide a fit to the experimental data. A parametric procedure for achieving that fit is established. Both a bulk material quality factor and a high frequency impedance level are required to characterize the real and imaginary part of the surface impedance and absorption coefficient. A derivation of the concepts of equivalent density and dynamic resistance is presented.

  11. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in studies of constituent materials composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology, and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Topics discussed include: mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; fatigue in composite materials; experimental and theoretical studies of moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates and neat resins; numerical investigations of the micromechanics of composite fracture; delamination failures of composite laminates; effect of notch size on composite laminates; improved beam theory for anisotropic materials; variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; numerical analysis composite processing; heat treatment of metal matrix composites, and the RP-1 and RP2 gliders of the sailplane project.

  12. Wire Cloth as Porous Material for Transpiration-cooled Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Kinsler, Martin R; Cochran, Reeves B

    1951-01-01

    The permeability characteristics and tensile strength of a porous material developed from stainless-steel corduroy wire cloth for use in transpiration-cooled walls where the primary stresses are in one direction were investigated. The results of this investigation are presented and compared with similar results obtained with porous sintered metal compacts. A much wider range of permeabilities is obtainable with the wire cloth than with the porous metal compacts considered and the ultimate tensile strength in the direction of the primary stresses for porous materials produced from three mesh sizes of wire cloth are from two to three times the ultimate tensile strengths of the porous metal compacts.

  13. Advanced Porous Coating for Low-Density Ceramic Insulation Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B.; Churchward, Rex; Katvala, Victor; Stewart, David; Balter, Aliza

    1988-01-01

    The need for improved coatings on low-density reusable surface insulation (RSI) materials used on the space shuttle has stimulated research into developing tougher coatings. The processing of a new porous composite "coating" for RST called toughened unipiece fibrous insulation Is discussed. Characteristics including performance in a simulated high-speed atmospheric entry, morphological structure before and after this exposure, resistance to Impact, and thermal response to a typical heat pulse are described. It is shown that this coating has improved impact resistance while maintaining optical and thermal properties comparable to the previously available reaction-cured glass coating.

  14. Synthesis and biocompatibility of porous nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/alginate composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S M; Cui, F Z; Liao, S S; Zhu, Y; Han, L

    2003-07-01

    Porous nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/alginate (nHAC/Alginate) composite containing nHAC and Ca-crosslinked alginate is synthesized biomimetically. This composite shows a significant improvement in mechanical properties over nHAC material. Mechanical test results show that the compressive modulus and yield strength of this composite are in direct proportion to the percentage of Ca-crosslinked alginate in the composite. Primary biocompatibility experiments in vitro including fibroblasts and osteoblasts co-culture with nHAC/alginate composite indicated the high biocompatibility of this composite. Therefore the composite can be a promising candidate of scaffold material for bone tissue engineering.

  15. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the RPI composites program is to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability and life prediction. Concommitant goals are to educate engineers to design and use composite materials as normal or conventional materials. A multifaceted program was instituted to achieve these objectives.

  16. Molecular Rotors Built in Porous Materials.

    PubMed

    Comotti, Angiolina; Bracco, Silvia; Sozzani, Piero

    2016-09-20

    Molecules and materials can show dynamic structures in which the dominant mechanism is rotary motion. The single mobile elements are defined as "molecular rotors" and exhibit special properties (compared with their static counterparts), being able in perspective to greatly modulate the dielectric response and form the basis for molecular motors that are designed with the idea of making molecules perform a useful mechanical function. The construction of ordered rotary elements into a solid is a necessary feature for such design, because it enables the alignment of rotors and the fine-tuning of their steric and dipolar interactions. Crystal surfaces or bulk crystals are the most suitable to adapt rotors in 2D or 3D arrangements and engineer juxtaposition of the rotors in an ordered way. Nevertheless, it is only in recent times that materials showing porosity and remarkably low density have undergone tremendous development. The characteristics of large free volume combine well with the virtually unhindered motion of the molecular rotors built into their structure. Indeed, the molecular rotors are used as struts in porous covalent and supramolecular architectures, spanning both hybrid and fully organic materials. The modularity of the approach renders possible a variety of rotor geometrical arrangements in both robust frameworks stable up to 850 K and self-assembled molecular materials. A nanosecond (fast dynamics) motional regime can be achieved at temperatures lower than 240 K, enabling rotor arrays operating in the solid state even at low temperatures. Furthermore, in nanoporous materials, molecular rotors can interact with the diffusing chemical species, be they liquids, vapors, or gases. Through this chemical intervention, rotor speed can be modulated at will, enabling a new generation of rotor-containing materials sensitive to guests. In principle, an applied electric field can be the stimulus for chemical release from porous materials. The effort needed to

  17. Molecular Rotors Built in Porous Materials.

    PubMed

    Comotti, Angiolina; Bracco, Silvia; Sozzani, Piero

    2016-09-20

    Molecules and materials can show dynamic structures in which the dominant mechanism is rotary motion. The single mobile elements are defined as "molecular rotors" and exhibit special properties (compared with their static counterparts), being able in perspective to greatly modulate the dielectric response and form the basis for molecular motors that are designed with the idea of making molecules perform a useful mechanical function. The construction of ordered rotary elements into a solid is a necessary feature for such design, because it enables the alignment of rotors and the fine-tuning of their steric and dipolar interactions. Crystal surfaces or bulk crystals are the most suitable to adapt rotors in 2D or 3D arrangements and engineer juxtaposition of the rotors in an ordered way. Nevertheless, it is only in recent times that materials showing porosity and remarkably low density have undergone tremendous development. The characteristics of large free volume combine well with the virtually unhindered motion of the molecular rotors built into their structure. Indeed, the molecular rotors are used as struts in porous covalent and supramolecular architectures, spanning both hybrid and fully organic materials. The modularity of the approach renders possible a variety of rotor geometrical arrangements in both robust frameworks stable up to 850 K and self-assembled molecular materials. A nanosecond (fast dynamics) motional regime can be achieved at temperatures lower than 240 K, enabling rotor arrays operating in the solid state even at low temperatures. Furthermore, in nanoporous materials, molecular rotors can interact with the diffusing chemical species, be they liquids, vapors, or gases. Through this chemical intervention, rotor speed can be modulated at will, enabling a new generation of rotor-containing materials sensitive to guests. In principle, an applied electric field can be the stimulus for chemical release from porous materials. The effort needed to

  18. Determination of connectivity in porous materials.

    PubMed

    Caccianotti, L; Lucchelli, E; Ramello, S; Spanò, G

    2012-12-01

    A method of practical use was set up to determine the connectivity in a porous material, modelling the physical system as a lattice, whose coordination number is assumed to be an index of connectivity itself. This task was approached through the theory of percolation and input data were provided by two different experimental techniques, that is, adsorption/desorption of nitrogen and mercury porosimetry. The overall procedure is based on the calculation of probability f(P) of occupation of the porous channels and of probability F(P) of percolation. In the framework of the above--mentioned lattice model, the average coordination number Z is calculated through the best fitting of a universal curve to the values found for F(P) and f(P), adopting as fitting parameter the ratio L between the characteristic linear dimension of the whole lattice and the characteristic linear dimension of each of its cells. The procedure described was implemented through a numerical code and applied to three commercial alumina. A simple empirical relationship was found between Z and the percolation threshold, showing an excellent coefficient of statistical correlation. The three products proved different in connectivity, allowing subtle distinctions from each other, despite their hysteresis cycles in the adsorption/desorption process appeared quite similar from a qualitative standpoint. PMID:23447967

  19. Large Deformations of a Soft Porous Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Christopher W.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Wettlaufer, John S.

    2016-04-01

    Compressing a porous material will decrease the volume of the pore space, driving fluid out. Similarly, injecting fluid into a porous material can expand the pore space, distorting the solid skeleton. This poromechanical coupling has applications ranging from cell and tissue mechanics to geomechanics and hydrogeology. The classical theory of linear poroelasticity captures this coupling by combining Darcy's law with Terzaghi's effective stress and linear elasticity in a linearized kinematic framework. Linear poroelasticity is a good model for very small deformations, but it becomes increasingly inappropriate for moderate to large deformations, which are common in the context of phenomena such as swelling and damage, and for soft materials such as gels and tissues. The well-known theory of large-deformation poroelasticity combines Darcy's law with Terzaghi's effective stress and nonlinear elasticity in a rigorous kinematic framework. This theory has been used extensively in biomechanics to model large elastic deformations in soft tissues and in geomechanics to model large elastoplastic deformations in soils. Here, we first provide an overview and discussion of this theory with an emphasis on the physics of poromechanical coupling. We present the large-deformation theory in an Eulerian framework to minimize the mathematical complexity, and we show how this nonlinear theory simplifies to linear poroelasticity under the assumption of small strain. We then compare the predictions of linear poroelasticity with those of large-deformation poroelasticity in the context of two uniaxial model problems: fluid outflow driven by an applied mechanical load (the consolidation problem) and compression driven by a steady fluid throughflow. We explore the steady and dynamical errors associated with the linear model in both situations, as well as the impact of introducing a deformation-dependent permeability. We show that the error in linear poroelasticity is due primarily to kinematic

  20. Ceramic Aerogel Composite Materials and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Aerogels a.k.a "Solid Smoke" are gels with the liquid phase replaced by gas, leaving behind a highly porous material with a nanoscale framework. Due to the porous, nanoscale structure, aerogels have the lowest known density and conductivity of solids. Aerogels have the potential for being a breakthrough material because of their extremely light weight and unique properties. In this paper, we address overcoming their most profound weaknesses: mechanical fragility and very high surface activity, which leads to a lowered sintering temperature. A matrix of ceramic aerogel composite materials was produced to investigate their properties and functionality. Mechanical property measurements and Scanning Electron Micrographs are used to identify trends and structure of these ceramic composite materials. Thermal cycling was used to identify the sintering points of the materials.

  1. Three-dimensional porous hydroxyapatite/collagen composite with rubber-like elasticity.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Shunji; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Monkawa, Akira; Marukawa, Eriko; Sotome, Shinichi; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Tanaka, Junzo

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional porous hydroxyapatite/collagen (HAp/Col) composite with a random pore structure was fabricated using freeze-drying processes; the self-organized HAp/Col nanocomposite with a weight ratio of 80.5:19.5, freeze-dried, was kneaded in 100 mM sodium phosphate buffer, frozen at -20 degrees C and freeze-dried. The cross-linkage of Col molecules was introduced dehydrothermally at 140 degrees C in vacuo. The porous composite had a porosity of 94.7% with pore sizes between 200 and 500 microm. The compressive stress for the wet porous composite in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) was gradually decreased during 20 days incubation with a small amount of weight loss. The cyclic and time-course compression tests showed good repeatability of stress and well-recovery of its height, and caused no collapse of the porous composite. The implantation of the porous composite in rat bone holes showed the biodegradable property and new bone formation occurred in the pores without inflammatory response. The porous composite fabricated has good flexibility and rubber-like elasticity, and is a promising bone regenerative material. PMID:17540116

  2. Siloxane treatment by adsorption into porous materials.

    PubMed

    Ricaurte Ortega, D; Subrenat, A

    2009-09-01

    Siloxanes are widely used in different applications: health care, dry cleaning, household products, paints and coatings, paper, personal care, for example. This explains their prevalence in the environment. Because of their volatile nature, most of the time they are dispersed in the atmosphere, but they can also be present in the slurry from landfills. During anaerobic digestion, when the temperature goes up to 60 degrees C, siloxanes are volatilized, forming part of the biogas. Operational problems using biogas to produce energy, heat and hydrogen have been identified. At high temperatures the siloxanes are transformed into silicate dioxide (commonly called sand transmission). These white deposits may adhere to metal or catalytic substrate surfaces, seriously reducing equipment efficiency, and this can be a reason for changing equipment warranties. Consequently, elimination of siloxanes has become very important. Unfortunately, relatively little information can be found on this subject. Nevertheless some authors have described different analytical methods for siloxane quantification, and recent studies have looked at the presence of siloxanes in landfills and the restriction on the energy recovery equipment using the biogas produced. The growing consumption of siloxanes and silicones in industrial processes consequently increase their prevalence in the environment, hampering the use of biogas as a source of 'green energy'. Therefore, the principal focus of this study is the treatment of siloxanes. Their elimination was carried out using an adsorption process with four different porous materials: activated carbon cloths (ACC), granular activated carbon (GAC), zeolite and silica gel. Two representative siloxane compounds were used in this study, hexamethyldisiloxane (L2) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4). Adsorption kinetics and isotherms in batch reactors were performed. It was observed that the mass transfer into the porous material was more rapid for the

  3. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  4. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, Roger L.; Sylwester, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  5. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    Overall emphasis is on basic long-term research in the following categories: constituent materials, composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology; and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Research in basic composition, characteristics, and processing science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to present and future problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of this comprehensive program are presented.

  6. Composite Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The development and application of filamentary composite materials, is considered. Such interest is based on the possibility of using relatively brittle materials with high modulus, high strength, but low density in composites with good durability and high tolerance to damage. Fiber reinforced composite materials of this kind offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been made since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. There were only limited applied to the primary structure of operational vehicles, mainly as aircrafts.

  7. SPUTTERING FROM A POROUS MATERIAL BY PENETRATING IONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Nieva, J. F.; Bringa, E. M.; Cassidy, T. A.; Caro, A.; Loeffler, M. J.; Farkas, D.

    2011-12-10

    Porous materials are ubiquitous in the universe and weathering of porous surfaces plays an important role in the evolution of planetary and interstellar materials. Sputtering of porous solids in particular can influence atmosphere formation, surface reflectivity, and the production of the ambient gas around materials in space. Several previous studies and models have shown a large reduction in the sputtering of a porous solid compared to the sputtering of the non-porous solid. Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the sputtering of a nanoporous solid with 55% of the solid density. We calculate the electronic sputtering induced by a fast, penetrating ion, using a thermal spike representation of the deposited energy. We find that sputtering for this porous solid is, surprisingly, the same as that for a full-density solid, even though the sticking coefficient is high.

  8. Sputtering from a Porous Material by Penetrating Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, J. F.; Bringa, E. M.; Cassidy, T. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Caro, A.; Fama, M.; Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.; Farkas, D.

    2011-12-01

    Porous materials are ubiquitous in the universe and weathering of porous surfaces plays an important role in the evolution of planetary and interstellar materials. Sputtering of porous solids in particular can influence atmosphere formation, surface reflectivity, and the production of the ambient gas around materials in space. Several previous studies and models have shown a large reduction in the sputtering of a porous solid compared to the sputtering of the non-porous solid. Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the sputtering of a nanoporous solid with 55% of the solid density. We calculate the electronic sputtering induced by a fast, penetrating ion, using a thermal spike representation of the deposited energy. We find that sputtering for this porous solid is, surprisingly, the same as that for a full-density solid, even though the sticking coefficient is high.

  9. Sputtering from a Porous Material by Penetrating Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, J. F.; Bringa, E. M.; Cassidy, T. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Caro, A.; Fama, M.; Loeffler, M.; Baragiola, R. A.; Farkas, D.

    2012-01-01

    Porous materials are ubiquitous in the universe and weathering of porous surfaces plays an important role in the evolution of planetary and interstellar materials. Sputtering of porous solids in particular can influence atmosphere formation, surface reflectivity, and the production of the ambient gas around materials in space, Several previous studies and models have shown a large reduction in the sputtering of a porous solid compared to the sputtering of the non-porous solid. Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the sputtering of a nanoporous solid with 55% of the solid density. We calculate the electronic sputtering induced by a fast, penetrating ion, using a thermal spike representation of the deposited energy. We find that sputtering for this porous solid is, surprisingly, the same as that for a full-density solid, even though the sticking coefficient is high.

  10. The AMWCNTs supported porous nanocarbon composites for high-performance supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yu; Sun, Li; Tian, Chungui; Lin, Haibo

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: The AMWCNTs supported porous nanocarbon composites were prepared by a easy method. The composites had shown good performances for electrochemical energy storage with high specific capacitance and good stability. - Highlights: • The AMWCNTs supported porous nanocarbon composites were prepared. • The composites have good conductivity and large BET specific surface areas. • The composites had shown high specific capacitance, and good stability. - Abstract: The porous nanocarbons supported by acid-treated multiwall carbon nanotubes (PC@ACNTs) were prepared by the combination of the hydrothermal polymerization of glucose on ACNTs, carbonization under N{sub 2} protection and final activation with ZnCl{sub 2}. The materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectra. The results indicated that the ACNTs distributed uniformly into the framework of the porous carbon. The composites showed the high BET specific surface area up to 1712 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and good conductivity. The electrochemical measurements indicated that the composites processed good performances for electrochemical energy storage (210 F g{sup −1} at 0.5 A g{sup −1}), and high stability (>99.9%), much higher than the corresponding ACNTs, porous carbons and the samples prepared by using raw MWCNTs as source. The good performance of PC@ACNTs composites was relative with the synergy of good conductivity of ACNTs and large specific surface areas of PC.

  11. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  12. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of filamentary composite materials, whose development may be considered as entering its second generation, continues to generate intense interest and applications activity. Fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been achieved since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. Rather limited applications to primary aircraft structure have been made, however, mainly in a material-substitution mode on military aircraft, except for a few experiments currently underway on large passenger airplanes in commercial operation. To fulfill the promise of composite materials completely requires a strong technology base. NASA and AFOSR recognize the present state of the art to be such that to fully exploit composites in sophisticated aerospace structures, the technology base must be improved. This, in turn, calls for expanding fundamental knowledge and the means by which it can be successfully applied in design and manufacture.

  13. Composite Material Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device to protect electronic circuitry from high voltage transients is constructed from a relatively thin piece of conductive composite sandwiched between two conductors so that conduction is through the thickness of the composite piece. The device is based on the discovery that conduction through conductive composite materials in this configuration switches to a high resistance mode when exposed to voltages above a threshold voltage.

  14. Dissolution of a surfactant-containing active porous material.

    PubMed

    Brielles, Nelly; Chantraine, Florence; Viana, Marylène; Chulia, Dominique; Branlard, Paul; Rubinstenn, Gilles; Lequeux, François; Mondain-Monval, Olivier

    2008-12-15

    We have studied the imbibition and dissolution of a porous material in two separate scenarios: (1) when the porous material contains a surfactant powder and (2) when the porous material is dissolved in a surfactant solution. We show that the dissolution kinetics in both scenarios is significantly affected by the presence of the surfactant and results in an increase in the characteristic imbibition time of the porous material, which can be well understood in the framework of the classical law of capillarity. Slowing of the imbibition kinetics was found to be affected by a modification of the liquid wetting properties, but is also affected by a variation in the solubility of the porous material in the presence of the surfactant. Furthermore, there is a depletion effect of the surfactant inside the rising liquid, which is in good agreement with previous work and theoretical predictions.

  15. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Research in the basic composition, characteristics, and processng science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of his program are presented.

  16. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1987-01-01

    The development and application of composite materials to aerospace vehicle structures which began in the mid 1960's has now progressed to the point where what can be considered entire airframes are being designed and built using composites. Issues related to the fabrication of non-resin matrix composites and the micro, mezzo and macromechanics of thermoplastic and metal matrix composites are emphasized. Several research efforts are presented. They are entitled: (1) The effects of chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatments on the properties of pitch-based carbon fiber; (2) Inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; (3) Analysis of fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; (4) Delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; (5) Numerical investigation of the microhardness of composite fracture; and (6) General beam theory for composite structures.

  17. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1972-01-01

    Process for determining thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials is described. Characteristics of materials are identified and used in development of mathematical models. Limitations of method are examined.

  18. Porous silicon as a substrate material for potentiometric biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thust, Marion; Schöning, M. J.; Frohnhoff, S.; Arens-Fischer, R.; Kordos, P.; Lüth, H.

    1996-01-01

    For the first time porous silicon has been investigated for the purpose of application as a substrate material for potentiometric biosensors operating in aqueous solutions. Porous silicon was prepared from differently doped silicon substrates by a standard anodic etching process. After oxidation, penicillinase, an enzyme sensitive to penicillin, was bound to the porous structure by physical adsorption. To characterize the electrochemical properties of the so build up penicillin biosensor, capacitance - voltage (C - V) measurements were performed on these field-effect structures.

  19. Template-assisted formation of porous vanadium oxide as high performance cathode materials for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yanhui; Pan, Anqiang; Wang, Yaping; Huang, Jiwu; Nie, Zhiwei; An, Xinxin; Liang, Shuquan

    2015-11-01

    Similar to carbonaceous materials, porous metal oxides have attracted wide attention in energy storage and conversion systems because of their structural advantages, including high activity and electrolyte accessibility. In this work, we report the novel preparation of porous vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) as high performance cathode material for lithium ion batteries. Ketjen black (KB), a porous carbon material, has been employed as hard templates to host precursor species in their porous structures. The porous V2O5 electrode material is prepared after removing the KB carbon framework by calcinating the composites in air. As cathode materials for lithium ion batteries, the porous V2O5 electrodes exhibit high capacity, good cycling stability and rate capability. An initial discharge capacity of 141.1 mA h g-1 is delivered at a current density of 100 mAg-1, very close to the theoretical capacity of 147 mA h g-1.

  20. Lithium ion battery application of porous composite oxide microcubes prepared via metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xia; Tang, Yong-Bing; Huang, Xing; Xue, Hong Tao; Kang, Wen Pei; Li, Wen Yue; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-06-01

    Prussian Blue (PB, Fe4[Fe(CN)6]3) is utilized to synthesize bimetallic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) (Fe4[Fe(CN)6]3/Mx[Fe(CN)6], M = Cu, Ni, Co, etc.) by cation exchange, driven by differences in solubility product constant (Ksp) of monometallic MOFs. Upon decomposition, the bimetallic MOFs convert to porous composite metal oxides (Fe2O3/MOx, M = Cu, Ni, Co, etc.) while keeping the original cubic morphology. This study demonstrates a general approach for preparing bimetallic MOFs and porous composite oxides. We also demonstrate the good electrochemical performance (specific capacity of 774 mAh g-1 after 120 cycles at 500 mA g-1) of the synthesized porous Fe2O3-CuO composite as an anode material for lithium ion batteries. And according to references, this composite exhibit better or comparable rate capability and cycle stability compared with other hybrid transition metal oxides.

  1. Calcium phosphate porous composites and ceramics prospective as bone implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabadjieva, D.; Tepavitcharova, S.; Gergulova, R.; Sezanova, K.; Ilieva, R.; Gabrashanska, M.; Alexandrov, M.

    2013-12-01

    Two types of calcium phosphate materials prospective as bone implants were prepared in the shape of granules and their biochemical behavior was tested by in vivo studies: (i) composite materials consisting of gelatin and bi-phase ion modified calcium phosphate Mg,Zn-(HA + β-TCP); and (ii) ceramics of ion modified calcium phosphate Mg,Zn-(HA + β-TCP). The starting fine powders were prepared by the method of biomimetic precipitation of the precursors followed by hightemperature treatment. Then granules were prepared by dispersion in liquid paraffin of a thick suspension containing 20% of gelatin gel and thus prepared calcium phosphate powders (1:1 ratios). The composite granules were obtained by subsequent hardening in a glutaraldehyde solution, while the highly porous ceramic granules - by further sintering at 1100°C. The in vivo behavior of both types of granules was tested in experimental rat models. Bone defects were created in rat tibia and were filled with the implants. Biochemical studies were performed. Three months after operation both bio-materials displayed analogous behavior.

  2. DDT modeling and shock compression experiments of porous or damaged energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Anderson, M.U.; Graham, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    In this presentation, we present modeling of DDT in porous energetic materials and experimental studies of a time-resolved, shock compression of highly porous inert and reactive materials. This combined theoretical and experimental studies explore the nature of the microscale processes of consolidation, deformation and reaction which are key features of the shock response of porous or damaged energetic materials. The theoretical modeling is based on the theory of mixtures in which multiphase mixtures are treated in complete nonequilibrium allowing for internal boundary effects associated mass/momentum and energy exchange between phases, relative flow, rate-dependent compaction behavior, multistage chemistry and interphase boundary effects. Numerous studies of low-velocity impacts using a high resolution adaptive finite element method are presented which replicate experimental observations. The incorporation of this model into multi-material hydrocode analysis will be discussed to address the effects of confinement and its influence on accelerated combustion behavior. The experimental studies will focus on the use of PVDF piezoelectric polymer stress-rate gauge to precisely measure the input and propagating shock stress response of porous materials. In addition to single constituent porous materials, such as granular HMX, we have resolved shock waves in porous composite intermetallic powders that confirm a dispersive wave nature which is highly morphologically and material dependent. This document consists of viewgraphs from the poster session.

  3. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  4. Dynamic magnetic compaction of porous materials

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-29

    IAP Research began development of the Dynamic Magnetic Compaction (DMC) process three years before the CRADA was established. IAP Research had experimentally demonstrated the feasibility of the process, and conducted a basic market survey. IAP identified and opened discussions with industrial partners and established the basic commercial cost structure. The purpose of this CRADA project was to predict and verify optimum pressure vs. time history for the compaction of porous copper and tungsten. LLNL modeled the rapid compaction of powdered material from an initial density of about 30% theoretical maximum to more than 90% theoretical maximum. The compaction simulations were benchmarked against existing data and new data was acquired by IAP Research. The modeling was used to perform parameter studies on the pressure loading time history, initial porosity and temperature. LLNL ran simulations using codes CALE or NITO and compared the simulations with published compaction data and equation of state (EOS) data. This project did not involve the development or modification of software code. CALE and NITO were existing software programs at LLNL. No modification of these programs occurred within the scope of the CRADA effort.

  5. Modified Composite Materials Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L. (Compiler)

    1978-01-01

    The reduction or elimination of the hazard which results from accidental release of graphite fibers from composite materials was studied at a workshop. At the workshop, groups were organized to consider six topics: epoxy modifications, epoxy replacement, fiber modifications, fiber coatings and new fibers, hybrids, and fiber release testing. Because of the time required to develop a new material and acquire a design data base, most of the workers concluded that a modified composite material would require about four to five years of development and testing before it could be applied to aircraft structures. The hybrid working group considered that some hybrid composites which reduce the risk of accidental fiber release might be put into service over the near term. The fiber release testing working group recommended a coordinated effort to define a suitable laboratory test.

  6. Novel hybrid multifunctional magnetoelectric porous composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, P.; Gonçalves, R.; Lopes, A. C.; Venkata Ramana, E.; Mendiratta, S. K.; Lanceros-Mendez, S.

    2015-12-01

    Novel multifunctional porous films have been developed by the integration of magnetic CoFe2O4 (CFO) nanoparticles into poly(vinylidene fluoride)-Trifuoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)), taking advantage of the synergies of the magnetostrictive filler and the piezoelectric polymer. The porous films show a piezoelectric response with an effective d33 coefficient of -22 pC/N-1, a maximum magnetization of 12 emu g-1 and a maximum magnetoelectric coefficient of 9 mV cm-1 Oe-1. In this way, a multifunctional membrane has been developed suitable for advanced applications ranging from biomedical to water treatment.

  7. METHOD OF IMPREGNATING A POROUS MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Steele, G.N.

    1960-06-01

    A method of impregnating a porous body with an inorganic uranium- containing salt is outlined and comprises dissolving a water-soluble uranium- containing salt in water; saturating the intercommunicating pores of the porous body with the salt solution; infusing ammonia gas into the intercommunicating pores of the body, the ammonia gas in water chemically reacting with the water- soluble uranium-containing salt in the water solvent to form a nonwater-soluble uranium-containing precipitant; and evaporating the volatile unprecipitated products from the intercommunicating pores whereby the uranium-containing precipitate is uniformly distributed in the intercommunicating peres of the porous body.

  8. Characterization of porous media and refractory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin

    Because of its unique advantages on energy savings and casting complex shapes, Lost Foam Casting (LFC) has been widely used as a replacement to the conventional techniques (sand and investment castings). In order to continuously improve the quality of the Lost Foam Casting process for reducing scrap rate and increasing energy savings, the US Department of Energy sponsored the present study to develop new characterization techniques for enhancing the understanding of the fundamental properties of the refractory materials used in the Lost Foam Casting process. In this study, new techniques are proposed to characterize the refractory materials' properties such as particle size, particle shape, rheological behavior, transport properties, microstructure, thickness, as well as packing properties. The microstructure information obtained from the proposed technique is found to be well correlated with the transport properties of the porous coating materials. A procedure using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code is developed to simulate experimental gas flow data for solving complex boundary value problems. In this study, the effects of dilution and dispersion on the coating properties such as transport properties and microstructures are also investigated. Results show that the dilution and dispersion have opposing influences on the pore size and transport properties. In addition, this study also includes another part of the permeability system, the un-bonded granular materials used in the Lost Foam Casting process. A three-dimensional (3-D) computer program is developed to simulate the packing behavior of granular materials at a loose state using a "drop and roll" method. This study provides a systematic characterization of the LFC refractory coating slurries, dried refractory coating, and the granular media. This study also demonstrates the application of proposed characterization techniques for coating quality control using statistical process control

  9. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Progress and plans are reported for investigations of: (1) the mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; (2) fatigue in composite materials; (3) moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates; (4) the theory of inhomogeneous swelling in epoxy resin; (5) numerical studies of the micromechanics of composite fracture; (6) free edge failures of composite laminates; (7) analysis of unbalanced laminates; (8) compact lug design; (9) quantification of Saint-Venant's principles for a general prismatic member; (10) variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; and (11) the wing fuselage ensemble of the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes.

  10. Fabrication of porous materials (metal, metal oxide and semiconductor) through an aerosol-assisted route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Hiesang

    Porous materials have gained attraction owing to their vast applications in catalysts, sensors, energy storage devices, bio-devices and other areas. To date, various porous materials were synthesized through soft and hard templating approaches. However, a general synthesis method for porous non-oxide materials, metal alloys and semiconductors with tunable structure, composition and morphology has not been developed yet. To address this challenge, this thesis presents an aerosol method towards the synthesis of such materials and their applications for catalysis, hydrogen storage, Li-batteries and photo-catalysis. The first part of this thesis presents the synthesis of porous metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors with controlled pore structure, crystalline structure and morphology. In these synthesis processes, metal salts and organic ligands were employed as precursors to create porous metal-carbon frameworks. During the aerosol process, primary metal clusters and nanoparticles were formed, which were coagulated/ aggregated forming the porous particles. Various porous particles, such as those of metals (e.g., Ni, Pt, Co, Fe, and Ni xPt(1-x)), metal oxides (e.g., Fe3O4 and SnO2) and semiconductors (e.g., CdS, CuInS2, CuInS 2x-ZnS(1-x), and CuInS2x-TiO2(1-x)) were synthesized. The morphology, porous structure and crystalline structure of the particles were regulated through both templating and non-templating methods. The second part of this thesis explores the applications of these materials, including propylene hydrogenation and H2 uptake capacity of porous Ni, NiPt alloys and Ni-Pt composites, Li-storage of Fe3O4 and SnO2, photodegradation of CuInS2-based semiconductors. The effects of morphology, compositions, and porous structure on the device performance were systematically investigated. Overall, this dissertation work unveiled a simple synthesis approach for porous particles of metals, metal alloys, metal oxides, and semiconductors with controlled

  11. Composite ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amarasinghe, S.; Zook, L.; Leddy, J.

    1994-12-31

    Composite ion exchange materials can be formed by sorbing ion exchange polymers on inert, high surface area substrates. In general, the flux of ions and molecules through these composites, as measured electrochemically, increases as the ratio of the surface area of the substrate increases relative to the volume of the ion exchanger. This suggests that fields and gradients established at the interface between the ion exchanger and substrate are important in determining the transport characteristics of the composites. Here, the authors will focus on composites formed with a cation exchange polymer, Nafion, and two different types of microbeads: polystyrene microspheres and polystyrene coated magnetic microbeads. For the polystyrene microbeads, scanning electron micrographs suggest the beads cluster in a self-similar manner, independent of the bead diameter. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through the composites was studied as a function of bead fraction, bead radii, and fixed surface area with mixed bead sizes. Flux was well modeled by surface diffusion along a fractal interface. Magnetic composites were formed with columns of magnetic microbeads normal to the electrode surface. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through these composites increased exponentially with bead fraction. For electrolyses, the difference in the molar magnetic susceptibility of the products and reactants, Dcm, tends to be non-zero. For seven redox reactions, the ratio of the flux through the magnetic composites to the flux through a Nafion film increases monotonically with {vert_bar}Dcm{vert_bar}, with enhancements as large as thirty-fold. For reversible species, the electrolysis potential through the magnetic composites is 35 mV positive of that for the Nafion films.

  12. Aerogel/polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Clayton, LaNetra M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention provides new composite materials containing aerogels blended with thermoplastic polymer materials at a weight ratio of aerogel to thermoplastic polymer of less than 20:100. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability. The composite materials also have better flexibility and less brittleness at low temperatures than the parent thermoplastic polymer materials.

  13. Predicting Pressure Drop In Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, Pierce L.

    1990-01-01

    Theory developed to predict drop in pressure based on drag of individual fibers. Simple correlation method for data also developed. Helps in predicting flow characteristics of many strain-isolation pad (SIP) glow geometries in Shuttle Orbiter tile system. Also helps in predicting venting characteristics of tile assemblies during ascent and leakage of hot gas under tiles during descent. Useful in study of mechanics of flows through fibrous and porous media, and procedures applicable to purged fiberglass insulation, dialysis filters, and other fibrous and porous media.

  14. Dynamic behavior of particulate/porous energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, Vitali

    2011-06-01

    Dynamic behavior of particulate/porous energetic materials in a broad range of impact conditions and types of deformation (shock, shear) will be discussed. Samples of these materials were fabricated using Cold Isostatic Pressing, sintering and Hot Isostatic Pressing with and without vacuum encapsulation. The current interest in these materials is due to the combination of their high strength with energy efficiency under critical conditions of mechanical deformation. They may exhibit high compressive and tensile strength with the ability to bulk distributed fracture resulting in a small size reactive fragments and possible reaction on later stages. The results of dynamic deformation and fragmentation of these materials in conditions of low velocity (10 m/s), high energy impact, under localized deformation in single and multiple shear bands generated using explosively driven Thick Walled Cylinder method will be discussed. The mechanical properties of these materials are highly sensitive to mesostructure. For example, a dynamic strength of Al-W composites with fine W particles is significantly larger than the strength of composite with the coarse W particles at the same porosity. Morphology of W inclusions had a strong effect on dynamic strength. Samples with W wires arranged in axial direction with the same volume content of components had a highest dynamic strength. Porosity in these materials can provide a strain hardening mechanism effect due to in situ densification which was observed experimentally for cold isostatically pressed Al and Al-coarse W powders. Experimental results will be compared with available numerical data. The support for this project provided by ONR MURI N00014-07-1-0740 (Program Officer Dr. Clifford Bedford).

  15. Applications of hierarchically structured porous materials from energy storage and conversion, catalysis, photocatalysis, adsorption, separation, and sensing to biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Hui; Huang, Shao-Zhuan; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Yu; Yang, Xiao-Yu; Yuan, Zhong-Yong; Su, Bao-Lian

    2016-06-13

    Over the last decade, significant effort has been devoted to the applications of hierarchically structured porous materials owing to their outstanding properties such as high surface area, excellent accessibility to active sites, and enhanced mass transport and diffusion. The hierarchy of porosity, structural, morphological and component levels in these materials is key for their high performance in all kinds of applications. The introduction of hierarchical porosity into materials has led to a significant improvement in the performance of materials. Herein, recent progress in the applications of hierarchically structured porous materials from energy conversion and storage, catalysis, photocatalysis, adsorption, separation, and sensing to biomedicine is reviewed. Their potential future applications are also highlighted. We particularly dwell on the relationship between hierarchically porous structures and properties, with examples of each type of hierarchically structured porous material according to its chemical composition and physical characteristics. The present review aims to open up a new avenue to guide the readers to quickly obtain in-depth knowledge of applications of hierarchically porous materials and to have a good idea about selecting and designing suitable hierarchically porous materials for a specific application. In addition to focusing on the applications of hierarchically porous materials, this comprehensive review could stimulate researchers to synthesize new advanced hierarchically porous solids.

  16. Method of tissue repair using a composite material

    DOEpatents

    Hutchens, Stacy A; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R; O'Neill, Hugh M

    2014-03-18

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  17. Method of tissue repair using a composite material

    DOEpatents

    Hutchens, Stacy A.; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.

    2016-03-01

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  18. TESTING ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY ON POROUS MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The efficacy of antimicrobial treatments to eliminate or control biological growth in the indoor environment can easily be tested on nonporous surfaces. However, the testing of antimicrobial efficacy on porous surfaces, such as those found in the indoor environment [i.e., gypsum ...

  19. Refractory composites structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzero, G. V.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents the latest available data for the NASP Refractory Composites Materials and Structures Augmentation Program. The program's main goal is to provide the necessary information for a positive phase II to phase III plan for the X-30 to be built. After a brief overview of the program, the state-of-the-art fabrication of carbon/carbon subelements is presented. Material data packages for screening data, characterization data, damage and durability tolerance and actively-cooled airframe and engine program development are also presented.

  20. Highly stable porous silicon-carbon composites as label-free optical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Chun Kwan; Kelly, Timothy L; Sailor, Michael J; Li, Yang Yang

    2012-12-21

    A stable, label-free optical biosensor based on a porous silicon-carbon (pSi-C) composite is demonstrated. The material is prepared by electrochemical anodization of crystalline Si in an HF-containing electrolyte to generate a porous Si template, followed by infiltration of poly(furfuryl) alcohol (PFA) and subsequent carbonization to generate the pSi-C composite as an optically smooth thin film. The pSi-C sensor is significantly more stable toward aqueous buffer solutions (pH 7.4 or 12) compared to thermally oxidized (in air, 800 °C), hydrosilylated (with undecylenic acid), or hydrocarbonized (with acetylene, 700 °C) porous Si samples prepared and tested under similar conditions. Aqueous stability of the pSi-C sensor is comparable to related optical biosensors based on porous TiO(2) or porous Al(2)O(3). Label-free optical interferometric biosensing with the pSi-C composite is demonstrated by detection of rabbit IgG on a protein-A-modified chip and confirmed with control experiments using chicken IgG (which shows no affinity for protein A). The pSi-C sensor binds significantly more of the protein A capture probe than porous TiO(2) or porous Al(2)O(3), and the sensitivity of the protein-A-modified pSi-C sensor to rabbit IgG is found to be ~2× greater than label-free optical biosensors constructed from these other two materials.

  1. Composite separators and redox flow batteries based on porous separators

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bin; Wei, Xiaoliang; Luo, Qingtao; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Wei; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-01-12

    Composite separators having a porous structure and including acid-stable, hydrophilic, inorganic particles enmeshed in a substantially fully fluorinated polyolefin matrix can be utilized in a number of applications. The inorganic particles can provide hydrophilic characteristics. The pores of the separator result in good selectivity and electrical conductivity. The fluorinated polymeric backbone can result in high chemical stability. Accordingly, one application of the composite separators is in redox flow batteries as low cost membranes. In such applications, the composite separator can also enable additional property-enhancing features compared to ion-exchange membranes. For example, simple capacity control can be achieved through hydraulic pressure by balancing the volumes of electrolyte on each side of the separator. While a porous separator can also allow for volume and pressure regulation, in RFBs that utilize corrosive and/or oxidizing compounds, the composite separators described herein are preferable for their robustness in the presence of such compounds.

  2. Migration Mechanism for Atomic Hydrogen in Porous Carbon Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, B.; Zhao, Y. F.; Ciobanu, C. V.

    2012-05-14

    To explain the fast kinetics of H in porous carbon, we propose that the migration relies on H hopping from a carbon nanotube (CNT) to another. Using density functional theory, we have found that the barrier for H hopping becomes smaller than that for diffusion along a tube for certain CNT separations, decreasting to less than 0.5 eV for separations of -3.1 {angstrom}. Such significant reduction occurs irrespective of radius, chirality, registry, and orientation of the two CNTs: the diffusion is thus facilitated by the porous nature of the material itself. The mechanism proposed is applicable for any porous carbon-based nanomaterials.

  3. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1971-01-01

    Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials, including 304L stainless steel Rigimesh, 304L stainless steel sintered spherical powders, and OFHC sintered spherical powders at different porosities and temperatures are reported and correlated. It was found that the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity can be related to the solid material properties and the porosity of the porous matrix regardless of the matrix structure. It was also found that the Wiedermann-Franz-Lorenz relationship is valid for the porous materials under consideration. For high conductivity materials, the Lorenz constant and the lattice component of conductivity depend on the material and are independent of the porosity. For low conductivity, the lattice component depends on the porosity as well.

  4. Elastic properties of a porous titanium-bone tissue composite.

    PubMed

    Rubshtein, A P; Makarova, E B; Rinkevich, A B; Medvedeva, D S; Yakovenkova, L I; Vladimirov, A B

    2015-01-01

    The porous titanium implants were introduced into the condyles of tibias and femurs of sheep. New bone tissue fills the pore, and the porous titanium-new bone tissue composite is formed. The duration of composite formation was 4, 8, 24 and 52 weeks. The formed composites were extracted from the bone and subjected to a compression test. The Young's modulus was calculated using the measured stress-strain curve. The time dependence of the Young's modulus of the composite was obtained. After 4 weeks the new bone tissue that filled the pores does not affect the elastic properties of implants. After 24 and 52 weeks the Young's modulus increases by 21-34% and 62-136%, respectively. The numerical calculations of the elasticity of porous titanium-new bone tissue composite were conducted using a simple polydisperse model that is based on the consideration of heterogeneous structure as a continuous medium with spherical inclusions of different sizes. The kinetics of the change in the elasticity of the new bone tissue is presented via the intermediate characteristics, namely the relative ultimate tensile strength or proportion of mature bone tissue in the bone tissue. The calculated and experimentally measured values of the Young's modulus of the composite are in good agreement after 8 weeks of composite formation. The properties of the porous titanium-new bone tissue composites can only be predicted when data on the properties of new bone tissue are available after 8 weeks of contact between the implant and the native bone. PMID:25953540

  5. Composite material radomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, R.; Simon, J.-Y.

    1987-06-01

    The fabrication of radomes from composite materials, for naval and aeronautical applications including the Mirage II, F1, and Mirage 2000, is discussed. The diverse radioelectric and mechanical requirements of radomes are best met in the average-temperature regime by reinforced plastics, and in the elevated supersonic regime by ceramic materials. The structural criteria of radomes concerning aerodynamic, inertial, and vibrational loading, and the environmental criteria concerning temperature, sand and rain erosion, and lightning effects, are reviewed. Materials considered for radome fabrication include modified polyesters, epoxies, and thermostable resins, using glass, silica, and aramide tissues or threads as the reinforcements. The advantages and disadvantages of the various fabrication methods, and the fabrication of monolithic radomes by winding and by using preformed weaves, are also discussed.

  6. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  7. Advanced composite materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Composites are generally defined as two or more individual materials, which, when combined into a single material system, results in improved physical and/or mechanical properties. The freedom of choice of the starting components for composites allows the generation of materials that can be specifically tailored to meet a variety of applications. Advanced composites are described as a combination of high strength fibers and high performance polymer matrix materials. These advanced materials are required to permit future aircraft and spacecraft to perform in extended environments. Advanced composite precursor materials, processes for conversion of these materials to structures, and selected applications for composites are reviewed.

  8. Advances in monoliths and related porous materials for microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Knob, Radim; Sahore, Vishal; Sonker, Mukul; Woolley, Adam T

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the use of monolithic porous polymers has seen significant growth. These materials present a highly useful support for various analytical and biochemical applications. Since their introduction, various approaches have been introduced to produce monoliths in a broad range of materials. Simple preparation has enabled their easy implementation in microchannels, extending the range of applications where microfluidics can be successfully utilized. This review summarizes progress regarding monoliths and related porous materials in the field of microfluidics between 2010 and 2015. Recent developments in monolith preparation, solid-phase extraction, separations, and catalysis are critically discussed. Finally, a brief overview of the use of these porous materials for analysis of subcellular and larger structures is given. PMID:27190564

  9. Application of porous materials for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Fairly smooth porous materials were elected for study Doweave; Fibermetal; Dynapore; and perforated titanium sheet. Factors examined include: surface smoothness; suction characteristics; porosity; surface impact resistance; and strain compatibility. A laminar flow control suction glove arrangement was identified with material combinations compatible with thermal expansion and structural strain.

  10. Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Robert V [Idaho Falls, ID; Avci, Recep [Bozeman, MT; Groenewold, Gary S [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-11-16

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  11. Permeability Asymmetry in Composite Porous Ceramic Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurcharov, I. M.; Laguntsov, N. I.; Uvarov, V. I.; Kurchatova, O. V.

    The results from the investigation of transport characteristics and gas transport asymmetry in bilayer composite membranes are submitted. These membranes are produced by SHS method. Asymmetric effect and hysteresis of permeability in nanoporous membranes are detected. It's shown, that permeability ratio (asymmetry value of permeability) increases up to several times. The asymmetry of permeability usually decreases monotonically with the pressure decrease.

  12. Computer simulation of chemical reactions in porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Christoffer Heath

    Understanding reactions in nanoporous materials from a purely experimental perspective is a difficult task. Measuring the chemical composition of a reacting system within a catalytic material is usually only accomplished through indirect methods, and it is usually impossible to distinguish between true chemical equilibrium and metastable states. In addition, measuring molecular orientation or distribution profiles within porous systems is not easily accomplished. However, molecular simulation techniques are well-suited to these challenges. With appropriate simulation techniques and realistic molecular models, it is possible to validate the dominant physical and chemical forces controlling nanoscale reactivity. Novel nanostructured catalysts and supports can be designed, optimized, and tested using high-performance computing and advanced modeling techniques in order to guide the search for next-generation catalysts---setting new targets for the materials synthesis community. We have simulated the conversion of several different equilibrium-limited reactions within microporous carbons and we find that the pore size, pore geometry, and surface chemistry are important factors for determining the reaction yield. The equilibrium-limited reactions that we have modeled include nitric oxide dimerization, ammonia synthesis, and the esterification of acetic acid, all of which show yield enhancements within microporous carbons. In conjunction with a yield enhancement of the esterification reaction, selective adsorption of ethyl acetate within carbon micropores demonstrates an efficient method for product recovery. Additionally, a new method has been developed for simulating reaction kinetics within porous materials and other heterogeneous environments. The validity of this technique is first demonstrated by reproducing the kinetics of hydrogen iodide decomposition in the gas phase, and then predictions are made within slit-shaped carbon pores and carbon nanotubes. The rate

  13. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marynowicz, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples' surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  14. Processing composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The fabrication of several composite structural articles including DC-10 upper aft rudders, L-1011 vertical fins and composite biomedical appliances are discussed. Innovative composite processing methods are included.

  15. Bacteria transport through porous material: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1989-02-13

    The injection and penetration of bacteria into a reservoir is the most problematic and crucial of the steps in microbial enhanced recovery (MEOR). In the last phase of our work valuable information on bacterial transport in porous media was obtained. A great deal of progress was made to determine chemical bonding characteristics between adsorbed bacteria and the rock surfaces. In order to further enhance our knowledge of the effects of surface tensions on bacteria transport through porous media, a new approach was taken to illustrate the effect of liquid surface tension on bacterial transport through a sandpack column. Work in surface charge characterization of reservoir rock as a composite oxide system was also accomplished. In the last section of this report a mathematical model to simulate the simultaneous diffusion and growth of bacteria cells in a nutrient-enriched porous media is proposed.

  16. Computational modeling of composite material fires.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Alexander L.; Erickson, Kenneth L.; Hubbard, Joshua Allen; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2010-10-01

    Composite materials behave differently from conventional fuel sources and have the potential to smolder and burn for extended time periods. As the amount of composite materials on modern aircraft continues to increase, understanding the response of composites in fire environments becomes increasingly important. An effort is ongoing to enhance the capability to simulate composite material response in fires including the decomposition of the composite and the interaction with a fire. To adequately model composite material in a fire, two physical model development tasks are necessary; first, the decomposition model for the composite material and second, the interaction with a fire. A porous media approach for the decomposition model including a time dependent formulation with the effects of heat, mass, species, and momentum transfer of the porous solid and gas phase is being implemented in an engineering code, ARIA. ARIA is a Sandia National Laboratories multiphysics code including a range of capabilities such as incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, energy transport equations, species transport equations, non-Newtonian fluid rheology, linear elastic solid mechanics, and electro-statics. To simulate the fire, FUEGO, also a Sandia National Laboratories code, is coupled to ARIA. FUEGO represents the turbulent, buoyantly driven incompressible flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, and combustion. FUEGO and ARIA are uniquely able to solve this problem because they were designed using a common architecture (SIERRA) that enhances multiphysics coupling and both codes are capable of massively parallel calculations, enhancing performance. The decomposition reaction model is developed from small scale experimental data including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) in both nitrogen and air for a range of heating rates and from available data in the literature. The response of the composite material subject to a radiant heat flux boundary

  17. Dodecahedron-Shaped Porous Vanadium Oxide and Carbon Composite for High-Rate Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifang; Pan, Anqiang; Wang, Yaping; Wei, Weifeng; Su, Yanhui; Hu, Jimei; Cao, Guozhong; Liang, Shuquan

    2016-07-13

    Carbon-based nanocomposites have been extensively studied in energy storage and conversion systems because of their superior electrochemical performance. However, the majority of metal oxides are grown on the surface of carbonaceous material. Herein, we report a different strategy of constructing V2O5 within the metal organic framework derived carbonaceous dodecahedrons. Vanadium precursor is absorbed into the porous dodecahedron-shaped carbon framework first and then in situ converted into V2O5 within the carbonaceous framework in the annealing process in air. As cathode materials for lithium ion batteries, the porous V2O5@C composites exhibit enhanced electrochemical performance, due to the synergistic effect of V2O5 and carbon composite. PMID:27285481

  18. Dodecahedron-Shaped Porous Vanadium Oxide and Carbon Composite for High-Rate Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifang; Pan, Anqiang; Wang, Yaping; Wei, Weifeng; Su, Yanhui; Hu, Jimei; Cao, Guozhong; Liang, Shuquan

    2016-07-13

    Carbon-based nanocomposites have been extensively studied in energy storage and conversion systems because of their superior electrochemical performance. However, the majority of metal oxides are grown on the surface of carbonaceous material. Herein, we report a different strategy of constructing V2O5 within the metal organic framework derived carbonaceous dodecahedrons. Vanadium precursor is absorbed into the porous dodecahedron-shaped carbon framework first and then in situ converted into V2O5 within the carbonaceous framework in the annealing process in air. As cathode materials for lithium ion batteries, the porous V2O5@C composites exhibit enhanced electrochemical performance, due to the synergistic effect of V2O5 and carbon composite.

  19. Silica decorated on porous activated carbon nanofiber composites for high-performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, So Yeun; Kim, Bo-Hye

    2016-10-01

    A hybrid of silica decorated on porous activated carbon nanofibers (ACNFs) is fabricated in the form of a web via electrospinning and an activation process as an electrode material for electrochemical capacitors in an organic electrolyte. The introduction of PhSiH3 (PS) into the polyacrylonitrile (PAN) solution induces a porous ACNF structure containing silica nanoparticles (NPs) via the spontaneous sol-gel process of PS by steam in the subsequent physical activation process. These inorganic-organic hybrid composites of porous ACNF containing silica NPs show superior specific capacitance and energy density in electrochemical tests, along with good rate capability and excellent cycle life in an organic electrolyte, which is attributed to the combination of ACNF's high surface area and silica's hydrophilicity. The electrochemical performance decreases with increasing PS concentration, and this trend is consistent with the specific surface area results, which reveal the rapid formation of a double layer.

  20. The Uniaxial Tensile Response of Porous and Microcracked Ceramic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Amit; Shyam, Amit; Watkins, Thomas R; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Stafford, Randall; Hemker, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The uniaxial tensile stress-strain behavior of three porous ceramic materials was determined at ambient conditions. Test specimens in the form of thin beams were obtained from the walls of diesel particulate filter honeycombs and tested using a microtesting system. A digital image correlation technique was used to obtain full-field 2D in-plane surface displacement maps during tensile loading, and in turn, the 2D strains obtained from displacement fields were used to determine the Secant modulus, Young s modulus and initial Poisson s ratio of the three porous ceramic materials. Successive unloading-reloading experiments were performed at different levels of stress to decouple the linear elastic, anelastic and inelastic response in these materials. It was found that the stress-strain response of these materials was non-linear and that the degree of nonlinearity is related to the initial microcrack density and evolution of damage in the material.

  1. Methyl alcohol used as penetrant inspection medium for porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendron, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Porous material thoroughly wetted with alcohol shows persistent wet line or area at locations of cracks or porosity. Inspection is qualitative and repeatable, but is used quantitatively with select samples to grade density variations in graphite blocks. Photography is employed to achieve permanent record of results.

  2. Characterizing He II flow through porous materials using counterflow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, J. R.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    An empirical extension of the two-fluid model is used to characterize He II flow through porous materials. It is shown that four empirical parameters are necessary to describe the pressure and temperature differences induced by He II flow through a porous sample. The three parameters required to determine pressure differences are measured in counterflow and found to compare favorably with those for isothermal flow. The fourth parameter, the Gorter-Mellink constant, differs substantially from smooth tube values. It is concluded that parameter values determined from counterflow can be used to predict pressure and temperature differences in a variety of flows to an accuracy of about +/- 20 percent.

  3. Composite material and method for production of improved composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A laminated composite material with improved interlaminar strength and damage tolerance having short rods distributed evenly throughout the composite material perpendicular to the laminae. Each rod is shorter than the thickness of the finished laminate, but several times as long as the thickness of each lamina. The laminate is made by inserting short rods in layers of prepreg material, and then stacking and curing prepreg material with rods inserted therethrough.

  4. Wormhole growth in soluble porous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nilson, R.H.; Griffiths, S.K. )

    1990-09-24

    Analytical solutions are derived for the quasisteady shape and speed of a single wormhole resulting from the coupled processes of Darcian fluid motion and chemical dissolution in a soluble permeable material. For an initially unsaturated medium, two-dimensional solutions are obtained by addressing an inverted free-boundary problem in which the spatial coordinates are treated as dependent variables on the plane of a complex potential. For initially saturated materials, solutions are obtained by analogy to Ivantsov's problem of dendrite growth.

  5. Porous scaffold of gelatin-starch with nanohydroxyapatite composite processed via novel microwave vacuum drying.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Jaya; Durance, Timothy D; Wang, Rizhi

    2008-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a fundamental mineral-based biomaterial, used for preparing composites for bone repair and regeneration. Gelatin blended with starch results in scaffold composites with enhanced mechanical properties. A gelatin-starch blend reinforced with HA nanocrystals (nHA) gave biocompatible composites with enhanced mechanical properties. In this study, a porous scaffold of gelatin-starch-nHA composites was fabricated through microwave vacuum drying and crosslinking using trisodium citrate. Three different composite scaffolds were prepared at three different percentages of nHA: 20%, 30% and 40%. The microstructures and compositions of the composites were analyzed. Within the porous structure, the nHA crystals were observed to precipitate. The interaction between the gelatin-starch network film and nHA crystalline material was studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). XRD reflections showed that there are two different minerals present in the scaffold composite. There were strong reflection peaks close to the 26 degrees and 32 degrees 2theta angles of HA, and close to the 8 degrees and 49 degrees 2theta angles for sodium citrate minerals. The FTIR result suggested that carboxyl groups, C=O and amino groups play crucial roles in HA formation on the surface of a gelatin network.

  6. Porous Carbon Supports: Recent Advances with Various Morphologies and Compositions

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhu, Huiyuan; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-31

    The importance of porous carbon as the support material is well recognized in the catalysis community, and it would be even more attractive if several characteristics are considered, such as the stability in acidic and basic media or the ease of noble metal recovery through complete burn off. Because it is still difficult to obtain constant properties even from batch to batch, activated carbons are not popular in industrial catalysis now.

  7. Erosion-resistant composite material

    DOEpatents

    Finch, C.B.; Tennery, V.J.; Curlee, R.M.

    A highly erosion-resistant composite material is formed of chemical vapor-deposited titanium diboride on a sintered titanium diboride-nickel substrate. This material may be suitable for use in cutting tools, coal liquefaction systems, etc.

  8. High-Density Protein Loading on Hierarchically Porous Layered Double Hydroxide Composites with a Rational Mesostructure.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Fukui, Megu; Tarutani, Naoki; Nishimura, Sari; Prevot, Vanessa; Forano, Claude; Poologasundarampillai, Gowsihan; Lee, Peter D; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-09-01

    Hierarchically porous biocompatible Mg-Al-Cl-type layered double hydroxide (LDH) composites containing aluminum hydroxide (Alhy) have been prepared using a phase-separation process. The sol-gel synthesis allows for the hierarchical pores of the LDH-Alhy composites to be tuned, leading to a high specific solid surface area per unit volume available for high-molecular-weight protein adsorptions. A linear relationship between the effective surface area, SEFF, and loading capacity of a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), is established following successful control of the structure of the LDH-Alhy composite. The threshold of the mean pore diameter, Dpm, above which BSA is effectively adsorbed on the surface of LDH-Alhy composites, is deduced as 20 nm. In particular, LDH-Alhy composite aerogels obtained via supercritical drying exhibit an extremely high capacity for protein loading (996 mg/g) as a result of a large mean mesopore diameter (>30 nm). The protein loading on LDH-Alhy is >14 times that of a reference LDH material (70 mg/g) prepared via a standard procedure. Importantly, BSA molecules pre-adsorbed on porous composites were successfully released on soaking in ionic solutions (HPO4(2-) and Cl(-) aqueous). The superior capability of the biocompatible LDH materials for loading, encapsulation, and releasing large quantities of proteins was clearly demonstrated. PMID:27501777

  9. High-Density Protein Loading on Hierarchically Porous Layered Double Hydroxide Composites with a Rational Mesostructure.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Fukui, Megu; Tarutani, Naoki; Nishimura, Sari; Prevot, Vanessa; Forano, Claude; Poologasundarampillai, Gowsihan; Lee, Peter D; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-09-01

    Hierarchically porous biocompatible Mg-Al-Cl-type layered double hydroxide (LDH) composites containing aluminum hydroxide (Alhy) have been prepared using a phase-separation process. The sol-gel synthesis allows for the hierarchical pores of the LDH-Alhy composites to be tuned, leading to a high specific solid surface area per unit volume available for high-molecular-weight protein adsorptions. A linear relationship between the effective surface area, SEFF, and loading capacity of a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), is established following successful control of the structure of the LDH-Alhy composite. The threshold of the mean pore diameter, Dpm, above which BSA is effectively adsorbed on the surface of LDH-Alhy composites, is deduced as 20 nm. In particular, LDH-Alhy composite aerogels obtained via supercritical drying exhibit an extremely high capacity for protein loading (996 mg/g) as a result of a large mean mesopore diameter (>30 nm). The protein loading on LDH-Alhy is >14 times that of a reference LDH material (70 mg/g) prepared via a standard procedure. Importantly, BSA molecules pre-adsorbed on porous composites were successfully released on soaking in ionic solutions (HPO4(2-) and Cl(-) aqueous). The superior capability of the biocompatible LDH materials for loading, encapsulation, and releasing large quantities of proteins was clearly demonstrated.

  10. Novel polymeric nanocomposites and porous materials prepared using organogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei-Chi; Tseng, Shen-Chen

    2009-11-01

    We propose a new method for preparing polymeric nanocomposites and porous materials using self-assembled templates formed by 1,3:2,4-dibenzylidene sorbitol (DBS) organogels. DBS is capable of self-assembling into a 3D nanofibrillar network at relatively low concentrations in some organic solvents to produce organogels. In this study, we induced the formation of such physical cross-linked networks in styrene. Subsequently, we polymerized the styrene in the presence of chemical cross-linkers, divinyl benzene (DVB), with different amounts of DBS using thermal-initiated polymerization. The resulting materials were transparent, homogeneous polystyrene (PS) nanocomposites with both physical and chemical cross-links. The porous polymeric materials were obtained by solvent extraction of the DBS nanofibrils from the PS. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements show that the amounts of DBS and DVB influenced the specific surface area after the removal of the DBS fibrils.

  11. Urothermal Synthesis of Crystalline Porous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Bu, Julia T.; Chen, Shumei; Wu, Tao; Zheng, Shoutian; Chen, Yigang; Nieto, Ruben A.; Feng, Pingyun

    2015-01-01

    Pores from Urea Urea derivatives are shown here to be a highly verstaile solvent system for the synthesis of crystalline solids. In particular, reversible binding of urea derivatives to framework metal sites has been utilized to create a variety of materials integrating both porosity and open-metal sites. PMID:20954225

  12. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The composite aircraft program component (CAPCOMP) is a graduate level project conducted in parallel with a composite structures program. The composite aircraft program glider (CAPGLIDE) is an undergraduate demonstration project which has as its objectives the design, fabrication, and testing of a foot launched ultralight glider using composite structures. The objective of the computer aided design (COMPAD) portion of the composites project is to provide computer tools for the analysis and design of composite structures. The major thrust of COMPAD is in the finite element area with effort directed at implementing finite element analysis capabilities and developing interactive graphics preprocessing and postprocessing capabilities. The criteria for selecting research projects to be conducted under the innovative and supporting research (INSURE) program are described.

  13. Porous silicon based anode material formed using metal reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Anguchamy, Yogesh Kumar; Masarapu, Charan; Deng, Haixia; Han, Yongbong; Venkatachalam, Subramanian; Kumar, Sujeet; Lopez, Herman A.

    2015-09-22

    A porous silicon based material comprising porous crystalline elemental silicon formed by reducing silicon dioxide with a reducing metal in a heating process followed by acid etching is used to construct negative electrode used in lithium ion batteries. Gradual temperature heating ramp(s) with optional temperature steps can be used to perform the heating process. The porous silicon formed has a high surface area from about 10 m.sup.2/g to about 200 m.sup.2/g and is substantially free of carbon. The negative electrode formed can have a discharge specific capacity of at least 1800 mAh/g at rate of C/3 discharged from 1.5V to 0.005V against lithium with in some embodiments loading levels ranging from about 1.4 mg/cm.sup.2 to about 3.5 mg/cm.sup.2. In some embodiments, the porous silicon can be coated with a carbon coating or blended with carbon nanofibers or other conductive carbon material.

  14. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    A decade long program to develop critical advanced composite technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concept and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life predictions is reviewed. Specific goals are discussed. The status of the chemical vapor deposition effects on carbon fiber properties; inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; and numerical analysis of composite micromechanical behavior are presented.

  15. Infiltrating sulfur into a highly porous carbon sphere as cathode material for lithium–sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Kim, Dul-Sun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A highly porous carbon (HPC) with regular spherical morphology was synthesized. • Sulfur/HPC composites were prepared by melt–diffusion method. • Sulfur/HPC composites showed improved cyclablity and long-term cycle life. - Abstract: Sulfur composite material with a highly porous carbon sphere as the conducting container was prepared. The highly porous carbon sphere was easily synthesized with resorcinol–formaldehyde precursor as the carbon source. The morphology of the carbon was observed with field emission scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, which showed a well-defined spherical shape. Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis indicated that it possesses a high specific surface area of 1563 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and a total pore volume of 2.66 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1} with a bimodal pore size distribution, which allow high sulfur loading and easy transportation of lithium ions. Sulfur carbon composites with varied sulfur contents were prepared by melt–diffusion method and lithium sulfur cells with the sulfur composites showed improved cyclablity and long-term cycle life.

  16. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO.sub.3, YCrO.sub.3 or LaMnO.sub.3 particles (32), on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate (30), (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure (34) between the doped particles (32), (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles (32) as a contact.

  17. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1992-04-21

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO[sub 3], YCrO[sub 3] or LaMnO[sub 3] particles, on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate, (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure between the doped particles, (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles as a contact. 7 figs.

  18. Composite materials: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Design, analysis and fabrication techniques for boron-aluminum composite-structure technology is presented and a new method of joining different laminated composites without mechanical fasteners is proposed. Also discussed is a low-cost procedure for rigidifying expanded honeycomb tubing and piping simulations. A brief note on patent information is added.

  19. Preparation of porous PLA/DBM composite biomaterials and experimental research of repair rabbit radius segmental bone defect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumin; Wang, Jianru; Wang, Jue; Niu, Xiaojun; Liu, Jianchun; Gao, Lan; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Chu, Kaibo

    2015-12-01

    Bone substitutes are used in wide range of orthopaedic application. An ideal bone substitute should exhibit superior osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties. Neither bio-derived materials nor synthetic materials can meet the needs of an ideal bone substitute. Preparation of composite materials is a promising way to improve properties of biomaterial. In this study, the porous poly lactic acid (PLA)/demineralized bone matrix (DBM) composite biomaterials prepared by supercritical CO2 technique were implanted to repair rabbit radius segmental bone defect. By comparing with PLA and bone autograft, the X-ray result and histological analysis showed the repair effect of PLA/DBM porous composite materials is significantly better than that of the PLA group and the blank control group, and is similar to autologous bone. The PLA/DBM can promote the healing of bone defects and can be used as a kind of ideal alternative materials to repair bone defects.

  20. Preparation of porous PLA/DBM composite biomaterials and experimental research of repair rabbit radius segmental bone defect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumin; Wang, Jianru; Wang, Jue; Niu, Xiaojun; Liu, Jianchun; Gao, Lan; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Chu, Kaibo

    2015-12-01

    Bone substitutes are used in wide range of orthopaedic application. An ideal bone substitute should exhibit superior osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties. Neither bio-derived materials nor synthetic materials can meet the needs of an ideal bone substitute. Preparation of composite materials is a promising way to improve properties of biomaterial. In this study, the porous poly lactic acid (PLA)/demineralized bone matrix (DBM) composite biomaterials prepared by supercritical CO2 technique were implanted to repair rabbit radius segmental bone defect. By comparing with PLA and bone autograft, the X-ray result and histological analysis showed the repair effect of PLA/DBM porous composite materials is significantly better than that of the PLA group and the blank control group, and is similar to autologous bone. The PLA/DBM can promote the healing of bone defects and can be used as a kind of ideal alternative materials to repair bone defects. PMID:25904497

  1. Combustion Synthesis of Advanced Porous Materials in Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, X.; Moore, J. J.; Schowengerdt, F. D.; Johnson, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    Combustion synthesis, otherwise known as self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS), can be used to produce engineered advanced porous material implants which offer the possibility for bone ingrowth as well as a permanent structure framework for the long-term replacement of bone defects. The primary advantage of SHS is based on its rapid kinetics and favorable energetics. The structure and properties of materials produced by SHS are strongly dependent on the combustion reaction conditions. Combustion reaction conditions such as reaction stoichiometry, particle size, green density, the presence and use of diluents or inert reactants, and pre-heating of the reactants, will affect the exothermicity of the reaction. A number of conditions must be satisfied in order to obtain high porosity materials: an optimal amount of liquid, gas and solid phases must be present in the combustion front. Therefore, a balance among these phases at the combustion front must be created by the SHS reaction to successfully engineer a bone replacement material system. Microgravity testing has extended the ability to form porous products. The convective heat transfer mechanisms which operate in normal gravity, 1 g, constrain the combustion synthesis reactions. Gravity also acts to limit the porosity which may be formed as the force of gravity serves to restrict the gas expansion and the liquid movement during reaction. Infiltration of the porous product with other phases can modify both the extent of porosity and the mechanical properties.

  2. Preparation and application of highly porous aerogel-based bioactive materials in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttor, Andrea; Szalóki, Melinda; Rente, Tünde; Kerényi, Farkas; Bakó, József; Fábián, István; Lázár, István; Jenei, Attila; Hegedüs, Csaba

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the possibility of preparation and application of highly porous silica aerogel-based bioactive materials are presented. The aerogel was combined with hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate as bioactive and osteoinductive agents. The porosity of aerogels was in the mesoporous region with a maximum pore diameter of 7.4 and 12.7 nm for the composite materials. The newly developed bioactive materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The in vitro biological effect of these modified surfaces was also tested on SAOS-2 osteogenic sarcoma cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  3. Characterisation of porous materials for bioseparation.

    PubMed

    Barrande, M; Beurroies, I; Denoyel, R; Tatárová, I; Gramblicka, M; Polakovic, M; Joehnck, M; Schulte, M

    2009-10-01

    A set of chromatographic materials for bioseparation were characterised by various methods. Both commercial materials and new supports presenting various levels of rigidity were analysed. The methods included size-exclusion and capillary phenomena based techniques. Both batch exclusion and inverse size-exclusion chromatography were used. Gas adsorption, mercury porosimetry and thermoporometry were applied as well as a new method based on water desorption starting from the saturated state. When the rigidity of adsorbents is high enough, the agreement is reasonable between the values of the structural parameters that were determined (surface area, porosity, and pore size) by various methods. Nevertheless, a part of macroporosity may not be evidenced by inverse size-exclusion chromatography whereas it is visible by batch exclusion and the other methods. When the rigidity decreases, for example with soft swelling gels, where standard nitrogen adsorption or mercury porosimetry are no more reliable, two main situations are encountered: either the methods based on capillary phenomena (thermoporometry or water desorption) overestimate the pore size with an amplitude that depends on the method, or in some cases it is possible to distinguish water involved in the swelling of pore walls from that involved in pore filling by capillary condensation. PMID:19740472

  4. Characterisation of porous materials for bioseparation.

    PubMed

    Barrande, M; Beurroies, I; Denoyel, R; Tatárová, I; Gramblicka, M; Polakovic, M; Joehnck, M; Schulte, M

    2009-10-01

    A set of chromatographic materials for bioseparation were characterised by various methods. Both commercial materials and new supports presenting various levels of rigidity were analysed. The methods included size-exclusion and capillary phenomena based techniques. Both batch exclusion and inverse size-exclusion chromatography were used. Gas adsorption, mercury porosimetry and thermoporometry were applied as well as a new method based on water desorption starting from the saturated state. When the rigidity of adsorbents is high enough, the agreement is reasonable between the values of the structural parameters that were determined (surface area, porosity, and pore size) by various methods. Nevertheless, a part of macroporosity may not be evidenced by inverse size-exclusion chromatography whereas it is visible by batch exclusion and the other methods. When the rigidity decreases, for example with soft swelling gels, where standard nitrogen adsorption or mercury porosimetry are no more reliable, two main situations are encountered: either the methods based on capillary phenomena (thermoporometry or water desorption) overestimate the pore size with an amplitude that depends on the method, or in some cases it is possible to distinguish water involved in the swelling of pore walls from that involved in pore filling by capillary condensation.

  5. One-step-process composite colloidal monolayers and further processing aiming at porous membranes.

    PubMed

    Espinha, André; Ibisate, Marta; Galisteo-López, Juan; Blanco, Álvaro; López, Cefe

    2012-09-18

    Composite materials consisting of a monolayer of polystyrene spheres (diameters of 430 and 520 nm) and porous silica, filling in the interstices, have been fabricated and characterized. The proposed growth method introduces some novelties as far as the fabrication of this kind of monolayers is concerned, as it probes the compatibility of coassembly (in which a silica precursor, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), is added to the base colloid) with confined growth in a wedge-shaped cell, while profiting from the advantages of both techniques. Using this method, it is possible to fabricate the composite monolayer in a single growth step. A systematic study of the influence of TEOS concentration in the initial colloid was performed in order to improve the quality of the two-dimensional crystals produced. Thus, it was demonstrated that the two methods are compatible. Furthermore, the composites were then subjected to thermal treatment so that the polymer is removed to reveal the inverse structure. After the calcination the membranes still present very good quality and so the proposed approach is effective for the fabrication of porous membranes. A comparison of reflectance spectra, between composite monolayers fabricated using this method and composites achieved by infiltrating polystyrene bare opals with silica chemical vapor deposition, is also established. The procedure presented is expected to establish the route for an easier and quicker fabrication of inverse monolayers of high refractive index materials with applications in light control. PMID:22866898

  6. Drying of porous materials in a medium with variable potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.Y. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper presents an application of the Luikov system of heat and mass transfer equations in dimensionless form to predict the temperature and moisture distributions in a slab of capillary-porous material during drying. The heat and mass potentials of the external medium in the boundary conditions are assumed to vary linearly with time. The method of solution is illustrated by considering the drying of a slab of lumber. Numerical results based on the estimated thermophysical properties of spruce are presented.

  7. Method for preparation of thermally and mechanically stable metal/porous substrate composite membranes

    DOEpatents

    Damle, Ashok S.

    2004-07-13

    A method is provided for the preparation of metal/porous substrate composite membranes by flowing a solution of metal to be plated over a first surface of a porous substrate and concurrently applying a pressure of gas on a second surface of the porous substrate, such that the porous substrate separates the solution of metal from the gas, and the use of the resulting membrane for the production of highly purified hydrogen gas.

  8. Composite structural materials. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of filamentary composite materials in the design and construction of primary aircraft structures is considered with emphasis on efforts to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, and reliability and life prediction. The redesign of a main spar/rib region on the Boeing 727 elevator near its actuator attachment point is discussed. A composite fabrication and test facility is described as well as the use of minicomputers for computer aided design. Other topics covered include (1) advanced structural analysis methids for composites; (2) ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite structures; (3) optimum combination of hardeners in the cure of epoxy; (4) fatigue in composite materials; (5) resin matrix characterization and properties; (6) postbuckling analysis of curved laminate composite panels; and (7) acoustic emission testing of composite tensile specimens.

  9. Facile Synthesis of Porous Nickel/Carbon Composite Microspheres with Enhanced Electromagnetic Wave Absorption by Magnetic and Dielectric Losses.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Song; Lyu, Hailong; Liu, Jiurong; Liu, Yuzhen; Wu, Nannan; Liu, Wei

    2016-08-10

    Porous nickel/carbon (Ni/C) composite microspheres with diameters of ca. 1.2-1.5 μm were fabricated by a solvothermal method combined with carbon reduction. The pore size of the synthesized Ni/C composite microspheres ranged from several nanometers to 50 nm. The porous Ni/C composite microspheres exhibited a saturation magnetization (MS) of 53.5 emu g(-1) and a coercivity (HC) of 51.4 Oe. When tested as an electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption material, the epoxy resin composites containing 60% and 75% porous Ni/C microspheres provided high-performance EM wave absorption at thicknesses of 3.0-11.0 and 1.6-7.0 mm in the corresponding frequency ranges of 2.0-12 and 2.0-18 GHz, respectively. The superior EM wave absorption performances of porous Ni/C composite microspheres were derived from the synergy effects generated by the magnetic loss of nickel, the dielectric loss of carbon, and the porous structure. PMID:27441382

  10. Facile Synthesis of Porous Nickel/Carbon Composite Microspheres with Enhanced Electromagnetic Wave Absorption by Magnetic and Dielectric Losses.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Song; Lyu, Hailong; Liu, Jiurong; Liu, Yuzhen; Wu, Nannan; Liu, Wei

    2016-08-10

    Porous nickel/carbon (Ni/C) composite microspheres with diameters of ca. 1.2-1.5 μm were fabricated by a solvothermal method combined with carbon reduction. The pore size of the synthesized Ni/C composite microspheres ranged from several nanometers to 50 nm. The porous Ni/C composite microspheres exhibited a saturation magnetization (MS) of 53.5 emu g(-1) and a coercivity (HC) of 51.4 Oe. When tested as an electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption material, the epoxy resin composites containing 60% and 75% porous Ni/C microspheres provided high-performance EM wave absorption at thicknesses of 3.0-11.0 and 1.6-7.0 mm in the corresponding frequency ranges of 2.0-12 and 2.0-18 GHz, respectively. The superior EM wave absorption performances of porous Ni/C composite microspheres were derived from the synergy effects generated by the magnetic loss of nickel, the dielectric loss of carbon, and the porous structure.

  11. In situ formation of porous space maintainers in a composite tissue defect.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Patrick P; Kretlow, James D; Henslee, Allan M; Shi, Meng; Young, Simon; Demian, Nagi; Jansen, John A; Wong, Mark E; Mikos, Antonios G; Kasper, F Kurtis

    2012-04-01

    Reconstruction of composite defects involving bone and soft tissue presents a significant clinical challenge. In the craniofacial complex, reconstruction of the soft and hard tissues is critical for both functional and aesthetic outcomes. Constructs for space maintenance provide a template for soft tissue regeneration, priming the wound bed for a definitive repair of the bone tissue with greater success. However, materials used clinically for space maintenance are subject to poor soft tissue integration, which can result in wound dehiscence. Porous materials in space maintenance applications have been previously shown to support soft tissue integration and to allow for drug release from the implant to further prepare the wound bed for definitive repair. This study evaluated solid and low porosity (16.9% ± 4.1%) polymethylmethacrylate space maintainers fabricated intraoperatively and implanted in a composite rabbit mandibular defect model for 12 weeks. The data analyses showed no difference in the solid and porous groups both histologically, evaluating the inflammatory response at the interface and within the pores of the implants, and grossly, observing the healing of the soft tissue defect over the implant. These results demonstrate the potential of porous polymethylmethacrylate implants formed in situ for space maintenance in the craniofacial complex, which may have implications in the potential delivery of therapeutic drugs to prime the wound site for a definitive bone repair.

  12. In situ formation of porous space maintainers in a composite tissue defect.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Patrick P; Kretlow, James D; Henslee, Allan M; Shi, Meng; Young, Simon; Demian, Nagi; Jansen, John A; Wong, Mark E; Mikos, Antonios G; Kasper, F Kurtis

    2012-04-01

    Reconstruction of composite defects involving bone and soft tissue presents a significant clinical challenge. In the craniofacial complex, reconstruction of the soft and hard tissues is critical for both functional and aesthetic outcomes. Constructs for space maintenance provide a template for soft tissue regeneration, priming the wound bed for a definitive repair of the bone tissue with greater success. However, materials used clinically for space maintenance are subject to poor soft tissue integration, which can result in wound dehiscence. Porous materials in space maintenance applications have been previously shown to support soft tissue integration and to allow for drug release from the implant to further prepare the wound bed for definitive repair. This study evaluated solid and low porosity (16.9% ± 4.1%) polymethylmethacrylate space maintainers fabricated intraoperatively and implanted in a composite rabbit mandibular defect model for 12 weeks. The data analyses showed no difference in the solid and porous groups both histologically, evaluating the inflammatory response at the interface and within the pores of the implants, and grossly, observing the healing of the soft tissue defect over the implant. These results demonstrate the potential of porous polymethylmethacrylate implants formed in situ for space maintenance in the craniofacial complex, which may have implications in the potential delivery of therapeutic drugs to prime the wound site for a definitive bone repair. PMID:22241726

  13. Vibrational damping of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    The purpose of this research was to develop new methods of vibrational damping in polymeric composite materials along with expanding the knowledge of currently used vibrational damping methods. A new barrier layer technique that dramatically increased damping in viscoelastic damping materials that interacted with the composite resin was created. A method for testing the shear strength of damping materials cocured in composites was developed. Directional damping materials, where the loss factor and modulus could be tailored by changing the angle, were produced and investigated. The addition of particles between composite prepreg layers to increase damping was studied. Electroviscoelastic materials that drastically changed properties such as loss factor and modulus with an applied voltage were manufactured and tested.

  14. Reversibly assembled cellular composite materials.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2013-09-13

    We introduce composite materials made by reversibly assembling a three-dimensional lattice of mass-produced carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite parts with integrated mechanical interlocking connections. The resulting cellular composite materials can respond as an elastic solid with an extremely large measured modulus for an ultralight material (12.3 megapascals at a density of 7.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter). These materials offer a hierarchical decomposition in modeling, with bulk properties that can be predicted from component measurements and deformation modes that can be determined by the placement of part types. Because site locations are locally constrained, structures can be produced in a relative assembly process that merges desirable features of fiber composites, cellular materials, and additive manufacturing.

  15. An electrochemical-sensor system for real-time flow measurements in porous materials.

    PubMed

    Bathany, Cédric; Han, Ja-Ryoung; Abi-Samra, Kameel; Takayama, Shuichi; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2015-08-15

    Flow monitoring in porous materials is critical for the engineering of paper-based microfluidic bioassays. Here, we present an electrochemical-sensor system that monitors the liquid flow in porous materials without affecting the real flow in paper-strip samples. The developed microfluidic sensor records an amperometric signal created by the solution movement mediated by paper wicking. This approach allows the in situ monitoring of the different hydrodynamic conditions of a specific paper geometry or composition. In addition, the method proposed in this work was employed to characterise the fluid flow of different nitrocellulose paper strips after oxygen-plasma treatment or dextran coating. The dextran fluid-flow modifiers were further used on the paper strip-based assays as means of signal enhancement. The proposed electrochemical-sensing method offers a valuable alternative to existing optical-based monitoring techniques for flow measurement in paper-based microfluidic systems.

  16. Piezoelectric composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiraly, L. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A laminated structural devices has the ability to change shape, position and resonant frequency without using discrete motive components. The laminate may be a combination of layers of a piezoelectrically active, nonconductive matrix material. A power source selectively places various levels of charge in electrically conductive filaments imbedded in the respective layers to produce various configurations in a predetermined manner. The layers may be electrically conductive having imbedded piezoelectrically active filaments. A combination of layers of electrically conductive material may be laminated to layers of piezoelectrically active material.

  17. Potential of hybrid functionalized meso-porous materials for the separation and immobilization of radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Luca, V.

    2013-07-01

    Functionalized meso-porous materials are a class of hybrid organic-inorganic material in which a meso-porous metal oxide framework is functionalized with multifunctional organic molecules. These molecules may contain one or more anchor groups that form strong bonds to the pore surfaces of the metal oxide framework and free functional groups that can impart and or modify the functionality of the material such as for binding metal ions in solution. Such materials have been extensively studied over the past decade and are of particular interest in absorption applications because of the tremendous versatility in choosing the composition and architecture of the metal oxide framework and the nature of the functional organic molecule as well as the efficient mass transfer that can occur through a well-designed hierarchically porous network. A sorbent for nuclear applications would have to be highly selective for particular radio nuclides, it would need to be hydrolytically and radiolytically stable, and it would have to possess reasonable capacity and fast kinetics. The sorbent would also have to be available in a form suitable for use in a column. Finally, it would also be desirable if once saturated with radio nuclides, the sorbent could be recycled or converted directly into a ceramic or glass waste form suitable for direct repository disposal or even converted directly into a material that could be used as a transmutation target. Such a cradle-to- grave strategy could have many benefits in so far as process efficiency and the generation of secondary wastes are concerned.This paper will provide an overview of work done on all of the above mentioned aspects of the development of functionalized meso-porous adsorbent materials for the selective separation of lanthanides and actinides and discuss the prospects for future implementation of a cradle-to-grave strategy with such materials. (author)

  18. Simplified modeling of transition to detonation in porous energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Asay, Blaine W.; Prasad, Kuldeep

    1994-07-01

    A simplified model that can predict the transitions from compaction to detonation and shock to detonation is given with the aim of describing experiments in beds of porous HMX. In the case of compaction to detonation, the energy of early impact generates a slowly moving, convective-reactive deflagration that expands near the piston face and evolves in a manner that is characteristic of confined deflagration to detonation transition. A single-phase state variable theory is adopted in contrast to a two-phase axiomatic mixture theory. The ability of the porous material to compact is treated as an endothermic process. Reaction is treated as an exothermic process. The algebraic (Rankine-Hugoniot) steady wave analysis is given for inert compaction waves and steady detonation waves in a piston supported configuration, typical of the experiments carried out in porous HMX. A structure analysis of the steady compaction wave is given. Numerical simulations of deflagration to detonation are carried out for parameters that describe an HMX-like material and compared with the experiments. The simple model predicts the high density plug that is observed in the experiments and suggests that the leading front of the plug is a secondary compaction wave. A shock to detonation transition is also numerically simulated.

  19. Simplified modeling of transition to detonation in porous energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.S. ); Asay, B.W. ); Prasad, K. )

    1994-07-01

    A simplified model that can predict the transitions from compaction to detonation and shock to detonation is given with the aim of describing experiments in beds of porous HMX. In the case of compaction to detonation, the energy of early impact generates a slowly moving, convective-reactive deflagration that expands near the piston face and evolves in a manner that is characteristic of confined deflagration to detonation transition. A single-phase state variable theory is adopted in contrast to a two-phase axiomatic mixture theory. The ability of the porous material to compact is treated as an endothermic process. Reaction is treated as an exothermic process. The algebraic (Rankine--Hugoniot) steady wave analysis is given for inert compaction waves and steady detonation waves in a piston supported configuration, typical of the experiments carried out in porous HMX. A structure analysis of the steady compaction wave is given. Numerical simulations of deflagration to detonation are carried out for parameters that describe an HMX-like material and compared with the experiments. The simple model predicts the high density plug that is observed in the experiments and suggests that the leading front of the plug is a secondary compaction wave. A shock to detonation transition is also numerically simulated.

  20. Acoustics of porous materials with partially opened porosity.

    PubMed

    Leclaire, P; Dupont, T; Panneton, R

    2013-12-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the acoustic properties of porous materials containing dead-end (or partially opened) porosity was recently proposed by Dupont, Leclaire, Sicot, Gong, and Panneton [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 094903 (2011)]. The present article provides a description of partially opened porosity systems and their numerous potential applications in the general context of the study of porous materials, the classical models describing them, and the characterization techniques. It is shown that the dead-end pore effect can be treated independently and that the description of this effect can be associated with any acoustic model of porous media. Different theoretical developments describing the dead-end porosity effect are proposed. In particular, a model involving the average effective length of the dead-end pores is presented. It is also shown that if the dead-end effect can be treated separately, the transfer matrix method is particularly well suited for the description of single or multilayer systems with dead-end porosity.

  1. Fundamental problems in porous materials: Experiments & computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhanping

    Porous materials have attracted massive scientific and technological interest because of their extremely high surface-to-volume ratio, molecular tunability in construction, and surface-based applications. Through my PhD work, porous materials were engineered to meet the design in selective binding, self-healing, and energy damping. For example, crystalline MOFs with pore size spanning from a few angstroms to a couple of nanometers were chemically engineered to show 120 times more efficiency in binding of large molecules. In addition, we found building blocks released from those crystals can be further patched back through a healing process at ambient and low temperatures down to -56 °C. When building blocks are replaced with graphenes, ultra-flyweight aerogels with pore size larger than 100 nm were made to delay shock waves. More stable rigid porous metal with larger pores (~um) was also fabricated, and its performance and survivability are under investigation. Aside from experimental studies, we also successfully applied numerical simulations to study the mutual interaction between the nonplanar liquid-solid interface and colloidal particles during the freezing of the colloidal suspensions. Colloidal particles can be either rejected or engulfed by the evolving interface depending on the freezing speed and strength of interface-particle interaction. Our interactive simulation was achieved by programming both simulation module and visualization module on high performance GPU devices.

  2. Propagation of Terahertz Radiation in Porous Polymer and Ceramic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, Caroline; Spicer, James; Fitch, Michael; Schuster, Paul; Osiander, Robert

    2005-04-01

    In this work we investigate the propagation of terahertz radiation through polyurethane foam and porous alumina ceramics to understand the effects of structure on the optical properties of these materials at terahertz frequencies. A terahertz time domain system with a GaAs photoconductive emitter and a ZnTe electro-optic crystal was used to generate and detect the transmitted terahertz signal. Using the amplitude and phase characteristics of these signals, the thickness, index of refraction, and other physical and optical properties of the materials were determined.

  3. Method of preparing thin porous sheets of ceramic material

    DOEpatents

    Swarr, Thomas E.; Nickols, Richard C.; Krasij, Myron

    1987-03-24

    A method of forming thin porous sheets of ceramic material for use as electrodes or other components in a molten carbonate fuel cell is disclosed. The method involves spray drying a slurry of fine ceramic particles in liquid carrier to produce generally spherical agglomerates of high porosity and a rough surface texture. The ceramic particles may include the electrode catalyst and the agglomerates can be calcined to improve mechanical strength. After slurrying with suitable volatile material and binder tape casting is used to form sheets that are sufficiently strong for further processing and handling in the assembly of a high temperature fuel cell.

  4. Method of preparing thin porous sheets of ceramic material

    DOEpatents

    Swarr, T.E.; Nickols, R.C.; Krasij, M.

    1984-05-23

    A method of forming thin porous sheets of ceramic material for use as electrodes or other components in a molten carbonate fuel cell is disclosed. The method involves spray drying a slurry of fine ceramic particles in liquid carrier to produce generally spherical agglomerates of high porosity and a rough surface texture. The ceramic particles may include the electrode catalyst and the agglomerates can be calcined to improve mechanical strength. After slurrying with suitable volatile material and binder tape casting is used to form sheets that are sufficiently strong for further processing and handling in the assembly of a high temperature fuel cell.

  5. Transport of bare and capped zinc oxide nanoparticles is dependent on porous medium composition.

    PubMed

    Kurlanda-Witek, H; Ngwenya, B T; Butler, I B

    2014-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are one of the most frequently used nanoparticles in industry and hence are likely to be introduced to the groundwater environment. The mobility of these nanoparticles in different aquifer materials has not been assessed. While some studies have been published on the transport of ZnO nanoparticles in individual porous media, these studies do not generally account for varying porous medium composition both within and between aquifers. As a first step towards understanding the impact of this variability, this paper compares the transport of bare ZnO nanoparticles (bZnO-NPs) and capped ZnO nanoparticles, coated with tri-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (cZnO-NPs), in saturated columns packed with glass beads, fine grained sand and fine grained calcite, at near-neutral pH and groundwater salinity levels. With the exception of cZnO-NPs in sand columns, ZnO nanoparticles are highly immobile in all three types of studied porous media, with most retention taking place near the column inlet. Results are in general agreement with DLVO theory, and the deviation in experiments with cZnO-NPs flowing through columns packed with sand is linked to variability in zeta potential of the capped nanoparticles and sand grains. Therefore, differences in surface charge of nanoparticles and porous media are demonstrated to be key drivers in nanoparticle transport.

  6. Transport of bare and capped zinc oxide nanoparticles is dependent on porous medium composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurlanda-Witek, H.; Ngwenya, B. T.; Butler, I. B.

    2014-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are one of the most frequently used nanoparticles in industry and hence are likely to be introduced to the groundwater environment. The mobility of these nanoparticles in different aquifer materials has not been assessed. While some studies have been published on the transport of ZnO nanoparticles in individual porous media, these studies do not generally account for varying porous medium composition both within and between aquifers. As a first step towards understanding the impact of this variability, this paper compares the transport of bare ZnO nanoparticles (bZnO-NPs) and capped ZnO nanoparticles, coated with tri-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (cZnO-NPs), in saturated columns packed with glass beads, fine grained sand and fine grained calcite, at near-neutral pH and groundwater salinity levels. With the exception of cZnO-NPs in sand columns, ZnO nanoparticles are highly immobile in all three types of studied porous media, with most retention taking place near the column inlet. Results are in general agreement with DLVO theory, and the deviation in experiments with cZnO-NPs flowing through columns packed with sand is linked to variability in zeta potential of the capped nanoparticles and sand grains. Therefore, differences in surface charge of nanoparticles and porous media are demonstrated to be key drivers in nanoparticle transport.

  7. Ceramic porous material and method of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Kim, Anthony Y.; Virden, Jud W.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a mesoporous ceramic membrane having substantially uniform pore size. Additionally, the invention includes aqueous and non-aqueous processing routes to making the mesoporous ceramic membranes. According to one aspect of the present invention, inserting a substrate into a reaction chamber at pressure results in reaction products collecting on the substrate and forming a membrane thereon. According to another aspect of the present invention, a second aqueous solution that is sufficiently immiscible in the aqueous solution provides an interface between the two solutions whereon the mesoporous membrane is formed. According to a further aspect of the present invention, a porous substrate is placed at the interface between the two solutions permitting formation of a membrane on the surface or within the pores of the porous substrate. According to yet another aspect of the present invention, mesoporous ceramic materials are formed using a non-aqueous solvent and water-sensitive precursors.

  8. Ceramic porous material and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Liu, J.; Kim, A.Y.; Virden, J.W.

    1997-07-08

    The invention is a mesoporous ceramic membrane having substantially uniform pore size. Additionally, the invention includes aqueous and non-aqueous processing routes to making the mesoporous ceramic membranes. According to one aspect of the present invention, inserting a substrate into a reaction chamber at pressure results in reaction products collecting on the substrate and forming a membrane thereon. According to another aspect of the present invention, a second aqueous solution that is sufficiently immiscible in the aqueous solution provides an interface between the two solutions whereon the mesoporous membrane is formed. According to a further aspect of the present invention, a porous substrate is placed at the interface between the two solutions permitting formation of a membrane on the surface or within the pores of the porous substrate. According to yet another aspect of the present invention, mesoporous ceramic materials are formed using a non-aqueous solvent and water-sensitive precursors. 21 figs.

  9. Supported metal nanoparticles on porous materials. Methods and applications.

    PubMed

    White, Robin J; Luque, Rafael; Budarin, Vitaliy L; Clark, James H; Macquarrie, Duncan J

    2009-02-01

    Nanoparticles are regarded as a major step forward to achieving the miniaturisation and nanoscaling effects and properties that have been utilised by nature for millions of years. The chemist is no longer observing and describing the behaviour of matter but is now able to manipulate and produce new types of materials with specific desired physicochemical characteristics. Such materials are receiving extensive attention across a broad range of research disciplines. The fusion between nanoparticle and nanoporous materials technology represents one of the most interesting of these rapidly expanding areas. The harnessing of nanoscale activity and selectivity, potentially provides extremely efficient catalytic materials for the production of commodity chemicals, and energy needed for a future sustainable society. In this tutorial review, we present an introduction to the field of supported metal nanoparticles (SMNPs) on porous materials, focusing on their preparation and applications in different areas. PMID:19169462

  10. Porous materials for thermal management under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Clyne, T W; Golosnoy, I O; Tan, J C; Markaki, A E

    2006-01-15

    A brief analysis is presented of how heat transfer takes place in porous materials of various types. The emphasis is on materials able to withstand extremes of temperature, gas pressure, irradiation, etc. i.e. metals and ceramics, rather than polymers. A primary aim is commonly to maximize either the thermal resistance (i.e. provide insulation) or the rate of thermal equilibration between the material and a fluid passing through it (i.e. to facilitate heat exchange). The main structural characteristics concern porosity (void content), anisotropy, pore connectivity and scale. The effect of scale is complex, since the permeability decreases as the structure is refined, but the interfacial area for fluid-solid heat exchange is, thereby, raised. The durability of the pore structure may also be an issue, with a possible disadvantage of finer scale structures being poor microstructural stability under service conditions. Finally, good mechanical properties may be required, since the development of thermal gradients, high fluid fluxes, etc. can generate substantial levels of stress. There are, thus, some complex interplays between service conditions, pore architecture/scale, fluid permeation characteristics, convective heat flow, thermal conduction and radiative heat transfer. Such interplays are illustrated with reference to three examples: (i) a thermal barrier coating in a gas turbine engine; (ii) a Space Shuttle tile; and (iii) a Stirling engine heat exchanger. Highly porous, permeable materials are often made by bonding fibres together into a network structure and much of the analysis presented here is oriented towards such materials. PMID:18272456

  11. Porous materials for thermal management under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Clyne, T W; Golosnoy, I O; Tan, J C; Markaki, A E

    2006-01-15

    A brief analysis is presented of how heat transfer takes place in porous materials of various types. The emphasis is on materials able to withstand extremes of temperature, gas pressure, irradiation, etc. i.e. metals and ceramics, rather than polymers. A primary aim is commonly to maximize either the thermal resistance (i.e. provide insulation) or the rate of thermal equilibration between the material and a fluid passing through it (i.e. to facilitate heat exchange). The main structural characteristics concern porosity (void content), anisotropy, pore connectivity and scale. The effect of scale is complex, since the permeability decreases as the structure is refined, but the interfacial area for fluid-solid heat exchange is, thereby, raised. The durability of the pore structure may also be an issue, with a possible disadvantage of finer scale structures being poor microstructural stability under service conditions. Finally, good mechanical properties may be required, since the development of thermal gradients, high fluid fluxes, etc. can generate substantial levels of stress. There are, thus, some complex interplays between service conditions, pore architecture/scale, fluid permeation characteristics, convective heat flow, thermal conduction and radiative heat transfer. Such interplays are illustrated with reference to three examples: (i) a thermal barrier coating in a gas turbine engine; (ii) a Space Shuttle tile; and (iii) a Stirling engine heat exchanger. Highly porous, permeable materials are often made by bonding fibres together into a network structure and much of the analysis presented here is oriented towards such materials.

  12. Composite structural materials. [aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of composite materials for aircraft applications is addressed with specific consideration of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life prediction. The design and flight testing of composite ultralight gliders is documented. Advances in computer aided design and methods for nondestructive testing are also discussed.

  13. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  14. Avalanches in compressed porous SiO(2)-based materials.

    PubMed

    Nataf, Guillaume F; Castillo-Villa, Pedro O; Baró, Jordi; Illa, Xavier; Vives, Eduard; Planes, Antoni; Salje, Ekhard K H

    2014-08-01

    The failure dynamics in SiO(2)-based porous materials under compression, namely the synthetic glass Gelsil and three natural sandstones, has been studied for slowly increasing compressive uniaxial stress with rates between 0.2 and 2.8 kPa/s. The measured collapsed dynamics is similar to Vycor, which is another synthetic porous SiO(2) glass similar to Gelsil but with a different porous mesostructure. Compression occurs by jerks of strain release and a major collapse at the failure point. The acoustic emission and shrinking of the samples during jerks are measured and analyzed. The energy of acoustic emission events, its duration, and waiting times between events show that the failure process follows avalanche criticality with power law statistics over ca. 4 decades with a power law exponent ɛ≃ 1.4 for the energy distribution. This exponent is consistent with the mean-field value for the collapse of granular media. Besides the absence of length, energy, and time scales, we demonstrate the existence of aftershock correlations during the failure process.

  15. Characterizing He 2 flow through porous materials using counterflow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansciver, Steven W.; Maddocks, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed space applications, such as the cooling of infrared and x ray telescopes, have generated substantial interest in the behavior of He(2) flowing in porous materials. For design purposes, classical porous media correlations and room temperature data are often used to obtain order of magnitude estimates of expected pressure drops, while the attendant temperature differences are either ignored or estimated using smooth tube correlations. A more accurate alternative to this procedure is suggested by an empirical extension of the two fluid models. It is shown that four empirical parameters are necessary to describe the pressure and temperature differences induced by He(2) flow through a porous sample. The three parameters required to determine pressure differences are measured in counterflow and found to compare favorably with those for isothermal flow. The fourth parameter, the Gorter-Mellink constant, differs substantially from smooth tube values. It is concluded that parameter values determined from counterflow can be used to predict pressure and temperature differences in a variety of flows to an accuracy of about + or - 20 percent.

  16. Characterizing He II flow through porous materials using counterflow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, J. R., Jr.; Vansciver, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed space applications, such as the cooling of infrared and x ray telescopes, have generated substantial interest in the behavior of He II flowing in porous materials. For design purposes, classical porous media correlations and room temperature data are often used to obtain order of magnitude estimates of expected pressure drops, while the attendant temperature differences are either ignored or estimated using smooth tube correlations. A more accurate alternative to this procedure is suggested by an empirical extension of the two fluid model. It is shown that four empirical parameters are necessary to describe the pressure and temperature differences induced by He II flow through a porous sample. The three parameters required to determine pressure differences are measured in counterflow and found to compare favorably with those for isothermal flow. The fourth parameter, the Gorter-Mellink constant, differs substantially from smooth tube values. It is concluded that parameter values determined from counterflow can be used to predict pressure and temperature differences in a variety of flows to an accuracy of about + or - 20 pct.

  17. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  18. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Burrows, Richard W.; Shinton, Yvonne D.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention discloses composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These phase change materials do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions, such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  19. Electrochemical differential photoacoustic cell to study in situ the growing process of porous materials.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Adriana; Giraldo, Jairo; Velázquez-Hernández, Rubén; Mendoza-López, Maria Luisa; Espinosa-Arbeláez, Diego G; del Real, Alicia; Rodríguez-García, Mario E

    2010-01-01

    In order to study in situ the growing process of porous materials, a new electrochemical differential photoacoustic cell (DPC) was developed. This system allows to obtain the thermal signals coming from the growing process of the pores without the external noise component. The DPC is a good system to growth porous silicon and study their growing process with reproducibility. The porous silicon samples were obtained by using electrochemical etching of (100) n-type silicon wafers with different nominal resistivity values in the range of 1-25 Omega cm. The samples were formed in a solution of hydrofluoric acid and ethanol having a composition ratio of 1:1 in volume with etching voltage of 10 V and an etching time of 2 min using back illumination provided by a laser beam with a wavelength of 808 nm. The porous samples were characterized by means of Raman microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The crystallite sizes of the samples were obtained through the analysis of the micro-Raman spectra using a phonon confinement model, and the analysis of the x-ray diffractograms.

  20. Synergistic Carbon Dioxide Capture and Conversion in Porous Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yugen; Lim, Diane S W

    2015-08-24

    Global climate change and excessive CO2 emissions have caused widespread public concern in recent years. Tremendous efforts have been made towards CO2 capture and conversion. This has led to the development of numerous porous materials as CO2 capture sorbents. Concurrently, the conversion of CO2 into value-added products by chemical methods has also been well-documented recently. However, realizing the attractive prospect of direct, in situ chemical conversion of captured CO2 into other chemicals remains a challenge.

  1. Acoustic structure and propagation in highly porous, layered, fibrous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.; Tesar, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustic structure and propagation of sound in highly porous, layered, fine fiber materials is examined. Of particular interest is the utilization of the Kozeny number for determining the static flow resistance and the static structure factor based on flow permeability measurements. In this formulation the Kozeny number is a numerical constant independent of volume porosity at high porosities. The other essential parameters are then evaluated employing techniques developed earlier for open cell foams. The attenuation and progressive phase characteristics in bulk samples are measured and compared with predicted values. The agreements on the whole are very satisfactory.

  2. Composite material impregnation unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, S. P.; Marchello, J. M.; Johnston, N. J.

    1993-01-01

    This memorandum presents an introduction to the NASA multi-purpose prepregging unit which is now installed and fully operational at the Langley Research Center in the Polymeric Materials Branch. A description of the various impregnation methods that are available to the prepregger are presented. Machine operating details and protocol are provided for its various modes of operation. These include, where appropriate, the related equations for predicting the desired prepreg specifications. Also, as the prepregger is modular in its construction, each individual section is described and discussed. Safety concerns are an important factor and a chapter has been included that highlights the major safety features. Initial experiences and observations for fiber impregnation are described. These first observations have given great insight into the areas of future work that need to be addressed. Future memorandums will focus on these individual processes and their related problems.

  3. The usable capacity of porous materials for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichtenmayer, Maurice; Hirscher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    A large number of different porous materials has been investigated for their hydrogen uptake over a wide pressure range and at different temperature. From the absolute adsorption isotherms, the enthalpy of adsorption is evaluated for a wide range of surface coverage. The usable capacity, defined as the amount of hydrogen released between a maximum tank pressure and a minimum back pressure for a fuel cell, is analyzed for isothermal operation. The usable capacity as a function of temperature shows a maximum which defines the optimum operating temperature. This optimum operating temperature is higher for materials possessing a higher enthalpy of adsorption. However, the fraction of the hydrogen stored overall that can be released at the optimum operating temperature is higher for materials with a lower enthalpy of adsorption than for the ones with higher enthalpy.

  4. Basalt fiber reinforced porous aggregates-geopolymer based cellular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Xu, Jin-Yu; Li, Weimin

    2015-09-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced porous aggregates-geopolymer based cellular material (BFRPGCM) was prepared. The stress-strain curve has been worked out. The ideal energy-absorbing efficiency has been analyzed and the application prospect has been explored. The results show the following: fiber reinforced cellular material has successively sized pore structures; the stress-strain curve has two stages: elastic stage and yielding plateau stage; the greatest value of the ideal energy-absorbing efficiency of BFRPGCM is 89.11%, which suggests BFRPGCM has excellent energy-absorbing property. Thus, it can be seen that BFRPGCM is easy and simple to make, has high plasticity, low density and excellent energy-absorbing features. So, BFRPGCM is a promising energy-absorbing material used especially in civil defense engineering.

  5. Composite materials for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawal, Suraj P.; Misra, Mohan S.; Wendt, Robert G.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the program were to: generate mechanical, thermal, and physical property test data for as-fabricated advanced materials; design and fabricate an accelerated thermal cycling chamber; and determine the effect of thermal cycling on thermomechanical properties and dimensional stability of composites. In the current program, extensive mechanical and thermophysical property tests of various organic matrix, metal matrix, glass matrix, and carbon-carbon composites were conducted, and a reliable database was constructed for spacecraft material selection. Material property results for the majority of the as-fabricated composites were consistent with the predicted values, providing a measure of consolidation integrity attained during fabrication. To determine the effect of thermal cycling on mechanical properties, microcracking, and thermal expansion behavior, approximately 500 composite specimens were exposed to 10,000 cycles between -150 and +150 F. These specimens were placed in a large (18 cu ft work space) thermal cycling chamber that was specially designed and fabricated to simulate one year low earth orbital (LEO) thermal cycling in 20 days. With this rate of thermal cycling, this is the largest thermal cycling unit in the country. Material property measurements of the thermal cycled organic matrix composite laminate specimens exhibited less than 24 percent decrease in strength, whereas, the remaining materials exhibited less than 8 percent decrease in strength. The thermal expansion response of each of the thermal cycled specimens revealed significant reduction in hysteresis and residual strain, and the average CTE values were close to the predicted values.

  6. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.; Shinton, Y.D.

    1985-01-04

    A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  7. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, D. K.; Burrows, R. W.; Shinton, Y. D.

    1985-01-01

    A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations are discussed. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  8. Fiber composite materials technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Chiao, T.T.

    1980-10-23

    The FY1980 technical accomplishments from the Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the Fiber Composite Materials Technology Development Task fo the MEST project are summarized. The task is divided into three areas: Engineering data base for flywheel design (Washington University will report this part separately), new materials evaluation, and time-dependent behavior of Kevlar composite strands. An epoxy matrix was formulated which can be used in composites for 120/sup 0/C service with good processing and mechanical properties. Preliminary results on the time-dependent properties of the Kevlar 49/epoxy strands indicate: Fatigue loading, as compared to sustained loading, drastically reduces the lifetime of a Kevlar composie; the more the number of on-off load cycles, the less the lifetime; and dynamic fatigue of the Kevlar composite can not be predicted by current damage theories such as Miner's Rule.

  9. Dense, finely, grained composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Holt, Joseph B.; Kingman, Donald D.; Munir, Zuhair A.

    1990-01-01

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  10. Modelling dynamic compaction of porous materials with the overstress approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Y.

    2014-05-01

    To model compaction of a porous material we need 1) an equation of state of the porous material in terms of the equation of state of its matrix, and 2) a compaction law. For an equation of state it is common to use Herrmann's suggestion, as in his Pα model. For a compaction law it is common to use a quasi-static compaction relation obtained from 1) a meso-scale model (as in Carroll and Holt's spherical shell model), or from 2) quasi-static tests. Here we are interested in dynamic compaction, like in a planar impact test. In dynamic compaction the state may change too fast for the state point to follow the quasi-static compaction curve. We therefore get an overstress situation. The state point moves out of the quasi-static compaction boundary, and only with time collapses back towards it at a certain rate. In this way the dynamic compaction event becomes rate dependent. In the paper we first write down the rate equations for dynamic compaction according to the overstress approach. We then implement these equations in a hydro-code and run some examples. We show how the overstress rate parameter can be calibrated from tests.

  11. Advances in design and modeling of porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayral, André; Calas-Etienne, Sylvie; Coasne, Benoit; Deratani, André; Evstratov, Alexis; Galarneau, Anne; Grande, Daniel; Hureau, Matthieu; Jobic, Hervé; Morlay, Catherine; Parmentier, Julien; Prelot, Bénédicte; Rossignol, Sylvie; Simon-Masseron, Angélique; Thibault-Starzyk, Frédéric

    2015-07-01

    This special issue of the European Physical Journal Special Topics is dedicated to selected papers from the symposium "High surface area porous and granular materials" organized in the frame of the conference "Matériaux 2014", held on November 24-28, 2014 in Montpellier, France. Porous materials and granular materials gather a wide variety of heterogeneous, isotropic or anisotropic media made of inorganic, organic or hybrid solid skeletons, with open or closed porosity, and pore sizes ranging from the centimeter scale to the sub-nanometer scale. Their technological and industrial applications cover numerous areas from building and civil engineering to microelectronics, including also metallurgy, chemistry, health, waste water and gas effluent treatment. Many emerging processes related to environmental protection and sustainable development also rely on this class of materials. Their functional properties are related to specific transfer mechanisms (matter, heat, radiation, electrical charge), to pore surface chemistry (exchange, adsorption, heterogeneous catalysis) and to retention inside confined volumes (storage, separation, exchange, controlled release). The development of innovative synthesis, shaping, characterization and modeling approaches enables the design of advanced materials with enhanced functional performance. The papers collected in this special issue offer a good overview of the state-of-the-art and science of these complex media. We would like to thank all the speakers and participants for their contribution to the success of the symposium. We also express our gratitude to the organization committee of "Matériaux 2014". We finally thank the reviewers and the staff of the European Physical Journal Special Topics who made the publication of this special issue possible.

  12. Cellular porous anodic alumina grown in neutral organic electrolyte. 1. Structure, composition, and properties of the films

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Alwitt, R.S.; Shimizu, K.

    2000-04-01

    Anodic alumina films with cellular porous structure grow in neutral organic electrolytes with low water content and containing ethylene glycol and a large dicarboxylic acid. An Al carboxylate precipitates in the pore and is extruded from the coating. The porous structure develops even though the current efficiency for film formation is near 95%. The coating matrix contains substantial organic material, 15 wt % by thermal analysis. It is an oxide/organic composite with higher field strength and lower dielectric constant than pure anodic alumina.

  13. Impact response of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Srinivasan, K.

    1991-01-01

    Composite materials composed of carbon fibers and resin matrices offer great promise in reducing the weight of aerospace structures. However they remain extremely vulnerable to out of plane impact loads, which lead to severe losses in strength and stiffness. The results of an experimental program, undertaken to investigate the low velocity impact damage tolerance of composite materials is presented. The objectives were to identify key neat resin/composite properties that lead to enhancement of composite impact damage tolerance and to find a small scale test that predicts compression after impact properties of panels. Five materials were selected for evaluation. These systems represented different classes of material behavior such as brittle epoxy, modified epoxies, and amorphous and semicrystalling thermoplastics. The influence of fiber properties on the impact performance was also studied in one material, i.e., in polyether ether ketone (PEEK). Several 24 and 48 ply quasi-isotropic and 24 ply orthotropic laminates were examined using an instrumented drop weight impactor. Correlations with post impact compression behavior were made.

  14. Characterization of porous carbon fibers and related materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.

    1996-07-15

    This program was geared to support the Fossil Energy Material Sciences Program with respect to several areas of interest in efficient production and utilization of energy. Carbon molecular sieves have great potential for economically purifying gases; i.e. removal of carbon dioxide from natural gas without having to resort to cryogenic techniques. Microporous carbons can be tailored to serve as adsorbents for natural gas in on-board storage in automotive applications, avoiding high pressures and heavy storage tanks. This program is a laboratory study to evaluate production methodologies and activation processes to produce porous carbons for specific applications. The Carbon Materials Technology Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is engaged in developmental programs to produce activated carbon fibers (ACF) for applications in fixed beds and/or flowing reactors engineering applications.

  15. System level permeability modeling of porous hydrogen storage materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Voskuilen, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    A permeability model for hydrogen transport in a porous material is successfully applied to both laboratory-scale and vehicle-scale sodium alanate hydrogen storage systems. The use of a Knudsen number dependent relationship for permeability of the material in conjunction with a constant area fraction channeling model is shown to accurately predict hydrogen flow through the reactors. Generally applicable model parameters were obtained by numerically fitting experimental measurements from reactors of different sizes and aspect ratios. The degree of channeling was experimentally determined from the measurements and found to be 2.08% of total cross-sectional area. Use of this constant area channeling model and the Knudsen dependent Young & Todd permeability model allows for accurate prediction of the hydrogen uptake performance of full-scale sodium alanate and similar metal hydride systems.

  16. Europium (III) Organic Complexes in Porous Boron Nitride Microfibers: Efficient Hybrid Luminescent Material

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Feng, Congcong; He, Xin; Wang, Weijia; Fang, Yi; Liu, Zhenya; Li, Jie; Tang, Chengchun; Huang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    We report the design and synthesis of a novel kind of organic-inorganic hybrid material via the incorporation of europium (III) β-diketonate complexes (Eu(TTA)3, TTA = 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone) into one-dimensional (1D) porous boron nitride (BN) microfibers. The developed Eu(TTA)3@BN hybrid composites with typical 1D fibrous morphology exhibit bright visible red-light emission on UV illumination. The confinement of Eu(TTA)3 within pores of BN microfibers not only decreases the aggregation-caused quenching in solid Eu(TTA)3, but also improves their thermal stabilities. Moreover, The strong interactions between Eu(TTA)3 and porous BN matrix result in an interesting energy transfer process from BN host to TTA ligand and TTA ligand to Eu3+ ions, leading to the remarkable increase of red emission. The synthetic approach should be a very promising strategy which can be easily expanded to other hybrid luminescent materials based on porous BN. PMID:27687246

  17. Method for preparing dielectric composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.; Montgomery, Frederick C.; Collins, Jack L.; Felten, John J.

    2004-11-23

    The invention allows the fabrication of small, dense beads of dielectric materials with selected compositions, which are incorporated into a polymeric matrix for use in capacitors, filters, and the like. A porous, generally spherical bead of hydrous metal oxide containing titanium or zirconium is made by a sol-gel process to form a substantially rigid bead having a generally fine crystallite size and correspondingly finely distributed internal porosity. The resulting gel bead may be washed and hydrothermally reacted with a soluble alkaline earth salt (typically Ba or Sr) at elevated temperature and pressure to convert the bead into a mixed hydrous titanium- or zirconium-alkaline earth oxide while retaining the generally spherical shape. Alternatively, the gel bead may be made by coprecipitation. This mixed oxide bead is then washed, dried and calcined to produce the desired (BaTiO.sub.3, PbTiO.sub.3, SrZrO.sub.3) structure. The sintered beads are incorporated into a selected polymer matrix. The resulting dielectric composite material may be electrically "poled" if desired.

  18. Dielectric composite materials and method for preparing

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.; Montgomery, Frederick C.; Collins, Jack L.; Felten, John J.

    2003-07-29

    The invention allows the fabrication of small, dense beads of dielectric materials with selected compositions, which are incorporated into a polymeric matrix for use in capacitors, filters, and the like. A porous, generally spherical bead of hydrous metal oxide containing titanium or zirconium is made by a sol-gel process to form a substantially rigid bead having a generally fine crystallite size and correspondingly finely distributed internal porosity. The resulting gel bead may be washed and hydrothermally reacted with a soluble alkaline earth salt (typically Ba or Sr) at elevated temperature and pressure to convert the bead into a mixed hydrous titanium- or zirconium-alkaline earth oxide while retaining the generally spherical shape. Alternatively, the gel bead may be made by coprecipitation. This mixed oxide bead is then washed, dried and calcined to produce the desired (BaTiO.sub.3, PbTiO.sub.3, SrZrO.sub.3) structure. The sintered beads are incorporated into a selected polymer matrix. The resulting dielectric composite material may be electrically "poled" if desired.

  19. Optical fiber oxygen sensor using layer-by-layer stacked porous composite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Sayuri; Hosoki, Ai; Nishiyama, Michiko; Seki, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Optical fiber oxygen sensors have attractive attentions such as no oxygen consume, thin size, light weight, flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference. Ruthenium (Ru) complexes are known as luminescent materials whose luminescent light is quenched depending on oxygen concentrations when concentrations of Ru complexes are fixed. They emit phosphorescence with the wavelength of around 620 nm as exited light with the wavelength of 450 nm is irradiated into Ru complexes. As a result, phosphorescence is quenched depending on oxygen concentrations. Conventional optical fiber oxygen sensors have employed large core-diameter such as 1000 μm in order to obtain quenching abundantly, hence they have large transmission loss. Therefore, they have little practicability in the case of remote monitoring system, for example undersea explorations. In this paper, we have successfully developed a novel optical fiber oxygen sensor with transmission GI multi-mode fiber whose core diameter is 62.5 μm and cladding diameter is 125 μm. The sensing portion was fabricated on an end of the fiber with porous composite membranes which is made by glass beads and polyallylamine in Layer-by-Layer technique. The composite membranes immobilized Ru complexes. In experiments, in order to investigate characteristics of the number of layers for porous composite membranes, we tested several kinds of sensors having such as 5-, 50- and 125-layers and confirmed phosphorescent intensity and change of phosphorescence against existence of oxygen. As a result, 5-layer and 50-layer sensors showed best sensitivity and reproducibility.

  20. Novel recycling of nonmetal particles from waste printed wiring boards to produce porous composite for sound absorbing application.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhixing; Shen, Zhigang; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    Nonmetal materials take up about 70 wt% of waste printed wiring boards (WPWB), which are usually recycled as low-value fillers or even directly disposed by landfill dumping and incineration. In this research, a novel reuse ofthe nonmetals to produce porous composites for sound absorbing application was demonstrated. The manufacturing process, absorbing performance and mechanical properties of the composites were studied. The results show that the high porous structure of the composites leads to an excellent sound absorption ability in broad-band frequency range. Average absorption coefficient of above 0.4 can be achievedby the composite in the frequency range from 100 to 6400 Hz. When the particle size is larger than 0.2 mm, the absorption ability of the composite is comparable to that of commercial wood-fibre board and urea-formaldehyde foam. Mechanical analysis indicates that the porous composites possess sufficient structural strength for self-sustaining applications. All the results indicate that producing sound absorbing composite with nonmetal particles from WPWB provides an efficient and profitable way for recycling this waste resource and can resolve both the environment pollution and noise pollution problems.

  1. Novel recycling of nonmetal particles from waste printed wiring boards to produce porous composite for sound absorbing application.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhixing; Shen, Zhigang; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    Nonmetal materials take up about 70 wt% of waste printed wiring boards (WPWB), which are usually recycled as low-value fillers or even directly disposed by landfill dumping and incineration. In this research, a novel reuse ofthe nonmetals to produce porous composites for sound absorbing application was demonstrated. The manufacturing process, absorbing performance and mechanical properties of the composites were studied. The results show that the high porous structure of the composites leads to an excellent sound absorption ability in broad-band frequency range. Average absorption coefficient of above 0.4 can be achievedby the composite in the frequency range from 100 to 6400 Hz. When the particle size is larger than 0.2 mm, the absorption ability of the composite is comparable to that of commercial wood-fibre board and urea-formaldehyde foam. Mechanical analysis indicates that the porous composites possess sufficient structural strength for self-sustaining applications. All the results indicate that producing sound absorbing composite with nonmetal particles from WPWB provides an efficient and profitable way for recycling this waste resource and can resolve both the environment pollution and noise pollution problems. PMID:24701924

  2. Silicon dioxide hollow microspheres with porous composite structure: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiuli; Lei, Zhongli

    2011-10-15

    In this paper, a strategy for hollow porous silica microspheres with ideally flower structure is presented. SiO(2)/PAM hybrid composite microspheres with porous were synthesized by the reaction that the porous polyacrylamide (PAM) micro-gels immersed in tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) anhydrous alcohol solution and water in a moist atmosphere, with ammonium hydroxide as a catalyst. The SiO(2) hollow microspheres with porous were obtained after calcination of the composite microspheres at 550 °C for 4 h. The morphology, composition, and crystalline structure of the microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FI-IR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), N(2) absorption analysis, respectively. The results indicated that the obtained hollow porous SiO(2) microspheres were a perfect flower structure.

  3. Catalytically Active Bimetallic Nanoparticles Supported on Porous Carbon Capsules Derived From Metal-Organic Framework Composites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Bradley, Siobhan J; Chan, Andrew; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Nann, Thomas; Kruger, Paul E; Telfer, Shane G

    2016-09-14

    We report a new methodology for producing monometallic or bimetallic nanoparticles confined within hollow nitrogen-doped porous carbon capsules. The capsules are derived from metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals that are coated with a shell of a secondary material comprising either a metal-tannic acid coordination polymer or a resorcinol-formaldehyde polymer. Platinum nanoparticles are optionally sandwiched between the MOF core and the shell. Pyrolysis of the MOF-shell composites produces hollow capsules of porous nitrogen-doped carbon that bear either monometallic (Pt, Co, and Ni) or alloyed (PtCo and PtNi) metal nanoparticles. The Co and Ni components of the bimetallic nanoparticles are derived from the shell surrounding the MOF crystals. The hollow capsules prevent sintering and detachment of the nanoparticles, and their porous walls allow for efficient mass transport. Alloyed PtCo nanoparticles embedded in the capsule walls are highly active, selective, and recyclable catalysts for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes to anilines. PMID:27575666

  4. Composite Materials: An Educational Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saliba, Tony E.; Snide, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is the need to incorporate the concepts and applications of advanced composite materials into existing chemical engineering programs. Discussed are the justification for, and implementation of topics including transport phenomena, kinetics and reactor design, unit operations, and product and process design. (CW)

  5. Biofiber composites - environmentally compatible materials

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, R.; Krishnan, M.

    1995-12-01

    A number of thermoplastics have been evaluated as potential materials for composite and blend formulations with natural polymers such as cellulosics, lignocellulose, and starches. The use of biofibers, derived from annually renewable resources, as reinforcing fibers provides positive environmental benefits.An important aspect that affects the processing and ultimate performance is the interfacial adhesion between the biofibers and the plastic.

  6. Joining of polymer composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Magness, F.H.

    1990-11-01

    Under ideal conditions load bearing structures would be designed without joints, thus eliminating a source of added weight, complexity and weakness. In reality the need for accessibility, repair, and inspectability, added to the size limitations imposed by the manufacturing process and transportation/assembly requirements mean that some minimum number of joints will be required in most structures. The designer generally has two methods for joining fiber composite materials, adhesive bonding and mechanical fastening. As the use of thermoplastic materials increases, a third joining technique -- welding -- will become more common. It is the purpose of this document to provide a review of the available sources pertinent to the design of joints in fiber composites. The primary emphasis is given to adhesive bonding and mechanical fastening with information coming from documentary sources as old as 1961 and as recent as 1989. A third, shorter section on composite welding is included in order to provide a relatively comprehensive treatment of the subject.

  7. From spent Mg/Al layered double hydroxide to porous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Laipan, Minwang; Zhu, Runliang; Chen, Qingze; Zhu, Jianxi; Xi, Yunfei; Ayoko, Godwin A; He, Hongping

    2015-12-30

    Adsorption has been considered as an efficient method for the treatment of dye effluents, but proper disposal of the spent adsorbents is still a challenge. This work attempts to provide a facile method to reutilize the spent Mg/Al layered double hydroxide (Mg/Al-LDH) after the adsorption of orange II (OII). Herein, the spent hybrid was carbonized under the protection of nitrogen, and then washed with acid to obtain porous carbon materials. Thermogravimetric analysis results suggested that the carbonization could be well achieved above 600°C, as mass loss of the spent hybrid gradually stabilized. Therefore, the carbonization process was carried out at 600, 800, and 1000°C, respectively. Scanning electron microscope showed that the obtained carbon materials possessed a crooked flaky morphology. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption results showed that the carbon materials had large BET surface area and pore volume, e.g., 1426 m(2)/g and 1.67 cm(3)/g for the sample carbonized at 800°C. Moreover, the pore structure and surface chemistry compositions were tunable, as they were sensitive to the temperature. Toluene adsorption results demonstrated that the carbon materials had high efficiency in toluene removal. This work provided a facile approach for synthesizing porous carbon materials using spent Mg/Al-LDH.

  8. From spent Mg/Al layered double hydroxide to porous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Laipan, Minwang; Zhu, Runliang; Chen, Qingze; Zhu, Jianxi; Xi, Yunfei; Ayoko, Godwin A; He, Hongping

    2015-12-30

    Adsorption has been considered as an efficient method for the treatment of dye effluents, but proper disposal of the spent adsorbents is still a challenge. This work attempts to provide a facile method to reutilize the spent Mg/Al layered double hydroxide (Mg/Al-LDH) after the adsorption of orange II (OII). Herein, the spent hybrid was carbonized under the protection of nitrogen, and then washed with acid to obtain porous carbon materials. Thermogravimetric analysis results suggested that the carbonization could be well achieved above 600°C, as mass loss of the spent hybrid gradually stabilized. Therefore, the carbonization process was carried out at 600, 800, and 1000°C, respectively. Scanning electron microscope showed that the obtained carbon materials possessed a crooked flaky morphology. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption results showed that the carbon materials had large BET surface area and pore volume, e.g., 1426 m(2)/g and 1.67 cm(3)/g for the sample carbonized at 800°C. Moreover, the pore structure and surface chemistry compositions were tunable, as they were sensitive to the temperature. Toluene adsorption results demonstrated that the carbon materials had high efficiency in toluene removal. This work provided a facile approach for synthesizing porous carbon materials using spent Mg/Al-LDH. PMID:26257095

  9. Approach to failure in porous granular materials under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Ferenc; Varga, Imre; Lennartz-Sassinek, Sabine; Main, Ian G.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the approach to catastrophic failure in a model porous granular material undergoing uniaxial compression. A discrete element computational model is used to simulate both the microstructure of the material and the complex dynamics and feedbacks involved in local fracturing and the production of crackling noise. Under strain-controlled loading, microcracks initially nucleate in an uncorrelated way all over the sample. As loading proceeds the damage localizes into a narrow damage band inclined at 30∘-45∘ to the load direction. Inside the damage band the material is crushed into a poorly sorted mixture of mainly fine powder hosting some larger fragments. The mass probability density distribution of particles in the damage zone is a power law of exponent 2.1, similar to a value of 1.87 inferred from observations of the length distribution of wear products (gouge) in natural and laboratory faults. Dynamic bursts of radiated energy, analogous to acoustic emissions observed in laboratory experiments on porous sedimentary rocks, are identified as correlated trails or cascades of local ruptures that emerge from the stress redistribution process. As the system approaches macroscopic failure consecutive bursts become progressively more correlated. Their size distribution is also a power law, with an equivalent Gutenberg-Richter b value of 1.22 averaged over the whole test, ranging from 3 to 0.5 at the time of failure, all similar to those observed in laboratory tests on granular sandstone samples. The formation of the damage band itself is marked by a decrease in the average distance between consecutive bursts and an emergent power-law correlation integral of event locations with a correlation dimension of 2.55, also similar to those observed in the laboratory (between 2.75 and 2.25).

  10. Approach to failure in porous granular materials under compression.

    PubMed

    Kun, Ferenc; Varga, Imre; Lennartz-Sassinek, Sabine; Main, Ian G

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the approach to catastrophic failure in a model porous granular material undergoing uniaxial compression. A discrete element computational model is used to simulate both the microstructure of the material and the complex dynamics and feedbacks involved in local fracturing and the production of crackling noise. Under strain-controlled loading, microcracks initially nucleate in an uncorrelated way all over the sample. As loading proceeds the damage localizes into a narrow damage band inclined at 30°-45° to the load direction. Inside the damage band the material is crushed into a poorly sorted mixture of mainly fine powder hosting some larger fragments. The mass probability density distribution of particles in the damage zone is a power law of exponent 2.1, similar to a value of 1.87 inferred from observations of the length distribution of wear products (gouge) in natural and laboratory faults. Dynamic bursts of radiated energy, analogous to acoustic emissions observed in laboratory experiments on porous sedimentary rocks, are identified as correlated trails or cascades of local ruptures that emerge from the stress redistribution process. As the system approaches macroscopic failure consecutive bursts become progressively more correlated. Their size distribution is also a power law, with an equivalent Gutenberg-Richter b value of 1.22 averaged over the whole test, ranging from 3 to 0.5 at the time of failure, all similar to those observed in laboratory tests on granular sandstone samples. The formation of the damage band itself is marked by a decrease in the average distance between consecutive bursts and an emergent power-law correlation integral of event locations with a correlation dimension of 2.55, also similar to those observed in the laboratory (between 2.75 and 2.25). PMID:24483436

  11. Conductive porous scaffolds as potential neural interface materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.; Cicotte, Kirsten N.; Buerger, Stephen P.; Reece, Gregory; Dirk, Shawn M.; Lin, Patrick P.

    2011-11-01

    Our overall intent is to develop improved prosthetic devices with the use of nerve interfaces through which transected nerves may grow, such that small groups of nerve fibers come into close contact with electrode sites, each of which is connected to electronics external to the interface. These interfaces must be physically structured to allow nerve fibers to grow through them, either by being porous or by including specific channels for the axons. They must be mechanically compatible with nerves such that they promote growth and do not harm the nervous system, and biocompatible to promote nerve fiber growth and to allow close integration with biological tissue. They must exhibit selective and structured conductivity to allow the connection of electrode sites with external circuitry, and electrical properties must be tuned to enable the transmission of neural signals. Finally, the interfaces must be capable of being physically connected to external circuitry, e.g. through attached wires. We have utilized electrospinning as a tool to create conductive, porous networks of non-woven biocompatible fibers in order to meet the materials requirements for the neural interface. The biocompatible fibers were based on the known biocompatible material poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) as well as a newer biomaterial developed in our laboratories, poly(butylene fumarate) (PBF). Both of the polymers cannot be electrospun using conventional electrospinning techniques due to their low glass transition temperatures, so in situ crosslinking methodologies were developed to facilitate micro- and nano-fiber formation during electrospinning. The conductivity of the electrospun fiber mats was controlled by controlling the loading with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Fabrication, electrical and materials characterization will be discussed along with initial in vivo experimental results.

  12. Approach to failure in porous granular materials under compression.

    PubMed

    Kun, Ferenc; Varga, Imre; Lennartz-Sassinek, Sabine; Main, Ian G

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the approach to catastrophic failure in a model porous granular material undergoing uniaxial compression. A discrete element computational model is used to simulate both the microstructure of the material and the complex dynamics and feedbacks involved in local fracturing and the production of crackling noise. Under strain-controlled loading, microcracks initially nucleate in an uncorrelated way all over the sample. As loading proceeds the damage localizes into a narrow damage band inclined at 30°-45° to the load direction. Inside the damage band the material is crushed into a poorly sorted mixture of mainly fine powder hosting some larger fragments. The mass probability density distribution of particles in the damage zone is a power law of exponent 2.1, similar to a value of 1.87 inferred from observations of the length distribution of wear products (gouge) in natural and laboratory faults. Dynamic bursts of radiated energy, analogous to acoustic emissions observed in laboratory experiments on porous sedimentary rocks, are identified as correlated trails or cascades of local ruptures that emerge from the stress redistribution process. As the system approaches macroscopic failure consecutive bursts become progressively more correlated. Their size distribution is also a power law, with an equivalent Gutenberg-Richter b value of 1.22 averaged over the whole test, ranging from 3 to 0.5 at the time of failure, all similar to those observed in laboratory tests on granular sandstone samples. The formation of the damage band itself is marked by a decrease in the average distance between consecutive bursts and an emergent power-law correlation integral of event locations with a correlation dimension of 2.55, also similar to those observed in the laboratory (between 2.75 and 2.25).

  13. Design of advanced porous graphene materials: from graphene nanomesh to 3D architectures.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lili; Fan, Zhuangjun

    2014-02-21

    In order to make full utilization of the high intrinsic surface area of graphene, recently, porous graphene materials including graphene nanomesh, crumpled graphene and graphene foam, have attracted tremendous attention and research interest, owing to their exceptional porous structure (high surface area, and high pore volume) in combination with the inherent properties of graphene, such as high electronic conductivity, good thermal stability, and excellent mechanical strength. Interestingly, porous graphene materials and their derivatives have been explored in a wide range of applications in the fields of electronic and photonic devices, energy storage, gas separation/storage, oil absorption and sensors. This article reviews recent progress in the synthesis, characterization, properties, and applications of porous graphene materials. We aim to highlight the importance of designing different porous structures of graphene to meet future challenges, and the trend on future design of porous graphene materials is analyzed.

  14. Design of advanced porous graphene materials: from graphene nanomesh to 3D architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lili; Fan, Zhuangjun

    2014-01-01

    In order to make full utilization of the high intrinsic surface area of graphene, recently, porous graphene materials including graphene nanomesh, crumpled graphene and graphene foam, have attracted tremendous attention and research interest, owing to their exceptional porous structure (high surface area, and high pore volume) in combination with the inherent properties of graphene, such as high electronic conductivity, good thermal stability, and excellent mechanical strength. Interestingly, porous graphene materials and their derivatives have been explored in a wide range of applications in the fields of electronic and photonic devices, energy storage, gas separation/storage, oil absorption and sensors. This article reviews recent progress in the synthesis, characterization, properties, and applications of porous graphene materials. We aim to highlight the importance of designing different porous structures of graphene to meet future challenges, and the trend on future design of porous graphene materials is analyzed.

  15. Porous carbon materials for Li-S batteries based on resorcinol-formaldehyde resin with inverse opal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Mukesh; Choudhury, Soumyadip; Gruber, Katharina; Simon, Frank; Fischer, Dieter; Albrecht, Victoria; Göbel, Michael; Koller, Stefan; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2014-09-01

    This study reports on a novel approach to fabrication of carbon-sulfur composite material and demonstrates its application as cathode for Li-S batteries. Firstly, highly porous carbon material has been prepared by exploiting PMMA colloidal crystal arrays as sacrificial template and subsequently mixing with elemental sulfur at 155 °C. The resulting carbon-sulfur composite cathode material possess very high intrinsic surface area, conductivity and has been found to demonstrate as high as 1600 mAh g-1 capacity in 1st discharge cycle and about 300-400 mAh g-1 in 50th discharge cycle.

  16. New wear resistant composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Angers, R.; Champagne, B.; Fiset, M.; Chollet, P.

    1983-01-01

    A composite material consisting of WC-Co particles in a steel matrix was fabricated by sintering mixtures of WC-Co particles and a steel powder and infiltrating the sintered pieces with a copper alloy. Its wear resistance and mechanical properties were studied as a function of the content in WC-Co particles and other characteristics of the composite material microstructure. Infiltration provided a simple means to obtain a strong cohesion between WC-Co particles and the steel matrix. An effective matrix protection against wear is obtained with relatively low additions of particles especially with a silica abrasive which is soft with respect to cemented carbide. The experimental results show that this material has good mechanical properties and wear resistance. Depending upon abrasion resistance, wear losses are reduced up to 10 times by a 30 vol% addition of cemented carbide particles.

  17. Collagen/chitosan porous bone tissue engineering composite scaffold incorporated with Ginseng compound K.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Thangavelu; Aravinthan, Adithan; Sharmila, Judith; Kim, Nam Soo; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-11-01

    In this study, suitable scaffold materials for bone tissue engineering were successfully prepared using fish scale collagen, hydroxyapatite, chitosan, and beta-tricalcium phosphate. Porous composite scaffolds were prepared by freeze drying method. The Korean traditional medicinal ginseng compound K, a therapeutic agent for the treatment of osteoporosis that reduces inflammation and enhances production of bone morphogenetic protein-2, was incorporated into the composite scaffold. The scaffold was characterized for pore size, swelling, density, degradation, mineralization, cell viability and attachment, and its morphological features were examined using scanning electron microscopy. This characterization and in vitro analysis showed that the prepared scaffold was biocompatible and supported the growth of MG-63 cells, and therefore has potential as an alternative approach for bone regeneration. PMID:27516305

  18. Energy absorption of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Results of a study on the energy absorption characteristics of selected composite material systems are presented and the results compared with aluminum. Composite compression tube specimens were fabricated with both tape and woven fabric prepreg using graphite/epoxy (Gr/E), Kevlar (TM)/epoxy (K/E) and glass/epoxy (Gl/E). Chamfering and notching one end of the composite tube specimen reduced the peak load at initial failure without altering the sustained crushing load, and prevented catastrophic failure. Static compression and vertical impact tests were performed on 128 tubes. The results varied significantly as a function of material type and ply orientation. In general, the Gr/E tubes absorbed more energy than the Gl/E or K/E tubes for the same ply orientation. The 0/ + or - 15 Gr/E tubes absorbed more energy than the aluminum tubes. Gr/E and Gl/E tubes failed in a brittle mode and had negligible post crushing integrity, whereas the K/E tubes failed in an accordian buckling mode similar to the aluminum tubes. The energy absorption and post crushing integrity of hybrid composite tubes were not significantly better than that of the single material tubes.

  19. The pressure drop in a porous material layer during combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrikov, B.N.

    1995-07-01

    During the combustion of a porous material layer, a manometer, which is attached to the cold end of the charge, records at the bottom of the layer a pressure reduction, which was discovered more than 20 years ago but which remains essentially unexplained up to the present. It is experimentally shown that this effect is similar to the pressure change in the cavities when a light gas (helium, hydrogen) diffuses from (or to) them under isothermal conditions and that it increases during the combustion mainly due to the accompanying Stefan type flow, and probably also as a result of the thermal diffusion. A pressure drop in the cavities is evidently made possible also by the pressure reduction in the flame which follows from the Hugoniot adiabatic theory.

  20. Salt transport and crystallization in porous building materials.

    PubMed

    Pel, L; Huinink, H; Kopinga, K

    2003-01-01

    Salt weathering is a major cause of deterioration of porous building materials. To obtain information about the mechanisms underlying these damage processes we have studied the moisture and ion transport. We measured the time evolution of NaCl saturated samples of fired-clay brick during one-sided drying using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The moisture content and amount of dissolved Na ions could be measured quantitatively as a function of position. The NaCl concentration profiles obtained from these data reflect the competition between advection to the surface and redistribution by diffusion. By representing the measured moisture and NaCl profiles in an efflorescence pathway diagram (EPD) also the crystallization can be taken into account.

  1. Novel, inorganic composites using porous, alkali-activated, aluminosilicate binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musil, Sean

    Geopolymers are an inorganic polymeric material composed of alumina, silica, and alkali metal oxides. Geopolymers are chemical and fire resistant, can be used as refractory adhesives, and are processed at or near ambient temperature. These properties make geopolymer an attractive choice as a matrix material for elevated temperature composites. This body of research investigated numerous different reinforcement possibilities and variants of geopolymer matrix material and characterized their mechanical performance in tension, flexure and flexural creep. Reinforcements can then be chosen based on the resulting properties to tailor the geopolymer matrix composites to a specific application condition. Geopolymer matrix composites combine the ease of processing of polymer matrix composites with the high temperature capability of ceramic matrix composites. This study incorporated particulate, unidirectional fiber and woven fiber reinforcements. Sodium, potassium, and cesium based geopolymer matrices were evaluated with cesium based geopolymer showing great promise as a high temperature matrix material. It showed the best strength retention at elevated temperature, as well as a very low coefficient of thermal expansion when crystallized into pollucite. These qualities made cesium geopolymer the best choice for creep resistant applications. Cesium geopolymer binders were combined with unidirectional continuous polycrystalline mullite fibers (Nextel(TM) 720) and single crystal mullite fibers, then the matrix was crystallized to form cubic pollucite. Single crystal mullite fibers were obtained by the internal crystallization method and show excellent creep resistance up to 1400°C. High temperature flexural strength and flexural creep resistance of pollucite and polycrystalline/single-crystal fibers was evaluated at 1000-1400°C.

  2. Metal-organic frameworks as functional, porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, Jeffrey A.

    The research presented in this thesis investigates the use of metal carboxylates as permanently porous materials called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The project has focused on three broad areas of study, each which strives to develop a further understanding of this class of materials. The first topic is concerned with the synthesis and structural characterization of MOFs. Our group and others have found that the reaction of metal salts with carboxylic acids in polar solvents at elevated temperatures often leads the formation of crystalline MOF materials that can be examined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Specifically, Chapter 2 reports on some of the first examples of magnesium MOFs, constructed from formate or aryldicarboxylate ligands. The magnesium formate MOF, [Mg3(O2CH) 6] was found to be a permanently porous 3-D material capable of selective uptake and exchange of small molecules. Once the synthesis and structures of some of these materials was known, their physical properties were studied. The magnesium formate MOF, [Mg 3(O2CH)6], was found to be permanently porous and able to reversibly adsorb both N2 and H2 gas. Furthermore, the material was also capable of taking up a variety of organic molecules to form new inclusion compounds that were characterized by XRD studies. Size exclusion was shown for cyclohexane and larger molecules. Chapters 3, 5, and 6 attempt to build off of the synthetic findings reported in Chapter 2. Specifically, the ability of these materials to take up guest molecules is expanded by the attempted synthesis of porous, homochiral MOFs using enantiopure carboxylic acids in the synthesis. It was found that under the appropriate synthetic conditions, both L-tartaric acid and (+)-camphoric acid were robust linkers for the formation of homochiral MOFs. Of the compounds synthesized, the most interesting were the set of compounds, [Zn2(Cam) 2(bipy)⊃3DMF] and [Zn2(Cam)2(apyr)⊃2DMF]. These compounds formed isoreticular cubic

  3. Molecular simulation of adsorption and transport in hierarchical porous materials.

    PubMed

    Coasne, Benoit; Galarneau, Anne; Gerardin, Corine; Fajula, François; Villemot, François

    2013-06-25

    Adsorption and transport in hierarchical porous solids with micro- (~1 nm) and mesoporosities (>2 nm) are investigated by molecular simulation. Two models of hierarchical solids are considered: microporous materials in which mesopores are carved out (model A) and mesoporous materials in which microporous nanoparticles are inserted (model B). Adsorption isotherms for model A can be described as a linear combination of the adsorption isotherms for pure mesoporous and microporous solids. In contrast, adsorption in model B departs from adsorption in pure microporous and mesoporous solids; the inserted microporous particles act as defects, which help nucleate the liquid phase within the mesopore and shift capillary condensation toward lower pressures. As far as transport under a pressure gradient is concerned, the flux in hierarchical materials consisting of microporous solids in which mesopores are carved out obeys the Navier-Stokes equation so that Darcy's law is verified within the mesopore. Moreover, the flow in such materials is larger than in a single mesopore, due to the transfer between micropores and mesopores. This nonzero velocity at the mesopore surface implies that transport in such hierarchical materials involves slippage at the mesopore surface, although the adsorbate has a strong affinity for the surface. In contrast to model A, flux in model B is smaller than in a single mesopore, as the nanoparticles act as constrictions that hinder transport. By a subtle effect arising from fast transport in the mesopores, the presence of mesopores increases the number of molecules in the microporosity in hierarchical materials and, hence, decreases the flow in the micropores (due to mass conservation). As a result, we do not observe faster diffusion in the micropores of hierarchical materials upon flow but slower diffusion, which increases the contact time between the adsorbate and the surface of the microporosity.

  4. Synthesis of nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanofibers as an efficient electrode material for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Feng; Zhang, Xu-Dong; Liang, Hai-Wei; Kong, Mingguang; Guan, Qing-Fang; Chen, Ping; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2012-08-28

    Supercapacitors (also known as ultracapacitors) are considered to be the most promising approach to meet the pressing requirements of energy storage. Supercapacitive electrode materials, which are closely related to the high-efficiency storage of energy, have provoked more interest. Herein, we present a high-capacity supercapacitor material based on the nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanofibers synthesized by carbonization of macroscopic-scale carbonaceous nanofibers (CNFs) coated with polypyrrole (CNFs@polypyrrole) at an appropriate temperature. The composite nanofibers exhibit a reversible specific capacitance of 202.0 F g(-1) at the current density of 1.0 A g(-1) in 6.0 mol L(-1) aqueous KOH electrolyte, meanwhile maintaining a high-class capacitance retention capability and a maximum power density of 89.57 kW kg(-1). This kind of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber represents an alternative promising candidate for an efficient electrode material for supercapacitors.

  5. Bioinspired large-scale aligned porous materials assembled with dual temperature gradients

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hao; Chen, Yuan; Delattre, Benjamin; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    Natural materials, such as bone, teeth, shells, and wood, exhibit outstanding properties despite being porous and made of weak constituents. Frequently, they represent a source of inspiration to design strong, tough, and lightweight materials. Although many techniques have been introduced to create such structures, a long-range order of the porosity as well as a precise control of the final architecture remain difficult to achieve. These limitations severely hinder the scale-up fabrication of layered structures aimed for larger applications. We report on a bidirectional freezing technique to successfully assemble ceramic particles into scaffolds with large-scale aligned, lamellar, porous, nacre-like structure and long-range order at the centimeter scale. This is achieved by modifying the cold finger with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wedge to control the nucleation and growth of ice crystals under dual temperature gradients. Our approach could provide an effective way of manufacturing novel bioinspired structural materials, in particular advanced materials such as composites, where a higher level of control over the structure is required. PMID:26824062

  6. Bioinspired large-scale aligned porous materials assembled with dual temperature gradients.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hao; Chen, Yuan; Delattre, Benjamin; Tomsia, Antoni P; Ritchie, Robert O

    2015-12-01

    Natural materials, such as bone, teeth, shells, and wood, exhibit outstanding properties despite being porous and made of weak constituents. Frequently, they represent a source of inspiration to design strong, tough, and lightweight materials. Although many techniques have been introduced to create such structures, a long-range order of the porosity as well as a precise control of the final architecture remain difficult to achieve. These limitations severely hinder the scale-up fabrication of layered structures aimed for larger applications. We report on a bidirectional freezing technique to successfully assemble ceramic particles into scaffolds with large-scale aligned, lamellar, porous, nacre-like structure and long-range order at the centimeter scale. This is achieved by modifying the cold finger with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wedge to control the nucleation and growth of ice crystals under dual temperature gradients. Our approach could provide an effective way of manufacturing novel bioinspired structural materials, in particular advanced materials such as composites, where a higher level of control over the structure is required. PMID:26824062

  7. A colloidoscope of colloid-based porous materials and their uses.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Katherine R; England, Grant T; Sunny, Steffi; Shirman, Elijah; Shirman, Tanya; Vogel, Nicolas; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-21

    Nature evolved a variety of hierarchical structures that produce sophisticated functions. Inspired by these natural materials, colloidal self-assembly provides a convenient way to produce structures from simple building blocks with a variety of complex functions beyond those found in nature. In particular, colloid-based porous materials (CBPM) can be made from a wide variety of materials. The internal structure of CBPM also has several key attributes, namely porosity on a sub-micrometer length scale, interconnectivity of these pores, and a controllable degree of order. The combination of structure and composition allow CBPM to attain properties important for modern applications such as photonic inks, colorimetric sensors, self-cleaning surfaces, water purification systems, or batteries. This review summarizes recent developments in the field of CBPM, including principles for their design, fabrication, and applications, with a particular focus on structural features and materials' properties that enable these applications. We begin with a short introduction to the wide variety of patterns that can be generated by colloidal self-assembly and templating processes. We then discuss different applications of such structures, focusing on optics, wetting, sensing, catalysis, and electrodes. Different fields of applications require different properties, yet the modularity of the assembly process of CBPM provides a high degree of tunability and tailorability in composition and structure. We examine the significance of properties such as structure, composition, and degree of order on the materials' functions and use, as well as trends in and future directions for the development of CBPM.

  8. Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J.; Henry, Michael P.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2011-07-12

    An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

  9. Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J.; Henry, Michael P.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2008-11-18

    An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

  10. Asymmetric Dielectric Elastomer Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Brian K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a dielectric elastomer composite material comprising a plurality of elastomer-coated electrodes arranged in an assembly. Embodiments of the invention provide improved force output over prior DEs by producing thinner spacing between electrode surfaces. This is accomplished by coating electrodes directly with uncured elastomer in liquid form and then assembling a finished component (which may be termed an actuator) from coated electrode components.

  11. Asymmetric Wicking and Reduced Evaporation Time of Droplets Penetrating a Thin Double-Layered Porous Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahdani, Aria; Gat, Amir; Nowakowski, Albert; Navaz, Homayun; Gharib, Morteza

    2013-11-01

    We study numerically and experimentally the penetration and evaporation dynamics of droplets wicking into a thin double-layered porous material with order-of-magnitude difference in the physical properties (such as capillary pressure drop, porosity or permeability) between the layers. We show that such double-layered porous materials can be used to create highly asymmetrical wicking properties, preventing liquid droplets wicking from one surface to the other, while allowing for wicking in the reverse direction. In addition, these double-layered porous materials are shown to reduce the evaporation time of droplets penetrating into the porous surface, compared with a single-layered material of equal thickness and physical properties similar to either of the layers. The asymmetric wicking and reduced evaporation time demonstrated in such double-layered porous materials may be of interest to applications such as medical bandages and wearable fabrics.

  12. Porous silicon-cyclodextrin based polymer composites for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Montelongo, J; Naveas, N; Degoutin, S; Tabary, N; Chai, F; Spampinato, V; Ceccone, G; Rossi, F; Torres-Costa, V; Manso-Silvan, M; Martel, B

    2014-09-22

    One of the main applications of porous silicon (PSi) in biomedicine is drug release, either as a single material or as a part of a composite. PSi composites are attractive candidates for drug delivery systems because they can display new chemical and physical characteristics, which are not exhibited by the individual constituents alone. Since cyclodextrin-based polymers have been proven efficient materials for drug delivery, in this work β-cyclodextrin-citric acid in-situ polymerization was used to functionalize two kinds of PSi (nanoporous and macroporous). The synthesized composites were characterized by microscopy techniques (SEM and AFM), physicochemical methods (ATR-FTIR, XPS, water contact angle, TGA and TBO titration) and a preliminary biological assay was performed. Both systems were tested as drug delivery platforms with two different model drugs, namely, ciprofloxacin (an antibiotic) and prednisolone (an anti-inflammatory), in two different media: pure water and PBS solution. Results show that both kinds of PSi/β-cyclodextrin-citric acid polymer composites, nano- and macro-, provide enhanced release control for drug delivery applications than non-functionalized PSi samples.

  13. Preparation of magnetic nano-composite: barium hexaferrite loaded in the ordered meso-porous silica matrix (MCM-41).

    PubMed

    Emamian, H R; Honarbakhsh-Raouf, A; Ataie, A

    2010-04-01

    In this work a magnetic nano-composite was synthesized by modified incorporation of iron-barium complex into ordered meso-porous silica (MCM-41) as a matrix. The MCM-41 was synthesized by silylation treatment which was accompanied by pH adjusting. Low angle XRD patterns of both annealed MCM-41 and resulted composite exhibited the characteristic reflection of high quality hexagonal meso-structures. TEM image of the composite material revealed that the hexagonal ordered meso-structure host material was not affected by wet impregnation and subsequent calcination in order to incorporate with barium hexaferrite. Also, TEM images accompanied by EDS analysis confirmed the formation of second phase consists of barium and iron ions inside the MCM-41 channels. The resulted composite material showed a super-paramagnetic nature at room temperature.

  14. Characterization of porous materials using combined small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Naiping; Borkar, Neha; Kohls, Doug; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2014-09-24

    A combination of ultra small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) is used to characterize porous materials. The analysis methods yield quantitative information, including the mean skeletal chord length, mean pore chord length, skeletal density, and composition. A mixed cellulose ester (MCE) membrane with a manufacturer-labeled pore size of 0.1 {mu}m was used as a model to elucidate the specifics of the method. Four approaches describing four specific scenarios (different known parameters and form of the scattering data) are compared. Pore chords determined using all four approaches are in good agreement with the scanning electron microscopy estimates but are larger than the manufacturer's nominal pore size. Our approach also gives the average chord of the skeletal solid (struts) of the membrane, which is also consistent for all four approaches. Combined data from USAXS and USANS gives the skeletal density and the strut composition.

  15. Improved Silica Aerogel Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven

    2008-01-01

    A family of aerogel-matrix composite materials having thermal-stability and mechanical- integrity properties better than those of neat aerogels has been developed. Aerogels are known to be excellent thermal- and acoustic-insulation materials because of their molecular-scale porosity, but heretofore, the use of aerogels has been inhibited by two factors: (1) Their brittleness makes processing and handling difficult. (2) They shrink during production and shrink more when heated to high temperatures during use. The shrinkage and the consequent cracking make it difficult to use them to encapsulate objects in thermal-insulation materials. The underlying concept of aerogel-matrix composites is not new; the novelty of the present family of materials lies in formulations and processes that result in superior properties, which include (1) much less shrinkage during a supercritical-drying process employed in producing a typical aerogel, (2) much less shrinkage during exposure to high temperatures, and (3) as a result of the reduction in shrinkage, much less or even no cracking.

  16. Composite material having high thermal conductivity and process for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Colella, N.J.; Davidson, H.L.; Kerns, J.A.; Makowiecki, D.M.

    1998-07-21

    A process is disclosed for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost. 7 figs.

  17. Composite material having high thermal conductivity and process for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    1998-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  18. Detection of water deposits and movement in porous materials by infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdelidis, N. P.; Moropoulou, A.; Theoulakis, P.

    2003-06-01

    Since a large amount of damage in porous materials arises as a direct or indirect consequence of moisture (static and dynamic phenomena), detection and monitoring of moisture in porous materials is important, in an attempt to determine the actual damage, as well as the deterioration rate. The most common methodology to assess the moisture content in porous materials is to collect representative samples from the sites investigated and then weigh them before and after drying. In this research, infrared thermography, an indirect moisture assessment technique, was used in the investigation of various porous stones in the laboratory during capillary rise tests. Supplementary investigation of the stones in terms of their microstructure (mercury intrusion porosimetry) and isothermic behaviour (water sorption) was also performed. Finally, an in field diagnostic survey on historic structures was carried out. The results of this study indicate that infrared imaging provides significant information in the study of moisture in porous materials.

  19. Synthesis of Na-A and/or Na-X zeolite/porous carbon composites from carbonized rice husk

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuki, Hiroaki; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2009-07-15

    Na-A and/or Na-X zeolite/porous carbon composites were prepared under hydrothermal conditions by NaOH dissolution of silica first from carbonized rice husk followed by addition of NaAlO{sub 2} and in situ crystallization of zeolites i.e., using a two-step process. When a one-step process was used, both Na-A and Na-X zeolites crystallized on the surface of carbon. Na-A or Na-X zeolite crystals were prepared on the porous carbonized rice husk at 90 deg. C for 2-6 h by changing the SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O/Na{sub 2}O and Na{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2} molar ratios of precursors in the two-step process. The surface area and NH{sub 4}{sup +}-cation exchange capacity (CEC) of Na-A zeolite/porous carbon were found to be 171 m{sup 2}/g and 506 meq/100 g, respectively, while those of Na-X zeolite/porous carbon composites were 676 m{sup 2}/g and 317 meq/100 g, respectively. Na-A and Na-X zeolites are well-known microporous and hydrophilic materials while carbonized rice husk was found to be mesoporous (pores of {approx}3.9 nm) and hydrophobic. These hybrid microporous-mesoporous and hydrophilic-hydrophobic composites are expected to be useful for decontamination of metal cations as well as organic contaminants simultaneously. - Graphical Abstract: Novel Na-X zeolite/porous carbon composite.

  20. Structure and Stability of Deflagrations in Porous Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    stephen B. Margolis; Forman A. Williams

    1999-03-01

    Theoretical two-phase-flow analyses have recently been developed to describe the structure and stability of multi-phase deflagrations in porous energetic materials, in both confined and unconfined geometries. The results of these studies are reviewed, with an emphasis on the fundamental differences that emerge with respect to the two types of geometries. In particular, pressure gradients are usually negligible in unconfined systems, whereas the confined problem is generally characterized by a significant gas-phase pressure difference, or overpressure, between the burned and unburned regions. The latter leads to a strong convective influence on the burning rate arising from the pressure-driven permeation of hot gases into the solid/gas region and the consequent preheating of the unburned material. It is also shown how asymptotic models that are suitable for analyzing stability may be derived based on the largeness of an overall activation-energy parameter. From an analysis of such models, it is shown that the effects of porosity and two-phase flow are generally destabilizing, suggesting that degraded propellants, which exhibit greater porosity than their pristine counterparts, may be more readily subject to combustion instability and nonsteady deflagration.

  1. Composition suitable for decontaminating a porous surface contaminated with cesium

    DOEpatents

    Kaminski, Michael D.; Finck, Martha R.; Mertz, Carol J.

    2010-06-15

    A method of decontaminating porous surfaces contaminated with water soluble radionuclides by contacting the contaminated porous surfaces with an ionic solution capable of solubilizing radionuclides present in the porous surfaces followed by contacting the solubilized radionuclides with a gel containing a radionuclide chelator to bind the radionuclides to the gel, and physically removing the gel from the porous surfaces. A dry mix is also disclosed of a cross-linked ionic polymer salt, a linear ionic polymer salt, a radionuclide chelator, and a gel formation controller present in the range of from 0% to about 40% by weight of the dry mix, wherein the ionic polymer salts are granular and the non cross-linked ionic polymer salt is present as a minor constituent.

  2. Tin nanoparticle-loaded porous carbon nanofiber composite anodes for high current lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhen; Hu, Yi; Chen, Yanli; Zhang, Xiangwu; Wang, Kehao; Chen, Renzhong

    2015-03-01

    Metallic Sn is a promising high-capacity anode material for use in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), but its huge volume variation during lithium ion insertion/extraction typically results in poor cycling stability. To address this, we demonstrate the fabrication of Sn nanoparticle-loaded porous carbon nanofiber (Sn-PCNF) composites via the electrospinning of Sn(II) acetate/mineral oil/polyacrylonitrile precursors in N,N-dimethylformamide solvent and their subsequent carbonization at 700 °C under an argon atmosphere. This is shown to result in an even distribution of pores on the surface of the nanofibers, allowing the Sn-PCNF composite to be used directly as an anode in lithium-ion batteries without the need to add non-active materials such as polymer binders or electrical conductors. With a discharge capacity of around 774 mA h g-1 achieved at a high current of 0.8 A g-1 over 200 cycles, this material clearly has a high rate capability and excellent cyclic stability, and thanks to its unique structure and properties, is an excellent candidate for use as an anode material in high-current rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

  3. Short time proton dynamics in bulk ice and in porous anode solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect

    Basoli, Francesco; Senesi, Roberto; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Licoccia, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen reduction and incorporation into solid electrolytes and the reverse reaction of oxygen evolution play a cru-cial role in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) applications. However a detailed un derstanding of the kinetics of the cor-responding reactions, i.e. on reaction mechanisms, rate limiting steps, reaction paths, electrocatalytic role of materials, is still missing. These include a thorough characterization of the binding potentials experienced by protons in the lattice. We report results of Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS) measurements of the vibrational state of the protons in Ni- YSZ highly porous composites (75% to 90% ), a ceramic-metal material showing a high electrical conductivity and ther mal stability, which is known to be most effectively used as anodes for solid ox ide fuel cells. The results are compared with INS and Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) experiments on the proton binding states in bulk ice.

  4. Production of nanotubes in delignified porous cellulosic materials after hydrolysis with cellulase.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, Αthanasios Α; Papafotopoulou-Patrinou, Evgenia; Gialleli, Angelika-Ioanna; Petsi, Theano; Bekatorou, Argyro; Kanellaki, Maria

    2016-08-01

    In this study, tubular cellulose (TC), a porous cellulosic material produced by delignification of sawdust, was treated with a Trichoderma reesei cellulase in order to increase the proportion of nano-tubes. The effect of enzyme concentration and treatment duration on surface characteristics was studied and the samples were analyzed with BET, SEM and XRD. Also, a composite material of gelatinized starch and TC underwent enzymatic treatment in combination with amylase (320U) and cellulase (320U) enzymes. For TC, the optimum enzyme concentration (640U) led to significant increase of TC specific surface area and pore volume along with the reduction of pore diameter. It was also shown that the enzymatic treatment did not result to a significant change of cellulose crystallinity index. The produced nano-tubular cellulose shows potential for application to drug and chemical preservative delivery systems.

  5. Attenuation of intense sinusoidal waves in air-saturated, bulk porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Herbert L.; Blackstock, David T.

    1987-01-01

    As intense, initially sinusoidal waves propagate in fluids, shocks form and excess attenuation of the wave occurs. Data are presented indicating that shock formation is not necessary for the occurrence of excess attenuation in nonlinear, lossy media, i.e., air-saturated, porous materials. An empirical equation is used to describe the excess attenuation of intense sinusoids in porous materials. The acoustic nonlinearity of and the excess attenuation in porous materials may be predicted directly from dc flow resistivity data. An empirical relationship is used to relate an acoustic nonlinearity parameter to the fundamental frequency and relative dc nonlinearity of two structurally different materials.

  6. Nano-structured phosphorus composite as high-capacity anode materials for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; He, Xiangming; Li, Jianjun; Sun, Wenting; Gao, Jian; Guo, Jianwei; Jiang, Changyin

    2012-09-01

    More than LiP service: The adsorption of red phosphorus into porous carbon provides a composite anode material for lithium-ion batteries. The amorphous nano phosphorus, in the carbon matrix, shows highly reversible lithium storage with high coulombic efficiencies and stable cycling capacity of 750 mAh per gram composite.

  7. Compression under conditions of the plane-strain state of composite powdered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Leshchinskii, V.M.; Blokhin, A.G.; Ermolaeva, I.E.

    1995-03-01

    The deviator part of the stress tensor has a key effect on the compaction of a highly-porous powdered material. The composition of the powder mixture promotes strengthening processes in the plastic phase. The nature of the macroscopic behavior of the composite powdered mixture is affected substantially by the reinforcement of contacts between particles.

  8. Ultrafine-grained porous titanium and porous titanium/magnesium composites fabricated by space holder-enabled severe plastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuanshen; Contreras, Karla G; Jung, Hyun-Do; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Lapovok, Rimma; Estrin, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    Compaction of powders by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) using a novel space holder method was employed to fabricate metallic scaffolds with tuneable porosity. Porous Ti and Ti/Mg composites with 60% and 50% percolating porosity were fabricated using powder blends with two kinds of sacrificial space holders. The high compressive strength and good ductility of porous Ti and porous Ti/Mg obtained in this way are believed to be associated with the ultrafine grain structure of the pore walls. To understand this, a detailed electron microscopy investigation was employed to analyse the interface between Ti/Ti and Ti/Mg particles, the grain structures in Ti particles and the topography of pore surfaces. It was found that using the proposed compaction method, high quality bonding between particles was obtained. Comparing with other powder metallurgy methods to fabricate Ti with an open porous structure, where thermal energy supplied by a laser beam or high temperature sintering is essential, the ECAP process conducted at a relatively low temperature of 400°C was shown to produce unique properties. PMID:26652430

  9. Ultrafine-grained porous titanium and porous titanium/magnesium composites fabricated by space holder-enabled severe plastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuanshen; Contreras, Karla G; Jung, Hyun-Do; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Lapovok, Rimma; Estrin, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    Compaction of powders by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) using a novel space holder method was employed to fabricate metallic scaffolds with tuneable porosity. Porous Ti and Ti/Mg composites with 60% and 50% percolating porosity were fabricated using powder blends with two kinds of sacrificial space holders. The high compressive strength and good ductility of porous Ti and porous Ti/Mg obtained in this way are believed to be associated with the ultrafine grain structure of the pore walls. To understand this, a detailed electron microscopy investigation was employed to analyse the interface between Ti/Ti and Ti/Mg particles, the grain structures in Ti particles and the topography of pore surfaces. It was found that using the proposed compaction method, high quality bonding between particles was obtained. Comparing with other powder metallurgy methods to fabricate Ti with an open porous structure, where thermal energy supplied by a laser beam or high temperature sintering is essential, the ECAP process conducted at a relatively low temperature of 400°C was shown to produce unique properties.

  10. Wear behavior of light-cured dental composites filled with porous glass-ceramic particles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yanni; Liu, Yong; Grover, Liam M; Huang, Baiyun

    2010-01-01

    Wear resistance is still perceived to be one of the most important limiting factors in the long-term performance of dental restorations. Consequently, a range of different materials have been used as filler particles to reduce the rate of wear, particularly in posterior restorations. In this study, novel bioactive glass-ceramic powders exhibiting different nominal calcium-mica to fluorapatite ratios were used as fillers for light-cured dental composites. Wear tests on the resulting samples were undertaken using a micro-tribometer with a linear reciprocating ball-on-flat geometry using lubrication from artificial saliva. The surfaces of the worn composites were then evaluated using optical microscopy. In order to enhance matrix bonding, the surfaces of the different particulates were treated using hydrofluoric acid to provide a porous surface and the resulting surface morphology was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Although in the case of the samples containing low fluorapatite contents (20 wt%; A2), surface etching enhanced the wear resistance of the composite, etching reduced the wear resistance of materials containing 50 wt% fluorapatite (A5). The reduction in wear resistance was attributed to the friability of the A5 particles following surface treatment. This suggests that in order to optimize wear resistance, it is important to find a critical balance between surface roughness and porosity and the strength of individual particles.

  11. Wear behavior of light-cured dental composites filled with porous glass-ceramic particles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yanni; Liu, Yong; Grover, Liam M; Huang, Baiyun

    2010-01-01

    Wear resistance is still perceived to be one of the most important limiting factors in the long-term performance of dental restorations. Consequently, a range of different materials have been used as filler particles to reduce the rate of wear, particularly in posterior restorations. In this study, novel bioactive glass-ceramic powders exhibiting different nominal calcium-mica to fluorapatite ratios were used as fillers for light-cured dental composites. Wear tests on the resulting samples were undertaken using a micro-tribometer with a linear reciprocating ball-on-flat geometry using lubrication from artificial saliva. The surfaces of the worn composites were then evaluated using optical microscopy. In order to enhance matrix bonding, the surfaces of the different particulates were treated using hydrofluoric acid to provide a porous surface and the resulting surface morphology was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Although in the case of the samples containing low fluorapatite contents (20 wt%; A2), surface etching enhanced the wear resistance of the composite, etching reduced the wear resistance of materials containing 50 wt% fluorapatite (A5). The reduction in wear resistance was attributed to the friability of the A5 particles following surface treatment. This suggests that in order to optimize wear resistance, it is important to find a critical balance between surface roughness and porosity and the strength of individual particles. PMID:19878904

  12. Improved osteoblasts growth on osteomimetic hydroxyapatite/BaTiO3 composites with aligned lamellar porous structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Beilei; Chen, Liangjian; Shao, Chunsheng; Zhang, Fuqiang; Zhou, Kechao; Cao, Jun; Zhang, Dou

    2016-04-01

    Osteoblasts growing into bone substitute is an important step of bone regeneration. This study prepared porous hydroxyapatite (HA)/BaTiO3 piezoelectric composites with porosity of 40%, 50% and 60% by ice-templating method. Effects of HA/BaTiO3 composites with different porosities, with and without polarizing treatment on adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts were investigated in vitro. Results revealed that cell densities of the porous groups were significantly higher than those of the dense group (p<0.05), so did the alkaline phosphate (ALP) and bone gla protein (BGP) activities. Porosity of 50% group exhibited higher ALP activity and BGP activity than those of the 40% and 60% groups. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations revealed that osteoblasts adhered and stretched better on porous HA/BaTiO3 than on the dense one, especially HA/BaTiO3 with porosity of 50% and 60%. However, there was no significant difference in the cell morphology, cell densities, ALP and BGP activities between the polarized group and the non-polarized group (p>0.05). The absence of mechanical loading on the polarized samples may account for this. The results indicated that hierarchically porous HA/BaTiO3 played a favorable part in osteoblasts proliferation, differentiation and adhesion process and is a promising bone substitute material. PMID:26838817

  13. Improved osteoblasts growth on osteomimetic hydroxyapatite/BaTiO3 composites with aligned lamellar porous structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Beilei; Chen, Liangjian; Shao, Chunsheng; Zhang, Fuqiang; Zhou, Kechao; Cao, Jun; Zhang, Dou

    2016-04-01

    Osteoblasts growing into bone substitute is an important step of bone regeneration. This study prepared porous hydroxyapatite (HA)/BaTiO3 piezoelectric composites with porosity of 40%, 50% and 60% by ice-templating method. Effects of HA/BaTiO3 composites with different porosities, with and without polarizing treatment on adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts were investigated in vitro. Results revealed that cell densities of the porous groups were significantly higher than those of the dense group (p<0.05), so did the alkaline phosphate (ALP) and bone gla protein (BGP) activities. Porosity of 50% group exhibited higher ALP activity and BGP activity than those of the 40% and 60% groups. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations revealed that osteoblasts adhered and stretched better on porous HA/BaTiO3 than on the dense one, especially HA/BaTiO3 with porosity of 50% and 60%. However, there was no significant difference in the cell morphology, cell densities, ALP and BGP activities between the polarized group and the non-polarized group (p>0.05). The absence of mechanical loading on the polarized samples may account for this. The results indicated that hierarchically porous HA/BaTiO3 played a favorable part in osteoblasts proliferation, differentiation and adhesion process and is a promising bone substitute material.

  14. Formation of nano-hydroxyapatite in gelatin droplets and the resulting porous composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Teng, Shuhua; Chen, Lijuan; Guo, Yanchuan; Shi, Jingjing

    2007-04-01

    A one-pot strategy was first presented in this paper to synthesize gelatin/hydroxyapatite (HAP) composite microspheres in a water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion. Using gelatin droplets as microreactors and colloid protective medium, needle-like nano-HAP crystals (5 nm x 60-100 nm) in form of clusters were homogeneously and orderly precipitated within gelatin matrix. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the as-prepared microspheres with an average diameter of 7.5 microm displayed a narrow particle size distribution, a high dispersity and a naturally porous structure. This microsphere material is expected to have a great potential for both controlled drug release and faster bone in-growth in bone tissue engineering.

  15. Self-lubricating composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two types of self lubricating composites (polymer matrix composites and inorganic composites) are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to the applicability of these composites in the aerospace industry.

  16. Modeling Dynamic Compaction of Porous Materials with the Overstress Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2013-06-01

    To model compaction of a porous material (PM) we need 1) an equation of state (EOS) of the PM in terms of the EOS of its matrix, and 2) a compaction law. For the EOS it is common to use Herrmann's suggestion, as in his P α model. For a compaction law it is common to use a quasi-static compaction relation obtained from 1) a mezzo-scale model (as in Carroll and Holt's spherical shell model), or from 2) quasi-static tests. Here we are interested in dynamic compaction, like in a planar impact test. In dynamic compaction, the state may change too fast for the state point to follow the quasi-static compaction curve. We therefore get an overstress situation. The state point moves out of the quasi-static compaction boundary, and only with time collapses back towards it at a certain rate. In this way the dynamic compaction event becomes rate dependent. In the paper we first write down the rate equations for dynamic compaction according to this overstress approach. We then implement these equations in a hydro-code, and run some examples. We show how the overstress rate parameter can be calibrated from tests.

  17. Calibration of thermocouple psychrometers and moisture measurements in porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guz, Łukasz; Sobczuk, Henryk; Połednik, Bernard; Guz, Ewa

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents in situ method of peltier psychrometric sensors calibration which allow to determine water potential. Water potential can be easily recalculated into moisture content of the porous material. In order to obtain correct results of water potential, each probe should be calibrated. NaCl salt solutions with molar concentration of 0.4M, 0.7M, 1.0M and 1.4M, were used for calibration which enabled to obtain osmotic potential in range: -1791 kPa to -6487 kPa. Traditionally, the value of voltage generated on thermocouples during wet-bulb temperature depression is calculated in order to determine the calibration function for psychrometric in situ sensors. In the new method of calibration, the field under psychrometric curve along with peltier cooling current and duration was taken into consideration. During calibration, different cooling currents were applied for each salt solution, i.e. 3, 5, 8 mA respectively, as well as different cooling duration for each current (from 2 to 100 sec with 2 sec step). Afterwards, the shape of each psychrometric curve was thoroughly examined and a value of field under psychrometric curve was computed. Results of experiment indicate that there is a robust correlation between field under psychrometric curve and water potential. Calibrations formulas were designated on the basis of these features.

  18. Composite materials for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Henager, C.H. Jr.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1991-10-01

    Ceramic matrix composites, CMCs, are being considered for advanced first-wall and blanket structural applications because of their high-temperature properties, low neutron activation, low density and low coefficient of expansion coupled with good thermal conductivity and corrosion behavior. This paper presents a review and analysis of the hermetic, thermal conductivity, corrosion, crack growth and radiation damage properties of CMCs. It was concluded that the leak rates of a gaseous coolant into the plasma chamber or tritium out of the blanket could exceed design criteria if matrix microcracking causes existing porosity to become interconnected. Thermal conductivities of unirradiated SiC/SiC and C/SiC materials are about 1/2 to 2/3 that of Type 316 SS whereas the thermal conductivity for C/C composites is seven times larger. The thermal stress figure-of-merit value for CMCs exceeds that of Type 316 SS for a single thermal cycle. SiC/SiC composites are very resistant to corrosion and are expected to be compatible with He or Li coolants if the O{sub 2} concentrations are maintained at the appropriate levels. CMCs exhibit subcritical crack growth at elevated temperatures and the crack velocity is a function of the corrosion conditions. The radiation stability of CMCs will depend on the stability of the fiber, microcracking of the matrix, and the effects of gaseous transmutation products on properties. 23 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Small-angle and surface scattering from porous and fractal materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, S. K.

    1998-09-18

    We review the basic theoretical methods used to treat small-angle scattering from porous materials, treated as general two-phase systems, and also the basic experimental techniques for carrying out such experiments. We discuss the special forms of the scattering when the materials exhibit mass or surface fractal behavior, and review the results of recent experiments on several types of porous media and also SANS experiments probing the phase behavior of binary fluid mixtures or polymer solutions confined in porous materials. Finally, we discuss the analogous technique of off-specular scattering from surfaces and interfaces which is used to study surface roughness of various kinds.

  20. Analysis of ignition of a porous energetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Telengator, A.M.; Williams, F.A.; Margolis, S.B.

    1998-04-01

    A theory of ignition is presented to analyze the effect of porosity on the time to ignition of a semi-infinite porous energetic solid subjected to a constant energy flux. An asymptotic perturbation analysis, based on the smallness of the gas-to-solid density ratio and the largeness of the activation energy, is utilized to describe the inert and transition stages leading to thermal runaway. As in the classical study of a nonporous solid, the transition stage consists of three spatial regions in the limit of large activation energy: a thin reactive-diffusive layer adjacent to the exposed surface of the material where chemical effects are first felt, a somewhat thicker transient-diffusive zone, and finally an inert region where the temperature field is still governed solely by conductive heat transfer. Solutions in each region are constructed at each order with respect to the density-ratio parameter and matched to one another using asymptotic matching principles. It is found that the effects of porosity provide a leading-order reduction in the time to ignition relative to that for the nonporous problem, arising from the reduced amount of solid material that must be heated and the difference in thermal conductivities of the solid and gaseous phases. A positive correction to the leading-order ignition-delay time, however, is provided by the convective flow of gas out of the solid, which stems from the effects of thermal expansion and removes energy from the system. The latter phenomenon is absent from the corresponding calculation for the nonporous problem and produces a number of modifications at the next order in the analysis arising from the relative transport effects associated with the gas flow.

  1. Comparison of porous and nonporous materials for methane storage

    SciTech Connect

    Thallapally, Praveen K.; Kirby, Karen A.; Atwood, Jerry L.

    2007-05-10

    Sublimed, low-density p-tert-buytlcalix(4)arene absorbs methane more readily at room temperature and 1 atm pressure than do either single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) or a comparaitive porous metal-organic framework (MOF-1).

  2. Space processing of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, W. H.; Kaye, S.

    1975-01-01

    Materials and processes for the testing of aluminum-base fiber and particle composites, and of metal foams under extended-time low-g conditions were investigated. A wetting and dispersion technique was developed, based on the theory that under the absence of a gas phase all solids are wetted by liquids. The process is characterized by a high vacuum environment and a high temperature cycle. Successful wetting and dispersion experiments were carried out with sapphire fibers, whiskers and particles, and with fibers of silicon carbide, pyrolytic graphite and tungsten. The developed process and facilities permit the preparation of a precomposite which serves as sample material for flight experiments. Low-g processing consists then merely in the uniform redistribution of the reinforcements during a melting cycle. For the preparation of metal foams, gas generation by means of a thermally decomposing compound was found most adaptable to flight experiments. For flight experiments, the use of compacted mixture of the component materials limits low-g processing to a simple melt cycle.

  3. Examining porous bio-active glass as a potential osteo-odonto-keratoprosthetic skirt material.

    PubMed

    Huhtinen, Reeta; Sandeman, Susan; Rose, Susanna; Fok, Elsie; Howell, Carol; Fröberg, Linda; Moritz, Niko; Hupa, Leena; Lloyd, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Bio-active glass has been developed for use as a bone substitute with strong osteo-inductive capacity and the ability to form strong bonds with soft and hard tissue. The ability of this material to enhance tissue in-growth suggests its potential use as a substitute for the dental laminate of an osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis. A preliminary in vitro investigation of porous bio-active glass as an OOKP skirt material was carried out. Porous glass structures were manufactured from bio-active glasses 1-98 and 28-04 containing varying oxide formulation (1-98, 28-04) and particle size range (250-315 μm for 1-98 and 28-04a, 315-500 μm for 28-04b). Dissolution of the porous glass structure and its effect on pH was measured. Structural 2D and 3D analysis of porous structures were performed. Cell culture experiments were carried out to study keratocyte adhesion and the inflammatory response induced by the porous glass materials. The dissolution results suggested that the porous structure made out of 1-98 dissolves faster than the structures made from glass 28-04. pH experiments showed that the dissolution of the porous glass increased the pH of the surrounding solution. The cell culture results showed that keratocytes adhered onto the surface of each of the porous glass structures, but cell adhesion and spreading was greatest for the 98a bio-glass. Cytokine production by all porous glass samples was similar to that of the negative control indicating that the glasses do not induce a cytokine driven inflammatory response. Cell culture results support the potential use of synthetic porous bio-glass as an OOKP skirt material in terms of limited inflammatory potential and capacity to induce and support tissue ingrowth.

  4. Mechanics of interfacial composite materials.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Abkarian, Manouk; Mahadevan, L; Stone, Howard A

    2006-11-21

    Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated that particle-covered fluid/fluid interfaces can exist in stable nonspherical shapes as a result of the steric jamming of the interfacially trapped particles. The jamming confers the interface with solidlike properties. We provide an experimental and theoretical characterization of the mechanical properties of these armored objects, with attention given to the two-dimensional granular state of the interface. Small inhomogeneous stresses produce a plastic response, while homogeneous stresses produce a weak elastic response. Shear-driven particle-scale rearrangements explain the basic threshold needed to obtain the near-perfect plastic deformation that is observed. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous stress state of the interface is exhibited experimentally by using surfactants to destabilize the particles on the surface. Since the interfacially trapped particles retain their individual characteristics, armored interfaces can be recognized as a kind of composite material with distinct chemical, structural, and mechanical properties.

  5. Evaluation of the novel three-dimensional porous poly (L-lactic acid)/nano-hydroxyapatite composite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianghong; Xiong, Jianyi; Liu, Jianquan; Zhu, Weimin; Chen, Jielin; Duan, Li; Zhang, Jufeng; Wang, Daping

    2015-01-01

    To determine the optimal ratio of nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) to polylactic acid (PLLA) in the novel three-dimensional porous PLLA/n-HA composite scaffolds, low-temperature rapid prototyping technology was employed to fabricate the composite materials with different n-HA contents. Mechanical properties and degradation behaviors of the composites were examined, and the scaffold microstructure and n-HA dispersion were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Mechanical tests demonstrated that the tensile strength of the composite material gradually decreased with an increase in n-HA content. When the n-HA content reached 20 wt%, the bending strength of the composite material peaked at 138.5 MPa. SEM images demonstrated that the optimal content of n-HA was 20 wt% as the largest interconnected pore size that can be seen, with a porosity as high as 80%. In vitro degradation experiments demonstrated that the pH value of the material containing solution gradually decreased in a time-dependent manner, with a simultaneous weakening of the mechanical properties. In vitro study using rat osteoblast cells showed that the composite scaffolds were biocompatible; the 20 wt% n-HA scaffold offered particular improvement to rat osteoblast cell adhesion and proliferation compared to other compositions. It was therefore concluded that 20 wt% n-HA is the optimal nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) to polylactic acid (PLLA) ratio, with promise for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26405972

  6. Evaluation of the novel three-dimensional porous poly (L-lactic acid)/nano-hydroxyapatite composite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianghong; Xiong, Jianyi; Liu, Jianquan; Zhu, Weimin; Chen, Jielin; Duan, Li; Zhang, Jufeng; Wang, Daping

    2015-01-01

    To determine the optimal ratio of nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) to polylactic acid (PLLA) in the novel three-dimensional porous PLLA/n-HA composite scaffolds, low-temperature rapid prototyping technology was employed to fabricate the composite materials with different n-HA contents. Mechanical properties and degradation behaviors of the composites were examined, and the scaffold microstructure and n-HA dispersion were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Mechanical tests demonstrated that the tensile strength of the composite material gradually decreased with an increase in n-HA content. When the n-HA content reached 20 wt%, the bending strength of the composite material peaked at 138.5 MPa. SEM images demonstrated that the optimal content of n-HA was 20 wt% as the largest interconnected pore size that can be seen, with a porosity as high as 80%. In vitro degradation experiments demonstrated that the pH value of the material containing solution gradually decreased in a time-dependent manner, with a simultaneous weakening of the mechanical properties. In vitro study using rat osteoblast cells showed that the composite scaffolds were biocompatible; the 20 wt% n-HA scaffold offered particular improvement to rat osteoblast cell adhesion and proliferation compared to other compositions. It was therefore concluded that 20 wt% n-HA is the optimal nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) to polylactic acid (PLLA) ratio, with promise for bone tissue engineering.

  7. Selenium/interconnected porous hollow carbon bubbles composites as the cathodes of Li-Se batteries with high performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Fan, Long; Zhu, Yongchun; Xu, Yanhua; Liang, Jianwen; Wei, Denghu; Qian, Yitai

    2014-11-01

    A kind of Se/C nanocomposite is fabricated by dispersing selenium in interconnected porous hollow carbon bubbles (PHCBs) via a melt-diffusion method. Such PHCBs are composed of porous hollow carbon spheres with a size of ∼70 nm and shells of ∼12 nm thickness interconnected to each other. Instrumental analysis shows that the porous shell of the PHCBs could effectively disperse and sequester most of the selenium, while the inner cavity remains hollow. When evaluated as cathode materials in a carbonate-based electrolyte for Li-Se batteries, the Se/PHCBs composites exhibit significantly excellent cycling performance and a high rate capability. Especially, the Se/PHCBs composite with an optimal content of ∼50 wt% selenium (Se50/PHCBs) displays a reversible discharge capacity of 606.3 mA h g(-1) after 120 cycles at 0.1 C charge-discharge rate. As the current density increased from 0.1 to 1 C (678 mA g(-1)), the reversible capacity of the Se50/PHCBs composite can still reach 64% of the theoretical capacity (431.9 mA h g(-1)). These outstanding electrochemical features should be attributed to effective sequestration of Se in the PHCBs, as well as to the ability to accommodate volume variation and enhance the electronic transport by making Se have close contact with the carbon framework.

  8. Durability of polymer composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liu

    The purpose of this research is to examine structural durability of advanced composite materials under critical loading conditions, e.g., combined thermal and mechanical loading and shear fatigue loading. A thermal buckling model of a burnt column, either axially restrained or under an axial applied force was developed. It was predicted that for a column exposed to the high heat flux under simultaneous constant compressive load, the response of the column is the same as that of an imperfection column; the instability of the burnt column happens. Based on the simplified theoretical prediction, the post-fire compressive behavior of fiberglass reinforced vinyl-ester composite columns, which have been exposed to high heat flux for a certain time was investigated experimentally, the post-fire compressive strength, modulus and failure mode were determined. The integrity of the same column under constant compressive mechanical loading combined with heat flux exposure was examined using a specially designed mechanical loading fixture that mounted directly below a cone calorimeter. All specimens in the experiments exhibited compressive instability. The experimental results show a thermal bending moment exists and has a significant influence on the structural behavior, which verified the thermal buckling model. The trend of response between the deflection of the column and exposure time is similar to that predicted by the model. A new apparatus was developed to study the monotonic shear and cyclic-shear behavior of sandwich structures. Proof-of-concept experiments were performed using PVC foam core polymeric sandwich materials. Shear failure occurred by the extension of cracks parallel to the face-sheet/core interface, the shear modulus degraded with the growth of fatigue damage. Finite element analysis was conducted to determine stress distribution in the proposed specimen geometry used in the new technique. Details for a novel apparatus used for the fatigue testing of thin

  9. Indirect solid free form fabrication of local and global porous, biomimetic and composite 3D polymer-ceramic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Taboas, J M; Maddox, R D; Krebsbach, P H; Hollister, S J

    2003-01-01

    Precise control over scaffold material, porosity, and internal pore architecture is essential for tissue engineering. By coupling solid free form (SFF) manufacturing with conventional sponge scaffold fabrication procedures, we have developed methods for casting scaffolds that contain designed and controlled locally porous and globally porous internal architectures. These methods are compatible with numerous bioresorbable and non-resorbable polymers, ceramics, and biologic materials. Phase separation, emulsion-solvent diffusion, and porogen leaching were used to create poly(L)lactide (PLA) scaffolds containing both computationally designed global pores (500, 600, or 800 microm wide channels) and solvent fashioned local pores (50-100 microm wide voids or 5-10 microm length plates). Globally porous PLA and polyglycolide/PLA discrete composites were made using melt processing. Biphasic scaffolds with mechanically interdigitated PLA and sintered hydroxyapatite regions were fabricated with 500 and 600 microm wide global pores. PLA scaffolds with complex internal architectures that mimicked human trabecular bone were produced. Our indirect fabrication using casting in SFF molds provided enhanced control over scaffold shape, material, porosity and pore architecture, including size, geometry, orientation, branching, and interconnectivity. These scaffolds that contain concurrent local and global pores, discrete material regions, and biomimetic internal architectures may prove valuable for multi-tissue and structural tissue interface engineering. PMID:12417192

  10. Supercritical adsorption testing of porous silicon, activated carbon, and zeolite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Brendan

    The supercritical adsorption of methane gas on porous silicon, activated carbon, and zeolite materials was studied. An apparatus that utilizes the volumetric adsorption measurement technique was designed and constructed to conduct the experiments. Activated carbon materials consisted of Norit RX3 Extra, Zorflex FM30K woven activated carbon cloth, and Zorflex FM10 knitted activated carbon cloth. Zeolite materials consisted of 3A, 4A, 5A, and 13X zeolites. Porous silicon materials consisted of stain etched and electrochemically etched porous films, and stain etched porous powder. All adsorption tests were conducted at room temperature (approximately 298 K) and pressures up to approximately 5 MPa. Overall, the Norit RX3 Extra granulated activated carbon produced the highest excess adsorption and effective storage capacities. Effective storage and delivery capacities of 109 and 90 stpmlml were obtained at a pressure of 3.5 MPa and a temperature of approximately 298 K.

  11. Coupled hydromechanical and electromagnetic disturbances in unsaturated porous materials.

    PubMed

    Revil, A; Mahardika, H

    2013-02-01

    A theory of cross-coupled flow equations in unsaturated soils is necessary to predict (1) electroosmotic flow with application to electroremediation and agriculture, (2) the electroseismic and the seismoelectric effects to develop new geophysical methods to characterize the vadose zone, and (3) the streaming current, which can be used to investigate remotely ground water flow in unsaturated conditions in the capillary water regime. To develop such a theory, the cross-coupled generalized Darcy and Ohm constitutive equations of transport are extended to unsaturated conditions. This model accounts for inertial effects and for the polarization of porous materials. Rather than using the zeta potential, like in conventional theories for the saturated case, the key parameter used here is the quasi-static volumetric charge density of the pore space, which can be directly computed from the quasi-static permeability. The apparent permeability entering Darcy's law is also frequency dependent with a critical relaxation time that is, in turn, dependent on saturation. A decrease of saturation increases the associated relaxation frequency. The final form of the equations couples the Maxwell equations and a simplified form of two-fluid phases Biot theory accounting for water saturation. A generalized expression of the Richard equation is derived, accounting for the effect of the vibration of the skeleton during the passage of seismic waves and the electrical field. A new expression is obtained for the effective stress tensor. The model is tested against experimental data regarding the saturation and frequency dependence of the streaming potential coupling coefficient. The model is also adapted for two-phase flow conditions and a numerical application is shown for water flooding of a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL, oil) contaminated aquifer. Seismoelectric conversions are mostly taking place at the NAPL (oil)/water encroachment front and can be therefore used to remotely track the

  12. Coupled hydromechanical and electromagnetic disturbances in unsaturated porous materials

    PubMed Central

    Revil, A; Mahardika, H

    2013-01-01

    A theory of cross-coupled flow equations in unsaturated soils is necessary to predict (1) electroosmotic flow with application to electroremediation and agriculture, (2) the electroseismic and the seismoelectric effects to develop new geophysical methods to characterize the vadose zone, and (3) the streaming current, which can be used to investigate remotely ground water flow in unsaturated conditions in the capillary water regime. To develop such a theory, the cross-coupled generalized Darcy and Ohm constitutive equations of transport are extended to unsaturated conditions. This model accounts for inertial effects and for the polarization of porous materials. Rather than using the zeta potential, like in conventional theories for the saturated case, the key parameter used here is the quasi-static volumetric charge density of the pore space, which can be directly computed from the quasi-static permeability. The apparent permeability entering Darcy's law is also frequency dependent with a critical relaxation time that is, in turn, dependent on saturation. A decrease of saturation increases the associated relaxation frequency. The final form of the equations couples the Maxwell equations and a simplified form of two-fluid phases Biot theory accounting for water saturation. A generalized expression of the Richard equation is derived, accounting for the effect of the vibration of the skeleton during the passage of seismic waves and the electrical field. A new expression is obtained for the effective stress tensor. The model is tested against experimental data regarding the saturation and frequency dependence of the streaming potential coupling coefficient. The model is also adapted for two-phase flow conditions and a numerical application is shown for water flooding of a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL, oil) contaminated aquifer. Seismoelectric conversions are mostly taking place at the NAPL (oil)/water encroachment front and can be therefore used to remotely track the

  13. Three-dimensional porous MXene/layered double hydroxide composite for high performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Dou, Hui; Wang, Jie; Ding, Bing; Xu, Yunling; Chang, Zhi; Hao, Xiaodong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, an exfoliated MXene (e-MXene) nanosheets/nickel-aluminum layered double hydroxide (MXene/LDH) composite as supercapacitor electrode material is fabricated by in situ growth of LDH on e-MXene substrate. The LDH platelets homogeneously grown on the surface of the e-MXene sheets construct a three-dimensional (3D) porous structure, which not only leads to high active sites exposure of LDH and facile liquid electrolyte penetration, but also alleviates the volume change of LDH during the charge/discharge process. Meanwhile, the e -MXene substrate forms a conductive network to facilitate the electron transport of active material. The optimized MXene/LDH composite exhibits a high specific capacitance of 1061 F g-1 at a current density of 1 A g-1, excellent capacitance retention of 70% after 4000 cycle tests at a current density of 4 A g-1 and a good rate capability with 556 F g-1 retention at 10 A g-1.

  14. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants.

    PubMed

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I; Temchenko, Volodymyr P; Kyselov, Vitalii S; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO2) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. PMID:27524006

  15. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants.

    PubMed

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I; Temchenko, Volodymyr P; Kyselov, Vitalii S; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO2) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application.

  16. Two Stage Repair of Composite Craniofacial Defects with Antibiotic Releasing Porous Poly(methyl methacrylate) Space Maintainers and Bone Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Patrick

    Craniofacial defects resulting from trauma and resection present many challenges to reconstruction due to the complex structure, combinations of tissues, and environment, with exposure to the oral, skin and nasal mucosal pathogens. Tissue engineering seeks to regenerate the tissues lost in these defects; however, the composite nature and proximity to colonizing bacteria remain difficult to overcome. Additionally, many tissue engineering approaches have further hurdles to overcome in the regulatory process to clinical translation. As such these studies investigated a two stage strategy employing an antibiotic-releasing porous polymethylmethacrylate space maintainer fabricated with materials currently part of products approved or cleared by the United States Food and Drug Administration, expediting the translation to the clinic. This porous space maintainer holds the bone defect open allowing soft tissue to heal around the defect. The space maintainer can then be removed and one regenerated in the defect. These studies investigated the individual components of this strategy. The porous space maintainer showed similar soft tissue healing and response to non-porous space maintainers in a rabbit composite tissue defect. The antibiotic-releasing space maintainers showed release of antibiotics from 1-5 weeks, which could be controlled by loading and fabrication parameters. In vivo, space maintainers releasing a high dose of antibiotics for an extended period of time increased soft tissue healing over burst release space maintainers in an infected composite tissue defect model in a rabbit mandible. Finally, stabilization of bone defects and regeneration could be improved through scaffold structures and delivery of a bone forming growth factor. These studies illustrate the possibility of the two stage strategy for repair of composite tissue defects of the craniofacial complex.

  17. Attenuation of shock waves propagating through nano-structured porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qananwah, Ahmad K.; Koplik, Joel; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2013-07-01

    Porous materials have long been known to be effective in energy absorption and shock wave attenuation. These properties make them attractive in blast mitigation strategies. Nano-structured materials have an even greater potential for blast mitigation because of their high surface-to-volume ratio, a geometric parameter which substantially attenuates shock wave propagation. A molecular dynamics approach was used to explore the effects of this remarkable property on the behavior of traveling shocks impacting on solid materials. The computational setup included a moving piston, a gas region and a target solid wall with and without a porous structure. The gas and porous solid were modeled by Lennard-Jones-like and effective atom potentials, respectively. The shock wave is resolved in space and time and its reflection from a solid wall is gradual, due to the wave's finite thickness, and entails a self-interaction as the reflected wave travels through the incoming incident wave. Cases investigated include a free standing porous structure, a porous structure attached to a wall and porous structures with graded porosity. The effects of pore shape and orientation have been also documented. The results indicate that placing a nano-porous material layer in front of the target wall reduced the stress magnitude and the energy deposited inside the solid by about 30 percent, while at the same time substantially decreasing the loading rate.

  18. Porous carbon nanotubes decorated with nanosized cobalt ferrite as anode materials for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lingyan; Zhuo, Linhai; Cheng, Haiyang; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Fengyu

    2015-06-01

    Generally, the fast ion/electron transport and structural stability dominate the superiority in lithium-storage applications. In this work, porous carbon nanotubes decorated with nanosized CoFe2O4 particles (p-CNTs@CFO) have been rationally designed and synthesized by the assistance of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). When tested as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, the p-CNTs@CFO composite exhibits outstanding electrochemical behavior with high lithium-storage capacity (1077 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles) and rate capability (694 mAh g-1 at 3 A g-1). These outstanding electrochemical performances are attributed to the synergistic effect of porous p-CNTs and nanosized CFO. Compared to pristine CNTs, the p-CNTs with substantial pores in the tubes possess largely increased specific surface area and rich oxygen-containing functional groups. The porous structure can not only accommodate the volume change during lithiation/delithiation processes, but also provide bicontinuous electron/ion pathways and large electrode/electrolyte interface, which facilitate the ion diffusion kinetics, improving the rate performance. Moreover, the CFO particles are bonded strongly to the p-CNTs through metal-oxygen bridges, which facilitate the electron fast capture from p-CNTs to CFO, and thus resulting in a high reversible capacity and excellent rate performance. Overall, the porous p-CNTs provide an efficient way for ion diffusion and continuous electron transport as anode materials.

  19. Monodisperse porous silicon spheres as anode materials for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Favors, Zachary; Ionescu, Robert; Ye, Rachel; Bay, Hamed Hosseini; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2015-03-05

    Highly monodisperse porous silicon nanospheres (MPSSs) are synthesized via a simple and scalable hydrolysis process with subsequent surface-protected magnesiothermic reduction. The spherical nature of the MPSSs allows for a homogenous stress-strain distribution within the structure during lithiation and delithiation, which dramatically improves the electrochemical stability. To fully extract the real performance of the MPSSs, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were added to enhance the electronic conductivity within the composite electrode structure, which has been verified to be an effective way to improve the rate and cycling performance of anodes based on nano-Si. The Li-ion battery (LIB) anodes based on MPSSs demonstrate a high reversible capacity of 3105 mAh g(-1). In particular, reversible Li storage capacities above 1500 mAh g(-1) were maintained after 500 cycles at a high rate of C/2. We believe this innovative approach for synthesizing porous Si-based LIB anode materials by using surface-protected magnesiothermic reduction can be readily applied to other types of SiOx nano/microstructures.

  20. Electrohydrodynamic bubbling: an alternative route to fabricate porous structures of silk fibroin based materials.

    PubMed

    Ekemen, Zeynep; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Stride, Eleanor; Kaplan, David; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2013-05-13

    Conventional fabrication techniques and structures employed in the design of silk fibroin (SF) based porous materials provide only limited control over pore size and require several processing stages. In this study, it is shown that, by utilizing electrohydrodynamic bubbling, not only can new hollow spherical structures of SF be formed in a single step by means of bubbles, but the resulting bubbles can serve as pore generators when dehydrated. The bubble characteristics can be controlled through simple adjustments to the processing parameters. Bubbles with diameters in the range of 240-1000 μm were fabricated in controlled fashion. FT-IR characterization confirmed that the rate of air infused during processing enhanced β-sheet packing in SF at higher flow rates. Dynamic mechanical analysis also demonstrated a correlation between air flow rate and film tensile strength. Results indicate that electrohydrodynamically generated SF and their composite bubbles can be employed as new tools to generate porous structures in a controlled manner with a range of potential applications in biocoatings and tissue engineering scaffolds.

  1. Monodisperse Porous Silicon Spheres as Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Favors, Zachary; Ionescu, Robert; Ye, Rachel; Bay, Hamed Hosseini; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2015-03-01

    Highly monodisperse porous silicon nanospheres (MPSSs) are synthesized via a simple and scalable hydrolysis process with subsequent surface-protected magnesiothermic reduction. The spherical nature of the MPSSs allows for a homogenous stress-strain distribution within the structure during lithiation and delithiation, which dramatically improves the electrochemical stability. To fully extract the real performance of the MPSSs, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were added to enhance the electronic conductivity within the composite electrode structure, which has been verified to be an effective way to improve the rate and cycling performance of anodes based on nano-Si. The Li-ion battery (LIB) anodes based on MPSSs demonstrate a high reversible capacity of 3105 mAh g-1. In particular, reversible Li storage capacities above 1500 mAh g-1 were maintained after 500 cycles at a high rate of C/2. We believe this innovative approach for synthesizing porous Si-based LIB anode materials by using surface-protected magnesiothermic reduction can be readily applied to other types of SiOx nano/microstructures.

  2. Monodisperse Porous Silicon Spheres as Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Favors, Zachary; Ionescu, Robert; Ye, Rachel; Bay, Hamed Hosseini; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2015-01-01

    Highly monodisperse porous silicon nanospheres (MPSSs) are synthesized via a simple and scalable hydrolysis process with subsequent surface-protected magnesiothermic reduction. The spherical nature of the MPSSs allows for a homogenous stress-strain distribution within the structure during lithiation and delithiation, which dramatically improves the electrochemical stability. To fully extract the real performance of the MPSSs, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were added to enhance the electronic conductivity within the composite electrode structure, which has been verified to be an effective way to improve the rate and cycling performance of anodes based on nano-Si. The Li-ion battery (LIB) anodes based on MPSSs demonstrate a high reversible capacity of 3105 mAh g−1. In particular, reversible Li storage capacities above 1500 mAh g−1 were maintained after 500 cycles at a high rate of C/2. We believe this innovative approach for synthesizing porous Si-based LIB anode materials by using surface-protected magnesiothermic reduction can be readily applied to other types of SiOx nano/microstructures. PMID:25740298

  3. The influence of composition of porous copolyester scaffolds on reactions induced by irradiation sterilization.

    PubMed

    Odelius, Karin; Plikk, Peter; Albertsson, Ann-Christine

    2008-01-01

    In our previous work regarding radiation sterilization of porous scaffolds we have concluded that the composition and microstructure of the polymer chain are a key factor influencing the degradation reactions occurring upon irradiation. In this work we in contrast reported on the effects of high-energy irradiation on the thermal and mechanical properties. Electron beam (EB)- and gamma-irradiation sterilization were used in order to finalize the properties of a series of porous scaffolds comprised of different aliphatic polyester copolymers. The results presented here show that, for both sterilization methods, the crystallinity increased for all copolymers of 1,5-dioxepan-2-one (DXO) and l,l-lactide (LLA) at the minimum sterilization dose. The same was true of the epsilon-caprolactone (CL)- and LLA-containing copolymers upon EB sterilization, while a reduction in crystallinity were found upon gamma-irradiation. As was anticipated, it was shown that crystallinity also is a characteristic of the copolymer influencing the effects of the irradiation-induced reactions. Both the onset temperature and the temperature corresponding to the maximum rate of weight loss increased after irradiation and hence the thermal stability was increased. This is a result of a simultaneous lengthening of the chains by cross-linking reactions and a shortening by random chain-scissions occurring throughout the molecule, which lead to the formation of new endgroups with higher thermal stability. Scaffolds of crystalline polymers retained more of their initial tensile properties after irradiation compared to amorphous materials. The result previously published, showing that the composition was a key factor influencing the degradation reactions occurring upon irradiation, was augmented here. PMID:17936898

  4. Porous magnesium/PLGA composite scaffolds for enhanced bone regeneration following tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew; Zaky, Samer; Ray, Herbert; Sfeir, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Sixty percent of implant-supported dental prostheses require bone grafting to enhance bone quantity and quality prior to implant placement. We have developed a metallic magnesium particle/PLGA composite scaffold to overcome the limitations of currently used dental bone grafting materials. This is the first report of porous metallic magnesium/PLGA scaffolds synthesized using a solvent casting, salt leaching method. We found that incorporation of varying amounts of magnesium into the PLGA scaffolds increased the compressive strength and modulus, as well as provided a porous structure suitable for cell infiltration, as measured by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Additionally, combining basic-degrading magnesium with acidic-degrading PLGA led to an overall pH buffering effect and long-term release of magnesium over the course of a 10-week degradation assay, as measured with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Using an indirect proliferation assay adapted from ISO 10993:5, it was found that extracts of medium from degrading magnesium/PLGA scaffolds increased bone marrow stromal cell proliferation in vitro, a phenomenon observed by other groups investigating magnesium's impact on cells. Finally, magnesium/PLGA scaffold biocompatibility was assessed in a canine socket preservation model. Micro-computed tomography and histological analysis showed the magnesium/PLGA scaffolds to be safer and more effective at preserving bone height than empty controls. Three-dimensional magnesium/PLGA composite scaffolds show promise for dental socket preservation and also, potentially, orthopedic bone regeneration. These scaffolds could decrease inflammation observed with clinically used PLGA devices, as well as enhance osteogenesis, as observed with previously studied magnesium devices.

  5. Delamination growth in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Carlsson, L. A.; Pipes, R. B.; Rothschilds, R.; Trethewey, B.; Smiley, A.

    1986-01-01

    The Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) specimens are employed to characterize MODE I and MODE II interlaminar fracture resistance of graphite/epoxy (CYCOM 982) and graphite/PEEK (APC2) composites. Sizing of test specimen geometries to achieve crack growth in the linear elastic regime is presented. Data reduction schemes based upon beam theory are derived for the ENF specimen and include the effects of shear deformation and friction between crack surfaces on compliance, C, and strain energy release rate, G sub II. Finite element (FE) analyses of the ENF geometry including the contact problem with friction are presented to assess the accuracy of beam theory expressions for C and G sub II. Virtual crack closure techniques verify that the ENF specimen is a pure Mode II test. Beam theory expressions are shown to be conservative by 20 to 40 percent for typical unidirectional test specimen geometries. A FE parametric study investigating the influence of delamination length and depth, span, thickness and material properties on G sub II is presented. Mode I and II interlaminar fracture test results are presented. Important experimental parameters are isolated, such as precracking techniques, rate effects, and nonlinear load-deflection response. It is found that subcritical crack growth and inelastic materials behavior, responsible for the observed nonlinearities, are highly rate-dependent phenomena with high rates generally leading to linear elastic response.

  6. Thin film dielectric composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Jia, Quanxi; Gibbons, Brady J.; Findikoglu, Alp T.; Park, Bae Ho

    2002-01-01

    A dielectric composite material comprising at least two crystal phases of different components with TiO.sub.2 as a first component and a material selected from the group consisting of Ba.sub.1-x Sr.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.3 to 0.7, Pb.sub.1-x Ca.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.4 to 0.7, Sr.sub.1-x Pb.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, Ba.sub.1-x Cd.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.02 to 0.1, BaTi.sub.1-x Zr.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Sn.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.15 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Hf.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.24 to 0.3, Pb.sub.1-1.3x La.sub.x TiO.sub.3+0.2x where x is from 0.23 to 0.3, (BaTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFeo.sub.0.5 Nb.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.75 to 0.9, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.- (PbCo.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.1 to 0.45, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbMg.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, and (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFe.sub.0.5 Ta.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0 to 0.2, as the second component is described. The dielectric composite material can be formed as a thin film upon suitable substrates.

  7. Polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1991-01-01

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein, said polyolefin being thermally form stable; the composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  8. Porous tooling process for manufacture of graphite/polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smiser, L. W.; Orr, K. K.; Araujo, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    A porous tooling system was selected for the processing of Graphite/PMR-15 Polyimide laminates in thickness up to 3.2 mm. (0.125 inch). This tool system must have a reasonable strength, permeability dimensional stability, and thermal conductivity to accomplish curing at 600 F and 200 psi and 200 psi autoclave temperature and pressure. A permeability measuring apparatus was constructed and permeability vs. casting water level determined to produce tools at three different permeability levels. On these tools, laminates of 5, 11, and 22 plies (.027, .060, and 0.121 inch) were produced and evaluated by ultrasonic, mechanical, and thermal tests to determine the effect of the tool permeability on the cured laminates. All tools produced acceptable laminates at 5 and 11 plies but only the highest permeability produced acceptable clear ultrasonic C-Scans. Recommendations are made for future investigations of design geometry, and strengthening techniques for porous ceramic tooling.

  9. Composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Samuels, William D.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2004-04-20

    The composite material and methods of making the present invention rely upon a fully dense monolayer of molecules attached to an oxygenated surface at one end, and an organic terminal group at the other end, which is in turn bonded to a polymer. Thus, the composite material is a second material chemically bonded to a polymer with fully dense monolayer there between.

  10. Porous nano-hydroxyapatite/poly(vinyl alcohol) composite hydrogel as artificial cornea fringe: characterization and evaluation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fenglan; Li, Yubao; Deng, Yingpin; Xiong, Jie

    2008-01-01

    A nano-hydroxyapatite/poly(vinyl alcohol) (n-HA/PVA) composite hydrogel was employed as artificial cornea fringe to improve biocompatibility for the firm fixation between material and surrounding host tissues. The morphology and swelling behavior, as well as mechanical strength of the fringes were characterized. The results showed that the n-HA/PVA fringes had interconnective porous structure, high water content and good mechanical properties. With the aid of cell culture observed by inverted microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and MTT test, it was concluded that PVA hydrogel modified with n-HA can improve biocompatibility and has no negative effects on the corneal fibroblasts in vitro. These findings indicate that the porous n-HA/PVA fringe can allow invasion and proliferation of cells, and can function as a fringe for artificial cornea.

  11. Development of porous Ti6Al4V/chitosan sponge composite scaffold for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Miao; Li, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    A novel composite scaffold consisting of porous Ti6Al4V part filled with chitosan sponge was fabricated using a combination of electron beam melting and freeze-drying. The mechanical properties of porous Ti6Al4V part were examined via compressive test. The ultimate compressive strength was 85.35 ± 8.68 MPa and the compressive modulus was 2.26 ± 0.42 GPa. The microstructure of composite scaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The chitosan sponge filled in Ti6Al4V part exhibited highly porous and well-interconnected micro-pore architecture. The osteoblastic cells were seeded on scaffolds to test their seeding efficiency and biocompatibility. Significantly higher cell seeding efficiency was found on composite scaffold. The biological response of osteoblasts on composite scaffolds was superior in terms of improved cell attachment, higher proliferation, and well-spread morphology in relation to porous Ti6Al4V part. These results suggest that the Ti6Al4V/chitosan composite scaffold is potentially useful as a biomedical scaffold for orthopedic applications. PMID:26478418

  12. Development of porous Ti6Al4V/chitosan sponge composite scaffold for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Miao; Li, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    A novel composite scaffold consisting of porous Ti6Al4V part filled with chitosan sponge was fabricated using a combination of electron beam melting and freeze-drying. The mechanical properties of porous Ti6Al4V part were examined via compressive test. The ultimate compressive strength was 85.35 ± 8.68 MPa and the compressive modulus was 2.26 ± 0.42 GPa. The microstructure of composite scaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The chitosan sponge filled in Ti6Al4V part exhibited highly porous and well-interconnected micro-pore architecture. The osteoblastic cells were seeded on scaffolds to test their seeding efficiency and biocompatibility. Significantly higher cell seeding efficiency was found on composite scaffold. The biological response of osteoblasts on composite scaffolds was superior in terms of improved cell attachment, higher proliferation, and well-spread morphology in relation to porous Ti6Al4V part. These results suggest that the Ti6Al4V/chitosan composite scaffold is potentially useful as a biomedical scaffold for orthopedic applications.

  13. Method for the preparation of ferrous low carbon porous material

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Curtis Jack

    2014-05-27

    A method for preparing a porous metal article using a powder metallurgy forming process is provided which eliminates the conventional steps associated with removing residual carbon. The method uses a feedstock that includes a ferrous metal powder and a polycarbonate binder. The polycarbonate binder can be removed by thermal decomposition after the metal article is formed without leaving a carbon residue.

  14. Method for machining holes in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Julia G. (Inventor); Ledbetter, Frank E., III (Inventor); Clemons, Johnny M. (Inventor); Penn, Benjamin G. (Inventor); White, William T. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method for boring well defined holes in a composite material such as graphite/epoxy is discussed. A slurry of silicon carbide powder and water is projected onto a work area of the composite material in which a hole is to be bored with a conventional drill bit. The silicon carbide powder and water slurry allow the drill bit, while experiencing only normal wear, to bore smooth, cylindrical holes in the composite material.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of permeability in porous materials with partially percolating voxels.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruru; Yang, Y Sam; Pan, Jinxiao; Pereira, Gerald G; Taylor, John A; Clennell, Ben; Zou, Caineng

    2014-09-01

    A partial-bounce-back lattice Boltzmann model has been used to simulate flow on a lattice consisting of cubic voxels with a locally varying effective percolating fraction. The effective percolating fraction of a voxel is the total response to the partial-bounce-back techniques for porous media flow due to subvoxel fine structures. The model has been verified against known analytic solutions on two- and three-dimensional regular geometries, and has been applied to simulate flow and permeabilities of two real-world rock samples. This enables quantitative determination of permeability for problems where voxels cannot be adequately segmented as discrete compositions. The voxel compositions are represented as volume fractions of various material phases and void. The numerical results have shown that, for the tight-sandstone sample, the bulk permeability is sensitive to the effective percolating fraction of calcite. That is, the subvoxel flow paths in the calcite phase are important for bulk permeability. On the other hand, flow in the calcite phase in the sandstone sample makes an insignificant contribution to the bulk permeability. The calculated permeability value for the sandstone sample is up to two orders of magnitude greater than the tight sandstone. This model is generic and could be applied to other oil and gas reservoir media or to material samples.

  16. Morphology and microstructure of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Srinivansan, K.

    1991-01-01

    Lightweight continuous carbon fiber based polymeric composites are currently enjoying increasing acceptance as structural materials capable of replacing metals and alloys in load bearing applications. As with most new materials, these composites are undergoing trials with several competing processing techniques aimed at cost effectively producing void free consolidations with good mechanical properties. As metallic materials have been in use for several centuries, a considerable database exists on their morphology - microstructure; and the interrelationships between structure and properties have been well documented. Numerous studies on composites have established the crucial relationship between microstructure - morphology and properties. The various microstructural and morphological features of composite materials, particularly those accompanying different processing routes, are documented.

  17. Process for producing dispersed particulate composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Hirth, John P.

    1995-01-01

    This invention is directed to a process for forming noninterwoven dispersed particulate composite products. In one case a composite multi-layer film product comprises a substantially noninterwoven multi-layer film having a plurality of discrete layers. This noninterwoven film comprises at least one discrete layer of a first material and at least one discrete layer of a second material. In another case the first and second materials are blended together with each other. In either case, the first material comprises a metalloid and the second material a metal compound. At least one component of a first material in one discrete layer undergoes a solid state displacement reaction with at least one component of a second material thereby producing the requisite noninterwoven composite film product. Preferably, the first material comprises silicon, the second material comprises Mo.sub.2 C, the third material comprises SiC and the fourth material comprises MoSi.sub.2.

  18. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  19. Porous carbon spheres and monoliths: morphology control, pore size tuning and their applications as Li-ion battery anode materials.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Aled D; Li, Xu; Zhang, Haifei

    2014-07-01

    The development of the next generation of advanced lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) requires new & advanced materials and novel fabrication techniques in order to push the boundaries of performance and open up new and exciting markets. Structured carbon materials, with controlled pore features on the micron and nanometer scales, are explored as advanced alternatives to conventional graphite as the active material of the LIB anode. Mesoporous carbon materials, carbon nanotube-based materials, and graphene-based materials have been extensively investigated and reviewed. Morphology control (e.g., colloids, thin films, nanofibrous mats, monoliths) and hierarchical pores (particularly the presence of large pores) exhibit an increasing influence on LIB performance. This tutorial review focuses on the synthetic techniques for preparation of porous carbon spheres and carbon monoliths, including hydrothermal carbonization, emulsion templating, ice templating and new developments in making porous carbons from sustainable biomass and metal-organic framework templating. We begin with a brief introduction to LIBs, defining key parameters and terminology used to assess the performance of anode materials, and then address synthetic techniques for the fabrication of carbon spheres & monoliths and the relevant composites, followed, respectively, by a review of their performance as LIB anode materials. The review is completed with a prospective view on the possible direction of future research in this field.

  20. Is Macroporosity Absolutely Required for Preliminary in Vitro Bone Biomaterial Study? A Comparison between Porous Materials and Flat Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juliana T.Y.; Chow, King L.; Wang, Kefeng; Tsang, Wai Hung

    2011-01-01

    Porous materials are highly preferred for bone tissue engineering due to space for blood vessel ingrowth, but this may introduce extra experimental variations because of the difficulty in precise control of porosity. In order to decide whether it is absolutely necessary to use porous materials in in vitro comparative osteogenesis study of materials with different chemistries, we carried out osteoinductivity study using C3H/10T1/2 cells, pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), on seven material types: hydroxyapatite (HA), α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) in both porous and dense forms and tissue culture plastic. For all materials under test, dense materials give higher alkaline phosphatase gene (Alp) expression compared with porous materials. In addition, the cell density effects on the 10T1/2 cells were assessed through alkaline phosphatase protein (ALP) enzymatic assay. The ALP expression was higher for higher initial cell plating density and this explains the greater osteoinductivity of dense materials compared with porous materials for in vitro study as porous materials would have higher surface area. On the other hand, the same trend of Alp mRNA level (HA > β-TCP > α-TCP) was observed for both porous and dense materials, validating the use of dense flat materials for comparative study of materials with different chemistries for more reliable comparison when well-defined porous materials are not available. The avoidance of porosity variation would probably facilitate more reproducible results. This study does not suggest porosity is not required for experiments related to bone regeneration application, but emphasizes that there is often a tradeoff between higher clinical relevance, and less variation in a less complex set up, which facilitates a statistically significant conclusion. Technically, we also show that the base of normalization for ALP activity may influence the conclusion and there may be ALP activity from

  1. NASA technology utilization survey on composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leeds, M. A.; Schwartz, S.; Holm, G. J.; Krainess, A. M.; Wykes, D. M.; Delzell, M. T.; Veazie, W. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    NASA and NASA-funded contractor contributions to the field of composite materials are surveyed. Existing and potential non-aerospace applications of the newer composite materials are emphasized. Economic factors for selection of a composite for a particular application are weight savings, performance (high strength, high elastic modulus, low coefficient of expansion, heat resistance, corrosion resistance,), longer service life, and reduced maintenance. Applications for composites in agriculture, chemical and petrochemical industries, construction, consumer goods, machinery, power generation and distribution, transportation, biomedicine, and safety are presented. With the continuing trend toward further cost reductions, composites warrant consideration in a wide range of non-aerospace applications. Composite materials discussed include filamentary reinforced materials, laminates, multiphase alloys, solid multiphase lubricants, and multiphase ceramics. New processes developed to aid in fabrication of composites are given.

  2. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  3. Study on Solidification of Phase Change Material in Fractal Porous Metal Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengbin; Wu, Liangyu; Chen, Yongping

    2015-02-01

    The Sierpinski fractal is introduced to construct the porous metal foam. Based on this fractal description, an unsteady heat transfer model accompanied with solidification phase change in fractal porous metal foam embedded with phase change material (PCM) is developed and numerically analyzed. The heat transfer processes associated with solidification of PCM embedded in fractal structure is investigated and compared with that in single-pore structure. The results indicate that, for the solidification of phase change material in fractal porous metal foam, the PCM is dispersedly distributed in metal foam and the existence of porous metal matrix provides a fast heat flow channel both horizontally and vertically, which induces the enhancement of interstitial heat transfer between the solid matrix and PCM. The solidification performance of the PCM, which is represented by liquid fraction and solidification time, in fractal structure is superior to that in single-pore structure.

  4. Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Frameworks (HOFs): A New Class of Porous Crystalline Proton-Conducting Materials.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Avishek; Illathvalappil, Rajith; Anothumakkool, Bihag; Sen, Arunabha; Samanta, Partha; Desai, Aamod V; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Sujit K

    2016-08-26

    Two porous hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs) based on arene sulfonates and guanidinium ions are reported. As a result of the presence of ionic backbones appended with protonic source, the compounds exhibit ultra-high proton conduction values (σ) 0.75× 10(-2)  S cm(-1) and 1.8×10(-2)  S cm(-1) under humidified conditions. Also, they have very low activation energy values and the highest proton conductivity at ambient conditions (low humidity and at moderate temperature) among porous crystalline materials, such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs). These values are not only comparable to the conventionally used proton exchange membranes, such as Nafion used in fuel cell technologies, but is also the highest value reported in organic-based porous architectures. Notably, this report inaugurates the usage of crystalline hydrogen-bonded porous organic frameworks as solid-state proton conducting materials. PMID:27464784

  5. Computational study of porous materials for gas separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Chiang

    Nanoporous materials such as zeolites, zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs), and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are used as sorbents or membranes for gas separations such as carbon dioxide capture, methane capture, paraffin/olefin separations, etc. The total number of nanoporous materials is large; by changing the chemical composition and/or the structural topologies we can envision an infinite number of possible materials. In practice one can synthesize and fully characterize only a small subset of these materials. Hence, computational study can play an important role by utilizing various techniques in molecular simulations as well as quantum chemical calculations to accelerate the search for optimal materials for various energy-related separations. Accordingly, several large-scale computational screenings of over one hundred thousand materials have been performed to find the best materials for carbon capture, methane capture, and ethane/ethene separation. These large-scale screenings identified a number of promising materials for different applications. Moreover, the analysis of these screening studies yielded insights into those molecular characteristics of a material that contribute to an optimal performance for a given application. These insights provided useful guidelines for future structural design and synthesis. For instance, one of the screening studies indicated that some zeolite structures can potentially reduce the energy penalty imposed on a coal-fired power plant by as much as 35% compared to the near-term MEA technology for carbon capture application. These optimal structures have topologies with a maximized density of pockets and they capture and release CO2 molecules with an optimal energy. These screening studies also pointed to some systems, for which conventional force fields were unable to make sufficiently reliable predictions of the adsorption isotherms of different gasses, e.g., CO2 in MOFs with open-metal sites. For these systems, we

  6. Removal of Algal Blooms in Freshwater by Meso-porous Composite Coagulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Li, Fengting; Hui, Franck; Lédion, Jean

    2010-11-01

    Based on the concept of "using waste to treat waste and changing waste into valuables", this paper put forward a new meso-porous composite coagulant with good performance and low cost, and the removal effects of meso-porous composite coagulant on algae cells and toxins, dissolved organics in water was studied, the object of this research was to provide a new and effective way for emergency needs to clear up harmful algal blooms in freshwater. The results showed that meso-porous composite coagulant at optimal loadings (1g/L) could remove over 99% algal cells; meanwhile, the removal efficiency of COD, microcystin, total nitrogen and phosphorus was found to be 87.5%, 97.7%, 41.5% and 77.8% respectively, moreover, the forming speed of floccules was fast, and the dense floccules had good settling performance. Furthermore, the mechanism of algae removal was explored preliminarily by meso-porous composite coagulant which played a dual role in adsorption and flocculation.

  7. Sound propagation in and low frequency noise absorption by helium-filled porous material.

    PubMed

    Choy, Y S; Huang, Lixi; Wang, Chunqi

    2009-12-01

    Low-frequency noise is difficult to deal with by traditional porous material due to its inherent high acoustic impedance. This study seeks to extend the effective range of sound absorption to lower frequencies by filling a low density gas, such as helium, in the porous material. Compared with conventional air-filled absorption material, the helium-filled porous material has a much reduced characteristic impedance; hence, a good impedance matching with pure air becomes more feasible at low frequencies. The acoustic properties of a series of helium-filled porous materials are investigated with a specially designed test rig. The characteristic of the sound propagation in a helium-filled porous material is established and validated experimentally. Based on the measured acoustic properties, the sound absorption performance of a helium-filled absorber (HA) of finite thickness is studied numerically as well as experimentally. For a random incidence field, the HA is found to perform much better than the air-filled absorber at low frequencies. The main advantage of HA lies in the middle range of oblique incidence angles where wave refraction in the absorber enhances sound absorption. The advantage of HA as duct lining is demonstrated both numerically and experimentally.

  8. Development of porous clay-based composites for the sorption of lead from water.

    PubMed

    Ake, C L; Mayura, K; Huebner, H; Bratton, G R; Phillips, T D

    2001-07-20

    Lead contamination of water is a major health hazard, as illustrated by the fact that exposure to this metal has been associated with death and disease in humans, birds, and animals. The present research was aimed at the development of a porous, solid-phase sorbent that can be used in the remediation of lead-contaminated water. A suitable sorbent was identified by screening various clays and other materials for their ability to effectively bind lead. The clay was adhered to a solid support using an aqueous solution of carboxymethyl cellulose. The binary composite was then tested for its ability to bind lead from solution, while providing void volume, increased surface area, and considerably enhanced hydraulic conductivity. The results suggested that a combination of sodium montmorillonite clay and carbon exhibited enhanced sorption of lead compared to carbon alone, and also supported the potential application of various combinations of sorbent materials. This value-added combination of clay, solid support, and adhesive will allow for the construction of column filtration systems that are multifunctional and capable of purifying large volumes of contaminated water.

  9. Development of porous clay-based composites for the sorption of lead from water.

    PubMed

    Ake, C L; Mayura, K; Huebner, H; Bratton, G R; Phillips, T D

    2001-07-20

    Lead contamination of water is a major health hazard, as illustrated by the fact that exposure to this metal has been associated with death and disease in humans, birds, and animals. The present research was aimed at the development of a porous, solid-phase sorbent that can be used in the remediation of lead-contaminated water. A suitable sorbent was identified by screening various clays and other materials for their ability to effectively bind lead. The clay was adhered to a solid support using an aqueous solution of carboxymethyl cellulose. The binary composite was then tested for its ability to bind lead from solution, while providing void volume, increased surface area, and considerably enhanced hydraulic conductivity. The results suggested that a combination of sodium montmorillonite clay and carbon exhibited enhanced sorption of lead compared to carbon alone, and also supported the potential application of various combinations of sorbent materials. This value-added combination of clay, solid support, and adhesive will allow for the construction of column filtration systems that are multifunctional and capable of purifying large volumes of contaminated water. PMID:11482800

  10. Porous Media and Mixture Models for Hygrothermal Behavior of Phenolic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Stokes, Eric H.

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical models are proposed to describe the interaction of water with phenolic polymer. The theoretical models involve the study of the flow of a viscous fluid through a porous media and the thermodynamic theory of mixtures. From the theory, a set of mathematical relations are developed to simulate the effect of water on the thermostructural response of phenolic composites. The expressions are applied to simulate the measured effect of water in a series of experiments conducted on carbon phenolic composites.

  11. Highly Porous Wood Based Carbon Materials for Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volperts, A.; Dobele, G.; Zhurinsh, A.; Vervikishko, D.; Shkolnikov, E.; Ozolinsh, J.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Sildos, I.

    2015-03-01

    Wood based activated carbons synthesized by two-stage thermocatalytical synthesis with NaOH activator were studied and used as supercapacitor electrodes (sulphuric acid electrolyte). Porous structure and electrochemical properties of carbons vs synthesis conditions were assessed. It was found that there are correlations between carbons synthesis variables, their porosity and supercapacitors functional characteristics. At the temperature 600°C and activator/precursor ratio 1.25 porosity decreased, however energy capacitance of supercapacitor increased calculating on elementary cell mass.

  12. Voigt waves in electro-optic homogenized composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Tom G.

    2014-08-01

    A study was undertaken into Voigt wave propagation in a homogenized composite material (HCM). The HCM investigated arose from a porous electro-optic host material infiltrated by a fluid of refractive index na, considered in the long-wavelength regime. The extended Bruggeman homogenization formalism was employed to estimate the constitutive parameters of the HCM. In principle, the directions which support Voigt wave propagation in the HCM may be controlled by means of an applied dc electric field; and the degree of control may be sensitive to the porosity of the host material, the shapes, sizes and orientations of the pores, as well as the refractive index na. Here the theoretical methodology is presented; numerical results are presented elsewhere.

  13. Clues for biomimetics from natural composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Lapidot, Shaul; Meirovitch, Sigal; Sharon, Sigal; Heyman, Arnon; Kaplan, David L; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Bio-inspired material systems are derived from different living organisms such as plants, arthropods, mammals and marine organisms. These biomaterial systems from nature are always present in the form of composites, with molecular-scale interactions optimized to direct functional features. With interest in replacing synthetic materials with natural materials due to biocompatibility, sustainability and green chemistry issues, it is important to understand the molecular structure and chemistry of the raw component materials to also learn from their natural engineering, interfaces and interactions leading to durable and highly functional material architectures. This review will focus on applications of biomaterials in single material forms, as well as biomimetic composites inspired by natural organizational features. Examples of different natural composite systems will be described, followed by implementation of the principles underlying their composite organization into artificial bio-inspired systems for materials with new functional features for future medicine. PMID:22994958

  14. Tough composite materials: Recent developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vosteen, L. F. (Editor); Johnston, N. J. (Editor); Teichman, L. A. (Editor); Blankenship, C. P. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The present volume broadly considers topics in composite fracture toughness and impact behavior characterization, composite system constituent properties and their interrelationships, and matrix systems' synthesis and characterization. Attention is given to the characterization of interlaminar crack growth in composites by means of the double cantilever beam specimen, the characterization of delamination resistance in toughened resin composites, the effect of impact damage and open holes on the compressive strength of tough resin/high strain fiber laminates, the effect of matrix and fiber properties on compression failure mechanisms and impact resistance, the relation of toughened neat resin properties to advanced composite mechanical properties, and constituent and composite properties' relationships in thermosetting matrices. Also treated are the effect of cross-link density on the toughening mechanism of elastomer-modified epoxies, the chemistry of fiber/resin interfaces, novel carbon fibers and their properties, the development of a heterogeneous laminating resin, solvent-resistant thermoplastics, NASA Lewis research in advanced composites, and opportunities for the application of composites in commercial aircraft transport structures.

  15. Composite materials and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Kevin L [Kennewick, WA; Wood, Geoffrey M [North Saanich, CA

    2011-05-17

    A method for forming improved composite materials using a thermosetting polyester urethane hybrid resin, a closed cavity mold having an internal heat transfer mechanism used in this method, and the composite materials formed by this method having a hybrid of a carbon fiber layer and a fiberglass layer.

  16. Composite, nanostructured, super-hydrophobic material

    DOEpatents

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2007-08-21

    A hydrophobic disordered composite material having a protrusive surface feature includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a protrusive surface feature, the protrusive feature being hydrophobic.

  17. In vitro behavior of a porous TiO2/perlite composite and its surface modification with fibronectin.

    PubMed

    von Walter, Matthias; Rüger, Matthias; Ragoss, Christian; Steffens, Guy C M; Hollander, Dirk A; Paar, Othmar; Maier, Horst R; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Bosserhoff, Anja K; Erli, Hans-Josef

    2005-06-01

    In this study, we introduce a porous composite material, termed "Ecopore", and describe in vitro investigation of the material and its modification with fibronectin. The material is a sintered compound of rutile TiO2 and the volcanic silicate perlite with a macrostructure of interconnecting pores. It is both inexpensive and easy to manufacture. We first investigated Ecopore for corrosion and leaching of elements in physiological saline. The corrosion supernatants did not contain critical concentrations of toxic trace elements. In an in vitro model, human primary osteoblasts (HOB) were cultured directly on Ecopore. HOB grew on the composite as well as on samples of its single constituents, TiO2 and perlite glass, and remained vital, but cellular spreading was less than on tissue culture plastic. The pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1 and TNF-alpha were below detection limits in HOB culture supernatants, whereas IL-6 was detectable on a low level. To enhance cellular attachment and growth, the surface of the composite was modified by etching, functionalization with aminosilane and coupling of fibronectin. This modification greatly enhanced the spreading of HOB, indicated by vital staining and Sodium 3'-[1-(phenylaminocarbonyl)-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis (4-methoxy-6-nitro) benzene sulfonic acid hydrate (XTT) metabolism assays. HOB grew on the entire visible surface of porous fibronectin-modified composite, expressing alkaline phosphatase, a mature osteoblast marker. We conclude that Ecopore is non-toxic and sustains HOB growth, cellular spreading being improvable by coating with fibronectin. The composite may be usable in the field of bone substitution.

  18. Composite Dielectric Materials for Electrical Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Modine, F.A.

    1999-04-25

    Composites that consist of a dielectric host containing a particulate conductor as a second phase are of interest for electrical switching applications. Such composites are "smart" materials that can function as either voltage or current limiters, and the difference in fimction depends largely upon whether the dielectric is filled to below or above the percolation threshold. It also is possible to combine current and voltage limiting in a single composite to make a "super-smart" material.

  19. Impedance spectroscopy and mechanical response of porous nanophase hydroxyapatite-barium titanate composite.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Ashutosh Kumar; Kakimoto, Ken-ichi

    2016-06-01

    The present study aims to develop the porous nanophase hydroxyapatite (HA)-barium titanate (BT) composite with reasonable mechanical and electrical properties as an electrically-active prosthetic orthopedic implant alternate. The porous samples (densification ~40-70%) with varying amounts of BT (0, 25, 35 and 100 vol.%) in HA were synthesized using optimal spark plasma sintering conditions, which revealed the thermochemical stability between both the phases. The reasonably good combination of functional properties such as compressive [(236.00 ± 44.90)MPa] and flexural [(56.18 ± 5.82) MPa] strengths, AC conductivity [7.62 × 10(-9)(ohm-cm)(-1) at 10 kHz] and relative permittivity [15.20 at 10 kHz] have been achieved with nanostructured HA-25 vol.% BT composite as far as significant sample porosity (~30%) is concerned. Detailed impedance spectroscopic analysis was performed to reveal the electrical microstructure of developed porous samples. The resistance and capacitance values (at 500 °C) of grain (RG, CG) and grain boundary (RGB, CGB) for the porous HA-25 vol.% BT composite are (1.3 × 10(7) ohm, 3.1 × 10(-11)F) and (1.6 × 10(7) ohm, 5.9 × 10(-10)F), respectively. Almost similar value of activation energy (~1-1.5 eV) for grain and grain boundary has been observed for all the samples. The mechanism of conduction is found to be same for porous monolithic HA as well as composite samples. Relaxation spectroscopic analyses suggest that both the localized as well as long range charge carrier translocations are responsible for conduction in these samples. The degree of polarization of porous samples has been assessed by measuring thermally stimulated depolarization current of the poled samples. The depolarization current is observed to depend on the heating rate. The maximum current density, measured for HA-25 vol.% BT sample at a heating rate of 1 °C/min is 2.7 nA/cm(2). Formation of oxygen vacancies due to the reduced atmosphere sintering contribute to the space

  20. Synthesis and gas adsorption study of porous metal-organic framework materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Bin

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) or porous coordination polymers (PCPs) have become the focus of intense study over the past decade due to their potential for advancing a variety of applications including air purification, gas storage, adsorption separations, catalysis, gas sensing, drug delivery, and so on. These materials have some distinct advantages over traditional porous materials such as the well-defined structures, uniform pore sizes, chemically functionalized sorption sites, and potential for postsynthetic modification, etc. Thus, synthesis and adsorption studies of porous MOFs have increased substantially in recent years. Among various prospective applications, air purification is one of the most immediate concerns, which has urgent requirements to improve current nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) filters involving commercial and military purposes. Thus, the major goal of this funded project is to search, synthesize, and test these novel hybrid porous materials for adsorptive removal of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and chemical warfare agents (CWAs), and to install the benchmark for new-generation NBC filters. The objective of this study is three-fold: (i) Advance our understanding of coordination chemistry by synthesizing novel MOFs and characterizing these porous coordination polymers; (ii) Evaluate porous MOF materials for gasadsorption applications including CO2 capture, CH4 storage, other light gas adsorption and separations, and examine the chemical and physical properties of these solid adsorbents including thermal stability and heat capacity of MOFs; (iii) Evaluate porous MOF materials for next-generation NBC filter media by adsorption breakthrough measurements of TICs on MOFs, and advance our understanding about structureproperty relationships of these novel adsorbents.

  1. Composite electrode composed of bimodal porous carbon and polypyrrole for electrochemical capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sang-Wook; Dokko, Kaoru; Kanamura, Kiyoshi

    Three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) carbons having walls composed of mesosized spherical pores were prepared by a colloidal crystal templating method. A composite electrode consisting of bimodal porous carbon and polypyrrole (PPy) was prepared by electropolymerization of pyrrole within the macropores of the bimodal porous carbon. The porous structure of the composite electrode was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope and by nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement. It was found that the deposition of PPy decreased the porosity and specific surface area of the electrode. The electrochemical properties of the composite electrode were characterized in a mixed solution of ethylene carbonate and diethyl carbonate containing 1 mol dm -3 LiPF 6. The discharge capacity of the carbon-PPy composite electrode was 78 mAh g carbon-PPy -1 in the potential range of 2.0-4.0 V vs. Li/Li +, which corresponded to a volumetric discharge capacity of 53 mAh cm -3. Both the double-layer capacity (31 mAh g -1) and the redox capacity of PPy (47 mAh g -1) contributed to the discharge capacity of the composite electrode. This indicates that the incorporation of PPy into the macropores of bimodal porous carbon is effective in increasing the volumetric discharge capacity of the composite electrode. The composite of carbon and PPy showed good rate capability, and its discharge capacity at a high current density of 4.0 A g -1 was as high as 49 mAh g -1.

  2. Composite materials for biomedical applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Salernitano, E; Migliaresi, C

    2003-01-01

    The word "composite" refers to the combination, on a macroscopic scale, of two or more materials, different for composition, morphology and general physical properties. In many cases, and depending on the constituent properties, composites can be designed with a view to produce materials with properties tailored to fulfill specific chemical, physical or mechanical requirements. Therefore over the past 40 years the use of composites has progressively increased, and today composite materials have many different applications, i.e., aeronautic, automotive, naval, and so on. Consequently many composite biomaterials have recently been studied and tested for medical application. Some of them are currently commercialized for their advantages over traditional materials. Most human tissues such as bones, tendons, skin, ligaments, teeth, etc., are composites, made up of single constituents whose amount, distribution, morphology and properties determine the final behavior of the resulting tissue or organ. Man-made composites can, to some extent, be used to make prostheses able to mimic these biological tissues, to match their mechanical behavior and to restore the mechanical functions of the damaged tissue. Different types of composites that are already in use or are being investigated for various biomedical applications are presented in this paper. Specific advantages and critical issues of using composite biomaterials are also described (Journal of Applied Bio-materials & Biomechanics 2003; 1: 3-18).

  3. Flame-retardant composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of eight different graphite composite panels fabricated using four different resin matrices and two types of graphite reinforcement are described. The resin matrices included: VPSP/BMI, a blend of vinylpolystyryl pyridine and bismaleimide; BMI, a bismaleimide; and phenolic and PSP, a polystyryl pyridine. The graphite fiber used was AS-4 in the form of either tape or fabric. The properties of these composites were compared with epoxy composites. It was determined that VPSP/BMI with the graphite tape was the optimum design giving the lowest heat release rate.

  4. Porous ceramic/agarose composite adsorbents for fast protein liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Haifeng; Jin, Xionghua; Wu, Puqiang; Zheng, Zhiyong

    2012-02-01

    Porous ceramic/agarose composite adsorbents were designed and prepared with silica ceramic beads and 4% agarose gel, and then functionalized with a special ligand carboxymethyl. A novel method was introduced to fabricating of the porous silica ceramic beads. The morphology of SEM shows a spherical shape and a porous structure of the ceramic beads. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis gives an average pore size of 287.5 Å, a BET surface area of 29.33 m²/g and a porosity of 41.8%, respectively. Additionally, X-ray diffraction pattern indicates that the amorphous silica has been transformed into two crystal phases of quartz and cristobalite, leading to a porous and rigid skeleton and ensuring the application of the composite beads at high flow velocities. Lysozyme of hen egg-white with the activity of 12,700 U/mg was purified by the composite ion-exchanger in one step and the recovery and purification factor reaches 95.2% and 7.9, respectively.

  5. Composites and blends from biobased materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, S.S.

    1995-05-01

    The program is focused on the development of composites and blends from biobased materials to use as membranes, high value plastics, and lightweight composites. Biobased materials include: cellulose derivative microporous materials, cellulose derivative copolymers, and cellulose derivative blends. This year`s research focused on developing an improved understanding of the molecular features that cellulose based materials with improved properties for gas separation applications. Novel cellulose ester membrane composites have been developed and are being evaluated under a collaborative research agreement with Dow Chemicals Company.

  6. Porous hollow carbon spheres for electrode material of supercapacitors and support material of dendritic Pt electrocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yang; Liu, Pei-Fang; Huang, Zhong-Yuan; Jiang, Tong-Wu; Yao, Kai-Li; Han, Ran

    2015-04-01

    Porous hollow carbon spheres (PHCSs) are prepared through hydrothermal carbonization of alginic acid and subsequent chemical activation by KOH. The porosity of the alginic acid derived PHCSs can be finely modulated by varying activation temperature in the range of 600-900 °C. The PHCSs activated at 900 °C possess the largest specific surface area (2421 m2 g-1), well-balanced micro- and mesoporosity, as well as high content of oxygen-containing functional groups. As the electrode material for supercapacitors, the PHCSs exhibit superior capacitive performance with specific capacitance of 314 F g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1. Pt nanodendrites supported on the PHCSs are synthesized by polyol reduction method which exhibit high electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Moreover, CO-poisoning tolerance of the Pt nanodendrites is greatly enhanced owing to the surface chemical property of the PHCSs support.

  7. A coupling concept for two-phase compositional porous-medium and single-phase compositional free flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosthaf, K.; Baber, K.; Flemisch, B.; Helmig, R.; Leijnse, A.; Rybak, I.; Wohlmuth, B.

    2011-10-01

    Domains composed of a porous part and an adjacent free-flow region are of special interest in many fields of application. So far, the coupling of free flow with porous-media flow has been considered only for single-phase systems. Here we extend this classical concept to two-component nonisothermal flow with two phases inside the porous medium and one phase in the free-flow region. The mathematical modeling of flow and transport phenomena in porous media is often based on Darcy's law, whereas in free-flow regions the (Navier-) -Stokes equations are used. In this paper, we give a detailed description of the employed subdomain models. The main contribution is the developed coupling concept, which is able to deal with compositional (miscible) flow and a two-phase system in the porous medium. It is based on the continuity of fluxes and the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium, and uses the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition. The phenomenological explanations leading to a simple, solvable model, which accounts for the physics at the interface, are laid out in detail. Our model can account for evaporation and condensation processes at the interface and is used to model evaporation from soil influenced by a wind field in a first numerical example.

  8. Graphene/polyaniline composite sponge of three-dimensional porous network structure as supercapacitor electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiu-Xing, Jiang; Xu-Zhi, Zhang; Zhen-Hua, Wang; Jian-Jun, Xu

    2016-04-01

    As a supercapacitor electrode, the graphene/polyaniline (PANI) composite sponge with a three-dimensional (3D) porous network structure is synthesized by a simple three-step method. The three steps include an in situ polymerization, freeze-drying and reduction by hydrazine vapor. The prepared sponge has a large specific surface area and porous network structure, so it is in favor of spreading the electrolyte ion and increasing the charge transfer efficiency of the system. The process of preparation is simple, easy to operate and low cost. The composite sponge shows better electrochemical performance than the pure individual graphene sponge while PANI cannot keep the shape of a sponge. Such a composite sponge exhibits specific capacitances of 487 F·g‑1 at 2 mV/s compared to pristine PANI of 397 F·g‑1. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation from Harbin University of Science and Technology and Harbin Institute of Technology.

  9. Graphene/polyaniline composite sponge of three-dimensional porous network structure as supercapacitor electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiu-Xing, Jiang; Xu-Zhi, Zhang; Zhen-Hua, Wang; Jian-Jun, Xu

    2016-04-01

    As a supercapacitor electrode, the graphene/polyaniline (PANI) composite sponge with a three-dimensional (3D) porous network structure is synthesized by a simple three-step method. The three steps include an in situ polymerization, freeze-drying and reduction by hydrazine vapor. The prepared sponge has a large specific surface area and porous network structure, so it is in favor of spreading the electrolyte ion and increasing the charge transfer efficiency of the system. The process of preparation is simple, easy to operate and low cost. The composite sponge shows better electrochemical performance than the pure individual graphene sponge while PANI cannot keep the shape of a sponge. Such a composite sponge exhibits specific capacitances of 487 F·g-1 at 2 mV/s compared to pristine PANI of 397 F·g-1. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation from Harbin University of Science and Technology and Harbin Institute of Technology.

  10. Preparation and characterization of silica nanoparticulate polyacrylonitrile composite and porous nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Liwen; Saquing, Carl; Khan, Saad A.; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2008-02-01

    In this study, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite nanofibers containing different amounts of silica nanoparticulates have been obtained via electrospinning. The surface morphology, thermal properties and crystal structure of PAN/silica nanofibers are characterized using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, wide-angle x-ray diffraction (WAXD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that the addition of silica nanoparticulates affects the structure and properties of the nanofibers. In addition to PAN/silica composite nanofibers, porous PAN nanofibers have been prepared by selective removal of the silica component from PAN/silica composite nanofibers using hydrofluoric (HF) acid. ATR-FTIR and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments validate the removal of silica nanoparticulates by HF acid, whereas SEM and TEM results reveal that the porous nanofibers obtained from composite fibers with higher silica contents exhibited more nonuniform surface morphology. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of porous PAN nanofibers made from PAN/silica (5 wt%) composite precursors is higher than that of pure nonporous PAN nanofibers.

  11. Macromolecular coatings on porous silicon: Applications in drug delivery, biosensing, and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelman, Loren Avery

    Two classes of macromolecules, proteins and polymers, are coated onto porous Si films in a variety of geometries in order to study fundamental behaviors of these coatings and their potential device applications. The unique preparation control that porous Si allows in both nano-morphology and surface functionalization provides the means for the coatings. In chapter two, a drug delivery platform using bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein as a stimuli-responsive capping layer on porous Si is described and characterized. It was found that the surface chemistry of the porous Si film has a profound influence on both drug loading capacity and drug release kinetics, providing for control over these drug release variables. The BSA is observed to act as a pH-responsive trigger for the release of vancomycin from the porous Si film. The drug is safely stored in the porous matrix at pH 4 and is released after triggering with pH 7.4 phosphate buffered saline. Chapter three discusses a porous SiO2-based biosensor that is prepared by oxidizing a porous Si film, adsorbing BSA to the surface as a coating, and functionalizing the protein with specific target probes for vancomycin. The BSA was observed to adsorb strongly to the surface, resisting desoprtion in both phosphate buffered saline and triton-X buffer solutions. Quantitative binding information for the tripeptide Ac-L-Lysine-D-Alanine-D-Alanine and vancomycin is determined using the optical properties of the porous Si as a transduction methodology. Chapters four and five describe the fabrication of thermoresponsive and multifunctional nanohybrids, respectively, using stimuli-responsive hydrogels to infiltrate and coat oxidized porous Si films. The optical properties of the porous Si films are used to study the response of the hydrogel phase of the hybrids to a variety of stimuli. The optical changes correspond to previously-described physical changes in the hydrogel phase, and it was determined that this platform provides a

  12. IMPACT OF COMPOSITION AND HEAT TREATMENT ON PORE SIZE IN POROUS WALLED HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Raszewski, F; Erich Hansen, E; Ray Schumacher, R; David Peeler, D

    2007-12-04

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a new geometric form: hollow glass microspheres (HGMs), with unique porous walls. The new geometric form combines the existing technology of HGMs with basic glass science knowledge in the realm of glass-in-glass phase separation. Conceptually, the development of a HGM with porous walls (referred to as a PWHGM) provides a unique system in which various media or filling agents can be incorporated into the PWHGM (via transport through the porous walls) and ultimately has the capacity to serve as a functional delivery system in various industrial applications. Applications of these types of systems could range from hydrogen storage, molecular sieves, drug and bioactive delivery systems, to environmental, chemical and biological indicators, relevant to Energy, Environmental Processing and Homeland Security fields. As a specific example, previous studies at SRNL have introduced materials capable of hydrogen storage (as well as other materials) into the interior of the PWHGMs. The goal of this project was to determine if the microstructure (i.e., pore size and pore size distribution) of a PWHGM could be altered or tailored by varying composition and/or heat treatment (time and/or temperature) conditions. The ability to tailor the microstructure through composition or heat treatments could provide the opportunity to design the PWHGM system to accommodate different additives or fill agents. To meet this objective, HGMs of various alkali borosilicate compositions were fabricated using a flame forming apparatus installed at the Aiken County Technical Laboratory (ACTL). HGMs were treated under various heat treatment conditions to induce and/or enhance glass in glass phase separation. Heat treatment temperatures ranged from 580 C to 620 C, while heat treatment times were either 8 or 24 hours. Of the two primary variables assessed in this study, heat treatment temperature was determined to be most effective in changing the

  13. New textile composite materials development, production, application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikhailov, Petr Y.

    1993-01-01

    New textile composite materials development, production, and application are discussed. Topics covered include: super-high-strength, super-high-modulus fibers, filaments, and materials manufactured on their basis; heat-resistant and nonflammable fibers, filaments, and textile fabrics; fibers and textile fabrics based on fluorocarbon poylmers; antifriction textile fabrics based on polyfen filaments; development of new types of textile combines and composite materials; and carbon filament-based fabrics.

  14. Polymer Matrix Composite Material Oxygen Compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Tom

    2001-01-01

    Carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite materials look promising as a material to construct liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks. Based on mechanical impact tests the risk will be greater than aluminum, however, the risk can probably be managed to an acceptable level. Proper tank design and operation can minimize risk. A risk assessment (hazard analysis) will be used to determine the overall acceptability for using polymer matrix composite materials.

  15. Composite Materials for Low-Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials with improved thermal conductivity and good mechanical strength properties should allow for the design and construction of more thermally efficient components (such as pipes and valves) for use in fluid-processing systems. These materials should have wide application in any number of systems, including ground support equipment (GSE), lunar systems, and flight hardware that need reduced heat transfer. Researchers from the Polymer Science and Technology Laboratory and the Cryogenics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center were able to develop a new series of composite materials that can meet NASA's needs for lightweight materials/composites for use in fluid systems and also expand the plastic-additive markets. With respect to thermal conductivity and physical properties, these materials are excellent alternatives to prior composite materials and can be used in the aerospace, automotive, military, electronics, food-packaging, and textile markets. One specific application of the polymeric composition is for use in tanks, pipes, valves, structural supports, and components for hot or cold fluid-processing systems where heat flow through materials is a problem to be avoided. These materials can also substitute for metals in cryogenic and other low-temperature applications. These organic/inorganic polymeric composite materials were invented with significant reduction in heat transfer properties. Decreases of 20 to 50 percent in thermal conductivity versus that of the unmodified polymer matrix were measured. These novel composite materials also maintain mechanical properties of the unmodified polymer matrix. These composite materials consist of an inorganic additive combined with a thermoplastic polymer material. The intrinsic, low thermal conductivity of the additive is imparted into the thermoplastic, resulting in a significant reduction in heat transfer over that of the base polymer itself, yet maintaining most of the polymer's original properties. Normal

  16. A mesomechanical analysis of the deformation and fracture in polycrystalline materials with ceramic porous coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balokhonov, R. R.; Zinoviev, A. V.; Romanova, V. A.; Batukhtina, E. E.

    2015-10-01

    The special features inherent in the mesoscale mechanical behavior of a porous ceramic coating-steel substrate composite are investigated. Microstructure of the coated material is accounted for explicitly as initial conditions of a plane strain dynamic boundary-value problem solved by the finite difference method. Using a mechanical analogy method, a procedure for generating a uniform curvilinear finite difference computational mesh is developed to provide a more accurate description of the complex grain boundary geometry. A modified algorithm for generation of polycrystalline microstructure of the substrate is designed on the basis of the cellular automata method. The constitutive equations for a steel matrix incorporate an elastic-plastic model for a material subjected to isotropic hardening. The Hall-Petch relation is used to account for the effect of the grain size on the yield stress and strain hardening history. A brittle fracture model for a ceramic coating relying on the Huber criterion is employed. The model allows for crack nucleation in the regions of triaxial tension. The complex inhomogeneous stress and plastic strain patterns are shown to be due to the presence of interfaces of three types: coating-substrate interface, grain boundaries, and pore surfaces.

  17. Tailoring of the porous structure of soft emulsion-templated polymer materials.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Artem; Zimny, Kévin; Mascaro, Benoit; Brunet, Thomas; Mondain-Monval, Olivier

    2016-06-21

    This paper discusses the formation of soft porous materials obtained by the polymerization of inverse water-in-silicone (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) emulsions. We show that the initial state of the emulsion has a strong impact on the porous structure and properties of the final material. We show that using a surfactant with different solubilities in the emulsion continuous phase (PDMS), it is possible to tune the interaction between emulsion droplets, which leads to materials with either interconnected or isolated pores. These two systems present completely different behavior upon drying, which results in macroporous air-filled materials in the interconnected case and in a collapsed material with low porosity in the second case. Finally, we compare the mechanical and acoustical properties of these two types of bulk polymer monoliths. We also describe the formation of micrometric polymer particles (beads) in these two cases. We show that materials with an interconnected macroporous structure have low mechanical moduli and low sound speed, and are suitable for acoustic applications. The mechanical and acoustical properties of the materials with a collapsed porous structure are similar to those of non-porous silicone, which makes them acoustically inactive. PMID:27195990

  18. Magnetoelectric effect in porous bulk ferromagnetic/piezoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichurin, M. I.; Srinivasan, G.

    2005-03-01

    Bulk and layered composites of piezoelectric and magnetostrictive phases show magnetoelectric (ME) properties. Bulk composites are desirable over layered samples due to superior mechanical strength. Here we discuss a model that considers the influence of porosity on ME interactions in a bulk composite. The composite is assumed to consist of piezoelectric, magnetostrictive and void (pores) subsystems. We solved combined elastostatic, electrostatic and magnetostatic equations to obtain effective composite parameters (piezoelectric modules, magnetostriction factors, compliances, ME coefficients). Expressions for longitudinal and transverse low-frequency ME voltage coefficients have been obtained for 3- 0-0 and 0-3-0 connectivity types. The dependence for ME voltage coefficient on volume fractions of the two phases are shown to be dependent on connectivity type. The strength of ME interaction depends on porosity. The calculated ME coefficients are in good agreement with data in Ref.1. *G. Srinivasan, C. P. DeVreugd, C. S. Flattery, V. M. Laletsin and N. Paddubnaya. Appl. Phys. Lett., 85, 2550 (2004). - supported by grants from the Russian Ministry of Education (Å02-3.4-278), the Universities of Russia Foundation (UNR 01.01.026) and the National Science Foundation (DMR-0302254).

  19. Combustion performance of porous silicon-based energetic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Benjamin Aaron; Son, Steve F; Asay, Blaine W; Cho, Kevin Y

    2009-01-01

    The combustion performance of oxidizer filled porous silicon(PSi) was studied. PSi samples with diameters of 2.54 cm were fabricated by electrochemical etching. The % porosity of the samples ranged from 55 to 82%. The samples were cut into 3-5 mm strips and filled with the oxidizers NaClO{sub 4} x 1H{sub 2}O, Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} x 4H{sub 2}O, S and perfluoropolyether (PFPE). The filled PSi was then burned by igniting the sample with a hot NiChrome{trademark} wire. The burns were recorded using high speed photography from which bring rates were calculated. That burning rates showed a strong dependency on quality of the oxidizer loading. The % porosity did not appear to have a direct affect on the burning rates for those studied. PSi loaded with NaClO{sub 4} x 1H{sub 2}O produced burning rates that ranged from 216-349 cm/s. PSi loaded with Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub x}x 4 H{sub 2}O had burning rates of 154-285 cm/s. An S filled PSi sample burned a rate of 16 to 290 cm/s, and perfluoropolyether loaded PSi burned at a rate of 1.4 cm/s.

  20. Bone attachment to glass-fibre-reinforced composite implant with porous surface.

    PubMed

    Mattila, R H; Laurila, P; Rekola, J; Gunn, J; Lassila, L V J; Mäntylä, T; Aho, A J; Vallittu, P K

    2009-06-01

    A method has recently been developed for producing fibre-reinforced composites (FRC) with porous surfaces, intended for use as load-bearing orthopaedic implants. This study focuses on evaluation of the bone-bonding behaviour of FRC implants. Three types of cylindrical implants, i.e. FRC implants with a porous surface, solid polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) implants and titanium (Ti) implants, were inserted in a transverse direction into the intercondular trabeculous bone area of distal femurs and proximal tibias of New Zealand White rabbits. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post operation, and push-out tests (n=5-6 per implant type per time point) were then carried out. At 12 weeks the shear force at the porous FRC-bone interface was significantly higher (283.3+/-55.3N) than the shear force at interfaces of solid PMMA/bone (14.4+/-11.0 N; p<0.001) and Ti/bone (130.6+/-22.2N; p=0.001). Histological observation revealed new bone growth into the porous surface structure of FRC implants. Solid PMMA and Ti implants were encapsulated mostly with fibrous connective tissue. Finite element analysis (FEA) revealed that porous FRC implants had mechanical properties which could be tailored to smooth the shear stress distribution at the bone-implant interface and reduce the stress-shielding effect. PMID:19268643

  1. Systems and strippable coatings for decontaminating structures that include porous material

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Robert V.; Avci, Recep; Groenewold, Gary S.

    2011-12-06

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  2. Synthesis of porous Fe3O4 hollow microspheres/graphene oxide composite for Cr(vi) removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mancheng; Wen, Tao; Wu, Xilin; Chen, Changlun; Hu, Jun; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiangke

    2013-10-01

    A composite of porous Fe3O4 hollow microspheres/graphene oxide (Fe3O4/GO) has been fabricated through a facile self-assembly approach. Driven by the mutual electrostatic interactions, the amine-functionalized Fe3O4 microspheres prepared by a hydrothermal method and then modified by 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane were decorated with negatively-charged GO sheets. The Fe3O4 microspheres were hollow with porous surfaces and the surfaces were successfully modified with the amine, which was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The specific saturation magnetization of Fe3O4/GO was 37.8 emu g(-1). The sorption performance of Fe3O4/GO for Cr(vi) was evaluated. The maximum sorption capacity for Cr(vi) on Fe3O4/GO was 32.33 mg g(-1), which was much higher than that of Fe3O4 microspheres. The GO sheets could not only prevent agglomeration of the Fe3O4 microspheres and enable a good dispersion of these oxide microspheres, but also substantially enhance the specific surface area of the composite. The Fe3O4/GO composite may be a promising sorption material for the separation and preconcentration of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions in environmental pollution cleanup. PMID:23743481

  3. Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, W.A.; Olsen, C.E.

    1980-03-12

    A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

  4. Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, William A.; Olsen, Clayton E.

    1982-01-01

    A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

  5. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  6. Combinatorial synthesis of inorganic or composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Goldwasser, Isy; Ross, Debra A.; Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Briceno, Gabriel; Sun, Xian-Dong; Wang, Kai-An

    2010-08-03

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials or, alternatively, allowing the components to interact to form at least two different materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, nonbiological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  7. Preliminary biocompatible evaluation of nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 composite porous membrane.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yili; Wang, Ping; Man, Yi; Li, Yubao; Zuo, Yi; Li, Jidong

    2010-08-09

    Nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (nHA/PA66) composite with good bioactivity and osteoconductivity was employed to develop a novel porous membrane with asymmetric structure for guided bone regeneration (GBR). In order to test material cytotoxicity and to investigate surface-dependent responses of bone-forming cells, the morphology, proliferation, and cell cycle of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of rats cultured on the prepared membrane were determined. The polygonal and fusiform shape of BMSCs was observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The proliferation of BMSCs cultured on nHA/PA66 membrane tested by the MTT method (MTT: [3-{4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl}-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazoliumbromide]) was higher than that of negative control groups for 1 and 4 days' incubation and had no significant difference for 7 and 11 days' culture. The results of cell cycle also suggested that the membrane has no negative influence on cell division. The nHA/PA66 membranes were then implanted into subcutaneous sites of nine Sprague Dawley rats. The wounds and implant sites were free from suppuration and necrosis in all periods. All nHA/PA66 membranes were surrounded by a fibrous capsule with decreasing thickness 1 to 8 weeks postoperatively. In conclusion, the results of the in vitro and in vivo studies reveal that nHA/PA66 membrane has excellent biocompatibility and indicate its use in guided tissue regeneration (GTR) or GBR.

  8. Sound Transmission Through Multi-Panel Structures Lined with Elastic Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, J. S.; Shiau, N.-M.; Kang, Y. J.

    1996-04-01

    Theory and measurements related to sound transmission through double panels lined with elastic porous media are presented. The information has application to the design of noise control barriers and to the optimization of aircraft fuselage transmission loss, for example. The major difference between the work described here and earlier research in this field relates to the treatment of the porous material that is used to line the cavity between the two panels of the double panel structure. Here we have used the porous material theory proposed by Biot since it takes explicit account of all the wave types known to propagate in elastic porous materials. As a result, it is possible to use the theory presented here to calculate the transmission loss of lined double panels at arbitrary angles of incidence; results calculated over a range of incidence angles may then be combined to yield the random incidence transmission loss. In this paper, the equations governing wave propagation in an elastic porous material are first considered briefly and then the general forms for the stresses and displacements within the porous material are given. Those solutions are expressed in terms of a number of constants that can be determined by application of appropriate boundary conditions. The boundary conditions required to model double panels having linings that are either directly attached to the facing panels or separated?!from them by air gaps are presented and discussed. Measurements of the random incidence transmission loss of aluminium double-panel structures lined with polyurethane foam are presented and have been found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Both the theoretical predictions and the measured results have shown that the method by which an elastic porous lining material is attached to the facing panels can have a profound influence on the transmission loss of the panel system. It has been found, for example, that treatments in which the lining material

  9. Potential of Lattice Boltzmann Method to Determine the Ohmic Resistance in Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza-Andaluz, Mayken; Andersson, Martin; Sundén, Bengt

    2016-08-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a suitable tool for solving transport phenomena that occur in gas- and liquid phases at different length scales, especially when complex geometries such as porous media are involved. However, investigations about applications of LBM in the solid electrical conducting material have not been carried out yet. Since in fuel cells (FCs) the multifunctional layers play an important role during the energy conversion process, and such layers consist of porous material, the ohmic resistance of porous materials represents a crucial characteristic to be studied to predict the internal ohmic losses. The purpose of this paper is to show the feasibility of LBM to determine the ohmic resistance of electrical conducting materials whose dimensions are modified considering the crosssectional area and length. Characteristics, limitations and recommendations of LBM applied to solid electrical conducting materials calculating the ohmic resistance are presented considering the coupling of the methodology with the Ohm's Law. Additionally, the behavior of the ohmic resistance for a given porous material is presented.

  10. Structure, composition and morphology of bioactive titanate layer on porous titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinshan; Wang, Xiaohua; Hu, Rui; Kou, Hongchao

    2014-07-01

    A bioactive coating was produced on pore surfaces of porous titanium samples by an amendatory alkali-heat treatment method. Porous titanium was prepared by powder metallurgy and its porosity and average size were 45% and 135 μm, respectively. Coating morphology, coating structure and phase constituents were examined by SEM, XPS and XRD. It was found that a micro-network structure with sizes of <200 nm mainly composed of bioactive sodium titanate and rutile phases of TiO2 covered the interior and exterior of porous titanium cells, and redundant Ca ion was detected in the titanate layer. The concentration distribution of Ti, O, Ca and Na in the coating showed a compositional gradient from the intermediate layer toward the outer surface. These compositional gradients indicate that the coating bonded to Ti substrate without a distinct interface. After immersion into the SBF solution for 3 days, a bone-like carbonate-hydroxylapatite showing a good biocompatibility was detected on the coating surface. And the redundant Ca advanced the bioactivity of the coating. Thus, the present modification is expected to allow the use of the bioactive porous titanium as artificial bones even under load-bearing conditions.

  11. Production and characterization of a composite insulation material from waste polyethylene teraphtalates

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtulmus, Erhan; Karaboyacı, Mustafa; Yigitarslan, Sibel

    2013-12-16

    The pollution of polyethylene teraphtalate (PET) is in huge amounts due to the most widely usage as a packaging material in several industries. Regional pumice has several desirable characteristics such as porous structure, low-cost and light-weight. Considering the requirements approved by the Ministry of Public Works on isolation, composite insulation material consisting of PET and pumice was studied. Sheets of composites differing both in particle size of pumice and composition of polymer were produced by hot-molding technique. Characterization of new composite material was achieved by measuring its weight, density, flammability, endurance against both to common acids and bases, and to a force applied, heat insulation and water adsorption capacity. The results of the study showed that produced composite material is an alternative building material due to its desirable characteristics; low weight, capability of low heat conduction.

  12. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Watkins, Casey N.

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials offer significant weight-saving potential for aerospace applications in propellant and oxidizer tanks. This application for oxygen tanks presents the challenge of being oxygen compatible in addition to complying with the other required material characteristics. This effort reports on the testing procedures and data obtained in examining and selecting potential composite materials for oxygen tank usage. Impact testing of composites has shown that most of these materials initiate a combustion event when impacted at 72 ft-lbf in the presence of liquid oxygen, though testing has also shown substantial variability in reaction sensitivities to impact. Data for screening of 14 potential composites using the Bruceton method is given herein and shows that the 50-percent reaction frequencies range from 17 to 67 ft-lbf. The pressure and temperature rises for several composite materials were recorded to compare the energy releases as functions of the combustion reactions with their respective reaction probabilities. The test data presented are primarily for a test pressure of 300 psia in liquid oxygen. The impact screening process is compared with oxygen index and autogenous ignition test data for both the composite and the basic resin. The usefulness of these supplemental tests in helping select the most oxygen compatible materials is explored. The propensity for mechanical impact ignition of the composite compared with the resin alone is also examined. Since an ignition-free composite material at the peak impact energy of 72 ft-lbf has not been identified, composite reactivity must be characterized over the impact energy level and operating pressure ranges to provide data for hazard analyses in selecting the best potential material for liquid tank usage.

  13. Improved sensitivity of polychlorinated-biphenyl-orientated porous-ZnO surface photovoltage sensors from chemisorption-formed ZnO-CuPc composites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingtao; Meng, Guowen; Huang, Qing; Zhang, Shile

    2014-01-01

    We report a new mechanism for the enhancement of porous-ZnO surface photovoltage (SPV) response to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, a notorious class of persistent organic pollutants as global environmental hazard) based on copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) chemisorptive bonding on porous-ZnO. A new ZnO-CuPc composite is formed on the porous-ZnO surface due to the interaction between the surface ZnO and CuPc, with its valence band (VB) energy level being higher than that of the pristine porous-ZnO. So that the efficiency of the photogenerated-electron transfer from the composite VB to the adjacent ZnO's surface states is drastically increased due to the reduced energy gap between the transition states. As a result, the sensitivity of the PCB-orientated SPV sensor is much improved by showing amplified variation of the SPV-signals perturbed by PCBs adsorbed on the ZnO-CuPc@porous-ZnO sensitive material. PMID:24594662

  14. Improved sensitivity of polychlorinated-biphenyl-orientated porous-ZnO surface photovoltage sensors from chemisorption-formed ZnO-CuPc composites.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingtao; Meng, Guowen; Huang, Qing; Zhang, Shile

    2014-01-01

    We report a new mechanism for the enhancement of porous-ZnO surface photovoltage (SPV) response to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, a notorious class of persistent organic pollutants as global environmental hazard) based on copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) chemisorptive bonding on porous-ZnO. A new ZnO-CuPc composite is formed on the porous-ZnO surface due to the interaction between the surface ZnO and CuPc, with its valence band (VB) energy level being higher than that of the pristine porous-ZnO. So that the efficiency of the photogenerated-electron transfer from the composite VB to the adjacent ZnO's surface states is drastically increased due to the reduced energy gap between the transition states. As a result, the sensitivity of the PCB-orientated SPV sensor is much improved by showing amplified variation of the SPV-signals perturbed by PCBs adsorbed on the ZnO-CuPc@porous-ZnO sensitive material. PMID:24594662

  15. Improved sensitivity of polychlorinated-biphenyl-orientated porous-ZnO surface photovoltage sensors from chemisorption-formed ZnO-CuPc composites.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingtao; Meng, Guowen; Huang, Qing; Zhang, Shile

    2014-03-05

    We report a new mechanism for the enhancement of porous-ZnO surface photovoltage (SPV) response to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, a notorious class of persistent organic pollutants as global environmental hazard) based on copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) chemisorptive bonding on porous-ZnO. A new ZnO-CuPc composite is formed on the porous-ZnO surface due to the interaction between the surface ZnO and CuPc, with its valence band (VB) energy level being higher than that of the pristine porous-ZnO. So that the efficiency of the photogenerated-electron transfer from the composite VB to the adjacent ZnO's surface states is drastically increased due to the reduced energy gap between the transition states. As a result, the sensitivity of the PCB-orientated SPV sensor is much improved by showing amplified variation of the SPV-signals perturbed by PCBs adsorbed on the ZnO-CuPc@porous-ZnO sensitive material.

  16. Laser-induced growth of nanocrystals embedded in porous materials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Space localization of the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a transparent medium at the submicron scale is still a challenge to yield the future generation of photonic devices. Laser irradiation techniques have always been thought to structure the matter at the nanometer scale, but combining them with doping methods made it possible to generate local growth of several types of nanocrystals in different kinds of silicate matrices. This paper summarizes the most recent works developed in our group, where the investigated nanoparticles are either made of metal (gold) or chalcogenide semiconductors (CdS, PbS), grown in precursor-impregnated porous xerogels under different laser irradiations. This review is associated to new results on silver nanocrystals in the same kind of matrices. It is shown that, depending on the employed laser, the particles can be formed near the sample surface or deep inside the silica matrix. Photothermal and/or photochemical mechanisms may be invoked to explain the nanoparticle growth, depending on the laser, precursor, and matrix. One striking result is that metal salt reduction, necessary to the production of the corresponding nanoparticles, can efficiently occur due to the thermal wrenching of electrons from the matrix itself or due to multiphoton absorption of the laser light by a reducer additive in femtosecond regime. Very localized semiconductor quantum dots could also be generated using ultrashort pulses, but while PbS nanoparticles grow faster than CdS particles due to one-photon absorption, this better efficiency is counterbalanced by a sensitivity to oxidation. In most cases where the reaction efficiency is high, particles larger than the pores have been obtained, showing that a fast diffusion of the species through the interconnected porosity can modify the matrix itself. Based on our experience in these techniques, we compare several examples of laser-induced nanocrystal growth in porous silica xerogels, which allows

  17. Laser-induced growth of nanocrystals embedded in porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capoen, Bruno; Chahadih, Abdallah; El Hamzaoui, Hicham; Cristini, Odile; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2013-06-01

    Space localization of the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a transparent medium at the submicron scale is still a challenge to yield the future generation of photonic devices. Laser irradiation techniques have always been thought to structure the matter at the nanometer scale, but combining them with doping methods made it possible to generate local growth of several types of nanocrystals in different kinds of silicate matrices. This paper summarizes the most recent works developed in our group, where the investigated nanoparticles are either made of metal (gold) or chalcogenide semiconductors (CdS, PbS), grown in precursor-impregnated porous xerogels under different laser irradiations. This review is associated to new results on silver nanocrystals in the same kind of matrices. It is shown that, depending on the employed laser, the particles can be formed near the sample surface or deep inside the silica matrix. Photothermal and/or photochemical mechanisms may be invoked to explain the nanoparticle growth, depending on the laser, precursor, and matrix. One striking result is that metal salt reduction, necessary to the production of the corresponding nanoparticles, can efficiently occur due to the thermal wrenching of electrons from the matrix itself or due to multiphoton absorption of the laser light by a reducer additive in femtosecond regime. Very localized semiconductor quantum dots could also be generated using ultrashort pulses, but while PbS nanoparticles grow faster than CdS particles due to one-photon absorption, this better efficiency is counterbalanced by a sensitivity to oxidation. In most cases where the reaction efficiency is high, particles larger than the pores have been obtained, showing that a fast diffusion of the species through the interconnected porosity can modify the matrix itself. Based on our experience in these techniques, we compare several examples of laser-induced nanocrystal growth in porous silica xerogels, which allows

  18. Chemical composition of lunar material.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, J A; Abbey, S; Champ, W H

    1970-01-30

    Chemical and emission spectrographic analyses of three Apollo 11 samples, 10017-29, 10020-30, and 10084-132, are given. Major and minor constituents were determined both by conventional rock analysis methods and by a new composite scheme utilizing a lithium fluoborate method for dissolution of the samples and atomic absorption spectroscopy and colorimetry. Trace constituents were determined by optical emission spectroscopy involving a d-c arc, air-jet controlled.

  19. Solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane comprising laser micromachined porous support

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Han; LaConti, Anthony B.; Mittelsteadt, Cortney K.; McCallum, Thomas J.

    2011-01-11

    A solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane and method of manufacturing the same. According to one embodiment, the composite membrane comprises a rigid, non-electrically-conducting support, the support preferably being a sheet of polyimide having a thickness of about 7.5 to 15 microns. The support has a plurality of cylindrical pores extending perpendicularly between opposing top and bottom surfaces of the support. The pores, which preferably have a diameter of about 5 microns, are made by laser micromachining and preferably are arranged in a defined pattern, for example, with fewer pores located in areas of high membrane stress and more pores located in areas of low membrane stress. The pores are filled with a first solid polymer electrolyte, such as a perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer. A second solid polymer electrolyte, which may be the same as or different than the first solid polymer electrolyte, may be deposited over the top and/or bottom of the first solid polymer electrolyte.

  20. Composite Material Application to Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The substitution of reinforced plastic composite (RPC) materials for metal was studied. The major objectives were to: (1) determine the extent to which composite materials can be beneficially used in liquid rocket engines; (2) identify additional technology requirements; and (3) determine those areas which have the greatest potential for return. Weight savings, fabrication costs, performance, life, and maintainability factors were considered. Two baseline designs, representative of Earth to orbit and orbit to orbit engine systems, were selected. Weight savings are found to be possible for selected components with the substitution of materials for metal. Various technology needs are identified before RPC material can be used in rocket engine applications.

  1. Electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serna, Patrick J.; Liechty, Gary H.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an engineering study of the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of composite materials used in space applications. The objective of the study is to identify and quantify the important electrical characteristics of composite materials proposed as substitutes for conventional metal-based structural elements of spacecraft. Current design practices utilized by various developers of spacecraft, particularly those with survivability and endurability requirements, employ variations of design constraints which rely on quantifiable and testable control of electromagnetic topology. These design practices are based on extensive knowledge and experience gained through analyses and tests of configurations on metallic structures and metal-enclosed electronics boxes. The purpose of this study is to determine, analytically and experimentally, the relevant electromagnetic characteristics of selected classes of composite material being recommended for inclusion in designs of new spacecraft systems. This study surveyed existing electromagnetic databases to determine known electrical characteristics of various advanced composite materials proposed as substitutes for spacecraft metal-based structures and enclosure materials. Particular attention was focused on determining the utility of this data in quantifying the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness through nominal bulk properties such as resistivity/conductivity and electrical connectivity through bonds/joints. For a select set of composite material, an experimental approach to evaluate the important electromagnetic characteristics of sample configurations was used. Primary material focus of this study is on carbon/epoxy, graphite/epoxy, and carbon/cyanate ester materials.

  2. Graded porous inorganic materials derived from self-assembled block copolymer templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yibei; Werner, Jörg G.; Dorin, Rachel M.; Robbins, Spencer W.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    Graded porous inorganic materials directed by macromolecular self-assembly are expected to offer unique structural platforms relative to conventional porous inorganic materials. Their preparation to date remains a challenge, however, based on the sparsity of viable synthetic self-assembly pathways to control structural asymmetry. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of graded porous carbon, metal, and metal oxide film structures from self-assembled block copolymer templates by using various backfilling techniques in combination with thermal treatments for template removal and chemical transformations. The asymmetric inorganic structures display mesopores in the film top layers and a gradual pore size increase along the film normal in the macroporous sponge-like support structure. Substructure walls between macropores are themselves mesoporous, constituting a structural hierarchy in addition to the pore gradation. Final graded structures can be tailored by tuning casting conditions of self-assembled templates as well as the backfilling processes. We expect that these graded porous inorganic materials may find use in applications including separation, catalysis, biomedical implants, and energy conversion and storage.Graded porous inorganic materials directed by macromolecular self-assembly are expected to offer unique structural platforms relative to conventional porous inorganic materials. Their preparation to date remains a challenge, however, based on the sparsity of viable synthetic self-assembly pathways to control structural asymmetry. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of graded porous carbon, metal, and metal oxide film structures from self-assembled block copolymer templates by using various backfilling techniques in combination with thermal treatments for template removal and chemical transformations. The asymmetric inorganic structures display mesopores in the film top layers and a gradual pore size increase along the film normal in the macroporous sponge

  3. Freeze-drying of “pearl milk tea”: A general strategy for controllable synthesis of porous materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yingke; Tian, Xiaohui; Wang, Pengcheng; Hu, Min; Du, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    Porous materials have been widely used in many fields, but the large-scale synthesis of materials with controlled pore sizes, pore volumes, and wall thicknesses remains a considerable challenge. Thus, the controllable synthesis of porous materials is of key general importance. Herein, we demonstrate the “pearl milk tea” freeze-drying method to form porous materials with controllable pore characteristics, which is realized by rapidly freezing the uniformly distributed template-containing precursor solution, followed by freeze-drying and suitable calcination. This general and convenient method has been successfully applied to synthesize various porous phosphate and oxide materials using different templates. The method is promising for the development of tunable porous materials for numerous applications of energy, environment, and catalysis, etc. PMID:27193866

  4. Freeze-drying of “pearl milk tea”: A general strategy for controllable synthesis of porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yingke; Tian, Xiaohui; Wang, Pengcheng; Hu, Min; Du, Guodong

    2016-05-01

    Porous materials have been widely used in many fields, but the large-scale synthesis of materials with controlled pore sizes, pore volumes, and wall thicknesses remains a considerable challenge. Thus, the controllable synthesis of porous materials is of key general importance. Herein, we demonstrate the “pearl milk tea” freeze-drying method to form porous materials with controllable pore characteristics, which is realized by rapidly freezing the uniformly distributed template-containing precursor solution, followed by freeze-drying and suitable calcination. This general and convenient method has been successfully applied to synthesize various porous phosphate and oxide materials using different templates. The method is promising for the development of tunable porous materials for numerous applications of energy, environment, and catalysis, etc.

  5. Composite materials with improved phyllosilicate dispersion

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-09-14

    The present invention provides phyllosilicates edge modified with anionic surfactants, composite materials made from the edge modified phyllosilicates, and methods for making the same. In various embodiments the phyllosilicates are also surface-modified with hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) modifying agents, polymeric hydrotropes, and antioxidants. The invention also provides blends of edge modified phyllosilicates and semicrystalline waxes. The composite materials are made by dispersing the edge modified phyllosilicates with polymers, particularly polyolefins and elastomers.

  6. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  7. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2004-11-02

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  8. Method of making a composite refractory material

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, Marvin S.; Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1995-01-01

    A composite refractory material is prepared by combining boron carbide with furan resin to form a mixture containing about 8 wt. % furan resin. The mixture is formed into a pellet which is placed into a grit pack comprising an oxide of an element such as yttrium to form a sinterable body. The sinterable body is sintered under vacuum with microwave energy at a temperature no greater than 2000.degree. C. to form a composite refractory material.

  9. Acoustic emission monitoring of polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardenheier, R.

    1981-01-01

    The techniques of acoustic emission monitoring of polymer composite materials is described. It is highly sensitive, quasi-nondestructive testing method that indicates the origin and behavior of flaws in such materials when submitted to different load exposures. With the use of sophisticated signal analysis methods it is possible the distinguish between different types of failure mechanisms, such as fiber fracture delamination or fiber pull-out. Imperfections can be detected while monitoring complex composite structures by acoustic emission measurements.

  10. Composite, ordered material having sharp surface features

    DOEpatents

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2006-12-19

    A composite material having sharp surface features includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a sharp surface feature. The sharp surface features can be coated to make the surface super-hydrophobic.

  11. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic.

    PubMed

    He, Fupo; Ren, Weiwei; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones.

  12. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic.

    PubMed

    He, Fupo; Ren, Weiwei; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. PMID:27127035

  13. Variably porous structures

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Paul V.; Yu, Xindi

    2011-01-18

    A method of making a monolithic porous structure, comprises electrodepositing a material on a template; removing the template from the material to form a monolithic porous structure comprising the material; and electropolishing the monolithic porous structure.

  14. Process of making porous ceramic materials with controlled porosity

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Ku, Qunyin

    1993-01-01

    A method of making metal oxide ceramic material is disclosed by which the porosity of the resulting material can be selectively controlled by manipulating the sol used to make the material. The method can be used to make a variety of metal oxide ceramic bodies, including membranes, but also pellets, plugs or other bodies. It has also been found that viscous sol materials can readily be shaped by extrusion into shapes typical of catalytic or adsorbent bodies used in industry, to facilitate the application of such materials for catalytic and adsorbent applications.

  15. Measurements of Acoustic Properties of Porous and Granular Materials and Application to Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Junhong; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    For application of porous and granular materials to vibro-acoustic controls, a finite dynamic strength of the solid component (frame) is an important design factor. The primary goal of this study was to investigate structural vibration damping through this frame wave propagation for various poroelastic materials. A measurement method to investigate the vibration characteristics of the frame was proposed. The measured properties were found to follow closely the characteristics of the viscoelastic materials - the dynamic modulus increased with frequency and the degree of the frequency dependence was determined by its loss factor. The dynamic stiffness of hollow cylindrical beams containing porous and granular materials as damping treatment was measured also. The data were used to extract the damping materials characteristics using the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The results suggested that the acoustic structure interaction between the frame and the structure enhances the dissipation of the vibration energy significantly.

  16. Dimpled elastic sheets: a new class of non-porous negative Poisson’s ratio materials

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Farhad; Smith-Roberge, Evelyne; Innes, Matthew C.; Shanian, Ali; Weaver, James C.; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report a novel periodic material with negative Poisson’s ratio (also called auxetic materials) fabricated by denting spherical dimples in an elastic flat sheet. While previously reported auxetic materials are either porous or comprise at least two phases, the material proposed here is non-porous and made of a homogeneous elastic sheet. Importantly, the auxetic behavior is induced by a novel mechanism which exploits the out-of-plane deformation of the spherical dimples. Through a combination of experiments and numerical analyses, we demonstrate the robustness of the proposed concept, paving the way for developing a new class of auxetic materials that significantly expand their design space and possible applications. PMID:26671169

  17. Dimpled elastic sheets: a new class of non-porous negative Poisson’s ratio materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javid, Farhad; Smith-Roberge, Evelyne; Innes, Matthew C.; Shanian, Ali; Weaver, James C.; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we report a novel periodic material with negative Poisson’s ratio (also called auxetic materials) fabricated by denting spherical dimples in an elastic flat sheet. While previously reported auxetic materials are either porous or comprise at least two phases, the material proposed here is non-porous and made of a homogeneous elastic sheet. Importantly, the auxetic behavior is induced by a novel mechanism which exploits the out-of-plane deformation of the spherical dimples. Through a combination of experiments and numerical analyses, we demonstrate the robustness of the proposed concept, paving the way for developing a new class of auxetic materials that significantly expand their design space and possible applications.

  18. Vertically Integrated MEMS SOI Composite Porous Silicon-Crystalline Silicon Cantilever-Array Sensors: Concept for Continuous Sensing of Explosives and Warfare Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyarova, Sara; Shemesh, Ariel; Aharon, Oren; Cohen, Omer; Gal, Lior; Eichen, Yoav; Nemirovsky, Yael

    This study focuses on arrays of cantilevers made of crystalline silicon (c-Si), using SOI wafers as the starting material and using bulk micromachining. The arrays are subsequently transformed into composite porous silicon-crystalline silicon cantilevers, using a unique vapor phase process tailored for providing a thin surface layer of porous silicon on one side only. This results in asymmetric cantilever arrays, with one side providing nano-structured porous large surface, which can be further coated with polymers, thus providing additional sensing capabilities and enhanced sensing. The c-Si cantilevers are vertically integrated with a bottom silicon die with electrodes allowing electrostatic actuation. Flip Chip bonding is used for the vertical integration. The readout is provided by a sensitive Capacitance to Digital Converter. The fabrication, processing and characterization results are reported. The reported study is aimed towards achieving miniature cantilever chips with integrated readout for sensing explosives and chemical warfare agents in the field.

  19. Solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane comprising plasma etched porous support

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Han; LaConti, Anthony B.

    2010-10-05

    A solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane and method of manufacturing the same. According to one embodiment, the composite membrane comprises a rigid, non-electrically-conducting support, the support preferably being a sheet of polyimide having a thickness of about 7.5 to 15 microns. The support has a plurality of cylindrical pores extending perpendicularly between opposing top and bottom surfaces of the support. The pores, which preferably have a diameter of about 0.1 to 5 microns, are made by plasma etching and preferably are arranged in a defined pattern, for example, with fewer pores located in areas of high membrane stress and more pores located in areas of low membrane stress. The pores are filled with a first solid polymer electrolyte, such as a perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer. A second solid polymer electrolyte, which may be the same as or different than the first solid polymer electrolyte, may be deposited over the top and/or bottom of the first solid polymer electrolyte.

  20. Highly Porous Materials with Unique Mechanical Properties from Smart Capillary Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Dittmann, Jens; Maurath, Johannes; Bitsch, Boris; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2016-02-24

    Smart capillary suspensions are used to fabricate macroporous solids with unique features regarding porosity and mechanical strength from a wide range of materials, including carbon layers and polyethylene membranes, even if sintering or high-temperature treatment is not feasible. High-strength porous ceramics are obtained, tailoring neck and pore shape via controlled deposition of fine particles at the sintering necks. PMID:26677099

  1. Anti-graffiti nanocomposite materials for surface protection of a very porous stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licchelli, Maurizio; Malagodi, Marco; Weththimuni, Maduka; Zanchi, Chiara

    2014-09-01

    The preservation of stone substrates from defacement induced by graffiti represents a very challenging task, which can be faced by applying suitable protective agents on the surface. Although different anti-graffiti materials have been developed, it is often found that their effectiveness is unsatisfactory, most of all when applied on very porous stones, e.g. Lecce stone. The aim of this work was to study the anti-graffiti behaviour of new nanocomposite materials obtained by dispersing montmorillonite nanoparticles (layered aluminosilicates with a high-aspect ratio) into a fluorinated polymer matrix (a fluorinated polyurethane based on perfluoropolyether blocks). Polymeric structure was modified by inducing a cross-linking process, in order to produce a durable anti-graffiti coating with enhanced barrier properties. Several composites were prepared using a naturally occurring and an organically modified montmorillonite clay (1, 3, and 5 % w/w concentrations). Materials were applied on Lecce stone specimens, and then their treated surfaces were soiled by a black ink permanent marker or by a black acrylic spray paint. Several repeated staining/cleaning cycles were performed in order to evaluate anti-graffiti effectiveness. Colorimetric measurements were selected to assess the anti-graffiti performance. It was found that the presence of 3 % w/w organically modified montmorillonite in the polymer coating is enough to induce a durable anti-graffiti effect when the stone surface is stained by acrylic paint. Less promising results are obtained when staining by permanent marker is considered as all the investigated treatments afford a reasonable protection from ink only for the first staining/cleaning cycle.

  2. Elastic constants of Transversely Isotropically Porous (TIP) materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tuchinskii, L.I.; Kalimova, N.L.

    1994-11-01

    The authors derive formulas describing the dependence of the elastic characteristics of multicapillary materials on the capillary porosity. The investigated materials are classified as transversely isotropic, and the anisotropy in their properties is the result of the directionality of the capillary pores. Analysis of the dependences obtained has shown that the elasticity moduli of these materials may be calculated using formulas suggested for reinforced materials, in which the elastic constants of the fibers are assumed to be equal to zero. The authors derive a relation between the Poisson`s ratios and the capillary porosity.

  3. Offgassing test methodology for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, Dale A.

    1994-01-01

    A significant increase in the use of composite materials has occurred during the past 20 years. Associated with this increased use is the potential for employees to be exposed to offgassing components from composite systems. Various components in composite systems, particularly residual solvents, offgas under various conditions. The potential for offgassing to occur increases as a composite material is heated either during cure or during lay-up operations. Various techniques can be employed to evaluate the offgassing characteristics of a composite system. A joint effort between AIA and SACMA resulted in the drafting of a proposed test method for evaluating the offgassing potential of composite materials. The purpose of testing composite materials for offgassing is to provide the industrial hygienist with information which can be used to assess the safety of the workplace. This paper outlines the proposed test method and presents round robin testing data associated with the test method. Also in this presentation is a discussion of classes of compounds which require specialized sampling techniques.

  4. 3-D textile reinforcements in composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miravete, A.

    1999-11-01

    Laminated composite materials have been used in structural applications since the 1960s. However, their high cost and inability to accommodate fibers in the laminate`s thickness direction greatly reduce their damage tolerance and impact resistance. The second generation of materials--3-D textile reinforced composites--offers significant cost reduction, and by incorporating reinforcement in the thickness direction, dramatically increases damage tolerance and impact resistance. However, methods for predicting mechanical properties of 3-D textile reinforced composite materials tend to be more complex. These materials also have disadvantages--particularly in regard to crimps in the yarns--that require more research. Textile preforms, micro- and macromechanical modeling, manufacturing processes, and characterization all need further development. As researchers overcome these problems, this new generation of composites will emerge as a highly competitive family of materials. This book provides a state-of-the-art account of this promising technology. In it, top experts describe the manufacturing processes, highlight the advantages, identify the main applications, analyze methods for predicting mechanical properties, and detail various reinforcement strategies, including grid structure, knitted fabric composites, and the braiding technique. Armed with the information in this book, readers will be prepared to better exploit the advantages of 3-D textile reinforced composites, overcome its disadvantages, and contribute to the further development of the technology.

  5. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Neil A.; Hudgins, Richard J.; McBain, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite liquid oxygen LO2 tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW), which is possible due to the 25%-40% reduction in weight that composite materials could provide over current aluminum technology. Although a composite LO2 tank makes these weight savings feasible, composite materials have not historically been viewed as "LO2 compatible." To be considered LO2 compatible, materials must be selected that will resist any type of detrimental, combustible reaction when exposed to usage environments. This is traditionally evaluated using a standard set of tests. However, materials that do not pass the standard tests can be shown to be safe for a particular application. This paper documents the approach and results of a joint NASA/Lockheed Martin program to select and verify LO2 compatible composite materials for liquid oxygen fuel tanks. The test approach developed included tests such as mechanical impact, particle impact, puncture, electrostatic discharge, friction, and pyrotechnic shock. These tests showed that composite liquid oxygen tanks are indeed feasible for future launch vehicles.

  6. Nonmetallic materials and composites at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, G.; Evans, D.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents articles by leading scientists who explore the cryogenic behavior of such materials as epoxies, polyethylenes, polymers, various composites, and glasses. Examines the thermal and dielectric properties of these materials, as well as their elasticity, cohesive strength, resistance to strain and fracturing, and applications. Topics include thermal properties of crystalline polymers; thermal conductivity in semicrystalline polymers; ultrasonic absorption in polymethylmethacrylate; radiation damage in thin sheet fiberglass; epoxide resins; dynamic mechanical properties of poly (methacrylates); dielectric loss due to antioxidants in polyolefins; fracture measurements on polyethylene in comparison with epoxy resins; fatigue testing of epoxide resins; lap testing of epoxide resins; thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of non-metallic composite materials; nonlinear stresses and displacements of the fibers and matrix in a radially loaded circular composite ring; the strain energy release rate of glass fiber-reinforced polyester composites; charpy impact testing of cloth reinforced epoxide resin; nonmetallic and composite materials as solid superleaks; carbon fiber reinforced expoxide resins; standardizing nonmetallic composite materials.

  7. Ultrasonic stress wave characterization of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The work reported covers three simultaneous projects. The first project was concerned with: (1) establishing the sensitivity of the acousto-ultrasonic method for evaluating subtle forms of damage development in cyclically loaded composite materials, (2) establishing the ability of the acousto-ultrasonic method for detecting initial material imperfections that lead to localized damage growth and final specimen failure, and (3) characteristics of the NBS/Proctor sensor/receiver for acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of laminated composite materials. The second project was concerned with examining the nature of the wave propagation that occurs during acoustic-ultrasonic evaluation of composite laminates and demonstrating the role of Lamb or plate wave modes and their utilization for characterizing composite laminates. The third project was concerned with the replacement of contact-type receiving piezotransducers with noncontacting laser-optical sensors for acousto-ultrasonic signal acquisition.

  8. Automotive applications for advanced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, G. C.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of nonaerospace applications for advanced composite materials with special emphasis on the automotive applications. The automotive industry has to satisfy exacting requirements to reduce the average fuel consumption of cars. A feasible approach to accomplish this involves the development of composites cars with a total weight of 2400 pounds and a fuel consumption of 33 miles per gallon. In connection with this possibility, the automotive companies have started to look seriously at composite materials. The aerospace industry has over the past decade accumulated a considerable data base on composite materials and this is being made available to the nonaerospace sector. However, the automotive companies will place prime emphasis on low cost resins which lend themselves to rapid fabrication techniques.

  9. Indirect composite resin materials for posterior applications.

    PubMed

    Shellard, E; Duke, E S

    1999-12-01

    Indirect composite resin restorations were introduced a number of years ago as possible alternatives to traditional metallic or ceramic-based indirect restorations. However, the earlier formulations did not provide evidence of improvement in mechanical and physical properties over chairside-placed direct composite resin materials. Because they required more tooth structure removal than direct restorations, their use became unpopular and was abandoned by most clinicians. Over the past few years, a new class of composite resin indirect materials has surfaced in the profession. Various technologies have been suggested as reinforcement mechanisms. Fibers, matrix modifications, and an assortment of innovations have been proposed for enhancing indirect composite resin restorations. Applications are from inlay restorations all the way to multi-unit fixed prostheses. This manuscript summarizes some of the progress made in this area. When available, data is presented to provide clinicians with guidelines and indications for the use of these materials.

  10. Enhanced ionic polymer metal composite actuator with porous nafion membrane using zinc oxide particulate leaching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sun Yong; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-03-01

    In this study, to improve the performance of an ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC), we suggest a porous nafion membrane fabricated with the particulate leaching method with zinc oxide and propose an IPMC that uses the porous nafion membrane. To fabricate this membrane, the proper ratio of nafion and zinc oxide powder is dispersed in a solvent. Then the zinc oxide embedded in the nafion membrane is fabricated with a casting method. With the particulate leaching method, the embedded zinc oxide particles are dissolved by an acid solution, and the spaces of the zinc oxide particles changed to pores. Finally, through electroless plating and ion exchange procedures, an IPMC with the porous nafion membrane is fabricated. The proposed IPMC has higher water uptake (WUP) and ion exchange capacity (IEC) and can show better actuation performance compared to the conventional nafion-based IPMC. We also measure the actuation displacement and blocking forces of the proposed IPMC. Compared with the conventional nafion-based IPMC, the proposed IPMC with the porous nafion membrane has increased displacements: about 80% at ac input and about 250% at dc input, and increased blocking force about 130% at dc input.

  11. Porous organic material from discotic tricarboxyamide: side chain-core interactions.

    PubMed

    Jana, Poulami; Paikar, Arpita; Bera, Santu; Maity, Suman Kumar; Haldar, Debasish

    2014-01-01

    The benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxyamide containing three l-methionine (1) self-assemble through 3-fold amide-amide hydrogen bonds and π-π stacking to fabricate one-dimensional nanorod like structure. However, the tyrosine analogue (2) carrying multiple H-bonding side chains lost the C3 symmetry and 3-fold amide-amide hydrogen bonds and developed a porous structure. The porous material exhibits ten times more N2 sorption (155 cc/g) than the columnar one, indicating that side chain-core interactions have a drastic effect on structure and function.

  12. Gradient composite materials for artificial intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Migacz, Katarzyna; Chłopek, Jan; Morawska-Chochół, Anna; Ambroziak, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Composites with the gradient of Young's modulus constitute a new group of biomimetic materials which affect the proper distribution of stresses between the implant and the bone. The aim of this article was to examine the mechanical properties of gradient materials based on carbon fibre-polysulfone composite, and to compare them to the properties of a natural intervertebral disc. Gradient properties were provided by different orientation or volume fraction of carbon fibres in particular layers of composites. The results obtained during in vitro tests displayed a good durability of the gradient materials put under long-term static load. However, the configuration based on a change in the volume fraction of the fibres seems more advantageous than the one based on a change of the fibres' orientation. The materials under study were designed to replace the intervertebral disc. The effect of Young's modulus of the material layers on the stress distribution between the tissue and the implant was analyzed and the biomimetic character of the gradient composites was stated. Unlike gradient materials, the pure polysulfone and the non-gradient composite resulted in the stress concentration in the region of nucleus pulposus, which is highly disadvantageous and does not occur in the stress distribution of natural intervertebral discs.

  13. Controlled High-Rate-Strain Shear Bands in Inert and Reactant Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, Vitali

    1997-07-01

    Shear localization was considered as one of the main reasons for initiation of chemical reaction in energetic materials under dynamic loading (Dremin and Breusov 1968, Winter and Field 1975, Frey 1981, Kipp 1985, Iyer, Bennet et al., 1994) and for particles bonding during shock compaction (Nesterenko 1985). However despite of wide spread recognition of the importance of rapid shear flow the shear bands in porous heterogeneous materials did not become an object of research. The primary reason for this was a lack of appropriate experimental method. The "Thick-Walled Cylinder" method, which allows to reproduce shear bands in controlled conditions, was initially proposed by Nesterenko et al., 1989 for solid inert materials and then modified by Nesterenko, Meyers et al., 1994 to fit porous inert and energetic materials. The method allows to reproduce the array of shear bands with shear strains 10 - 100 and strain rate 107 s-1. Experimental results will be presented for inert materials (granular, fractured ceramics) and for reactant porous mixtures (Nb-Si, Ti-Si, Ti-C). Mechanisms of material deformation and shear induced chemical reactions inside shear localization zone as well as conditions for the initiation of the chemical reaction in the bulk of energetic material by array of shear bands will be considered.

  14. Advanced composite materials: a strong growth industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced composites represent a material form that will see significant growth in structural applications. The authors notes that Du Pont sees a broad opportunity for these materials and proceeds to review reasons for the company's optimism as well as their approach to this technology. Substitution of composites for metals is shown graphically since 1960 and projected to 2025. Price reductions vs. steel of five materials also shown graphically since 1970 and projected to 1990. Today, use of advanced composites is primarily when high performance, is required, e.g., aerospace and sporting goods. The author sees a shift into higher-volume applications in the next 15 years, primarily the automotive industry. Finally, as the next century approaches, the author sees a possible capture of 50% of the structure-materials market, mostly in lightweight bridging structures and the top portion of large high-rise structures.

  15. High-speed neutron radiography for monitoring the water absorption by capillarity in porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cnudde, Veerle; Dierick, Manuel; Vlassenbroeck, Jelle; Masschaele, Bert; Lehmann, Eberhard; Jacobs, Patric; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Fluid flow through porous natural building stones is of great importance when studying their weathering processes. Many traditional experiments based on mass changes are available for studying liquid transport in porous stones, such as the determination of the water absorption coefficient by capillarity. Because thermal neutrons experience a strong attenuation by hydrogen, neutron radiography is a suitable technique for the study of water absorption by capillarity in porous stones. However, image contrast can be impaired because hydrogen mainly scatters neutrons rather than absorbing them, resulting in a blurred image. Capillarity results obtained by neutron radiography and by the European Standard 1925 for the determination of the water absorption coefficient by capillarity for natural building stones with a variable porosity were compared. It is illustrated that high-speed neutron radiography can be a useful research tool for the visualization of internal fluid flow inside inorganic building materials such as limestones and sandstones.

  16. A three-dimensional porous MoP@C hybrid as a high-capacity, long-cycle life anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Sun, Pingping; Qin, Jinwen; Wang, Jianqiang; Xiao, Ying; Cao, Minhua

    2016-05-21

    Metal phosphides are great promising anode materials for lithium-ion batteries with a high gravimetric capacity. However, significant challenges such as low capacity, fast capacity fading and poor cycle stability must be addressed for their practical applications. Herein, we demonstrate a versatile strategy for the synthesis of a novel three-dimensional porous molybdenum phosphide@carbon hybrid (3D porous MoP@C hybrid) by a template sol-gel method followed by an annealing treatment. The resultant hybrid exhibits a 3D interconnected ordered porous structure with a relatively high surface area. Benefiting from its advantages of microstructure and composition, the 3D porous MoP@C hybrid displays excellent lithium storage performance as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries in terms of specific capacity, cycling stability and long-cycle life. It presents stable cycling performance with a high reversible capacity up to 1028 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) after 100 cycles. By ex situ XRD, HRTEM, SAED and XPS analyses, the 3D porous MoP@C hybrid was found to follow the Li-intercalation reaction mechanism (MoP + xLi(+) + e(-)↔ LixMoP), which was further confirmed by ab initio calculations based on density functional theory.

  17. Avoiding Errors in Electrochemical Measurements: Effect of Frit Material on the Performance of Reference Electrodes with Porous Frit Junctions.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Maral P S; Saba, Stacey A; Anderson, Evan L; Hillmyer, Marc A; Bühlmann, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    In many commercially available and in-house-prepared reference electrodes, nanoporous glass frits (often of the brand named Vycor) contain the electrolyte solution that forms a salt bridge between the sample and the reference solution. Recently, we showed that in samples with low ionic strength, the half-cell potentials of reference electrodes comprising nanoporous Vycor frits are affected by the sample and can shift in response to the sample composition by more than 50 mV (which can cause up to 900% error in potentiometric measurements). It was confirmed that the large potential variations result from electrostatic screening of ion transfer through the frit due to the negatively charged surfaces of the glass nanopores. Since the commercial production of porous Vycor glass was recently discontinued, new materials have been used lately as porous frits in commercially available reference electrodes, namely frits made of Teflon, polyethylene, or one of two porous glasses sold under the brand names CoralPor and Electro-porous KT. In this work, we studied the effect of the frit characteristics on the performance of reference electrodes, and show that the unwanted changes in the reference potential are not unique to electrodes with Vycor frits. Increasing the pore size in the glass frits from the <10 nm into the 1 μm range or switching to polymeric frits with pores in the 1 to 10 μm range nearly eliminates the potential variations caused by electrostatic screening of ion transport through the frit pores. Unfortunately, bigger frit pores result in larger flow rates of the reference solution through the pores, which can result in the contamination of test solutions. PMID:27464837

  18. Avoiding Errors in Electrochemical Measurements: Effect of Frit Material on the Performance of Reference Electrodes with Porous Frit Junctions.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Maral P S; Saba, Stacey A; Anderson, Evan L; Hillmyer, Marc A; Bühlmann, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    In many commercially available and in-house-prepared reference electrodes, nanoporous glass frits (often of the brand named Vycor) contain the electrolyte solution that forms a salt bridge between the sample and the reference solution. Recently, we showed that in samples with low ionic strength, the half-cell potentials of reference electrodes comprising nanoporous Vycor frits are affected by the sample and can shift in response to the sample composition by more than 50 mV (which can cause up to 900% error in potentiometric measurements). It was confirmed that the large potential variations result from electrostatic screening of ion transfer through the frit due to the negatively charged surfaces of the glass nanopores. Since the commercial production of porous Vycor glass was recently discontinued, new materials have been used lately as porous frits in commercially available reference electrodes, namely frits made of Teflon, polyethylene, or one of two porous glasses sold under the brand names CoralPor and Electro-porous KT. In this work, we studied the effect of the frit characteristics on the performance of reference electrodes, and show that the unwanted changes in the reference potential are not unique to electrodes with Vycor frits. Increasing the pore size in the glass frits from the <10 nm into the 1 μm range or switching to polymeric frits with pores in the 1 to 10 μm range nearly eliminates the potential variations caused by electrostatic screening of ion transport through the frit pores. Unfortunately, bigger frit pores result in larger flow rates of the reference solution through the pores, which can result in the contamination of test solutions.

  19. Si/Ag composite with bimodal micro-nano porous structure as a high-performance anode for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qin; Zhao, Dianyun; Duan, Huimei; Zhou, Qiuxia; Xu, Caixia

    2015-03-12

    A one-step dealloying method is employed to conveniently fabricate a bimodal porous (BP) Si/Ag composite in high throughput under mild conditions. Upon dealloying the carefully designed SiAgAl ternary alloy in HCl solution at room temperature, the obtained Si/Ag composite has a uniform bicontinuous porous structure in three dimensions with micro-nano bimodal pore size distribution. Compared with the traditional preparation methods for porous Si and Si-based composites, this dealloying route is easily operated and environmentally benign. More importantly, it is convenient to realize the controllable components and uniform distribution of Si and Ag in the product. Owing to the rich porosity of the unique BP structure and the incorporation of highly conductive Ag, the as-made Si/Ag composite possesses the improved conductivity and alleviated volume changes of the Si network during repeated charging and discharging. As expected, the BP Si/Ag anode exhibits high capacity, excellent cycling reversibility, long cycling life and good rate capability for lithium storage. When the current rate is up to 1 A g(-1), BP Si/Ag can deliver a stable reversible capacity above 1000 mA h g(-1), and exhibits a capacity retention of up to 89.2% against the highest capacity after 200 cycles. With the advantages of unique performance and easy preparation, the BP Si/Ag composite holds great application potential as an advanced anode material for Li-ion batteries.

  20. Characterization of Porous Materials by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Super-resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Brunetti, Rachel; Tauzin, Lawrence J; Shuang, Bo; Yi, Xiyu; Kirkeminde, Alec W; Higgins, Daniel A; Weiss, Shimon; Landes, Christy F

    2015-09-22

    Porous materials such as cellular cytosol, hydrogels, and block copolymers have nanoscale features that determine macroscale properties. Characterizing the structure of nanopores is difficult with current techniques due to imaging, sample preparation, and computational challenges. We produce a super-resolution optical image that simultaneously characterizes the nanometer dimensions of and diffusion dynamics within porous structures by correlating stochastic fluctuations from diffusing fluorescent probes in the pores of the sample, dubbed here as "fluorescence correlation spectroscopy super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging" or "fcsSOFI". Simulations demonstrate that structural features and diffusion properties can be accurately obtained at sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We apply our technique to image agarose hydrogels and aqueous lyotropic liquid crystal gels. The heterogeneous pore resolution is improved by up to a factor of 2, and diffusion coefficients are accurately obtained through our method compared to diffraction-limited fluorescence imaging and single-particle tracking. Moreover, fcsSOFI allows for rapid and high-throughput characterization of porous materials. fcsSOFI could be applied to soft porous environments such hydrogels, polymers, and membranes in addition to hard materials such as zeolites and mesoporous silica.

  1. Biocorrosion and osteoconductivity of PCL/nHAp composite porous film-based coating of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdal-hay, Abdalla; Amna, Touseef; Lim, Jae Kyoo

    2013-04-01

    The present study was aimed at designing a novel porous hydroxyapatite/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (nHAp/PCL) hybrid nanocomposite matrix on a magnesium substrate with high and low porosity. The coated samples were prepared using a dip-coating technique in order to enhance the bioactivity and biocompatibility of the implant and to control the degradation rate of magnesium alloys. The mechanical and biocompatible properties of the coated and uncoated samples were investigated and an in vitro test for corrosion was conducted by electrochemical polarization and measurement of weight loss. The corrosion test results demonstrated that both the pristine PCL and nHAp/PCL composites showed good corrosion resistance in SBF. However, during the extended incubation time, the composite coatings exhibited more uniform and superior resistance to corrosion attack than pristine PCL, and were able to survive severe localized corrosion in physiological solution. Furthermore, the bioactivity of the composite film was determined by the rapid formation of uniform CaP nanoparticles on the sample surfaces during immersion in SBF. The mechanical integrity of the composite coatings displayed better performance (˜34% higher) than the uncoated samples. Finally, our results suggest that the nHAp incorporated with novel PCL composite membranes on magnesium substrates may serve as an excellent 3-D platform for cell attachment, proliferation, migration, and growth in bone tissue. This novel as-synthesized nHAp/PCL membrane on magnesium implants could be used as a potential material for orthopedic applications in the future.

  2. An aptasensor for sensitive detection of human breast cancer cells by using porous GO/Au composites and porous PtFe alloy as effective sensing platform and signal amplification labels.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mei; Sun, Guoqiang; Liu, Fang; Lu, Juanjuan; Yu, Jinghua; Song, Xianrang

    2013-10-10

    A novel aptamer biosensor for cancer cell assay has been reported on the basis of ultrasensitive electrochemical detection. The assay uses the aptamer as a capture probe to recognize and bind the tumor marker on the surface of the cancer cells, forming an aptamer-based sandwich structure for MCF-7 cells detection. Functionalized nanoporous materials, porous graphene oxide/Au composites (GO/Au composites) and porous PtFe alloy have been introduced into the biosensor. Owing to the large surface area and versatile porous structure, the use of nanoporous materials can significantly improve the analysis performance of the biosensors by loading of large amounts of molecules and accelerating diffusion rate. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the proposed aptamer biosensor exhibited excellent analytical performance for MCF-7 cells determination, ranging from 100 to 5.0×10(7) cells mL(-1) with the detection limit of 38 cells mL(-1). The biosensor showed good selectivity, acceptable stability and reproducibility, and developed a highly sensitive and selective method for cancer cells detection.

  3. Poly (ε-caprolactone) coating delays vancomycin delivery from porous chitosan/β-tricalcium phosphate composites.

    PubMed

    Fang, Taolin; Wen, Jianchuan; Zhou, Jian; Shao, Zhengzhong; Dong, Jian

    2012-10-01

    The orthopedic infection, such as osteomyelitis, especially those caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), remains a major complication of open fractures. Local vancomycin delivery is considered to provide better methods when avascular zones prevent the delivery of drugs from conventional routes of administration. Chitosan (CS) delivery system has been developed with the disadvantages, such as mechanically weakness, lacking osteoconductivity, and the initial burst of antibiotics into the environment. The aim of this study was to confirm that the prepared CS/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) composites coated with poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL), similar to natural bone in components, had a three-dimensional porous structure and could be used as drug carriers to deliver vancomycin in a sustained and controlled manner effectively for 6 weeks at levels to inhibit MRSA proliferation. We prepared porous CS/β-TCP composites by incorporating β-TCP into the system, and coated the composites with PCL of three different concentrations. The morphological structure of composites, including pore size and porosity, was examined. The result showed that CS/β-TCP coated with 2.5w/v% PCL solution had the best coating effect and it retarded the release of vancomycin in a near zero-order mechanism from 0 to 14 days. The drug delivery was significantly delayed after coated with 2.5w/v% PCL. The quantitative release of vancomycin was extended to 42 days. Therefore PCL coating could be used to retard the release of vancomycin from CS/β-TCP composites in a sustained and controlled manner. Porous CS/β-TCP coated with PCL might be one of the candidate vancomycin carriers for treating MRSA-related osteomyelitis.

  4. Mechanically Strong, Lightweight Porous Materials Developed (X-Aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Aerogels are attractive materials for a variety of NASA missions because they are ultralightweight, have low thermal conductivity and low-dielectric constants, and can be readily doped with other materials. Potential NASA applications for these materials include lightweight insulation for spacecraft, habitats, and extravehicular activity (EVA) suits; catalyst supports for fuel cell and in situ resource utilization; and sensors for air- and water-quality monitoring for vehicles, habitats, and EVA suits. Conventional aerogels are extremely fragile and require processing via supercritical fluid extraction, which adds cost to the production of an aerogel and limits the sizes and geometries of samples that can be produced from these materials. These issues have severely hampered the application of aerogels in NASA missions.

  5. The Interaction of Sound and Shock Waves with Flexible Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, James Fuller

    Several topics are studied which illustrate the role of flexibility in determining the acoustical properties of flexible porous materials. A power balance relation is obtained for the flexible porous material which explicitly identifies two loss mechanisms for sound absorption: the losses due to the irreversible deformation of the structure, and those attributed to the viscous drag between the fluid and the structure. The finite flexible porous layer backed by a rigid wall is then considered. Irreversible deformation of the structure is shown to be the dominant loss mechanism for closed layers. Three departures from the basic model-- a porous layer with anisotropic flow resistance and structure factor, periodic structures consisting of porous layers separated by air gaps, and the porous medium in bulk with mean fluid flow--are considered. The reflection of shock waves is also studied, and a quasi-linear theory is developed which reproduces the principal features of experimental results obtained previously by Ingard. The theory assumes that the propagating pulses in the air and structure are linear and the gross, zeroth order motion of the porous layer is modeled by including its energy and momentum in the conservation equations; these equations compare the system just before and just after the reflection of the incident shock from the front surface of the layer. The substantial motion of the layer and its dragging against a constraining boundary (in this case the walls of the shock tube) are found to introduce a dependence of the front reflection coefficient and maximal layer deformation on the peak pressure of the incident shock. Lastly, we address the question of measurement of the complex compressibility K, a key parameter used to describe the dynamics of a given flexible porous material. The standard long-wavelength assumption used to determine K from experimental measurements of the frequency dependent velocity transfer function across a sample is shown to

  6. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.K.; Reed, S.T.; Ashley, C.S.; Neiser, R.A.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1999-07-20

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties. 6 figs.

  7. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, Janda K.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Neiser, Richard A.; Moffatt, William C.

    1999-01-01

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties.

  8. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    SciTech Connect

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  9. Supersonic flow around a cylinder with front gas-permeable insert which modeled by skeleton of porous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poplavskaya, T. V.; Kirilovskiy, S. V.; Mironov, S. G.

    2016-10-01

    Experimental data and results of numerical simulation of a supersonic flow around a streamwise aligned cylinder with a frontal gas-permeable insert made of a high-porosity cellular material are presented. The porous material structure is modeled by a system of staggered rings of different diameters (discrete model of a porous medium). The model skeleton of the material corresponds to the pore size (diameter 1mm) and porosity (0.95) of a real cellular porous material. The computed results are compared with the data of wind tunnel experiments performed in a T-327B supersonic continuous-flow wind tunnel at the flow Mach number M∞ = 4.85.

  10. Tensile failure criteria for fiber composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, B. W.; Zweben, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    The analysis provides insight into the failure mechanics of these materials and defines criteria which serve as tools for preliminary design material selection and for material reliability assessment. The model incorporates both dispersed and propagation type failures and includes the influence of material heterogeneity. The important effects of localized matrix damage and post-failure matrix shear stress transfer are included in the treatment. The model is used to evaluate the influence of key parameters on the failure of several commonly used fiber-matrix systems. Analyses of three possible failure modes were developed. These modes are the fiber break propagation mode, the cumulative group fracture mode, and the weakest link mode. Application of the new model to composite material systems has indicated several results which require attention in the development of reliable structural composites. Prominent among these are the size effect and the influence of fiber strength variability.

  11. Getting Out Of A Tight Spot: Physics Of Flow Through Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Sujit Sankar

    We study the physics of flow through porous materials in two different ways: by directly visualizing flow through a model three-dimensional (3D) porous medium, and by investigating the deformability of fluid-filled microcapsules having porous shells. In the first part of this thesis, we develop an experimental approach to directly visualize fluid flow through a 3D porous medium. We use this to investigate drainage, the displacement of a wetting fluid from a porous medium by a non-wetting fluid, as well as secondary imbibition, the subsequent displacement of the non-wetting fluid by the wetting fluid. We characterize the intricate morphologies of the non-wetting fluid ganglia left trapped within the pore space, and show how the ganglia configurations vary with the wetting fluid flow rate. We then visualize the spatial fluctuations in the fluid flow, both for single- and multi-phase flow. We use our measurements to quantify the strong variability in the flow velocities, as well as the pore-scale correlations in the flow. Finally, we use our experimental approach to study the simultaneous flow of both a wetting and a non-wetting fluid through a porous medium, and elucidate the flow instabilities that arise for sufficiently large flow rates. In the second part of this thesis, we study the mechanical properties of porous spherical microcapsules. We first introduce emulsions, and describe how their rheology depends on the microscopic interactions between the drops comprising them. We then study the formation and buckling of one class of microcapsule -- nanoparticle-coated emulsion drops. We also use double emulsions, drops within drops, as templates to form another class of microcapsule -- drops coated with thin, porous, polymer shells. We investigate how, under sufficient osmotic pressure, these microcapsules buckle, and show how the inhomogeneity in the shell structure can guide the folding pathway taken by a microcapsule as it buckles. Finally, we study the expansion

  12. Computing the Seismic Attenuation in Complex Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Yder Jean

    The present work analyzes seismic attenuation due to wave-induced flow in complex poroelastic materials containing an arbitrary amount of heterogeneity and fully or partially saturated with a mixture of fluids. In the first part, two distinct finite-difference (FDTD) numerical schemes for solving Biot's poroelastic set of equations are introduced. The first algorithm is designed to be used in the seismic band of frequencies; i.e., when the permeability of the medium doesn't depend on frequency. The second algorithm accounts for viscous boundary layers that appear in the pores at high frequencies (in this case, the permeability depends on frequency) and can be used across the entire band of frequencies. An innovative numerical method is presented in the second part allowing computation of seismic attenuation due to wave-induced flow for any poroelastic material. This method is applied to study the attenuation associated with different classes of materials saturated with a single fluid (water). For a material having a self-affine (fractal) distribution of elastic properties, it is demonstrated that frequency dependence in the attenuation is controlled by a single parameter that is directly related to the fractal dimension of the material. For anisotropic materials, a relation is established between the attenuation levels associated with waves propagating in different directions and the geometrical aspect ratio of the heterogeneities present within the material. The third part concerns the study of attenuation associated with materials having a homogeneous solid skeleton saturated with a mixture of immiscible fluids. The special case where the distribution of fluids is the result of an invasion-percolation process is treated in detail. Finally, the last part presents a novel experimental setup designed to measure fluctuations of the elastic properties in real rock samples. This device performs automated micro-indentation tests at the surface of rock samples and

  13. Properties of five toughened matrix composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Dow, Marvin B.

    1992-01-01

    The use of toughened matrix composite materials offers an attractive solution to the problem of poor damage tolerance associated with advanced composite materials. In this study, the unidirectional laminate strengths and moduli, notched (open-hole) and unnotched tension and compression properties of quasi-isotropic laminates, and compression-after-impact strengths of five carbon fiber/toughened matrix composites, IM7/E7T1-2, IM7/X1845, G40-800X/5255-3, IM7/5255-3, and IM7/5260 have been evaluated. The compression-after-impact (CAI) strengths were determined primarily by impacting quasi-isotropic laminates with the NASA Langley air gun. A few CAI tests were also made with a drop-weight impactor. For a given impact energy, compression after impact strengths were determined to be dependent on impactor velocity. Properties and strengths for the five materials tested are compared with NASA data on other toughened matrix materials (IM7/8551-7, IM6/1808I, IM7/F655, and T800/F3900). This investigation found that all five materials were stronger and more impact damage tolerant than more brittle carbon/epoxy composite materials currently used in aircraft structures.

  14. Recent advances in porous polyoxometalate-based metal-organic framework materials.

    PubMed

    Du, Dong-Ying; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Li, Shun-Li; Su, Zhong-Min; Lan, Ya-Qian

    2014-07-01

    Polyoxometalate (POM)-based metal-organic framework (MOF) materials contain POM units and generally generate MOF materials with open networks. POM-based MOF materials, which utilize the advantages of both POMs and MOFs, have received increasing attention, and much effort has been devoted to their preparation and relevant applications over the past few decades. They have good prospects in catalysis owing to the electronic and physical properties of POMs that are tunable by varying constituent elements. In this review, we present recent developments in porous POM-based MOF materials, including their classification, synthesis strategies, and applications, especially in the field of catalysis. PMID:24676127

  15. Impact testing of textile composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, Marc

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this report were to evaluate the impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of a variety of textile composite materials. Static indentation and impact tests were performed on the stitched and unstitched uniweave composites constructed from AS4/3501-6 Carbon/Epoxy with a fiberglass yarn woven in to hold the fibers together while being stitched. Compression and tension were measured after the tests to determine the damage resistance, residual strength and the damage tolerance of the specimens.

  16. Electrode including porous particles with embedded active material for use in a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Donald R.; Nelson, Paul A.; Kaun, Thomas D.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1978-04-25

    Particles of carbonaceous matrices containing embedded electrode active material are prepared for vibratory loading within a porous electrically conductive substrate. In preparing the particles, active materials such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in powdered or particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and particles of a volatile to form a paste mixture. The paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity at about the same time as the resin begins to cure into a rigid, solid structure. The solid structure is then comminuted into porous, carbonaceous particles with the embedded active material.

  17. Method of preparing porous, active material for use in electrodes of secondary electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Donald R.; Nelson, Paul A.; Kaun, Thomas D.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1977-01-01

    Particles of carbonaceous matrices containing embedded electrode active material are prepared for vibratory loading within a porous electrically conductive substrate. In preparing the particles, active materials such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in powdered or particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and particles of a volatile to form a paste mixture. The paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity at about the same time as the resin begins to cure into a rigid, solid structure.The solid structure is then comminuted into porous, carbonaceous particles with the embedded active material.

  18. Dark-field X-ray imaging of unsaturated water transport in porous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F. E-mail: michele.griffa@empa.ch; Di Bella, C.; Lura, P.; Prade, F.; Herzen, J.; Sarapata, A.; Pfeiffer, F.; Griffa, M. E-mail: michele.griffa@empa.ch; Jerjen, I.

    2014-10-13

    We introduce in this Letter an approach to X-ray imaging of unsaturated water transport in porous materials based upon the intrinsic X-ray scattering produced by the material microstructural heterogeneity at a length scale below the imaging system spatial resolution. The basic principle for image contrast creation consists in a reduction of such scattering by permeation of the porosity by water. The implementation of the approach is based upon X-ray dark-field imaging via Talbot-Lau interferometry. The proof-of-concept is provided by performing laboratory-scale dark-field X-ray radiography of mortar samples during a water capillary uptake experiment. The results suggest that the proposed approach to visualizing unsaturated water transport in porous materials is complementary to neutron and magnetic resonance imaging and alternative to standard X-ray imaging, the latter requiring the use of contrast agents because based upon X-ray attenuation only.

  19. Shape Memory Alloy Modeling and Applications to Porous and Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Pingping

    underlying mechanism of pore interactions in the SMA foams. Additionally, the influence of geometric features including the number, size and locations of pores are studied to guide the design and optimization of porous SMAs. Thirdly, modeling and simulation are performed on a series of cracked self-healing SMA composite systems. These composites are to be applied in aeronautic structures where fatigue crack initiation and propagation is a significant safety and economic concern, based on a liquid-assisted SMA self-healing technology. We develop a modeling approach in Abaqus to create composite models with the as-is or pre-strained SMA wires. The modeling approach is validated by two simulation cases following the experiment setups. The amount of crack closure in the SMA-reinforced MMC is then focused, especially on the role of the SMA reinforcement, the softening property of the matrix, and the effect of pre-strain in the SMA. Composites with various geometric configurations of SMA are also created to study how the number, location, length and orientation of the SMA wires would affect the crack closure and self-healing behavior. These studies, from three aspects, provide deep insights to SMA and its related applications from the modeling and simulation point of view, which can further guide the development and application of this unique material.

  20. The Limits of Porous Materials in the Topology Optimization of Stokes Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Evgrafov, Anton

    2005-10-15

    We consider a problem concerning the distribution of a solid material in a given bounded control volume with the goal to minimize the potential power of the Stokes flow with given velocities at the boundary through the material-free part of the domain.We also study the relaxed problem of the optimal distribution of the porous material with a spatially varying Darcy permeability tensor, where the governing equations are known as the Darcy-Stokes, or Brinkman, equations. We show that the introduction of the requirement of zero power dissipation due to the flow through the porous material into the relaxed problem results in it becoming a well-posed mathematical problem, which admits optimal solutions that have extreme permeability properties (i.e., assume only zero or infinite permeability); thus, they are also optimal in the original (non-relaxed) problem. Two numerical techniques are presented for the solution of the constrained problem. One is based on a sequence of optimal Brinkman flows with increasing viscosities, from the mathematical point of view nothing but the exterior penalty approach applied to the problem. Another technique is more special, and is based on the 'sizing' approximation of the problem using a mix of two different porous materials with high and low permeabilities, respectively. This paper thus complements the study of Borrvall and Petersson (Internat. J. Numer. Methods Fluids, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 77-107, 2003), where only sizing optimization problems are treated.

  1. Preparation of steel slag porous sound-absorbing material using coal powder as pore former.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Guo, Zhancheng

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to prepare a porous sound-absorbing material using steel slag and fly ash as the main raw material, with coal powder and sodium silicate used as a pore former and binder respectively. The influence of the experimental conditions such as the ratio of fly ash, sintering temperature, sintering time, and porosity regulation on the performance of the porous sound-absorbing material was investigated. The results showed that the specimens prepared by this method had high sound absorption performance and good mechanical properties, and the noise reduction coefficient and compressive strength could reach 0.50 and 6.5MPa, respectively. The compressive strength increased when the dosage of fly ash and sintering temperature were raised. The noise reduction coefficient decreased with increasing ratio of fly ash and reducing pore former, and first increased and then decreased with the increase of sintering temperature and time. The optimum preparation conditions for the porous sound-absorbing material were a proportion of fly ash of 50% (wt.%), percentage of coal powder of 30% (wt.%), sintering temperature of 1130°C, and sintering time of 6.0hr, which were determined by analyzing the properties of the sound-absorbing material. PMID:26456608

  2. Preparation of steel slag porous sound-absorbing material using coal powder as pore former.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Guo, Zhancheng

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to prepare a porous sound-absorbing material using steel slag and fly ash as the main raw material, with coal powder and sodium silicate used as a pore former and binder respectively. The influence of the experimental conditions such as the ratio of fly ash, sintering temperature, sintering time, and porosity regulation on the performance of the porous sound-absorbing material was investigated. The results showed that the specimens prepared by this method had high sound absorption performance and good mechanical properties, and the noise reduction coefficient and compressive strength could reach 0.50 and 6.5MPa, respectively. The compressive strength increased when the dosage of fly ash and sintering temperature were raised. The noise reduction coefficient decreased with increasing ratio of fly ash and reducing pore former, and first increased and then decreased with the increase of sintering temperature and time. The optimum preparation conditions for the porous sound-absorbing material were a proportion of fly ash of 50% (wt.%), percentage of coal powder of 30% (wt.%), sintering temperature of 1130°C, and sintering time of 6.0hr, which were determined by analyzing the properties of the sound-absorbing material.

  3. Health monitoring method for composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Watkins, Jr., Kenneth S.; Morris, Shelby J.

    2011-04-12

    An in-situ method for monitoring the health of a composite component utilizes a condition sensor made of electrically conductive particles dispersed in a polymeric matrix. The sensor is bonded or otherwise formed on the matrix surface of the composite material. Age-related shrinkage of the sensor matrix results in a decrease in the resistivity of the condition sensor. Correlation of measured sensor resistivity with data from aged specimens allows indirect determination of mechanical damage and remaining age of the composite component.

  4. Water Adsorption in Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, H; Gandara, F; Zhang, YB; Jiang, JC; Queen, WL; Hudson, MR; Yaghi, OM

    2014-03-19

    Water adsorption in porous materials is important for many applications such as dehumidification, thermal batteries, and delivery of drinking water in remote areas. In this study, we have identified three criteria for achieving high performing porous materials for water adsorption. These criteria deal with condensation pressure of water in the pores, uptake capacity, and recyclability and water stability of the material. In search of an excellently performing porous material, we have studied and compared the water adsorption properties of 23 materials, 20 of which are metal organic frameworks (MOFs). Among the MOFs are 10 zirconium(IV) MOFs with a subset of these, MOF-801-SC (single crystal form), -802, -805, -806, -808, -812, and -841 reported for the first time. MOF-801-P (microcrystalline powder form) was reported earlier and studied here for its water adsorption properties. MOF-812 was only made and structurally characterized but not examined for water adsorption because it is a byproduct of MOF-841 synthesis. All the new zirconium MOFs are made from the Zr6O4(OH)(4)(-CO2)(n) secondary building units (n = 6, 8, 10, or 12) and variously shaped carboxyl organic linkers to make extended porous frameworks. The permanent porosity of all 23 materials was confirmed and their water adsorption measured to reveal that MOF-801-P and MOF-841 are the highest performers based on the three criteria stated above; they are water stable, do not lose capacity after five adsorption/desorption cycles, and are easily regenerated at room temperature. An X-ray single-crystal study and a powder neutron diffraction study reveal the position of the water adsorption sites in MOF-801 and highlight the importance of the intermolecular interaction between adsorbed water molecules within the pores.

  5. Composite materials and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Uribe, Francisco A.; Wilson, Mahlon S.; Garzon, Fernando H.

    2009-09-15

    A method of depositing noble metals on a metal hexaboride support. The hexaboride support is sufficiently electropositive to allow noble metals to deposit spontaneously from solutions containing ionic species of such metals onto the support. The method permits the deposition of metallic films of controlled thickness and particle size at room temperature without using separate reducing agents. Composite materials comprising noble metal films deposited on such metal hexaborides are also described. Such composite materials may be used as catalysts, thermionic emitters, electrical contacts, electrodes, adhesion layers, and optical coatings.

  6. Thermal expansion properties of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. R.; Kural, M. H.; Mackey, G. B.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal expansion data for several composite materials, including generic epoxy resins, various graphite, boron, and glass fibers, and unidirectional and woven fabric composites in an epoxy matrix, were compiled. A discussion of the design, material, environmental, and fabrication properties affecting thermal expansion behavior is presented. Test methods and their accuracy are discussed. Analytical approaches to predict laminate coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) based on lamination theory and micromechanics are also included. A discussion is included of methods of tuning a laminate to obtain a near-zero CTE for space applications.

  7. An alternative Biot's displacement formulation for porous materials.

    PubMed

    Dazel, Olivier; Brouard, Bruno; Depollier, Claude; Griffiths, Stéphane

    2007-06-01

    This paper proposes an alternative displacement formulation of Biot's linear model for poroelastic materials. Its advantage is a simplification of the formalism without making any additional assumptions. The main difference between the method proposed in this paper and the original one is the choice of the generalized coordinates. In the present approach, the generalized coordinates are chosen in order to simplify the expression of the strain energy, which is expressed as the sum of two decoupled terms. Hence, new equations of motion are obtained whose elastic forces are decoupled. The simplification of the formalism is extended to Biot and Willis thought experiments, and simpler expressions of the parameters of the three Biot waves are also provided. A rigorous derivation of equivalent and limp models is then proposed. It is finally shown that, for the particular case of sound-absorbing materials, additional simplifications of the formalism can be obtained.

  8. Ductile damage of porous materials with two populations of voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Pierre-Guy; Monerie, Yann; Suquet, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    This study is devoted to the modelling of ductile damage in uranium dioxide. This polycrystalline material contains two populations of voids of well separated size. The problem addressed here is the prediction of the effective flow surface of a Gurson material containing randomly oriented oblate voids. The case of spherical voids is considered first and the variational approach of Gurson is generalized by adding a compressible component to his original velocity field. The case of aligned oblate voids is then considered and a suitable generalization of a velocity field due to Gologanu et al. (ASME J. Engrg. Mater. Technol. 116 (1994) 290-297) is proposed. The extension to randomly oriented voids is achieved by averaging over all orientations. In each case, rigorous upper bounds and approximate estimates are derived and compared (in the case of spherical voids) with Finite Element simulations. To cite this article: P.-G. Vincent et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  9. Characterization of Porous Carbon Fibers and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A one-year subcontract sponsored by the Carbon Materials Technology Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the Department of Geological Sciences, University Of Tennessee, has been completed. A volumetric sorption system has been upgraded, in cooperation with commercial vendor, to allow the acquisition of data relevant to the program for the production of activated carbon molecular fiber sieves (ACFMS). The equipment and experimental techniques have been developed to determine the pore structure and porosity of reference materials and materials produced at ORNL as part of the development of methods for the activation of carbon fibers by various etching agents. Commercial activated coconut shell charcoal (ACSC) has been studied to verify instrument performance and to develop methodology for deducing cause and effects in the activation processes and to better understand the industrial processes (gas separation, natural gas storage, etc.). Operating personnel have been trained, standard operating procedures have been established, and quality assurance procedures have been developed and put in place. Carbon dioxide and methane sorption have been measured over a temperature range 0 to 200 C for both ACFMS and ACSC and similarities and differences related to the respective structures and mechanisms of interaction with the sorbed components. Nitrogen sorption (at 77 K) has been used to evaluate ''surface area'' and ''porosity'' for comparison with the large data base that exists for other activated carbons and related materials. The preliminary data base reveals that techniques and theories currently used to evaluate activated carbons may be somewhat erroneous and misleading. Alternate thermochemical and structural analyses have been developed that show promise in providing useful information related both to the activation process and to industrial applications of interest in the efficient and economical utilization of fossil fuels in a manner that is

  10. Quantitative properties of complex porous materials calculated from x-ray μCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Adrian P.; Arns, Christoph H.; Sakellariou, Arthur; Senden, Tim J.; Sok, Rob M.; Averdunk, Holger; Saadatfar, Mohammad; Limaye, Ajay; Knackstedt, Mark A.

    2006-08-01

    numerical laboratory approach to the study of complex porous materials.

  11. Preliminary results on the abradability of porous, sintered seal material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolak, J.; Emery, A. F.; Etemad, S.; Choi, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for the case of titanium blade specimens, with bare tips (or covered with wear resistant, plasma sprayed materials) rubbing at 100 m/s against specimens of abradable nickel-chromium seal material moving toward the rotating blades at 0.0125 mm/s or at 0.025 mm/s. Using a two component dynamometer, the normal force of the rub interaction was measured and the shear component estimated. The elastoplastic properties of the seal material have been determined and those parameters as well as the rigidity of the rub tester system are considered in conjunction with those affecting the accuracy of the measurement of the forces arising at the blade-seal interface. The average and the 'local instantaneous' temperatures of the seal specimen and the temperature of the blade tip surface during rubbing are presented as functions of time. A seal densification factor is defined and its functional relationships with contact force components, temperature, wear ratio and blade tip abrading capability are indicated.

  12. A new high-throughput method utilizing porous silica-based nano-composites for the determination of partition coefficients of drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chih H; Tam, Kin; Tsang, Shik C

    2011-09-01

    We show that highly porous silica-based nanoparticles prepared via micro-emulsion and sol-gel techniques are stable colloids in aqueous solution. By incorporating a magnetic core into the porous silica nano-composite, it is found that the material can be rapidly separated (precipitated) upon exposure to an external magnetic field. Alternatively, the porous silica nanoparticles without magnetic cores can be equally separated from solution by applying a high-speed centrifugation. Using these silica-based nanostructures a new high-throughput method for the determination of partition coefficient for water/n-octanol is hereby described. First, a tiny quantity of n-octanol phase is pre-absorbed in the porous silica nano-composite colloids, which allows an establishment of interface at nano-scale between the adsorbed n-octanol with the bulk aqueous phase. Organic compounds added to the mixture can therefore undergo a rapid partition between the two phases. The concentration of drug compound in the supernatant in a small vial can be determined by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. With the adaptation of a robotic liquid handler, a high-throughput technology for the determination of partition coefficients of drug candidates can be employed for drug screening in the industry based on these nano-separation skills. The experimental results clearly suggest that this new method can provide partition coefficient values of potential drug candidates comparable to the conventional shake-flask method but requires much shorter analytical time and lesser quantity of chemicals.

  13. Toward compositional design of reticular type porous films by mixing and coating titania-based frameworks with silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, T.

    2015-12-01

    A recently developed reticular type porous structure, which can be fabricated as the film through the soft colloidal block copolymer (e.g., PS-b-PEO) templating, is very promising as the porous platform showing high-performance based on its high surface area as well as high diffusivity of targeted organic molecules and effective accommodation of bulky molecules, but the compositional design of oxide frameworks has not been developed so enough to date. Here, I report reliable synthetic methods of the reticular type porous structure toward simple compositional variations. Due to the reproducibility of reticular type porous titania films from titanium alkoxide (e.g., TTIP; titanium tetraisopropoxide), a titania-silica film having similar porous structure was obtained by mixing silicon alkoxide (e.g., tetraethoxysilane) and TTIP followed by their pre-hydrolysis, and the mixing ratio of Ti to Si composition was easily reached to 1.0. For further compositional design, a concept of surface coating was widely applicable; the reticular type porous titania surfaces can be coated with other oxides such as silica. Here, a silica coating was successfully achieved by the simple chemical vapor deposition of silicon alkoxide (e.g., tetramethoxysilane) without water (with water at the humidity level), which was also utilized for pore filling with silica by the similar process with water.

  14. Iron-rich nanoparticle encapsulated, nitrogen doped porous carbon materials as efficient cathode electrocatalyst for microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolong; Zhu, Youlong; Lu, Lu; Xu, Kongliang; Wang, Heming; Jin, Yinghua; Jason Ren, Zhiyong; Liu, Zhenning; Zhang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Developing efficient, readily available, and sustainable electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in neutral medium is of great importance to practical applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Herein, a porous nitrogen-doped carbon material with encapsulated Fe-based nanoparticles (Fe-Nx/C) has been developed and utilized as an efficient ORR catalyst in MFCs. The material was obtained through pyrolysis of a highly porous organic polymer containing iron(II) porphyrins. The characterizations of morphology, crystalline structure and elemental composition reveal that Fe-Nx/C consists of well-dispersed Fe-based nanoparticles coated by N-doped graphitic carbon layer. ORR catalytic performance of Fe-Nx/C has been evaluated through cyclic voltammetry and rotating ring-disk electrode measurements, and its application as a cathode electrocatalyst in an air-cathode single-chamber MFC has been investigated. Fe-Nx/C exhibits comparable or better performance in MFCs than 20% Pt/C, displaying higher cell voltage (601 mV vs. 591 mV), maximum power density (1227 mW m-2 vs. 1031 mW m-2) and Coulombic efficiency (50% vs. 31%). These findings indicate that Fe-Nx/C is more tolerant and durable than Pt/C in a system with bacteria metabolism and thus holds great potential for practical MFC applications.

  15. A polytetrafluoroethylene porous membrane and dimethylhexadecylamine quaternized poly (vinyl benzyl chloride) composite membrane for intermediate temperature fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yuan-Cheng; Xu, Chenxi; Zou, Linling; Scott, Keith; Liu, Jiyan

    2015-10-01

    A composite material for phosphoric acid (PA) loaded membrane was prepared using a porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) thin film. N, N-Dimethylhexadecylamine partially quaternized poly (vinyl benzyl chloride) (qPVBzCl-) was synthesized as the substrate for the phosphoric acid loaded polymer membrane. SEM observation indicated that the pores were filled with the qPVBzCl-. The maximum PA loading level was calculated to be 4.67-5.12 per repeat unit on average. TGA results showed that resultant composite membrane was stable in the intermediate temperature from 100 °C to 200 °C. The composite membrane tensile stress was 56.23 MPa, and the Young's Modulus was 0.25 GPa, and the fractured elongation was 23%. The conductivity of the composite membrane after the PA addition (H3PO4@PTFE/qPVBzCl-) increased from 0.085 S cm-1 to 0.11 S cm-1 from 105 °C to 180 °C. The peak power density of the H2/O2 at 175 °C under low humidity condition (<1%) for H3PO4@PTFE/qPVBzCl- membranes was 360 mW cm-2.

  16. Frictional Ignition Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, Steve; Rosales, Keisa; Robinson, Michael J.; Stoltzfus, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The space flight community has been investigating lightweight composite materials for use in propellant tanks for both liquid and gaseous oxygen for space flight vehicles. The use of these materials presents some risks pertaining to ignition and burning hazards in the presence of oxygen. Through hazard analysis process, some ignition mechanisms have been identified as being potentially credible. One of the ignition mechanisms was reciprocal friction; however, test data do not exist that could be used to clear or fail these types of materials as "oxygen compatible" for the reciprocal friction ignition mechanism. Therefore, testing was performed at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to provide data to evaluate this ignition mechanism. This paper presents the test system, approach, data results, and findings of the reciprocal friction testing performed on composite sample materials being considered for propellant tanks.

  17. Natural frequency behavior of damaged composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, M. B.; Ochoa, O. O.

    1992-11-01

    Attention is given to characterizing the effect of material system, geometry, and stacking sequence on the vibration response of damaged plates of fiber-reinforced composite. Plate layups are fashioned from various composite materials and subjected to four damage cycles, and a signal analyzer is employed to study the frequency response function (FRF) of the materials. The materials employed include the AS4/3501-6, IM7/E7T1-2, and IM7/977-2 families, and numerical analyses are used for comparison. Frequencies are obtained from the experimentally established FRFs, and natural frequencies tend to decrease in the presence of extensive localized damage. The fiber is argued to dominate the response of the plate, and the experimental data are confirmed in some cases by the results of finite-element calculations.

  18. Modeling of laser interactions with composite materials

    DOE PAGES

    Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Boley, Charles D.

    2013-05-07

    In this study, we develop models of laser interactions with composite materials consisting of fibers embedded within a matrix. A ray-trace model is shown to determine the absorptivity, absorption depth, and optical power enhancement within the material, as well as the angular distribution of the reflected light. We also develop a macroscopic model, which provides physical insight and overall results. We show that the parameters in this model can be determined from the ray trace model.

  19. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  20. A diffusivity model for predicting VOC diffusion in porous building materials based on fractal theory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfeng; Zhou, Xiaojun; Wang, Dengjia; Song, Cong; Liu, Jiaping

    2015-12-15

    Most building materials are porous media, and the internal diffusion coefficients of such materials have an important influences on the emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The pore structure of porous building materials has a significant impact on the diffusion coefficient. However, the complex structural characteristics bring great difficulties to the model development. The existing prediction models of the diffusion coefficient are flawed and need to be improved. Using scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) tests of typical porous building materials, this study developed a new diffusivity model: the multistage series-connection fractal capillary-bundle (MSFC) model. The model considers the variable-diameter capillaries formed by macropores connected in series as the main mass transfer paths, and the diameter distribution of the capillary bundles obeys a fractal power law in the cross section. In addition, the tortuosity of the macrocapillary segments with different diameters is obtained by the fractal theory. Mesopores serve as the connections between the macrocapillary segments rather than as the main mass transfer paths. The theoretical results obtained using the MSFC model yielded a highly accurate prediction of the diffusion coefficients and were in a good agreement with the VOC concentration measurements in the environmental test chamber. PMID:26291782

  1. Porous carbon material containing CaO for acidic gas capture: preparation and properties.

    PubMed

    Przepiórski, Jacek; Czyżewski, Adam; Pietrzak, Robert; Toyoda, Masahiro; Morawski, Antoni W

    2013-12-15

    A one-step process for the preparation of CaO-containing porous carbons is described. Mixtures of poly(ethylene terephthalate) with natural limestone were pyrolyzed and thus hybrid sorbents could be easily obtained. The polymeric material and the mineral served as a carbon precursor and CaO delivering agent, respectively. We discuss effects of the preparation conditions and the relative amounts of the raw materials used for the preparations on the porosity of the hybrid products. The micropore areas and volumes of the obtained products tended to decrease with increasing CaO contents. Increase in the preparation temperature entailed a decrease in the micropore volume, whereas the mesopore volume increased. The pore creation mechanism is proposed on the basis of thermogravimetric and temperature-programmed desorption measurements. The prepared CaO-containing porous carbons efficiently captured SO2 and CO2 from air. Washing out of CaO from the hybrid materials was confirmed as a suitable method to obtain highly porous carbon materials.

  2. Enhancing activated-peroxide formulations for porous materials :

    SciTech Connect

    Krauter, Paula; Tucker, Mark D.; Tezak, Matthew S.; Boucher, Raymond

    2012-12-01

    During an urban wide-area incident involving the release of a biological warfare agent, the recovery/restoration effort will require extensive resources and will tax the current capabilities of the government and private contractors. In fact, resources may be so limited that decontamination by facility owners/occupants may become necessary and a simple decontamination process and material should be available for this use. One potential process for use by facility owners/occupants would be a liquid sporicidal decontaminant, such as pHamended bleach or activated-peroxide, and simple application devices. While pH-amended bleach is currently the recommended low-tech decontamination solution, a less corrosive and toxic decontaminant is desirable. The objective of this project is to provide an operational assessment of an alternative to chlorine bleach for low-tech decontamination applications activated hydrogen peroxide. This report provides the methods and results for activatedperoxide evaluation experiments. The results suggest that the efficacy of an activated-peroxide decontaminant is similar to pH-amended bleach on many common materials.

  3. A facile and green approach for the controlled synthesis of porous SnO₂ nanospheres: application as an efficient photocatalyst and an excellent gas sensing material.

    PubMed

    Manjula, P; Boppella, Ramireddy; Manorama, Sunkara V

    2012-11-01

    A facile and elegant methodology invoking the principles of Green Chemistry for the synthesis of porous tin dioxide nanospheres has been described. The low-temperature (∼50 °C) synthesis of SnO₂ nanoparticles and their self-assembly into organized, uniform, and monodispersed porous nanospheres with high surface area is facilitated by controlling the concentration of glucose, which acts as a stabilizing as well as structure-directing agent. A systematic control on the stannate to glucose molar concentration ratio determines the exact conditions to obtain monodispersed nanospheres, preferentially over random aggregation. Detailed characterization of the structure, morphology, and chemical composition reveals that the synthesized material, 50 nm SnO₂ porous nanospheres possess BET surface area of about 160 m²/g. Each porous nanosphere consists of a few hundred nanoparticles ∼2-3 nm in diameter with tetragonal cassiterite crystal structure. The SnO₂ nanospheres exhibit elevated photocatalytic activity toward methyl orange with good recyclability. Because of the high activity and stability of this photocatalyst, the material is ideal for applications in environmental remediation. Moreover, SnO₂ nanospheres display excellent gas sensing capabilities toward hydrogen. Surface modification of the nanospheres with Pd transforms this sensing material into a highly sensitive and selective room-temperature hydrogen sensor.

  4. Composite materials for rail transit systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.; Guerdal, Zafer; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    The potential is explored for using composite materials in urban mass transit systems. The emphasis was to identify specific advantages of composite materials in order to determine their actual and potential usage for carbody and guideway structure applications. The literature was reviewed, contacts were made with major domestic system operators, designers, and builders, and an analysis was made of potential composite application to railcar construction. Composites were found to be in use throughout the transit industry, usually in secondary or auxiliary applications such as car interior and nonstructural exterior panels. More recently, considerable activity has been initiated in the area of using composites in the load bearing elements of civil engineering structures such as highway bridges. It is believed that new and improved manufacturing refinements in pultrusion and filament winding will permit the production of beam sections which can be used in guideway structures. The inherent corrosion resistance and low maintenance characteristics of composites should result in lowered maintenance costs over a prolonged life of the structure.

  5. Composite materials for the extravehicular mobility unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrera, Enrique V.; Tello, Hector M.

    1992-01-01

    The extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), commonly known as the astronaut space suit assembly (SSA) and primary life support system (PLSS), has evolved through the years to incorporate new and innovative materials in order to meet the demands of the space environment. The space shuttle program which is seeing an increasing level of extravehicular activity (EVA), also called space walks, along with interest in an EMU for Lunar-Mars missions means even more demanding conditions are being placed on the suit and PLSS. The project for this NASA-ASEE Summer Program was to investigate new materials for these applications. The focus was to emphasize the use of composite materials for every component of the EMU to enhance the properties while reducing the total weight of the EMU. To accomplish this, development of new materials called fullerene reinforced materials (FRM's) was initiated. Fullerenes are carbon molecules which when added to a material significantly reduce the weight of that material. The Faculty Fellow worked directly on the development of the fullerene reinforced materials. A chamber for fullerene production was designed and assembled and first generation samples were processed. He also supervised with the JSC Colleague, a study of composite materials for the EMU conducted by the student participant in the NASA-ASEE Program, Hector Tello a Rice University graduate student, and by a NASA Aerospace Technologist (Materials Engineer) Evelyne Orndoff, in the Systems Engineering Analysis Office (EC7), also a Rice University graduate student. Hector Tello conducted a study on beryllium and Be alloys and initiated a study of carbon and glass reinforced composites for space applications. Evelyne Orndoff compiled an inventory of the materials on the SSA. Ms. Orndoff also reviewed SSA material requirements and cited aspects of the SSA design where composite materials might be further considered. Hector Tello spent part of his time investigating the solar radiation

  6. Microwave-assisted synthesis of porous chitosan-modified montmorillonite-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kar, Sumanta; Kaur, Tejinder; Thirugnanam, A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a porous chitosan-organically modified montmorillonite-hydroxyapatite (CS-OM-HA) composite scaffold was developed by combining microwave irradiation and gas foaming method. Hydroxyapatite (HA) particles of size ∼ 65 nm were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The prepared composite scaffolds were characterized using ATR-FTIR, XRD, mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies. The synergistic effect of HA and OM on the mechanical and in vitro biological properties (swelling, degradation, protein adsorption and bioactivity) of the composite scaffolds were evaluated. Swelling, degradation, mechanical property, bioactivity and protein adsorption studies of CS-OM-HA composite scaffolds have shown desirable results in comparison with the pure CS and CS-OM composite scaffolds. CS-OM-HA composite scaffolds were also found to be non-cytotoxic to MG 63 osteoblast cell lines. From the study, it can be concluded that the novel CS-OM-HA composite scaffold with improved mechanical and in vitro biological properties has wide potential in non-load bearing bone tissue engineering applications.

  7. Moisture storage parameters of porous building materials as time-dependent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Záleská, Martina; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-01

    Three different types of bricks and two different types of sandstones are studied in terms of measurement moisture storage parameters for over-hygroscopic moisture area using pressure plate device. For researched materials, basic physical properties as bulk density, matrix density and total open porosity are determined. From the obtained data of moisture storage measurement, the water retention curves and curves of degree of saturation in dependence on suction pressure are constructed. Water retention curve (also called suction curve, capillary potential curve, capillary-pressure function and capillary-moisture relationship) is the basic material property used in models for simulation of moisture storage in porous building materials.

  8. Candida albicans adhesion to composite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Bürgers, Ralf; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    The adhesion of Candida albicans to dental restorative materials in the human oral cavity may promote the occurrence of oral candidosis. This study aimed to compare the susceptibility of 14 commonly used composite resin materials (two compomers, one ormocer, one novel silorane, and ten conventional hybrid composites) to adhere Candida albicans. Differences in the amount of adhering fungi should be related to surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the type of matrix. Cylindrical specimens of each material were made according to the manufacturers' instructions. Surface roughness R (a) was assessed by perthometer measurements and the degree of hydrophobicity by computerized contact angle analysis. Specimens were incubated with a reference strain of C. albicans (DMSZ 1386), and adhering fungi were quantified by using a bioluminometric assay in combination with an automated plate reader. Statistical differences were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to assess correlations. Median R (a) of the tested composite resin materials ranged between 0.04 and 0.23 microm, median contact angles between 69.2 degrees and 86.9 degrees . The two compomers and the ormocer showed lower luminescence intensities indicating less adhesion of fungi than all tested conventional hybrid composites. No conclusive correlation was found between surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the amount of adhering C. albicans.

  9. High Velocity Impact Interaction of Metal Particles with Porous Heterogeneous Materials with an Inorganic Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazunov, A. A.; Ishchenko, A. N.; Afanasyeva, S. A.; Belov, N. N.; Burkin, V. V.; Rogaev, K. S.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Khabibulin, M. V.; Yugov, N. T.

    2016-03-01

    A computational-experimental investigation of stress-strain state and fracture of a porous heterogeneous material with an inorganic matrix, used as a thermal barrier coating of flying vehicles, under conditions of a high-velocity impact by a spherical steel projectile imitating a meteorite particle is discussed. Ballistic tests are performed at the velocities about 2.5 km/s. Numerical modeling of the high-velocity impact is described within the framework of a porous elastoplastic model including fracture and different phase states of the materials. The calculations are performed using the Euler and Lagrange numerical techniques for the velocities up to 10 km/s in a complete-space problem statement.

  10. Fly ash porous material using geopolymerization process for high temperature exposure.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Jamaludin, Liyana; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ghazali, Che Mohd Ruzaidi; Ahmad, Mohd Izzat

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of temperature on geopolymers manufactured using pozzolanic materials (fly ash). In this paper, we report on our investigation of the performance of porous geopolymers made with fly ash after exposure to temperatures from 600 °C up to 1000 °C. The research methodology consisted of pozzolanic materials (fly ash) synthesized with a mixture of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solution as an alkaline activator. Foaming agent solution was added to geopolymer paste. The geopolymer paste samples were cured at 60 °C for one day and the geopolymers samples were sintered from 600 °C to 1000 °C to evaluate strength loss due to thermal damage. We also studied their phase formation and microstructure. The heated geopolymers samples were tested by compressive strength after three days. The results showed that the porous geopolymers exhibited strength increases after temperature exposure.

  11. Fly Ash Porous Material using Geopolymerization Process for High Temperature Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Jamaludin, Liyana; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ghazali, Che Mohd Ruzaidi; Ahmad, Mohd Izzat

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of temperature on geopolymers manufactured using pozzolanic materials (fly ash). In this paper, we report on our investigation of the performance of porous geopolymers made with fly ash after exposure to temperatures from 600 °C up to 1000 °C. The research methodology consisted of pozzolanic materials (fly ash) synthesized with a mixture of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solution as an alkaline activator. Foaming agent solution was added to geopolymer paste. The geopolymer paste samples were cured at 60 °C for one day and the geopolymers samples were sintered from 600 °C to 1000 °C to evaluate strength loss due to thermal damage. We also studied their phase formation and microstructure. The heated geopolymers samples were tested by compressive strength after three days. The results showed that the porous geopolymers exhibited strength increases after temperature exposure. PMID:22605984

  12. Estimation of moisture transport coefficients in porous materials using experimental drying kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaknoune, A.; Glouannec, P.; Salagnac, P.

    2012-02-01

    From experimental drying kinetics, an inverse technique is used to evaluate the moisture transport coefficients in building hygroscopic porous materials. Based on the macroscopic approach developed by Whitaker, a one-dimensional mathematical model is developed to predict heat and mass transfers in porous material. The parameters identification is made by the minimisation of the square deviation between numerical and experimental values of the surface temperature and the average moisture content. Two parameters of an exponential function describing the liquid phase transfer and one parameter relative to the diffusion of the vapour phase are identified. To ensure the feasibility of the estimation method, it is initially validated with cellular concrete and applied to lime paste.

  13. Ordered porous mesostructured materials from nanoparticle-block copolymer self-assembly

    DOEpatents

    Warren, Scott; Wiesner, Ulrich; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J

    2013-10-29

    The invention provides mesostructured materials and methods of preparing mesostructured materials including metal-rich mesostructured nanoparticle-block copolymer hybrids, porous metal-nonmetal nanocomposite mesostructures, and ordered metal mesostructures with uniform pores. The nanoparticles can be metal, metal alloy, metal mixture, intermetallic, metal-carbon, metal-ceramic, semiconductor-carbon, semiconductor-ceramic, insulator-carbon or insulator-ceramic nanoparticles, or combinations thereof. A block copolymer/ligand-stabilized nanoparticle solution is cast, resulting in the formation of a metal-rich (or semiconductor-rich or insulator-rich) mesostructured nanoparticle-block copolymer hybrid. The hybrid is heated to an elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of an ordered porous nanocomposite mesostructure. A nonmetal component (e.g., carbon or ceramic) is then removed to produce an ordered mesostructure with ordered and large uniform pores.

  14. Porous Alumina Template by Selective Dissolution of Ni from Sintered Al2O3-Ni Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, M.; Moon, A. P.; Mondal, K.

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, porous alumina template was fabricated by selective dissolution of Ni from the pressureless sintered Al2O3-Ni. Alumina and Ni powders of 99.9% purity were subjected to ball milling (200 rpm, 1 h, 10:1 ball-to-powder weight ratio) in order to get homogeneous mechanical mixture. The milled powder was compacted using hydraulic press under the uniaxial pressure of 400 MPa for 1 min, and the pressureless sintering was carried out in reducing atmosphere (H2) at 1400 °C. Ni was then selectively and completely dissolved from the 1-mm-thick sintered disk of diameter 16 mm in 1 M HCl + 3 wt.% FeCl3 solution to get the porous template of alumina. The porous alumina template was found to have sufficient compressive strength. BET, x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy studies along with energy dispersive spectroscopy were performed to study microstructural evolutions, bonding characteristics, and distributions of Ni before and after the dissolution of the sintered composite.

  15. Degradation and biocompatibility of porous nano-hydroxyapatite/polyurethane composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhihong; Li, Yubao; Zou, Qin

    2009-04-01

    Porous scaffold containing 30 wt% nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) and 70 wt% polyurethane (PU) from castor oil was prepared by a foaming method and investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results show that n-HA particles disperse homogeneously in the PU matrix. The porous scaffold has not only macropores of 100-800 μm in size but also a lot of micropores on the walls of macropores. The porosity and compressive strength of scaffold are 80% and 271 kPa, respectively. After soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF), hydrolysis and deposition partly occur on the scaffold. The biological evaluation in vitro and in vivo shows that the n-HA/PU scaffold is non-cytotoxic and degradable. The porous structure provides a good microenvironment for cell adherence, growth and proliferation. The n-HA/PU composite scaffold can be satisfied with the basic requirement for tissue engineering, and has the potential to be applied in repair and substitute of human menisci of the knee-joint and articular cartilage.

  16. Test Plan for Composite Hydrogen Getter Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.R.

    2000-11-09

    The intent of this test plan is to provide details of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) effort to evaluate composite getter materials for eventual use in expanding the wattage limits for transportation of contact-handled transuranic waste (CH-TRU). This effort is funded by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) under Technical Task Plan (TTP) SR-1-9-MW-45 and is the result of a competitive process initiated by a MWFA request for proposals. In response to this request, SRTC presented data on several composite getter materials that demonstrated good potential for application in transportation of transuranic wastes. The tests outlined in the SRTC proposal for composite getter materials should demonstrate compliance with functional requirements provided by the MWFA in a Statement of Work (SOW) which accompanied the request for proposals. Completion of Phase 1 testing, as defined in the TTP, should provide sufficient data to determine if composite getters should progress to Phase s 2 and 3. These test results will provide support for future safety reviews as part of the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) certification process to utilize getter technology. This test plan provides details of the test descriptions, test objectives, required measurements, data quality objectives, data analysis, and schedule information relevant to Phase 1 of the TTP. The results of these tests are expected to help identify any potential weaknesses in the use of composite getter for transportation of CH-TRU wastes. Where a potential weakness is identified, this will be addressed as part of Phase 2 of the proposed effort. It is also important to recognize that these tests are focused on the individual composite getter materials and not the engineered system that would eventually be used in a TRUPACT-II. However, these test results will be very helpful in establishing the requirements for the design of a TRUPACT-II getter system that is included as part of the propo sed Phase

  17. Atomic layer deposition HfO2 capping layer effect on porous low dielectric constant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yi-Lung; Kao, Kai-Chieh; Huang, Chi-Jia; Chen, Giin-Shan; Fang, Jau-Shiung

    2015-11-01

    Low dielectric constant (low-k) materials are used as inter-level insulators between copper (Cu) conductors to improve the characteristics of integrated circuits. This work proposes a new method for improving the characteristics of porous low-k dielectric film by capping it with an HfO2 film by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Experimental results revealed that capping a porous low-k dielectric film with a ∼1.0 nm-thick HfO2 film increases its dielectric constant from 2.56 to 2.65 because the pores in the surface of the film are sealed by Hf precursors. The leakage current density and reliability of the porous low-k dielectrics are greatly improved. The HfO2 capping film also increased resistances against Cu diffusion and damage by oxygen plasma. Therefore, this ALD-deposited HfO2 capping film can be used as a pore-sealing layer and a Cu barrier layer for the porous low-k dielectric film in the future advanced technologies.

  18. Preparation of porous nickel-titania cermets and their application to anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Taimatsu, H.; Kudo, K.; Kaneko, H.; Matsukaze, N.; Iwata, T.

    1995-12-31

    Porous nickel-titania cermets have been prepared as new-type anode materials for solid oxide fuel cells using the solid-state displacement reaction method. The microstructures of the cermets were interwoven aggregate-type, differently from those of conventional nickel-YSZ cermets: nickel and titania phases three-dimensionally entangled each other. These cermets revealed good properties in compatibility of thermal expansion with YSZ, strength, gas permeation and electrical conduction.

  19. A homochiral metal-organic porous material for enantioselective separation and catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Soo; Whang, Dongmok; Lee, Hyoyoung; Jun, Sung Im; Oh, Jinho; Jeon, Young Jin; Kim, Kimoon

    2000-04-01

    Inorganic zeolites are used for many practical applications that exploit the microporosity intrinsic to their crystal structures. Organic analogues, which are assembled from modular organic building blocks linked through non-covalent interactions, are of interest for similar applications. These range from catalysis, separation and sensor technology to optoelectronics, with enantioselective separation and catalysis being especially important for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The modular construction of these analogues allows flexible and rational design, as both the architecture and chemical functionality of the micropores can, in principle, be precisely controlled. Porous organic solids with large voids and high framework stability have been produced, and investigations into the range of accessible pore functionalities have been initiated. For example, catalytically active organic zeolite analogues are known, as are chiral metal-organic open-framework materials. However, the latter are only available as racemic mixtures, or lack the degree of framework stability or void space that is required for practical applications. Here we report the synthesis of a homochiral metal-organic porous material that allows the enantioselective inclusion of metal complexes in its pores and catalyses a transesterification reaction in an enantioselective manner. Our synthesis strategy, which uses enantiopure metal-organic clusters as secondary building blocks, should be readily applicable to chemically modified cluster components and thus provide access to a wide range of porous organic materials suitable for enantioselective separation and catalysis.

  20. Fabrication of interpenetrating polymer network chitosan/gelatin porous materials and study on dye adsorption properties.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li; Xiong, Zihao; Guo, Yi; Liu, Yun; Zhao, Jinchao; Zhang, Chuanjie; Zhu, Ping

    2015-11-01

    One kind of adsorbent based on chitosan and gelatin with interpenetrating polymer networks (IPN) and porous dual structures was prepared using genipin as the cross-linker. These dual structures were demonstrated by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Adsorptions of acid orange II dye from aqueous solution were carried out at different genipin contents, adsorption times and pH values. The results showed that this material was put up the largest adsorption capacity when the genipin content is 0.25 mmol/L, meanwhile, the lower the solution pH value the greater the adsorption capacity. The chitosan/gelatin interpenetrating polymer networks porous material displayed pH-sensitive and rapidly response in adsorption and desorption to pH altered. It is indicated that the cross-linked chitosan/gelatin interpenetrating polymer networks porous material could be used as a recyclable adsorbent in removal or separation of anionic dyes as environmental pH condition changed.