Science.gov

Sample records for porous media experiments

  1. Experiments with metallic and ceramic porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Abbassi, P.; Khandhar, P. K.; Luna, Jack

    1988-01-01

    Work in the area of mechano-caloric phenomena was initiated during 1988 with startup in the Summer 1988 period. The ideal system utilizing He-II super-phenomena is modeled readily, within the frame of thermodynamics energetics, using the concept of an ideal superleak. The real system however uses porous media of non-ideal pore-grain ingredients. The early phase of experimental and related modeling studies is outlined for the time period from Summer 1988 to the end of 1988.

  2. Bacterial transport in heterogeneous porous media: Observations from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silliman, S. E.; Dunlap, R.; Fletcher, M.; Schneegurt, M. A.

    2001-11-01

    Transport of bacteria through heterogeneous porous media was investigated in small-scale columns packed with sand and in a tank designed to allow the hydraulic conductivity to vary as a two-dimensional, lognormally distributed, second-order stationary, exponentially correlated random field. The bacteria were Pseudomonas ftuorescens R8, a strain demonstrating appreciable attachment to surfaces, and strain Ml, a transposon mutant of strain R8 with reduced attachment ability. In bench top, sand-filled columns, transport was determined by measuring intensity of fluorescence of stained cells in the effluent or by measuring radiolabeled cells that were retained in the sand columns. Results demonstrated that strain Ml was transported more efficiently than strain R8 through columns packed with either a homogeneous silica sand or a more heterogeneous sand with iron oxide coatings. Two experiments conducted in the tank involved monitoring transport of bacteria to wells via sampling from wells and sample ports in the tank. Bacterial numbers were determined by direct plate count. At the end of the first experiment, the distribution of the bacteria in the sediment was determined by destructive sampling and plating. The two experiments produced bacterial breakthrough curves that were quite similar even though the similarity between the two porous media was limited to first- and second-order statistical moments. This result appears consistent with the concept of large-scale, average behavior such as has been observed for the transport of conservative chemical tracers. The transported bacteria arrived simultaneously with a conservative chemical tracer (although at significantly lower normalized concentration than the tracer). However, the bacterial breakthrough curves showed significant late time tailing. The concentrations of bacteria attached to the sediment surfaces showed considerably more spatial variation than did the concentrations of bacteria in the fluid phase. This

  3. Centrifuge Techniques and Apparatus for Transport Experiments in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D. Mattson; Carl D. Paler; Robert W. Smith; Markus Flury

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes experimental approaches and apparatus that we have developed to study solute and colloid transport in porous media using Idaho National Laboratory's 2-m radius centrifuge. The ex-perimental techniques include water flux scaling with applied acceleration at the top of the column and sub-atmospheric pressure control at the column base, automation of data collection, and remote experimental con-trol over the internet. These apparatus include a constant displacement piston pump, a custom designed liquid fraction collector based on switching valve technology, and modified moisture monitoring equipment. Suc-cessful development of these experimental techniques and equipment is illustrated through application to transport of a conservative tracer through unsaturated sand column, with centrifugal acceleration up to 40 gs. Development of such experimental equipment that can withstand high accelerations enhances the centrifuge technique to conduct highly controlled unsaturated solute/colloid transport experiments and allows in-flight liquid sample collection of the effluent.

  4. Experiments versus modeling of buoyant drying of porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salin, D.; Yiotis, A.; Tajer, E.; Yortsos, Y. C.

    2012-12-01

    Experiments versus modeling of buoyant drying of porous media D. Salin and A.G. Yiotis, Laboratoire FAST, Univ Pierre & Marie Curie, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, Orsay 91405, France and E.S. Tajer and Y.C. Yortsos, Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1450 A series of isothermal drying experiments in packed glass beads saturated with volatile hydrocarbons (hexane or pentane) are conducted. The transparent glass cells containing the packing allow for the visual monitoring of the phase distribution patterns below the surface, including the formation of liquid films, as the gaseous phase invades the pore space, and for the control of the thickness of the diffusive mass boundary layer over the packing. We demonstrate the existence of an early Constant Rate Period, CRP, that lasts as long as the films saturate the surface of the packing, and of a subsequent Falling Rate Period, FRP, that begins practically after the detachment of the film tips from the external surface. During the CRP, the process is controlled by diffusion within the stagnant gaseous phase in the upper part of the cells, yielding a Stefan tube problem solution. During the FRP, the process is controlled by diffusion within the packing, with a drying rate inversely proportional to the observed position of the film tips in the cell. The critical residual liquid saturation that marks the transition between these two regimes is found to be a function of the average bead size in our packs and the incline of the cells with respect to the flat vertical, with larger beads and angles closer to the vertical position leading to earlier film detachment times and higher critical saturations. We developed a model for the drying of porous media in the presence of gravity. It incorporated effects of corner film flow, internal and external mass transfer and the effect of gravity. Analytical results were derived when gravity opposes

  5. Experiments on bypassing during gasfloods in heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Springate, G.S.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1996-05-01

    Mass transfer from a bypassed region to a flowing region is a very strong function of the solvent phase behavior. Diffusion, dispersion, and capillarity-driven crossflow can contribute to this mass transfer in addition to pressure- and buoyancy-driven crossflow. The authors experiments indicated that the mass transfer rate increased with enrichment. Liquid phase diffusion played a significant role and capillary pumping did not contribute to mass transfer in the cases studied.

  6. Laboratory setup and results of experiments on two-dimensional multiphase flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, J.F. ); Graham, D.N.; Schiegg, H.O. )

    1990-10-01

    In the event of an accidental release into earth's subsurface of an immiscible organic liquid, such as a petroleum hydrocarbon or chlorinated organic solvent, the spatial and temporal distribution of the organic liquid is of great interest when considering efforts to prevent groundwater contamination or restore contaminated groundwater. An accurate prediction of immiscible organic liquid migration requires the incorporation of relevant physical principles in models of multiphase flow in porous media; these physical principles must be determined from physical experiments. This report presents a series of such experiments performed during the 1970s at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, Switzerland. The experiments were designed to study the transient, two-dimensional displacement of three immiscible fluids in a porous medium. This experimental study appears to be the most detailed published to date. The data obtained from these experiments are suitable for the validation and test calibration of multiphase flow codes. 73 refs., 140 figs.

  7. Superstatistics model for T₂ distribution in NMR experiments on porous media.

    PubMed

    Correia, M D; Souza, A M; Sinnecker, J P; Sarthour, R S; Santos, B C C; Trevizan, W; Oliveira, I S

    2014-07-01

    We propose analytical functions for T2 distribution to describe transverse relaxation in high- and low-fields NMR experiments on porous media. The method is based on a superstatistics theory, and allows to find the mean and standard deviation of T2, directly from measurements. It is an alternative to multiexponential models for data decay inversion in NMR experiments. We exemplify the method with q-exponential functions and χ(2)-distributions to describe, respectively, data decay and T2 distribution on high-field experiments of fully water saturated glass microspheres bed packs, sedimentary rocks from outcrop and noisy low-field experiment on rocks. The method is general and can also be applied to biological systems. PMID:24819425

  8. Superstatistics model for T₂ distribution in NMR experiments on porous media.

    PubMed

    Correia, M D; Souza, A M; Sinnecker, J P; Sarthour, R S; Santos, B C C; Trevizan, W; Oliveira, I S

    2014-07-01

    We propose analytical functions for T2 distribution to describe transverse relaxation in high- and low-fields NMR experiments on porous media. The method is based on a superstatistics theory, and allows to find the mean and standard deviation of T2, directly from measurements. It is an alternative to multiexponential models for data decay inversion in NMR experiments. We exemplify the method with q-exponential functions and χ(2)-distributions to describe, respectively, data decay and T2 distribution on high-field experiments of fully water saturated glass microspheres bed packs, sedimentary rocks from outcrop and noisy low-field experiment on rocks. The method is general and can also be applied to biological systems.

  9. Combustion in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.

    1999-09-01

    A 2.8-liter tube-shaped combustion vessel was constructed to study flame propagation and quenching in porous media. For this experiment, hydrogen-air flames propagating horizontally into abed of 6 mm diameter glass beads were studied. Measurements of pressure and temperature along the length of the tube were used to observe flame propagation of quenching. The critical hydrogen concentration for Hz-air mixtures was found to be 11.5%, corresponding to a critical Peclet number of Pe* = 37. This value is substantially less than the value of Pe* = 65 quoted in the literature, for example Babkin et al. (1991). It is hypothesized that buoyancy and a dependence of Pe on the Lewis number account for the discrepancy between these two results.

  10. Foams in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, S.S.

    1986-07-01

    In 1978 a literature search on selective blocking of fluid flow in porous media was done by Professor S.S. Marsden and two of his graduate students, Tom Elson and Kern Huppy. This was presented as SUPRI Report No. TR-3 entitled ''Literature Preview of the Selected Blockage of Fluids in Thermal Recovery Projects.'' Since then a lot of research on foam in porous media has been done on the SUPRI project and a great deal of new information has appeared in the literature. Therefore we believed that a new, up-to-date search should be done on foam alone, one which would be helpful to our students and perhaps of interest to others. This is a chronological survey showing the development of foam flow, blockage and use in porous media, starting with laboratory studies and eventually getting into field tests and demonstrations. It is arbitrarily divided into five-year time periods. 81 refs.

  11. Porous media experience applicable to field evaluation for compressed air energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Gutknecht, P.J.

    1980-06-01

    A survey is presented of porous media field experience that may aid in the development of a compressed air energy storage field demonstration. Work done at PNL and experience of other groups and related industries is reviewed. An overall view of porous media experience in the underground storage of fluids is presented. CAES experience consists of site evaluation and selection processes used by groups in California, Kansas, and Indiana. Reservoir design and field evaluation of example sites are reported. The studies raised questions about compatibility with depleted oil and gas reservoirs, storage space rights, and compressed air regulations. Related experience embraces technologies of natural gas, thermal energy, and geothermal and hydrogen storage. Natural gas storage technology lends the most toward compressed air storage development, keeping in mind the respective differences between stored fluids, physical conditions, and cycling frequencies. Both fluids are injected under pressure into an aquifer to form a storage bubble confined between a suitable caprock structure and partially displaced ground water. State-of-the-art information is summarized as the necessary foundation material for field planning. Preliminary design criteria are given as recommendations for basic reservoir characteristics. These include geometric dimensions and storage matrix properties such as permeability. Suggested ranges are given for injection air temperature and reservoir pressure. The second step in developmental research is numerical modeling. Results have aided preliminary design by analyzing injection effects upon reservoir pressure, temperature and humidity profiles. Results are reported from laboratory experiments on candidate sandstones and caprocks. Conclusions are drawn, but further verification must be done in the field.

  12. Design and construction of an experiment for two-phase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, R.E.G.; Aziz, K.

    1993-08-01

    In numerical reservoir simulation naturally fractured reservoirs are commonly divided into matrix and fracture systems. The high permeability fractures are usually entirely responsible for flow between blocks and flow to the wells. The flow in these fractures is modeled using Darcy`s law and its extension to multiphase flow by means of relative permeabilities. The influence and measurement of fracture relative permeability for two-phase flow in fractured porous media have not been studied extensively, and the few works presented in the literature are contradictory. Experimental and numerical work on two-phase flow in fractured porous media has been initiated. An apparatus for monitoring this type of flow was designed and constructed. It consists of an artificially fractured core inside an epoxy core holder, detailed pressure and effluent monitoring, saturation measurements by means of a CT-scanner and a computerized data acquisition system. The complete apparatus was assembled and tested at conditions similar to the conditions expected for the two-phase flow experiments. Fine grid simulations of the experimental setup-were performed in order to establish experimental conditions and to study the effects of several key variables. These variables include fracture relative permeability and fracture capillary pressure. The numerical computations show that the flow is dominated by capillary imbibition, and that fracture relative permeabilities have only a minor influence. High oil recoveries without water production are achieved due to effective water imbibition from the fracture to the matrix. When imbibition is absent, fracture relative permeabilities affect the flow behavior at early production times.

  13. Desiccation of unsaturated porous media: Intermediate-scale experiments and numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Dane, J. H.; Truex, Michael J.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2009-08-01

    Soil desiccation (drying) is recognized as a potentially robust vadose zone remediation process involving water evaporation induced by air injection and extraction. Desiccation has the potential to immobilize contaminants and could potentially improve access for other gas-phase treatments by reducing water saturation and therefore increasing sediment gas-phase permeability. Before this technology could be deployed in the field, concerns related to energy limitations, osmotic effects, and potential contaminant remobilization after rewetting need to be addressed. A series of detailed wedge-shaped, intermediate-scale laboratory experiments in unsaturated homogeneous and simple heterogeneous systems was conducted to improve the understanding of the impact of energy balance issues on soil desiccation. The experiments were simulated with the multifluid flow simulator STOMP, using independently obtained hydraulic and thermal porous medium properties. In all the experiments, the injection of dry air proved to be an effective means for removing essentially all moisture from the test media. Evaporative cooling was observed which generally decreased with increased distance from the gas inlet chamber. Observations of temperature in fine-grained sands in the heterogeneous systems show two local temperature minima associated with the cooling. The first one occurs because of evaporation in the adjacent medium-grained sand whereas the second minimum is attributed to evaporative cooling in the fine-grained sand itself. Results of the laboratory tests were simulated accurately when thermal properties of the flow cell walls and insulation material were taken into account, indicating that the proper physics were incorporated into the simulator.

  14. Miscible fluid displacement stability in unconfined porous media:. Two-dimensional flow experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawitz, James W.; Annable, Michael D.; Rao, P. S. C.

    1998-06-01

    In situ flushing groundwater remediation technologies, such as cosolvent flushing, rely on the stability of the interface between the resident and displacing fluids for efficient removal of contaminants. Contrasts in density and viscosity between the resident and displacing fluids can adversely affect the stability of the displacement front. Petroleum engineers have developed techniques to describe these types of processes; however, their findings do not necessarily translate directly to aquifer remediation. The purpose of this laboratory study was to investigate how density and viscosity contrasts affected cosolvent displacements in unconfined porous media characterized by the presence of a capillary fringe. Two-dimensional flow laboratory experiments, which were partially scaled to a cosolvent flushing field experiment, were conducted to determine potential implications of flow instabilities in homogeneous sand packs. Numerical simulations were also conducted to investigate the differential impact of fluid property contrasts in unconfined and confined systems. The results from these experiments and simulations indicated that the presence of a capillary fringe was an important factor in the displacement efficiency. Buoyant forces can act to carry a lighter-than-water cosolvent preferentially into the capillary fringe during displacement of the resident groundwater. During subsequent water flooding, buoyancy forces can act to effectively trap the cosolvent in the capillary fringe, contributing to the inefficient removal of cosolvent from the aquifer.

  15. FLUID TRANSPORT THROUGH POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluid transport through porous media is a relevant topic to many scientific and engineering fields. Soil scientists, civil engineers, hydrologists and hydrogeologists are concerned with the transport of water, gases and nonaqueous phase liquid contaminants through porous earth m...

  16. An Experimenting Field Approach for the Numerical Solution of Multiphase Flow in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu; Bao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we apply the experimenting pressure field technique to the problem of the flow of two or more immiscible phases in porous media. In this technique, a set of predefined pressure fields are introduced to the governing partial differential equations. This implies that the velocity vector field and the divergence at each cell of the solution mesh can be determined. However, since none of these fields is the true pressure field entailed by the boundary conditions and/or the source terms, the divergence at each cell will not be the correct one. Rather the residue which is the difference between the true divergence and the calculated one is obtained. These fields are designed such that these residuals are used to construct the matrix of coefficients of the pressure equation and the right-hand side. The experimenting pressure fields are generated in the solver routine and are fed to the different routines, which may be called physics routines, which return to the solver the elements of the matrix of coefficients. Therefore, this methodology separates the solver routines from the physics routines and therefore results in simpler, easy to construct, maintain, and update algorithms.

  17. Biofilm growth in porous media: Experiments, computational modeling at the porescale, and upscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peszynska, Malgorzata; Trykozko, Anna; Iltis, Gabriel; Schlueter, Steffen; Wildenschild, Dorthe

    2016-09-01

    Biofilm growth changes many physical properties of porous media such as porosity, permeability and mass transport parameters. The growth depends on various environmental conditions, and in particular, on flow rates. Modeling the evolution of such properties is difficult both at the porescale where the phase morphology can be distinguished, as well as during upscaling to the corescale effective properties. Experimental data on biofilm growth is also limited because its collection can interfere with the growth, while imaging itself presents challenges. In this paper we combine insight from imaging, experiments, and numerical simulations and visualization. The experimental dataset is based on glass beads domain inoculated by biomass which is subjected to various flow conditions promoting the growth of biomass and the appearance of a biofilm phase. The domain is imaged and the imaging data is used directly by a computational model for flow and transport. The results of the computational flow model are upscaled to produce conductivities which compare well with the experimentally obtained hydraulic properties of the medium. The flow model is also coupled to a newly developed biomass-nutrient growth model, and the model reproduces morphologies qualitatively similar to those observed in the experiment.

  18. Bacterial Chemotaxis in Porous Media: Theory Derivation and Comparison with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés-Parada, Francisco J.; Porter, Mark L.; Wood, Brian D.

    2010-12-01

    Chemotaxis is the movement of organisms toward or away from the concentration gradient of a chemical species. Microbial chemotaxis has been shown to significantly increase contaminant degradation in subsurface environments with respect to traditional methods such as pump-and-treat. This type of transport phenomena often involves diffusion and convection along several scales. In this work we use the method of volume averaging to upscale the governing equations for in situ bioremediation by bacterial chemotaxis. The results are effective medium mass balance equations for both the bacteria and the chemical attractant. These equations are expressed in terms of average transport coefficients, which can be computed from the solution of the associated closure problems. For the bacteria, we introduce a total motility tensor and a total velocity vector, which are dependent upon the porous medium geometry, the fluid flow and the macroscale concentration and flux of the attractant. An attractive feature of this approach is that the transport coefficients can be computed a priori from performing experiments since they do not involve the use of adjustable coefficients. In addition, the necessary scaling laws, in terms of length-scale constraints and assumptions, which bound the applicability of the model are explicitly stated. The model was validated by comparing the transverse bacterial concentration with previously reported experimental measurements for E. coli HCB1 in a T-sensor. The results exhibited a maximum deviation of approximately 10% (in terms of the mean absolute error) with experimental data for several flow rates. These results suggest that the predictive multiscale approach presented here is reliable for modeling chemotaxis in porous media.

  19. Porous polymer media

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2002-01-01

    Highly crosslinked monolithic porous polymer materials for chromatographic applications. By using solvent compositions that provide not only for polymerization of acrylate monomers in such a fashion that a porous polymer network is formed prior to phase separation but also for exchanging the polymerization solvent for a running buffer using electroosmotic flow, the need for high pressure purging is eliminated. The polymer materials have been shown to be an effective capillary electrochromatographic separations medium at lower field strengths than conventional polymer media. Further, because of their highly crosslinked nature these polymer materials are structurally stable in a wide range of organic and aqueous solvents and over a pH range of 2-12.

  20. Laboratory experiments on solute transport in bimodal porous media under cyclic precipitation-evaporation boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Flow and solute transport in the shallow subsurface is strongly governed by atmospheric boundary conditions. Erratically varying infiltration and evaporation cycles lead to alternating upward and downward flow, as well as spatially and temporally varying water contents and associated hydraulic conductivity of the prevailing materials. Thus presenting a highly complicated, dynamic system. Knowledge of subsurface solute transport processes is vital to assess e.g. the entry of, potentially hazardous, solutes to the groundwater and nutrient uptake by plant roots and can be gained in many ways. Besides field measurements and numerical simulations, physical laboratory experiments represent a way to establish process understanding and furthermore validate numerical schemes. With the aim to gain a better understanding and to quantify solute transport in the unsaturated shallow subsurface under natural precipitation conditions in heterogeneous media, we conduct physical laboratory experiments in a 22 cm x 8 cm x 1 cm flow cell that is filled with two types of sand and apply cyclic infiltration-evaporation phases at the soil surface. Pressure at the bottom of the domain is kept constant. Following recent studies (Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al., 2011a), heterogeneity is introduced by a sharp vertical interface between coarse and fine sand. Fluorescent tracers are used to i) qualitatively visualize transport paths within the domain and ii) quantify solute leaching at the bottom of the domain. Temporal and spatial variations in water content during the experiment are derived from x-ray radiographic images. Monitored water contents between infiltration and evaporation considerably changed in the coarse sand while the fine sand remained saturated throughout the experiments. Lateral solute transport through the interface in both directions at different depths of the investigated soil columns were observed. This depended on the flow rate applied at the soil surface and

  1. Interaction of pressure and momentum driven flows with thin porous media: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaktgeboren, Christian

    Flow interaction with thin porous media arise in a variety of natural and man-made settings. Examples include flow through thin grids in electronics cooling, and NOx emissions reduction by means of ammonia injection grids, pulsatile aquatic propulsion with complex trailing anatomy (e.g., jellyfish with tentacles) and microbursts from thunderstorm activity over dense vegetation, unsteady combustion in or near porous materials, pulsatile jet-drying of textiles, and pulsed jet agitation of clothing for trace contaminant sampling. Two types of interactions with thin porous media are considered: (i) forced convection or pressure-driven flows, where fluid advection is maintained by external forces, and (ii) inertial or momentum-driven flows, in which fluid motion is generated but not maintained by external forces. Forced convection analysis through thin permeable media using a porous continuum approach requires the knowledge of porous medium permeability and form coefficients, K and C, respectively, which are defined by the Hazen-Dupuit-Darcy (HDD) equation. Their determination, however, requires the measurement of the pressure-drop per unit of porous medium length. The pressure-drop caused by fluid entering and exiting the porous medium, however, is not related to the porous medium length. Hence, for situations in which the inlet and outlet pressure-drops are not negligible, e.g., for short porous media, the definition of Kand C via the HDD equation becomes ambiguous. This aspect is investigated analytically and numerically using the flow through a restriction in circular pipe and parallel plates channels as preliminary models. Results show that inlet and outlet pressure-drop effects become increasingly important when the inlet and outlet fluid surface fraction φ decreases and the Reynolds number Re increases for both laminar and turbulent flow regimes. A conservative estimate of the minimum porous medium length beyond which the core pressure-drop predominates over the

  2. Regeneratively Cooled Porous Media Jacket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Greg (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); London, Adam Pollok (Inventor); Fryer, Jack Merrill (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The fluid and heat transfer theory for regenerative cooling of a rocket combustion chamber with a porous media coolant jacket is presented. This model is used to design a regeneratively cooled rocket or other high temperature engine cooling jacket. Cooling jackets comprising impermeable inner and outer walls, and porous media channels are disclosed. Also disclosed are porous media coolant jackets with additional structures designed to transfer heat directly from the inner wall to the outer wall, and structures designed to direct movement of the coolant fluid from the inner wall to the outer wall. Methods of making such jackets are also disclosed.

  3. Natural convection in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V.; Hussain, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on free convection in porous materials. Topics considered at the conference included heat transfer, nonlinear temperature profiles and magnetic fields, boundary conditions, concentrated heat sources in stratified porous media, free convective flow in a cavity, heat flux, laminar mixed convection flow, and the onset of convection in a porous medium with internal heat generation and downward flow.

  4. Cryptosporidium Parvum Transport Through Natural Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, J. B.; Santamaria, J.; Blandford, W. P.; Gerba, C. P.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum through saturated natural porous media. A series of miscible-displacement experiments were conducted, varying the properties of the porous media and electrolyte solution to help elucidate retention mechanisms. Significant removal (~99%) of oocysts was observed for transport in a sandy soil. Similar removals were also observed for experiments conducted with deionized water in place of the 0.01M NaCl electrolyte solution and experiments with a sub sample of the sandy soil that was treated with nitric acid. Effluent recoveries were greater for experiments conducted using coarser porous media. These results indicate straining contributed to the retention of Cryptosporidium parvum in our system.

  5. The use of laboratory experiments for the study of conservative solute transport in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silliman, S. E.; Zheng, L.; Conwell, P.

    Laboratory experiments on heterogeneous porous media (otherwise known as intermediate scale experiments, or ISEs) have been increasingly relied upon by hydrogeologists for the study of saturated and unsaturated groundwater systems. Among the many ongoing applications of ISEs is the study of fluid flow and the transport of conservative solutes in correlated permeability fields. Recent advances in ISE design have provided the capability of creating correlated permeability fields in the laboratory. This capability is important in the application of ISEs for the assessment of recent stochastic theories. In addition, pressure-transducer technology and visualization methods have provided the potential for ISEs to be used in characterizing the spatial distributions of both hydraulic head and local water velocity within correlated permeability fields. Finally, various methods are available for characterizing temporal variations in the spatial distribution (and, thereby, the spatial moments) of solute concentrations within ISEs. It is concluded, therefore, that recent developments in experimental techniques have provided an opportunity to use ISEs as important tools in the continuing study of fluid flow and the transport of conservative solutes in heterogeneous, saturated porous media. Résumé Les hydrogéologues se sont progressivement appuyés sur des expériences de laboratoire sur des milieux poreux hétérogènes (connus aussi par l'expression "Expériences àéchelle intermédiaire", ISE) pour étudier les zones saturées et non saturées des aquifères. Parmi les nombreuses applications en cours des ISE, il faut noter l'étude de l'écoulement de fluide et le transport de solutés conservatifs dans des champs aux perméabilités corrélées. Les récents progrès du protocole des ISE ont donné la possibilité de créer des champs de perméabilités corrélées au laboratoire. Cette possibilité est importante dans l'application des ISE pour l'évaluation des th

  6. Ventilation of porous media

    DOEpatents

    Neeper, D.A.

    1994-02-22

    Methods are presented for distributing gases throughout the interstices of porous materials and removing volatile substances from the interstices of porous materials. Continuous oscillation of pressures and flows results in increased penetration of the interstices by flowing gases and increased transport of gaseous components out of the interstices. The invention is particularly useful in soil vapor extraction. 10 figures.

  7. Ventilation of porous media

    DOEpatents

    Neeper, Donald A.

    1994-01-01

    Methods for distributing gases throughout the interstices of porous materials and removing volatile substances from the interstices of porous materials. Continuous oscillation of pressures and flows results in increased penetration of the interstices by flowing gases and increased transport of gaseous components out of the interstices. The invention is particularly useful in soil vapor extraction.

  8. Experiments on flow focusing in soluble porous media, with applications to melt extraction from the mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Kelemen, P.B.; Whitehead, J.A.; Aharonov, E.; Jordahl, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrate finite strucutres formed as a consequence of the `reactive infiltration instability` in a series of laboratory and numerical experiments with growth of solution channels parallel to the fluid flow direction. Our experiments demonstrate channel growth in the presence of an initial solution front and without an initial solution front where there is a gradient in the solubility of the solid matrix. In the gradient case, diffuse flow is unstable everywhere, channels can form and grow at any point, and channels may extend over the length scale of the gradient. As a consequence of the gradient results, we suggest that the reactive infiltration instability is important in the Earth`s mantle, where partial melts in the mantle ascend adiabatically. This hypothesis represents an important alternative to mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORB) extraction in fractures, since fractures may not form in weak, viscously deforming asthenospheric mantle. We also briefly consider the effects of crystallization, rather than dissolution reactions, on the morphology of porous flow via a second set of experiments where fluid becomes supersaturated in a solid phase. This process may produce a series of walled conduits, as in our experiments. Development of a low-porosity cap overlying high porosity conduits may create hydrostatic overpressure sufficient to cause fracture and magma transport to the surface in dikes.

  9. Neural Tissue as Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Basser, Peter J.

    2008-12-05

    The fields of MR in Porous Media and Neuroradiology have largely developed separately during the past two decades with little appreciation of the problems, challenges and methodologies of the other. However, this trend is clearly changing and possibilities for significant cross-fertilization and synergies are now being realized.

  10. Explosion propagation in inert porous media.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, G

    2012-02-13

    Porous media are often used in flame arresters because of the high surface area to volume ratio that is required for flame quenching. However, if the flame is not quenched, the flow obstruction within the porous media can promote explosion escalation, which is a well-known phenomenon in obstacle-laden channels. There are many parallels between explosion propagation through porous media and obstacle-laden channels. In both cases, the obstructions play a duel role. On the one hand, the obstruction enhances explosion propagation through an early shear-driven turbulence production mechanism and then later by shock-flame interactions that occur from lead shock reflections. On the other hand, the presence of an obstruction can suppress explosion propagation through momentum and heat losses, which both impede the unburned gas flow and extract energy from the expanding combustion products. In obstacle-laden channels, there are well-defined propagation regimes that are easily distinguished by abrupt changes in velocity. In porous media, the propagation regimes are not as distinguishable. In porous media the entire flamefront is affected, and the effects of heat loss, turbulence and compressibility are smoothly blended over most of the propagation velocity range. At low subsonic propagation speeds, heat loss to the porous media dominates, whereas at higher supersonic speeds turbulence and compressibility are important. This blending of the important phenomena results in no clear transition in propagation mechanism that is characterized by an abrupt change in propagation velocity. This is especially true for propagation velocities above the speed of sound where many experiments performed with fuel-air mixtures show a smooth increase in the propagation velocity with mixture reactivity up to the theoretical detonation wave velocity. PMID:22213663

  11. Modeling Polymer Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron Transport Experiments in Porous Media to Understand the Transport Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, P.; Krol, M.; Sleep, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    A wide variety of groundwater contaminants can be treated with nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI). However, delivery of nZVI in the subsurface to the treatment zones is challenging as the bare nZVI particles have a higher tendency to agglomerate. The subsurface mobility of nZVI can be enhanced by stabilizing nZVI with polymer, such as carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). In this study, numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate CMC stabilized nZVI transport behavior in porous media. The numerical simulations were based on a set of laboratory-scale transport experiments that were conducted in a two-dimensional water-saturated glass-walled sandbox (length - 55 cm; height - 45 cm; width - 1.4 cm), uniformly packed with silica sand. In the transport experiments: CMC stabilized nZVI and a non-reactive dye tracer Lissamine Green B (LGB) were used; water specific discharge and CMC concentration were varied; movements of LGB, and CMC-nZVI in the sandbox were tracked using a camera, a light source and a dark box. The concentrations of LGB, CMC, and CMC-nZVI at the sandbox outlet were analyzed. A 2D multiphase flow and transport model was applied to simulate experimental results. The images from LGB dye transport experiments were used to determine the pore water velocities and media permeabilities in various layers in the sand box. These permeability values were used in the subsequent simulations of CMC-nZVI transport. The 2D compositional simulator, modified to include colloid filtration theory (CFT), treated CMC as a solute and nZVI as a colloid. The simulator included composition dependent viscosity to account for CMC injection and mixing, and attachment efficiency as a fitting parameter for nZVI transport modeling. In the experiments, LGB and CMC recoveries were greater than 95%; however, CMC residence time was significantly higher than the LGB residence time and the higher CMC concentration caused higher pressure drops in the sandbox. The nZVI recovery was lower than 40

  12. Infiltration through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, W.; Redner, S.

    2001-02-01

    We study the kinetics of infiltration in which contaminant particles, which are suspended in a flowing carrier fluid, penetrate a porous medium. The progress of the ``invader'' particles is impeded by their trapping on active ``defender'' sites which are on the surfaces of the medium. As the defenders are used up, the invader penetrates further and ultimately breaks through. We study this process in the regime where the particles are much smaller than the pores so that the permeability change due to trapping is negligible. We develop a family of microscopic models of increasing realism to determine the propagation velocity of the invasion front, as well as the shapes of the invader and defender profiles. The predictions of our model agree qualitatively with experimental results on breakthrough times and the time dependence of the invader concentration at the output. Our results also provide practical guidelines for improving the design of deep bed filters in which infiltration is the primary separation mechanism.

  13. Two-domain description of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media: Comparison between theoretical predictions and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherblanc, F.; Ahmadi, A.; Quintard, M.

    2007-05-01

    This paper deals with two-equation models describing solute transport in highly heterogeneous porous systems and more particularly dual permeability structures composed of high- and low-permeability regions. A macroscopic two-equation model has been previously proposed in the literature based on the volume averaging technique [Ahmadi A, Quintard M, Whitaker S. Transport in chemically and mechanically heterogeneous porous media V: two-equation model for solute transport with adsorption, Adv Water Resour 1998;22:59-86; Cherblanc F, Ahmadi A, Quintard M. Two-medium description of dispersion in heterogeneous porous media: calculation of macroscopic properties. Water Resour Res 2003;39(6):1154-73]. Through this theoretical upscaling method, both convection and dispersion mechanisms are taken into account in both regions, allowing one to deal with a large range of heterogeneous systems. In this paper, the numerical tools associated with this model are developed in order to test the theory by comparing macroscopic concentration fields to those obtained by Darcy-scale numerical experiments. The heterogeneous structures considered are made up of low-permeability nodules embedded in a continuous high-permeability region. Several permeability ratios are used, leading to very different macroscopic behaviours. Taking advantage of the Darcy-scale simulations, the role of convection and dispersion in the mass exchange between the two regions is investigated. Large-scale averaged concentration fields and elution curves are extracted from the Darcy-scale numerical experiments and compared to the theoretical predictions given by the two-equation model. Very good agreement is found between experimental and theoretical results. A permeability ratio around 100 presents a behaviour characteristic of "mobile-mobile" systems emphasizing the relevance of this two-equation description. Eventually, the theory is used to set-up a criterion for the existence of local equilibrium conditions

  14. Resurgence flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Pierre; Mityushev, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Porous media are generally described by the Darcy equation when the length scales are sufficiently large with respect to the pore scale. This approach is also applicable when the media are heterogeneous, i.e., when permeability varies with space which is the most common case. In addition, real media are very often fractured; for a long time, this complex physical problem has been schematized by the double porosity model devised by Barenblatt. More recently, these fractured media have been addressed with a detailed description of the fractures and of their hydrodynamic interaction with the surrounding porous medium. This approach will be briefly summarized and the main recent progress surveyed (2). There is another situation which occurs frequently in underground studies. One well is connected to a distant well while it is not connected to closer wells. Such a situation can only be understood if there is a direct link between the two connected wells and if this link has little if any hydrodynamic interaction with the porous medium that it crosses. This link can be a fracture or more likely a set of fractures. This phenomenon is called resurgence because of the obvious analogy with rivers which suddenly disappear underground and go out at the ground surface again. Similar ideas have already been developed in other fields. In Physics, random networks limited to nearest neighbors have been recently extended to small world models where distant vertices can be related directly by a link. The electrical testing of porous media by electrical probes located at the walls (electrical tomography) has been used frequently in Geophysics since it is a non-invasive technique; this classical technique corresponds exactly to the situation addressed here from a different perspective. Media with resurgences consist of a double structure (3). The first one which is continuous is described by Darcy law as usual. The second one models the resurgences by capillaries with impermeable walls

  15. Laboratory-scale experiments and numerical modeling of cosolvent flushing of multi-component NAPLs in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Agaoglu, Berken; Scheytt, Traugott; Copty, Nadim K

    2012-10-01

    This study examines the mechanistic processes governing multiphase flow of a water-cosolvent-NAPL system in saturated porous media. Laboratory batch and column flushing experiments were conducted to determine the equilibrium properties of pure NAPL and synthetically prepared NAPL mixtures as well as NAPL recovery mechanisms for different water-ethanol contents. The effect of contact time was investigated by considering different steady and intermittent flow velocities. A modified version of multiphase flow simulator (UTCHEM) was used to compare the multiphase model simulations with the column experiment results. The effect of employing different grid geometries (1D, 2D, 3D), heterogeneity and different initial NAPL saturation configurations was also examined in the model. It is shown that the change in velocity affects the mass transfer rate between phases as well as the ultimate NAPL recovery percentage. The experiments with low flow rate flushing of pure NAPL and the 3D UTCHEM simulations gave similar effluent concentrations and NAPL cumulative recoveries. Model simulations over-estimated NAPL recovery for high specific discharges and rate-limited mass transfer, suggesting a constant mass transfer coefficient for the entire flushing experiment may not be valid. When multi-component NAPLs are present, the dissolution rate of individual organic compounds (namely, toluene and benzene) into the ethanol-water flushing solution is found not to correlate with their equilibrium solubility values. PMID:23010548

  16. Resurgence flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Mityushev, V.

    2009-12-01

    Porous media are generally described by the Darcy equation when the length scales are sufficiently large with respect to the pore scale. This approach is also applicable when the media are heterogeneous, i.e., when permeability varies with space which is the most common case. In addition, real media are very often fractured; for a long time, this complex physical problem has been schematized by the double porosity model devised by Barenblatt. More recently, these fractured media have been addressed with a detailed description of the fractures and of their hydrodynamic interaction with the surrounding porous medium. There is another situation which occurs frequently in underground studies. One well is connected to a distant well while it is not connected to closer wells. Such a situation can only be understood if there is a direct link between the two connected wells and if this link has little if any hydrodynamic interaction with the porous medium that it crosses. This link can be a fracture or more likely a set of fractures. This phenomenon is called resurgence because of the obvious analogy with rivers which suddenly disappear underground and go out at the ground surface again. Similar ideas have already been developed in other fields. In Physics, random networks limited to nearest neighbors have been recently extended to small world models where distant vertices can be related directly by a link. The electrical testing of porous media by electrical probes located at the walls (electrical tomography) has been used frequently in Geophysics since it is a non-invasive technique; this classical technique corresponds exactly to the situation addressed here from a different perspective. Media with resurgences consist of a double structure. The first one which is continuous is described by Darcy law as usual. The second one models the resurgences by capillaries with impermeable walls which relate distant points of the continuous medium. These two structures have already

  17. Multiphase Transport in Porous Media: Gas-Liquid Separation Using Capillary Pressure Gradients International Space Station (ISS) Flight Experiment Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Holtsnider, John T.; Dahl, Roger W.; Deeks, Dalton; Javanovic, Goran N.; Parker, James M.; Ehlert, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of multiphase flow characteristics under variable gravity conditions will ultimately lead to improved and as of yet unknown process designs for advanced space missions. Such novel processes will be of paramount importance to the success of future manned space exploration as we venture into our solar system and beyond. In addition, because of the ubiquitous nature and vital importance of biological and environmental processes involving airwater mixtures, knowledge gained about fundamental interactions and the governing properties of these mixtures will clearly benefit the quality of life here on our home planet. The techniques addressed in the current research involving multiphase transport in porous media and gas-liquid phase separation using capillary pressure gradients are also a logical candidate for a future International Space Station (ISS) flight experiment. Importantly, the novel and potentially very accurate Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) modeling of multiphase transport in porous media developed in this work offers significantly improved predictions of real world fluid physics phenomena, thereby promoting advanced process designs for both space and terrestrial applications.This 3-year research effort has culminated in the design and testing of a zero-g demonstration prototype. Both the hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (Teflon) media Capillary Pressure Gradient (CPG) cartridges prepared during the second years work were evaluated. Results obtained from ground testing at 1-g were compared to those obtained at reduced gravities spanning Martian (13-g), Lunar (16-g) and zero-g. These comparisons clearly demonstrate the relative strength of the CPG phenomena and the efficacy of its application to meet NASAs unique gas-liquid separation (GLS) requirements in non-terrestrial environments.LB modeling software, developed concurrently with the zero-g test effort, was shown to accurately reproduce observed CPG driven gas-liquid separation

  18. Experimental tracking of the evolution of foam in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, D; Patzek, T.W.; Radke, C.J.

    1996-07-01

    The authors discuss the experiments that have been done to track the effects of diffusion of gas in foams trapped in porous media. They describe several types of experiments and discuss the difficulties that prevent quantitative results from being obtained in most cases. However, the experiments do help them understand the physics and diffusion-driven coarsening of foams trapped in porous media. This understanding is necessary to simulate the behavior of these foams and predict the mobilization characteristics of foam in porous media. At the end of this paper, they compare the trends and predictions resulting from the experimental work to the predictions of the models which are presented elsewhere.

  19. Transport phenomena in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Jacob; Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz

    The Advanced Study Institute on Fundamentals of Transport Phenomena in Porous Media, held July 14-23, 1985 in Newark, Del. and directed by Jacob Bear (Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa) and M. Yavuz Corapcioglu (City College of New York), under the auspices of NATO, was a sequel to the NATO Advanced Study Institute (ASI) held in 1982 (proceedings published as Fundamentals of Transport Phenomena in Porous Media, J. Bear, and M.Y. Corapcioglu (Ed.), Martinus Nijhoff, Dordrecht, the Netherlands, 1984). The meeting was attended by 106 participants and lecturers from 21 countries.As in the first NATO/ASI, the objective of this meeting—which was a combination of a conference of experts and a teaching institute— was to present and discuss selected topics of transport in porous media. In selecting topics and lecturers, an attempt was made to bridge the gap that sometimes exists between research and practice. An effort was also made to demonstrate the unified approach to the transport of mass of a fluid phase, components of a fluid phase, momentum, and heat in a porous medium domain. The void space may be occupied by a single fluid phase or by a number of such phases; each fluid may constitute a multicomponent system; the solid matrix may be deformable; and the whole process of transport in the system may take place under nonisothermal conditions, with or without phase changes. Such phenomena are encountered in a variety of disciplines, e.g., petroleum engineering, civil engineering (in connection with groundwater flow and contamination), soil mechanics, and chemical engineering. One of the goals of the 1985 NATO/ASI, as in the 1982 institute, was to bring together experts from all these disciplines and enhance communication among them.

  20. Transport of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles in saturated porous media: Column experiments and model analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jin-Kyu; Yi, In-Geol; Park, Jeong-Ann; Kim, Song-Bae; Kim, Hyunjung; Han, Yosep; Kim, Pil-Je; Eom, Ig-Chun; Jo, Eunhye

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the transport behavior of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) in porous media including quartz sand, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS), and aluminum oxide-coated sand (AOCS). Two sets of column experiments were performed under saturated flow conditions for potassium chloride (KCl), a conservative tracer, and CBNPs. Breakthrough curves were analyzed to obtain mass recovery and one-dimensional transport model parameters. The first set of experiments was conducted to examine the effects of metal (Fe, Al) oxides and flow rate (0.25 and 0.5 mL min- 1) on the transport of CBNPs suspended in deionized water. The results showed that the mass recovery of CBNPs in quartz sand (flow rate = 0.5 mL min- 1) was 83.1%, whereas no breakthrough of CBNPs (mass recovery = 0%) was observed in IOCS and AOCS at the same flow rate, indicating that metal (Fe, Al) oxides can play a significant role in the attachment of CBNPs to porous media. In addition, the mass recovery of CBNPs in quartz sand decreased to 76.1% as the flow rate decreased to 0.25 mL min- 1. Interaction energy profiles for CBNP-porous media were calculated using DLVO theory for sphere-plate geometry, demonstrating that the interaction energy for CBNP-quartz sand was repulsive, whereas the interaction energies for CBNP-IOCS and CBNP-AOCS were attractive with no energy barriers. The second set of experiments was conducted in quartz sand to observe the effect of ionic strength (NaCl = 0.1 and 1.0 mM; CaCl2 = 0.01 and 0.1 mM) and pH (pH = 4.5 and 5.4) on the transport of CBNPs suspended in electrolyte. The results showed that the mass recoveries of CBNPs in NaCl = 0.1 and 1.0 mM were 65.3 and 6.4%, respectively. The mass recoveries of CBNPs in CaCl2 = 0.01 and 0.1 mM were 81.6 and 6.3%, respectively. These results demonstrated that CBNP attachment to quartz sand can be enhanced by increasing the electrolyte concentration. Interaction energy profiles demonstrated that

  1. Transport of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles in saturated porous media: Column experiments and model analyses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin-Kyu; Yi, In-Geol; Park, Jeong-Ann; Kim, Song-Bae; Kim, Hyunjung; Han, Yosep; Kim, Pil-Je; Eom, Ig-Chun; Jo, Eunhye

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the transport behavior of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) in porous media including quartz sand, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS), and aluminum oxide-coated sand (AOCS). Two sets of column experiments were performed under saturated flow conditions for potassium chloride (KCl), a conservative tracer, and CBNPs. Breakthrough curves were analyzed to obtain mass recovery and one-dimensional transport model parameters. The first set of experiments was conducted to examine the effects of metal (Fe, Al) oxides and flow rate (0.25 and 0.5 mL min(-1)) on the transport of CBNPs suspended in deionized water. The results showed that the mass recovery of CBNPs in quartz sand (flow rate=0.5 mL min(-1)) was 83.1%, whereas no breakthrough of CBNPs (mass recovery=0%) was observed in IOCS and AOCS at the same flow rate, indicating that metal (Fe, Al) oxides can play a significant role in the attachment of CBNPs to porous media. In addition, the mass recovery of CBNPs in quartz sand decreased to 76.1% as the flow rate decreased to 0.25 mL min(-1). Interaction energy profiles for CBNP-porous media were calculated using DLVO theory for sphere-plate geometry, demonstrating that the interaction energy for CBNP-quartz sand was repulsive, whereas the interaction energies for CBNP-IOCS and CBNP-AOCS were attractive with no energy barriers. The second set of experiments was conducted in quartz sand to observe the effect of ionic strength (NaCl=0.1 and 1.0mM; CaCl2=0.01 and 0.1mM) and pH (pH=4.5 and 5.4) on the transport of CBNPs suspended in electrolyte. The results showed that the mass recoveries of CBNPs in NaCl=0.1 and 1.0mM were 65.3 and 6.4%, respectively. The mass recoveries of CBNPs in CaCl2=0.01 and 0.1mM were 81.6 and 6.3%, respectively. These results demonstrated that CBNP attachment to quartz sand can be enhanced by increasing the electrolyte concentration. Interaction energy profiles demonstrated that the

  2. Analysis of vortex flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanipour, Fatemeh

    2012-05-01

    This study presents a numerical analysis of a two-dimensional flow propagating through porous media. The vortical flow is produced by a piston-cylinder vortex ring generator. The objective is to understand the flow behavior in porous media as a function of impingement velocity and porous media properties, e.g. porosity and permeability. The results show that the formation of vortices and flow pattern in porous media strongly depend on the permeability of the porous media but only has a weak dependence on the porosity and Reynolds number. The average vorticity over the porous media is calculated for various velocities, porosities and permeabilities. The results reveal that when Reynolds number is low, neither porosity nor permeability have any significant effect on average vorticity. However for high Reynolds numbers, the average vorticity is affected by permeability but not by porosity.

  3. Effect of natural particles on the transport of lindane in saturated porous media: Laboratory experiments and model-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngueleu, Stéphane K.; Grathwohl, Peter; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2013-06-01

    Colloidal particles can act as carriers for adsorbing pollutants, such as hydrophobic organic pollutants, and enhance their mobility in the subsurface. In this study, we investigate the influence of colloidal particles on the transport of pesticides through saturated porous media by column experiments. We also investigate the effect of particle size on this transport. The model pesticide is lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane), a representative hydrophobic insecticide which has been banned in 2009 but is still used in many developing countries. The breakthrough curves are analyzed with the help of numerical modeling, in which we examine the minimum model complexity needed to simulate such transport. The transport of lindane without particles can be described by advective-dispersive transport coupled to linear three-site sorption, one site being in local equilibrium and the others undergoing first-order kinetic sorption. In the presence of mobile particles, the total concentration of mobile lindane is increased, that is, lindane is transported not only in aqueous solution but also sorbed onto the smallest, mobile particles. The models developed to simulate separate and associated transport of lindane and the particles reproduced the measurements very well and showed that the adsorption/desorption of lindane to the particles could be expressed by a common first-order rate law, regardless whether the particles are mobile, attached, or strained.

  4. Nonlinear flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Sergio Jesus

    1998-07-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in two-dimensional quasi-periodic and quasi-isotropic random media were obtained to analyze the local and large scale aspects of finite Reynolds number flow. For Reynolds number less than one, the results show a first correction to Darcy's law which is cubic in the Darcy (averaged) velocity, while for Reynolds number greater than one, the results are in agreement with Forchheimer equation. That is, the correction to Darcy's law is quadratic in the average (Darcy) velocity. The cubic correction to Darcy's law support Mei and Auriault's (1991) theoretical study, based on homogenization theory. In addition, the results show support to a unifying empirical equation describing fluid flow in porous media of similar structure, first proposed by Beavers and Sparrow (1969). Also, the results show agreement, except by a multiplicative constant, with Sangani and Acrivos (1982) equation for the drag on dilute array of cylinders.

  5. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum in porous media: Long-term elution experiments and continuous time random walk filtration modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortis, Andrea; Harter, Thomas; Hou, Lingling; Atwill, E. Robert; Packman, Aaron I.; Green, Peter G.

    2006-12-01

    Complex transport behavior other than advection-dispersion, simple retardation, and first-order removal has been observed in many biocolloid transport experiments in porous media. Such nonideal transport behavior is particularly evident in the late time elution of biocolloids at low concentrations. Here we present a series of saturated column experiments that were designed to measure the breakthrough and long-term elution of Cryptosporidium parvum in medium sand for a few thousand pore volumes after the initial source of oocysts was removed. For a wide range of ionic strengths, I, we consistently observe slower-than-Fickian, power law tailing. The slope of the tail is flatter for higher I. At very high ionic strength the slope decays to a rate slower than t-1. To explain this behavior, we propose a new filtration model based on the continuous time random walk (CTRW) theory. Our theory upscales heterogeneities at both the pore-scale geometry of the flow field and the grain surface physicochemical properties that affect biocolloid attachment and detachment. Pore-scale heterogeneities in fluid flow are shown to control the breakthrough of a conservative tracer but are shown to have negligible effect on oocyst transport. In our experiments, C. parvum transport is dominated by the effects of physicochemical heterogeneities. The CTRW model provides a parsimonious theory of nonreactive and reactive transport. The CTRW filtration process is controlled by three parameters, Λ, β, and c, which are related to the overall breakthrough retardation (R = 1 + Λ), the slope of the power law tail (β), and the transition to a slower than t-1 decay (c).

  6. Microscale transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Rashidi, M.; Rinker, R.

    1996-04-01

    In-pore transport processes in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media have been investigated using novel 3D imaging techniques. The experimental system consists of a clear column packed with clear particles and a refractive index-matched fluid seeded with fluorescent tracers and an organic solute dye. By illuminating the porous regions within the column with a planar sheet of laser beam, flow and transport processes through the porous medium can be observed microscopically, and qualitative and quantitative in-pore transport information can be obtained at a good resolution and a high accuracy. Fluorescent images are captured and recorded at every vertical plane location while sweeping back and forth across the test section. These digitized transport images are then analyzed and accumulated over a 3D volume within the column. This paper reports on pore-scale observations of velocity, chemical concentration, and fluxes. Tests were undertaken with two separate columns. One is a rectangular column for chemical transport and bioremediation studies in aqueous heterogeneous systems and the other is a cylindrical column for flow and transport investigations in nonaqueous homogeneous systems.

  7. BACTERIOPHAGE AND MICROSPHERE TRANSPORT IN SATURATED POROUS MEDIA: FORCED-GRADIENT EXPERIMENT AT BORDEN, ONTARIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-well forced-gradient experiment involving virus and microsphere transport was carried out in a sandy aquifer in Borden, Ontario, Canada. Virus traveled at least a few meters in the experiment, but virus concentrations at observation points 1 and 2.54 m away from the injecti...

  8. Interpretation of Transport Experiments in Porous Media: Evaluation of Different Formulations via Sensitivity-Based Parameter Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciriello, V.; Guadagnini, A.; Di Federico, V.; Edery, Y.; Berkowitz, B.

    2013-12-01

    We illustrate a general strategy to (a) calibrate the parameters embedded in competing mathematical models employed to interpret laboratory scale tracer experiments in porous media, (b) rank these alternative models, and (c) estimate the relative degree of likelihood of each model through a posterior probability weight. As an example of application, we consider the interpretation of the conservative and reactive transport experiments of Gramling et al. [2002]. For the interpretation of the conservative experiment three competitive one-dimensional models, i.e., (i) the advection-dispersion equation, (ii) a double porosity formulation, and (iii) the Continuous Time Random Walk are selected. The reactive transport experiment is analyzed by comparing (i) a formulation of the advection-dispersion reaction equation, and (ii) the Continuous Time Random Walk. The methodological framework is based on the joint use of global sensitivity analysis and model discrimination criteria and is fully consistent with Maximum Likelihood methods which are typically employed for groundwater flow and transport model calibration. Global sensitivity analysis is performed via the Polynomial Chaos Expansion approach, providing a minimum set of observations corresponding to the most sensitive (space-time) locations for each of a suite of selected transport formulations. This is accomplished by considering model calibration parameters as sources of uncertainty and treating them as independent random variables. Quantification of the most sensitive locations has strong implications for experiment design, while global sensitivity analysis allows identification of the relative importance of the parameters involved in model calibration practice. Model quality criteria are then employed to assess the capability of each model to approximate its most sensitive observations. Validation against the entire available dataset allows testing of the predictive performance of each selected model. Contrasting

  9. Comparison of three labeled silica nanoparticles used as tracers in transport experiments in porous media. Part II: transport experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Vitorge, Elsa; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Martins, Jean M-F; Barthès, Véronique; Gaudet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Three types of labeled silica nanoparticles were used in transport experiments in saturated sand. The goal of this study was to evaluate both the efficiency of labeling techniques (fluorescence (FITC), metal (Ag(0) core) and radioactivity ((110m)Ag(0) core)) in realistic transport conditions and the reactive transport of silica nanocolloids of variable size and concentration in porous media. Experimental results obtained under contrasted experimental conditions revealed that deposition in sand is controlled by nanoparticles size and ionic strength of the solution. A mathematical model is proposed to quantitatively describe colloid transport. Fluorescent labeling is widely used to study fate of colloids in soils but was the less sensitive one. Ag(0) labeling with ICP-MS detection was found to be very sensitive to measure deposition profiles. Radiolabeled ((110m)Ag(0)) nanoparticles permitted in situ detection. Results obtained with radiolabeled nanoparticles are wholly original and might be used for improving the modeling of deposition and release dynamics.

  10. Column experiment to study isotope fractionation of volatile organic contaminants in porous media under unsaturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeannottat, Simon; Hunkeler, Daniel; Breider, Florian

    2010-05-01

    Pollution by organic contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents is common in industrialized countries. The use of stable isotope analysis is increasingly recognized as a powerful technique for investigating the behaviour of organic or inorganic contaminants. Recently, compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) has proven to be an effective tool to confirm and quantify in-situ biodegradation by indigenous microbial populations in groundwater.In contrast, only few studies have investigated the use of CSIA in the unsaturated zone. In the unsaturated zone, the main potential applications of CSIA include the assessment of biodegradation and the fingerprinting of different sources of petroleum hydrocarbon or chlorinated solvents vapours. However, it has to be taken into account that isotope ratios in the unsaturated zone can vary due to diffusion and volatilization in addition to biodegradation. For application of isotope methods in the unsaturated zone, it is crucial to quantify isotopic fractionation resulting from physico-chemical and transport processes. The study is focused on laboratory experiments that investigate the effect of vaporization and diffusion on isotope ratios. The effect of diffusion is carried out using a column experiment setup that can be considered to represent VOC transport from a floating NAPL towards the atmosphere. Furthermore, additional column and batch experiments will be conducted to better understand the effect of biodegradation. Volatilization is studied with an other experimental setup. In addition, a mathematical framework was developed to simulate the isotope evolution in the column study. Since the initial experiments aimed at investigating the effect of vaporization and diffusion only, the column is filled with dry quartz sand in order to avoid perturbations of concentration profiles by humidity or adsorption on organic matter. An activated sand will later be used for the biodegradation experiments. A

  11. Acid/base front propagation in saturated porous media: 2D laboratory experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyaux-Lawniczak, Stéphanie; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    We perform laboratory scale reactive transport experiments involving acid-basic reactions between nitric acid and sodium hydroxide. A two-dimensional experimental setup is designed to provide continuous on-line measurements of physico-chemical parameters such as pH, redox potential (Eh) and electrical conductivity (EC) inside the system under saturated flow through conditions. The electrodes provide reliable values of pH and EC, while sharp fronts associated with redox potential dynamics could not be captured. Care should be taken to properly incorporate within a numerical model the mixing processes occurring inside the electrodes. The available observations are modeled through a numerical code based on the advection-dispersion equation. In this framework, EC is considered as a variable behaving as a conservative tracer and pH and Eh require solving the advection dispersion equation only once. The agreement between the computed and measured pH and EC is good even without recurring to parameters calibration on the basis of the experiments. Our findings suggest that the classical advection-dispersion equation can be used to interpret these kinds of experiments if mixing inside the electrodes is adequately considered.

  12. Acid/base front propagation in saturated porous media: 2D laboratory experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Loyaux-Lawniczak, Stéphanie; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    We perform laboratory scale reactive transport experiments involving acid-basic reactions between nitric acid and sodium hydroxide. A two-dimensional experimental setup is designed to provide continuous on-line measurements of physico-chemical parameters such as pH, redox potential (Eh) and electrical conductivity (EC) inside the system under saturated flow through conditions. The electrodes provide reliable values of pH and EC, while sharp fronts associated with redox potential dynamics could not be captured. Care should be taken to properly incorporate within a numerical model the mixing processes occurring inside the electrodes. The available observations are modeled through a numerical code based on the advection-dispersion equation. In this framework, EC is considered as a variable behaving as a conservative tracer and pH and Eh require solving the advection dispersion equation only once. The agreement between the computed and measured pH and EC is good even without recurring to parameters calibration on the basis of the experiments. Our findings suggest that the classical advection-dispersion equation can be used to interpret these kinds of experiments if mixing inside the electrodes is adequately considered.

  13. Forced imbibition in natural porous media: comparison between experiments and continuum models.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Amir; Tang, Guo-Qing; Tchelepi, Hamdi A; Kovscek, Anthony R

    2007-03-01

    A well-characterized set of large-scale laboratory experiments is presented, illustrating forced imbibition displacements in the presence of irreducible wetting phase saturation in a cylindrical, homogeneous Berea sandstone rock. Experiments are designed to operate in the regime of compact microscopic flows and large-scale viscous instability. The distribution of fluid phases during the flow process is visualized by high-resolution computed tomography imaging. Linear stability analysis and high-accuracy numerical simulations are employed to analyze the ability of macroscopic continuum equations to provide a consistent approximation of the displacement process. The validity of the equilibrium relative permeability functions, which form the basis for the continuum model, is fundamentally related to the stability of the displacement process. It is shown that not only is the stable flow regime modeled accurately by existing continuum models, but the onset of instability as well as the initial unstable modes are also determined with reasonable accuracy for unstable flows. However, the continuum model is found to be deficient in the case of fully developed unstable flows.

  14. Influence of flow velocity and spatial heterogeneity on DNAPL migration in porous media: insights from laboratory experiments and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fei; Gao, Yanwei; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Xu, Hongxia; Wu, Jichun

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the migration of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in complex subsurface systems is important for evaluating contamination source zones and designing remediation schemes after spill events. Six sandbox experiments were performed to explore the individual effect of flow velocity, and the combined effect of flow velocity and layered lenses on a DNAPL (PCE) migration in porous media. DNAPL saturation was measured using a light transmission system, and saturation distribution was quantified by spatial moments. The experimental results show that large flow velocity significantly promotes lateral and vertical migration of the low-viscosity DNAPL, while when layered lenses exist, the infiltration rate decreases and horizontal spread increases. Migration processes were numerically simulated, and the modelling results tested against experimental results. Furthermore, migration of DNAPLs with different viscosities was simulated to explore the combined effects of flow velocity and geological heterogeneity. Simulation results show that enhanced heterogeneity makes low-viscosity DNAPLs migrate along preferential pathways, resulting in irregular DNAPL morphology. Layered lenses combined with heterogeneity complicate the effect of flow velocity on the migration of low-viscosity DNAPLs by changing percolation paths. Results also demonstrate that flow velocity exhibits relatively little influence on the migration of medium/high-viscosity DNAPLs, which is predominantly controlled by viscosity and heterogeneity. Enhanced heterogeneity has a larger effect on migration behavior. Findings indicate that the migration paths and position of the source zone could change significantly, due to the combined effect of groundwater flow velocity and geological heterogeneity; thus, comprehensive hydrogeological investigation is needed to characterize the source zone.

  15. Column experiments to investigate transport of colloidal humic acid through porous media during managed aquifer recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Zhou, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenjing; Huan, Ying; Yu, Xipeng; Li, Fulin; Chen, Xuequn

    2016-09-01

    Colloids act as vectors for pollutants in groundwater, thereby creating a series of environmental problems. While managed aquifer recharge plays an important role in protecting groundwater resources and controlling land subsidence, it has a significant effect on the transport of colloids. In this study, particle size and zeta potential of colloidal humic acid (HA) have been measured to determine the effects of different hydrochemistry conditions. Column experiments were conducted to examine the effects on the transport of colloidal HA under varying conditions of pH (5, 7, 9), ionic strength (<0.0005, 0.02, 0.05 M), cation valence (Na+, Ca2+) and flow rate (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 ml/min) through collectors (glass beads) to model the properties and quality of artificial recharge water and changes in the hydrodynamic field. Breakthrough curves showed that the behavior of colloidal HA being transported varied depending on the conditions. Colloid transport was strongly influenced by hydrochemical and hydrodynamic conditions. With decreasing pH or increasing ionic strength, a decrease in the peak effluent concentration of colloidal HA and increase in deposition could be clearly seen. Comparison of different cation valence tests indicated that changes in transport and deposition were more pronounced with divalent Ca2+ than with monovalent Na+. Changes in hydrodynamic field (flow rate) also had an impact on transportation of colloidal HA. The results of this study highlight the need for further research in this area.

  16. Determining concentration fields of tracer plumes for layered porous media in flow-tank experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Schwartz, Franklin W.

    In the laboratory, computer-assisted image analysis provides an accurate and efficient way to monitor tracer experiments. This paper describes the determination of detailed temporal concentration distributions of tracers in a flow-tank experiment by analyzing photographs of plumes of Rhodamine dye through the glass wall of the tank. The methodology developed for this purpose consists of four steps: (1) digitally scanning black and white negatives obtained from photographs of the flow-tank experiment; (2) calibrating and normalizing each digitized image to a standard optical-density scale by determining the relation between the optical density and pixel value for each image; (3) constructing standard curves relating the concentration in an optical density from five experimental runs with predetermined concentrations (2-97mg/L) and (4) converting the optical density to concentration. The spatial distribution of concentration for two photographs was determined by applying these calibration and conversion procedures to all pixels of the digitized images. This approach provides an efficient way to study patterns of plume evolution and transport mechanisms. Résumé Au laboratoire, l'analyse d'images assistée par ordinateur est un moyen précis et efficace pour suivre certaines expériences de traçage. Ce papier présente comment sont déterminées dans le détail les distributions temporelles de la concentration en traceur au cours d'une expérience d'écoulement en réservoir au moyen de l'analyse de photographies de panaches de rhodamine à travers la paroi de verre du réservoir. La méthodologie développée dans cette expérience suit quatre étapes: (1) digitalisation par balayage des négatifs noir et blanc des prises de vue de l'expérience d'écoulement en réservoir (2) calibration et normalisation de chaque image digitalisée par rapport à une échelle étalon de densité optique en déterminant la relation entre la densité optique et la valeur des pixels

  17. Emulsions Droplet Capture Mechanism in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidani, Khalil; Polikar, Marcel

    2006-03-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the physics of emulsion flow in porous media. The objective of experiments were to study the applicability of oil-in-water emulsion as a plugging agent in the vicinity of the well bore for thousands of Canadian gas wells that are continuously leaking gas to surface. The motion of oil droplets and the capture mechanisms were investigated through visualized experiments. Well-characterized emulsions were injected into a micro model resembling a two parallel plate model packed with glass beads. Effects of emulsion properties and wettability of the medium were studied on a plugging mechanism. The results demonstrate the reduction in permeability mainly due to droplets size exclusion compared to the pore constrictions. Also, smaller droplets may lodge and coalesce in pores crevices thereby accelerating the blockage process. Moreover, more viscous emulsions are more effective compared with the less viscous ones due to combined effects of capillary and viscous forces. The deposition of droplets was adjusted through utilizing different preflush solutions. Criteria were set for enhancing emulsion penetration depth thereby defining the extent of the blocked region. In conclusion, this work characterizes the physics of emulsion flow in porous media and demonstrates its application as a novel sealant in near well bore region. The novelty, which constitutes a step-change in technology, is a method that emplaces an emulsion at a desired location in underground media.

  18. Scaling theory of drying in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tsimpanogiannis, I.N.; Yortsos, Y.C.; Poulou, S.; Kanellopoulos, N.; Stubos, A.K.

    1999-04-01

    Concepts of immiscible displacements in porous media driven by mass transfer are utilized to model drying of porous media. Visualization experiments of drying in two-dimensional glass micromodels are conducted to identify pore-scale mechanisms. Then, a pore network approach is used to analyze the advancing drying front. It is shown that in a porous medium, capillarity induces a flow that effectively limits the extent of the front, which would otherwise be of the percolation type, to a finite width. In conjuction with the predictions of a macroscale stable front, obtained from a linear stability analysis, the process is shown to be equivalent to invasion percolation in a stabilizing gradient. A power-law scaling relation of the front width with a diffusion-based capillary number is also obtained. This capillary number reflects the fact that drying is controlled by diffusion in contrast to external drainage. The scaling exponent predicted is compatible with the experimental results of Shaw [Phys Rev. Lett. {bold 59}, 1671 (1987)]. A framework for a continuum description of the upstream drying regimes is also developed. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Multiphase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, A.

    1995-02-01

    The major goal of this research project was to improve the understanding of the gas-oil two-phase flow in fractured porous media. In addition, miscible displacement was studied to evaluate its promise for enhanced recovery.

  20. Micromechanics of saturated and unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chateau, Xavier; Dormieux, Luc

    2002-07-01

    The homogenization method is used to determine the formulation of the behaviour of both saturated and unsaturated porous media. This approach makes it possible to assess the validity of the effective stress concept as a function of the properties of the porous media at the microscopic scale. Furthermore, the influence of the morphologies of the solid and fluid phases on the macroscopic behaviour is studied. The strain induced by drying is examined as a function of the morphological properties.

  1. Fundamentals of foam transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Kovscek, A.R.; Radke, C.J.

    1993-10-01

    Foam in porous media is a fascinating fluid both because of its unique microstructure and because its dramatic influence on the flow of gas and liquid. A wealth of information is now compiled in the literature describing foam generation, destruction, and transport mechanisms. Yet there are conflicting views of these mechanisms and on the macroscopic results they produce. By critically reviewing how surfactant formulation and porous media topology conspire to control foam texture and flow resistance, we attempt to unify the disparate viewpoints. Evolution of texture during foam displacement is quantified by a population balance on bubble concentration, which is designed specifically for convenient incorporation into a standard reservoir simulator. Theories for the dominant bubble generation and coalescence mechanisms provide physically based rate expressions for the proposed population balance. Stone-type relative permeability functions along with the texture-sensitive and shear-thinning nature of confined foam complete the model. Quite good agreement is found between theory and new experiments for transient foam displacement in linear cores.

  2. Pore Structure Reconstruction and Moisture Migration in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiayi; Shi, Xing; Shi, Juan; Chen, Zhenqian

    2014-09-01

    Three kinds of porous media (isotropic, perpendicular anisotropic and parallel anisotropic porous media) with the same porosity, different pore size distributions and fractal spectral dimensions were reconstructed by random growth method. It was aimed to theoretically study the impact of microscopic pore structure on water vapor diffusion process in porous media. The results show that pore size distribution can only denote the static characteristics of porous media but cannot effectively reflect the dynamic transport characteristics of porous media. Fractal spectral dimension can effectively analyze and reflect pores connectivity and moisture dynamic transport properties of porous media from the microscopic perspective. The pores connectivity and water vapor diffusion performance in pores of porous media get better with the increase of fractal spectral dimension of porous media. Fractal spectral dimension of parallel anisotropic porous media is more than that of perpendicular anisotropic porous media. Fractal spectral dimension of isotropic porous media is between parallel anisotropic porous media and perpendicular anisotropic porous media. Other macroscopic parameters such as equilibrium diffusion coefficient of water vapor, water vapor concentration variation at right boundary in equilibrium, the time when water vapor diffusion process reaches a stable state also can characterize the pores connectivity and water vapor diffusion properties of porous media.

  3. Fluid dynamics in porous media with Sailfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Rodrigo C. V.; Neumann, Rodrigo F.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we show the application of Sailfish to the study of fluid dynamics in porous media. Sailfish is an open-source software based on the lattice-Boltzmann method. This application of computational fluid dynamics is of particular interest to the oil and gas industry and the subject could be a starting point for an undergraduate or graduate student in physics or engineering. We built artificial samples of porous media with different porosities and used Sailfish to simulate the fluid flow through them in order to calculate their permeability and tortuosity. We also present a simple way to obtain the specific superficial area of porous media using Python libraries. To contextualise these concepts, we analyse the applicability of the Kozeny-Carman equation, which is a well-known permeability-porosity relation, to our artificial samples.

  4. Fluid dynamics in porous media with Sailfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Rodrigo C. V.; Neumann, Rodrigo F.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we show the application of Sailfish to the study of fluid dynamics in porous media. Sailfish is an open-source software based on the lattice-Boltzmann method. This application of computational fluid dynamics is of particular interest to the oil and gas industry and the subject could be a starting point for an undergraduate or graduate student in physics or engineering. We built artificial samples of porous media with different porosities and used Sailfish to simulate the fluid flow through them in order to calculate their permeability and tortuosity. We also present a simple way to obtain the specific superficial area of porous media using Python libraries. To contextualise these concepts, we analyse the applicability of the Kozeny–Carman equation, which is a well-known permeability–porosity relation, to our artificial samples.

  5. Precipitation Of Iron Minerals In Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, D.; Baham, J. E.; Dragila, M. I.

    2007-12-01

    Formation of soil redoximorphic features, such as mottles, concretions and placic horizons is governed by Fe (II) and oxygen transport in porous media. We have conducted column experiments with four grades of silica sand that were placed vertically in the reduced saturated soil. Two sets of iron bands appeared within one week. Red oxidized bands (ferrihydrite and/or possibly lepidocrocite) were formed at the upper extent of the capillary fringe. Whereas, black bands (magnetite and/or green rust) were formed below the oxidized iron bands. These bands were transformed to the red bands as the experiment progressed. We propose a conceptual mechanistic framework for abiotic band formation and have developed a numerical model that incorporates the relevant factors contributing to the abiotic genesis of iron bands. This study reveals that abiotic iron oxide formation in unsaturated media is mainly a diffusion controlled process. The position of iron oxide bands is regulated by the diffusion rates of Fe (II) (aq) and Oxygen (g); thus elucidating the role of air-water and water-mineral interfacial properties, and diffusion gradients on iron transformations in natural systems. Our results suggest that the formation of Fe (III) oxide cemented bands in unsaturated hydrological systems is a rapid process occurring on a time scale relevant to human activity.

  6. Transport of subsurface bacteria in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Bales, R.C.; Arnold, R.G.; Gerba, C.P.

    1995-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to develop tools with which to measure the advective transport of microorganisms through porous media. These tools were then applied to investigate the sorptive properties of representative microorganisms that were selected at random from the DOE`s deep subsurface collection of bacterial, maintained at Florida State University. The transport screening procedure that arose from this study was also used to investigate biological factors that affect the transport/sorption of biocolloids during their movement through porous media with the bulk advective flow.

  7. Evaluation of bacterial detachment rates in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, B.M.; Hooker, B.S.; Skeen, R.S.; Cunningham, A.B.; Lundman, R.W.

    1994-05-01

    The ability of published biomass detachment rate expressions to describe experimental data obtained from porous media reactors using Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown aerobically on glucose was evaluated. A first-order rate expression on attached biomass concentration best reflected effluent substrate concentration for combined data sets. Detachment rate coefficient k{sub d1} was dependent on initial substrate concentration. Simulation of porous media reactor experiments indicated that responses using higher influent substrate concentrations possessed greater sensitivity to variations in k{sub d1}. Simulations of field bioremediation systems suggest the use of accurate biofilm development kinetics is important in the prediction of well bore biofouling.

  8. The effect of entrapped nonaqueous phase liquids on tracer transport in heterogeneous porous media: Laboratory experiments at the intermediate scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, G.R.; Illangasekare, T.H.; Rajaram, H.

    2003-01-01

    This work considers the applicability of conservative tracers for detecting high-saturation nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) entrapment in heterogeneous systems. For this purpose, a series of experiments and simulations was performed using a two-dimensional heterogeneous system (10??1.2 m), which represents an intermediate scale between laboratory and field scales. Tracer tests performed prior to injecting the NAPL provide the baseline response of the heterogeneous porous medium. Two NAPL spill experiments were performed and the entrapped-NAPL saturation distribution measured in detail using a gamma-ray attenuation system. Tracer tests following each of the NAPL spills produced breakthrough curves (BTCs) reflecting the impact of entrapped NAPL on conservative transport. To evaluate significance, the impact of NAPL entrapment on the conservative-tracer breakthrough curves was compared to simulated breakthrough curve variability for different realizations of the heterogeneous distribution. Analysis of the results reveals that the NAPL entrapment has a significant impact on the temporal moments of conservative-tracer breakthrough curves. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Acoustic Signature of Evaporation from Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grapsas, N. K.; Shokri, N.

    2012-12-01

    During evaporation from saturated porous media, rapid interfacial jumps at the pore scale, known as Haines jumps, occur as air invades the pore network and displaces the evaporating fluid. This process produces crackling noises that can be detected using an acoustic emission (AE) machine. In this study, we investigated the acoustic signature of evaporation from porous media using Hele-Shaw cells packed with seven types of sand and glass beads differing in particle size distribution and surface roughness. Each sample was saturated with dyed water, left to evaporate under constant atmospheric conditions on a digital balance in an environmental chamber, and digitally imaged every 20 minutes to quantify phase distribution. An AE sensor was fixed to each column to record the features of observed AE events (hits) such as amplitude, absolute energy, and duration. Results indicate that the cumulative number of hits is strongly related to evaporative mass loss through time in all configurations. Additionally, the cumulative number of hits shares an inverse relationship with particle size and roughness. Finally, image analysis of the liquid phase distribution during evaporation reveals a strong correlation between the area invaded by air and the cumulative AE hits detected in each column. This confirms that AEs are generated by receding liquid menisci and the propagation of drying fronts in porous media. These results suggest that AE techniques may potentially be used to non-invasively analyze the drying of porous media.

  10. Biomass plug development and propagation in porous media.

    PubMed

    Stewart, T L; Fogler, H S

    2001-02-01

    Exopolymer-producing bacteria can be used to modify soil profiles for enhanced oil recovery or bioremediation. Understanding the mechanisms associated with biomass plug development and propagation is needed for successful application of this technology. These mechanisms were determined from packed-bed and micromodel experiments that simulate plugging in porous media. Leuconostoc mesenteroides was used, because production of dextran, a water-insoluble exopolymer, can be controlled by using different carbon sources. As dextran was produced, the pressure drop across the porous media increased and began to oscillate. Three pressure phases were identified under exopolymer-producing conditions: the exopolymer-induction phase, the plugging phase, and the plug-propagation phase. The exopolymer-induction phase extended from the time that exopolymer-producing conditions were induced until there was a measurable increase in pressure drop across the porous media. The plugging phase extended from the first increase in pressure drop until a maximum pressure drop was reached. Changes in pressure drop in these two phases were directly related to biomass distribution. Specifically, flow channels within the porous media filled with biomass creating a plugged region where convective flow occurred only in water channels within the biofilm. These water channels were more restrictive to flow causing the pressure drop to increase. At a maximum pressure drop across the porous media, the biomass yielded much like a Bingham plastic, and a flow channel was formed. This behavior marked the onset of the plug-propagation phase which was characterized by sequential development and breakthrough of biomass plugs. This development and breakthrough propagated the biomass plug in the direction of nutrient flow. The dominant mechanism associated with all three phases of plugging in porous media was exopolymer production; yield stress is an additional mechanism in the plug-propagation phase. PMID

  11. Diesel oil volatilization processes affected by selected porous media.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanfei; Zheng, Xilai; Anderson, S H; Lu, Jie; Feng, Xuedong

    2014-03-01

    Volatilization plays an important role in attenuating petroleum products in contaminated soils. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of wind speed, vessel diameter and mean grain size of porous media on diesel oil volatilization. Experiments were conducted to investigate the volatilization behavior of diesel oil from porous media by weighing contaminated samples pre- and post-volatilization. Three selected field porous media materials were evaluated: Silty Clay Loam, Fine Sand, and Coarse Sand along with six individual sand fractions of the Coarse Sand. Results indicate that increasing wind speed accelerates the diesel oil volatilization process, especially for wind speeds below 2.10ms(-1). The low-carbon components of diesel oil volatilize more rapidly, with the effects of wind speed more pronounced on C10 to C15 volatilization than on C16 and higher. The volatilization rate coefficient of diesel oil increases with decreasing mean grain size of porous media, and with increasing vessel diameter. A power function expressed the relationship with mean grain size. All processes (wind speed, vessel diameter, and mean grain size) were included in an equation which explained over 92% of the measured diesel oil volatilization rate coefficient variations for the experiments. Diesel oil volatilization appears to be boundary-layer regulated to some extent.

  12. Foam Transport in Porous Media - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhong, Lirong

    2009-11-11

    Amendment solutions with or without surfactants have been used to remove contaminants from soil. However, it has drawbacks such that the amendment solution often mobilizes the plume, and its movement is controlled by gravity and preferential flow paths. Foam is an emulsion-like, two-phase system in which gas cells are dispersed in a liquid and separated by thin liquid films called lamellae. Potential advantages of using foams in sub-surface remediation include providing better control on the volume of fluids injected, uniformity of contact, and the ability to contain the migration of contaminant laden liquids. It is expected that foam can serve as a carrier of amendments for vadose zone remediation, e.g., at the Hanford Site. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s EM-20 program, a numerical simulation capability will be added to the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) flow simulator. The primary purpose of this document is to review the modeling approaches of foam transport in porous media. However, as an aid to understanding the simulation approaches, some experiments under unsaturated conditions and the processes of foam transport are also reviewed. Foam may be formed when the surfactant concentration is above the critical micelle concentration. There are two main types of foams – the ball foam (microfoam) and the polyhedral foam. The characteristics of bulk foam are described by the properties such as foam quality, texture, stability, density, surface tension, disjoining pressure, etc. Foam has been used to flush contaminants such as metals, organics, and nonaqueous phase liquids from unsaturated soil. Ball foam, or colloidal gas aphrons, reportedly have been used for soil flushing in contaminated site remediation and was found to be more efficient than surfactant solutions on the basis of weight of contaminant removed per gram of surfactant. Experiments also indicate that the polyhedral foam can be used to enhance soil remediation. The

  13. Finite volume hydromechanical simulation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-05-01

    Cell-centered finite volume methods are prevailing in numerical simulation of flow in porous media. However, due to the lack of cell-centered finite volume methods for mechanics, coupled flow and deformation is usually treated either by coupled finite-volume-finite element discretizations, or within a finite element setting. The former approach is unfavorable as it introduces two separate grid structures, while the latter approach loses the advantages of finite volume methods for the flow equation. Recently, we proposed a cell-centered finite volume method for elasticity. Herein, we explore the applicability of this novel method to provide a compatible finite volume discretization for coupled hydromechanic flows in porous media. We detail in particular the issue of coupling terms, and show how this is naturally handled. Furthermore, we observe how the cell-centered finite volume framework naturally allows for modeling fractured and fracturing porous media through internal boundary conditions. We support the discussion with a set of numerical examples: the convergence properties of the coupled scheme are first investigated; second, we illustrate the practical applicability of the method both for fractured and heterogeneous media.

  14. Finite volume hydromechanical simulation in porous media

    PubMed Central

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-01-01

    Cell-centered finite volume methods are prevailing in numerical simulation of flow in porous media. However, due to the lack of cell-centered finite volume methods for mechanics, coupled flow and deformation is usually treated either by coupled finite-volume-finite element discretizations, or within a finite element setting. The former approach is unfavorable as it introduces two separate grid structures, while the latter approach loses the advantages of finite volume methods for the flow equation. Recently, we proposed a cell-centered finite volume method for elasticity. Herein, we explore the applicability of this novel method to provide a compatible finite volume discretization for coupled hydromechanic flows in porous media. We detail in particular the issue of coupling terms, and show how this is naturally handled. Furthermore, we observe how the cell-centered finite volume framework naturally allows for modeling fractured and fracturing porous media through internal boundary conditions. We support the discussion with a set of numerical examples: the convergence properties of the coupled scheme are first investigated; second, we illustrate the practical applicability of the method both for fractured and heterogeneous media. PMID:25574061

  15. Scale up of flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    An, L.; Glimm, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, Q.

    1995-09-01

    The authors study the scale up problem for flow in porous media. The general nature of this problem is outlined, leading to a discussion of assumptions on random fields appropriate for the description of geological heterogeneities. The main point of this paper is to use direct numerical simulation to evaluate the ensemble averages describing fluid dispersion, for flow in porous media. The relation between ensemble dispersion and single realization dispersion is discussed in the case of linear transport, and the role of plume or channel width is also explored. Finally, they consider nonlinear transport, and contrast dispersive to hyperbolic renormalization of the flow equations. For the geological and fluid parameters considered here, the hyperbolic renormalization is trivial, indicating that dispersive renormalization is appropriate in these cases. Further study of the ideas explored in this paper will be required for a proper understanding of their role in a more complete theory which the authors hope will follow.

  16. Simulation of penetration into porous geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, O Y; Liu, B T; Lomov, I N; Antoun, T

    2005-05-31

    We present a computational study on the penetration of steel projectiles into porous geologic materials. The purpose of the study is to extend the range of applicability of a recently developed constitutive model to simulations involving projectile penetration into geologic media. The constitutive model is non-linear, thermodynamically consistent, and properly invariant under superposed rigid body motions. The equations are valid for large deformations and they are hyperelastic in the sense that the stress tensor is related to a derivative of the Helmholtz free energy. The model uses the mathematical structure of plasticity theory to capture the basic features of the mechanical response of geological materials including the effects of bulking, yielding, damage, porous compaction and loading rate on the material response. The new constitutive model has been successfully used to simulate static laboratory tests under a wide range of triaxial loading conditions, and dynamic spherical wave propagation tests in both dry and saturated geologic media.

  17. THE VELOCITY OF DNAPL FINGERING IN WATER-SATURATED POROUS MEDIA LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS AND A MOBILE-IMMOBILE-ZONE MODEL. (R826157)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are immiscible with water and can give rise to highly fingered fluid distributions when infiltrating through water-saturated porous media. In this paper, a conceptual mobile¯immobile¯zone (MIZ) model is pr...

  18. Chemo-hydrodynamic patterns in porous media.

    PubMed

    De Wit, A

    2016-10-13

    Chemical reactions can interplay with hydrodynamic flows to generate chemo-hydrodynamic instabilities affecting the spatio-temporal evolution of the concentration of the chemicals. We review here such instabilities for porous media flows. We describe the influence of chemical reactions on viscous fingering, buoyancy-driven fingering in miscible systems, convective dissolution as well as precipitation patterns. Implications for environmental systems are discussed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'. PMID:27597788

  19. Fluid Flow Within Fractured Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, D.M.; Ahmadi, G.; Smith, D.H.; Bromhal, G.S.

    2006-10-01

    Fractures provide preferential flow paths to subterranean fluid flows. In reservoir scale modeling of geologic flows fractures must be approximated by fairly simple formulations. Often this is accomplished by assuming fractures are parallel plates subjected to an applied pressure gradient. This is known as the cubic law. An induced fracture in Berea sandstone has been digitized to perform numerical flow simulations. A commercially available computational fluid dynamics software package has been used to solve the flow through this model. Single phase flows have been compared to experimental works in the literature to evaluate the accuracy with which this model can be applied. Common methods of fracture geometry classification are also calculated and compared to experimentally obtained values. Flow through regions of the fracture where the upper and lower fracture walls meet (zero aperture) are shown to induce a strong channeling effect on the flow. This model is expanded to include a domain of surrounding porous media through which the flow can travel. The inclusion of a realistic permeability in this media shows that the regions of small and zero apertures contribute to the greatest pressure losses over the fracture length and flow through the porous media is most prevalent in these regions. The flow through the fracture is shown to be the largest contributor to the net flow through the media. From this work, a novel flow relationship is proposed for flow through fractured media.

  20. OPM: The Open Porous Media Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemisch, B.; Flornes, K. M.; Lie, K.; Rasmussen, A.

    2011-12-01

    The principal objective of the Open Porous Media (OPM) initiative is to develop a simulation suite that is capable of modeling industrially and scientifically relevant flow and transport processes in porous media and bridge the gap between the different application areas of porous media modeling, including reservoir mechanics, CO2 sequestration, biological systems, and product development of engineered media. The OPM initiative will provide a long-lasting, efficient, and well-maintained open-source software for flow and transport in porous media built on modern software principles. The suite is released under the GNU General Public License (GPL). Our motivation is to provide a means to unite industry and public research on simulation of flow and transport in porous media. For academic users, we seek to provide a software infrastructure that facilitates testing of new ideas on models with industry-standard complexity, while at the same time giving the researcher control over discretization and solvers. Similarly, we aim to accelerate the technology transfer from academic institutions to professional companies by making new research results available as free software of professional standard. The OPM initiative is currently supported by six research groups in Norway and Germany and funded by existing grants from public research agencies as well as from Statoil Petroleum and Total E&P Norge. However, a full-scale development of the OPM initiative requires substantially more funding and involvement of more research groups and potential end users. In this talk, we will provide an overview of the current activities in the OPM initiative. Special emphasis will be given to the demonstration of the synergies achieved by combining the strengths of individual open-source software components. In particular, a new fully implicit solver developed within the DUNE-based simulator DuMux could be enhanced by the ability to read industry-standard Eclipse input files and to run on

  1. Porous Media in the Oilfield (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilke, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    The complex interaction of liquids, gases and solids at the pore scale is of interest in many areas of geoscience including enhanced oil recovery, hydraulic fracturing and carbon sequestration. This paper presents an overview of porous media in the oilfield. We begin with a review of the digital rock workflow that includes imaging, image processing, and the modeling of static and dynamic processes. We then review experimental approaches to image dynamic multiphase interactions at the microscopic level during drainage and imbibition. Modeling multiphase fluid flow at the pore scale gives us much insight to the physics at nanometer and micrometer scale. However, when interpreting and modeling porous media in the oilfield one must consider the wide spectrum of scales that must be addressed and the challenges in reconciling the physics and geology at these different scales. Finally, we address some of the challenges in understanding porous media introduced by the shale oil and gas revolution. Hydraulic fracturing technology is now allowing us to extract oil and gas from shales with nano Darcy permeabilities.

  2. Micron-Size Zero-Valent Iron Emplacement in Porous Media Using Polymer Additives: Column and Flow Cell Ex-periments

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2006-03-20

    At the Hanford Site, an extensive In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) permeable reactive barrier was installed to prevent chromate from reaching the Columbia River. However, chromium has been detected in several wells, indicating a premature loss of the reductive capacity in the aquifer. Laboratory experiments have been conducted to investigate whether barrier reductive capacity can be enhanced by adding micron-scale zero-valent iron to the high-permeability zones within the aquifer using shear-thinning fluids containing polymers. Porous media were packed in a wedge-shaped flow cell to create either a heterogeneous layered system with a high-permeability zone between two low-permeability zones or a high-permeability channel sur-rounded by low-permeability materials. The injection flow rate, polymer type, polymer concentration, and injected pore volumes were determined based on preliminary short- and long-column experiments. The flow cell experiments indicated that iron concentration enhancements of at least 0.6% (w/w) could be obtained using moderate flow rates and injection of 30 pore volumes. The 0.6% amended Fe0 concentration would provide approximately 20 times the average reductive capacity that is provided by the dithionite-reduced iron in the ISRM barrier. Calculations show that a 1-m-long Fe0 amended zone with an average concentration of 0.6% w/w iron subject to a groundwater velocity of 1 m/day will have an estimated longevity of 7.2 years.

  3. Buoyancy-Driven Flows in Deformable Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Ichiro; Kurita, Kei

    2015-04-01

    Laboratory experiments on buoyancy-driven flows in deformable porous media were conducted to understand the dynamics of magma transport in a partially molten region. As an analogue material of partially molten media, a mixture of transparent hydrogel beads and viscous fluids was used. Since the hydrogel is deformable, the volume fraction of the interstitial fluids is varied, which depends on the pressure distribution in the porous media. A thin transparent tank was filled with the mixture, and a buoyant viscous fluid was injected from a nozzle or from a slit at a constant volume flux into the mixture. The injected viscous fluid was dyed and the flow fields in the deformable porous media were quantitatively visualized by particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) methods. For the point source experiments, three types of fluid flow were identified: homogeneous permeable flow, pulsating flow, and localized continuous flow. The flow behavior depends on the injection flow rate, the rheological properties of the mixture and the buoyant fluid, the volume fraction of the interstitial fluid, and also the boundary condition of the deformable porous media (wall effect). For the line source experiments, the flow pattern always shows a time-dependent behavior. As the viscous fluid is supplied from the source at a constant volume flux, the fluid infiltrates into the deformable gel beads layer until a gravitational instability (e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor instability) occurs. Then, the flow is localized through channels with a characteristic spacing. The plume-like flow is relatively continuous around the source region; however, the flow along the channels can become unstable and create pulsations. Their characteristic frequency was obtained by image analysis. Our experimental results indicate that the intermittent nature of the volcanic activity is inherent to magma transport in a partially molten zone, which explains the spatio-temporal patterns of volcanic

  4. Influence of mechanochemical activation in various media on structure of porous and non-porous silicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydorchuk, V.; Khalameida, S.; Zazhigalov, V.; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.; Leboda, R.; Wieczorek-Ciurowa, K.

    2010-11-01

    Influence of mechanochemical activation on porous structure and surface properties of porous and non-porous silicas in air, water and ethanol has been studied. Milled samples have been investigated with help of nitrogen adsorption-desorption, mercury porometry, thermogravimetric analysis, FTIR and ESR spectroscopy. It has been revealed that destruction of porous structure of silicagel at dry milling and, on the contrary, formation of porous silica from non-porous powders (aerosils) during treatment in liquid media occurs.

  5. Capillary Rise in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Lago, Marcelo; Araujo, Mariela

    2001-02-01

    Capillary rise experiments were performed in columns filled with glass beads and Berea sandstones, using visual methods to register the advance of the water front. For the glass bead filled columns, early time data are well fitted by the Washburn equation. However, in the experiments, the advancing front exceeded the predicted equilibrium height. For large times, an algebraic behavior of the velocity of the front is observed (T. Delker et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2902 (1996)). A model for studying the capillary pressure evolution in a regular assembly of spheres is proposed and developed. It is based on a quasi-static advance of the meniscus with a piston-like motion and allows us to estimate the hydraulic equilibrium height, with values very close to those obtained by fitting early time data to a Washburn equation. The change of regime is explained as a transition in the mechanism of advance of the meniscus. On the other hand, only the Washburn regime was observed for the sandstones. The front velocity was fitted to an algebraical form with an exponent close to 0.5, a value expected from the asymptotic limit of the Washburn equation. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11161488

  6. Microwave heating of porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Gori, F.; Martini, L. ); Gentili, G.B. )

    1987-05-01

    The technique actually used for recycling in place asphaltic concrete pavements is the following: heating of the surface layer of the pavement with special infrared lamps (gas-fed); hot removal and remixing in place of the materials with the addition of new binder; in-line reconstruction of the pavement layer with rolling. Such a technique is highly efficient and economic but it suffers an important disadvantage: The low thermal conductivity of the asphalt causes a strong temperature decrease with depth. Further on, the infrared radiation produces carbonization of the pavement skin with possible modification of the rheological properties of the bitumen. The technology of microwave generators (Magnetron, Klystron, and Amplitron) has registered some recent advances. It is now possible, and in some cases convenient, to use microwave energy for industrial heating of low-thermal-conductivity materials. Actually the microwaves are employed for drying wood, paper, and textiles, and for freeze-drying, cooking, and defrosting foods. One of the most interesting features of the microwave process is the rate and uniformity of the heating inside the material. Some preliminary experiments have been carried out for recycling in place asphaltic concrete pavements. The goal of the present paper is to propose a theoretical model capable of describing the phenomena occurring in a soil during a microwave heating process.

  7. Transport of human adenoviruses in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinos, Petros; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Tselepi, Maria A.; Bellou, Maria; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.; Vantarakis, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater may be contaminated with infective human enteric viruses from various wastewater discharges, sanitary landfills, septic tanks, agricultural practices, and artificial groundwater recharge. Coliphages have been widely used as surrogates of enteric viruses, because they share many fundamental properties and features. Although a large number of studies focusing on various factors (i.e. pore water solution chemistry, fluid velocity, moisture content, temperature, and grain size) that affect biocolloid (bacteria, viruses) transport have been published over the past two decades, little attention has been given toward human adenoviruses (hAdVs). The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pore water velocity on hAdV transport in water saturated laboratory-scale columns packed with glass beads. The effects of pore water velocity on virus transport and retention in porous media was examined at three pore water velocities (0.39, 0.75, and 1.22 cm/min). The results indicated that all estimated average mass recovery values for hAdV were lower than those of coliphages, which were previously reported in the literature by others for experiments conducted under similar experimental conditions. However, no obvious relationship between hAdV mass recovery and water velocity could be established from the experimental results. The collision efficiencies were quantified using the classical colloid filtration theory. Average collision efficiency, α, values decreased with decreasing flow rate, Q, and pore water velocity, U, but no significant effect of U on α was observed. Furthermore, the surface properties of viruses and glass beads were used to construct classical DLVO potential energy profiles. The results revealed that the experimental conditions of this study were unfavorable to deposition and that no aggregation between virus particles is expected to occur. A thorough understanding of the key processes governing virus transport is pivotal for public

  8. Velocity Statistics of Flows in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooshapur, S.; Manhart, M.

    2014-12-01

    In later phases of transport in porous media, dispersion might be modelled by Fickian diffusion using an effective diffusion coefficient in the transport equation. Early phases of the transport process are however more difficult to deal with due to non-Fickian behavior. On the macro-scale, modelling of non-Fickian dispersion is complicated by scale dependence and therefore empirical correlations, experiments or numerical simulations on the micro-scale must be employed [1]. A fully resolved solution of the Navier-Stokes and transport equations which yields a detailed description of the flow properties, dispersion, interfaces of fluids, etc. however, is not practical for domains containing more than a few thousand grains, due to the huge computational effort that resolving such geometries would require. Through Probability Density Function (PDF) based methods, the velocity distribution in the pore space can facilitate the understanding and modelling of non-Fickian dispersion [2,3,4]. Our aim is to model the transition between non-Fickian and Fickian dispersion in a random sphere pack within the framework of a PDF based transport model proposed by Meyer and Tchelepi [5]. In addition to [5], we consider the effects of pore scale diffusion and formulate a different stochastic equation for the increments in velocity space from first principles. To assess the terms in this equation, we performed Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for solving the Navier-Stokes equation. We extracted the PDFs and statistical moments (up to the 4th moment) of velocity and first and second order velocity derivatives both independent and conditioned on velocity. This data enables us to quantify the fluxes in the velocity space. We observe that the components of velocity fluxes derived through the combination of the Taylor expansion and the Langevin equation, point to a drift and diffusion behavior in the velocity space.

  9. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Wong, G P; Hoffmann, D; Hurlimann, M D; Patz, S; Schwartz, L M; Walsworth, R L

    1999-10-18

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks. PMID:11543587

  10. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Wong, G. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Patz, S.; Schwartz, L. M.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks.

  11. MULTIGRID HOMOGENIZATION OF HETEROGENEOUS POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dendy, J.E.; Moulton, J.D.

    2000-10-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); this report, however, reports on only two years research, since this project was terminated at the end of two years in response to the reduction in funding for the LDRD Program at LANL. The numerical simulation of flow through heterogeneous porous media has become a vital tool in forecasting reservoir performance, analyzing groundwater supply and predicting the subsurface flow of contaminants. Consequently, the computational efficiency and accuracy of these simulations is paramount. However, the parameters of the underlying mathematical models (e.g., permeability, conductivity) typically exhibit severe variations over a range of significantly different length scales. Thus the numerical treatment of these problems relies on a homogenization or upscaling procedure to define an approximate coarse-scale problem that adequately captures the influence of the fine-scale structure, with a resultant compromise between the competing objectives of computational efficiency and numerical accuracy. For homogenization in models of flow through heterogeneous porous media, We have developed new, efficient, numerical, multilevel methods, that offer a significant improvement in the compromise between accuracy and efficiency. We recently combined this approach with the work of Dvorak to compute bounded estimates of the homogenized permeability for such flows and demonstrated the effectiveness of this new algorithm with numerical examples.

  12. Refractive Index Matching for Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging of Fluid Mixing in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, E. J.; Tigera, R. G.; Crimaldi, J. P.; Mays, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Research in porous media is often hampered by the difficulty in making pore-scale observations. By selecting porous media that is refractive index matched (RIM) to the pore fluid, the media becomes transparent. This allows optical imaging techniques such as static light scattering (SLS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal microscopy, and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) to be employed. RIM is particularly useful for research concerning contaminant remediation in the subsurface, permitting visual observation of plume dynamics at the pore scale. The goal of this research is to explore and assess candidate combinations of porous media, fluid, and fluorescent dye. The strengths and weaknesses of each combination will then be evaluated in terms of safety, cost, and optical quality in order to select the best combination for use with PLIF. Within this framework, top-ranked RIM combinations include Pyrex glass beads, water beads, or granular Nafion saturated in vegetable glycerin, deionized water, and an aqueous solution of 48% isopropanol, respectively. This research lays the groundwork for future efforts to build a flow chamber in which the selected RIM porous media, solution, and dye will be used in evaluating subsurface pumping strategies designed to impose chaotic plume spreading in porous media. Though the RIM porous media explored in this research are selected based on the specifications of a particular experiment, the methods developed for working with and evaluating RIM porous media should be of utility to a wide variety of research interests.

  13. Intermittent filtration of bacteria and colloids in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auset, Maria; Keller, Arturo A.; Brissaud, FrançOis; Lazarova, Valentina

    2005-09-01

    Intermittent filtration through porous media used for water and wastewater treatment can achieve high pathogen and colloid removal efficiencies. To predict the removal of bacteria, the effects of cyclic infiltration and draining events (transient unsaturated flow) were investigated. Using physical micromodels, we visualized the intermittent transport of bacteria and other colloids in unsaturated porous media. Column experiments provided quantitative measurements of the phenomena observed at the pore scale. Tagged Escherichia coli and a conservative tracer (NaI) were introduced in an initial pulse into a 1.5 m sand column. Subsequent hydraulic flushes without tagged bacteria or tracer were repeated every 4 hours for the next 4 days, during which outflow concentrations were monitored. Breakthrough behavior between colloids and dissolved tracer differed significantly, reflecting the differences in transport processes. Advancement of the wetting front remobilized bacteria which were held in thin water films, attached to the air-water interface (AWI), or entrapped in stagnant pore water between gas bubbles. In contrast, the tracer was only remobilized by diffusion from immobile to mobile water. Remobilization led to successive concentration peaks of bacteria and tracer in the effluent but with significant temporal differences. Observations at the pore-scale indicated that the colloids were essentially irreversibly attached to the solid-water interface, which explained to some extent the high removal efficiency of microbes in the porous media. Straining, cluster filtration, cell lysis, protozoa grazing, and bacteriophage parasitism could also contribute to the removal efficiency of bacteria.

  14. Simulations on porous media with nanofluids-initial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidan, D.; Alnaief, M.; Saghir, M. Ziad; Touma, R.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations of natural convection heat and mass transfer in a square cavity using Comsol Multiphysics 5.0 software are presented. The effective thermal conductivity of nanofluid in porous media is computed using glass beads as porous media. It is observed that the heat and mass transfer rate increases with the increase of temperature variation as well as nanoparticle volume concentration.

  15. A study of vapor-liquid flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Satik, Cengiz; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    1994-01-20

    We study the heat transfer-driven liquid-to-vapor phase change in single-component systems in porous media by using pore network models and flow visualization experiments. Experiments using glass micromodels were conducted. The flow visualization allowed us to define the rules for the numerical pore network model. A numerical pore network model is developed for vapor-liquid displacement where fluid flow, heat transfer and capillarity are included at the pore level. We examine the growth process at two different boundary conditions.

  16. Review of enhanced vapor diffusion in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.W.; Ho, C.K.

    1998-08-01

    Vapor diffusion in porous media in the presence of its own liquid has often been treated similar to gas diffusion. The gas diffusion rate in porous media is much lower than in free space due to the presence of the porous medium and any liquid present. However, enhanced vapor diffusion has also been postulated such that the diffusion rate may approach free-space values. Existing data and models for enhanced vapor diffusion, including those in TOUGH2, are reviewed in this paper.

  17. Humic acid transport in saturated porous media: influence of flow velocity and influent concentration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaorong; Shao, Mingan; Du, Lina; Horton, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the transport of humic acids (HAs) in porous media can provide important and practical evidence needed for accurate prediction of organic/inorganic contaminant transport in different environmental media and interfaces. A series of column transport experiments was conducted to evaluate the transport of HA in different porous media at different flow velocities and influent HA concentrations. Low flow velocity and influent concentration were found to favor the adsorption and deposition of HA onto sand grains packed into columns and to give higher equilibrium distribution coefficients and deposition rate coefficients, which resulted in an increased fraction of HA being retained in columns. Consequently, retardation factors were increased and the transport of HA through the columns was delayed. These results suggest that the transport of HA in porous media is primarily controlled by the attachment of HA to the solid matrix. Accordingly, this attachment should be considered in studies of HA behavior in porous media.

  18. Colloid facilitated transport of strongly sorbing contaminants in natural porous media: mathematical modeling and laboratory column experiments.

    PubMed

    Grolimund, Daniel; Borkovec, Michal

    2005-09-01

    Mobile colloidal particles may act as carriers of strongly sorbing contaminants in subsurface materials. Such colloid-facilitated transport can be induced by changes in salinity, similar to freshwater intrusion to a contaminated aquifer saturated with saltwater, or groundwater penetration into a contaminated site saturated with a dumpsite leachate. This process is studied for noncalcareous soil material with laboratory column experiments with sodium and calcium as major cations and with lead as a strongly sorbing model contaminant. The measured breakthrough curves of these elements were described with a mathematical transport model, which invokes release and deposition kinetics of the colloids, together with adsorption and desorption of the relevant ions to the solid matrix as well as to the suspended colloids. In particular, the specific coupling between colloid and solute transport is considered. The crux of a successful description of such colloidal transport processes is to capture the inhibition of the particle release by adsorbed divalent ions properly and explicitly to considerthe dependence of colloid release on the solution chemistry and the chemical conditions at the solid-liquid interface. Experiments and modeling address colloid-facilitated transport of lead out of a contaminated zone and through a noncontaminated zone, including effects of flow velocity and length of the noncontaminated zone. We finally show that colloid-facilitated transport can be suppressed by the injection of a suitably chosen solution of a calcium salt.

  19. Drying patterns of porous media containing wettability contrasts.

    PubMed

    Shokri, N; Or, D

    2013-02-01

    Porous media containing sharp wettability discontinuities may occur in natural systems due to depositional processes, accumulation of organic layers or modification of soil wettability following intense forest fires all of which are known to significantly modify water flow and transport processes. We studied evaporation from sand columns containing hydraulically-interacting domains with sharp wettability contrasts. We employed neutron transmission technique to map liquid phase dynamics during evaporation, and conducted laboratory experiments to evaluate evaporative fluxes affected by interactions across wettability contrast. We explained the preferential drying front displacement in the hydrophobic domain and the spatial extent of capillary flow supporting the vaporization plane using a physically-based model. The model provides description of observed liquid phase patterns and dynamics observed in neutron radiography measurements and evaporative fluxes from laboratory experiments. Our results provide new insights into evaporation induced capillary exchange and preferential liquid phase distribution during evaporation from hydraulically interacting vertical porous domains with differing wettability properties and offer opportunities for design of selectively drying of porous media in natural and engineered systems. PMID:23123032

  20. Drying patterns of porous media containing wettability contrasts.

    PubMed

    Shokri, N; Or, D

    2013-02-01

    Porous media containing sharp wettability discontinuities may occur in natural systems due to depositional processes, accumulation of organic layers or modification of soil wettability following intense forest fires all of which are known to significantly modify water flow and transport processes. We studied evaporation from sand columns containing hydraulically-interacting domains with sharp wettability contrasts. We employed neutron transmission technique to map liquid phase dynamics during evaporation, and conducted laboratory experiments to evaluate evaporative fluxes affected by interactions across wettability contrast. We explained the preferential drying front displacement in the hydrophobic domain and the spatial extent of capillary flow supporting the vaporization plane using a physically-based model. The model provides description of observed liquid phase patterns and dynamics observed in neutron radiography measurements and evaporative fluxes from laboratory experiments. Our results provide new insights into evaporation induced capillary exchange and preferential liquid phase distribution during evaporation from hydraulically interacting vertical porous domains with differing wettability properties and offer opportunities for design of selectively drying of porous media in natural and engineered systems.

  1. Numerical investigation of nanoparticles transport in anisotropic porous media.

    PubMed

    Salama, Amgad; Negara, Ardiansyah; El Amin, Mohamed; Sun, Shuyu

    2015-10-01

    In this work the problem related to the transport of nanoparticles in anisotropic porous media is investigated numerically using the multipoint flux approximation. Anisotropy of porous media properties is an essential feature that exists almost everywhere in subsurface formations. In anisotropic media, the flux and the pressure gradient vectors are no longer collinear and therefore interesting patterns emerge. The transport of nanoparticles in subsurface formations is affected by several complex processes including surface charges, heterogeneity of nanoparticles and soil grain collectors, interfacial dynamics of double-layer and many others. We use the framework of the theory of filtration in this investigation. Processes like particles deposition, entrapment, as well as detachment are accounted for. From the numerical methods point of view, traditional two-point flux finite difference approximation cannot handle anisotropy of media properties. Therefore, in this work we use the multipoint flux approximation (MPFA). In this technique, the flux components are affected by more neighboring points as opposed to the mere two points that are usually used in traditional finite volume methods. We also use the experimenting pressure field approach which automatically constructs the global system of equations by solving multitude of local problems. This approach facilitates to a large extent the construction of the global system. A set of numerical examples is considered involving two-dimensional rectangular domain. A source of nanoparticles is inserted in the middle of the anisotropic layer. We investigate the effects of both anisotropy angle and anisotropy ratio on the transport of nanoparticles in saturated porous media. It is found that the concentration plume and porosity contours follow closely the principal direction of anisotropy of permeability of the central domain.

  2. Numerical investigation of nanoparticles transport in anisotropic porous media.

    PubMed

    Salama, Amgad; Negara, Ardiansyah; El Amin, Mohamed; Sun, Shuyu

    2015-10-01

    In this work the problem related to the transport of nanoparticles in anisotropic porous media is investigated numerically using the multipoint flux approximation. Anisotropy of porous media properties is an essential feature that exists almost everywhere in subsurface formations. In anisotropic media, the flux and the pressure gradient vectors are no longer collinear and therefore interesting patterns emerge. The transport of nanoparticles in subsurface formations is affected by several complex processes including surface charges, heterogeneity of nanoparticles and soil grain collectors, interfacial dynamics of double-layer and many others. We use the framework of the theory of filtration in this investigation. Processes like particles deposition, entrapment, as well as detachment are accounted for. From the numerical methods point of view, traditional two-point flux finite difference approximation cannot handle anisotropy of media properties. Therefore, in this work we use the multipoint flux approximation (MPFA). In this technique, the flux components are affected by more neighboring points as opposed to the mere two points that are usually used in traditional finite volume methods. We also use the experimenting pressure field approach which automatically constructs the global system of equations by solving multitude of local problems. This approach facilitates to a large extent the construction of the global system. A set of numerical examples is considered involving two-dimensional rectangular domain. A source of nanoparticles is inserted in the middle of the anisotropic layer. We investigate the effects of both anisotropy angle and anisotropy ratio on the transport of nanoparticles in saturated porous media. It is found that the concentration plume and porosity contours follow closely the principal direction of anisotropy of permeability of the central domain. PMID:26212784

  3. Comparison of three labeled silica nanoparticles used as tracers in transport experiments in porous media. Part I: syntheses and characterizations.

    PubMed

    Vitorge, Elsa; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Martins, Jean M F; Barthès, Véronique; Auger, Aurélien; Renard, Oliver; Gaudet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis and the characterization of three kinds of labeled silica nanoparticles were performed. Three different labeling strategies were investigated: fluorescent organic molecule (FITC) embedded in silica matrix, heavy metal core (Ag(0)) and radioactive core ((110m)Ag) surrounded by a silica shell. The main properties and the suitability of each kind of labeled nanoparticle in terms of size, surface properties, stability, detection limits, and cost were determined and compared regarding its use for transport studies. Fluorescent labeling was found the most convenient and the cheapest, but the best detection limits were reached with chemical (Ag(0)) and radio-labeled ((110m)Ag) nanoparticles, which also allowed nondestructive quantifications. This work showed that the choice of labeled nanoparticles as surrogates of natural colloids or manufactured nanoparticles strongly depends on the experimental conditions, especially the concentration and amount required, the composition of the effluent, and the timescale of the experiment.

  4. Utilization of Porous Media for Condensing Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George C.

    2006-01-01

    The use of porous media as a mean of separating liquid condensate from the air stream in condensing heat exchangers has been explored in the past inside small plant growth chambers and in the Apollo Command Module. Both applications used a cooled porous media made of sintered stainless steel to cool and separate condensation from the air stream. However, the main issues with the utilization of porous media in the past have been the deterioration of the porous media over long duration, such as clogging and changes in surface wetting characteristics. In addition, for long duration usage, biofilm growth from microorganisms on the porous medial would also be an issue. In developing Porous Media Condensing Heat Exchangers (PMCHX) for future space applications, different porous materials and microbial growth control methods will need to be explored. This paper explores the work performed at JSC and GRC to evaluate different porous materials and microbial control methods to support the development of a Porous Media Condensing Heat Exchanger. It outlines the basic principles for designing a PMCHX and issues that were encountered and ways to resolve those issues. The PMCHX has potential of mass, volume, and power savings over current CHX and water separator technology and would be beneficial for long duration space missions.

  5. Helical swimming in viscoelastic and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Many bacteria swim by rotating helical flagella. These cells often live in polymer suspensions, which are viscoelastic. Recently there have been several theoretical and experimental studies showing that viscoelasticity can either enhance or suppress propulsion, depending on the details of the microswimmer. To help clarify this situation, we study experimentally the motility of the flagellum using a scaled-up model system - a motorized helical coil that rotates along its axial direction. A free-swimming speed is obtained when the net force on the helix is zero. When the helix is immersed in a viscoelastic (Boger) fluid, we find an increase in the force-free swimming speed as compared with the Newtonian case. The enhancement is maximized at a Deborah number of approximately one, and the magnitude depends not only on the elasticity of the fluid but also on the geometry of the helix. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss how spatial confinements, such as a porous medium, affect the flagellated swimming. For clarity, the porous media are modeled as cylindrical cavities with solid walls. A modified boundary element method allows us to investigate a situation that the helical flagella are very close to the wall, with high spatial resolution and relatively low computational cost. To our surprise, at fixed power consumption, a highly coiled flagellum swims faster in narrower confinements, while an elongated flagellum swims faster in a cavity with a wider opening. We try understanding these effects with simple physical pictures.

  6. Mechanics of fluids in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Jacob; Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz

    Transport of quantities such as mass component of a phase and/or heat occurs in fields as diversified as petroleum reservoir engineering, groundwater hydraulics, soil mechanics, industrial filtration, water purification, wastewater treatment, soil drainage and irrigation, and geothermal energy production. In all these areas, scientists, engineers, and planners make use of mathematical models; these models describe the relevant transport processes that occur within controlled porous medium domains and enable forecasting of the future behavior of these domains in response to planned activities. The mathematical models, in turn, are based on the understanding of phenomena, often within the void space, and on theories that relate these phenomena to measurable quantities.Because of the pressing needs in areas of practical interest such as the development of groundwater energy storage and geothermal energy production, a vast amount of research in all these fields has contributed, especially in the last two decades, to our understanding and ability to describe transport phenomena in porous media. In recent years these research efforts have been significantly accelerated, attracting scientists from many disciplines. The practical needs of solving boundary value problems in heterogeneous domains, irregular boundaries, coupled phenomena and multiple dependent variables led to the development of a variety of powerful numerical techniques. The realization that fields are highly heterogeneous and that the degree of heterogeneity depends on the scale of the problem led to the introduction of stochastic concepts as an additional tool for the description of phenomena.

  7. Macroscopic properties of fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thovert, J.; Mourzenko, V. V.; Adler, P. M.

    2007-12-01

    The determination of the local fields in fractured porous media is a challenging problem, because of the multiple scales that are involved and of the possible nonlinearity of the governing equations. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overall view of the numerical technique which has been used to solve numerous problems. It is based on a three-dimensional discrete description of the fracture network and of the embedding matrix. Any fracture network geometry, any type of boundary condition, and any distribution of the fracture and matrix properties can be addressed, without simplifying approximations. The first step is to mesh the fracture network as it is by triangles of a controlled size. This meshing by an advancing front technique is done successively for each fracture and the intersections between fractures are taken into account. Then, the space in between the fractures is meshed by tetrahedra by the advancing front technique again. The faces of the tetrahedra which are in contact with fractures, coincide with the corresponding triangles in these fractures. The performances of these meshing codes will be illustrated by a few examples. The second step consists in discretizing the conservation equations by the finite volume technique. Specific properties are given to each fracture such as a surface permeability or a joint rigidity. This general technique has been applied to the basic and most important properties of fracture networks and of fractured porous media (1). These properties are single and two phase flows, wether they are accompagnied or not by dispersion of a solute and mechanical properties possibly coupled with flow. These applications will be briefly illustrated by some examples, including when possible comparison with real data. Ref: (1) P.M. Adler, V.V. Mourzenko, J.-F. Thovert, I. Bogdanov, in Dynamics of fluids and transport in fractured rock, ed. B. Faybishenko, Geophysical Monograph Series, 162, 33, 2005.

  8. Anomalous dynamics of capillary rise in porous media.

    PubMed

    Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D; Sprittles, James E

    2012-07-01

    The anomalous dynamics of capillary rise in a porous medium discovered experimentally more than a decade ago [T. Delker et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2902 (1996)] is described. The developed theory is based on considering the principal modes of motion of the menisci that collectively form the wetting front on the Darcy scale. These modes, which include (i) dynamic wetting mode, (ii) threshold mode, and (iii) interface depinning process, are incorporated into the boundary conditions for the bulk equations formulated in the regular framework of continuum mechanics of porous media, thus allowing one to consider a general case of three-dimensional flows. The developed theory makes it possible to describe all regimes observed in the experiment, with the time spanning more than four orders of magnitude, and highlights the dominant physical mechanisms at different stages of the process.

  9. Modeling Multi-process Transport of Pathogens in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2004-12-01

    The transport behavior of microorganisms in porous media is of interest with regard to the fate of pathogens associated with wastewater recharge, riverbank filtration, and land application of biosolids. This interest has fomented research on the transport of pathogens in the subsurface environment. The factors influencing pathogen transport within the subsurface environment include advection, dispersion, filtration, and inactivation. The filtration process, which mediates the magnitude and rate of pathogen retention, comprises several mechanisms such as attachment to porous-medium surfaces, straining, and sedimentation. We present a mathematical model wherein individual filtration mechanisms are explicitly incorporated along with advection, dispersion, and inactivation. The performance of the model is evaluated by applying it to several data sets obtained from miscible-displacement experiments conducted using various pathogens. Input parameters are obtained to the extent possible from independent means.

  10. Multiphase flow and transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1989-08-01

    Multiphase flow and transport of compositionally complex fluids in geologic media is of importance in a number of applied problems which have major social and economic effects. In petroleum reservoir engineering, efficient recovery of energy reserves is the principal goal. Unfortunately, some of these hydrocarbons and other organic chemicals often find their way unwanted into the soils and groundwater supplies. Removal in the latter case is predicated on ensuring the public health and safety. In this paper, principles of modeling fluid flow in systems containing up to three fluid phases (namely, water, air, and organic liquid) are described. Solution of the governing equations for multiphase flow requires knowledge of functional relationships between fluid pressures, saturations, and permeabilities which may be formulated on the basis of conceptual models of fluid-porous media interactions. Mechanisms of transport in multicomponent multiphase systems in which species may partition between phases are also described, and the governing equations are presented for the case in which local phase equilibrium may be assumed. A number of hypothetical numerical problems are presented to illustrate the physical behavior of systems in which multiphase flow and transport arise.

  11. Influences of environmental factors on bacterial extracellular polymeric substances production in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lu; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Xin, Jia; Peng, Tao

    2014-11-01

    Bioclogging of natural porous media occurs frequently under a wide range of conditions. It may influence the performance of permeable reactive barrier and constructed wetland. It is also one of the factors that determine the effect of artificial groundwater recharge and in situ bioremediation process. In this study, a series of percolation column experiments were conducted to simulate bioclogging process in porous media. The predominant bacteria in porous media which induced clogging were identified to be Methylobacterium, Janthinobacterium, Yersinia, Staphylococcus and Acidovorax, most of which had been shown to effectively produce viscous extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The column in which EPS production was maximized also coincided with the largest reduction in saturated hydraulic conductivity of porous media. In addition, carbon concentration was the most significant factor to affect polysaccharide, protein and EPS secretion, followed by phosphorus concentration and temperature. The coupled effect of carbon and phosphorus concentration was also very important to stimulate polysaccharide and EPS production.

  12. Effect of Bacterial Motility on Contaminant Mixing in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Olson, M. S.; Bioremediation At Drexel

    2010-12-01

    Groundwater flow is typically characterized by laminar flow and therefore contaminant mixing limited conditions prevail in subsurface environments. The presence of porous media introduces tortuosity to groundwater flow paths, thereby enhancing contaminant mixing. In addition, bacterial motility is reported to induce movement in their surrounding liquid, which may enhance contaminant mixing. Enhancement of chemical diffusion coefficients in bulk fluid due to bacterial random motility and chemotaxis has been already reported in literature. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of bacterial motility on contaminant mixing in the presence of porous media. A microfluidic device was designed and fabricated using standard photolithography and soft-lithography techniques to simulate a contaminant plume in subsurface porous media due to leakage of an underground storage tank. A non-reactive conservative tracer, Dextran solution labeled with FITC (fluorescein isothiocyanate), was used as surrogate for the contaminant and the motile bacterial strain Escherichia coli HCB33 (wild type) was used for the experiments to enhance contaminant mixing. Images were obtained at various cross-sections along the device and fluorescence intensity profile distributions were analyzed to determine the transverse dispersion of the contaminant. Enhancement in contaminant mixing was assessed by comparing the contaminant transverse dispersion coefficients (Dyi) in porous media in presence of motile bacteria, immobilized bacteria, and with no bacteria. In order to quantify the contaminant dispersion coefficients under the various test conditions, experimental data obtained were fitted to concentration profiles predicted by the contaminant advection-dispersion equation for the given experimental conditions (Figure 1). The transverse dispersion coefficient values obtained in the presence of motile bacteria (Dymb)and with no bacteria (Dynb) were 2.49 x 10-4 cm2/s and 1.39 x 10-4 cm2/s

  13. Fractal Analysis of Stress Sensitivity of Permeability in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiao-Hua; Li, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Jian-Yi; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Cai, Jianchao

    2015-12-01

    A permeability model for porous media considering the stress sensitivity is derived based on mechanics of materials and the fractal characteristics of solid cluster size distribution. The permeability of porous media considering the stress sensitivity is related to solid cluster fractal dimension, solid cluster fractal tortuosity dimension, solid cluster minimum diameter and solid cluster maximum diameter, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, as well as power index. Every parameter has clear physical meaning without the use of empirical constants. The model predictions of permeability show good agreement with those obtained by the available experimental expression. The proposed model may be conducible to a better understanding of the mechanism for flow in elastic porous media.

  14. Combined Evaporation and Salt Precipitation in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, N.; Dragila, M. I.; Nachshon, U.; Or, D.; Shaharani, E.; Grader, A.

    2012-12-01

    The vadose zone pore water contains dissolved salts and minerals; therefore, evaporation results in high rates of salt accumulation that may change the physical and chemical properties of the porous media. Here, a series of experiments, together with a mathematical model, are presented to shed new light on these processes. Experiments included: (1) long-term column evaporation experiments to quantify changes in evaporation rates due to salt precipitation; (2) CT scans of evaporated porous media samples saturated with salt solutions, to observe salt precipitation from micro to macro scales; and (3) Infrared thermography analysis to quantify evaporation rates from porous media surfaces for homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions and constant water table, in the presence of salt precipitation. As expected, the majority of salt crystallization occurs in the upper parts of the matrix, near the evaporation front. For heterogeneous porous matrices, salt precipitation will occur mainly in the fine pore regions as preferential evaporation takes place in these locations. In addition, it was found that the precipitated NaCl salt crust diffusion coefficient for water vapor is one to two orders of magnitude lower than the vapor diffusion coefficient in free air, depending on environmental conditions and salt crystallization rates. Three new stages of evaporation were defined for saline solutions: SS1, SS2 and SS3. SS1 exhibits a low and gradual decrease in the evaporation rate due to osmotic pressure. During SS2, the evaporation rate falls progressively due to salt precipitation; SS3 is characterized by a constant low evaporation rate and determined by the diffusion rate of water vapor through the precipitated salt layer. Even though phenomenologically similar to the classical evaporation stages of pure water, these stages correspond to different mechanisms and the transition between stages can occur regardless the hydraulic conditions. As well, it was shown that matrix

  15. Random walk calculations for bacterial migration in porous media.

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, K J; Cummings, P T; Ford, R M

    1995-01-01

    Bacterial migration is important in understanding many practical problems ranging from disease pathogenesis to the bioremediation of hazardous waste in the environment. Our laboratory has been successful in quantifying bacterial migration in fluid media through experiment and the use of population balance equations and cellular level simulations that incorporate parameters based on a fundamental description of the microscopic motion of bacteria. The present work is part of an effort to extend these results to bacterial migration in porous media. Random walk algorithms have been used successfully to date in nonbiological contexts to obtain the diffusion coefficient for disordered continuum problems. This approach has been used here to describe bacterial motility. We have generated model porous media using molecular dynamics simulations applied to a fluid with equal sized spheres. The porosity is varied by allowing different degrees of sphere overlap. A random walk algorithm is applied to simulate bacterial migration, and the Einstein relation is used to calculate the effective bacterial diffusion coefficient. The tortuosity as a function of particle size is calculated and compared with available experimental results of migration of Pseudomonas putida in sand columns. Tortuosity increases with decreasing obstacle diameter, which is in agreement with the experimental results. PMID:7756547

  16. Modeling imbibition of liquids into rigid and swelling porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoodi, Reza

    In porous media studies, imbibition is the spontaneous movement of a liquid into a porous medium under the influence of capillary forces. It is also known by the name wicking, and can sometimes be aided by an external pressure, as in the case of forced infiltration of liquid polymers into a bed of fibermats. In this study, the imbibition of liquids into porous media in important engineering applications is studied. A relatively new approach of using the single-phase flow behind a clearly-defined liquid front in a porous medium has been adopted in this work to model imbibition or wicking. Such an approach employs Darcy's law in conjunction with the continuity equation to model the liquid flow behind the front. First the modeling of liquid flow in polymer wicks is undertaken. A new formula to predict the capillary suction-pressure at the liquid fronts in commercial wicks made of sintering the polymer beads was proposed. Later, a more general formula was derived and verified for estimating the capillary suction pressure in any kind of porous substance. We compared the performance of the proposed Darcy's-law based approach with that of the Lucas-Washburn equation; some new methods were suggested to improve the accuracy of these two dominant methods for modeling the liquid transport in aforementioned wicks. Our Darcy's law based modeling approach is superior to the previous Washburn Equation based approaches as the former can be easily extended to 2-D and 3-D unlike the latter. The 3-D liquid flow in the wicks was studied numerically using PORE-FLOW(c), an in-house computer program to model porous-media flows. For the first time, the finite element/control volume (FE/CV) algorithm is employed to solve the moving- boundary problem encountered in wicking. A good validation is achieved against the 1-D wicking-flow analytical solution as well as a 3-D wicking experiment involving a wick with two different cross-sections. A special case of wicking, in which both the external

  17. Physical Properties of Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, T. E.; Schmitt, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of fractures on the physical properties of porous media is of considerable interest to oil and gas exploration as well as enhanced geothermal systems and carbon capture and storage. This work represents an attempt to study the effect fractures have on multiple physical properties of rocks. An experimental technique to make simultaneous electric and ultrasonic measurements on cylindrical core plugs is developed. Aluminum end caps are mounted with ultrasonic transducers to transmit pules along the axis of the cylinder while non-polarizing electrodes are mounted on the sides of the core to make complex conductivity measurements perpendicular to the cylinder axis. Electrical measurements are made by applying a sinusoidal voltage across the measurement circuit that consist of a resister and the sample in series. The magnitude and phase of the signal across the sample is recorded relative to the input signal across a range of frequencies. Synthetic rock analogs are constructed using sintered glass beads with fractures imbedded in them. The fracture location, size and orientation are controlled and each fractured specimen has an unfractured counterpart. Porosity, Permeability, electrical conductivity and ultrasonic velocity measurements are conducted on each sample with the complex electrical conductivities recorded at frequencies from 10hz to 1 Mhz. These measurements allow us to examine the changes induced by these mesoscale fractures on the embedding porous medium. Of particular interest is the effect of fracture orientation on electrical conductivity of the rock. Seismic anisotropy caused by fractures is a well understood phenomenon with many rock physics models dedicated to its understanding. The effect of fractures on electrical conductivity is less well understood with electrical anisotropy scarcely investigated in the literature. None the less, using electrical conductivity to characterize fractures can add an extra constraint to characterization based

  18. Foam Flows in Analog Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; Géraud, B.; Jones, S. A.; Cantat, I.; Dollet, B.

    2015-12-01

    Foams have been used for decades as displacing fluids for EOR and aquifer remediation, and more recently as carriers of chemical amendments for the remediation of the vadose zone. Apart from various interesting physico-chemical and biochemical properties, foams are better injection fluids due to their low sensitivity to gravity and their peculiar rheology: for foams with bubbles on the order of at least the typical pore size, viscous dissipation arises mostly from the contact zones between the soap films and the walls. In most experimental studies no local information of the foam structure is possible, and only global quantities such as the effective viscosity can be measured. We investigate foam flow through a two-dimensional porous medium consisting of circular obstacles positioned randomly in a horizontal transparent Hele-Shaw cell. The local foam structure is recorded in situ, which provides a measure of the spatial distribution of bubble velocities and sizes at regular time intervals. The flow exhibits a rich phenomenology including preferential flow paths and local flow intermittency/non-stationarity despite the imposed permanent global flow rate. Moreover, the medium selects the bubble size distribution through lamella division-triggered bubble fragmentation. Varying the mean bubble size of the injected foam, its water content, and mean velocity, we characterize those processes systematically and show that the distributions of bubble sizes and velocities are to some extent correlated. We furthermore measure the evolution, along the flow direction, of the distribution of bubble sizes, and measure the efficiency of bubble fragmentation as a function of the control parameters. The bubble fragmentation can be modeled numerically and to some extent analytically, based on statistical measures inferred from the experimental data. This study sheds new light on the local rheology of foams in porous media and opens the way towards quantitative characterization of the

  19. Determination of the Darcy permeability of porous media including sintered metal plugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Hepler, W. A.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Feng, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Sintered-metal porous plugs with a normal size of the order of 1-10 microns are used to evaluate the Darcy permeability of laminar flow at very small velocities in laminar fluids. Porous media experiment results and data adduced from the literature are noted to support the Darcy law analog for normal fluid convection in the laminar regime. Low temperature results suggest the importance of collecting room temperature data prior to runs at liquid He(4) temperatures. The characteristic length diagram gives a useful picture of the tolerance range encountered with a particular class of porous media.

  20. Experimentally Determined Interfacial Area Between Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, J; Hassanizadeh, S.M; Smith, Duane

    2008-01-01

    When multiple fluids flow through a porous medium, the interaction between the fluid interfaces can be of great importance. While this is widely recognized in practical applications, numerical models often disregard interactios between discrete fluid phases due to the computational complexity. And rightly so, for this level of detail is well beyond most extended Darcy Law relationships. A new model of two-phase flow including the interfacial area has been proposed by Hassarizadeh and Gray based upon thermodynamic principles. A version of this general equation set has been implemented by Nessner and Hassarizadeh. Many of the interfacial parameters required by this equation set have never been determined from experiments. The work presented here is a description of how the interfacial area, capillary pressure, interfacial velocity and interfacial permeability from two-phase flow experiments in porous media experiments can be used to determine the required parameters. This work, while on-going, has shown the possibility of digitizing images within translucent porous media and identifying the location and behavior of interfaces under dynamic conditions. Using the described methods experimentally derived interfacial functions to be used in larger scale simulations are currently being developed. In summary, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) by mapping a pore-throat geometry onto an image of immiscible fluid flow, the saturation of fluids and the individual interfaces between the fluids can be identified; (2) the resulting saturation profiles of the low velocity drainage flows used in this study are well described by an invasion percolation fractal scaling; (3) the interfacial area between fluids has been observed to increase in a linear fashion during the initial invasion of the non-wetting fluid; and (4) the average capillary pressure within the entire cell and representative elemental volumes were observed to plateau after a small portion of the volume was

  1. Perspectives on Porous Media MR in Clinical MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmund, E. E.

    2011-03-01

    Many goals and challenges of research in natural or synthetic porous media are mirrored in quantitative medical MRI. This review will describe examples where MR techniques used in porous media (particularly diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)) are applied to physiological pathologies. Tissue microstructure is one area with great overlap with porous media science. Diffusion-weighting (esp. in neurological tissue) has motivated models with explicit physical dimensions, statistical parameters, empirical descriptors, or hybrids thereof. Another clinically relevant microscopic process is active flow. Renal (kidney) tissue possesses significant active vascular / tubular transport that manifests as "pseudodiffusion." Cancerous lesions involve anomalies in both structure and flow. The tools of magnetic resonance and their interpretation in porous media has had great impact on clinical MRI, and continued cross-fertilization of ideas can only enhance the progress of both fields.

  2. Evaluation of liquid aerosol transport through porous media.

    PubMed

    Hall, R; Murdoch, L; Falta, R; Looney, B; Riha, B

    2016-07-01

    Application of remediation methods in contaminated vadose zones has been hindered by an inability to effectively distribute liquid- or solid-phase amendments. Injection as aerosols in a carrier gas could be a viable method for achieving useful distributions of amendments in unsaturated materials. The objectives of this work were to characterize radial transport of aerosols in unsaturated porous media, and to develop capabilities for predicting results of aerosol injection scenarios at the field-scale. Transport processes were investigated by conducting lab-scale injection experiments with radial flow geometry, and predictive capabilities were obtained by developing and validating a numerical model for simulating coupled aerosol transport, deposition, and multi-phase flow in porous media. Soybean oil was transported more than 2m through sand by injecting it as micron-scale aerosol droplets. Oil saturation in the sand increased with time to a maximum of 0.25, and decreased with radial distance in the experiments. The numerical analysis predicted the distribution of oil saturation with only minor calibration. The results indicated that evolution of oil saturation was controlled by aerosol deposition and subsequent flow of the liquid oil, and simulation requires including these two coupled processes. The calibrated model was used to evaluate field applications. The results suggest that amendments can be delivered to the vadose zone as aerosols, and that gas injection rate and aerosol particle size will be important controls on the process.

  3. Mobility of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Liu, X.; Petersen, E.; Huang, Q.; Anderson, L.

    2007-12-01

    Engineered multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are the subject of intense research and are expected to gain widespread usage in a broad variety of commercial products. However concerns have been raised regarding their potential environmental and health risks. The mobility of MWCNTs in porous media is examined in this study through one dimensional flow-through column experiments under conditions representative of subsurface and drinking water treatment systems. The goal of this work was to determine dominant MWCNT removal mechanisms and factors that control MWCNT transport. Results demonstrate that pore water velocity strongly influenced MWCNT transport, a result that stands in contrast to traditional colloid filtration theory, which suggests a relatively minor effect of flow velocity in comparison to Brownian diffusion. Experiments conducted at different ionic strengths indicate that both particle deposition and straining are important MWCNT removal mechanisms from the aqueous phase. Given these findings, traditional colloid filtration theory may not be appropriate for the prediction of MWCNT mobility in porous media. This may be due to the large aspect ratio of the MWCNTs and the importance of straining in MWCNT removal.

  4. Evaluation of liquid aerosol transport through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R.; Murdoch, L.; Falta, R.; Looney, B.; Riha, B.

    2016-07-01

    Application of remediation methods in contaminated vadose zones has been hindered by an inability to effectively distribute liquid- or solid-phase amendments. Injection as aerosols in a carrier gas could be a viable method for achieving useful distributions of amendments in unsaturated materials. The objectives of this work were to characterize radial transport of aerosols in unsaturated porous media, and to develop capabilities for predicting results of aerosol injection scenarios at the field-scale. Transport processes were investigated by conducting lab-scale injection experiments with radial flow geometry, and predictive capabilities were obtained by developing and validating a numerical model for simulating coupled aerosol transport, deposition, and multi-phase flow in porous media. Soybean oil was transported more than 2 m through sand by injecting it as micron-scale aerosol droplets. Oil saturation in the sand increased with time to a maximum of 0.25, and decreased with radial distance in the experiments. The numerical analysis predicted the distribution of oil saturation with only minor calibration. The results indicated that evolution of oil saturation was controlled by aerosol deposition and subsequent flow of the liquid oil, and simulation requires including these two coupled processes. The calibrated model was used to evaluate field applications. The results suggest that amendments can be delivered to the vadose zone as aerosols, and that gas injection rate and aerosol particle size will be important controls on the process.

  5. Parametric study of boiling heat transfer in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, B.; Jones, B.G.; Pan, C.

    1996-04-01

    Detailed numerical modeling and parametric variation studies were conducted on boiling heat transfer processes in porous deposits with emphasis on applications associated with light water nuclear power reactor systems. The processes of boiling heat transfer in the porous corrosion deposits typically involve phase changes in finite volumetric regions in the porous media. The study examined such processes in two porous media configurations, without chimneys (homogeneous porous structures) and with chimneys (heterogeneous porous structures). A 1-D model and a 2-D model were developed to simulate two-phase flows with phase changes, without dry-out, inside the porous media for both structural configurations. For closure of the governing equations, an empirical correlation of the evaporation rate for phase changes inside the porous media was introduced. In addition, numerical algorithms were developed to solve the coupled nonlinear equations of mass, momentum, energy, capillary pressure, and evaporation rate. The distributions of temperature, thermodynamic saturation, liquid pressure, vapor pressure, liquid velocity, and vapor velocity were predicted. Furthermore, the effects of heat flux, system pressure, porosity, particle diameter, chimney population density, chimney radius, and crud thickness on the all superheat, critical heat flux, and minimum saturation were examined. The predictions were found to be in good agreement with the available experimental results.

  6. Statistical mechanics of unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Louge, Michel Y

    2015-12-01

    We explore a mean-field theory of fluid imbibition and drainage through permeable porous solids. In the limit of vanishing inertial and viscous forces, the theory predicts the hysteretic "retention curves" relating the capillary pressure applied across a connected domain to its degree of saturation in wetting fluid in terms of known surface energies and void space geometry. To avoid complicated calculations, we adopt the simplest statistical mechanics, in which a pore interacts with its neighbors through narrow openings called "necks," while being either full or empty of wetting fluid. We show how the main retention curves can be calculated from the statistical distribution of two dimensionless parameters λ and α measuring the specific areas of, respectively, neck cross section and wettable pore surface relative to pore volume. The theory attributes hysteresis of these curves to collective first-order phase transitions. We illustrate predictions with a porous domain consisting of a random packing of spheres, show that hysteresis strength grows with λ and weakens as the distribution of α broadens, and reproduce the behavior of Haines jumps observed in recent experiments on an ordered pore network.

  7. Statistical mechanics of unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Louge, Michel Y.

    2015-12-01

    We explore a mean-field theory of fluid imbibition and drainage through permeable porous solids. In the limit of vanishing inertial and viscous forces, the theory predicts the hysteretic "retention curves" relating the capillary pressure applied across a connected domain to its degree of saturation in wetting fluid in terms of known surface energies and void space geometry. To avoid complicated calculations, we adopt the simplest statistical mechanics, in which a pore interacts with its neighbors through narrow openings called "necks," while being either full or empty of wetting fluid. We show how the main retention curves can be calculated from the statistical distribution of two dimensionless parameters λ and α measuring the specific areas of, respectively, neck cross section and wettable pore surface relative to pore volume. The theory attributes hysteresis of these curves to collective first-order phase transitions. We illustrate predictions with a porous domain consisting of a random packing of spheres, show that hysteresis strength grows with λ and weakens as the distribution of α broadens, and reproduce the behavior of Haines jumps observed in recent experiments on an ordered pore network.

  8. Statistical mechanics of unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Louge, Michel Y

    2015-12-01

    We explore a mean-field theory of fluid imbibition and drainage through permeable porous solids. In the limit of vanishing inertial and viscous forces, the theory predicts the hysteretic "retention curves" relating the capillary pressure applied across a connected domain to its degree of saturation in wetting fluid in terms of known surface energies and void space geometry. To avoid complicated calculations, we adopt the simplest statistical mechanics, in which a pore interacts with its neighbors through narrow openings called "necks," while being either full or empty of wetting fluid. We show how the main retention curves can be calculated from the statistical distribution of two dimensionless parameters λ and α measuring the specific areas of, respectively, neck cross section and wettable pore surface relative to pore volume. The theory attributes hysteresis of these curves to collective first-order phase transitions. We illustrate predictions with a porous domain consisting of a random packing of spheres, show that hysteresis strength grows with λ and weakens as the distribution of α broadens, and reproduce the behavior of Haines jumps observed in recent experiments on an ordered pore network. PMID:26764701

  9. Effect of sequential release of NAPLs on NAPL migration in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Woohui; Yeo, In Wook

    2016-04-01

    NAPLs (Non-aqueous phase liquids) are common groundwater contaminants and are classified as LNAPLs (Light non-aqueous phase liquids) and DNAPLs (Dense non-aqueous phase liquids) according to relative density for water. Due to their low solubility in water, NAPLs remain for a long time in groundwater, and they pose a serious environmental problem. Therefore, understanding NAPLs migration in porous media is essential for effective NAPLs remediation. DNAPLs tend to move downward through the water table by gravity force because its density is higher than water. However, if DNAPLs do not have sufficient energy which breaks capillary force of porous media, they will just accumulate above capillary zone or water table. Mobile phase of LNAPLs rises and falls depending on fluctuation of water table, and it could change the wettability of porous media from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This could impacts on the migration characteristics of subsequently-released DNAPLs. LNAPLs and DNAPLs are sometime disposed at the same place (for example, the Hill air force base, USA). Therefore, this study focuses on the effect of sequential release of NAPLs on NAPLs (in particular, DNAPL) migration in porous media. We have conducted laboratory experiments. Gasoline, which is known to change wettability of porous media from hydrophilic to intermediate, and TCE (Trichloroethylene) were used as LNAPL and DNAPL, respectively. Glass beads with the grain size of 1 mm and 2 mm were prepared for two sets of porous media. Gasoline and TCE was dyed for visualization. First, respective LNAPL and DNAPL of 10 ml were separately released into prepared porous media. For the grain size of 2 mm glass beads, LNAPL became buoyant above the water table, and DNAPL just moved downward through porous media. However, for the experiment with the grain size of 1 mm glass beads, NAPLs behaved very differently. DNAPL did not migrate downward below and just remained above the water table due to capillary pressure of

  10. Characterization of an impinging jet into porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Alhani, Salwan; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    In this work, characteristic behavior of a liquid jet into porous hydrophobic / hydrophilic particle media is investigated. In porous media, the capillary effect becomes significant, especially when the jet Reynolds Number is low. To analyze the cavity creation phenomena, the effect of jet's diameter, speed and acceleration as well as particles' size are carefully studied. Such knowledge of fluid behavior will provide guidance for medicine injection process. This work is supported by Caltech GALCIT STEM program.

  11. Porous Media Approach for Modeling Closed Cell Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2006-01-01

    In order to minimize boil off of the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen and to prevent the formation of ice on its exterior surface, the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) is insulated using various low-density, closed-cell polymeric foams. Improved analysis methods for these foam materials are needed to predict the foam structural response and to help identify the foam fracture behavior in order to help minimize foam shedding occurrences. This presentation describes a continuum based approach to modeling the foam thermo-mechanical behavior that accounts for the cellular nature of the material and explicitly addresses the effect of the internal cell gas pressure. A porous media approach is implemented in a finite element frame work to model the mechanical behavior of the closed cell foam. The ABAQUS general purpose finite element program is used to simulate the continuum behavior of the foam. The soil mechanics element is implemented to account for the cell internal pressure and its effect on the stress and strain fields. The pressure variation inside the closed cells is calculated using the ideal gas laws. The soil mechanics element is compatible with an orthotropic materials model to capture the different behavior between the rise and in-plane directions of the foam. The porous media approach is applied to model the foam thermal strain and calculate the foam effective coefficient of thermal expansion. The calculated foam coefficients of thermal expansion were able to simulate the measured thermal strain during heat up from cryogenic temperature to room temperature in vacuum. The porous media approach was applied to an insulated substrate with one inch foam and compared to a simple elastic solution without pore pressure. The porous media approach is also applied to model the foam mechanical behavior during subscale laboratory experiments. In this test, a foam layer sprayed on a metal substrate is subjected to a temperature variation while the metal substrate is

  12. Dual Transport Process for Targeted Delivery in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, W.; Fan, J.

    2015-12-01

    The targeted delivery in porous media is a promising technology to encapsulate the solute (i.e., the cargo) in colloid-like microcapsules (i.e., the carriers), transport the microcapsules in the targeted location in porous media, and then release the solute. While extensive literatures and applications about the drug delivery in human and animal bodies exist, the targeted delivery using similar delivery carriers in subsurface porous media is not well understood. The dual transport process study is an explorative study for the targeted delivery in porous media. While the colloid transport is dominated by the advection process and the solute transport is dominated by the advection-dispersion, the dual transport process is the process with the first step of carrier transport, which is dominated by advection, and then after the release of cargo, the transport of cargo is dominated by advection-dispersion. By applying the random walk particle tracking (RWPT) approach, we investigate how the carriers transport in porous media and how the cargo release mechanisms affect the cargo distribution for the targeted delivery in various patterns of porous media. The RWPT numerical model will be verified against the experimental results of dual transport process in packed-disk 2D micromodels. The understanding of the mechanism of dual transport process is crucial to achieve the potential applications of targeted delivery in improved oil and gas recovery, CO2 sequestration, environmental remediation, and soil biomediation.

  13. Enhancing nZVI mobility in porous media using humate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Doris; Micic Batka, Vesna; Gondikas, Andreas; Velimirovic, Milica; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    The limited transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles in porous media is a major drawback for its use in groundwater remediation. Among other factors, transport of nZVI particles might be negatively affected by mineralogical and physical heterogeneities of the aquifer matrix. Carbonate minerals and iron oxides, for instance, provide positively charged patches which would further increase particle attachment to the sand grains. This study does assess the potential of sodium humate, a salt of humic acids, to enhance the mobility of nZVI particles. Humate is a non-toxic, inexpensive material extracted from natural oxidized lignite and obtained in commercial grade, which makes it advantageous for field applications. Humate is expected to shield the positively charged patches of the sand grains and consequently enhance nZVI mobility in porous media. In this study the humate was injected into an aquifer prior to injection of the nZVI particles. The potential of humate for enhancing the mobility of nZVI particles was tested in an array of columns packed with heterogeneous natural porous media of different mineralogical composition and sediment texture. The results demonstrated that without pre-injection of humates only limited mobility of nZVI particles can be obtained in all tested porous media. After the pre-injection of low concentration of humate (10 mg/L) the mobility of nZVI particles (1 g/L) was enhanced in all tested porous media. The magnitude of this enhancement was depended on the properties of the porous media. The largest improvement of nZVI mobility was observed for homogeneous quartz. This material had also the highest porosity (~ 40%), good sorting, and therefore a higher permeability compared to the other porous media tested. It is assumed that the higher permeability of this porous medium allowed an optimal distribution of humate, resulting in an approximately 6-fold enhancement of nZVI mobility. In carbonate-rich porous medium with a

  14. Mobility of engineered inorganic nanoparticles in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metreveli, George; Heidmann, Ilona; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-04-01

    Besides the excellent properties and great potential for various industrial, medical, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and life science applications, engineered inorganic nanoparticles (EINP) can show also disadvantages concerning increasing risk potential with increasing application, if they are released in the environmental systems. EINP can influence microbial activity and can show toxic effects (Fabrega et al., 2009). Similar to the inorganic natural colloids, EINP can be transported in soil and groundwater systems (Metreveli et al., 2005). Furthermore, due to the large surface area and high sorption and complex formation capacity, EINP can facilitate transport of different contaminants. In this study the mobility behaviour of EINP and their effect on the transport of different metal(loid) species in water saturated porous media was investigated. For these experiments laboratory column system was used. The column was filled with quartz sand. The interactions between EINP and metal(loid)s were characterised by coupling of asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation (AF4) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). As EINP laponite (synthetic three layer clay mineral), and as metal(loid)s Cu, Pb, Zn, Pt and As were used. In AF4 experiments sorption of metal(loid)s on the surface of EINP could be observed. The extent of interactions was influenced by pH value and was different for different metal(loid)s. Laboratory column experiments showed high mobility of EINP, which facilitated transport of most of metal(loid)s in water saturated porous media. Furthermore the migration of synthetic silver nanoparticles in natural soil columns was determined in leaching experiments. Acknowledgement Financial support by German Research Council (DFG) and Max-Buchner-Research Foundation (MBFSt) is gratefully acknowledged. We thank Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) for the opportunity to perform the column and AF4 experiments. References: Fabrega, J., Fawcett, S. R

  15. Dynamics of water evaporation from saline porous media with mixed wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstad, Mina; Shokri, Nima

    2016-04-01

    Understanding of the dynamics of salt transport and precipitation in porous media during evaporation is of crucial concern in various environmental and hydrological applications such as soil salinization, rock weathering, terrestrial ecosystem functioning, microbiological activities and biodiversity in vadose zone. Vegetation, plant growth and soil organisms can be severely limited in salt-affected land. This process is influenced by the complex interaction among atmospheric conditions, transport properties of porous media and properties of the evaporating solution (1-5). We investigated effects of mixed wettability conditions on salt precipitation during evaporation from saline porous media. To do so, we conducted a series of evaporation experiments with sand mixtures containing different fractions of hydrophobic grains saturated with NaCl solutions. The dynamics of salt precipitation at the surface of sand columns (mounted on digital balances to record the evaporation curves) as well as the displacement of the receding drying front (the interface between wet and partially wet zone) were recorded using an automatic imaging system at well-defined time intervals. The experiments were conducted with sand packs containing 0, 25, 40, 50, 65, and 80% fraction of hydrophobic grains. All experiments were conducted in an environmental chamber in which the relative humidity and ambient temperature were kept constant at 30% and 30 C, respectively. Our results show that partial wettability conditions had minor impacts on the evaporative mass losses from saline sand packs due to the presence of salt. This is significantly different than what is normally observed during evaporation from mixed wettability porous media saturated with pure water (6). In our experiments, increasing the fraction of hydrophobic grains did not result in any notable reduction of the evaporative mass losses from saline porous media. Our results show that the presence of hydrophobic grains on the surface

  16. Thermal conductivity modeling in variably saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, B.; Daigle, H.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling effective thermal conductivity under variably saturated conditions is essential to study heat transfer in natural sediments, soils, and rocks. The effective thermal conductivity in completely dry and fully saturated porous media is an integrated quantity representing the complex behavior of two conducting phases, i.e., pore fluid (either air or water) and solid matrix. Under partially saturated conditions, however, the effective thermal conductivity becomes even more complicated since three phases (air, water, and solid matrix) conduct heat simultaneously. In this study, we invoke an upscaling treatment called percolation-based effective-medium approximation to model the effective thermal conductivity in fully and partially saturated porous media. Our theoretical porosity- and saturation-dependent models contain endmember properties, such as air, solid matrix, and saturating fluid thermal conductivities, a percolation exponent t, and a percolation threshold. Comparing our theory with 216 porosity-dependent thermal conductivity measurements and 25 saturation-dependent thermal conductivity datasets indicate excellent match between theory and experiments. Our results show that the effective thermal conductivity under fully and partially saturated conditions follows nonuniversal behavior. This means the value of t changes from medium to medium and depends not only on topological and geometrical properties of the medium but also characteristics of the saturating fluid.

  17. Fluid flow patterns in porous media with partially ordered microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirsaeidi, A.; Thompson, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Natural granular porous media found in geosciences applications are disordered at the pore scale, which contributes to the interesting behavior that they exhibit including hydrodynamic dispersion, capillary pressure and wetting behavior, and various types of fingering. Many standard equations and models that have been developed for transport in porous media are based on the assumption of uniform disorder, randomly distributed parameters, and isotropic behavior. However, factors that cause partial ordering (e.g., settling of oblong grains, alignment of elongated particles, or packing structures near a boundary) can lead to anomalous flow behavior relative to the base case, when in turn requires different ways to understand and describe transport. In this work we examine the packing structure and fluid flow patterns in packings of equilateral cylindrical particles that are packed in a tube. The detailed packing structures are obtained experimentally from microCT experiments, and the flow patterns are simulated by numerical solution of the Stokes equations using the finite element method. This research is of interest in chemical engineering because this type of packing is used in catalytic reactors. However, the structures are also interesting from both a fundamental perspective and as prototypes for partially ordered natural materials because the packings undergo a transition from fully disordered internally to highly structured at the wall, and therefore provide insight into differences caused by the ordering.

  18. Evaporation Limited Radial Capillary Penetration in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingchao; Wu, Jian; Gan, Yixiang; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Chen, C Q

    2016-09-27

    The capillary penetration of fluids in thin porous layers is of fundamental interest in nature and various industrial applications. When capillary flows occur in porous media, the extent of penetration is known to increase with the square root of time following the Lucas-Washburn law. In practice, volatile liquid evaporates at the surface of porous media, which restricts penetration to a limited region. In this work, on the basis of Darcy's law and mass conservation, a general theoretical model is developed for the evaporation-limited radial capillary penetration in porous media. The presented model predicts that evaporation decreases the rate of fluid penetration and limits it to a critical radius. Furthermore, we construct a unified phase diagram that describes the limited penetration in an annular porous medium, in which the boundaries of outward and inward liquid are predicted quantitatively. It is expected that the proposed theoretical model will advance the understanding of penetration dynamics in porous media and facilitate the design of engineered porous architectures.

  19. Evaporation Limited Radial Capillary Penetration in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingchao; Wu, Jian; Gan, Yixiang; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Chen, C Q

    2016-09-27

    The capillary penetration of fluids in thin porous layers is of fundamental interest in nature and various industrial applications. When capillary flows occur in porous media, the extent of penetration is known to increase with the square root of time following the Lucas-Washburn law. In practice, volatile liquid evaporates at the surface of porous media, which restricts penetration to a limited region. In this work, on the basis of Darcy's law and mass conservation, a general theoretical model is developed for the evaporation-limited radial capillary penetration in porous media. The presented model predicts that evaporation decreases the rate of fluid penetration and limits it to a critical radius. Furthermore, we construct a unified phase diagram that describes the limited penetration in an annular porous medium, in which the boundaries of outward and inward liquid are predicted quantitatively. It is expected that the proposed theoretical model will advance the understanding of penetration dynamics in porous media and facilitate the design of engineered porous architectures. PMID:27583455

  20. Capillary thermomechanics in serially porous media, with implications for randomly porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Robert D.

    Visions of a single mobile substance present as two rival phases more or less cleanly segregated by capillarity between rival strata of a serially porous medium (a ``discontinuum'') imply explicit testable equations for externally measured capillary thermo-osmotic pressures and capillary thermo-osmosis, with implications for thermomechanical consolidation, dilation, and cracking. Underlying equations assume fluid phases governed by the laws of surface tension and viscous flow, moderated by an appropriate form of the Clapeyron equation. Derived phenomenological coefficients in macroscopic equations for steady coupled transports of mass and heat include only path-length-weighted fluid and heat conductances for rival domains and the heat of phase transformation. Expressions emphasize the phase-specific nature of Onsager's reciprocity principle and apply to serial media held within permeameters set up for measuring either ``isothermal'' or ``adiabatic'' mass transport or held within sealed containers intended for measurements of ``thermal conductivities.'' Results clarify unmet challenges facing modelers of similar processes and attributes in randomly porous media.

  1. Homogenization of two fluid flow in porous media

    PubMed Central

    Daly, K. R.; Roose, T.

    2015-01-01

    The macroscopic behaviour of air and water in porous media is often approximated using Richards' equation for the fluid saturation and pressure. This equation is parametrized by the hydraulic conductivity and water release curve. In this paper, we use homogenization to derive a general model for saturation and pressure in porous media based on an underlying periodic porous structure. Under an appropriate set of assumptions, i.e. constant gas pressure, this model is shown to reduce to the simpler form of Richards' equation. The starting point for this derivation is the Cahn–Hilliard phase field equation coupled with Stokes equations for fluid flow. This approach allows us, for the first time, to rigorously derive the water release curve and hydraulic conductivities through a series of cell problems. The method captures the hysteresis in the water release curve and ties the macroscopic properties of the porous media with the underlying geometrical and material properties. PMID:27547073

  2. Porous media heat transfer for injection molding

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2016-05-31

    The cooling of injection molded plastic is targeted. Coolant flows into a porous medium disposed within an injection molding component via a porous medium inlet. The porous medium is thermally coupled to a mold cavity configured to receive injected liquid plastic. The porous medium beneficially allows for an increased rate of heat transfer from the injected liquid plastic to the coolant and provides additional structural support over a hollow cooling well. When the temperature of the injected liquid plastic falls below a solidifying temperature threshold, the molded component is ejected and collected.

  3. Experimental investigation of magnetically driven flow of ferrofluids in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Borglin, S.E.; Moridis, G.J.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    1998-08-01

    This report presents experimental results of the flow of ferrofluids in porous media to investigate the potential for precisely controlling fluid emplacement in porous media using magnetic fields. Ferrofluids are colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles stabilized in various carrier liquids. In the presence of an external magnetic field, the ferrofluid becomes magnetized as the particles align with the magnetic field. Potential applications of ferrofluids to subsurface contamination problems include magnetic guidance of reactants to contaminated target zones in the subsurface for in situ treatment or emplacement of containment barriers. Laboratory experiments of magnetically induced ferrofluid flow in porous media in this report demonstrate the potential for mobilizing ferrofluid and controlling fluid emplacement through control of the external magnetic field. The pressures measured in ferrofluid due to the attraction of ferrofluid to a permanent magnet agree well with calculated values. The results show that a predictable pressure gradient is produced in the fluid which is strong near the magnet and drops off quickly with distance. This pressure gradient drives the fluid through sand without significant loss of ferrofluid strength due to filtration or dilution. Flow visualization experiments of ferrofluid in water-filled horizontal Hele-Shaw cells demonstrate that ferrofluid obtains a consistent final arc-shaped configuration around the magnet regardless of initial configuration or flow path toward the magnet. Analogous experiments in actual porous media showed similar features and confirm the ability of ferrofluid to move through porous media by magnetic forces.

  4. Transport of Graphene Oxide through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duster, T. A.; Na, C.; Bolster, D.; Fein, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is comprised of anisotropic nanosheets decorated with covalently-bonded epoxide, ketone, and hydroxyl functional groups on the basal planes, and carboxylic and phenolic functional groups at the edges. Individual GO nanosheets are generally two to three micrometers in width, with thicknesses depending on the degree of exfoliation and typically ranging from one to approximately 100 nanometers. As a result of this extraordinarily large surface area-to-mass ratio and the presence of numerous proton-active functional groups, GO nanosheets exhibit a tremendous capacity to adsorb metals and other contaminants from aqueous solutions and are thus often suggested for use in in situ remediation efforts. The potential importance of GO nanosheets as an adsorbent in soil and groundwater necessitates a detailed understanding of their mobility in environmental systems, but this topic remains largely unexplored. Hence, the objective of this study was to investigate the transport behavior of GO nanosheets through well-characterized saturated porous media. In this study, we used replicate glass columns packed with two different sand grain sizes, and within each treatment we varied pH (5.5 to 8.5), ionic strength (<0.01 M to 0.1 M), electrolyte composition (Na+ and Ca2+ salts), and GO nanosheet exfoliation extent (few-layered and many-layered) to determine the relative influence of both physical and electrochemical properties on GO nanosheet transport in these systems. The break-through of GO nanosheets from each treatment was continuously monitored using a flow-through quartz cuvette and UV-Vis absorbance at 230 nm. GO nanosheet transport through these systems was then modeled using distinct advection-dispersion equations to establish the relative influence of attachment, deposition, and detachment in the overall transport behavior, and a corresponding retardation coefficient was calculated for each treatment. Break-through curves displayed anomalous transport

  5. Wave propagation through porous media containing two immiscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng

    by the inclusion of relative acceleration vectors as independent constitutive variables. The resulting momentum balance equations governing immiscible two-phase flows in deformable porous media then account for the reaction of fluids to an acceleration of the solid matrix. A mathematical model was proposed to quantify the impact of elastic wave excitation on a fluid-containing porous medium by formulating a boundary value problem for a core sample packed with unconsolidated sand permeated by water, a simpler system than current laboratory experiments investigating seismic stimulation. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  6. Mixing Zones and Mineral Precipitation Dynamics in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebrehiwet, T.; Henrikson, J.; Guo, L.; Fox, D. T.; Huang, H.; Fujita, Y.; Tu, L.

    2011-12-01

    Precipitation of mineral phases in subsurface environments involves coupling between reactant transport and changes in media properties that control transport. Chemical gradients within mixing zones will determine the rates and products of reactions, which in turn can modify the permeability and flow paths within the porous media. This reaction-transport coupling is being studied using double diffusion experiments and reactive transport modeling, with calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate as the model mineral systems. In particular we are investigating: (1) the interplay between permeability modifications and reactions that can change local chemical conditions, hydrodynamic conditions, and therefore the rate of precipitation, (2) narrowing ("focusing") of the precipitation zone, and (3) migration of the precipitation zone associated with asymmetry across the mixing zone with respect to precipitation rates and/or local chemical conditions. Experiments are being conducted in hydrogel (polyacrylamide) and granular (glass beads and fine-grained sand) media. Gels were used to investigate the role of diffusion alone on the structure of precipitation zones. We observed differences between carbonate and phosphate systems with respect to the induction period for precipitation, and the position and migration of the precipitation zone. One interesting observation was that multiple precipitation bands are produced in the calcium phosphate system, while no clear banding has been observed in the calcium carbonate system. Initial reactive transport simulations that couple precipitation kinetics with reactant transport and mixing appear consistent with the experimental observations. Precipitation band width and position were found to change with time, and precipitation appeared to slow subsequent reactions at the mixing interfaces. The induction time, spacing between the precipitation bands and band width in the calcium phosphate system were influenced by pH, saturation state

  7. Liquid flow and distribution in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan

    2004-01-01

    Flow and transport in permeable or porous media and microchannels occurs in a variety of situations in micro- and reduced-gravity environments, many of them associated with environmental control and life support systems. While the role of gravity is limited, due to the typically small size scales associated permeable media, gravity, at the very least, affects the overall disposition of fluid in a macroscopic system. This presentation will discuss examples where the absence of gravity affects flow and phase distribution in selected examples of unsaturated flow and transport of heat and mass in porous media and microchannels that are pertinent to spacecraft systems.

  8. Microbial growth and transport in saturated and unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hron, Pavel; Jost, Daniel; Bastian, Peter; Ippisch, Olaf

    2014-05-01

    There is a considerable ongoing effort aimed at understanding the behavior of microorganisms in porous media. Microbial activity is of significant interest in various environmental applications such as in situ bioremediation, protection of drinking water supplies and for subsurface geochemistry in general. The main limiting factors for bacterial growth are the availability of electron acceptors, nutrients and bio-available water. The capillary fringe, defined - in a wider sense than usual - as the region of the subsurface above the groundwater table, but still dominated by capillary rise, is a region where all these factors are abundantly available. It is thus a region where high microbial activity is to be expected. In a research unit 'Dynamic Capillary Fringes - A Multidisciplinary Approach (DyCap)' founded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), the growth of microorganisms in the capillary fringe was studied experimentally and with numerical simulations. Processes like component transport and diffusion, exchange between the liquid phase and the gas phase, microbial growth and cell attachment and detachment were incorporated into a numerical simulator. The growth of the facultative anaerobic Escherichia coli as a function of nutrient availability and oxygen concentration in the liquid phase is modeled with modified Monod-type models and modifications for the switch between aerobic and anaerobic growth. Laboratory batch experiments with aqueous solutions of bacteria have been carried out under various combinations of oxygen concentrations in the gas phase and added amounts of dissolved organic carbon to determine the growth model parameters by solution of a parameter estimation problem. For the transport of bacteria the adhesion to phase boundaries is also very important. As microorganisms are transported through porous media, they are removed from the pore fluid by physicochemical filtration (attachment to sediment grain surfaces) or are adhering to gas

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of Liquid Transport Through Fibrous Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palakurthi, Nikhil Kumar

    Fluid flow through fibrous media occurs in many industrial processes, including, but not limited, to fuel cell technology, drug delivery patches, sanitary products, textile reinforcement, filtration, heat exchangers, and performance fabrics. Understanding the physical processes involved in fluid flow through fibrous media is essential for their characterization as well as for the optimization and development of new products. Macroscopic porous-media equations require constitutive relations, which account for the physical processes occurring at the micro-scale, to predict liquid transport at the macro-scale. In this study, micro-scale simulations were conducted using conventional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique (finite-volume method) to determine the macroscopic constitutive relations. The first part of this thesis deals with the single-phase flow in fibrous media, following which multi-phase flow through fibrous media was studied. Darcy permeability is an important parameter that characterizes creeping flow through a fibrous porous medium. It has a complex dependence on the medium's properties such as fibers' in-plane and through-plane orientation, diameter, aspect ratio, curvature, and porosity. A suite of 3D virtual fibrous structures with a wide range of geometric properties were constructed, and the permeability values of the structures were calculated by solving the 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The through-plane permeability was found to be a function of only the fiber diameter, the fibers' through-plane orientation, and the porosity of the medium. The numerical results were used to extend a permeability-porosity relation, developed in literature for 3D isotropic fibrous media, to a wide range of fibers' through-plane orientations. In applications where rate of capillary penetration is important, characterization of porous media usually involves determination of either the effective pore radius from capillary penetration experiments

  10. A pore scale study on turbulent combustion in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouybari, N. F.; Maerefat, M.; Nimvari, M. E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents pore scale simulation of turbulent combustion of air/methane mixture in porous media to investigate the effects of multidimensionality and turbulence on the flame within the pores of porous media. In order to investigate combustion in the pores of porous medium, a simple but often used porous medium consisting of a staggered arrangement of square cylinders is considered in the present study. Results of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent viscosity ratio, temperature, flame speed, convective heat transfer and thermal conductivity are presented and compared for laminar and turbulent simulations. It is shown that the turbulent kinetic energy increases from the inlet of burner, because of turbulence created by the solid matrix with a sudden jump or reduction at the flame front due to increase in temperature and velocity. Also, the pore scale simulation revealed that the laminarization of flow occurs after flame front in the combustion zone and turbulence effects are important mainly in the preheat zone. It is shown that turbulence enhances the diffusion processes in the preheat zone, but it is not enough to affect the maximum flame speed, temperature distribution and convective heat transfer in the porous burner. The dimensionless parameters associated with the Borghi-Peters diagram of turbulent combustion have been analyzed for the case of combustion in porous media and it is found that the combustion in the porous burner considered in the present study concerns the range of well stirred reactor very close to the laminar flame region.

  11. Fate and Transport of Graphene Oxide in Granular Porous Media: Experimental Results and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin

    2014-05-01

    Although graphene oxide (GO) has been used in many applications to improve human life quality, its environmental fate and behavior are still largely unknown. In this work, a range of laboratory experiments were conducted to explore the aggregation, deposition, and transport mechanisms of GO nano-sheets in porous media under various conditions. Stability experimental data showed that both cation valence and pH showed significant effect on the aggregation of GO sheets. The measured critical coagulation concentrations were in good agreement with the predictions of the extended Schulze-Hardy rule. Sand column experimental results indicated that deposition and transport of GO in porous media were strongly dependent on solution ionic strength. Particularly, GO showed high mobility under low ionic strength conditions in both saturated and unsaturated columns. Increasing ionic strength dramatically increased the retention of GO in porous media, mainly through secondary-minimum deposition. Recovery rates of GO in unsaturated sand columns were lower than that in saturated columns under the same ionic strength conditions, suggesting moisture content also played an important role in the retention of GO in porous media. Findings from the bubble column experiments showed that the GO did not attach to the air-water interface, which is consistent with the XDLVO predictions. Additional retention mechanisms, such as film straining, thus could be responsible to the reduced mobility of GO in unsaturated porous media. The breakthrough curves of GO in saturated and unsaturated columns could be accurately simulated by an advection-dispersion-reaction model.

  12. Enhanced CO2 Dissolution in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, K.; Neufeld, J. A.; Bickle, M. J.; Hallworth, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term and secure geological storage of CO2 through technologies such as Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) within reservoirs is seen as a technological means to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The long-term viability of this technology is reliant on the structural and secondary trapping of supercritical CO2 within heterogeneous reservoirs. Secondary trapping, primarily through the dissolution of CO2 into ambient reservoir brine to produce a denser fluid, is capable of retaining CO2 in the subsurface and thus reducing the risks of storage. To model secondary trapping we need to understand how the flow of CO2 through heterogeneous reservoir rocks enhances dissolution of supercritical CO2 in reservoir brines. Here we experimentally investigate the dissolution of CO2 in reservoir brines in layered, heterogeneous geological formations. Using analogue experiments, designed to approximate an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) setting, the processes of mixing, dispersion and dissolution are examined. These are compared against test results from non-layered, homogeneous porous media experiments. We find that heterogeneities significantly enhance mixing, particularly between adjacent porous layers. During fluid propagation, pore-scale viscous fingers grow and retreat, thereby providing an increased surface area between the flow and the ambient reservoir fluid. This enhanced mixing is predicted to substantially increase the dissolution of CO2 in reservoir brines. Both permeability and viscosity differences are found to have a significant effect on the interface between the two fluids, and therefore the likely amount of dissolution of CO2.

  13. Electrokinetic coupling in unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Revil, A.; Linde, N.; Cerepi, A.; Jougnot, D.; Matthai, S.; Finsterle, S.

    2007-02-27

    We consider a charged porous material that is saturated bytwo fluid phases that are immiscible and continuous on the scale of arepresentative elementary volume. The wetting phase for the grains iswater and the nonwetting phase is assumed to be an electricallyinsulating viscous fluid. We use a volume-averaging approach to derivethe linear constitutive equations for the electrical current density aswell as the seepage velocities of the wetting and nonwetting phases onthe scale of a representative elementary volume. These macroscopicconstitutive equations are obtained by volume-averaging Ampere's lawtogether with the Nernst Planck equation and the Stokes equations. Thematerial properties entering the macroscopic constitutive equations areexplicitly described as functions of the saturation of the water phase,the electrical formation factor, and parameters that describe thecapillary pressure function, the relative permeability function, and thevariation of electrical conductivity with saturation. New equations arederived for the streaming potential and electro-osmosis couplingcoefficients. A primary drainage and imbibition experiment is simulatednumerically to demonstrate that the relative streaming potential couplingcoefficient depends not only on the water saturation, but also on thematerial properties of the sample, as well as the saturation history. Wealso compare the predicted streaming potential coupling coefficients withexperimental data from four dolomite core samples. Measurements on thesesamples include electrical conductivity, capillary pressure, thestreaming potential coupling coefficient at various level of saturation,and the permeability at saturation of the rock samples. We found verygood agreement between these experimental data and the modelpredictions.

  14. a Fractal Network Model for Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Li, Cuihong; Qiu, Shuxia; Sasmito, Agus Pulung

    2016-04-01

    The transport properties and mechanisms of fractured porous media are very important for oil and gas reservoir engineering, hydraulics, environmental science, chemical engineering, etc. In this paper, a fractal dual-porosity model is developed to estimate the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media, where a fractal tree-like network model is used to characterize the fracture system according to its fractal scaling laws and topological structures. The analytical expressions for the effective permeability of fracture system and fractured porous media, tortuosity, fracture density and fraction are derived. The proposed fractal model has been validated by comparisons with available experimental data and numerical simulation. It has been shown that fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture have significant effect on the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media. The effective permeability of fracture system can be increased with the increase of fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture, while it can be remarkably lowered by introducing tortuosity at large branching angle. Also, a scaling law between the fracture density and fractal dimension for fracture length has been found, where the scaling exponent depends on the fracture number. The present fractal dual-porosity model may shed light on the transport physics of fractured porous media and provide theoretical basis for oil and gas exploitation, underground water, nuclear waste disposal and geothermal energy extraction as well as chemical engineering, etc.

  15. SPH numerical simulation of fluid flow through a porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapp-Escribano, Jaime; Mayoral-Villa, Estela; Rodriguez-Meza, Mario Alberto; de La Cruz-Sanchez, Eduardo; di G Sigalotti, Leonardo; Inin-Abacus Collaboration; Ivic Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We have tested an improved a method for 3D SPH simulations of fluid flow through a porous media using an implementation of this method with the Dual-Physics code. This improvement makes it possible to simulate many particles (of the order of several million) in reasonable computer times because its execution on GPUs processors makes it possible to reduce considerably the simulation cost for large systems. Modifications in the initial configuration have been implemented in order to simulate different arrays and geometries for the porous media. The basic tests were reproduced and the performance was analyzed. Our 3D simulations of fluid flow through a saturated homogeneous porous media shows a discharge velocity proportional to the hydraulic gradient reproducing Darcy's law at small body forces. The results are comparable with values obtained in previous work and published in the literature for simulations of flow through periodic porous media. Our simulations for a non saturated porous media produce adequate qualitative results showing that a non steady state is generated. The relaxation time for these systems were obtained. Work partially supported by Cinvestav-ABACUS, CONACyT grant EDOMEX-2011-C01-165873.

  16. Modeling isothermal and non-isothermal flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni Languri, Ehsan

    2011-12-01

    A complete understanding of the physics of flow and heat transfer phenomena in porous media is vital for accurate simulation of flow processes in industrial applications. In one such application pertaining to liquid composite molding (LCM) for manufacturing polymer composites, the fiber preforms used in LCM as reinforcements are limited not only to the single-scale porous media in the form of random fiber-mats, but also include dual-scale porous media in the form of woven or stitched fiber-mats. The conventional flow physics is not able to model the resin filling process in LCM involving the dual-scale porous media. In this study, the flow in dual-scale porous media is studied in order to predict the permeability of these fiber mats. The effect of aspect ratio of the fiber preform on the accuracy and flow during permeability estimation in single- and dual-scale porous media is analyzed experimentally and numerically. Flow of liquid in a free channel bounded on one side by porous medium is studied next, and two well-known boundary conditions of stress continuity and stress jump at the interface of the two regions are evaluated numerically. A point-wise solution for Stokes flow through periodic and non periodic porous media (made of cylindrical particles) adjacent to the free channel is presented using the Imite element based CFD software COMSOL. The efficacy of the two interfacial conditions is evaluated after volume averaging the point-wise velocity using a long averaging volume, also called the representative elementary volume or REV, and then comparing such a volume-averaged velocity profile with the available analytical solution. The investigation is carried out for five different porosities at three different Reynolds numbers to cover a wide range of applications. The presence of randomly-placed cylinders during the creation of non-periodic porous media damps out spatial fluctuations in the averaged velocity observed in periodic porous media. The analytical

  17. Characterization of porous media and refractory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin

    Because of its unique advantages on energy savings and casting complex shapes, Lost Foam Casting (LFC) has been widely used as a replacement to the conventional techniques (sand and investment castings). In order to continuously improve the quality of the Lost Foam Casting process for reducing scrap rate and increasing energy savings, the US Department of Energy sponsored the present study to develop new characterization techniques for enhancing the understanding of the fundamental properties of the refractory materials used in the Lost Foam Casting process. In this study, new techniques are proposed to characterize the refractory materials' properties such as particle size, particle shape, rheological behavior, transport properties, microstructure, thickness, as well as packing properties. The microstructure information obtained from the proposed technique is found to be well correlated with the transport properties of the porous coating materials. A procedure using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code is developed to simulate experimental gas flow data for solving complex boundary value problems. In this study, the effects of dilution and dispersion on the coating properties such as transport properties and microstructures are also investigated. Results show that the dilution and dispersion have opposing influences on the pore size and transport properties. In addition, this study also includes another part of the permeability system, the un-bonded granular materials used in the Lost Foam Casting process. A three-dimensional (3-D) computer program is developed to simulate the packing behavior of granular materials at a loose state using a "drop and roll" method. This study provides a systematic characterization of the LFC refractory coating slurries, dried refractory coating, and the granular media. This study also demonstrates the application of proposed characterization techniques for coating quality control using statistical process control

  18. Anomalous transport in weakly heterogeneous geological porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan

    2013-03-01

    Anomalous transport is found to be ubiquitous in complex geological formations and it has a paramount impact on petroleum engineering and groundwater sciences. This process can be well described by the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model, in which the probability density function w(t) of a particle's transition time t follows a power law for large t: w(t)˜t-1-α (0<α<2). In this work, based on the CTRW theory, a semifractional advection-diffusion equation is proposed to model the anomalous transport for 1<α<2, which is, as evidenced by field and numerical experiments, possibly the typical situation for many complex geological porous media with weakly heterogeneous microstructures.

  19. Biopolymer system for permeability modification in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Stepp, A.K.; Bryant, R.S.; Llave, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    New technologies are needed to reduce the current high rate of well abandonment. Improved sweep efficiency, reservoir conformance, and permeability modification can have a significant impact on oil recovery processes. Microorganisms can be used to selectively plug high-permeability zones to improve sweep efficiency and impart conformance control. Studies of a promising microbial system for polymer production were conducted to evaluate reservoir conditions in which this system would be effective. Factors which can affect microbial growth and polymer production include salinity, pH, temperature, divalent ions, presence of residual oil, and rock matrix. Flask tests and coreflooding experiments were conducted to optimize and evaluate the effectiveness of this system. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) was used to visualize microbial polymer production in porous media. Changes in fluid distribution within the pore system of the core were detected.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of chemical waves in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Annette F.; Britton, Melanie M.

    2006-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful tool for the investigation of chemical structures in optically opaque porous media, in which chemical concentration gradients can be visualized, and diffusion and flow properties are simultaneously determined. In this paper we give an overview of the MRI technique and review theory and experiments on the formation of chemical waves in a tubular packed bed reactor upon the addition of a nonlinear chemical reaction. MR images are presented of reaction-diffusion waves propagating in the three-dimensional (3D) network of channels in the reactor, and the 3D structure of stationary concentration patterns formed via the flow-distributed oscillation mechanism is demonstrated to reflect the local hydrodynamics in the packed bed. Possible future directions regarding the influence of heterogeneities on transport and reaction are discussed.

  1. Heat transfer characteristics of porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, B. S.; Dybbs, A.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted regarding the relative effects of conduction and convection in a saturated porous medium. A method reported by Singh et al. (1973) is used to determine the effective thermal conductivity of the saturated porous material. Heat transfer measurements are conducted under conditions of forced convection of the saturated liquid parallel and countercurrent to the flow of heat. The results are compared with the data obtained with the aid of an analytical model.

  2. Influence of residual polymer on nanoparticle deposition in porous media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonggang; Becker, Matthew D; Colvin, Vicki L; Abriola, Linda M; Pennell, Kurt D

    2014-09-16

    Although surface coatings and free polymers are known to affect the mobility of nanoparticles in water-saturated porous media, the influence of these compounds on nanoparticle deposition behavior has received limited attention. A series of column experiments was conducted to evaluate the transport and retention of quantum dots (QDs) coated with a synthetic polymer, polyacrylic acid-octylamine (PAA-OA). Initial column studies, conducted with three size fractions of Ottawa sand, resulted in unusual solid-phase retention profiles, characterized by low QD deposition near the column inlet and increasing solid-phase concentrations along the column until a plateau or limiting capacity was reached near the column midpoint. Mathematical modeling studies indicated that the observed retention behavior could not be reproduced using one-dimensional simulators based on either clean-bed filtration theory or a modified filtration theory (MFT) model that incorporated a maximum retention capacity. Additional column studies demonstrated that changes in the inlet end plate configuration designed to ensure uniform flow did not alter the observed effluent breakthrough curves (BTCs) or shape of the retention profile. Subsequent QD transport experiments, pretreated by flushing with a pulse of PAA-OA solution, resulted in almost complete QD breakthrough with minimal retention. It is postulated that free polymer was preferentially adsorbed onto the solid surface near the column inlet, thereby preventing QD attachment, whereas in the down-gradient portion of the column, QDs attached to the solid phase without competition from the polymer. These findings reveal the importance of accounting for the influence of coconstituents on nanoparticle deposition and demonstrate the need to simulate both transport and retention data when assessing nanoparticle mobility in porous media.

  3. Modeling microbial processes in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Ellyn M.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    The incorporation of microbial processes into reactive transport models has generally proceeded along two separate lines of investigation: (1) transport of bacteria as inert colloids in porous media, and (2) the biodegradation of dissolved contaminants by a stationary phase of bacteria. Research over the last decade has indicated that these processes are closely linked. This linkage may occur when a change in metabolic activity alters the attachment/detachment rates of bacteria to surfaces, either promoting or retarding bacterial transport in a groundwater-contaminant plume. Changes in metabolic activity, in turn, are controlled by the time of exposure of the microbes to electron acceptors/donor and other components affecting activity. Similarly, metabolic activity can affect the reversibility of attachment, depending on the residence time of active microbes. Thus, improvements in quantitative analysis of active subsurface biota necessitate direct linkages between substrate availability, metabolic activity, growth, and attachment/detachment rates. This linkage requires both a detailed understanding of the biological processes and robust quantitative representations of these processes that can be tested experimentally. This paper presents an overview of current approaches used to represent physicochemical and biological processes in porous media, along with new conceptual approaches that link metabolic activity with partitioning of the microorganism between the aqueous and solid phases. Résumé L'introduction des processus microbiologiques dans des modèles de transport réactif a généralement suivi deux voies différentes de recherches: (1) le transport de bactéries sous forme de colloïdes inertes en milieu poreux, et (2) la biodégradation de polluants dissous par une phase stationnaire de bactéries. Les recherches conduites au cours des dix dernières années indiquent que ces processus sont intimement liés. Cette liaison peut intervenir lorsqu

  4. Modeling microbial processes in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Ellyn M.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    The incorporation of microbial processes into reactive transport models has generally proceeded along two separate lines of investigation: (1) transport of bacteria as inert colloids in porous media, and (2) the biodegradation of dissolved contaminants by a stationary phase of bacteria. Research over the last decade has indicated that these processes are closely linked. This linkage may occur when a change in metabolic activity alters the attachment/detachment rates of bacteria to surfaces, either promoting or retarding bacterial transport in a groundwater-contaminant plume. Changes in metabolic activity, in turn, are controlled by the time of exposure of the microbes to electron acceptors/donor and other components affecting activity. Similarly, metabolic activity can affect the reversibility of attachment, depending on the residence time of active microbes. Thus, improvements in quantitative analysis of active subsurface biota necessitate direct linkages between substrate availability, metabolic activity, growth, and attachment/detachment rates. This linkage requires both a detailed understanding of the biological processes and robust quantitative representations of these processes that can be tested experimentally. This paper presents an overview of current approaches used to represent physicochemical and biological processes in porous media, along with new conceptual approaches that link metabolic activity with partitioning of the microorganism between the aqueous and solid phases. Résumé L'introduction des processus microbiologiques dans des modèles de transport réactif a généralement suivi deux voies différentes de recherches: (1) le transport de bactéries sous forme de colloïdes inertes en milieu poreux, et (2) la biodégradation de polluants dissous par une phase stationnaire de bactéries. Les recherches conduites au cours des dix dernières années indiquent que ces processus sont intimement liés. Cette liaison peut intervenir lorsqu

  5. Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Unsaturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahal, Maninder; Flury, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are complex organic molecules containing 2 or more fused benzene rings. Being hydrophobic and non-polar, PAHs tend to partition to the organic matter in the soil from bulk aqueous phase. Though transport of these contaminants has been well studied in saturated environment, interactive mechanisms of these fluorescent compounds in unsaturated (identified by presence of air-water interface) porous media is still not well understood. We studied is the transport of fluoranthene in unsaturated porous media as facilitated by moving air-water interfaces. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize the interactions of fluoranthene particles in a glass channel packed with quartz glass beads. The packed glass channel was used to mimic a porous media and effects of an advancing and receding capillary fringe on the detachment of fluoranthene.

  6. Examining Asphaltene Solubility on Deposition in Model Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Jiun; He, Peng; Tavakkoli, Mohammad; Mathew, Nevin Thunduvila; Fatt, Yap Yit; Chai, John C; Goharzadeh, Afshin; Vargas, Francisco M; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2016-08-30

    Asphaltenes are known to cause severe flow assurance problems in the near-wellbore region of oil reservoirs. Understanding the mechanism of asphaltene deposition in porous media is of great significance for the development of accurate numerical simulators and effective chemical remediation treatments. Here, we present a study of the dynamics of asphaltene deposition in porous media using microfluidic devices. A model oil containing 5 wt % dissolved asphaltenes was mixed with n-heptane, a known asphaltene precipitant, and flowed through a representative porous media microfluidic chip. Asphaltene deposition was recorded and analyzed as a function of solubility, which was directly correlated to particle size and Péclet number. In particular, pore-scale visualization and velocity profiles, as well as three stages of deposition, were identified and examined to determine the important convection-diffusion effects on deposition. PMID:27532331

  7. A volume-balance model for flow on porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2015-11-01

    Volume-balance models are used by petroleum engineers for simulating multiphase and multicomponent flow phenomena in porous media and the extraction process in oil reservoirs. In these models, mass conservation equations and Darcy's law are supplemented by a balance condition for the pore and fluid volumes. This provides a pressure equation suitable for simulating a compressible flow within a compressible solid matrix. Here we present an alternative interpretation of the volume-balance condition that includes the advective transport within a consolidated porous media. We obtain a modified equation for the time evolution of the pressure field. Numerical tests for phase separation under gravity are presented for multiphase three dimensional flow in heterogeneous porous media. The authors acknowledge funding from Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER grant number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  8. Evaporation of NaCl solution from porous media with mixed wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstad, Mina; Shokri, Nima

    2016-05-01

    Evaporation of saline water from porous media is ubiquitous in many processes including soil salinization, crop production, and CO2 sequestration in deep saline acquirer. It is controlled by the transport properties of porous media, atmospheric conditions, and properties of the evaporating saline solution. In the present study, the effects of mixed wettability conditions on the general dynamics of water evaporation from porous media saturated with NaCl solution were investigated. To do so, we conducted a comprehensive series of evaporation experiments using sand mixtures containing different fractions of hydrophobic grains saturated with NaCl solutions. Our results showed that increasing fraction of hydrophobic grains in the mixed wettability sand pack had minor impact on the evaporative mass losses due to the presence of salt whose precipitation patterns were significantly influenced by the mixed wettability condition. Through macroscale and microscale investigations, we found formation of patchy efflorescence in the case of mixed wettability sand pack as opposed to crusty efflorescence in the case of completely hydrophilic porous media. Furthermore, the presence of salty water and hydrophobic grains in the sand pack significantly influenced the general dynamics and morphology of the receding drying front. Our results extend the understanding of the saline water evaporation from porous media with direct applications to various hydrological and engineering processes.

  9. Gel barrier formation in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Meejeong; Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz

    2002-05-01

    The gel barrier formation by a gelling liquid (Colloidal Silica) injection in an unsaturated porous medium is investigated by developing a mathematical model and conducting numerical simulations. Gelation process is initiated by adding electrolytes such as NaCl, and the gel phase consisting of cross-linked colloidal silica particles grows as the gelation process proceeds. The mathematical model describing the transport and gelation of Colloidal Silica (CS) is based on coupled mass balance equations for the gel mixture (the sol phase plus the gel phase), gel phase (cross-linked colloidal silica particles plus water captured between cross-linked particles), and colloidal silica particles (discrete and cross-linked) and NaCl in the sol (suspension of discrete colloidal silica particles in water) and gel phases. The solutions in terms of volumetric fraction of the gel phase yield the gel mixture viscosity via the dependency on the volumetric fraction of gel phase. This dependency is determined from a kinetic gelation model with time-normalized viscosity curves. The proposed model is verified by comparing experimentally and numerically determined hydraulic conductivities of gel-treated soil columns at different CS injection volumes. The numerical experiments indicate that an impermeable gel layer is formed within the time period twice the gel-point in a one-dimensional flow system. At the same normalized time corresponding to twice the gel-point, the CS solutions with lower NaCl concentrations result in further migration and poor performance in plugging the pore space. The viscosity computation proposed in this study is compared with another method available in the literature. It is observed that the other method estimates the viscosity at the mixing zone higher than the one proposed by the authors. The proposed model can simulate realistic injection scenarios with various combinations of operating parameters such as NaCl concentration and NaCl mixing time, and thus

  10. Gel barrier formation in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Meejeong; Corapcioglu, M Yavuz

    2002-05-01

    The gel barrier formation by a gelling liquid (Colloidal Silica) injection in an unsaturated porous medium is investigated by developing a mathematical model and conducting numerical simulations. Gelation process is initiated by adding electrolytes such as NaCl, and the gel phase consisting of cross-linked colloidal silica particles grows as the gelation process proceeds. The mathematical model describing the transport and gelation of Colloidal Silica (CS) is based on coupled mass balance equations for the gel mixture (the sol phase plus the gel phase), gel phase (cross-linked colloidal silica particles plus water captured between cross-linked particles), and colloidal silica particles (discrete and cross-linked) and NaCl in the sol (suspension of discrete colloidal silica particles in water) and gel phases. The solutions in terms of volumetric fraction of the gel phase yield the gel mixture viscosity via the dependency on the volumetric fraction of gel phase. This dependency is determined from a kinetic gelation model with time-normalized viscosity curves. The proposed model is verified by comparing experimentally and numerically determined hydraulic conductivities of gel-treated soil columns at different CS injection volumes. The numerical experiments indicate that an impermeable gel layer is formed within the time period twice the gel-point in a one-dimensional flow system. At the same normalized time corresponding to twice the gel-point, the CS solutions with lower NaCl concentrations result in further migration and poor performance in plugging the pore space. The viscosity computation proposed in this study is compared with another method available in the literature. It is observed that the other method estimates the viscosity at the mixing zone higher than the one proposed by the authors. The proposed model can simulate realistic injection scenarios with various combinations of operating parameters such as NaCl concentration and NaCl mixing time, and thus

  11. A Monte Carlo paradigm for capillarity in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Zeidman, Benjamin D.; Lusk, Mark T.; Willson, Clinton S.; Wu, David T.

    2011-08-09

    Wet porous media are ubiquitous in nature as soils, rocks, plants, and bones, and in engineering settings such as oil production, ground stability, filtration and composites. Their physical and chemical behavior is governed by the distribution of liquid and interfaces between phases. Characterization of the interfacial distribution is mostly based on macroscopic experiments, aided by empirical formulae. We present an alternative computational paradigm utilizing a Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate interfaces in complex realistic pore geometries. The method agrees with analytical solutions available only for idealized pore geometries, and is in quantitative agreement with Micro X-ray Computed Tomography (microXCT), capillary pressure, and interfacial area measurements for natural soils. We demonstrate that this methodology predicts macroscopic properties such as the capillary pressure and air-liquid interface area versus liquid saturation based only on the pore size information from microXCT images and interfacial interaction energies. The generality of this method should allow simulation of capillarity in many porous materials.

  12. A Monte Carlo paradigm for capillarity in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ning; Zeidman, Benjamin D.; Lusk, Mark T.; Willson, Clinton S.; Wu, David T.

    2010-12-01

    Wet porous media are ubiquitous in nature as soils, rocks, plants, and bones, and in engineering settings such as oil production, ground stability, filtration and composites. Their physical and chemical behavior is governed by the distribution of liquid and interfaces between phases. Characterization of the interfacial distribution is mostly based on macroscopic experiments, aided by empirical formulae. We present an alternative computational paradigm utilizing a Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate interfaces in complex realistic pore geometries. The method agrees with analytical solutions available only for idealized pore geometries, and is in quantitative agreement with Micro X-ray Computed Tomography (microXCT), capillary pressure, and interfacial area measurements for natural soils. We demonstrate that this methodology predicts macroscopic properties such as the capillary pressure and air-liquid interface area versus liquid saturation based only on the pore size information from microXCT images and interfacial interaction energies. The generality of this method should allow simulation of capillarity in many porous materials.

  13. Percolation models for boiling and bubble growth in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1991-05-01

    We analyze the liquid-to-vapor phase change in single-component fluids in porous media at low superheats. Conditions typical to steam injection in porous media are taken. We examine nucleation, phase equilibria and their stability, and the growth of vapor bubbles. Effects of pore structure are emphasized. It is shown that at low supersaturations, bubble growth can be described as a percolation process. In the absence of spatial gradients, macroscopic flow properties are calculated in terms of nucleation parameters. A modification of gradient percolation is also proposed in the case of spatial temperature gradients, when solid conduction predominates. 22 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. On the Study of Lifting Mechanism of a Soft Porous Media under Fast Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qianhong; Santhanam, S.; Nathan, R.; Vucbmss Team

    2015-11-01

    Fluid flow in a soft porous media under fast compressions is widely observed in biological systems and industrial applications. Despite of much progress, it remains unclear for the lifting mechanisms of the porous media due to the lack of complete experimental verifications of theoretical models. We report herein a unique approach to treat the limitation. The permeability of a synthetic fibrous porous media as a function of its compression was first measured. The material was then employed in a dynamic compression experiment using a porous-walled cylinder piston apparatus. The obtained transient compression of the porous media and the aforementioned permeability data were applied in different theoretical models for the pore pressure generation, which conclusively proved the validity of the consolidation theory developed by Wu et al. (JFM, 542, 281, 2005). Furthermore, the solid phase lifting force was separated from the total reaction force and was characterized by a new viscoelastic model, containing a nonlinear spring in conjunction with a linear viscoelastic Generalized Maxwell mechanical module. Excellent agreement was obtained between the experiment and the theory. Thus, the lifting forces from both the fluid and the solid were determined. This project is supported by NSF Grant 1511096.

  15. Unifying diffusion and seepage for nonlinear gas transport in multiscale porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongqing; Wang, Yuhe; Wang, Jiulong; Li, Zhengyi

    2016-09-01

    We unify the diffusion and seepage process for nonlinear gas transport in multiscale porous media via a proposed new general transport equation. A coherent theoretical derivation indicates the wall-molecule and molecule-molecule collisions drive the Knudsen and collective diffusive fluxes, and constitute the system pressure across the porous media. A new terminology, nominal diffusion coefficient can summarize Knudsen and collective diffusion coefficients. Physical and numerical experiments show the support of the new formulation and provide approaches to obtain the diffusion coefficient and permeability simultaneously. This work has important implication for natural gas extraction and greenhouse gases sequestration in geological formations.

  16. Empirical time dependence of liquid self-diffusion coefficient in porous media.

    PubMed

    Loskutov, V V

    2012-03-01

    A new method of finding experimental time dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient D(t) for fluid in the porous media is proposed. We investigate the time-dependent self-diffusion coefficient D(t) of random walkers in permeable porous media. D(t) is measured in pulse field gradient (PFG) experiments with fluid-saturated porous media of randomly packed spherical glass beads. In absence of the specific interactions between pore walls and a fluid we show that D(t) = (D(0) - D(∞))exp(-F√(D(0)t)/d) + D(∞), where D(0) is the diffusion constant in a bulk fluid, D(∞) is the asymptotical value of the diffusion coefficient for long diffusion times (t→∞), d is the bead diameter and F is the constant characterizing the geometry (the size and shape) pores.

  17. Detachment of fullerene nC60 nanoparticles in saturated porous media under flow/stop-flow conditions: Column experiments and mechanistic explanations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhan; Wang, Dengjun; Li, Baoguo; Wang, Jizhong; Li, Tiantian; Zhang, Mengjia; Huang, Yuanfang; Shen, Chongyang

    2016-06-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the detachment of fullerene nC60 nanoparticles (NPs) in saturated sand porous media under transient and static conditions. The nC60 NPs were first attached at primary minima of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energy profiles in electrolyte solutions with different ionic strengths (ISs). The columns were then eluted with deionized water to initiate nC60 NP detachment by decreasing solution IS. Finally, the flow of the columns was periodically interrupted to investigate nC60 NP detachment under static condition. Our results show that the detachment of nC60 NPs occurred under both transient and static conditions. The detachment under transient conditions was attributed to the fact that the attractions acting on the nC60 NPs at primary minima were weakened by nanoscale physical heterogeneities and overcome by hydrodynamic drags at lower ISs. However, a fraction of nC60 NPs remained at shallow primary minima in low flow regions, and detached via Brownian diffusion during flow interruptions. Greater detachment of nC60 NPs occurred under both transient and static conditions if the NPs were initially retained in electrolyte solutions with lower valent cations due to lower attractions between the NPs and collectors. Decrease in collector surface chemical heterogeneities and addition of dissolved organic matter also increased the extent of detachment by increasing electrostatic and steric repulsions, respectively. While particle attachment in and subsequent detachment from secondary minima occur in the same electrolyte solution, our results indicate that perturbation in solution chemistry is necessary to lower the primary minimum depths to initiate spontaneous detachment from the primary minima. These findings have important implications for predicting the fate and transport of nC60 NPs in subsurface environments during multiple rainfall events and accordingly for accurately assessing their environmental risks. PMID

  18. Mechanistic models of biofilm growth in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Priyank; Al-Hadrami, Fathiya; Atekwana, Estella A.; Atekwana, Eliot A.

    2014-07-01

    Nondestructive acoustics methods can be used to monitor in situ biofilm growth in porous media. In practice, however, acoustic methods remain underutilized due to the lack of models that can translate acoustic data into rock properties in the context of biofilm. In this paper we present mechanistic models of biofilm growth in porous media. The models are used to quantitatively interpret arrival times and amplitudes recorded in the 29 day long Davis et al. (2010) physical scale biostimulation experiment in terms of biofilm morphologies and saturation. The model pivots on addressing the sediment elastic behavior using the lower Hashin-Shtrikman bounds for grain mixing and Gassmann substitution for fluid saturation. The time-lapse P wave velocity (VP; a function of arrival times) is explained by a combination of two rock models (morphologies); "load bearing" which assumes the biofilm as an additional mineral in the rock matrix and "pore filling" which assumes the biofilm as an additional fluid phase in the pores. The time-lapse attenuation (QP-1; a function of amplitudes), on the other hand, can be explained adequately in two ways; first, through squirt flow where energy is lost from relative motion between rock matrix and pore fluid, and second, through an empirical function of porosity (φ), permeability (κ), and grain size. The squirt flow model-fitting results in higher internal φ (7% versus 5%) and more oblate pores (0.33 versus 0.67 aspect ratio) for the load-bearing morphology versus the pore-filling morphology. The empirical model-fitting results in up to 10% increase in κ at the initial stages of the load-bearing morphology. The two morphologies which exhibit distinct mechanical and hydraulic behavior could be a function of pore throat size. The biofilm mechanistic models developed in this study can be used for the interpretation of seismic data critical for the evaluation of biobarriers in bioremediation, microbial enhanced oil recovery, and CO2

  19. Direct, Dynamic Measurement of Interfacial Area within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the

  20. Unstable infiltration fronts in porous media on laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Cindi; Neuweiler, Insa

    2014-05-01

    Water flow and transport of substances in the unsaturated zone are important processes for the quality and quantity of water in the hydrologic cycle. The water movement through preferential paths is often much faster than standard models (e. g. Richards equation in homogeneous porous media) predict. One type/phenomenon of preferential flow can occur during water infiltration into coarse and/or dry porous media: the so-called gravity-driven fingering flow. To upscale the water content and to describe the averaged water fluxes in order to couple models of different spheres it is necessary to understand and to quantify the behavior of flow instabilities. We present different experiments of unstable infiltration in homogeneous and heterogeneous structures to analyze development and morphology of gravity-driven fingering flow on the laboratory scale. Experiments were carried out in two-dimensional and three-dimensional sand tanks as well as in larger two-dimensional sand tanks with homogeneous and heterogeneous filling of sand and glass beads. In the small systems, water content in the medium was measured at different times. We compare the experiments to prediction of theoretical approaches (e.g. Saffman and Taylor, 1958; Chuoke et al., 1959; Philip 1975a; White et al., 1976; Parlange and Hill, 1976a; Glass et al., 1989a; Glass et al., 1991; Wang et al., 1998c) that quantify properties of the gravity-driven fingers. We use hydraulic parameters needed for the theoretical predictions (the water-entry value (hwe), van Genuchten parameter (Wang et al., 1997, Wang et al., 2000) and saturated conductivity (Ks), van Genuchten parameter (Guarracino, 2007) to simplify the prediction of the finger properties and if necessary to identify a constant correction factor. We find in general that the finger properties correspond well to theoretical predictions. In heterogeneous settings, where fine inclusions are embedded into a coarse material, the finger properties do not change much

  1. Transport and Retention of Colloids in Porous Media: Does Shape Really Matter?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle shape on its transport and retention in porous media was evaluated by stretching carboxylate-modified fluorescent polystyrene spheres into rod shapes with aspect ratios of 2:1 and 4:1. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation experiments (QCM-D) were c...

  2. Organic Dye Effects on DNAPL Entry Pressure in Water Saturated Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, G.M.

    2001-10-02

    One of three diazo dyes with the same fundamental structure have been used in most studies of DNAPL behavior in porous media to stain the NAPL: Sudan III, Sudan IV, or Oil-Red-O. The dyes are generally implicitly assumed to not influence DNAPL behavior. That assumption was tested using simple entry pressure experiments.

  3. Effects of heat sink compounds on contact resistance of porous media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High and low-conductivity heat sink compounds were applied in succession on a thermal probe, which was then used to determine the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of some porous media at room temperature. The experiment was conducted separately under different packing densities and water...

  4. Pressure diffusion waves in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitry; Korneev, Valeri; Goloshubin, Gennady

    2003-04-08

    Pressure diffusion wave in porous rocks are under consideration. The pressure diffusion mechanism can provide an explanation of the high attenuation of low-frequency signals in fluid-saturated rocks. Both single and dual porosity models are considered. In either case, the attenuation coefficient is a function of the frequency.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance as a method of fluid mobility detection in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhakov, Sergey; Loskutov, Valentin

    2016-04-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method is widely used for studying the structure of porous media and processes taking place in such media. This method permits to determine porosity and pore-size distributions, which have direct practical application in various areas. The problem of porous media permeability determination is connected directly with extraction of hydrocarbons from pays and water from aquiferous layers. But it is impossible to measure directly amount of fluid past through the fixes cross section for determination of bed permeability. So various indirect approaches are used to find correlation of permeability value with porosity and pore size distribution which can be determined directly using NMR relaxometry. In contrast to porosity, permeability is dynamic characteristic of porous media so it may be measured correctly only in conditions of moving fluid. Natural porous medium has branched pore structure, so a chaotic component of fluid velocity will occur even for constant mean filtration fluid velocity. In the presence of magnetic field gradient this chaotic fluid velocity will produce additional spin dephasing and decrease of relaxation time [1]. Direct detecting of fluid movement in porous core samples through the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence has been demonstrated and theoretical model and analysis was given. Experiments were made on a set of sandstone samples (Berea, Bentheimer, Castle Gate, Leopard) and with synthetic high-perm samples made of abrasive material. The experiments show that the NMR spin echo measurements permit to fix mean fluid velocity mm/sec. The experiments and the theoretical model show that for low fluid velocities the mean relaxation rate is proportional to fluid velocity . The results may serve as the basis for determination of mobility of liquids in porous media and permeability. 1. P.T.Callaghan. Principles of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy. 1991, Oxford University Press.

  6. Implicit Media Knowledge Experiments & Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Muy-Chu; Germaneau, Alexis

    2011-08-01

    Implicit Media Knowledge aims to provide relevant information related to visual media without effort. It is based on the analysis of media usage from several users (e.g. a community). Algorithms based on clustering methods that extract relevant information (e.g. tags, taxonomy trees) related to a media from its usage are detailed. To validate our new approach, we propose to apply our concept and algorithms on a specific media use such as the analysis of how multiple users organize their media files. Significant results of two experiments will be highlighted. Perspectives of our work will be finally presented.

  7. Dynamics and stability of two-potential flows in the porous media.

    PubMed

    Markicevic, B; Bijeljic, B; Navaz, H K

    2011-11-01

    The experimental and numerical results of the capillary-force-driven climb of wetting liquid in porous media, which is opposed by the gravity force, are analyzed with respect to the emergence of a multiphase flow front and flow stability of the climbing liquid. Two dynamic characteristics are used: (i) the multiphase flow front thickness as a function of time, and (ii) the capillary number as a function of Bond number, where both numbers are calculated from the harmonic average of pores radii. Throughout the climb, the influence of capillary, gravity, and viscous force variations on the flow behavior is investigated for different porous media. For a specific porous medium, a unique flow front power law function of time is observed for the capillary flow climbs with or without gravity force. Distinct dynamic flow front power law functions are found for different porous media. However, for capillary climb in different porous media, one is able to predict a unique behavior for the wetting height (the interface between wetted and dry regions of porous medium) using the capillary and Bond number. It is found that these two numbers correlate as a unique exponential function, even for porous media whose permeabilities vary for two orders of magnitude. For climbs without the gravity force (capillary spreads), the initial climb dynamics follows this exponential law, but for later flow times and when a significant flow front is developed, one observes a constant value of the capillary number. Using this approach to describe the capillary climb, only the capillary versus Bond number correlation is needed, which is completely measureable from the experiments.

  8. Dynamics of barite growth in porous media quantified by in situ synchrotron X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, jose; Gerke, kirill

    2016-04-01

    Current models used to formulate mineral sequestration strategies of dissolved contaminants in the bedrock often neglect the effect of confinement and the variation of reactive surface area with time. In this work, in situ synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography is used to quantify barite growth rates in a micro-porous structure as a function of time during 13.5 hours with a resolution of 1 μm. Additionally, the 3D porous network at different time frames are used to simulate the flow velocities and calculate the permeability evolution during the experiment. The kinetics of barite growth under porous confinement is compared with the kinetics of barite growth on free surfaces in the same fluid composition. Results are discussed in terms of surface area normalization and the evolution of flow velocities as crystals fill the porous structure. During the initial hours the growth rate measured in porous media is similar to the growth rate on free surfaces. However, as the thinner flow paths clog the growth rate progressively decreases, which is correlated to a decrease of local flow velocity. The largest pores remain open, enabling growth to continue throughout the structure. Quantifying the dynamics of mineral precipitation kinetics in situ in 4D, has revealed the importance of using a time dependent reactive surface area and accounting for the local properties of the porous network, when formulating predictive models of mineral precipitation in porous media.

  9. Averaged model for momentum and dispersion in hierarchical porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabanon, Morgan; David, Bertrand; Goyeau, Benoît.

    2015-08-01

    Hierarchical porous media are multiscale systems, where different characteristic pore sizes and structures are encountered at each scale. Focusing the analysis to three pore scales, an upscaling procedure based on the volume-averaging method is applied twice, in order to obtain a macroscopic model for momentum and diffusion-dispersion. The effective transport properties at the macroscopic scale (permeability and dispersion tensors) are found to be explicitly dependent on the mesoscopic ones. Closure problems associated to these averaged properties are numerically solved at the different scales for two types of bidisperse porous media. Results show a strong influence of the lower-scale porous structures and flow intensity on the macroscopic effective transport properties.

  10. Towards aeroacoustic sound generation by flow through porous media.

    PubMed

    Hasert, Manuel; Bernsdorf, Joerg; Roller, Sabine

    2011-06-28

    In this work, we present single-step aeroacoustic calculations using the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Our application case consists of the prediction of an acoustic field radiating from the outlet of a porous media silencer. It has been proved that the LBM is able to simulate acoustic wave generation and propagation. Our particular aim is to validate the LBM for aeroacoustics in porous media. As a validation case, we consider a spinning vortex pair emitting sound waves as the vortices rotate around a common centre. Non-reflective boundary conditions based on characteristics have been adopted from Navier-Stokes methods and are validated using the time evolution of a Gaussian pulse. We show preliminary results of the flow through the porous medium.

  11. Three-dimensional convection of binary mixtures in porous media.

    PubMed

    Umla, R; Augustin, M; Huke, B; Lücke, M

    2011-11-01

    We investigate convection patterns of binary mixtures with a positive separation ratio in porous media. As setup, we choose the Rayleigh-Bénard system of a fluid layer heated from below. Results are obtained by a multimode Galerkin method. Using this method, we compute square and crossroll patterns, and we analyze their structural, bifurcation, and stability properties. Evidence is provided that, for a strong enough Soret effect, both structures exist as stable forms of convection. Some of their properties are found to be similar to square and crossroll convection in the system without porous medium. However, there are also qualitative differences. For example, squares can be destabilized by oscillatory perturbations with square symmetry in porous media, and their velocity isolines are deformed in the so-called Soret regime.

  12. Anomalous transport and chaotic advection in homogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Lester, D R; Metcalfe, G; Trefry, M G

    2014-12-01

    The topological complexity inherent to all porous media imparts persistent chaotic advection under steady flow conditions, which, in concert with the no-slip boundary condition, generates anomalous transport. We explore the impact of this mechanism upon longitudinal dispersion via a model random porous network and develop a continuous-time random walk that predicts both preasymptotic and asymptotic transport. In the absence of diffusion, the ergodicity of chaotic fluid orbits acts to suppress longitudinal dispersion from ballistic to superdiffusive transport, with asymptotic variance scaling as σ(L)(2)(t)∼t(2)/(ln t)(3). These results demonstrate that anomalous transport is inherent to homogeneous porous media and has significant implications for macrodispersion.

  13. Anomalous transport and chaotic advection in homogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Lester, D R; Metcalfe, G; Trefry, M G

    2014-12-01

    The topological complexity inherent to all porous media imparts persistent chaotic advection under steady flow conditions, which, in concert with the no-slip boundary condition, generates anomalous transport. We explore the impact of this mechanism upon longitudinal dispersion via a model random porous network and develop a continuous-time random walk that predicts both preasymptotic and asymptotic transport. In the absence of diffusion, the ergodicity of chaotic fluid orbits acts to suppress longitudinal dispersion from ballistic to superdiffusive transport, with asymptotic variance scaling as σ(L)(2)(t)∼t(2)/(ln t)(3). These results demonstrate that anomalous transport is inherent to homogeneous porous media and has significant implications for macrodispersion. PMID:25615192

  14. Fractal and Multifractal Models Applied to Porous Media - Editorial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Given the current high level of interest in the use of fractal geometry to characterize natural porous media, a special issue of the Vadose Zone Journal was organized in order to expose established fractal analysis techniques and cutting-edge new developments to a wider Earth science audience. The ...

  15. Moisture Content and Migration Dynamics in Unsaturated Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homsy, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    Fundamental studies of fluid mechanics and transport in partially saturated soils are presented. Solution of transient diffusion problems in support of the development of probes for the in-situ measurement of moisture content is given. Numerical and analytical methods are used to study the fundamental problem of meniscus and saturation front propagation in geometric models of porous media.

  16. Microscopic interfacial phenomena during flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Miksis, M.J.; Ida, M.P.

    1996-12-31

    A fundamental process during any multiphase flow in porous media is the breaking apart of one of the phases into smaller components. Here the authors investigate this breaking process as applied to a thin liquid film. They study the breaking of both a two dimensional planar film and a cylindrical thread of liquid using both analytical and numerical methods.

  17. Acoustic Wave Monitoring of Biofilm Development in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilm development in porous media can result in significant changes to the hydrogeological properties of subsurface systems with implications for fluid flow and contaminant transport. As such, a number of numerical models and simulations have been developed in an attempt to qua...

  18. The Study of Porous Media with AC Electrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengra, David B.; Wong, Po-Zen

    1996-11-01

    Electrokinetic phenomena, which involve the coupling of fluid and electric currents, are present in many porous media systems. They arise from the presence of a space charge layer at the fluid/solid interface, and depend on characteristics of the interface and properties of the porous material. Although understood for years, electrokinetic phenomena have been typically too weak to use as an experimental probe of such systems. Recently we have shown that modern instrumentation, based on AC excitations, can be used to measure electrokinetic response in porous rock. From the measurements we derive the permeability of the rock exactly, and study other physicochemical properties. We review electrokinetic theory, describe our results for porous rock, and discuss present research using the AC techniques. Research supported by the Gas Research Institute, Contract 5090-260-1953, and National Science Foundation Grant DMR-9405672.

  19. FLUID FLOW, SOLUTE MIXING AND PRECIPITATION IN POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Redden, George D; Y. Fang; T.D. Scheibe; A.M. Tartakovsky; Fox, Don T; Fujita, Yoshiko; White, Timothy A

    2006-09-01

    Reactions that lead to the formation of mineral precipitates, colloids or growth of biofilms in porous media often depend on the molecular-level diffusive mixing. For example, for the formation of mineral phases, exceeding the saturation index for a mineral is a minimum requirement for precipitation to proceed. Solute mixing frequently occurs at the interface between two solutions each containing one or more soluble reactants, particularly in engineered systems where contaminant degradation or modification or fluid flow are objectives. Although many of the fundamental component processes involved in the deposition or solubilization of solid phases are reasonably well understood, including precipitation equilibrium and kinetics, fluid flow and solute transport, the deposition of chemical precipitates, biofilms and colloidal particles are all coupled to flow, and the science of such coupled processes is not well developed. How such precipitates (and conversely, dissolution of solids) are distributed in the subsurface along flow paths with chemical gradients is a complex and challenging problem. This is especially true in systems that undergo rapid change where equilibrium conditions cannot be assumed, particularly in subsurface systems where reactants are introduced rapidly, compared to most natural flow conditions, and where mixing fronts are generated. Although the concept of dispersion in porous media is frequently used to approximate mixing at macroscopic scales, dispersion does not necessarily describe pore-level or molecular level mixing that must occur for chemical and biological reactions to be possible. An example of coupling between flow, mixing and mineral precipitation, with practical applications to controlling fluid flow or contaminant remediation in subsurface environments is shown in the mixing zone between parallel flowing solutions. Two- and three-dimensional experiments in packed-sand media were conducted where solutions containing calcium and

  20. Dilution and reactive mixing in three-dimensional helical flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiogna, Gabriele; Ye, Yu; Grathwohl, Peter; Cirpka, Olaf A.; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Dilution under steady-state flow and transport conditions in porous media occurs primarily by lateral mass exchange at the fringe of solute plumes. This process controls the fate and transport of scalars in groundwater and in chemical reactors and it is fundamental for the understanding of many reactive processes. Three-dimensional flow fields can be characterized by a complex topological structure, which may greatly influence dilution and dilution enhancement of dissolved plumes, which is quantified by the exponential of the Shannon entropy [1]. In previous works, we identified the necessary conditions to obtain helical flow fields in non-stationary anisotropic heterogeneous porous media [2, 3]. To prove our theoretical findings, we perform steady-state bench-scale experiments with a conservative tracer and we provide a model-based investigation of the results [4]. The relevance of transverse mixing enhancement for the case of reactive solute transport is computed numerically using, as metrics of mixing, the length of a reactive plume undergoing an instantaneous complete bimolecular reaction and its critical dilution index. [1] Cirpka O.A., Chiogna G., Rolle M. and A. Bellin (2015). Transverse mixing in three-dimensional non-stationary anisotropic heterogeneous porous media. Water Resources Research, 51, DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015331. [2] Chiogna G., Cirpka O.A., Rolle M. and A. Bellin (2015). Helical flow streamlines in three-dimensional nonstationary anisotropic heterogeneous porous media. Water Resources Research, 51, DOI:10.1002/2014WR015330. [3] Chiogna G., Rolle M., Bellin A. and O.A. Cirpka (2014). Helicity and flow topology in three dimensional porous media. Advances in Water Resources, 73, 134-143, DOI: 10.1016/j.advwatres.2014.06.017. [4] Ye Y., Chiogna G., Cirpka O.A., Grathwohl P., and M. Rolle (2015). Experimental evidence of helical flow in porous media. Phys. Rev. Lett., 115, 194502, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.194502

  1. Effects of texture on salt precipitation dynamics and deposition patterns in drying porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi Rad, Mansoureh; Shokri, Nima

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many natural and engineering applications such as durability of building materials and preservation of monuments, CO2 sequestration and water quality. Also excess of salt accumulation in soil may result in soil salinization which is a global problem adversely affecting vegetation, plant growth and crop production. Thus it is important to understand the parameters affecting salt transport and precipitation in porous media. We applied X-ray micro-tomography to investigate the dynamics of salt precipitation during evaporation from porous media as influenced by the particle and pore sizes. The packed beds were saturated with NaCl solution of 3 Molal and the time-lapse X-ray imaging was continued for one day. The results show that the presence of preferential evaporation sites (associated with fine pores) on the surface of the sand columns influences significantly the patterns and dynamics of NaCl precipitation (Norouzi Rad et al., 2013; Norouzi Rad and Shokri, 2014). They confirm the formation of an increasingly thick and discrete salt crust with increasing grain size in the sand column due to the presence of fewer fine pores (preferential precipitation sites) at the surface compared to the sand packs with finer grains. Fewer fine pores on the surface also results in shorter stage-1 precipitation for the columns with larger grain sizes. A simple model for the evolution of salt crust thickness based on this principle shows a good agreement with our experiments. Our results provide new insights regarding the physics of salt precipitation and its complex dynamics in porous media during evaporation. References Norouzi Rad, M., Shokri, N., Sahimi, M. (2013), Pore-Scale Dynamics of Salt Precipitation in Drying Porous Media, Phys. Rev. E, 88, 032404. Norouzi Rad, M., Shokri, N. (2014), Effects of grain angularity on NaCl precipitation in porous media during evaporation, Water Resour. Res

  2. Optical Analyses of Flow in and Transformation of Deformable Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvalheim Eriksen, Fredrik; Toussaint, Renaud; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Turkaya, Semih; Flekkøy, Eirik

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on the characterization of fluid flow through transforming porous media and the simultaneous transformation of the porous media itself. The motivation is to investigate how fluid flow and deformation of the porous media influence each other, which are complex feedback processes. As a source of data, we have performed controlled experiments of air injection into deformable porous media samples created in the lab. The samples are transparent, horizontal and quasi 2-dimensional, enabling us to visually observe fluid flow through a slice of deformable porous media. The experiments are recorded from above with a digital high-speed camera, providing the raw-data as image sequences with high framerates (250 - 1000 images/s). Analyses on the fluid flow are based on the spatial properties of the observed flow patterns. The spatial properties are derived digitally after the raw-images are transformed into binary images of the flow patterns. Analyses on the transformation of the porous media are based on the frame-to-frame displacement fields of the particles. Such displacement fields are obtained by evaluating a sequence of raw images with a Particle Image Velocimetry software. We aim to show connections between flow observations and porous media observations. Two different kinds of experiments are analyzed. The first is two-phase flow in deformable porous media, and the other is aerofracturing in dry, fine-grained granular packings. The samples for the two-phase flow experiments are created in a circular Hele-Shaw cell with the inlet in the center and the outlet along its rim. Inside the cell, glass beads form a monolayer of deformable porous media saturated with a viscous glycerol-water solution. During an experiment, air is injected into the center of the sample with a constant overpressure, which will force the air to drain the sample radially outwards. This two-phase flow is an unstable event creating fingering patterns of air, while at the same time

  3. Studies of Reaction Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Dissocation in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2005-03-10

    The objective of this study is the description of the kinetic dissociation of CH4-hydrates in porous media, and the determination of the corresponding kinetic parameters. Knowledge of the kinetic dissociation behavior of hydrates can play a critical role in the evaluation of gas production potential of gas hydrate accumulations in geologic media. We analyzed data from a sequence of tests of CH4-hydrate dissociation by means of thermal stimulation. These tests had been conducted on sand cores partially saturated with water, hydrate and CH4 gas, and contained in an x-ray-transparent aluminum pressure vessel. The pressure, volume of released gas, and temperature (at several locations within the cores) were measured. To avoid misinterpreting local changes as global processes, x-ray computed tomography scans provided accurate images of the location and movement of the reaction interface during the course of the experiments. Analysis of the data by means of inverse modeling (history matching ) provided estimates of the thermal properties and of the kinetic parameters of the hydration reaction in porous media. Comparison of the results from the hydrate-bearing porous media cores to those from pure CH4-hydrate samples provided a measure of the effect of the porous medium on the kinetic reaction. A tentative model of composite thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing media was also developed.

  4. Diffusion of Bacterial Cells in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Licata, Nicholas A; Mohari, Bitan; Fuqua, Clay; Setayeshgar, Sima

    2016-01-01

    The chemotaxis signal transduction network regulates the biased random walk of many bacteria in favorable directions and away from harmful ones through modulating the frequency of directional reorientations. In mutants of diverse bacteria lacking the chemotaxis response, migration in classic motility agar, which constitutes a fluid-filled porous medium, is compromised; straight-swimming cells unable to tumble become trapped within the agar matrix. Spontaneous mutations that restore spreading have been previously observed in the enteric bacterium Escherichia coli, and recent work in other bacterial species has isolated and quantified different classes of nonchemotacting mutants exhibiting the same spreading phenotype. We present a theoretical description of bacterial diffusion in a porous medium-the natural habitat for many cell types-which elucidates how diverse modifications of the motility apparatus resulting in a nonzero tumbling frequency allows for unjamming of otherwise straight-swimming cells at internal boundaries and leads to net migration. A unique result of our analysis is increasing diffusive spread with increasing tumbling frequency in the small pore limit, consistent with earlier experimental observations but not captured by previous models. Our theoretical results, combined with a simple model of bacterial diffusion and growth in agar, are compared with our experimental measurements of swim ring expansion as a function of time, demonstrating good quantitative agreement. Our results suggest that the details of the cellular tumbling process may be adapted to enable bacteria to propagate efficiently through complex environments. For engineered, self-propelled microswimmers that navigate via alternating straight runs and changes in direction, these results suggest an optimal reorientation strategy for efficient migration in a porous environment with a given microarchitecture. PMID:26745427

  5. Diffusion Driven Combustion Waves in Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldushin, A. P.; Matkowsky, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Filtration of gas containing oxidizer, to the reaction zone in a porous medium, due, e.g., to a buoyancy force or to an external pressure gradient, leads to the propagation of Filtration combustion (FC) waves. The exothermic reaction occurs between the fuel component of the solid matrix and the oxidizer. In this paper, we analyze the ability of a reaction wave to propagate in a porous medium without the aid of filtration. We find that one possible mechanism of propagation is that the wave is driven by diffusion of oxidizer from the environment. The solution of the combustion problem describing diffusion driven waves is similar to the solution of the Stefan problem describing the propagation of phase transition waves, in that the temperature on the interface between the burned and unburned regions is constant, the combustion wave is described by a similarity solution which is a function of the similarity variable x/square root of(t) and the wave velocity decays as 1/square root of(t). The difference between the two problems is that in the combustion problem the temperature is not prescribed, but rather, is determined as part of the solution. We will show that the length of samples in which such self-sustained combustion waves can occur, must exceed a critical value which strongly depends on the combustion temperature T(sub b). Smaller values of T(sub b) require longer sample lengths for diffusion driven combustion waves to exist. Because of their relatively small velocity, diffusion driven waves are considered to be relevant for the case of low heat losses, which occur for large diameter samples or in microgravity conditions, Another possible mechanism of porous medium combustion describes waves which propagate by consuming the oxidizer initially stored in the pores of the sample. This occurs for abnormally high pressure and gas density. In this case, uniformly propagating planar waves, which are kinetically controlled, can propagate, Diffusion of oxidizer decreases

  6. Spectral-Element Simulations of Wave Propagation in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, C.; Tromp, J.

    2007-12-01

    Biot theory has been extensively used in the petroleum industry, where seismic surveys are performed to determine the physical properties of reservoir rocks. The theory is also of broad general interest when a physical understanding of the coupling between solid and fluid phases is desired. One fundamental result of Biot theory is the prediction of a second compressional wave, which attenuates rapidly, often referred to as "type II" or "Biot's slow compressional wave", in addition to the classical fast compressional and shear waves. The mathematical formulation of wave propagation in porous media developed by Biot is based upon the principle of virtual work, ignoring processes at the microscopic level. Moreover, even if the Biot formulations are claimed to be valid for non-uniform porosity, gradients in porosity are not explicitly incorporated in the original theory. More recent studies focused on averaging techniques to derive the macroscopic porous medium equations from the microscale, and made an attempt to derive an expression for the change in porosity, but there is still room for clarification of such an expression, and to properly integrate the effects of gradients in porosity. We aim to present a straightforward derivation of the main equations describing wave propagation in porous media, with a particular emphasis on the effects of gradients in porosity. We also present a two dimensional numerical implementation of these equations using a spectral-element method. Finally, we have performed different benchmarks to validate our method, involving acoustic-poroelastic waves interaction and wave propagation in heterogenous porous media.

  7. Heat and mass transfer in unsaturated porous media. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, S.W.; Malstaff, G.

    1982-02-01

    A preliminary study of heat and water transport in unsaturated porous media is reported. The project provides background information regarding the feasibility of seasonal thermal energy storage in unconfined aquifers. A parametric analysis of the factors of importance, and an annotated bibliography of research findings pertinent to unconfined aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) are presented. This analysis shows that heat and mass transfer of water vapor assume dominant importance in unsaturated porous media at elevated temperature. Although water vapor fluxes are seldom as large as saturated medium liquid water fluxes, they are important under unsaturated conditions. The major heat transport mechanism for unsaturated porous media at temperatures from 50 to 90/sup 0/C is latent heat flux. The mechanism is nonexistent under saturated conditions but may well control design of unconfined aquifer storage systems. The parametric analysis treats detailed physical phenomena which occur in the flow systems study and demonstrates the temperature and moisture dependence of the transport coefficients of importance. The question of design of an unconfined ATES site is also addressed by considering the effects of aquifer temperature, depth to water table, porous medium flow properties, and surface boundary conditions. Recommendations are made for continuation of this project in its second phase. Both scientific and engineering goals are considered and alternatives are presented.

  8. Theory of ice premelting in porous media.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik; Wettlaufer, J S

    2010-03-01

    Premelting describes the confluence of phenomena that are responsible for the stable existence of the liquid phase of matter in the solid region of its bulk phase diagram. Here we develop a theoretical description of the premelting of water ice contained in a porous matrix, made of a material with a melting temperature substantially larger than ice itself, to predict the amount of liquid water in the matrix at temperatures below its bulk freezing point. Our theory combines the interfacial premelting of ice in contact with the matrix, grain-boundary melting in the ice, and impurity and curvature induced premelting, with the latter occurring in regions which force the ice-liquid interface into a high curvature configuration. These regions are typically found at points where the matrix surface is concave, along contact lines of a grain boundary with the matrix, and in liquid veins. Both interfacial premelting and curvature induced premelting depend on the concentration of impurities in the liquid, which, due to the small segregation coefficient of impurities in ice are treated as homogeneously distributed in the premelted liquid. Our principal result is an equation for the fraction of liquid in the porous medium as a function of the undercooling, which embodies the combined effects of interfacial premelting, curvature induced premelting, and impurities. The result is analyzed in detail and applied to a range of experimentally relevant settings.

  9. Transport of metal oxide nanoparticles in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Ben-Moshe, Tal; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2010-09-01

    The behavior of four types of untreated metal oxide nanoparticles in saturated porous media was studied. The transport of Fe(3)O(4), TiO(2), CuO, and ZnO was measured in a series of column experiments. Vertical columns were packed with uniform, spherical glass beads. The particles were introduced as a pulse suspended in aqueous solutions and breakthrough curves at the outlet were measured using UV-vis spectrometry. Different factors affecting the mobility of the nanoparticles such as ionic strength, addition of organic matter (humic acid), flow rate and pH were investigated. The experiments showed that mobility varies strongly among the nanoparticles, with TiO(2) demonstrating the highest mobility. The mobility is also strongly affected by the experimental conditions. Increasing the ionic strength enhances the deposition of the nanoparticles. On the other hand, addition of humic acid increases the nanoparticle mobility significantly. Lower flow rates again led to reduced mobility, while changes in pH had little effect. Overall, in natural systems, it is expected that the presence of humic acid in soil and aquifer materials, and the ionic strength of the resident water, will be key factors determining nanoparticle mobility.

  10. Flow and displacement of Bingham plastics in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, C.B.; Kharabaf, H.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1995-12-31

    Bingham plastics, which exhibit a finite yield stress at zero shear rate, have been used to model the flow behavior of certain heavy oils at reservoir conditions. In such fluids, the onset of flow and displacement occurs only after the applied pressure gradient exceeds a minimum value. Understanding the flow behavior of such fluids has been limited to phenomenological approaches. In this paper, we present numerical simulations and experimental visualization of flow and immiscible displacement of Bingham plastics in porous media using micromodels. First, we describe a novel pore network simulation approach to determine the onset of flow. The dependence of the critical yield stress on the pore-size distribution is discussed. Visualization experiments of the constant-rate immiscible displacement of Bingham plastics in glass micromodels and Hele-Shaw cells are next presented. The process is subsequently simulated in a pore network. Experiments are successfully simulated with the pore network model. We discuss the effect of the yield stress and injection rate on the displacement patterns. We also propose a classification of the displacement patterns, similar to that for Newtonian displacement.

  11. Oil drainage in model porous media by viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Julien; Bodiguel, Hugues; Colin, Annie

    2012-11-01

    Crude oil recovery efficiency has been shown to depend directly on the capillary number (Ca). If the capillary phenomenon is well described for Newtonian fluids, the consequences of non linear rheology and viscoelasticity require more experimental work at the pore scale. In this work we take advantage of microfluidic to revisit this field. We carried out oil drainage experiments through a micromodel made up with photoresist resin. The wetting phase trapped is a model oil. The invading phases used are aqueous solutions of high molecular weight hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) and surfactant. Qualitatively, we observed a transition between a capillary fingering at low flow rates and a stable front at high flow rates for the drainage experiments with HPAM and surfactant solutions as it happened for drainage with Newtonian fluids. From movies of the filling of the device, we determine the local velocity of all menisci in the porous media. Thus, we quantify the capillary fingering. Surprisingly, local velocities are not significantly different from those measured using water, whereas the HPAM solutions are much more viscous. With betaine solutions, we observed an emulsification of the oil clusters trapped during the invasion leading to a very high oil recovery after percolation.

  12. Laboratory investigation of DNAPL migration in porous media.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Antonella; Viotti, Paolo; Papini, Marco Petrangeli

    2010-04-15

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out with and without groundwater flow in a two-dimensional laboratory-scale tank to assess the influence of layered media and hydraulic gradient on DNAPL infiltration and redistribution processes. Hydrofluoroether has been used as DNAPL and glass beads have been utilized as porous medium. An image analysis procedure has been used to determine saturation distribution during infiltration and redistribution processes. This method allows quantitative time dependent full fields mapping of the DNAPL saturation, as well as the monitoring of DNAPL saturation variation. By means of performed experiments important information were obtained about the migration and redistribution process, the infiltration and migration velocity, the characteristics of migration body. The experimental results show that the hydraulic gradient promotes the infiltration process, increasing the infiltration rate. It hampers DNAPL spread and fingering bringing to a reduction of residual DNAPL and it also promotes the DNAPL redistribution, and it reduces the amount remaining at residual saturation. Furthermore the hydraulic gradient promotes downward and down-gradient migration. DNAPL migration in the direction of water flow, can be considered important due to significant errors in the location of sources in the case of high gradients and high aquifer thicknesses, and for high water flow velocities, such as those which can be expected during pumping actions in water supply or in remediation activities.

  13. Curating Media Learning: Towards a Porous Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDougall, Julian; Potter, John

    2015-01-01

    This article combines research results from a range of projects with two consistent themes. Firstly, we explore the potential for curation to offer a productive metaphor for the convergence of digital media learning across and between home/lifeworld and formal educational/system-world spaces--or between the public and private spheres. Secondly, we…

  14. Imaging spectral electrical properties of variably saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelter, Matthias; Huisman, Johann A.; Kemna, Andreas; Zimmermann, Egon; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    The spatial distribution of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface is of importance for hydrological modeling. Conventional methods to determine unsaturated hydraulic properties in the field are invasive and typically have a poor spatial resolution. In order to overcome these drawbacks, geophysical methods have received much attention in the last decades. Recent results of electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) on a range of saturated and unsaturated porous media revealed promising relationships between spectral electrical and hydraulic properties. Therefore, spectral electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a promising method to image hydraulic properties in the subsurface. While this approach is emerging for aquifer characterization, unsaturated hydraulic properties have not yet been determined by EIT. In order to do so, a laboratory setup has been developed to perform controlled infiltration, drainage and stationary flow experiments on soil columns. A lysimeter with a height of 50 cm and a diameter of 22 cm is equipped with 40 electrodes and 4 tensiometers. An irrigation device at the top controlled by a peristaltic pump is used for a constant and homogeneous infiltration. Outflow is controlled by a suction plate at the bottom where an adjustable vacuum of up to 500 hPa can be applied. In a first measurement series, spectral EIT measurements were performed on a homogeneous sand column during stepwise drainage of the saturated porous medium using predefined pressure at the bottom. First results show that with decreasing water content the low frequency phase shift of complex electrical conductivity increases. This is consistent with previously reported EIS results. Calibrated relationships between electrical and hydraulic properties were used to convert the resulting electrical into hydraulic conductivity images.

  15. Power-exponential velocity distributions in disordered porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyka, Maciej; Gołembiewski, Jarosław; Koza, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Velocity distribution functions link the micro- and macro-level theories of fluid flow through porous media. Here we study them for the fluid absolute velocity and its longitudinal and lateral components relative to the macroscopic flow direction in a model of a random porous medium. We claim that all distributions follow the power-exponential law controlled by an exponent γ and a shift parameter u0 and examine how these parameters depend on the porosity. We find that γ has a universal value 1 /2 at the percolation threshold and grows with the porosity, but never exceeds 2.

  16. Characteristic evaluation of cooling technique using liquid nitrogen and metal porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tanno, Yusuke; Ito, Satoshi; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-29

    A remountable high-temperature superconducting magnet, whose segments can be mounted and demounted repeatedly, has been proposed for construction and maintenance of superconducting magnet and inner reactor components of a fusion reactor. One of the issues in this design is that the performance of the magnet deteriorates by a local temperature rise due to Joule heating in jointing regions. In order to prevent local temperature rise, a cooling system using a cryogenic coolant and metal porous media was proposed and experimental studies have been carried out using liquid nitrogen. In this study, flow and heat transfer characteristics of cooling system using subcooled liquid nitrogen and bronze particle sintered porous media are evaluated through experiments in which the inlet degree of subcooling and flow rate of the liquid nitrogen. The flow characteristics without heat input were coincided with Ergun’s equation expressing single-phase flow in porous materials. The obtained boiling curve was categorized into three conditions; convection region, nucleate boiling region and mixed region with nucleate and film boiling. Wall superheat did not increase drastically with porous media after departure from nucleate boiling point, which is different from a situation of usual boiling curve in a smooth tube. The fact is important characteristic to cooling superconducting magnet to avoid its quench. Heat transfer coefficient with bronze particle sintered porous media was at least twice larger than that without the porous media. It was also indicated qualitatively that departure from nucleate boiling point and heat transfer coefficient depends on degree of subcooling and mass flow rate. The quantitative evaluation of them and further discussion for the cooling system will be performed as future tasks.

  17. CHEMO-hydrodynamic coupling between forced advection in porous media and self-sustained chemical waves.

    PubMed

    Atis, S; Saha, S; Auradou, H; Martin, J; Rakotomalala, N; Talon, L; Salin, D

    2012-09-01

    Autocatalytic reaction fronts between two reacting species in the absence of fluid flow, propagate as solitary waves. The coupling between autocatalytic reaction front and forced simple hydrodynamic flows leads to stationary fronts whose velocity and shape depend on the underlying flow field. We address the issue of the chemico-hydrodynamic coupling between forced advection in porous media and self-sustained chemical waves. Towards that purpose, we perform experiments over a wide range of flow velocities with the well characterized iodate arsenious acid and chlorite-tetrathionate autocatalytic reactions in transparent packed beads porous media. The characteristics of these porous media such as their porosity, tortuosity, and hydrodynamics dispersion are determined. In a pack of beads, the characteristic pore size and the velocity field correlation length are of the order of the bead size. In order to address these two length scales separately, we perform lattice Boltzmann numerical simulations in a stochastic porous medium, which takes into account the log-normal permeability distribution and the spatial correlation of the permeability field. In both experiments and numerical simulations, we observe stationary fronts propagating at a constant velocity with an almost constant front width. Experiments without flow in packed bead porous media with different bead sizes show that the front propagation depends on the tortuous nature of diffusion in the pore space. We observe microscopic effects when the pores are of the size of the chemical front width. We address both supportive co-current and adverse flows with respect to the direction of propagation of the chemical reaction. For supportive flows, experiments and simulations allow observation of two flow regimes. For adverse flow, we observe upstream and downstream front motion as well as static front behaviors over a wide range of flow rates. In order to understand better these observed static state fronts, flow

  18. Imaging of colloidal deposits in granular porous media by X-ray difference micro-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Jean-François; Chen, Cheng; Stonedahl, Susa H.; Lau, Boris L. T.; Keane, Denis T.; Packman, Aaron I.

    2007-09-01

    High resolution synchrotron-based X-ray computed microtomography (X-CMT) was used to identify the morphology of colloidal deposits formed in porous media. We show that difference microtomography - whereby a tomographic reconstruction is performed across an absorption edge - provides valuable information on the nature and location of the aggregates formed by the deposition of colloidal particles. Column experiments were performed using an idealized porous medium consisting of glass beads through which colloidal ZrO2 particles were transported. Tomographic reconstructions of the porous medium and of the aggregate structure provide an unique opportunity to observe colloidal particle deposits and of their morphology. These results show that the local pore geometry controls particle deposition and that deposits tend to form in a rather heterogeneous manner in the porous medium.

  19. Imaging of colloidal deposits in granular porous media by X-ray difference micro-tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, Jean-Francois; Chen, Cheng; Stonedahl, Susa H.; Lau, Boris L.T.; Keane, Denis T.; Packman, Aaron I.

    2008-07-08

    High resolution synchrotron-based X-ray computed microtomography (X-CMT) was used to identify the morphology of colloidal deposits formed in porous media. We show that difference microtomography - whereby a tomographic reconstruction is performed across an absorption edge - provides valuable information on the nature and location of the aggregates formed by the deposition of colloidal particles. Column experiments were performed using an idealized porous medium consisting of glass beads through which colloidal ZrO{sub 2} particles were transported. Tomographic reconstructions of the porous medium and of the aggregate structure provide an unique opportunity to observe colloidal particle deposits and of their morphology. These results show that the local pore geometry controls particle deposition and that deposits tend to form in a rather heterogeneous manner in the porous medium.

  20. Upscaling flow and transport properties in synthetic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, Lukasz; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    Flow and transport through the porous media has instances in nature and industry: contaminant migration in geological formations, gas/oil extraction from proppant filled hydraulic fractures and surrounding porous matrix, underground carbon dioxide sequestration and many others. We would like to understand the behavior of propagating solute front in such medium, mainly flow preferential pathways and the solute dispersion due to the porous medium geometry. The motivation of our investigation is to find connection between the effective flow and transport properties and porous media geometry in 2D and 3D for large system sizes. The challenge is to discover a good way of upscaling flow and transport processes to obtain results comparable to these calculated on pore-scale in much faster way. We study synthetic porous media made of densely packed poly-disperse disk-or spherical-shaped grains in 2D and 3D, respectively. We use various protocols such as the random sequential addition (RSA) algorithm to generate densely packed grains. Imposed macroscopic pressure gradient invokes fluid flow through the pore space of generated porous medium samples. As the flow is considered in the low Reynolds number regime, a stationary velocity field is obtained by solving the Stokes equations by means of finite element method. Void space between the grains is accurately discretized by using body-fitting triangular or tetrahedral mesh. Finally, pure advection of a front carried by the velocity field is studied. Periodicity in all directions is applied to microstructure, flow and transport processes. Effective permeability of the media can be calculated by integrating the velocity field on cross sections, whereas effective dispersion coefficient is deduced by application of centered moment methods on the concentration field of transported solute in time. The effective parameters are investigated as a function of geometrical parameters of the media, such as porosity, specific surface area

  1. Attenuation of Shocks through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Charles A.; Cybyk, Bohdan Z.; Boris, Jay P.

    1998-11-01

    Structures designed to mitigate the effects of blast and shock waves are important for both accidental and controlled explosions. The net effect of these mitigating structures is to reduce the strength of the transmitted shock thereby reducing the dynamic pressure loading on nearby objects. In the present study, the attenuation of planar blast and shock waves by passage through structured media is numerically studied with the FAST3D model. The FAST3D model is a state-of-the-art, portable, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model based on Flux-Corrected Transport and uses the Virtual Cell Embedding algorithm for simulating complex geometries. The effects of media placement, spacing, orientation, and area blockage are parametrically studied to enhance the understanding of the complex processes involved and to determine ways to minimize the adverse effects of these blast waves.

  2. The effect of hydraulic loading on bioclogging in porous media: Quantitative results from tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iltis, G.; Davit, Y.; Connolly, J. M.; Gerlach, R.; Wood, B. D.; Wildenschild, D.

    2013-12-01

    Biofilm growth in porous media is generally surface attached, and pore filling. A direct result of biofilm formation is the clogging of pore space available for fluid transport. This clogging effect has come to be termed bioclogging. In physical experiments bioclogging expresses as an increase in differential pressure across experimental specimens and traditional investigations of bioclogging in 3D porous media have included measurements of bulk differential pressure changes in order to evaluate changes in permeability or hydraulic conductivity. Due to the opaque nature of most types of porous media, visualization of bioclogging has been limited to the use of 2D or pseudo-3D micromodels. As a result, bioclogging models have relied on parameters derived from 2D visualization experiments. Results from these studies have shown that even small changes in pore morphology associated with biofilm growth can significantly alter fluid hydrodynamics. Recent advances in biofilm imaging facilitate the investigation of biofilm growth and bioclogging in porous media through the implementation of x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) and a functional contrast agent. We used barium sulfate as the contrast agent which consists of a particle suspension that fills all pore space available to fluid flow. Utilization of x-ray CMT with a barium sulfate contrast agent facilitates the examination of biofilm growth at the micron scale throughout experimental porous media growth reactors. This method has been applied to investigate changes in macropore morphology associated with biofilm growth. Applied fluid flow rates correspond to initial Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.1 to 100. Results include direct comparison of measured changes in porosity and hydraulic conductivity as calculated using differential pressure measurements vs. images. In addition, parameters such as biofilm thickness, reactive surface area, and attachment surface area will be presented in order to help characterize

  3. Pore-scale simulation of laminar flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piller, M.; Casagrande, D.; Schena, G.; Santini, M.

    2014-04-01

    The experimental investigation of flow through porous media is inherently difficult due to the lack of optical access. The recent developments in the fields of X-ray micro-tomography (micro-CT hereafter), digital sample reconstruction by image-processing techniques and fluid-dynamics simulation, together with the increasing power of super-computers, allow to carry out pore-scale simulations through digitally-reconstructed porous samples. The scientific relevance of pore-scale simulations lies in the possibility of upscaling the pore-level data, yielding volume-averaged quantities useful for practical purposes. One of the best-known examples of upscaling is the calculation of absolute and relative permeability of reservoir rocks. This contribution presents a complete work-flow for setting up pore-scale simulations, starting from the micro-CT of a (in general small) porous sample. Relevant applications are discussed in order to reveal the potential of the proposed methodology.

  4. Effects of capillarity on microscopic flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Miksis, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Central theme of this proposal is to study effects of capillarity on motion of a fluid interface and to apply these results to flow in porous media. Here we report on several problems considered this year, the second year of the grant. In particular we have developed a numerical code to study the dynamics of a gas bubble in a pore in order to examine the fundamental mechanism for the generation of a foam in a porous material, we have started an investigation of the stability of a foam lamella in order to understand the stability of foam flow in a porous material and we have derived systematically a slip coefficient for flow over a rough surface, e.g., as in a pore. In addition we report on work on several other problems.

  5. Horizontal flow and capillarity-driven redistribution in porous media.

    PubMed

    Doster, F; Hönig, O; Hilfer, R

    2012-07-01

    A recent macroscopic mixture theory for two-phase immiscible displacement in porous media has introduced percolating and nonpercolating phases. Quasi-analytic solutions are computed and compared to the traditional theory. The solutions illustrate physical insights and effects due to spatiotemporal changes of nonpercolating phases, and they highlight the differences from traditional theory. Two initial and boundary value problems are solved in one spatial dimension. In the first problem a fluid is displaced by another fluid in a horizontal homogeneous porous medium. The displacing fluid is injected with a flow rate that keeps the saturation constant at the injection point. In the second problem a horizontal homogeneous porous medium is considered which is divided into two subdomains with different but constant initial saturations. Capillary forces lead to a redistribution of the fluids. Errors in the literature are reported and corrected.

  6. NMR studies of granular media and two-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyu

    This dissertation describes two experimental studies of a vibrofluidized granular medium and a preliminary study of two-phase fluid flow in a porous medium using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The first study of granular medium is to test a scaling law of the rise in center of mass in a three-dimensional vibrofluidized granular system. Our granular system consisted of mustard seeds vibrated vertically at 40 Hz from 0g to 14g. We used Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to measure density profile in vibrated direction. We observed that the rise in center of mass scaled as nu 0alpha/Nlbeta with alpha = 1.0 +/- 0.2 and beta = 0.5 +/- 0.1, where nu 0 is the vibration velocity and Nl is the number of layers of grains in the container. A simple theory was proposed to explain the scaling exponents. In the second study we measured both density and velocity information in the same setup of the first study. Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG)-NMR combined with MRI was used to do this measurement. The granular system was fully fluidized at 14.85g 50 Hz with Nl ≤ 4. The velocity distributions at horizontal and vertical direction at different height were measured. The distributions were nearly-Gaussian far from sample bottom and non-Gaussian near sample bottom. Granular temperature profiles were calculated from the velocity distributions. The density and temperature profile were fit to a hydrodynamic theory. The theory agreed with experiments very well. A temperature inversion near top was also observed and explained by additional transport coefficient from granular hydrodynamics. The third study was the preliminary density measurement of invading phase profile in a two-phase flow in porous media. The purpose of this study was to test an invasion percolation with gradient (IPG) theory in two-phase flow of porous media. Two phases are dodecane and water doped with CuSO4. The porous medium was packed glass beads. The front tail width sigma and front width of invading phase were

  7. Plume dynamics in Hele-Shaw porous media convection.

    PubMed

    Ecke, Robert E; Backhaus, Scott

    2016-10-13

    Mass transport in multi-species porous media is through molecular diffusion and plume dynamics. Predicting the rate of mass transport has application in determining the efficiency of the storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide. We study a water and propylene-glycol system enclosed in a Hele-Shaw cell with variable permeability that represents a laboratory analogue of the general properties of porous media convection. The interface between the fluids, tracked using an optical shadowgraph technique, is used to determine the mass transport rate, the spatial separation of solutal plumes, and the velocity and width characteristics of those plumes. One finds that the plume dynamics are closely related to the mass transport rate.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'. PMID:27597786

  8. Dissipative particle dynamics model for colloid transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2013-08-01

    We present that the transport of colloidal particles in porous media can be effectively modeled with a new formulation of dissipative particle dynamics, which augments standard DPD with non-central dissipative shear forces between particles while preserving angular momentum. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the new formulation is able to capture accurately the drag forces as well as the drag torques on colloidal particles that result from the hydrodynamic retardation effect. In the present work, we use the new formulation to study the contact efficiency in colloid filtration in saturated porous media. Note that the present model include all transport mechanisms simultaneously, including gravitational sedimentation, interception and Brownian diffusion. Our results of contact efficiency show a good agreement with the predictions of the correlation equation proposed by Tufenkji and EliMelech, which also incorporate all transport mechanisms simultaneously without the additivity assumption.

  9. Lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible flows through porous media.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaoli; Zhao, T S

    2002-09-01

    In this paper a lattice Boltzmann model is proposed for isothermal incompressible flow in porous media. The key point is to include the porosity into the equilibrium distribution, and add a force term to the evolution equation to account for the linear and nonlinear drag forces of the medium (the Darcy's term and the Forcheimer's term). Through the Chapman-Enskog procedure, the generalized Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow in porous media are derived from the present lattice Boltzmann model. The generalized two-dimensional Poiseuille flow, Couette flow, and lid-driven cavity flow are simulated using the present model. It is found the numerical results agree well with the analytical and/or the finite-difference solutions.

  10. On growth and flow: bacterial biofilms in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, William; Leombruni, Alberto; Tranzer, Olivier; Stocker, Roman

    2011-11-01

    Bacterial biofilms often occur in porous media, where they play pivotal roles in medicine, industry and the environment. Though flow is ubiquitous in porous media, its effects on biofilm growth have been largely ignored. Using patterned microfluidic devices that simulate unconsolidated soil, we find that the structure of Escherichia coli biofilms undergoes a self-organization mediated by the interaction of growth and flow. Intriguingly, we find that biofilm productivity peaks at intermediate flow rates, when the biofilm is irrigated by a minimum number of preferential flow channels. At larger and smaller flow rates, fluid flows more uniformly through the matrix, but productivity drops due to removal by shear and reduced nutrient transport, respectively. These dynamics are correctly predicted by a simple network model. The observed tradeoff between growth and flow may have important consequences on biofilm-mediated processes such as biochemical cycling, antibiotic resistance and water filtration.

  11. Analysis of Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Bae; Yavuz Corapcioglu, M.

    2004-08-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite, transmitted through aqueous environments in the form of an oocyst. In this study, a transport model into which sorption, filtration and inactivation mechanisms are incorporated is applied to simulate laboratory column data, and the suitability of a kinetic model to describe the C. parvum oocyst transport and removal in porous media is compared with an equilibrium model. The kinetic model is applied to simulate previous column experimental data and successfully simulates the concentration peak; the late time tailing effect appeared in the breakthrough curves, indicating that the kinetic model is more suitable than the equilibrium one at simulating the fate and transport of the oocysts in porous media. Simulation illustrates that sorption causes retardation along with a tailing in the breakthrough curve. Additionally, filtration acts as a major mechanism of removing the oocysts from the aqueous phase, whereas the role of inactivation in reducing the viable oocyst concentration is minimal.

  12. Colloid suspension stability and transport through unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, M.A.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1997-04-01

    Contaminant transport is traditionally modeled in a two-phase system: a mobile aqueous phase and an immobile solid phase. Over the last 15 years, there has been an increasing awareness of a third, mobile solid phase. This mobile solid phase, or mobile colloids, are organic or inorganic submicron-sized particles that move with groundwater flow. When colloids are present, the net effect on radionuclide transport is that radionuclides can move faster through the system. It is not known whether mobile colloids exist in the subsurface environment of the Hanford Site. Furthermore, it is not known if mobile colloids would likely exist in a plume emanating from a Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal site. No attempt was made in this study to ascertain whether colloids would form. Instead, experiments and calculations were conducted to evaluate the likelihood that colloids, if formed, would remain in suspension and move through saturated and unsaturated sediments. The objectives of this study were to evaluate three aspects of colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides as they specifically relate to the LLW Performance Assessment. These objectives were: (1) determine if the chemical conditions likely to exist in the near and far field of the proposed disposal site are prone to induce flocculation (settling of colloids from suspension) or dispersion of naturally occurring Hanford colloids, (2) identify the important mechanisms likely involved in the removal of colloids from a Hanford sediment, and (3) determine if colloids can move through unsaturated porous media.

  13. Normalized inverse characterization of sound absorbing rigid porous media.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Tomasz G

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the inverse characterization of sound absorbing rigid porous media, based on standard measurements of the surface acoustic impedance of a porous sample. The model parameters need to be normalized to have a robust identification procedure which fits the model-predicted impedance curves with the measured ones. Such a normalization provides a substitute set of dimensionless (normalized) parameters unambiguously related to the original model parameters. Moreover, two scaling frequencies are introduced, however, they are not additional parameters and for different, yet reasonable, assumptions of their values, the identification procedure should eventually lead to the same solution. The proposed identification technique uses measured and computed impedance curves for a porous sample not only in the standard configuration, that is, set to the rigid termination piston in an impedance tube, but also with air gaps of known thicknesses between the sample and the piston. Therefore, all necessary analytical formulas for sound propagation in double-layered media are provided. The methodology is illustrated by one numerical test and by two examples based on the experimental measurements of the acoustic impedance and absorption of porous ceramic samples of different thicknesses and a sample of polyurethane foam. PMID:26093413

  14. Computation of streaming potential in porous media: Modified permeability tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; DasGupta, Debabrata; Mitra, Sushanta K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-11-01

    We quantify the pressure-driven electrokinetic transport of electrolytes in porous media through a matched asymptotic expansion based method to obtain a homogenized description of the upscaled transport. The pressure driven flow of aqueous electrolytes over charged surfaces leads to the generation of an induced electric potential, commonly termed as the streaming potential. We derive an expression for the modified permeability tensor, K↔eff, which is analogous to the Darcy permeability tensor with due accounting for the induced streaming potential. The porous media herein are modeled as spatially periodic. The modified permeability tensor is obtained for both topographically simple and complex domains by enforcing a zero net global current. Towards resolving the complicated details of the porous medium in a computationally efficient framework, the domain identification and reconstruction of the geometries are performed using adaptive quadtree (in 2D) and octree (in 3D) algorithms, which allows one to resolve the solid-liquid interface as per the desired level of resolution. We discuss the influence of the induced streaming potential on the modification of the Darcy law in connection to transport processes through porous plugs, clays and soils by considering a case-study on Berea sandstone.

  15. Reconstruction of Porous Media with Multiple Solid Phases

    PubMed

    Losic; Thovert; Adler

    1997-02-15

    A process is proposed to generate three-dimensional multiphase porous media with fixed phase probabilities and an overall correlation function. By varying the parameters, a specific phase can be located either at the interface between two phases or within a single phase. When the interfacial phase has a relatively small probability, its shape can be chosen as granular or lamellar. The influence of a third phase on the macroscopic conductivity of a medium is illustrated. PMID:9056372

  16. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Scale Dependent Transport Phenomena and Bioactivity in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, J. D.; Codd, S. L.; Romanenko, K. V.; Hornemann, J. A.; Brosten, T. R.

    2008-05-01

    equations, closure problems and comparison with experiment. Chemical Engineering Science, 48(14): 2537-2564 (1993). 2. N. Goldenfeld and L.P. Kadanoff, Simple lessons from complexity. Science, 284: 87-89 (1999). 3. J.D. Seymour and P.T. Callaghan, Generalized approach to NMR analysis of flow and dispersion in porous medium. AIChE Journal, 43: 2096-2111 (1997). 4. S.L. Codd, B. Manz, J.D. Seymour, and P.T. Callaghan, Taylor dispersion and molecular displacements in poiseuille flow. Physical Review E, 60(4): R3491-R3494 (1999). 5. P.T. Callaghan, Principles of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy. New York: Oxford University Press (1991). 6. G.K. Batchelor, Developments in microhydrodynamics, in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, W.T. Koiter, Editor. North-Holland: Amsterdam. p. 33-55 (1976). 7. J.D. Seymour, J.P. Gage, S.L. Codd, and R. Gerlach, Anomalous fluid transport in porous media induced by biofilm growth. Physical Review Letters, 93: 198103 (2004).

  17. The flow around circular cylinders partially coated with porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruck, Bodo; Klausmann, Katharina; Wacker, Tobias

    2012-05-01

    There are indications that the flow resistance of bodies can be reduced by a porous coating or porous sheath. A few numerical investigations exists in this field, however, experimental evidence is lacking. In order to investigate this phenomenon, the drag resistance of cylinders with porous coating has been investigated qualitatively and quantitatively in wind tunnel experiments. The Reynolds number was systematically varied in the range from 104 to 1.3*105. The results show that the boundary layer over the porous surface is turbulent right from the beginning and thickens faster because of the possible vertical momentum exchange at the interface. The region of flow detachment is widened resulting in a broader area with almost vanishing low flow velocities. All in all, the measurements show that a full porous coating of the cylinders increase the flow resistance. However, the measurements show that a partial coating only on the leeward side can decrease the flow resistance of the body. This effect seems due to the fact that the recirculating velocity and the underpressure in the wake is reduced significantly through a leeward porous coating. Thus, combining a smooth non-permeable windward side with a porous-coated leeward side can lead to a reduction of the body's flow resistance. These findings can be applied advantageously in many technical areas, such as energy saving of moving bodies (cars/trains/planes) or in reducing fluid loads on submersed bodies.

  18. Small scale flow processes in aqueous heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Rashidi, M.; Dickenson, E.

    1996-04-01

    Small scale flow processes in aqueous heterogeneous porous systems have been studied experimentally via novel nonintrusive fluorescence imaging techniques. The techniques involve 3D visualization and quantification of flow fields within a refractive index-matched transparent porous column. The refractive index-matching yields a transparent porous medium, free from any scattering and refraction at the solid-liquid interfaces, as a result allowing direct optical probing at any point within the porous system. By illuminating the porous regions within the column with a planar sheet of laser beam, flow processes through the porous medium can be observed microscopically, and qualitative and quantitative in-pore transport information can be obtained at a good resolution and a good accuracy. A CCD camera is used to record the fluorescent images at every vertical plane location while sweeping back and forth across the column. These digitized flow images are then analyzed and accumulated over a 3D volume within the column. Series of flow experiments in aqueous, refractive index-matched, porous systems packed with natural mineral particles have been performed successfully in these laboratories.

  19. Application of a portable nuclear magnetic resonance surface probe to porous media.

    PubMed

    Marko, Andriy; Wolter, Bernd; Arnold, Walter

    2007-03-01

    A portable nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) surface probe was used to determine the time-dependent self-diffusion coefficient D(t) of water molecules in two fluid-filled porous media. The measuring equipment and the inhomogeneous magnetic fields in the sensitive volume of the probe are described. It is discussed how to evaluate D(t) using a surface probe from the primary and stimulated echoes generated in three-pulse experiments. Furthermore, the evaluation of D(t) allows one to determine the geometrical structure of porous materials.

  20. Dendrite Suppression by Shock Electrodeposition in Charged Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji-Hyung; Wang, Miao; Bai, Peng; Brushett, Fikile R; Bazant, Martin Z

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that surface conduction can stabilize electrodeposition in random, charged porous media at high rates, above the diffusion-limited current. After linear sweep voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy, copper electrodeposits are visualized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy in two different porous separators (cellulose nitrate, polyethylene), whose surfaces are modified by layer-by-layer deposition of positive or negative charged polyelectrolytes. Above the limiting current, surface conduction inhibits growth in the positive separators and produces irregular dendrites, while it enhances growth and suppresses dendrites behind a deionization shock in the negative separators, also leading to improved cycle life. The discovery of stable uniform growth in the random media differs from the non-uniform growth observed in parallel nanopores and cannot be explained by classic quasi-steady "leaky membrane" models, which always predict instability and dendritic growth. Instead, the experimental results suggest that transient electro-diffusion in random porous media imparts the stability of a deionization shock to the growing metal interface behind it. Shock electrodeposition could be exploited to enhance the cycle life and recharging rate of metal batteries or to accelerate the fabrication of metal matrix composite coatings. PMID:27307136

  1. Pore Scale View of Fluid Displacement Fronts in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Moebius, F.

    2014-12-01

    The macroscopically smooth and regular motion of fluid fronts in porous media is composed of abrupt pore-scale interfacial jumps involving intense interfacial energy release marked by pressure bursts and acoustic emissions. The characteristics of these pore scale events affect residual phase entrapment and the resulting unsaturated transport properties behind the front. Experimental studies using acoustic emissions technique (AE), rapid imaging, and pressure measurements help characterize pore scale processes during drainage and imbibition in model porous media. Imbibition and drainage produce different AE signatures (obeying a power law). For rapid drainage, AE signals persist long after cessation of front motion indicative of redistribution and interfacial relaxation. Rapid imaging revealed that interfacial jumps exceed mean front velocity and are highly inertial (Re>1000). Imaged pore invasion volumes and pore volumes deduced from waiting times between pressure fluctuations were in remarkable agreement with geometric pores. Differences between invaded volumes and geometrical pores increase with increasing capillary numbers due to shorter pore evacuation times and onset of simultaneous invasion events. A new mechanistic model for interfacial motions through a pore-throat network enabled systematic evaluation of inertia in interfacial dynamics. Results suggest that in contrast to great sensitivity of pore scale dynamics to variations in pore geometry and boundary conditions, inertia exerts only a minor effect on average phase entrapment. Pore scale invasion events paint a complex picture of rapid and inertial motions and provide new insights on mechanisms at displacement fronts essential for improving the macroscopic description of multiphase flow in porous media.

  2. Dendrite Suppression by Shock Electrodeposition in Charged Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ji-Hyung; Wang, Miao; Bai, Peng; Brushett, Fikile R.; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that surface conduction can stabilize electrodeposition in random, charged porous media at high rates, above the diffusion-limited current. After linear sweep voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy, copper electrodeposits are visualized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy in two different porous separators (cellulose nitrate, polyethylene), whose surfaces are modified by layer-by-layer deposition of positive or negative charged polyelectrolytes. Above the limiting current, surface conduction inhibits growth in the positive separators and produces irregular dendrites, while it enhances growth and suppresses dendrites behind a deionization shock in the negative separators, also leading to improved cycle life. The discovery of stable uniform growth in the random media differs from the non-uniform growth observed in parallel nanopores and cannot be explained by classic quasi-steady “leaky membrane” models, which always predict instability and dendritic growth. Instead, the experimental results suggest that transient electro-diffusion in random porous media imparts the stability of a deionization shock to the growing metal interface behind it. Shock electrodeposition could be exploited to enhance the cycle life and recharging rate of metal batteries or to accelerate the fabrication of metal matrix composite coatings.

  3. Dendrite Suppression by Shock Electrodeposition in Charged Porous Media

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji-Hyung; Wang, Miao; Bai, Peng; Brushett, Fikile R.; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that surface conduction can stabilize electrodeposition in random, charged porous media at high rates, above the diffusion-limited current. After linear sweep voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy, copper electrodeposits are visualized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy in two different porous separators (cellulose nitrate, polyethylene), whose surfaces are modified by layer-by-layer deposition of positive or negative charged polyelectrolytes. Above the limiting current, surface conduction inhibits growth in the positive separators and produces irregular dendrites, while it enhances growth and suppresses dendrites behind a deionization shock in the negative separators, also leading to improved cycle life. The discovery of stable uniform growth in the random media differs from the non-uniform growth observed in parallel nanopores and cannot be explained by classic quasi-steady “leaky membrane” models, which always predict instability and dendritic growth. Instead, the experimental results suggest that transient electro-diffusion in random porous media imparts the stability of a deionization shock to the growing metal interface behind it. Shock electrodeposition could be exploited to enhance the cycle life and recharging rate of metal batteries or to accelerate the fabrication of metal matrix composite coatings. PMID:27307136

  4. Laboratory measurement of sorption in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Harr, M.S.; Pettit, P.; Ramey, J.J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A new apparatus for measuring steam adsorption-desorption isothermally on rock samples has been installed and initial runs made for rock samples from geothermal reservoirs. The amounts adsorbed measured in these experiments are the same order of magnitude as previous experiments.

  5. Evaporation and capillary coupling across vertical textural contrasts in porous media.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2009-10-01

    High and nearly constant evaporation rates from initially saturated porous media are sustained by capillary-driven flow from receding drying front below the evaporating surface. The spatial extent of continuous liquid pathways in homogeneous porous medium is defined by its hydraulically connected pore size distribution. We consider here evaporative losses from porous media consisting of two hydraulically coupled dissimilar domains each with own pore and particle size distributions separated by sharp vertical textural contrast. Evaporation experiments from texturally dissimilar media were monitored using neutron transmission and dye pattern imaging to quantify water distribution and drying front dynamics. Drying front invades exclusively coarse-textured domain while fine-textured domain remains saturated and its surface continuously coupled with the atmosphere. Results show that evaporation from fine-textured surface was supplied by liquid flow from adjacent coarse domain driven by capillary pressure differences between the porous media. A first characteristic length defining limiting drying front depth during which fine sand region remains saturated is deduced from difference in air-entry pressures of the two porous media. A second characteristic length defining the end of high evaporation rate includes the extent of continuous liquid films pinned in the crevices of the pore space and between particle contacts in the fine medium. We established numerically the lateral extent of evaporation-induced hydraulic coupling that is limited by viscous losses and gravity. For certain combinations of soil types the lateral extent of hydraulic coupling may exceed distances of 10 m. Results suggest that evaporative water losses from heterogeneous and coupled system are larger compared with uncoupled or homogenized equivalent systems. PMID:19905447

  6. Mineral carbonation in water-unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, A. L.; Dipple, G. M.; Mayer, K. U.; Power, I. M.

    2014-12-01

    Ultramafic mine tailings have an untapped capacity to sequester CO2 directly from air or CO2-rich gas streams via carbonation of tailings minerals [1]. The CO2 sequestration capacity of these sites could be exploited simply by increasing the supply of CO2 into tailings, such as through circulation of air or flue gas from mine site power plants [1,2]. Mine tailings storage facilities typically have heterogeneously distributed pore water [1], affecting both the reactive capacity of the porous medium and the exposure of reactive phases to CO2 [3]. We examine the physical reaction processes that govern carbonation efficiency in variably saturated porous media using meter-scale column experiments containing the tailings mineral, brucite [Mg(OH)2], that were supplied with 10% CO2 gas streams. The experiments were instrumented with water content and gas phase CO2 sensors to track changes in water saturation and CO2concentration with time. The precipitation of hydrated Mg-carbonates as rinds encasing brucite particles resulted in passivation of brucite surfaces and an abrupt shut down of the reaction prior to completion. Moreover, the extent of reaction was further limited at low water saturation due to the lack of water available to form hydrated Mg-carbonates, which incorporate water into their crystal structures. Reactive transport modeling using MIN3P-DUSTY [4] revealed that the instantaneous reaction rate was not strongly affected by water saturation, but the reactive capacity was reduced significantly. Surface passivation and water-limited reaction resulted in a highly non-geometric evolution of reactive surface area. The extent of reaction was also limited at high water content because viscous fingering of the gas streams injected at the base of the columns resulted in narrow zones of highly carbonated material, but left a large proportion of brucite unreacted. The implication is that carbonation efficiency in mine tailings could be maximized by targeting an

  7. Thermal diffusion of radon in porous media.

    PubMed

    Minkin, L

    2003-01-01

    Based on the non-intersection model of cylindrical capillaries, the mean radius of the pores of some soils and building materials are estimated. In size, the above-mentioned radii are usually of the order of the free path of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure. A review of pore size distribution data also reveals that a large fraction of concrete pores belong to Knudsen's region. This fact indicates that the thermal gradient in these media must cause gas (radon) transport. The interpretation of the experimental data concerning the rate of emanation of 222Rn from a concrete-capped source subjected to a sudden increase in temperature is given, based on irreversible thermodynamics theory. The calculations given here for radon flux, caused by concentration and thermal gradients, are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. It is shown that thermodiffusion can significantly contribute to radon flux in concrete. The need to include the thermodiffusion radon flux in the radon entry model is discussed.

  8. Dual mesh method in heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Verdiere, S.; Guerillot, D.

    1995-08-01

    More and more computerized geological models provide reservoir descriptions of million cells. Currently fluid flow simulations with these media need upscaling techniques. Sometimes these averaging techniques modify drastically the behaviour of the solutions. In fact, the results are averaged phase pressure and saturations, and for compositionnal modelling, components of the oil or gas. A specific discretisation in time and space for each unknown is proposed in the poster to overcome this drawback. For a typical two phase problem, a high resolution grid for the water saturation equation, and a low resolution grid for the pressure equation are used. The interest of this {open_quotes}Dual Mesh Method{close_quotes} is to keep the information on the distribution of the saturation to compute accurate averaged parameters for the pressure equation. The method is then a way to dynamically update the pseudo functions for the relative and capillary pressure curves. The poster presents applications to both homogeneous and heterogeneous geological models. Comparing this method with current numerical scheme demonstrates that it is possible to apply this approach to full field simulations with more accurate solutions for the same computer cost. For cases where a priori pseudos are not valid, this Dual Mesh Method is the only way to overcome this difficulty.

  9. Influence of the Gas-Water Interface on Transport of Microorganisms through Unsaturated Porous Media

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jiamin; Wilson, John L.; Kieft, Thomas L.

    1994-01-01

    In this article, a new mechanism influencing the transport of microorganisms through unsaturated porous media is examined, and a new method for directly visualizing bacterial behavior within a porous medium under controlled chemical and flow conditions is introduced. Resting cells of hydrophilic and relatively hydrophobic bacterial strains isolated from groundwater were used as model microorganisms. The degree of hydrophobicity was determined by contact-angle measurements. Glass micromodels allowed the direct observation of bacterial behavior on a pore scale, and three types of sand columns with different gas saturations provided quantitative measurements of the observed phenomena on a porous medium scale. The reproducibility of each break-through curve was established in three to five repeated experiments. The data collected from the column experiments can be explained by phenomena directly observed in the micromodel experiments. The retention rate of bacteria is proportional to the gas saturation in porous media because of the preferential sorption of bacteria onto the gas-water interface over the solid-water interface. The degree of sorption is controlled mainly by cell surface hydrophobicity under the simulated groundwater conditions because of hydrophobic forces between the organisms and the interfaces. The sorption onto the gas-water interface is essentially irreversible because of capillary forces. This preferential and irreversible sorption at the gas-water interface strongly influences the movement and spatial distribution of microorganisms. Images PMID:16349180

  10. Influence of the Gas-Water Interface on Transport of Microorganisms through Unsaturated Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Wan, J; Wilson, J L; Kieft, T L

    1994-02-01

    In this article, a new mechanism influencing the transport of microorganisms through unsaturated porous media is examined, and a new method for directly visualizing bacterial behavior within a porous medium under controlled chemical and flow conditions is introduced. Resting cells of hydrophilic and relatively hydrophobic bacterial strains isolated from groundwater were used as model microorganisms. The degree of hydrophobicity was determined by contact-angle measurements. Glass micromodels allowed the direct observation of bacterial behavior on a pore scale, and three types of sand columns with different gas saturations provided quantitative measurements of the observed phenomena on a porous medium scale. The reproducibility of each break-through curve was established in three to five repeated experiments. The data collected from the column experiments can be explained by phenomena directly observed in the micromodel experiments. The retention rate of bacteria is proportional to the gas saturation in porous media because of the preferential sorption of bacteria onto the gas-water interface over the solid-water interface. The degree of sorption is controlled mainly by cell surface hydrophobicity under the simulated groundwater conditions because of hydrophobic forces between the organisms and the interfaces. The sorption onto the gas-water interface is essentially irreversible because of capillary forces. This preferential and irreversible sorption at the gas-water interface strongly influences the movement and spatial distribution of microorganisms.

  11. Neutron imaging of hydrogen-rich fluids in geomaterials and engineered porous media: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfect, E.; Cheng, C.-L.; Kang, M.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Lamanna, J. M.; Gragg, M. J.; Wright, D. M.

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in visualization technologies are providing new discoveries as well as answering old questions with respect to the phase structure and flow of hydrogen-rich fluids, such as water and oil, within porous media. Magnetic resonance and x-ray imaging are sometimes employed in this context, but are subject to significant limitations. In contrast, neutrons are ideally suited for imaging hydrogen-rich fluids in abiotic non-hydrogenous porous media because they are strongly attenuated by hydrogen and can "see" through the solid matrix in a non-destructive fashion. This review paper provides an overview of the general principles behind the use of neutrons to image hydrogen-rich fluids in both 2-dimensions (radiography) and 3-dimensions (tomography). Engineering standards for the neutron imaging method are examined. The main body of the paper consists of a comprehensive review of the diverse scientific literature on neutron imaging of static and dynamic experiments involving variably-saturated geomaterials (rocks and soils) and engineered porous media (bricks and ceramics, concrete, fuel cells, heat pipes, and porous glass). Finally some emerging areas that offer promising opportunities for future research are discussed.

  12. Porous Media and Mixture Models for Hygrothermal Behavior of Phenolic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Stokes, Eric H.

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical models are proposed to describe the interaction of water with phenolic polymer. The theoretical models involve the study of the flow of a viscous fluid through a porous media and the thermodynamic theory of mixtures. From the theory, a set of mathematical relations are developed to simulate the effect of water on the thermostructural response of phenolic composites. The expressions are applied to simulate the measured effect of water in a series of experiments conducted on carbon phenolic composites.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of chemical dissolution in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Qinjun; Zhang, Dongxiao; Chen, Shiyi; He, Xiaoyi

    2002-03-01

    In this paper, we develop a lattice Boltzmann model for simulating the transport and reaction of fluids in porous media. To simulate such a system, we account for the interaction of forced convection, molecular diffusion, and surface reaction. The problem is complicated by the evolution of the porous media geometry due to chemical reactions, which may significantly and continuously modify the hydrologic properties of the media. The particular application that motivates the present study is acid stimulation, a common technique used to increase production from petroleum reservoirs. This technique involves the injection of acid (e.g., hydrochloric acid, HCl, acetic acid, HAc) into the formation to dissolve minerals comprising the rock. As acid is injected, highly conductive channels or ``wormholes'' may be formed. The dissolution of carbonate rocks in 0.5M HCl and 0.5M HAc is simulated with the lattice Boltzmann model developed in this study. The dependence of dissolution process and the geometry of the final wormhole pattern on the acid type and the injection rate is studied. The results agree qualitatively with the experimental and theoretical analyses of others and substantiate the previous finding that there exists an optimal injection rate at which the wormhole is formed as well as the number of pore volumes of the injected fluid to break through is minimized. This study also confirms the experimentally observed phenomenon that the optimal injection rate decreases and the corresponding minimized number of pore volumes to break through increases as the acid is changed from HCl to HAc. Simulations suggest that the proposed lattice Boltzmann model may serve as an alternative reliable quantitative approach to study chemical dissolution in porous media.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of chemical dissolution in porous media.

    PubMed

    Kang, Qinjun; Zhang, Dongxiao; Chen, Shiyi; He, Xiaoyi

    2002-03-01

    In this paper, we develop a lattice Boltzmann model for simulating the transport and reaction of fluids in porous media. To simulate such a system, we account for the interaction of forced convection, molecular diffusion, and surface reaction. The problem is complicated by the evolution of the porous media geometry due to chemical reactions, which may significantly and continuously modify the hydrologic properties of the media. The particular application that motivates the present study is acid stimulation, a common technique used to increase production from petroleum reservoirs. This technique involves the injection of acid (e.g., hydrochloric acid, HCl, acetic acid, HAc) into the formation to dissolve minerals comprising the rock. As acid is injected, highly conductive channels or "wormholes" may be formed. The dissolution of carbonate rocks in 0.5M HCl and 0.5M HAc is simulated with the lattice Boltzmann model developed in this study. The dependence of dissolution process and the geometry of the final wormhole pattern on the acid type and the injection rate is studied. The results agree qualitatively with the experimental and theoretical analyses of others and substantiate the previous finding that there exists an optimal injection rate at which the wormhole is formed as well as the number of pore volumes of the injected fluid to break through is minimized. This study also confirms the experimentally observed phenomenon that the optimal injection rate decreases and the corresponding minimized number of pore volumes to break through increases as the acid is changed from HCl to HAc. Simulations suggest that the proposed lattice Boltzmann model may serve as an alternative reliable quantitative approach to study chemical dissolution in porous media.

  15. Combustion Characteristics of Biofuels in Porous-Media Burners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barajas, Pablo E.; Parthasarathy, R. N.; Gollahalli, S. R.

    2010-05-01

    Biofuels, such as canola methyl ester (CME) and soy methyl ester (SME) derived from vegetable oil are alternative sources of energy that have been developed to reduce the dependence on petroleum-based fuels. In the present study, CME, SME, commercial Jet-A fuel were tested in a porous-media burner. The measured combustion characteristics at an initial equivalence ratio of 0.8 included NOx and CO emission indices, radiative fractions of heat release, and axial temperatures. The effects of fuel on the injector and porous media durability were also documented. The NOx emission index was higher for the SME and CME flames than that of the Jet-A flame. Furthermore, the axial temperature profiles were similar for all the flames. The prolonged use of CME and SME resulted in the solid-particle deposition on the metal walls of the injector and within the structure of the porous medium, thereby increasing the restriction to the fuel/air flow.

  16. Measurement of Interfacial Area Production and Permeability within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the pore-level interactions that affect multi-phase flow in porous media is important in many subsurface engineering applications, including enhanced oil recovery, remediation of dense non-aqueous liquid contaminated sites, and geologic CO2 sequestration. Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to have several shortcomings, which might partially be overcome using a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles that includes interfacial area as an additional parameter. A few static experimental studies have been previously performed, which allowed the determination of static parameters of the model, but no information exists concerning the interfacial area dynamic parameters. A new experimental porous flow cell that was constructed using stereolithography for two-phase gas-liquid flow studies was used in conjunction with an in-house analysis code to provide information on dynamic evolution of both fluid phases and gas-liquid interfaces. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the new generalized model of two-phase flow model and describe how the stereolithography flow cell experimental setup was used to obtain the dynamic parameters for the interfacial area numerical model. In particular, the methods used to determine the interfacial area permeability and production terms are shown.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Displacement Studies of Flow, Dispersion and Reaction in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederman, A. J.; Gladden, L. F.; Johns, M. L.; Mantle, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of the wide variety of Magnetic Resonance (MR) techniques which are used to investigate transport processes in porous media. By using this data along with simulations of flow in porous media an insight can be gained into the underlying fundamental processes. The unique capabilities of NMR/MRI allow non-invasive spatially resolved measurement of transport, diffusion, chemical composition and local molecular environment. Here displacement and dispersion are investigated in a variety of porous materials including beadpacks and rock cores; as is the extent to which the transport is affected by the type of porous matrix used and the rheological properties of the fluid. MRI velocity images show structural data and local heterogeneities in velocity while probability distributions of molecular displacements are made with NMR-PFG measurements. By suitable experimental implementation, both local and non-local dispersion measurements can be made in the pre-asymptotic and asymptotic regimes. These experiments show an increasing dispersion as the pore structure becomes more heterogeneous and as the fluid becomes more shear-thinning. MRI structural images of porous media provide an input lattice for fluid flow simulations using the lattice- Boltzmann technique from which displacement predictions are made. These are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results. The effect on molecular displacements of alterations to structure heterogeneity and microscale dynamics are simulated and compared to observed experimental changes. It is shown that in reactive flows it is possible to measure quantitatively the local chemical composition with MRI. These experiments show the effect of the local structural and velocity heterogeneities on conversion. With the inclusion of diffusion/mass transfer and reaction kinetics in the lattice-Boltzmann technique, the conversion is simulated and compared with the experiment.

  18. Transport of bacteria in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Anke; Ustohal, Petr; Harms, Hauke; Stauffer, Fritz; Dracos, Themistocles; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.

    1998-09-01

    Bacterial mobility in unsaturated soils plays an important role in bioremediation, biofacilitated transport of pollutants, and dispersal of pathogenic microorganisms. A sand column equipped with ports for measuring water pressure and water saturation has been used to study bacterial transport under well-defined unsaturated flow conditions. Bacterial breakthrough curves at various water saturations were obtained for two soil bacteria. Retention of hydrophobic Rhodococcus sp. C125 and mesohydrophilic Pseudomonas putida mt2 was markedly increased at lower water saturation. A mechanistic model for bacterial transport under unsaturated conditions is proposed. The model attributes stronger bacterial retention under unsaturated conditions to the accumulation of bacteria at the air-water interface. Moreover, the model takes into account changes in the available surface areas of both the solid surface and the air-water interface due to coverage by bacteria and changes in the water flow. Application of the model to our own data and data from the literature showed that short-term breakthrough experiments can be simulated, but that the model deviates from experimental observation in long-term experiments. Reasons for this deviation are discussed, and suggestions for a further model extension are made. All investigated colloidal particles had a higher affinity to the air-water interface than to the solid surface. Therefore, trapping of bacteria by air-water interfaces is an important process possibly controlling bacterial transport in unsaturated soils.

  19. The Role of Biofilms and Curli in Salmonella Transport Through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, A. E.; Zhang, W.; Morales, V. L.; Cakmak, M. E.; Hay, A. G.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    Microbial pathogens, such as Salmonella and E. coli, are continually deposited in the environment and have been shown to contaminate the groundwater by leaching through the vadose zone. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms controlling the transport of these microbial pathogens through porous media is critical to protecting drinking water supplies. As previous research has shown, retention of microbial pathogens in porous media can be influenced by numerous biological factors. Consequently, this experiment specifically investigated the role of biofilm formation and curli production on the transport of environmental Salmonella through porous media. Environmental Salmonella strains used in the experiment were isolated from tile drains on dairy farms. In addition, two well-characterized E. coli strains with known high and low biofilm and curli producing capabilities were tested as controls alongside the Salmonella isolates throughout the experiment. The isolates were first assayed for their ability to form biofilms and produce curli, and then a subset of these isolates, representing range of high and low biofilm and curli formation capabilities, were simultaneously examined for transport characteristics through packed sand columns. Transport characteristics were tested for correlation with biofilm and curli-forming capabilities. Unlike the E. coli strains in which column retention correlated with biofilm formation and curli production, no obvious correlation between Salmonella phenotypes was observed. The results indicate that while transport of well-characterized laboratory E. coli strains can often be hindered by the presence of curli and biofilms, such assumptions are not fully representative of the behavior exhibited by environmental isolates of Salmonella.

  20. A cellular automaton simulation of contaminant transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, D.M.; Simonson, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    A simulation tool to investigate radionuclide transport in porous groundwater flow is described. The flow systems of interest are those important in determining the fate of radionuclides emplaced in an underground repository, such as saturated matrix flow, matrix and fracture flow in the unsaturated zone, and viscous fingering in porous fractures. The work discussed here is confined to consideration of saturated flow in porous media carrying a dilute, sorptive species. The simulation technique is based on a special class of cellular automata known as lattice gas automata (LGA) which are capable of predicting hydrodynamic behavior. The original two-dimensional scheme (that of Frisch et. al. known as the FHP model) used particles of unit mass traveling on a triangular lattice with unit velocity and undergoing simple collisions which conserve mass and momentum at each node. These microscopic rules go over to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the macroscopic limit. One of the strengths of this technique is the natural way that heterogeneities, such as boundaries, are accommodated. Complex geometries such as those associated with porous microstructures can be modeled effectively. Several constructions based on the FHP model have been devised, including techniques to eliminate statistical noise, extension to three dimensions, and the addition of surface tension which leads to multiphase flow.

  1. P-adic model of transport in porous disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Adrei Yu.; Oleschko, Klaudia

    2014-05-01

    The soil porosity and permeability are the most important quantitative indicators of soil dynamics under the land-use change. The main problema in the modeling of this dynamic is still poor correlation between the real measuring data and the mathematical and computer simulation models. In order to overpassed this deep divorce we have designed a new technique, able to compare the data arised from the multiscale image analices and time series of the basic physical properties dynamics in porous media studied in time and space. We present a model of the diffusion reaction type describing transport in disordered porous media, e.g., water or oil flow in a complex network of pores. Our model is based on p-adic representation of such networks. This is a kind of fractal representation. We explore advantages of p- adic representation, namely, the possibility to endow p-adic trees with an algebraic structure and ultrametric topology and, hence, to apply analysis which have (at least some) similarities with ordinary real analysis on the straight line. We present the system of two diffusion reaction equations describing propagation of particles in networks of pores in disordered media. As an application, one can consider water transport through the soil pore Networks, or oil flow through capillaries nets. Under some restrictions on potentials and rate coefficients we found the stationary regime corresponding to water content or concentration of oil in a cluster of capillaries. Usage of p-adic analysis (in particular, p-adic wavelets) gives a possibility to find the stationary solution in the analytic form which makes possible to present a clear pedological or geological picture of the process. The mathematical model elaborated in this paper (Khrennikov, 2013) can be applied to variety of problems from water concentration in aquifers to the problem of formation of oil reservoirs in disordered media with porous structures. Another possible application may have real practical

  2. Fixation of radioactive ions in porous media with ion exchange gels

    DOEpatents

    Mercer, Jr., Basil W.; Godfrey, Wesley L.

    1979-01-01

    A method is provided for fixing radioactive ions in porous media by injecting into the porous media water-soluble organic monomers which are polymerizable to gel structures with ion exchange sites and polymerizing the monomers to form ion exchange gels. The ions and the particles of the porous media are thereby physically fixed in place by the gel structure and, in addition, the ions are chemically fixed by the ion exchange properties of the resulting gel.

  3. Assessment of quantitative imaging of contaminant distributions in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catania, F.; Massabò, M.; Valle, M.; Bracco, G.; Paladino, O.

    2008-01-01

    In this article an experimental setup designed to assist in the characterization of complex solute transport problems in porous media is described. Glass beads representing the medium are confined in a 2-D transparent Perspex box and a water flow transports a fluorescent dye. Under suitable illumination, the dye emits visible light which is collected by a CCD camera. The image acquired by this non-invasive optical technique is processed to estimate the 2-dimensional distribution of tracer concentrations by using an appropriate calibration curve that links fluorescent intensity and solute concentration. Details about the dye choice and discussion about photobleaching are reported. An analysis of the experimental error on the concentration profile is also presented. A few recent results of a study on contaminant plume within a homogenous porous matrix constituted by glass beads having mean diameter of 1 mm or 2 mm shows the performance of constructed model.

  4. Cotransport of bismerthiazol and montmorillonite colloids in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chongyang; Wang, Hong; Lazouskaya, Volha; Du, Yichun; Lu, Weilan; Wu, Junxue; Zhang, Hongyan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2015-01-01

    While bismerthiazol [N,N'-methylene-bis-(2-amino-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole)] is one of the most widely used bactericides, the transport of bismerthiazol in subsurface environments is unclear to date. Moreover, natural colloids are ubiquitous in the subsurface environments. The cotransport of bismerthiazol and natural colloids has not been investigated. This study conducted laboratory column experiments to examine the transport of bismerthiazol in saturated sand porous media both in the absence and presence of montmorillonite colloids. Results show that a fraction of bismerthiazol was retained in sand and the retention was higher at pH7 than at pH 4 and 10. The retention did not change with ionic strength. The retention was attributed to the complex of bismerthiazol with metals/metal oxides on sand surfaces through ligand exchange. The transport of bismerthiazol was enhanced with montmorillonite colloids copresent in the solutions and, concurrently, the transport of montmorillonite colloids was facilitated by the bismerthiazol. The transport of montmorillonite colloids was enhanced likely because the bismerthiazol and the colloids competed for the attachment/adsorption sites on collector surfaces and the presence of bismerthiazol changed the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies between colloids and collectors. The transport of bismerthiazol was inhibited if montmorillonite colloids were pre-deposited in sand because bismerthiazol could adsorb onto the colloid surfaces. The adsorbed bismerthiazol could be co-remobilized with the colloids from primary minima by decreasing ionic strength. Whereas colloid-facilitated transport of pesticides has been emphasized, our study implies that transport of colloids could also be facilitated by the presence of pesticides.

  5. Rock Physics Models of Biofilm Growth in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, P.; alhadhrami, F. M.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies suggest the potential to use acoustic techniques to image biofilm growth in porous media. Nonetheless the interpretation of the seismic response to biofilm growth and development remains speculative because of the lack of quantitative petrophysical models that can relate changes in biofilm saturation to changes in seismic attributes. Here, we report our efforts in developing quantitative rock physics models to biofilm saturation with increasing and decreasing P-wave velocity (VP) and amplitudes recorded in the Davis et al. [2010] physical scale experiment. We adapted rock physics models developed for modeling gas hydrates in unconsolidated sediments. Two distinct growth models, which appear to be a function of pore throat size, are needed to explain the experimental data. First, introduction of biofilm as an additional mineral grain in the sediment matrix (load-bearing mode) is needed to explain the increasing time-lapse VP. Second, introduction of biofilm as part of the pore fluid (pore-filling mode) is required to explain the decreasing time-lapse VP. To explain the time-lapse VP, up to 15% of the pore volume was required to be saturated with biofilm. The recorded seismic amplitudes, which can be expressed as a function of porosity, permeability and grain size, showed a monotonic time-lapse decay except on Day 3 at a few selected locations, where it increased. Since porosity changes are constrained by VP, amplitude increase could be modeled by increasing hydraulic conductivity. Time lapse VP at locations with increasing amplitudes suggest that these locations have a load-bearing growth style. We conclude that permeability can increase by up to 10% at low (~2%) biofilm saturation in load-bearing growth style due to the development of channels within the biofilm structure. Developing a rock physics model for the biofilm growth in general may help create a field guide for interpreting porosity and permeability changes in bioremediation, MEOR and

  6. Complex resistivity signatures of ethanol biodegradation in porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personna, Yves Robert; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Werkema, Dale; Szabo, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Numerous adverse effects are associated with the accidental release of ethanol (EtOH) and its persistence in the subsurface. Geophysical techniques may permit non-invasive, real time monitoring of microbial degradation of hydrocarbon. We performed complex resistivity (CR) measurements in conjunction with geochemical data analysis on three microbial-stimulated and two control columns to investigate changes in electrical properties during EtOH biodegradation processes in porous media. A Debye Decomposition approach was applied to determine the chargeability (m), normalized chargeability (mn) and time constant (τ) of the polarization magnitude and relaxation length scale as a function of time. The CR responses showed a clear distinction between the bioaugmented and control columns in terms of real (σ′) and imaginary (σ″) conductivity, phase (ϕ) and apparent formation factor (Fapp). Unlike the control columns, a substantial decrease in σ′ and increase in Fapp occurred at an early time (within 4 days) of the experiment for all three bioaugmented columns. The observed decrease in σ′ is opposite to previous studies on hydrocarbon biodegradation. These columns also exhibited increases in ϕ (up to ~ 9 mrad) and σ″ (up to two order of magnitude higher) 5 weeks after microbial inoculation. Variations in m and mn were consistent with temporal changes in ϕ and σ″ responses, respectively. Temporal geochemical changes and high resolution scanning electron microscopy imaging corroborated the CR findings, thus indicating the sensitivity of CR measurements to EtOH biodegradation processes. Our results offer insight into the potential application of CR measurements for long-term monitoring of biogeochemical and mineralogical changes during intrinsic and induced EtOH biodegradation in the subsurface.

  7. Cotransport of bismerthiazol and montmorillonite colloids in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chongyang; Wang, Hong; Lazouskaya, Volha; Du, Yichun; Lu, Weilan; Wu, Junxue; Zhang, Hongyan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2015-06-01

    While bismerthiazol [N,N‧-methylene-bis-(2-amino-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole)] is one of the most widely used bactericides, the transport of bismerthiazol in subsurface environments is unclear to date. Moreover, natural colloids are ubiquitous in the subsurface environments. The cotransport of bismerthiazol and natural colloids has not been investigated. This study conducted laboratory column experiments to examine the transport of bismerthiazol in saturated sand porous media both in the absence and presence of montmorillonite colloids. Results show that a fraction of bismerthiazol was retained in sand and the retention was higher at pH 7 than at pH 4 and 10. The retention did not change with ionic strength. The retention was attributed to the complex of bismerthiazol with metals/metal oxides on sand surfaces through ligand exchange. The transport of bismerthiazol was enhanced with montmorillonite colloids copresent in the solutions and, concurrently, the transport of montmorillonite colloids was facilitated by the bismerthiazol. The transport of montmorillonite colloids was enhanced likely because the bismerthiazol and the colloids competed for the attachment/adsorption sites on collector surfaces and the presence of bismerthiazol changed the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies between colloids and collectors. The transport of bismerthiazol was inhibited if montmorillonite colloids were pre-deposited in sand because bismerthiazol could adsorb onto the colloid surfaces. The adsorbed bismerthiazol could be co-remobilized with the colloids from primary minima by decreasing ionic strength. Whereas colloid-facilitated transport of pesticides has been emphasized, our study implies that transport of colloids could also be facilitated by the presence of pesticides.

  8. Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

    2009-03-01

    Adsorbed water films strongly influence residual water saturations and hydraulic conductivities in porous media at low saturations. Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media were investigated through combining Langmuir's film model with scaling analysis, without use of any adjustable parameters. Diffuse double layer influences are predicted to be important through the strong dependence of adsorbed water film thickness (f) on matric potential ({Psi}) and ion charge (z). Film thickness, film velocity, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity are predicted to vary with z{sup -1}, z{sup -2}, and z{sup -3}, respectively. In monodisperse granular media, the characteristic grain size ({lambda}) controls film hydraulics through {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of (1) the perimeter length per unit cross sectional area over which films occur, (2) the critical matric potential ({Psi}{sub c}) below which films control flow, and (3) the magnitude of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity when {Psi} < {Psi}{sub c}. While it is recognized that finer textured sediments have higher unsaturated hydraulic conductivities than coarser sands at intermediate {Psi}, the {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of hydraulic conductivity predicted here extends this understanding to very low saturations where all pores are drained. Extremely low unsaturated hydraulic conductivities are predicted under adsorbed film-controlled conditions (generally < 0.1 mm y{sup -1}). On flat surfaces, the film hydraulic diffusivity is shown to be constant (invariant with respect to {Psi}).

  9. Calculation of the effective permeability of saturated random porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostvar, S.; Wood, B. D.; Apte, S.; Liburdy, J.

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the effective permeability tensor is an essential part of Darcy-scale representations of flow in porous media. The permeability tensor itself is a property of the medium, and depends only on the microscale geometry of the system. Determining the functional relationships between effective permeability (or conductivity in the general sense) and the structure of the medium is an old problem, with the earliest results for ordered porous media dating the 1920's. In this presentation, we report on the results of (1) detailed theory development, and (2) computations for the effective permeability tensor in fully-saturated random sphere packs, with a focus on the computational results. The theory is developed by volume averaging the Stokes equations, and using developing appropriate closures via potential theory, and has been reported on previously. For the computations, we have adopted an immersed boundary method to fully resolve the pore-scale velocity field. From our results, we compute the hydraulic permeability for both ordered and random media, and we compare these results with existing analytical solutions for the hydraulic conductivity in periodic arrays.

  10. Stochastic-convective transport with nonlinear reaction and mixing: application to intermediate-scale experiments in aerobic biodegradation in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginn, T. R.; Murphy, E. M.; Chilakapati, A.; Seeboonruang, U.

    2001-03-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of benzoate by Pseudomonas cepacia sp. in a saturated heterogeneous porous medium was simulated using the stochastic-convective reaction (SCR) approach. A laboratory flow cell was randomly packed with low permeability silt-size inclusions in a high permeability sand matrix. In the SCR upscaling approach, the characteristics of the flow field are determined by the breakthrough of a conservative tracer. Spatial information on the actual location of the heterogeneities is not used. The mass balance equations governing the nonlinear and multicomponent reactive transport are recast in terms of reactive transports in each of a finite number of discrete streamtubes. The streamtube ensemble members represent transport via a steady constant average velocity per streamtube and a conventional Fickian dispersion term, and their contributions to the observed breakthroughs are determined by flux-averaging the streamtube solute concentrations. The resulting simulations were compared to those from a high-resolution deterministic simulation of the reactive transport, and to alternative ensemble representations involving (i) effective Fickian travel time distribution function, (ii) purely convective streamtube transport, and (iii) streamtube ensemble subset simulations. The results of the SCR simulation compare favorably to that of a sophisticated high-resolution deterministic approach.

  11. Experimental investigation of transverse mixing in porous media under helical flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A; Grathwohl, Peter; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Plume dilution and transverse mixing can be considerably enhanced by helical flow occurring in three-dimensional heterogeneous anisotropic porous media. In this study, we perform tracer experiments in a fully three-dimensional flow-through chamber to investigate the effects of helical flow on plume spiraling and deformation, as well as on its dilution. Porous media were packed in angled stripes of materials with different grain sizes to create blocks with macroscopically anisotropic hydraulic conductivity, which caused helical flows. Steady-state transport experiments were carried out by continuously injecting dye tracers at different inlet ports. High-resolution measurements of concentration and flow rates were performed at 49 outlet ports. These measurements allowed quantifying the spreading and dilution of the solute plumes at the outlet cross section. Direct evidence of plume spiraling and visual proof of helical flow was obtained by freezing and slicing the porous media at different cross sections and observing the dye-tracer distribution. We simulated flow and transport to interpret our experimental observations and investigate the effects of helical flow on mixing-controlled reactive transport. The simulation results were evaluated using metrics of reactive mixing such as the critical dilution index and the length of continuously injected steady-state plumes. The results show considerable reaction enhancement, quantified by the remarkable decrease of reactive plume lengths (up to four times) in helical flows compared to analogous scenarios in uniform flows. PMID:27575223

  12. Experimental investigation of transverse mixing in porous media under helical flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A; Grathwohl, Peter; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Plume dilution and transverse mixing can be considerably enhanced by helical flow occurring in three-dimensional heterogeneous anisotropic porous media. In this study, we perform tracer experiments in a fully three-dimensional flow-through chamber to investigate the effects of helical flow on plume spiraling and deformation, as well as on its dilution. Porous media were packed in angled stripes of materials with different grain sizes to create blocks with macroscopically anisotropic hydraulic conductivity, which caused helical flows. Steady-state transport experiments were carried out by continuously injecting dye tracers at different inlet ports. High-resolution measurements of concentration and flow rates were performed at 49 outlet ports. These measurements allowed quantifying the spreading and dilution of the solute plumes at the outlet cross section. Direct evidence of plume spiraling and visual proof of helical flow was obtained by freezing and slicing the porous media at different cross sections and observing the dye-tracer distribution. We simulated flow and transport to interpret our experimental observations and investigate the effects of helical flow on mixing-controlled reactive transport. The simulation results were evaluated using metrics of reactive mixing such as the critical dilution index and the length of continuously injected steady-state plumes. The results show considerable reaction enhancement, quantified by the remarkable decrease of reactive plume lengths (up to four times) in helical flows compared to analogous scenarios in uniform flows.

  13. Colloid Deposit Morphology and Clogging in Porous Media: Fundamental Insights Through Investigation of Deposit Fractal Dimension.

    PubMed

    Roth, Eric J; Gilbert, Benjamin; Mays, David C

    2015-10-20

    Experiments reveal a wide discrepancy between the permeability of porous media containing colloid deposits and the available predictive equations. Evidence suggests that this discrepancy results, in part, from the predictive equations failing to account for colloid deposit morphology. This article reports a series of experiments using static light scattering (SLS) to characterize colloid deposit morphology within refractive index matched (RIM) porous media during flow through a column. Real time measurements of permeability, specific deposit, deposit fractal dimension, and deposit radius of gyration, at different vertical positions, were conducted with initially clean porous media at various ionic strengths and fluid velocities. Decreased permeability (i.e., increased clogging) corresponded with higher specific deposit, lower fractal dimension, and smaller radius of gyration. During deposition, fractal dimension, radius of gyration, and permeability decreased with increasing specific deposit. During flushing with colloid-free fluid, these trends reversed, with increased fractal dimension, radius of gyration, and permeability. These observations suggest a deposition scenario in which large and uniform aggregates become deposits, which reduce porosity, lead to higher fluid shear forces, which then decompose the deposits, filling the pore space with small and dendritic fragments of aggregate.

  14. Dynamics of coupled contaminant and microbial transport in heterogeneous porous media. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, T.R.; Boone, D.R.; Fletcher, M.M.; Friedrich, D.M.; Murphy, E.M.

    1997-06-01

    'Dynamic microbial attachment/detachment occurs in subsurface systems in response to changing environmental conditions caused by contaminant movement and degradation. Understanding the environmental conditions and mechanisms by which anaerobic bacteria partition between aqueous and solid phases is a critical requirement for designing and evaluating in situ bioremediation efforts. This interdisciplinary research project will provide fundamental information on the attachment/detachment dynamics of anaerobic bacteria in heterogeneous porous media under growth and growth-limiting conditions. Experiments will provide information on passive and active attachment/detachment mechanisms used by growing anaerobes capable of reductive dechlorination. Theoretical representations of these attachment/detachment mechanisms will be incorporated into existing groundwater flow and contaminant transport models that incorporate heterogeneity effects and can be used to predict behavior at field scales. These mechanistic-based models will be tested against experimental data provided through controlled laboratory experiments in heterogeneous porous media in large (meter-scale) 2-D flow cells. In addition to a mechanistic-based predictive model, this research will lead to new theories for the transient spatial distribution of microbial populations and contaminant plumes in heterogeneous porous media, improving the capability for designing staged remediation strategies for dealing with mixed contaminants.'

  15. Dynamics of coupled contaminant and microbial transport in heterogeneous porous media. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, T.R.; Cushman, J.H.; Murphy, E.M.; Fletcher, M.

    1998-06-01

    'Dynamic microbial attachment/detachment occurs in subsurface systems in response to changing environmental conditions caused by contaminant movement and degradation. Understanding the environmental conditions and mechanisms by which anaerobic bacteria partition between aqueous and solid phases is a critical requirement for designing and evaluating in-situ bioremediation efforts. This interdisciplinary research project will provide fundamental information on the attachment/detachment dynamics of anaerobic bacteria in heterogeneous porous media under growth and growth-limiting conditions. Experiments will provide information on passive and active attachment/detachment mechanisms used by growing anaerobes capable of reductive dechlorination. Theoretical representations of these attachment/detachment mechanisms will be incorporated into existing flow and transport models that incorporate heterogeneity effects and can be used to predict behavior at field scales. These mechanistic-based models will be tested against experimental data provided through controlled laboratory experiments in heterogeneous porous media in large (meter-scale) 2-D flow cells. In addition to a mechanistic-based predictive model, this research will lead to new theories for the transient spatial distribution of microbial populations and contaminant plumes in heterogeneous porous media, improving the capability for designing staged remediation strategies for dealing with mixed contaminants.'

  16. A rapid screening technique for estimating nanoparticle transport in porous media.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Dermont; Zhang, Wei; Chang, Xiaojun

    2013-08-01

    Quantifying the mobility of engineered nanoparticles in hydrologic pathways from point of release to human or ecological receptors is essential for assessing environmental exposures. Column transport experiments are a widely used technique to estimate the transport parameters of engineered nanoparticles in the subsurface environment, but this technique is often time-consuming, labor-intensive, and of low sample throughput. Thus, the traditional column experiment is unlikely to be a viable tool for processing the large numbers of engineered nanomaterials in various types of porous media that will be needed for environmental impact assessment and regulatory activities. Here we present a high throughput screening technique for nanoparticle transport using 96 deep well plate columns packed with porous media. The technique was tested for the transport of 60-nm polystyrene microspheres, fullerene C60 nanoparticles (aq/nC60), and surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in 0.001-0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) through Iota quartz sand and Calls Creek sediment. Our results showed that this screening technique produced highly reproducible column hydrodynamic properties as revealed by conservative tracer tests and precise measurements of nanoparticle transport parameters. Additionally, all nanoparticles exhibited greater retention in the sediment than in Iota quartz, and the retention of SDS-SWNTs decreased with increasing SDS concentrations, which is consistent with the existing literature. We conclude that this technique is well suited for rapidly screening the mobility of engineered nanomaterials in porous media.

  17. Experimental investigation of the displacement of viscous fluids from porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshnikov, Nikolay; Belyakov, Georgy; Tairova, Aliya; Turuntaev, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    The problems of increase of oil recover by means of a reservoir flooding are considered as a basis for the study. The results of laboratory experimental investigations of different-viscosity and immiscible Newtonian fluid flows through porous media are presented. The investigations were carried out for a Hele-Shaw cell filled by two types of porous media. The basic difference from the previous studies is the observation of the flow after break-through of the displacing fluid into sink. A series of qualitative and quantitative results which clarify the physics of immiscible fluid flows through capillaries and porous media were obtained in the course of the experimental investigations. Experiments carried out confirm the proposition of the Saffman-Taylor theory concerning the instability of the displacement front when a lower-viscosity fluid displaces a higher-viscosity fluid. It was found that the unstable flow pattern is determined not by the length of the capillary wave which disrupts the flow but by the geometry of the pore space. Experiments on the displacement of oil from capillary by water show that the oil can be completely driven out of the capillary due to the development of wavy flow after the displacing fluid arrives at the capillary outlet.

  18. Study of Displacement Efficiency and Flow Behavior of Foamed Gel in Non-Homogeneous Porous Media

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Baojun; Wei, Mingzhen

    2015-01-01

    Field trials have demonstrated that foamed gel is a very cost-effective technology for profile modification and water shut-off. However, the mechanisms of profile modification and flow behavior of foamed gel in non-homogeneous porous media are not yet well understood. In order to investigate these mechanisms and the interactions between foamed gel and oil in porous media, coreflooding and pore-scale visualization waterflooding experiments were performed in the laboratory. The results of the coreflooding experiment in non-homogeneous porous media showed that the displacement efficiency improved by approximately 30% after injecting a 0.3 pore volume of foamed gel, and was proportional to the pore volumes of the injected foamed gel. Additionally, the mid-high permeability zone can be selectively plugged by foamed gel, and then oil located in the low permeability zone will be displaced. The visualization images demonstrated that the amoeba effect and Jamin effect are the main mechanisms for enhancing oil recovery by foamed gel. Compared with conventional gel, a unique benefit of foamed gel is that it can pass through micropores by transforming into arbitrary shapes without rupturing, this phenomenon has been named the amoeba effect. Additionally, the stability of foam in the presence of crude oil also was investigated. Image and statistical analysis showed that these foams boast excellent oil resistance and elasticity, which allows them to work deep within formations. PMID:26030282

  19. Experimental investigation of transverse mixing in porous media under helical flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A.; Grathwohl, Peter; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Plume dilution and transverse mixing can be considerably enhanced by helical flow occurring in three-dimensional heterogeneous anisotropic porous media. In this study, we perform tracer experiments in a fully three-dimensional flow-through chamber to investigate the effects of helical flow on plume spiraling and deformation, as well as on its dilution. Porous media were packed in angled stripes of materials with different grain sizes to create blocks with macroscopically anisotropic hydraulic conductivity, which caused helical flows. Steady-state transport experiments were carried out by continuously injecting dye tracers at different inlet ports. High-resolution measurements of concentration and flow rates were performed at 49 outlet ports. These measurements allowed quantifying the spreading and dilution of the solute plumes at the outlet cross section. Direct evidence of plume spiraling and visual proof of helical flow was obtained by freezing and slicing the porous media at different cross sections and observing the dye-tracer distribution. We simulated flow and transport to interpret our experimental observations and investigate the effects of helical flow on mixing-controlled reactive transport. The simulation results were evaluated using metrics of reactive mixing such as the critical dilution index and the length of continuously injected steady-state plumes. The results show considerable reaction enhancement, quantified by the remarkable decrease of reactive plume lengths (up to four times) in helical flows compared to analogous scenarios in uniform flows.

  20. Enhanced transport of Si-coated nanoscale zero-valent iron particles in porous media.

    PubMed

    HonetschlÄgerová, Lenka; Janouškovcová, Petra; Kubal, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory column experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of previously described silica coating method on the transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in porous media. The silica coating method showed the potential to prevent the agglomeration of nZVI. Transport experiments were conducted using laboratory-scale sand-packed columns at conditions that were very similar of natural groundwater. Transport properties of non-coated and silica-coated nZVI are investigated in columns of 40 cm length, which were filled with porous media. A suspension was injected in three different Fe particle concentrations (100, 500, and 1000 mg/L) at flow 5  mL/min. Experimental results were compared using nanoparticle attachment efficiency and travel distances which were calculated by classical particle filtration theory. It was found that non-coated particles were essentially immobile in porous media. In contrast, silica-coated particles showed significant transport distances at the tested conditions. Results of this study suggest that silica can increase nZVI mobility in the subsurface.

  1. Bacteria transport through porous media. Annual report, December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1986-09-01

    The following five chapters in this report have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base: (1) theoretical model of convective diffusion of motile and non-motile bacteria toward solid surfaces; (2) interfacial electrochemistry of oxide surfaces in oil-bearing sands and sandstones; (3) effects of sodium pyrophosphate additive on the ''huff and puff''/nutrient flooding MEOR process; (4) interaction of Escherichia coli B, B/4, and bacteriophage T4D with Berea sandstone rock in relation to enhanced oil recovery; and (5) transport of bacteria in porous media and its significance in microbial enhanced oil recovery.

  2. Domain growth, wetting, and scaling in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Grunau, D.W.; Lookman, T.; Chen, S.Y.; Lapedes, A.S. )

    1993-12-20

    The lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is used to study the kinetics of domain growth of a binary fluid in a number of geometries modeling two-dimensional porous media. Unlike methods which solve the Cahn-Hilliard equation, the LB method correctly simulates fluid properties, phase segregation, interface dynamics, and wetting. Our results, based on lattice sizes of up to 4096[times]4096, show little evidence to indicate the breakdown of late stage dynamical scaling, and suggest that confinement of the fluid is the key to the slow kinetics observed. Randomness of the pore structure appears unnecessary.

  3. A Porous Media Model for Blood Flow within Reticulated Foam.

    PubMed

    Ortega, J M

    2013-08-01

    A porous media model is developed for non-Newtonian blood flow through reticulated foam at Reynolds numbers ranging from 10(-8) to 10. This empirical model effectively divides the pressure gradient versus flow speed curve into three regimes, in which either the non-Newtonian viscous forces, the Newtonian viscous forces, or the inertial fluid forces are most prevalent. When compared to simulation data of blood flow through two reticulated foam geometries, the model adequately captures the pressure gradient within all three regimes, especially that within the Newtonian regime where blood transitions from a power-law to a constant viscosity fluid. PMID:24031095

  4. A Porous Media Model for Blood Flow within Reticulated Foam

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    A porous media model is developed for non-Newtonian blood flow through reticulated foam at Reynolds numbers ranging from 10−8 to 10. This empirical model effectively divides the pressure gradient versus flow speed curve into three regimes, in which either the non-Newtonian viscous forces, the Newtonian viscous forces, or the inertial fluid forces are most prevalent. When compared to simulation data of blood flow through two reticulated foam geometries, the model adequately captures the pressure gradient within all three regimes, especially that within the Newtonian regime where blood transitions from a power-law to a constant viscosity fluid. PMID:24031095

  5. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of immiscible fluids in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisch, H.; Mitrovic, D.; Nordbotten, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    The time development of an interface separating two immiscible fluids of different densities in heterogeneous two-dimensional porous media is studied. The governing equations are simplified with the help of approximate Green's functions which allow computation of the shape of the interface directly without resolving the fluid flow in the entire domain. The new formulation is amenable to numerical approximation, and the reduction in dimension leads to a significant gain in efficiency in the numerical simulation of the interfacial dynamics. Several test cases are investigated, and the numerical solutions are compared to known exact solutions and experimental data.

  6. Multi-phase Thermohaline Convection in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, S.; Driesner, T.; Matthai, S. K.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    The simultaneous motion of heat and dissolved solutes by aqueous or magmatic fluids through porous or fractured media within the earth's crust is a key factor that drives many important geological processes, such as the formation of large ore deposits, cooling of new-formed oceanic crust along mid-ocean ridges, metamorphism, or the evolution of geothermal systems. The motion of such crustal fluids is usually dominated by convection due to density differences within the fluids that arise from pressure, temperature and compositional variations present in the fluids. Oxygen isotope data and fluid inclusion data indicate that fluids may percolate down to 15 km depth and experience temperatures exceeding 700 {o}C. Although crustal fluids commonly contain various dissolved chemical components and gases, the most abundant solute is salt, i.e. NaCl. Hence, changes in the concentration of NaCl influence the density variations of crustal fluids the most. The presence of NaCl in H2O has decisive effects on the thermodynamics and hydrodynamics of crustal fluids. NaCl-H2O fluids can boil and separate into a high-density brine and low-salinity vapor at much higher temperatures and pressures than the critical temperature and pressure for pure H2O. NaCl-H2O fluids may also become saturated with respect to NaCl such that a solid NaCl phase coexists with a liquid or vapor fluid phase. Because salt advects faster than heat but diffuses slower than heat, the resulting double-diffusive and double-convective motion of salt and heat may lead to non-linear flow instabilities such as periodic or chaotic behavior. While many studies have addressed the theory of convection driven by temperature and/or salinity gradients, they were limited to a Boussinesq approximation and neglected phase separation. In this study we have numerically examined the behavior of multi-phase thermohaline convection in a porous media heated and salted from below using a novel finite element - finite volume

  7. A novel approach to model hydraulic and electrical conductivity in fractal porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, B.; Daigle, H.; Sahimi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate prediction of conductivity in partially-saturated porous media has broad applications in various phenomena in porous media, and has been studied intensively since the 1940s by petroleum, chemical and civil engineers, and hydrologists. Many of the models developed in the past are based on the bundle of capillary tubes. In addition, pore network models have also been developed for simulating multiphase fluid flow in porous media and computing the conductivity in unsaturated porous media. In this study, we propose a novel approach using concepts from the effective-medium approximation (EMA) and percolation theory to model hydraulic and electrical conductivity in fractal porous media whose pore-size distributions exhibit power-law scaling. In our approach, the EMA, originally developed for predicting electrical conductivity of composite materials, is used to predict the effective conductivity, from complete saturation to some intermediate water content that represents a crossover point. Below the crossover water content, but still above a critical saturation (percolation threshold), a universal scaling predicted by percolation theory, a power law that expresses the dependence of the conductivity on the water content (less a critical water saturation) with an exponent of 2, is invoked to describe the effective conductivity. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the approach, experimental data were used from the literature. The predicted hydraulic conductivities for most cases are in excellent agreement with the data. In a few cases the theory underestimates the hydraulic conductivities, which correspond to porous media with very broad pore-size distribution in which the largest pore radius is more than 7 orders of magnitude greater than the smallest one. The approach is also used to predict the saturation dependence of the electrical conductivity for experiments in which capillary pressure data are available. The results indicate that the universal scaling of

  8. Single- and two-phase flow in microfluidic porous media analogs based on Voronoi tessellation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Mengjie; Xiao, Feng; Johnson-Paben, Rebecca; Retterer, Scott T; Yin, Xiaolong; Neeves, Keith B

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create a microfluidic model of complex porous media for studying single and multiphase flows. Most experimental porous media models consist of periodic geometries that lend themselves to comparison with well-developed theoretical predictions. However, most real porous media such as geological formations and biological tissues contain a degree of randomness and complexity that is not adequately represented in periodic geometries. To design an experimental tool to study these complex geometries, we created microfluidic models of random homogeneous and heterogeneous networks based on Voronoi tessellations. These networks consisted of approximately 600 grains separated by a highly connected network of channels with an overall porosity of 0.11 0.20. We found that introducing heterogeneities in the form of large cavities within the network changed the permeability in a way that cannot be predicted by the classical porosity-permeability relationship known as the Kozeny equation. The values of permeability found in experiments were in excellent agreement with those calculated from three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann simulations. In two-phase flow experiments of oil displacement with water we found that the surface energy of channel walls determined the pattern of water invasion, while the network topology determined the residual oil saturation. These results suggest that complex network topologies lead to fluid flow behavior that is difficult to predict based solely on porosity. The microfluidic models developed in this study using a novel geometry generation algorithm based on Voronoi tessellation are a new experimental tool for studying fluid and solute transport problems within complex porous media.

  9. Numerical method for computing flow through partially saturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of the finite element computer code SAGUARO which calculates the two-dimensional flow of mass and energy through porous media. The media may be saturated or partially saturated. SAGUARO solves the parabolic time-dependent mass transport equation which accounts for the presence of partially saturated zones through the use of highly non-linear material characteristic curves. The energy equation accounts for the possibility of partially-saturated regions by adjusting the thermal capacitances and thermal conductivities according to the volume fraction of water present in the local pores. The code capabilities are demonstrated through the presentation of a sample problem involving the one-dimensional calculation of simultaneous energy transfer and water infiltration into partially saturated hard rock.

  10. Numerical method for computing flow through partially saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, R. R.

    This paper discusses the development of the finite element computer code SAGUARO which calculates the two-dimensional flow of mass and energy through porous media. The media may be saturated or partially saturated. SAGUARO solves the parabolic time-dependent mass transport equation which accounts for the presence of partially saturated zones through the use of highly non-linear material characteristic curves. The energy equation accounts for the possibility of partially-saturated regions by adjusting the thermal capacitances and thermal conductivities according to the volume fraction of water present in the local pores. The code capabilities are demonstrated through the presentation of a sample problem involving the one dimensional calculation of simultaneous energy transfer and water infiltration into partially saturated hard rock.

  11. Vorticity and upscaled dispersion in 3D heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dato, Mariaines; Chiogna, Gabriele; de Barros, Felipe; Bellin, Alberto; Fiori, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    Modeling flow in porous media is relevant for many environmental, energy and industrial applications. From an environmental perspective, the relevance of porous media flow becomes evident in subsurface hydrology. In general, flow in natural porous media is creeping, yet the large variability in the hydraulic conductivity values encountered in natural aquifers leads to highly heterogeneous flow fields. This natural variability in the conductivity field will affect both dilution rates of chemical species and reactive mixing. A physical consequence of this heterogeneity is also the presence of a various localized kinematical features such as straining, shearing and vorticity in aquifers, which will influence the shape of solute clouds and its fate and transport. This work aims in fundamentally characterizing the vorticity field in spatially heterogeneous flow fields as a function of their statistical properties in order to analyze the impact on transport processes. In our study, three-dimensional porous formations are constructed with an ensemble of N independent, non-overlapping spheroidal inclusions submerged into an homogeneous matrix, of conductivity K0. The inclusions are randomly located in a domain of volume W and are fully characterized by the geometry of spheroid (oblate or prolate), their conductivity K (random and drawn from a given probability density function fκ), the centroid location ¯x, the axes ratio e, the orientation of the rotational axis (α1,α2) and the volume w. Under the assumption of diluted medium, the flow problem is solved analitically by means of only two parameters: the conductivity contrast κ = K/K0 and the volume fraction n = Nw/W . Through the variation of these parameters of the problem, it is possible to approximate the structure of natural heterogeneous porous media. Using a random distribution of the orientation of the inclusions, we create media defined by the same global anisotropy f = Iz/Ix but different micro

  12. Impact of biofilm on bacterial transport and deposition in porous media.

    PubMed

    Bozorg, Ali; Gates, Ian D; Sen, Arindom

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory scale experiments were conducted to obtain insights into factors that influence bacterial transport and deposition in porous media. According to colloidal filtration theory, the removal efficiency of a filter medium is characterized by two main factors: collision efficiency and sticking efficiency. In the case of bacterial transport in porous media, bacteria attached to a solid surface can establish a thin layer of biofilm by excreting extracellular polymeric substances which can significantly influence both of these factors in a porous medium, and thus, affect the overall removal efficiency of the filter medium. However, such polymeric interactions in bacterial adhesion are not well understood and a method to calculate polymeric interactions is not yet available. Here, to determine how the migration of bacteria flowing within a porous medium is affected by the presence of surface-associated extracellular polymeric substances previously produced and deposited by the same bacterial species, a commonly used colloidal filtration model was applied to study transport and deposition of Pseudomonas fluorescens in small-scale columns packed with clean and biofilm coated glass beads. Bacterial recoveries were monitored in column effluents and used to quantify biofilm interactions and sticking efficiencies of the biofilm coated packed-beds. The results indicated that, under identical hydraulic conditions, the sticking efficiencies in packed-beds were improved consistently by 36% when covered by biofilm. PMID:26583740

  13. Impact of biofilm on bacterial transport and deposition in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozorg, Ali; Gates, Ian D.; Sen, Arindom

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory scale experiments were conducted to obtain insights into factors that influence bacterial transport and deposition in porous media. According to colloidal filtration theory, the removal efficiency of a filter medium is characterized by two main factors: collision efficiency and sticking efficiency. In the case of bacterial transport in porous media, bacteria attached to a solid surface can establish a thin layer of biofilm by excreting extracellular polymeric substances which can significantly influence both of these factors in a porous medium, and thus, affect the overall removal efficiency of the filter medium. However, such polymeric interactions in bacterial adhesion are not well understood and a method to calculate polymeric interactions is not yet available. Here, to determine how the migration of bacteria flowing within a porous medium is affected by the presence of surface-associated extracellular polymeric substances previously produced and deposited by the same bacterial species, a commonly used colloidal filtration model was applied to study transport and deposition of Pseudomonas fluorescens in small-scale columns packed with clean and biofilm coated glass beads. Bacterial recoveries were monitored in column effluents and used to quantify biofilm interactions and sticking efficiencies of the biofilm coated packed-beds. The results indicated that, under identical hydraulic conditions, the sticking efficiencies in packed-beds were improved consistently by 36% when covered by biofilm.

  14. Impact of biofilm on bacterial transport and deposition in porous media.

    PubMed

    Bozorg, Ali; Gates, Ian D; Sen, Arindom

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory scale experiments were conducted to obtain insights into factors that influence bacterial transport and deposition in porous media. According to colloidal filtration theory, the removal efficiency of a filter medium is characterized by two main factors: collision efficiency and sticking efficiency. In the case of bacterial transport in porous media, bacteria attached to a solid surface can establish a thin layer of biofilm by excreting extracellular polymeric substances which can significantly influence both of these factors in a porous medium, and thus, affect the overall removal efficiency of the filter medium. However, such polymeric interactions in bacterial adhesion are not well understood and a method to calculate polymeric interactions is not yet available. Here, to determine how the migration of bacteria flowing within a porous medium is affected by the presence of surface-associated extracellular polymeric substances previously produced and deposited by the same bacterial species, a commonly used colloidal filtration model was applied to study transport and deposition of Pseudomonas fluorescens in small-scale columns packed with clean and biofilm coated glass beads. Bacterial recoveries were monitored in column effluents and used to quantify biofilm interactions and sticking efficiencies of the biofilm coated packed-beds. The results indicated that, under identical hydraulic conditions, the sticking efficiencies in packed-beds were improved consistently by 36% when covered by biofilm.

  15. (De)compaction of porous viscoelastoplastic media: Solitary porosity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, Viktoriya M.; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2015-07-01

    Buoyancy-driven flow in deformable porous media is important for understanding sedimentary compaction as well as magmatic and metamorphic differentiation processes. Here mathematical analysis of the viscoplastic compaction equations is used to develop an understanding of the porosity wave instability and its sensitivity to the choice of rheological model. The conditions of propagation, size, speed, and shape of the porosity waves depend strongly on the properties of the solid rock frame. Whereas most of the previous studies on porosity waves were focused on viscous or viscoelastic mode, here we consider the ability of a solid matrix to undergo simultaneous plastic (rate-independent) and viscous (rate-dependent) deformation in parallel. Plastic yielding is identified as a cause of compaction-decompaction asymmetry in porous media—this is known to lead to a strong focusing of porous flow. Speed and amplitude of a porosity wave are given as functions of material parameters and a volume of a source region. Formulation is applicable to fluid flow in sedimentary rocks where viscous deformation is due to pressure solution as well as in deep crustal or upper mantle rocks deforming in a semibrittle regime.

  16. Microscale simulation of particle deposition in porous media.

    PubMed

    Boccardo, Gianluca; Marchisio, Daniele L; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-03-01

    In this work several geometries, each representing a different porous medium, are considered to perform detailed computational fluid dynamics simulation for fluid flow, particle transport and deposition. Only Brownian motions and steric interception are accounted for as deposition mechanisms. Firstly pressure drop in each porous medium is analyzed in order to determine an effective grain size, by fitting the results with the Ergun law. Then grid independence is assessed. Lastly, particle transport in the system is investigated via Eulerian steady-state simulations, where particle concentration is solved for, not following explicitly particles' trajectories, but solving the corresponding advection-diffusion equation. An assumption was made in considering favorable collector-particle interactions, resulting in a "perfect sink" boundary condition for the collectors. The gathered simulation data are used to calculate the deposition efficiency due to Brownian motions and steric interception. The original Levich law for one simple circular collector is verified; subsequently porous media constituted by a packing of collectors are scrutinized. Results show that the interactions between the different collectors result in behaviors which are not in line with the theory developed by Happel and co-workers, highlighting a different dependency of the deposition efficiency on the dimensionless groups involved in the relevant correlations.

  17. Effect of biofilm on colloid attachment in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Udayan; Alexander, Thrisha; Waskar, Morris; Dagaonkar, Manoj V

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm plays an important role in controlling the transport of colloids in a porous media. Biofilms are formed when micro-organisms come in contact with substrates, and are able to attach and grow with availability of nutrients. The microorganisms get embedded in a matrix of the substrate and extracellular polymeric substances which are responsible for the morphology, physico-chemical properties, structure and coherence of the biofilm. In this study, the effect of biofilm and its aging on colloid removal was studied on a glass bead column. Oocysts, polystyrene microspheres and inorganic colloids were used as colloidal particles. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was used as a model biofilm-forming microorganism. Presence of biofilm significantly enhanced colloid removal in the column. After 3 weeks, almost complete colloid removal was observed. The formation of biofilm was confirmed by various physical characterization techniques. During the extended aging study, biofilm sloughed off under shear stress. The loss of biofilm was higher during the early stage of its growth, and subsequently slowed down probably due to the formation of a more rigid biofilm. This research indicates that biofilm formation, maturation and sloughing-off play a critical role in colloid removal through porous media.

  18. Studies on dispersive stabilization of porous media flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daripa, Prabir; Gin, Craig

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by a need to improve the performance of chemical enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes, we investigate dispersive effects on the linear stability of three-layer porous media flow models of EOR for two different types of interfaces: permeable and impermeable interfaces. Results presented are relevant for the design of smarter interfaces in the available parameter space of capillary number, Peclet number, longitudinal and transverse dispersion, and the viscous profile of the middle layer. The stabilization capacity of each of these two interfaces is explored numerically and conditions for complete dispersive stabilization are identified for each of these two types of interfaces. Key results obtained are (i) three-layer porous media flows with permeable interfaces can be almost completely stabilized by diffusion if the optimal viscous profile is chosen, (ii) flows with impermeable interfaces can also be almost completely stabilized for short time, but become more unstable at later times because diffusion flattens out the basic viscous profile, (iii) diffusion stabilizes short waves more than long waves which leads to a "turning point" Peclet number at which short and long waves have the same growth rate, and (iv) mechanical dispersion further stabilizes flows with permeable interfaces but in some cases has a destabilizing effect for flows with impermeable interfaces, which is a surprising result. These results are then used to give a comparison of the two types of interfaces. It is found that for most values of the flow parameters, permeable interfaces suppress flow instability more than impermeable interfaces.

  19. Effective Gradients in Porous Media Due to Susceptibility Differences

    PubMed

    Hürlimann

    1998-04-01

    In porous media, magnetic susceptibility differences between the solid phase and the fluid filling the pore space lead to field inhomogeneities inside the pore space. In many cases, diffusion of the spins in the fluid phase through these internal inhomogeneities controls the transverse decay rate of the NMR signal. In disordered porous media such as sedimentary rocks, a detailed evaluation of this process is in practice not possible because the field inhomogeneities depend not only on the susceptibility difference but also on the details of the pore geometry. In this report, the major features of diffusion in internal gradients are analyzed with the concept of effective gradients. Effective gradients are related to the field inhomogeneities over the dephasing length, the typical length over which the spins diffuse before they dephase. For the CPMG sequence, the dependence of relaxation rate on echo spacing can be described to first order by a distribution of effective gradients. It is argued that for a given susceptibility difference, there is a maximum value for these effective gradients, gmax, that depends on only the diffusion coefficient, the Larmor frequency, and the susceptibility difference. This analysis is applied to the case of water-saturated sedimentary rocks. From a set of NMR measurements and a compilation of a large number of susceptibility measurements, we conclude that the effective gradients in carbonates are typically smaller than gradients of current NMR well logging tools, whereas in many sandstones, internal gradients can be comparable to or larger than tool gradients. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  20. Electrokinetic induced solute dispersion in porous media; pore network modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuai; Schotting, Ruud; Raoof, Amir

    2013-04-01

    Electrokinetic flow plays an important role in remediation process, separation technique, and chromatography. The solute dispersion is a key parameter to determine transport efficiency. In this study, we present the electrokinetic effects on solute dispersion in porous media at the pore scale, using a pore network model. The analytical solution of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was obtained to quantity the fluid flow velocity in a cylinder capillary. The effect of electrical double layer on the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was investigated by applying different ionic concentration. By averaging the velocity over cross section within a single pore, the average flux was obtained. Applying such single pore relationships, in the thin electrical double layer limit, to each and every pore within the pore network, potential distribution and the induced fluid flow was calculated for the whole domain. The resulting pore velocities were used to simulate solute transport within the pore network. By averaging the results, we obtained the breakthrough curve (BTC) of the average concentration at the outlet of the pore network. Optimizing the solution of continuum scale advection-dispersion equation to such a BTC, solute dispersion coefficient was estimated. We have compared the dispersion caused by electrokinetic flow and pure pressure driven flow under different Peclet number values. In addition, the effect of microstructure and topological properties of porous media on fluid flow and solute dispersion is presented, mainly based on different pore coordination numbers.

  1. Influence of biofilms on transport properties in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davit, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial activity and biofilm growth in porous media can drastically modify transport properties such as permeability, longitudinal and transverse dispersion or effective reaction rates. Understanding these effects has proven to be a considerable challenge. Advances in this field have been hindered by the difficulty of modeling and visualizing these multi-phase non-linear effects across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. To address these issues, we are developing a strategy that combines imaging techniques based on x-ray micro-tomography with homogenization of pore-scale transport equations. Here, we review recent progress in x-ray imaging of biofilms in porous media, with a particular focus on the contrast agents that are used to differentiate between the fluid and biofilm phases. We further show how the 3D distribution of the different phases can be used to extract specific information about the biofilm and how effective properties can be calculated via the resolution of closure problems. These closure problems are obtained using the method of volume averaging and must be adapted to the problem of interest. In hydrological systems, we show that a generic formulation for reactive solute transport is based on a domain decomposition approach at the micro-scale yielding macro-scale models reminiscent of multi-rate mass transfer approaches.

  2. Multicomponent, multiphase flow in porous media with temperature variation

    SciTech Connect

    Wingard, J.S.; Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1990-10-01

    Recovery of hydrocarbons from porous media is an ongoing concern. Advanced techniques augment conventional recovery methods by injecting fluids that favorably interact with the oil. These fluids interact with the oil by energy transfer, in the case of steam injection, or by mass transfer, as in a miscible gas flood. Often both thermal and compositional considerations are important. An understanding of these injection methods requires knowledge of how temperature variations, phase equilibrium and multiphase flow in porous media interact. The material balance for each component and energy balance are cast as a system of non-strictly hyperbolic partial differential equations. This system of equations is solved using the method of characteristics. The model takes into account the phase behavior by using the Peng-Robinson equation of state to partition the individual components into different phases. Temperature effects are accounted for by the energy balance. Flow effects are modelled by using fractional flow curves and a Stone's three phase relative permeability model. Three problems are discussed. The first problem eliminates the phase behavior aspect of the problem by studying the flow of a single component as it undergoes an isothermal phase change. The second couples the effects of temperature and flow behavior by including a second component that is immiscible with the original component. Phase behavior is added by using a set of three partially miscible components that partition into two or three separate phases. 66 refs., 54 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. Rugged Energy Landscapes in Multiphase Porous Media Flow: A Discrete-Domain Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Immiscible displacements in porous media involve a complex sequence of pore-scale events, from the smooth, reversible displacement of interfaces to abrupt interfacial reconfigurations and rapid pore invasion cascades. Discontinuous changes in pressure or saturation have been referred to as Haines jumps, and they emerge as a key mechanism to understand the origin of hysteresis in porous media flow. Hysteresis persists at the many-pore scale: when multiple cycles of drainage and imbibition of a porous sample are conducted, a dense hysteresis diagram emerges. The interpretation of hysteresis as a consequence of irreversible transitions and multistability is at the heart of early hysteresis models, and in recent experiments, and points to an inherently non-equilibrium behavior. For a given volume fraction of fluids occupying the pore space, many stable configurations are possible, due to the tortuous network of nonuniform pores and throats that compose the porous medium, and to complex wetting and capillary transitions. Multistability indicates that porous media systems exhibit rugged energy landscapes, where the system may remain pinned at local energy minima for long times. We address the question of developing a zero-dimensional model that inherits the path-dependence and `'bursty'' behavior of immiscible displacements, and propose a discrete-domain model that captures the role of metastability and local equilibria in the origin of hysteresis. We describe the porous medium and fluid system as a discrete set of weakly connected, multistable compartments, charaterized by a unique free energy function. This description does not depend explicitly on past saturations, turning points, or drainage/imbibition labels. The system behaves hysteretically, and we rationalize its behavior as sweeping a complex metastability diagram, with dissipation arising from discrete switches among metastable branches. The hysteretic behavior of the pressure-saturation curve is controlled by

  4. Capillary pinning of immiscible gravity currents in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B.; MacMinn, C. W.; Huppert, H. E.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Gravity currents in porous media have attracted interest recently in the context of geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, where supercritical CO2 is captured from the flue gas of power plants and injected underground into deep saline aquifers. Capillarity can be important in the spreading and migration of the buoyant CO2 after injection because the typical pore size is very small (~10-100 microns), but the impact of capillarity on these flows is not well understood. Here, we study the impact of capillarity on the buoyant spreading of a finite gravity current of non-wetting fluid into a dense, wetting fluid in a vertically confined, horizontal aquifer. We show via simple, table-top experiments using glass bead packs that capillary pressure hysteresis pins a portion of the fluid-fluid interface. The horizontal extent of the pinned portion of the interface grows over time and this is responsible for ultimately stopping the spreading of the buoyant current after a finite distance. In addition, capillarity blunts the leading edge of the buoyant current. We demonstrate through micromodel experiments that the characteristic height of the nose of the current is controlled by the pore throat size distribution and the balance between capillarity and gravity. We develop a theoretical model that captures the evolution of immiscible gravity currents and predicts the maximum migration distance. Our work suggests that capillary pinning and capillary blunting exert an important control on finite-release gravity currents in the context of CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers. Gravity driven flow of a buoyant, nonwetting fluid (air) over a dense, wetting fluid (propylene glycol). Starting with a vertical interface between the fluids, the flow first undergoes a lock-exchange process. The process models a finite release problem after the dense fluid hits the left boundary. In contrast to finite release of a miscible current that spreads indefinitely, spreading of an immiscible

  5. Laboratory Models of Thermal Convection in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. A.; Breitmeyer, R.; Schumer, R.; Voepel, H.; Decker, D.

    2011-12-01

    Experiments have been conducted to measure the length and times scales of thermal plumes in laboratory porous media. A polycarbonate cell 1 m high x 75 cm wide x 2.54 cm deep filled with 3 mm glass beads is heated uniformly from the bottom using electrical heat tape. The heat tape is in direct contact with an aluminum alloy heat exchanger sandwiched between the two vertical plates, and a digital controller is used to maintain constant temperature. The upper boundary is kept at constant temperature by circulating cold water from a constant-temperature refrigerating bath through copper tubes in contact with the upper part of the cell. Flow is visualized by mixing a neutrally buoyant thermochromic liquid tracer in the working fluid (water and glycerin). TLCs are liquid crystals manufactured to change color as a function of temperature. Color change is repeatable and reversible with a response time to temperature change is less than 0.01 s. Image acquisition is done using a CCD camera, and three images are captured nearly simultaneously, each with a red, blue, or green filter over the camera lens. The three images are then combined to make a true color image. At each pixel in the image, hue is extracted and a calibration curve is developed to relate hue to temperature. In one experiment with a 10 degree C temperature difference between the upper and lower boundaries, the onset of convection began within 26 minutes, which is about half the time predicted by a scale analysis. The initial velocity of all plumes is on the order of 15 cm/hr, although some plumes stop moving before reaching the upper boundary of the cell. There are several reasons for plume deceleration: (1) As plumes travel vertically, they alter the initial temperature profile of the fluid such that the temperature field makes constant adjustments, which affects the dimensions, velocities, and interactions of the plumes; (2) adjacent plumes merge, resulting in a single larger plume; and (3) interactions

  6. Modeling of Mineral Precipitation and Dissolution for Various Reactant Mixing Patterns in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Huang, H.; Redden, G. D.; Fox, D. T.; Hu, B. X.

    2008-12-01

    Spatial and temporal distribution of mineral precipitates in porous media depends on how amendments are delivered and mineral-forming substrates are mixed. The spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation products are determined mainly by the injection geometry, the sequence of reactant injection, and physical and chemical heterogeneity of the system. In this study, two scenarios for mixing Ca2+ and bicarbonate in porous media are simulated using TOUGHREACT: parallel injection and sequential injection. For parallel flow injection scenario in which solutions containing mineral-forming solutes are injected side-by-side, a relatively wide mixing zone is formed. However, a much narrower precipitation zone is observed to evolve in the simulation, which is consistent with laboratory flow cell experiments. When the feedback effects between changes in porosity and permeability and mineral precipitation are not considered, the precipitation zone propagates towards the bicarbonate solution due to chemical asymmetry with respect to proton activities on both sides of the precipitation zone. Sensitivity studies of precipitation to diffusion coefficient, reaction network, kinetic reaction rate formula, and reaction rate constant are conducted to investigate controlling mechanisms and parameters mostly relevant to experiment conditions. In sequential injection scenario in which solutions containing Ca2+ and bicarbonate are injected one after the other, a migrating mixing and precipitation zone is formed and travels through the simulated porous medium, which is consistent with our laboratory flow cell experiments.

  7. Characteristics of acoustic emissions generated by drying front displacement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grapsas, N. K.; Shokri, N.; Or, D.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid displacement fronts in porous media may produce acoustic emissions (AE) primarily due to rapid interfacial jumps at pore scale. We investigated acoustical signatures of propagating drying fronts in porous media during evaporation from Hele-Shaw cells packed with four types of sand, initially water saturated, with average particle sizes of 0.16 mm, 0.48 mm, 0.61 mm, and 1.76 mm. Evaporation rates were deduced from mass loss measured using digital balances. Evaporation experiments were conducted in an environmental chamber set to 35° C and 40% RH. An AE sensor was fixed to each glass column to monitor AEs associated with Haines jumps from a receding drying front. The characteristics of measured AEs such as amplitude, frequency, absolute energy, number of hits, and wave forms were recorded using an AE acquisition system. Preliminary results indicate a strong relationship between the cumulative number of AE hits and the columns' evaporative mass loss. Our results reveal that particle size significantly impacts the characteristics of the emitted acoustic waves. Larger particle sizes increase AE amplitudes, energies, and durations. Conversely, average hit frequency and the total number of hits are inversely related to particle size-- i.e. the smaller the particle size, the higher the frequency and total number of hits. These results suggest that AE techniques can be used to non-invasively characterize the texture of porous media and bring insights into their drying patterns.

  8. A method for moisture measurement in porous media based on epithermal neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    El Abd, A

    2015-11-01

    A method for moisture measurement in porous media was proposed. A wide beam of epithermal neutrons was obtained from a Pu-Be neutron source immersed in a cylinder made of paraffin wax. (3)He detectors (four or six) arranged in the backward direction of the incident beam were used to record scattered neutrons from investigated samples. Experiments of water absorption into clay and silicate bricks, and a sand column were investigated by neutron scattering. While the samples were absorbing water, scattered neutrons were recorded from fixed positions along the water flow direction. It was observed that, at these positions scattered neutrons increase as the water uptake increases. Obtained results are discussed in terms of the theory of macroscopic flow in porous media. It was shown that, the water absorption processes were Fickian and non Fickian in the sand column and brick samples, respectively. The advantages of applying the proposed method to study fast as well as slow flow processes in porous media are discussed. PMID:26298060

  9. A method for moisture measurement in porous media based on epithermal neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    El Abd, A

    2015-11-01

    A method for moisture measurement in porous media was proposed. A wide beam of epithermal neutrons was obtained from a Pu-Be neutron source immersed in a cylinder made of paraffin wax. (3)He detectors (four or six) arranged in the backward direction of the incident beam were used to record scattered neutrons from investigated samples. Experiments of water absorption into clay and silicate bricks, and a sand column were investigated by neutron scattering. While the samples were absorbing water, scattered neutrons were recorded from fixed positions along the water flow direction. It was observed that, at these positions scattered neutrons increase as the water uptake increases. Obtained results are discussed in terms of the theory of macroscopic flow in porous media. It was shown that, the water absorption processes were Fickian and non Fickian in the sand column and brick samples, respectively. The advantages of applying the proposed method to study fast as well as slow flow processes in porous media are discussed.

  10. Continuous time random walk analysis of solute transport in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Cortis, Andrea; Cortis, Andrea; Birkholzer, Jens

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this work is to discuss solute transport phenomena in fractured porous media, where the macroscopic transport of contaminants in the highly permeable interconnected fractures can be strongly affected by solute exchange with the porous rock matrix. We are interested in a wide range of rock types, with matrix hydraulic conductivities varying from almost impermeable (e.g., granites) to somewhat permeable (e.g., porous sandstones). In the first case, molecular diffusion is the only transport process causing the transfer of contaminants between the fractures and the matrix blocks. In the second case, additional solute transfer occurs as a result of a combination of advective and dispersive transport mechanisms, with considerable impact on the macroscopic transport behavior. We start our study by conducting numerical tracer experiments employing a discrete (microscopic) representation of fractures and matrix. Using the discrete simulations as a surrogate for the 'correct' transport behavior, we then evaluate the accuracy of macroscopic (continuum) approaches in comparison with the discrete results. However, instead of using dual-continuum models, which are quite often used to account for this type of heterogeneity, we develop a macroscopic model based on the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) framework, which characterizes the interaction between the fractured and porous rock domains by using a probability distribution function of residence times. A parametric study of how CTRW parameters evolve is presented, describing transport as a function of the hydraulic conductivity ratio between fractured and porous domains.

  11. Flow of foams in two-dimensional disordered porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollet, Benjamin; Geraud, Baudouin; Jones, Sian A.; Meheust, Yves; Cantat, Isabelle; Institut de Physique de Rennes Team; Geosciences Rennes Team

    2015-11-01

    Liquid foams are a yield stress fluid with elastic properties. When a foam flow is confined by solid walls, viscous dissipation arises from the contact zones between soap films and walls, giving very peculiar friction laws. In particular, foams potentially invade narrow pores much more efficiently than Newtonian fluids, which is of great importance for enhanced oil recovery. To quantify this effect, we study experimentally flows of foam in a model two-dimensional porous medium, consisting of an assembly of circular obstacles placed randomly in a Hele-Shaw cell, and use image analysis to quantify foam flow at the local scale. We show that bubbles split as they flow through the porous medium, by a mechanism of film pinching during contact with an obstacle, yielding two daughter bubbles per split bubble. We quantify the evolution of the bubble size distribution as a function of the distance along the porous medium, the splitting probability as a function of bubble size, and the probability distribution function of the daughter bubbles. We propose an evolution equation to model this splitting phenomenon and compare it successfully to the experiments, showing how at long distance, the porous medium itself dictates the size distribution of the foam.

  12. PREDICTION OF INTERFACIAL AREAS DURING IMBIBITION IN SIMPLE POROUS MEDIA. (R827116)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interfacial area between wetting (W-) and non-wetting (NW-) phases is one of the crucial parameters in several flow and transport processes in porous media. This paper gives predictions of such areas during imbibition (displacement of NW-phase by W) in simple porous media....

  13. Review of key factors controlling engineered nanoparticle transport in porous media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Gao, Bin; Tang, Deshan

    2016-11-15

    Nanotechnology, an emerging technology, has witnessed rapid development in production and application. Engineered nanomaterials revolutionize the industry due to their unique structure and superior performance. The release of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) into the environment, however, may pose risks to the environment and public health. To advance current understanding of environmental behaviors of ENPs, this work provides an introductory overview of ENP fate and transport in porous media. It systematically reviews the key factors controlling their fate and transport in porous media. It first provides a brief overview of common ENPs in the environment and their sources. The key factors that govern ENP transport in porous media are then categorized into three groups: (1) nature of ENPs affecting their transport in porous media, (2) nature of porous media affecting ENP transport, and (3) nature of flow affecting ENP transport in porous media. In each group, findings in recent literature on the specific governing factors of ENP transport in porous media are discussed in details. Finally, this work concludes with remarks on the importance of ENP transport in porous media and directions for future research. PMID:27427890

  14. Distribution and Recovery of Crude Oil in Various Types of Porous Media and Heterogeneity Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tick, G. R.; Ghosh, J.; Greenberg, R. R.; Akyol, N. H.

    2015-12-01

    A series of pore-scale experiments were conducted to understand the interfacial processes contributing to the removal of crude oil from various porous media during surfactant-induced remediation. Effects of physical heterogeneity (i.e. media uniformity) and carbonate soil content on oil recovery and distribution were evaluated through pore scale quantification techniques. Additionally, experiments were conducted to evaluate impacts of tetrachloroethene (PCE) content on crude oil distribution and recovery under these same conditions. Synchrotron X-ray microtomography (SXM) was used to obtain high-resolution images of the two-fluid-phase oil/water system, and quantify temporal changes in oil blob distribution, blob morphology, and blob surface area before and after sequential surfactant flooding events. The reduction of interfacial tension in conjunction with the sufficient increase in viscous forces as a result of surfactant flushing was likely responsible for mobilization and recovery of lighter fractions of crude oil. Corresponding increases in viscous forces were insufficient to initiate and maintain the displacement of the heavy crude oil in more homogeneous porous media systems during surfactant flushing. Interestingly, higher relative recoveries of heavy oil fractions were observed within more heterogeneous porous media indicating that wettability may be responsible for controlling mobilization in these systems. Compared to the "pure" crude oil experiments, preliminary results show that crude oil with PCE produced variability in oil distribution and recovery before and after each surfactant-flooding event. Such effects were likely influenced by viscosity and interfacial tension modifications associated with the crude-oil/solvent mixed systems.

  15. Quantitative discrimination of water and hydrocarbons in porous media by magnetization prepared centric-scan SPRITE.

    PubMed

    Li, Linqing; Marica, Florin; Chen, Quan; MacMillan, Bryce; Balcom, Bruce J

    2007-06-01

    MRI has considerable potential as a non-destructive probe of porous media, offering the possibility of rapid quantification of local oil and water content. This potential has not yet, however, been completely realized. In this paper, we explore a general magnetization preparation approach to the discrimination of water and oil in a model, representative, porous medium. These measurements have, as a common element, a centric scan pure phase encode readout based on the SPRITE methodology. Magnetization preparation permits facile T1, T2 and diffusion coefficient mapping as the basis for oil and water discrimination. Diffusion coefficient mapping proved to be the most robust approach to discrimination of oil and water. These methods are illustrated through static experiments and a dynamic immiscible fluid displacement experiment. PMID:17428712

  16. Recent developments in neutron imaging with applications for porous media research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaestner, A. P.; Trtik, P.; Zarebandkouki, M.; Kazantsev, D.; Snehota, M.; Dobson, K. J.; Lehmann, E. H.

    2015-12-01

    Computed tomography has become a standard method to probe processes in porous media. Neutrons enabled us to better study the dynamics of hydrogeneous fluids in the matrix of dense and opaque materials. We review recent instrumentation and method improvements to the neutron imaging facilities NEUTRA and ICON at Paul Scherrer Institute. The improvements give us higher spatial resolution making it possible to follow finer details and faster acquisition to increase the CT volume capture rate. The combination with new reconstruction techniques improve the information output with less acquired projection data and hence providing higher volume rates. Bi-modality is a further option to provide more information about the sample and the processes taking place. These features make new neutron imaging experiments to investigate the fluid distribution in porous samples possible. We demonstrate the performance on a selection of experiments performed at our neutron imaging instruments.

  17. Multiphase flow, deformation and wave propagation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazdniakou, A.; Adler, P. M.

    2010-12-01

    Our goals are to determine some of the most important macroscopic properties of porous media whether they are dry or saturated by one or two fluids such as permeabilities, solid deformations and acoustic velocities. Therefore, one needs to calculate fluid flow through the pores and the deformation of the solid matrix. Single and multiphase flows are determined by Lattice Boltzmann Models (LBM) where fluid motion is described in terms of a discretized particle distribution function which obeys a Lattice Boltzmann Equation equivalent to the Navier-Stokes equations at the macroscopic level. Complex boundary conditions can be easily treated by LBM which makes it convenient for flow simulations in porous media. Applications to the determination of the absolute permeability and of the relative permeabilities in complex media are given as well as examples of transient phenomena. Elastic deformations of the solid matrix whether they are static or time dependent can be determined by Lattice Spring Models (LSM). The solid matrix is represented by a regular cubic lattice whose points are connected by springs which are either linear (between the lattice points) or angular (between the linear springs). The spring set is selected in order to obtain an equivalent isotropic solid. The elastic properties of the medium can be calculated from the elastic energy stored in the elementary cell. A mass can be assigned to the lattice points. Applications to the determination of the macroscopic Young modulus and Poisson ratio of porous solids are given as well as direct simulations of wave propagation through dry porous solids. In order to study wave propagation in porous media containing one or two fluids, the LBM and LSM codes are coupled by using a momentum exchange algorithm which equates the velocities and the normal stresses at the solid-fluid interface. Then, two different methods can be used to study wave propagation. In the first direct method, a pressure variation is induced at a

  18. Transport, retention, and size perturbation of graphene oxide in saturated porous media: Effects of input concentration and grain size

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurately predicting the fate and transport of graphene oxide (GO) in porous media is critical to assess its environmental impact. In this work, sand column experiments were conducted to determine the effect of input concentration and grain size on transport, retention, and size perturbation of GO ...

  19. Coupled effects of hydrodynamic and solution chemistry conditions on long-term nanoparticle transport and deposition in saturated porous media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aims to systematically explore the coupled effects of hydrodynamic and solution chemistry conditions on the long-term transport and deposition kinetics of nanoparticles (NPs) in saturated porous media. Column transport experiments were carried out at various solution ionic strengths (IS),...

  20. Morphology Engineering of Porous Media for Enhanced Solar Fuel and Power Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Silvan; Haussener, Sophia

    2013-12-01

    The favorable and adjustable transport properties of porous media make them suitable components in reactors used for solar energy conversion and storage processes. The directed engineering of the porous media's morphology can significantly improve the performance of these reactors. We used a multiscale approach to characterize the changes in performance of exemplary solar fuel processing and solar power production reactors incorporating porous media as multifunctional components. The method applied uses imaging-based direct numerical simulations and digital image processing in combination with volume averaging theory to characterize the transport in porous media. Two samples with varying morphology (fibrous vs. foam) and varying size range (mm vs. μm scale), each with porosity between 0.46 and 0.84, were characterized. The obtained effective transport properties were used in continuum-scale models to quantify the performance of reactors incorporating multifunctional porous media for solar fuel processing by photoelectrochemical water splitting or power production by solar thermal processes.

  1. Complex three dimensional modelling of porous media using high performance computing and multi-scale incompressible approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R.; Orgogozo, L.; Noiriel, C. N.; Guibert, R.; Golfier, F.; Debenest, G.; Quintard, M.

    2013-05-01

    In the context of biofilm growth in porous media, we developed high performance computing tools to study the impact of biofilms on the fluid transport through pores of a solid matrix. Indeed, biofilms are consortia of micro-organisms that are developing in polymeric extracellular substances that are generally located at a fluid-solid interfaces like pore interfaces in a water-saturated porous medium. Several applications of biofilms in porous media are encountered for instance in bio-remediation methods by allowing the dissolution of organic pollutants. Many theoretical studies have been done on the resulting effective properties of these modified media ([1],[2], [3]) but the bio-colonized porous media under consideration are mainly described following simplified theoretical media (stratified media, cubic networks of spheres ...). Therefore, recent experimental advances have provided tomography images of bio-colonized porous media which allow us to observe realistic biofilm micro-structures inside the porous media [4]. To solve closure system of equations related to upscaling procedures in realistic porous media, we solve the velocity field of fluids through pores on complex geometries that are described with a huge number of cells (up to billions). Calculations are made on a realistic 3D sample geometry obtained by X micro-tomography. Cell volumes are coming from a percolation experiment performed to estimate the impact of precipitation processes on the properties of a fluid transport phenomena in porous media [5]. Average permeabilities of the sample are obtained from velocities by using MPI-based high performance computing on up to 1000 processors. Steady state Stokes equations are solved using finite volume approach. Relaxation pre-conditioning is introduced to accelerate the code further. Good weak or strong scaling are reached with results obtained in hours instead of weeks. Factors of accelerations of 20 up to 40 can be reached. Tens of geometries can now be

  2. Effects of surface active agents on DNAPL migration and distribution in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhou; Gao, Bin; Xu, Hongxia; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jichun

    2016-11-15

    Dissolved surface active agents such as surfactant and natural organic matter can affect the distribution and fate of dense nonaqueous liquids (DNAPLs) in soil and groundwater systems. This work investigated how two common groundwater surface active agents, humic acid (HA) and Tween 80, affected tetrachloroethylene (PCE) migration and source zone architecture in saturated porous media under environmentally relevant conditions. Batch experiments were first conducted to measure the contact angles and interfacial tensions (IFT) between PCE and quartz surface in water containing different amount of surface active agents. Results showed that the contact angle increased and IFT decreased with concentration of surface active agent increasing, and Tween 80 was much more effective than HA. Five 2-D flow cell experiments were then conducted. Correspondingly, Tween 80 showed strong effects on the migration and distribution of PCE in the porous media due to its ability to change the medium wettability from water-wet into intermediate/NAPL-wet. The downward migration velocities of the PCE in three Tween 80 cells were slower than those in the other two cells. In addition, the final saturation of the PCE in the cells containing surface active agents was higher than that in the water-only cell. Results from this work indicate that the presence of surface active agents in groundwater may strongly affect the fate and distribution of DNAPL through altering porous medium wettability.

  3. Effects of surface active agents on DNAPL migration and distribution in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhou; Gao, Bin; Xu, Hongxia; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jichun

    2016-11-15

    Dissolved surface active agents such as surfactant and natural organic matter can affect the distribution and fate of dense nonaqueous liquids (DNAPLs) in soil and groundwater systems. This work investigated how two common groundwater surface active agents, humic acid (HA) and Tween 80, affected tetrachloroethylene (PCE) migration and source zone architecture in saturated porous media under environmentally relevant conditions. Batch experiments were first conducted to measure the contact angles and interfacial tensions (IFT) between PCE and quartz surface in water containing different amount of surface active agents. Results showed that the contact angle increased and IFT decreased with concentration of surface active agent increasing, and Tween 80 was much more effective than HA. Five 2-D flow cell experiments were then conducted. Correspondingly, Tween 80 showed strong effects on the migration and distribution of PCE in the porous media due to its ability to change the medium wettability from water-wet into intermediate/NAPL-wet. The downward migration velocities of the PCE in three Tween 80 cells were slower than those in the other two cells. In addition, the final saturation of the PCE in the cells containing surface active agents was higher than that in the water-only cell. Results from this work indicate that the presence of surface active agents in groundwater may strongly affect the fate and distribution of DNAPL through altering porous medium wettability. PMID:27450259

  4. Adaptive multiresolution modeling of groundwater flow in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenica, Luka; Gotovac, Hrvoje; Srzic, Veljko; Andric, Ivo

    2016-04-01

    Proposed methodology was originally developed by our scientific team in Split who designed multiresolution approach for analyzing flow and transport processes in highly heterogeneous porous media. The main properties of the adaptive Fup multi-resolution approach are: 1) computational capabilities of Fup basis functions with compact support capable to resolve all spatial and temporal scales, 2) multi-resolution presentation of heterogeneity as well as all other input and output variables, 3) accurate, adaptive and efficient strategy and 4) semi-analytical properties which increase our understanding of usually complex flow and transport processes in porous media. The main computational idea behind this approach is to separately find the minimum number of basis functions and resolution levels necessary to describe each flow and transport variable with the desired accuracy on a particular adaptive grid. Therefore, each variable is separately analyzed, and the adaptive and multi-scale nature of the methodology enables not only computational efficiency and accuracy, but it also describes subsurface processes closely related to their understood physical interpretation. The methodology inherently supports a mesh-free procedure, avoiding the classical numerical integration, and yields continuous velocity and flux fields, which is vitally important for flow and transport simulations. In this paper, we will show recent improvements within the proposed methodology. Since "state of the art" multiresolution approach usually uses method of lines and only spatial adaptive procedure, temporal approximation was rarely considered as a multiscale. Therefore, novel adaptive implicit Fup integration scheme is developed, resolving all time scales within each global time step. It means that algorithm uses smaller time steps only in lines where solution changes are intensive. Application of Fup basis functions enables continuous time approximation, simple interpolation calculations across

  5. Transport of molecular fluids through three-dimensional porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Pierre; Pazdniakou, Aliaksei

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of this study is to extend the analysis which has been made for the double layer theory (summarized by [1]) to situations where the distance between the solid walls is of the order of several molecular diameters. This is of a large interest from a scientific viewpoint and for various engineering applications. The intermolecular forces and their influence on fluid structure and dynamics can be taken into account by using the mesoscopic scale models based on the Boltzmann equation [2]. The numerical methods derived from these models are less demanding in computational resources than conventional molecular dynamics methods and therefore long time evolution of large samples can be considered. Three types of fluid particles are considered, namely the anions, the cations and the solvent. They possess a finite diameter which should be at least a few lattice units. The collision frequency between particles is increased by the pair correlation function for hard spheres. The lattice Boltzmann model is built in three dimensions with 19 velocities; it involves two relaxation times. The particle distribution functions are discretized over a basis of Hermite polynomial tensors. Electric forces are included and a Poisson equation is simultaneously solved by a successive over-relaxation method. The numerical algorithm is detailed; it is devised in order to be able to address any three-dimensional porous media. It involves the determination of the densities of each particle species, of the overall density and of the equilibrium distribution function. Then, the electric forces are determined. Collision operators are applied as well as the boundary conditions. Finally, the propagation step is performed and the algorithm starts a new loop. The influence of parameters can be illustrated by systematic calculations in a plane Poiseuille configuration. The drastic influence of the ratio between the channel width and the particle sizes on the local densities and the

  6. Fluid Flow in Porous Media for Soil-Water Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare; Selva, Bertrand; Beaufret, Raphael; Hough, Larry; Fretigny, Christian; Dreyfus, Remi; CNRS / Rhodia / UPenn UMI 3254 Team

    2011-11-01

    The study aims to understand the mechanisms that determine the behavior of water in soil. In developing a better comprehension of the coupling between the various fluxes (e.g. evaporation, drainage) in soil and the surrounding environment, we elaborate strategies that permit to understand and improve particularly the water absorption by the roots. Our first approach, through direct visualization, focuses on evaporation out of a 2D model soil consisting of monolayer glass beads. Evaporation from porous media exhibits an abrupt transition from capillary-supported regime 1 to diffusion-controlled regime 2. Varying the wettability of the model soil suggests that the duration of regime 1evaporation and drying front formation in hydrophobic media are shorter than in hydrophilic media due to the absence of hydraulic continuity towards the evaporating surface. We then study how evaporation couples in the presence of roots in the model soil while being subjected to various treatment conditions (e.g. physical additives, etc.). Through this study, we would be able to quantify how the physico-chemical soil treatments affect these phenomena and inspire solutions for improving soil water retention.

  7. Quadrature conductivity: A quantitative indicator of bacterial abundance in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Zhang; Andre Revil; Yoshiko Fujita; Junko Munakata-Marr; George Redden

    2014-09-01

    ABSTRACT The abundance and growth stages of bacteria in subsurface porous media affect the concentrations and distributions of charged species within the solid-solution interfaces. Therefore, spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements can be used to monitor changes in bacterial biomass and growth stage. Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the SIP response of bacteria present in a porous material. Bacterial cell surfaces possess an electric double layer and therefore become polarized in an electric field. We performed SIP measurements over the frequency range of 0.1–1 kHz on cell suspensions alone and cell suspensions mixed with sand at four pore water conductivities. We used Zymomonas mobilis at four different cell densities (in- cluding the background). The quadrature conductivity spectra exhibited two peaks, one around 0.05–0.10 Hz and the other around 1–10 Hz. Because SIP measurements on bacterial suspensions are typically made at frequencies greater than 1 Hz, these peaks have not been previously reported. In the bac-terial suspensions in growth medium, the quadrature conduc-tivity at peak I was linearly proportional to the density of the bacteria. For the case of the suspensions mixed with sands, we observed that peak II presented a smaller increase in the quadrature conductivity with the cell density. A comparison of the experiments with and without sand grains illustrated the effect of the porous medium on the overall quadrature con- ductivity response (decrease in the amplitude and shift of the peaks to the lower frequencies). Our results indicate that for a given porous medium, time-lapse SIP has potential for mon- itoring changes in bacterial abundance within porous media.

  8. Phase field modeling of partially saturated deformable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarra, Giulio

    2016-09-01

    A poromechanical model of partially saturated deformable porous media is proposed based on a phase field approach at modeling the behavior of the mixture of liquid water and wet air, which saturates the pore space, the phase field being the saturation (ratio). While the standard retention curve is expected still^ to provide the intrinsic retention properties of the porous skeleton, depending on the porous texture, an enhanced description of surface tension between the wetting (liquid water) and the non-wetting (wet air) fluid, occupying the pore space, is stated considering a regularization of the phase field model based on an additional contribution to the overall free energy depending on the saturation gradient. The aim is to provide a more refined description of surface tension interactions. An enhanced constitutive relation for the capillary pressure is established together with a suitable generalization of Darcy's law, in which the gradient of the capillary pressure is replaced by the gradient of the so-called generalized chemical potential, which also accounts for the "force", associated to the local free energy of the phase field model. A micro-scale heuristic interpretation of the novel constitutive law of capillary pressure is proposed, in order to compare the envisaged model with that one endowed with the concept of average interfacial area. The considered poromechanical model is formulated within the framework of strain gradient theory in order to account for possible effects, at laboratory scale, of the micro-scale hydro-mechanical couplings between highly localized flows (fingering) and localized deformations of the skeleton (fracturing).

  9. On the transport of emulsions in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Cortis, Andrea; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2007-06-27

    Emulsions appear in many subsurface applications includingbioremediation, surfactant-enhanced remediation, and enhancedoil-recovery. Modeling emulsion transport in porous media is particularlychallenging because the rheological and physical properties of emulsionsare different from averages of the components. Current modelingapproaches are based on filtration theories, which are not suited toadequately address the pore-scale permeability fluctuations and reductionof absolute permeability that are often encountered during emulsiontransport. In this communication, we introduce a continuous time randomwalk based alternative approach that captures these unique features ofemulsion transport. Calculations based on the proposed approach resultedin excellent match with experimental observations of emulsionbreakthrough from the literature. Specifically, the new approach explainsthe slow late-time tailing behavior that could not be fitted using thestandard approach. The theory presented in this paper also provides animportant stepping stone toward a generalizedself-consistent modeling ofmultiphase flow.

  10. Evaluation of QNI corrections in porous media applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebe, M. J.; de Beer, F. C.; Nshimirimana, R.

    2011-09-01

    Qualitative measurements using digital neutron imaging has been the more explored aspect than accurate quantitative measurements. The reason for this bias is that quantitative measurements require correction for background and material scatter, and neutron spectral effects. Quantitative Neutron Imaging (QNI) software package has resulted from efforts at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and Necsa to correct for these effects, while the sample-detector distance (SDD) principle has previously been demonstrated as a measure to eliminate material scatter effect. This work evaluates the capabilities of the QNI software package to produce accurate quantitative results on specific characteristics of porous media, and its role to nondestructive quantification of material with and without calibration. The work further complements QNI abilities by the use of different SDDs. Studies of effective %porosity of mortar and attenuation coefficient of water using QNI and SDD principle are reported.

  11. Effects of capillarity on microscopic flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The central theme of this proposal is to study the effects of capillarity on the motion of a fluid interface and to apply these results to flow in porous media. Here we report on several problems considered this year. In particular we have investigated a new similarity solution of a moving boundary problem driven only by surface tension, we have started an investigation on the effect of roughness on the motion of a contact line and we have started both a numerical and analytical investigation of the motion of fluid interfaces in a pore. In addition we report on a new method to derive macroscopic effective equation of motion of two-phase flows at low volume fraction.

  12. Gelfand-type problem for two-phase porous media

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Peter V.; Moroz, Vitaly

    2014-01-01

    We consider a generalization of the Gelfand problem arising in Frank-Kamenetskii theory of thermal explosion. This generalization is a natural extension of the Gelfand problem to two-phase materials, where, in contrast to the classical Gelfand problem which uses a single temperature approach, the state of the system is described by two different temperatures. We show that similar to the classical Gelfand problem the thermal explosion occurs exclusively owing to the absence of stationary temperature distribution. We also show that the presence of interphase heat exchange delays a thermal explosion. Moreover, we prove that in the limit of infinite heat exchange between phases the problem of thermal explosion in two-phase porous media reduces to the classical Gelfand problem with renormalized constants. PMID:24611025

  13. Model coupling for multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Rainer; Flemisch, Bernd; Wolff, Markus; Ebigbo, Anozie; Class, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Numerical models for flow and transport in porous media are valid for a particular set of processes, scales, levels of simplification and abstraction, grids etc. The coupling of two or more specialised models is a method of increasing the overall range of validity while keeping the computational costs relatively low. Several coupling concepts are reviewed in this article with a focus on the authors’ work in this field. The concepts are divided into temporal and spatial coupling concepts, of which the latter is subdivided into multi-process, multi-scale, multi-dimensional, and multi-compartment coupling strategies. Examples of applications for which these concepts can be relevant include groundwater protection and remediation, carbon dioxide storage, nuclear-waste disposal, soil dry-out and evaporation processes as well as fuel cells and technical filters.

  14. Uncertainty quantification for flow in highly heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, D. M.; Xiu, D.

    2004-01-01

    Natural porous media are highly heterogeneous and characterized by parameters that are often uncertain due to the lack of sufficient data. This uncertainty (randomness) occurs on a multiplicity of scales. We focus on geologic formations with the two dominant scales of uncertainty: a large-scale uncertainty in the spatial arrangement of geologic facies and a small-scale uncertainty in the parameters within each facies. We propose an approach that combines random domain decompositions (RDD) and polynomial chaos expansions (PCE) to account for the large- and small-scales of uncertainty, respectively. We present a general framework and use a one-dimensional flow example to demonstrate that our combined approach provides robust, non-perturbative approximations for the statistics of the system states.

  15. Aspects of hysteresis in unsaturated porous media flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duijn, Hans

    2016-04-01

    About 20 years ago, Peter Raats and I wrote a technical note related to the horizontal redistribution in unsaturated porous media with hysteresis in the capillary pressure (P.A.C. Raats & C.J. van Duijn, A note on horizontal redistribution with capillary hysteresis, WWR 31, p. 231-232, 1995). In the first part of my presentation, I will revisit the results of that paper. In particular the cases of unconventional flow, where the water flows from the dry region to the wet region. A comparison will be made with results obtained with the current interface area models as introduced by Gray & Hassanizadeh. I will explain and outline the differences. In the second part, travelling wave solutions of Richards equation with gravity and with hysteresis in both the capillary pressure and relative permeability will be discussed. It will be explained why such solutions oscillate in space-time and how they behave as the hysteresis regularization vanishes.

  16. Generalized Newtonian fluid flow through fibrous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzwiczak, Magdalena; Kołodziej, Jan Adam; Grabski, Jakub Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    The numerical calculations of the velocity field and the component of transverse permeability in the filtration equation for steady, incompressible flow of the generalized Newtonian fluid through the assemblages of cylindrical fibers are presented in this paper. The fibers are arranged regularly in arrays. Flow is transverse with respect to the fibers. The non-linear governing equation in the repeated element of the array is solved using iteration method. At each iteration step the method of fundamental solutions and the method of particular solutions are used. The bundle of fibers is treated as a porous media and on the base of velocity field the permeability coefficients are calculated as a function of porosity.

  17. Flows in Porous Media: Visualization by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shattuck, Mark David

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a Magnetic Resonance Imaging, MRI, technique which non-invasively measures local interstitial fluid velocity distributions in fully-saturated porous media. This was achieved by extending the standard three -dimensional MRI sequence to include local velocity and temperature information and adapted the technique to use the fast spin echo technique. We then applied this novel technique to two important problems. First, we studied pressure-driven flow through a fully-saturated, cylindrical packed bed. In this flow, we observed for the first time flow channeling inside a porous medium, as previously predicted. The MRI technique can also measure the local relative density. Which provides a non-invasive way of determining the spacial distribution of porosity in a porous medium. We used this information to verify previous findings concerning long -range spacial order and spacial oscillations in the porosity of packed beds of spheres. We found that the distribution of velocities in the flowing system is exponential. To our knowledge, this surprising fact has never before been documented. In the second application, we studied Porous Media Convection, PMC, from onset to eight times the critical Rayleigh number, Ra_{c}. We analyzed both ordered and disordered packings of mono-disperse spheres, in circular, rectangular, and hexagonal planforms. The disordered media was characterized by large ordered regions of close packing with grain boundaries and isolated defects. The defects created regions of larger permeability, and thus spacial variations in the Rayleigh Number, Ra. We define the critical Ra, Ra_{c}, as Ra at the onset of convection in the ordered regions. We find that stable localized convective regions exist around grain-boundaries and defects at Ra < Ra _{c} and remain as pinning sites for the convection patterns in the ordered regions as Ra is increased above Ra_{c} . In ordered media, defects only occurred within a thin region near the vertical

  18. Strength and stability of microbial plugs in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    Mobility reduction induced by the growth and metabolism of bacteria in high-permeability layers of heterogeneous reservoirs is an economically attractive technique to improve sweep efficiency. This paper describes an experimental study conducted in sandpacks using an injected bacterium to investigate the strength and stability of microbial plugs in porous media. Successful convective transport of bacteria is important for achieving sufficient initial bacteria distribution. The chemotactic and diffusive fluxes are probably not significant even under static conditions. Mobility reduction depends upon the initial cell concentrations and increase in cell mass. For single or multiple static or dynamic growth techniques, permeability reduction was approximately 70% of the original permeability. The stability of these microbial plugs to increases in pressure gradient and changes in cell physiology in a nutrient-depleted environment needs to be improved.

  19. Critical transport parameters for porous media subjected to counterflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Afifi, F. A.; Ono, D. Y.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been conducted to determine critical parameters at the onset of nonlinear counterflow in He II below the lambda point of He-4. Critical temperature differences have been measured in porous media for zero net mass flow and for Darcy permeabilities in the order of magnitude range from 10 to the -10th to 10 to the -8th sq cm. The normalized critical temperature gradients, which covered the liquid temperature range of 1.5 K to the lambda temperature, are found to vary with T proportional to the ratio of the superfluid density to the normal fluid density. This liquid temperature dependence appears to be consistent with duct data which are limited at low temperature by a Reynolds number criterion.

  20. Magnetic Resonance of Porous Media (MRPM): A perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yi-Qiao

    2013-04-01

    Porous media are ubiquitous in our environment and their application is extremely broad. The common connection between these diverse materials is the importance of the microstructure (μm to mm scale) in determining the physical, chemical and biological functions and properties. Magnetic resonance and its imaging modality have been essential for noninvasive characterization of these materials, in the development of catalysts, understanding cement hydration, fluid transport in rocks and soil, geological prospecting, and characterization of tissue properties for medical diagnosis. The past two decades have witnessed significant development of MRPM that couples advances in physics, chemistry and engineering with a broad range of applications. This article will summarize key advances in basic physics and methodology, examine their limitations and envision future R&D directions.

  1. Gelfand-type problem for two-phase porous media.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Peter V; Moroz, Vitaly

    2014-03-01

    We consider a generalization of the Gelfand problem arising in Frank-Kamenetskii theory of thermal explosion. This generalization is a natural extension of the Gelfand problem to two-phase materials, where, in contrast to the classical Gelfand problem which uses a single temperature approach, the state of the system is described by two different temperatures. We show that similar to the classical Gelfand problem the thermal explosion occurs exclusively owing to the absence of stationary temperature distribution. We also show that the presence of interphase heat exchange delays a thermal explosion. Moreover, we prove that in the limit of infinite heat exchange between phases the problem of thermal explosion in two-phase porous media reduces to the classical Gelfand problem with renormalized constants.

  2. Advanced Laser Based Measurements in Porous Media Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements using dual-pump dual-broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (DP-DBB-CARS) inside a porous media burner. This work continues our previous measurements in such combustion systems. The existing setup was significantly modified with the aim of providing improved data quality and data rate, reduction of interferences and additional species information. These changes are presented and discussed in detail. The CARS technique was expanded to a dual-pump dual-broadband CARS system which in principle enables acquisition of temperatures together with relative H2/N2- and O2/N2- species concentrations. Experimental complexity was reduced by the use of a modified spectrometer enabling the detection of both signals, vibrational and rotational CARS, with only one detection system.

  3. Nonlocal Formulation for Multiscale Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgoshaie, A. H.; Meyer, D. W.; Jenny, P.; Tchelepi, H.

    2015-12-01

    In porous media multiple pathways may exist between different locations. The length and strength of these pathways vary significantly, and the total flow at a given location is composed of contributions from both very short and long paths. If a pore network representation of such a medium is considered, there exist pores which get bypassed by long tubes. A local single continuum model can only capture the contributions from all paths properly, if the computational cells are larger than the longest connections. However, depending on the density and the lengths of these bypassing connections, choosing appropriately coarse grid blocks might be in conflict with the desired resolution. In order to capture these non-local effects present due to long bypassing connections, a non-local continuum model has been proposed. Here, it is explained how the model can be derived from the fine-scale description of a porous medium, and it is shown that in the limit where the longest connections are much smaller than the size of the computational cells, the model is consistent with Darcy's law. The non-local model was applied to pore-networks generated from a Berea sand stone sample, and the results were compared with corresponding pore-network simulations. It is shown that the resulting pressure solutions are in very good agreement, yet differ significantly from the Darcy solution. At the field-scale, this method is relevant in connection with fracture networks.

  4. Modeling of Biomass Plug Development and Propagation in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Terri L.; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2004-02-01

    Biomass accumulation and evolution in porous media were simulated using a combination of biofilm evolution model and a biofilm removal model. Theses models describe biomass plug development, removal, and propagation in biological applications such as microbial enhanced oil recovery, in situ bioremediation, and bio-barrier techniques. The biofilm evolution model includes the cell growth rate and exopolymer production kinetics. The biofilm removal model was used for describing the biomass plug propagation and channel breakthrough using Bingham yield stress of biofilm, which represents the stability of biofilm against shear stress. Network model was used to describe a porous medium. The network model consists of pore body and pore bond of which the sizes were determined based on the pore size distribution of ceramic cores. The pressure drop across the network is assumed to be generated from pore bonds only, and the cell growth and biomass accumulation took place in pore bonds. The simulation results showed that the biofilm models based on Bingham yield stress predicted the biomass accumulation and channel breakthrough well. The pressure oscillation (or, permeability oscillation) was also demonstrated well indicating the process of biomass accumulation and breakthrough channel formation. In addition, the effects of cell and biofilm sucrose concentration were significant on the biomass plug development and permeability reduction rates. The modeling elucidated some deficiencies in our knowledge of the biomass yield stress that enables us to predict the stability of biomass plug against shear stress.

  5. Overlimiting current and shock electrodialysis in porous media.

    PubMed

    Deng, Daosheng; Dydek, E Victoria; Han, Ji-Hyung; Schlumpberger, Sven; Mani, Ali; Zaltzman, Boris; Bazant, Martin Z

    2013-12-31

    Most electrochemical processes, such as electrodialysis, are limited by diffusion, but in porous media, surface conduction and electroosmotic flow also contribute to ionic flux. In this article, we report experimental evidence for surface-driven overlimiting current (faster than diffusion) and deionization shocks (propagating salt removal) in a porous medium. The apparatus consists of a silica glass frit (1 mm thick with a 500 nm mean pore size) in an aqueous electrolyte (CuSO4 or AgNO3) passing ionic current from a reservoir to a cation-selective membrane (Nafion). The current-voltage relation of the whole system is consistent with a proposed theory based on the electroosmotic flow mechanism over a broad range of reservoir salt concentrations (0.1 mM to 1.0 M) after accounting for (Cu) electrode polarization and pH-regulated silica charge. Above the limiting current, deionized water (≈10 μM) can be continuously extracted from the frit, which implies the existence of a stable shock propagating against the flow, bordering a depleted region that extends more than 0.5 mm across the outlet. The results suggest the feasibility of shock electrodialysis as a new approach to water desalination and other electrochemical separations.

  6. Specification of matrix cleanup goals in fractured porous media.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, David J; Kueper, Bernard H

    2013-01-01

    Semianalytical transient solutions have been developed to evaluate what level of fractured porous media (e.g., bedrock or clay) matrix cleanup must be achieved in order to achieve compliance of fracture pore water concentrations within a specified time at specified locations of interest. The developed mathematical solutions account for forward and backward diffusion in a fractured porous medium where the initial condition comprises a spatially uniform, nonzero matrix concentration throughout the domain. Illustrative simulations incorporating the properties of mudstone fractured bedrock demonstrate that the time required to reach a desired fracture pore water concentration is a function of the distance between the point of compliance and the upgradient face of the domain where clean groundwater is inflowing. Shorter distances correspond to reduced times required to reach compliance, implying that shorter treatment zones will respond more favorably to remediation than longer treatment zones in which back-diffusion dominates the fracture pore water response. For a specified matrix cleanup goal, compliance of fracture pore water concentrations will be reached sooner for decreased fracture spacing, increased fracture aperture, higher matrix fraction organic carbon, lower matrix porosity, shorter aqueous phase decay half-life, and a higher hydraulic gradient. The parameters dominating the response of the system can be measured using standard field and laboratory techniques.

  7. Scaling heat and mass flow through porous media during pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Julien; Muggeridge, Ann H.; Jackson, Matthew D.; Quintard, Michel; Lapene, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    The modelling of heat and mass flow through porous media in the presence of pyrolysis is complex because various physical and chemical phenomena need to be represented. In addition to the transport of heat by conduction and convection, and the change of properties with varying pressure and temperature, these processes involve transport of mass by convection, evaporation, condensation and pyrolysis chemical reactions. Examples of such processes include pyrolysis of wood, thermal decomposition of polymer composite and in situ upgrading of heavy oil and oil shale. The behaviours of these systems are difficult to predict as relatively small changes in the material composition can significantly change the thermophysical properties. Scaling reduces the number of parameters in the problem statement and quantifies the relative importance of the various dimensional parameters such as permeability, thermal conduction and reaction constants. This paper uses inspectional analysis to determine the minimum number of dimensionless scaling groups that describe the decomposition of a solid porous material into a gas in one dimension. Experimental design is then used to rank these scaling groups in terms of their importance in describing the outcome of two example processes: the thermal decomposition of heat shields formed from polymer composites and the in situ upgrading of heavy oils and oil shales. A sensitivity analysis is used to divide these groups into three sets (primary, secondary and insignificant), thus identifying the combinations of solid and fluid properties that have the most impact on the performance of the different processes.

  8. Fingering instability and mixing of a blob in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Satyajit; Mishra, Manoranjan

    2016-10-01

    The curvature of the unstable part of the miscible interface between a circular blob and the ambient fluid in two-dimensional homogeneous porous media depends on the viscosity of the fluids. The influence of the interface curvature on the fingering instability and mixing of a miscible blob within a rectilinear displacement is investigated numerically. The fluid velocity in porous media is governed by Darcy's law, coupled with a convection-diffusion equation that determines the evolution of the solute concentration controlling the viscosity of the fluids. Numerical simulations are performed using a Fourier pseudospectral method to determine the dynamics of a miscible blob (circular or square). It is shown that for a less viscous circular blob, there exist three different instability regions without any finite R -window for viscous fingering, unlike the case of a more viscous circular blob. Critical blob radius for the onset of instability is smaller for a less viscous blob as compared to its more viscous counterpart. Fingering enhances spreading and mixing of miscible fluids. Hence a less viscous blob mixes with the ambient fluid quicker than the more viscous one. Furthermore, we show that mixing increases with the viscosity contrast for a less viscous blob, while for a more viscous one mixing depends nonmonotonically on the viscosity contrast. For a more viscous blob mixing depends nonmonotonically on the dispersion anisotropy, while it decreases monotonically with the anisotropic dispersion coefficient for a less viscous blob. We also show that the dynamics of a more viscous square blob is qualitatively similar to that of a circular one, except the existence of the lump-shaped instability region in the R -Pe plane. We have shown that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a circular blob (heavier or lighter than the ambient fluid) is independent of the interface curvature.

  9. Measurement of Thin Film Characteristics in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornley, E.; Jansik, D.; Wildenschild, D.

    2007-12-01

    Liquid film formation in unsaturated subsurface porous media is commonly not accounted for in flow and transport models. Characteristics of this type of film flow are complex to quantify and are therefore often overlooked, despite the apparent need for a more complete low saturation flow model in fields such as hazardous waste disposal, enhanced oil recovery, and environmental contamination situations. The most important effects of film flow in porous media relate to available interfacial areas, meniscus curvature development, and permeability; greater understanding of these effects is necessary to accurately model these low saturation flow situations. In order to examine this topic further, we have created two-dimensional, pore scale flow cells containing crushed Yucca Mountain tuff. Tuff is characterized by large surface areas and intra-granular porosity which encourages thin film formation. Using these flow cells, relative humidity sensors, and a digital microscope and image processing software, the saturation and capillary pressure (as relative humidity) inside of the cells are measured. The measured values allow us to estimate the saturation point at which Van der Waals forces no longer dominate and capillary forces become the controlling factor. This point is characterized by the formation of pendular rings from condensing thin films. By introducing water into the cell and subsequently drying it, the formation of thin films and pendular rings can be observed while relative humidity and temperature are recorded. Relative humidity and temperature are then related to capillary pressure and saturation using the Kelvin and Young-LaPlace equations. Using this data and imaging analysis, the transition point from pendular rings to film- dominated flow can be related to the saturations and capillary pressures.

  10. Multimodel framework for characterization of transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciriello, Valentina; Edery, Yaniv; Guadagnini, Alberto; Berkowitz, Brian

    2015-05-01

    We consider modeling approaches to characterize solute transport in porous media, integrating them into a unique theoretical and experimental framework for model evaluation and data interpretation. To date, development of (conservative and reactive chemical) transport models and formulation of model calibration methods grounded on sensitivity-based collection of measurements have been pursued in parallel. Key questions that remain include: For a given set of measurements, which conceptual picture of the transport processes, as embodied in a mathematical model or models, is most appropriate? What are the most valuable space-time locations for solute concentration measurements, depending on the model selected? How is model parameter uncertainty propagated to model output, and how does this propagation affect model calibration? We address these questions by merging parallel streams of research—model formulation, reduction, calibration, sensitivity analysis, and discrimination—offering our view on an emerging framework that guides (i) selection of an appropriate number and location of time-dependent concentration measurements given a transport model and (ii) assessment (through discrimination criteria) of the relative benefit of applying any particular model from a set of several models. Our strategy is to employ metrics to quantify the relative contribution of each uncertain model parameter to the variability of the model output. We evaluate these metrics through construction of a surrogate (or "meta") transport model that has the additional benefit of enabling sensitivity analysis and model calibration at a highly reduced computational cost. We demonstrate the applicability of this framework, focusing on transport of reactive chemicals in laboratory-scale porous media.

  11. Freezing in porous media: Phase behavior, dynamics and transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    2012-12-21

    This research was focused on developing the underlying framework for the mechanisms that control the nature of the solidification of a broad range of porous media. To encompass the scope of porous media under consideration we considered material ranging from a dilute colloidal suspension to a highly packed saturated host matrix with a known geometry. The basic physical processes that occur when the interstitial liquid phase solidifies revealed a host of surprises with a broad range of implications from geophysics to materials science and engineering. We now understand that ostensibly microscopic films of unfrozen liquid control both the equilibrium and transport properties of a highly packed saturated host matrix as well as a rather dilute colloidal suspension. However, our description of the effective medium behavior in these settings is rather different and this sets the stage for the future research based on our past results. Once the liquid phase of a saturated relatively densely packed material is frozen, there is a rich dynamical behavior of particles for example due to the directed motion driven by thermomolecular pressure gradients or the confined Brownian motion of the particles. In quite striking contrast, when one freezes a dilute suspension the behavior can be rather more like that of a binary alloy with the particles playing the role of a ``solute''. We probed such systems quantitatively by (i) using X ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne (ii) studying the Argonne cell in the laboratory using optical microscopy and imagery (because it is not directly visible while in the vacuum can). (3) analyzed the general transport phenomena within the framework of both irreversible thermodynamics and alloy solidification and (4) applied the results to the study of the redistribution of solid particles in a frozen interstitial material. This research has gone a long way towards

  12. Identification of radiative properties of reticulated ceramic porous inert media using ray tracing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, P.; Habisreuther, P.; Zarzalis, N.

    2012-10-01

    The radiative properties of reticulated porous inert media are computationally identified using the real three-dimensional structural data of porous media. The computational grids data are reconstructed from three-dimensional computer tomography scans and magnetic resonance image scans of different reticulated porous media. A ray tracing algorithm is used to track the rays inside the grid structure. Statistically large numbers of rays are traced for their path length and incident angle, which are used to find the probability based equivalent extinction coefficient and scattering phase function. The equivalent extinction coefficients are found for porous media with different porosities and pore densities. The dependency of specular and diffuse scattering phase functions on the porous structure and surface reflectance are also studied.

  13. Relating tortuosity and permeability in microfractured and unfractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokan-Lawal, A.; Wang, W.; Prodanovic, M.

    2012-12-01

    . Tortuosity distributions were observed to vary in the different samples. Fractures provide the most direct path across the sample (when aligned) and have the narrowest tortuosity distribution, followed by granular packings. Consolidated media and carbonate samples have the widest distribution. The higher the amount of rock cementing material, carbonate or quartz overgrowth, the higher tortuosity (and ultimately the fluid retention time) in both consolidated porous media and partially cemented fractures. When analyzing tortuosity of different fluid phases in the matrix, we observe the non-wetting phase as being more tortuous than the wetting phase. The addition of fracture to the matrix (as a connected system) however, reverses this behavior. Although, imaged samples were necessary for this study, observed tortuosity (and thus permeability) can be correlated to geologic description of the subsurface formations.

  14. Computational and Experimental Study of Fluid Flow and Heat Flow Characteristics in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koundinya, Sandeep; Vigneshkumar, N.; Krishnan, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    Shortage of energy is increasing day by day and we have to store energy for our future. Storage is a challenge in the current scenario and lot of research is being conducted to find an effective way to store energy. Packed beds are one of the promising and potential methods to store thermal energy. This paper describes an attempt that has been made to study the fluid flow and heat flow characteristics in porous media. CFD analysis and experiments have been carried out with air-alumina as the porous medium. Pressure drop, velocity distribution, temperature distribution and Effective thermal conductivity have been found out. Parametric studies have been done both in experimentation and in the CFD analysis. Both experimental and computational results seem to be in good agreement.

  15. Colloid Transport in Porous Media: A Continuing Survey of Conceptual Model Developmen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginn, T. R.; Nelson, K.; Kamai, T.; Massoudieh, A.; Nguyen, T. H.; Le Borgne, T.; Meheust, Y.; Turuban, R.; Benjamin, A.; Palomino, A.

    2014-12-01

    The grand challenge problem of understanding colloid transport and filtration processes in porous media continues to defy fundamental solution, limiting progress of engineering science in in fields ranging from human health to water quality to materials engineering to energy production to microbiology. Focused experimental and modeling studies continue to chip away at our ignorance, in particular as regards colloid interactions with surfaces and colloid motion. In this continuing survey we give an updated overview of some of the currently active research areas with a focus on the exciting new conceptual model development and testing, with reference to pore-to-continuum scale experiments and simulations.

  16. Fabric dependence of quasi-waves in anisotropic porous media

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Luis; Cowin, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of bone loss and osteoporosis by ultrasound systems is based on the speed of sound and broadband ultrasound attenuation of a single wave. However, the existence of a second wave in cancellous bone has been reported and its existence is an unequivocal signature of poroelastic media. To account for the fact that ultrasound is sensitive to microarchitecture as well as bone mineral density (BMD), a fabric-dependent anisotropic poroelastic wave propagation theory was recently developed for pure wave modes propagating along a plane of symmetry in an anisotropic medium. Key to this development was the inclusion of the fabric tensor—a quantitative stereological measure of the degree of structural anisotropy of bone—into the linear poroelasticity theory. In the present study, this framework is extended to the propagation of mixed wave modes along an arbitrary direction in anisotropic porous media called quasi-waves. It was found that differences between phase and group velocities are due to the anisotropy of the bone microarchitecture, and that the experimental wave velocities are more accurately predicted by the poroelastic model when the fabric tensor variable is taken into account. This poroelastic wave propagation theory represents an alternative for bone quality assessment beyond BMD. PMID:21568431

  17. Fabric dependence of quasi-waves in anisotropic porous media.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Luis; Cowin, Stephen C

    2011-05-01

    Assessment of bone loss and osteoporosis by ultrasound systems is based on the speed of sound and broadband ultrasound attenuation of a single wave. However, the existence of a second wave in cancellous bone has been reported and its existence is an unequivocal signature of poroelastic media. To account for the fact that ultrasound is sensitive to microarchitecture as well as bone mineral density (BMD), a fabric-dependent anisotropic poroelastic wave propagation theory was recently developed for pure wave modes propagating along a plane of symmetry in an anisotropic medium. Key to this development was the inclusion of the fabric tensor--a quantitative stereological measure of the degree of structural anisotropy of bone--into the linear poroelasticity theory. In the present study, this framework is extended to the propagation of mixed wave modes along an arbitrary direction in anisotropic porous media called quasi-waves. It was found that differences between phase and group velocities are due to the anisotropy of the bone microarchitecture, and that the experimental wave velocities are more accurately predicted by the poroelastic model when the fabric tensor variable is taken into account. This poroelastic wave propagation theory represents an alternative for bone quality assessment beyond BMD.

  18. Impact of saturation on dispersion and mixing in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Martinez, J.; De Anna, P.; Turuban, R.; Tabuteau, H.; Le Borgne, T.; Meheust, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In partially saturated porous media, the spatial distribution of wetting (e.g., water) and non-wetting (e.g., air) phases causes the liquid flow to be focused onto narrow and complex flow paths, leaving large volumes of wetting fluid trapped in between non-wetting phase clusters. The impact of the resulting highly heterogeneous wetting fluid velocity distributions on the dispersion and mixing of a solute in this wetting phase is critical for predicting reactive transport processes that take place in partially saturated porous media. We study the dependence of dispersion and mixing on the saturation degree using a 2D experimental setup consisting of cylindrical grains built using soft lithography. The joint injection of the two phases (wetting and non-wetting) provides a controlled homogeneous saturation in the medium. The simultaneous measurement of the flow velocity field, the spatial distribution of the wetting and non-wetting phases, and the tracer concentration field are used to investigate the relationship between the flow field complexity induced by desaturation and dispersion/mixing properties. We analyze the temporal behavior of the mean concentration gradient and the scalar dissipation rate, which quantify the temporal variation of the concentration variability and the potential for mixing-controlled chemical reactivity. The formation of preferential flowpaths in unsaturated flows is found to have an important impact on the mixing behavior. While the mean concentration gradient decays in time for saturated flow following the classical diffusive smoothing of concentration gradients, the creation of highly channelized finger structures in unsaturated flows induces persistently large concentration gradients which decay slowly in time. The highly resolved concentration field images show that this effect is due to i) a drastic increase of the surface available for creating concentration gradients across the finger boundaries, ii) the existence of dead-ends with

  19. Physical factors affecting the transport and fate of colloids in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Yates, Scott R.; Bettahar, Mehdi; Simunek, Jirka

    2002-12-01

    Saturated soil column experiments were conducted to explore the influence of colloid size and soil grain size distribution characteristics on the transport and fate of colloid particles in saturated porous media. Stable monodispersed colloids and porous media that are negatively charged were employed in these studies. Effluent colloid concentration curves and the final spatial distribution of retained colloids by the porous media were found to be highly dependent on the colloid size and soil grain size distribution. Relative peak effluent concentrations decreased and surface mass removal by the soil increased when the colloid size increased and the soil median grain size decreased. These observations were attributed to increased straining of the colloids; i.e., blocked pores act as dead ends for the colloids. When the colloid size is small relative to the soil pore sizes, straining becomes a less significant mechanism of colloid removal and attachment becomes more important. Mathematical modeling of the colloid transport experiments using traditional colloid attachment theory was conducted to highlight differences in colloid attachment and straining behavior and to identify parameter ranges that are applicable for attachment models. Simulated colloid effluent curves using fitted first-order attachment and detachment parameters were able to describe much of the effluent concentration data. The model was, however, less adequate at describing systems which exhibited a gradual approach to the peak effluent concentration and the spatial distribution of colloids when significant mass was retained in the soil. Current colloid filtration theory did not adequately predict the fitted first-order attachment coefficients, presumably due to straining in these systems.

  20. Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media -- Subsurface Biogeochemical Research

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, Frederick; Wildenschild, Dorthe; Wood, Brian; Gerlach, Robin; Mitchell, Andrew; Redden, George

    2014-08-29

    The goal for this research was to understand how best to add compounds to receptive microbial communities in porous media in order to achieve optimal calcite precipitation in a volumetrically significant space and to understand the physiological health of the cells that are responsible for the calcite precipitation. The specific objectives were to: (1) develop better tools for visually examining biofilms in porous media and calcium carbonate precipitation being mediated by microbes in porous media, and (2) demonstrate the effectiveness of using that tool within a flow cell model system.

  1. Numerical analysis of the pressure drop in porous media flow with lattice Boltzmann (BGK) automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernsdorf, J.; Brenner, G.; Durst, F.

    2000-07-01

    The lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is used for a detailed study on the origins of the pressure drop in porous media flow. In agreement with the experimental results [Durst et al., J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 22 (1987) 169] it is shown, that the elongation and the contraction of fluid elements is an important factor for the pressure loss in porous media flow, and that a significant error is made, when only shear forces are taken into account. To obtain the geometry information of the porous media for our simulations, we used the 3D computer tomography technique.

  2. Study on Two-Phase Flow in Heterogeneous Porous Media by Light Transmission Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, W.

    2015-12-01

    The non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) released to the subsurface can form residual ganglia and globules occupying pores and also accumulate and form pools, in which multiphase system forms. Determining transient fluid saturations in a multiphase system is essential to understand the flow characteristics of systems and to perform effective remediation strategies. As a non-destructive and non-invasive laboratory technique utilized for the measurement of liquid saturation in porous media, light transmission is of the lowest cost and safe. Utilization of Coupled Charge Device camera in light transmission systems provides a nearly instantaneous high-density array of spatial measurements over a very large dynamic range. The migration of NAPL and air spariging technique applied to remove NAPL in aquifer systems are typically two-phase flow problem. Because of the natural aquifer normally being heterogeneous, two 2-D sandboxes (Length55cm×width1.3cm×hight45cm) are set up to study the migration of gas and DNAPL in heterogeneous porous media based on light transmission method and its application in two-phase flow. Model D for water/gas system developed by Niemet and Selker (2001) and Model NW-A for water/NAPL system developed by Zhang et al. (2014) are applied for the calculation of fluid saturation in the two experiments, respectively. The gas injection experiments show that the gas moves upward in the irregular channels, piling up beneath the low permeability lenses and starting lateral movement. Bypassing the lenses, the gas moves upward and forms continuous distribution in the top of the sandbox. The faster of gas injects, the wider of gas migration will be. The DNAPL infiltration experiment shows that TCE mainly moves downward as the influence of gravity, stopping vertical infiltration when reaching the low permeability lenses because of its failure to overcome the capillary pressure. Then, TCE accumulates on the surface and starts transverse movement. Bypassing the

  3. Investigation of Episodic Flow from Unsaturated Porous Media into a Macropore

    SciTech Connect

    R. K. Podgorney; J. P. Fairley

    2008-02-01

    Th e recent literature contains numerous observations of episodic or intermittent fl ow in unsaturated flow systems under both constant fl ux and ponded boundary conditions. Flow systems composed of a heterogeneous porous media, as well as discrete fracture networks, have been cited as examples of systems that can exhibit episodic fl ow. Episodic outfl ow events are significant because relatively large volumes of water can move rapidly through an unsaturated system, carrying water and contaminants to depth greatly ahead of a wetting front predicted by a one-dimensional, gravity-driven diff usive infiltration model. In this study, we model the behavior of water flow through a sand column underlain by an impermeable-walled macropore. Relative permeability and capillary pressure relationships were developed that capture the complex interrelationships between the macropore and the overlying porous media that control fl ow out of the system. The potential for episodic flow is assessed and compared to results of conventional modeling approaches and experimental data from the literature. Model results using coupled matrix–macropore relative permeability and capillary pressure relationships capture the behavior observed in laboratory experiments remarkably well, while simulations using conventional relative permeability and capillary pressure functions fail to capture some of the observed fl ow dynamics. Capturing the rapid downward movement of water suggests that the matrix-macropore capillary pressure and relative permeability functions developed have the potential to improve descriptions of fl ow and transport processes in heterogeneous, variably saturated media.

  4. Development and assessment of a rate equation for chemical transformations in reactive porous media.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J F

    2009-06-01

    With increasing interest in reactive porous media for groundwater remediation, such as granular iron, kinetic rate equations based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) assumptions have proven useful. Three parameters describe L-H kinetics: the two Langmuir sorption parameters, J and Cmax, and the first order rate constant, k. Unfortunately, the Cmax and k are lumped in the L-H equation, making it impossible to estimate their individual magnitudes. A re-examination of the theory underlying the L-H rate equation showed that L-H kinetics are not necessarily appropriate for packed reactive porous media experiments in columns or in the field. A more general rate equation was derived by accounting for changes in sorbed concentrations over time. The equation contains the Langmuir sorption parameter Cmax not lumped with the reaction rate constant, k, so it is possible to obtain unique estimates of J and Cmax and the rate constant, k. A sensitivity analysis suggested that this separation of variables can be achieved over a finite range of conditions applicable to granular iron media. The equation was demonstrated to be applicable, and the separation of variables possible, using the reduction of 4-chloronitrobenzene with Connelly granular iron as a test case.

  5. On the air-entry value of porous media: New insights from measurements, imaging and pore scale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Peter; Hoogland, Frouke; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    The air entry value is the capillary pressure associated with the formation of a continuous gas phase, hence marking the onset of unsaturated conditions in a porous medium. Near the air-entry value, transport properties change abruptly hence the importance of reliable determination of this value for modeling processes in the vadose zone. Typically, air entry value is inferred from the soil water characteristics of a porous sample subjected to step-wise increase in applied suction. This procedure is laborious and may require long equilibration times, and is difficult to apply for coarse media. We present an alternative and simpler method to deduce air entry-value from continuous evaporation from an initially saturated porous sample. As water evaporates and menisci form and penetrate the surface, the capillary pressure (measured with a tensiometer at any depth) abruptly changes and marks the macroscopic air entry value. This value remains remarkably constant during evaporation and receding drying front (after accounting for hydrostatic front position). We present experimental results from different porous media confirming that air-entry values deduced from soil water characteristics and evaporation experiments are similar. We employed pore scale imaging and network modeling to confirm that the air-entry value corresponds to the critical path that is needed to form a continuous air phase and its macroscopic value remains stable at a drying front that traverses a uniform porous medium. For layered media, corresponding adjustments in air entry values and air invasion patterns have been predicted and measured.

  6. ANNUAL REPORT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM PROJECT NUMBER 86598 COUPLED FLOW AND REACTIVITY IN VARIABLY SATURATED POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Carl D.; Mattson, Earl D.; Smith, Robert W.

    2003-06-13

    Improved models of contaminant migration in heterogeneous, variably saturated porous media are required to better define the long-term stewardship requirements for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands and to assist in the design of effective vadose zone barriers to contaminant migrations. The objective of our three-year project is to meet the DOE need by developing new experimental approaches to describe adsorption and transport of contaminants in heterogeneous, variably saturated media (i.e., the vadose zone). The research specifically addresses the behavior of strontium, a high priority DOE contaminant. However, the key benefit of this research is improved conceptual models of how all contaminants migrate through heterogeneous, variably-saturated, porous media. Research activities are driven by the hypothesis that the reactivity of variably saturated porous media is dependent on the moisture content of the medium and can be represented by a relatively simple function applicable over a range of scales, contaminants, and media. A key and novel aspect of our research is the use of the 2-meter radius geocentrifuge capabilities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to conduct unsaturated reactive transport experiments (Figure 1). The experimental approach using the geocentrifuge provides data in a much shorter time period than conventional methods allowing us to complete more experiments and explore a wider range of moisture contents. The vadose zone research being done in this project will demonstrate the utility of environmental geocentrifuge experimental approaches and their applicability to DOE's vadose research needs.

  7. ANNUAL REPORT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM PROJECT NUMBER 86598 COUPLED FLOW AND REACTIVITY IN VARIABLY SATURATED POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Carl D.; Mattson, Earl D.; Smith, Robert W.

    2003-06-15

    Improved models of contaminant migration in heterogeneous, variably saturated porous media are required to better define the long-term stewardship requirements for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands and to assist in the design of effective vadose-zone barriers to contaminant migrations. The objective of our three-year project is to meet the DOE need by developing new experimental approaches to describe adsorption and transport of contaminants in heterogeneous, variably saturated media (i.e., the vadose zone). The research specifically addresses the behavior of strontium, a high priority DOE contaminant. However, the key benefit of this research is improved conceptual models of how all contaminants migrate through heterogeneous, variably-saturated, porous media. Research activities are driven by the hypothesis that the reactivity of variably saturated porous media is dependent on the moisture content of the medium and can be represented by a relatively simple function applicable over a range of scales, contaminants, and media. A key and novel aspect of our research is the use of the 2-meter radius geocentrifuge capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct unsaturated reactive transport experiments (Figure 1). The experimental approach using the geocentrifuge provides data in a much shorter time period than conventional methods allowing us to complete more experiments and explore a wider range of moisture contents. The vadose zone research being done in this project will demonstrate the utility of environmental geocentrifuge experimental approaches and their applicability to DOE’s vadose research needs.

  8. New hydrologic model of fluid migration in deep porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrievsky, A.; Balanyuk, I.

    2009-04-01

    The authors present a new hydrological model of mantle processes that effect on formation of oil-and-gas bearing basins, fault tectonics and thermal convection. Any fluid migration is initially induced by lateral stresses in the crust and lithosphere which result from global geodynamic processes related to the mantle convection. The global processes are further transformed into regional movements in weakness zones. Model of porous media in deep fractured zones and idea of self-oscillation processes in mantle layers and fractured zones of the crust at different depths was used as the basis for developed concept. The content of these notions resides in the fact that there are conditions of dynamic balance in mantle layers originating as a result of combination and alternate actions of compaction and dilatance mechanisms. These mechanisms can be manifested in different combinations and under different conditions as well as can be complemented by other processes influencing on regime of fluid migration. They can act under condition of passive margin, ocean rift and ocean subduction zones as well as in consolidated platform and sheet. Self-oscillation regime, sub vertical direction of fluid flows, anomalously high layer pressure, and high level of anomalies of various geophysical fields are common for them. A certain class of fluid dynamic models describing consolidation of sedimentary basins, free oscillation processes slow and quick (at the final stage) fluid dynamic processes of the evolution of a sedimentary basin in subduction zones is considered for the first time. The last model of quick fluid dynamic processes reflects the process of formation of hydrocarbon deposits in the zones of collision of lithosphere plates. The results of numerical simulation and diagrams reflecting consecutive stages of the gas-fluid dynamic front propagation are assessed of the Pri-Caspian depression as the example. Calculations with this model will simultaneously be carried out for

  9. Characterization of fluid micro-structures in porous media and their relation to wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpyn, Z. T.; Piri, M.; Singh, G.; Landry, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    Uncertainties in the quantification of transport properties associated with porous soil systems often make the prediction of fluid residence and migration a difficult task. Movement and trapping of immiscible fluids in permeable formations respond to a complex combination of fluid properties, rock properties, the interactions between these fluids and the solid surface, and boundary conditions. This work includes implementation of a sophisticated experimental approach using x-rays and visualization techniques to map the distribution of immiscible liquid structures inside porous samples at the end of various displacement scenarios. We investigate the effect of flowing conditions and wettability on the evolution of fluid micro-structures and trapping in porous media using x-ray microtomography. Core-flooding experiments were conducted to monitor fluid distribution in artificial permeable samples made of solid spherical glass and polyethylene beads (0.43-0.60mm in diameter), which represent a hydrophilic and hydrophobic media, respectively. We present detailed characterizations of the trapped non-wetting phase clusters for the entire body of the cores allowing a more rigorous analysis of the responsible displacement mechanisms. Fluid injection rates and wetting characteristics were found to affect the mobilization and trapping of fluid phases in these porous systems. The degree of sensitivity to various flowing conditions and rock-fluid interactions is of crucial importance to understand immiscible transport mechanisms in natural soil environments. Results from this work are expected to provide a powerful calibration mechanism for physically-based multiphase flow models, which will in turn help in the generalization and extrapolation of experimental observations. Three-dimensional visualization of an oil cluster trapped in the pore space of a granular glass bead pack saturated with brine.

  10. Characteristics of acoustic emissions from fluid front displacement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möbius, F.; Canone, D.; Or, D.

    2009-12-01

    Fluid displacement in porous media is of interest for environmental, petroleum and chemical engineering. Percolation theory and pore-scale models are useful in describing filling and emptying of pores and throats but fail to capture characteristics of the fast interfacial jumps and reconfigurations occurring during fluid displacement processes such as imbibitions and drainage. Energy release caused by these rapid events generates acoustic waves which propagate through the porous medium and can be detected at its surface using acoustic emission (AE) sensors. Through a series of experiment displacing various fluids through Hele-Shaw cells filled with glass beads of different sizes we investigate correlation between acoustic emission signals, fluid and pore space properties, and energy dissipation. Acoustic emission signals were quantified by considering number of hits (events) and amplitudes. The exponent of power law relating these characteristic values varied with the displacement process and pore size. The number of AE events and amplitudes dropped with decreasing liquid surface tension for displacement within the same porous medium (water, ethanol, silicon oil). Similar trends were observed with increasing liquid viscosity, only a few hits are recorded for silicon oil with 10 mPas. The results are interpreted considering air or liquid entry pressures into the pore spaces, with increasing pressure entries for small pores and liquid with higher surface tension. The viscosity plays an important role in restraining AE-producing jump events and dumping interfacial oscillations as could be shown theoretically for simple capillaries. The study establishes direct relationships between measured AE fluid and pore properties and offer potential for quantifying energy dissipation during fluid displacement in porous media as well as other transient flow characteristics using non invasive AE signals.

  11. Experimentally Measured Interfacial Area during Gas Injection into Saturated Porous Media: An Air Sparging Analogy

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    The amount of interfacial area (awn) between air and subsurface liquids during air-sparging can limit the rate of site remediation. Lateral movement within porous media could be encountered during air-sparging operations when air moves along the bottom of a low-permeability lens. This study was conducted to directly measure the amount of awn between air and water flowing within a bench-scale porous flow cell during the lateral movement of air along the upper edge of the cell during air injections into an initially water-saturated flow cell. Four different cell orientations were used to evaluate the effect of air injection rates and porous media geometries on the amount of awn between fluids. Air was injected at flow rates that varied by three orders of magnitude, and for each flow cellover this range of injection rates little change in awn was noted. A wider variation in awn was observed when air moved through different regions for the different flow cell orientations. These results are in good agreement with the experimental findings of Waduge et al. (2007), who performed experiments in a larger sand-pack flow cell, and determined that air-sparging efficiency is nearly independent of flow rate but highly dependent on the porous structure. By directly measuring the awn, and showing that awn does not vary greatly with changes in injection rate, we show that the lack of improvement to remediation rates is because there is a weak dependence of the awn on the air injection rate.

  12. Targeted delivery by smart capsules for controlling two-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jing; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Weitz, David; Harvard Weitzgroup Team

    2015-11-01

    Two-phase flow in porous media is significantly influenced by the physical properties of the fluids and the geometry of the medium. We develop a variety of smart microcapsules that can deliver and release specific substances to the target location in the porous medium, and therefore change the fluid property or medium geometry at certain locations. In this talk, I will present two types of smart capsules for targeted surfactant delivery to the vicinity of oil-water interface and targeted microgel delivery for improving the homogeneity of the porous medium, respectively. We further prove the concept by monitoring the capsule location and the fluid structure in the porous media by micro-CT and confocal microscopy. This technique not only is of particular importance to the relevant industry applications especially in the oil industry but also opens a new window to study the mechanism of two-phase flow in porous media. Advanced Energy Consortium BEG08-027.

  13. A coupled Immersed Boundary-Lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible flows through moving porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepona, Marianna; Favier, Julien

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we propose a numerical framework to simulate fluid flows in interaction with moving porous media of complex geometry. It is based on the Lattice Boltzmann method including porous effects via a Brinkman-Forchheimer-Darcy force model coupled to the Immersed Boundary method to handle complex geometries and moving structures. The coupling algorithm is described in detail and it is validated on well-established literature test cases for both stationary and moving porous configurations. The proposed method is easy to implement and efficient in terms of CPU cost and memory management compared to alternative methods which can be used to deal with moving immersed porous media, e.g. re-meshing at each time step or use of a moving/chimera mesh. An overall good agreement was obtained with reference results, opening the way to the numerical simulation of moving porous media for flow control applications.

  14. A new tracer-density criterion for heterogeneous porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, G.R.; Illangasekare, T.H.; Hill, M.C.; Rajaram, H.

    2001-01-01

    Tracerexperiments provide information about aquifer material properties vital for accurate site characterization. Unfortunately, density-induced sinking can distort tracer movement, leading to an inaccurate assessment of material properties. Yet existing criteria for selecting appropriate tracer concentrations are based on analysis of homogeneous media instead of media with heterogeneities typical of field sites. This work introduces a hydraulic-gradient correction for heterogeneous media and applies it to a criterion previously used to indicate density-induced instabilities in homogeneous media. The modified criterion was tested using a series of two-dimensional heterogeneous intermediate-scale tracer experiments and data from several detailed field tracer tests. The intermediate-scale experimental facility (10.0 ?? 1.2 ?? 0.06 m) included both homogeneous and heterogeneous (??2/In ?? = 1.22) zones. The field tracer tests were less heterogeneous (0.24 < ??2/ln ?? < 0.37), but measurements were sufficient to detect density-induced sinking. Evaluation of the modified criterion using the experiments and field tests demonstrates that the new criterion appears to account for the change in density-induced sinking due to heterogeneity. The criterion demonstrates the importance of accounting for heterogeneity to predict density-induced sinking and differences in the onset of density induced sinking in two-and three-dimensional systems.

  15. Permeability estimation of porous media by using an improved capillary bundle model based on micro-CT derived pore geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lanlan; Liu, Yu; Teng, Ying; Zhao, Jiafei; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Mingjun; Song, Yongchen

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a permeability estimation method for porous media. This method is based on an improved capillary bundle model by introducing some pore geometries. We firstly carried out micro-CT scans to extract the 3D digital model of porous media. Then we applied a maximum ball extraction method to the digital model to obtain the topological and geometrical pore parameters such as the pore radius, the throat radius and length and the average coordination number. We also applied a random walker method to calculate the tortuosity factors of porous media. We improved the capillary bundle model by introducing the pore geometries and tortuosity factors. Finally, we calculated the absolute permeabilities of four kinds of porous media formed of glass beads and compared the results with experiments and several other models to verify the improved model. We found that the calculated permeabilities using this improved capillary bundle model show better agreement with the measured permeabilities than the other methods.

  16. Development of a correlation for aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatkowski, Andrew; Imhoff, Paul T.; Miller, Cass T.

    1995-03-01

    In many situations vapor-phase extraction procedures (e.g., soil venting, air sparging, and bioventing) may be suitable methods for remediating porous media contaminated by volatile organic compounds. This has led to increased study of operative processes in these systems, including aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer. Past work has shown the importance of the flow regime on this process, but a quantitative estimate of mass-transfer coefficients is lacking, especially for systems not confounded by uncertainties involving interfacial area between the phases. An experimental investigation was conducted to isolate the resistance to aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer at the phase boundary, using an ideal porous medium system. Mass-transfer coefficients were measured for toluene for a wide range of Reynolds numbers. An empirical model was fit to the data in dimensionless form. The mass-transfer model was coupled with an available interfacial area model, yielding a dimensionless expression for the mass-transfer rate coefficient. This expression was used to compare results from this work to three other experimental studies reported in the literature. These comparisons showed that for experiments where infiltrating water flowed uniformly within the porous medium, the predicted mass-transfer coefficients were within a factor of 5 of the measured coefficients. Mass transfer was significantly slower than the rate predicted, using the results from this work, in experiments where infiltrating water flowed nonuniformly.

  17. Interaction between carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Bae; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Yi, In-Geol

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes, fullerene, and graphene, have received considerable attention due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics, leading to mass production and widespread application in industrial, commercial, and environmental fields. During their life cycle from production to disposal, however, carbon nanomaterials are inevitably released into water and soil environments, which have resulted in concern about their health and environmental impacts. Carbon black is a nano-sized amorphous carbon powder that typically contains 90-99% elemental carbon. It can be produced from incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons in petroleum and coal. Carbon black is widely used in chemical and industrial products or applications such as ink pigments, coating plastics, the rubber industry, and composite reinforcements. Even though carbon black is strongly hydrophobic and tends to aggregate in water, it can be dispersed in aqueous media through surface functionalization or surfactant use. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the transport behavior of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) in porous media. Column experiments were performed for potassium chloride (KCl), a conservative tracer, and CBNPs under saturated flow conditions. Column experiments was conducted in duplicate using quartz sand, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS), and aluminum oxide-coated sand (AOCS) to examine the effect of metal (Fe, Al) oxide presence on the transport of CBNPs. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of CBNPs and chloride were obtained by monitoring effluent, and then mass recovery was quantified from these curves. Additionally, interaction energy profiles for CBNP-porous media were calculated using DLVO theory for sphere-plate geometry. The BTCs of chloride had relative peak concentrations ranging from 0.895 to 0.990. Transport parameters (pore-water velocity v, hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient D) obtained by the model fit from the

  18. A new numerical benchmark for variably saturated variable-density flow and transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Carlos; Graf, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In subsurface hydrological systems, spatial and temporal variations in solute concentration and/or temperature may affect fluid density and viscosity. These variations could lead to potentially unstable situations, in which a dense fluid overlies a less dense fluid. These situations could produce instabilities that appear as dense plume fingers migrating downwards counteracted by vertical upwards flow of freshwater (Simmons et al., Transp. Porous Medium, 2002). As a result of unstable variable-density flow, solute transport rates are increased over large distances and times as compared to constant-density flow. The numerical simulation of variable-density flow in saturated and unsaturated media requires corresponding benchmark problems against which a computer model is validated (Diersch and Kolditz, Adv. Water Resour, 2002). Recorded data from a laboratory-scale experiment of variable-density flow and solute transport in saturated and unsaturated porous media (Simmons et al., Transp. Porous Medium, 2002) is used to define a new numerical benchmark. The HydroGeoSphere code (Therrien et al., 2004) coupled with PEST (www.pesthomepage.org) are used to obtain an optimized parameter set capable of adequately representing the data set by Simmons et al., (2002). Fingering in the numerical model is triggered using random hydraulic conductivity fields. Due to the inherent randomness, a large number of simulations were conducted in this study. The optimized benchmark model adequately predicts the plume behavior and the fate of solutes. This benchmark is useful for model verification of variable-density flow problems in saturated and/or unsaturated media.

  19. Investigating the role of particle shape on colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Seymour, M.; Chen, G.; Su, C.

    2011-12-01

    Mechanistic understanding of the transport and retention of nanoparticles in porous media is essential both for environmental applications of nanotechnology and assessing the potential environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials. Engineered and naturally occurring nanoparticles can be found in various shapes including rod-shape carbon nanotubes that have high aspect ratios. Although it is expected that nonspherical shape could play an important role on their transport and retention behaviors, current theoretical models for particle transport in porous media, however, are mostly based on spherical particle shape. In this work, the effect of particle shape on its transport and retention in porous media was evaluated by stretching carboxylate-modified fluorescent polystyrene spheres into rod shapes with aspect ratios of 2:1 and 4:1. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation experiments (QCM-D) were conducted to measure the deposition rates of spherical and rod-shaped nanoparticles to the collector (poly-L-lysine coated silica sensor) surface under favorable conditions. Under unfavorable conditions, the retention of nanoparticles in a microfluidic flow cell packed with glass beads was studied with the use of laser scanning cytometry (LSC). Under favorable conditions, the spherical particles displayed a significantly higher deposition rate compared with that of the rod-shaped particles. Theoretical analysis based on Smoluchowski-Levich approximation indicated that the rod-shaped particles largely counterbalance the attractive energies due to higher hydrodynamic forces and torques experienced during their transport and rotation. Under unfavorable conditions, significantly more attachment was observed for rod-shaped particles than spherical particles, and the attachment rate of the rod-shaped particles showed an increasing trend with the increase in injection volume. Rod-shaped particles were found to be less sensitive to the surface charge heterogeneity change

  20. Investigating the role of particle shape on colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Seymour, M.; Chen, G.; Su, C.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanistic understanding of the transport and retention of nanoparticles in porous media is essential both for environmental applications of nanotechnology and assessing the potential environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials. Engineered and naturally occurring nanoparticles can be found in various shapes including rod-shape carbon nanotubes that have high aspect ratios. Although it is expected that nonspherical shape could play an important role on their transport and retention behaviors, current theoretical models for particle transport in porous media, however, are mostly based on spherical particle shape. In this work, the effect of particle shape on its transport and retention in porous media was evaluated by stretching carboxylate-modified fluorescent polystyrene spheres into rod shapes with aspect ratios of 2:1 and 4:1. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation experiments (QCM-D) were conducted to measure the deposition rates of spherical and rod-shaped nanoparticles to the collector (poly-L-lysine coated silica sensor) surface under favorable conditions. Under unfavorable conditions, the retention of nanoparticles in a microfluidic flow cell packed with glass beads was studied with the use of laser scanning cytometry (LSC). Under favorable conditions, the spherical particles displayed a significantly higher deposition rate compared with that of the rod-shaped particles. Theoretical analysis based on Smoluchowski-Levich approximation indicated that the rod-shaped particles largely counterbalance the attractive energies due to higher hydrodynamic forces and torques experienced during their transport and rotation. Under unfavorable conditions, significantly more attachment was observed for rod-shaped particles than spherical particles, and the attachment rate of the rod-shaped particles showed an increasing trend with the increase in injection volume. Rod-shaped particles were found to be less sensitive to the surface charge heterogeneity change

  1. Numerical simulation of the transport phenomena due to sudden heating in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, S.Y.; Zheng, G.Y.; Wang, B.X.; Yang, R.G.; Xia, C.M.

    1997-07-01

    Such process as wet porous media suddenly heated by hot fluids frequently occurs in nature and in industrial applications. The three-variable simulation model was developed to predict violent transport phenomena due to sudden heating in porous media. Two sets of independent variables were applied to different regions in porous media in the simulation. For the wet zone, temperature, wet saturation and air pressure were used as the independent variables. For the dry zone, the independent variables were temperature, vapor pressure and air pressure. The model simulated two complicated transport processes in wet unsaturated porous media which is suddenly heated by melting metal or boiling water. The effect of the gas pressure is also investigated on the overall transport phenomena.

  2. Study of the effects of stress sensitivity on the permeability and porosity of fractal porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiao-Hua; Li, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Jian-Yi; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Fan, Zhou

    2015-10-01

    Flow in porous media under stress is very important in various scientific and engineering fields. It has been shown that stress plays an important role in effect of permeability and porosity of porous media. In this work, novel predictive models for permeability and porosity of porous media considering stress sensitivity are developed based on the fractal theory and mechanics of materials. Every parameter in the proposed models has clear physical meaning. The proposed models are evaluated using previously published data for permeability and porosity measured in various natural materials. The predictions of permeability and porosity show good agreement with those obtained by the available experimental data and illustrate that the proposed models can be used to characterize the flow in porous media under stress accurately.

  3. Hysteresis of Colloid Retention and Release in Saturated Porous Media During Transients in Solution Chemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saturated packed column and micromodel transport studies wereconducted to gain insightonmechanismsof colloid retention and release under unfavorable attachment conditions. The initial deposition of colloids in porous media was found to be a strongly coupled process that depended on solution chemistr...

  4. SURFACE CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON COLLOID STABILITY AND TRANSPORT THROUGH NATURAL POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface chemical effects on colloidal stability and transport through porous media were investigated using laboratory column techniques. Approximately 100 nm diameter, spherical, iron oxide particles were synthesized as the mobile colloidal phase. The column packing material was ...

  5. Recent developments in neutron imaging with applications for porous media research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaestner, Anders P.; Trtik, Pavel; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kazantsev, Daniil; Snehota, Michal; Dobson, Katherine J.; Lehmann, Eberhard H.

    2016-09-01

    Computed tomography has become a routine method for probing processes in porous media, and the use of neutron imaging is especially suited to the study of the dynamics of hydrogenous fluids, and of fluids in a high-density matrix. In this paper we give an overview of recent developments in both instrumentation and methodology at the neutron imaging facilities NEUTRA and ICON at the Paul Scherrer Institut. Increased acquisition rates coupled to new reconstruction techniques improve the information output for fewer projection data, which leads to higher volume acquisition rates. Together, these developments yield significantly higher spatial and temporal resolutions, making it possible to capture finer details in the spatial distribution of the fluid, and to increase the acquisition rate of 3-D CT volumes. The ability to add a second imaging modality, e.g., X-ray tomography, further enhances the feature and process information that can be collected, and these features are ideal for dynamic experiments of fluid distribution in porous media. We demonstrate the performance for a selection of experiments carried out at our neutron imaging instruments.

  6. MS-2 and poliovirus transport in porous media: Hydrophobic effects and chemical perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bales, Roger C.; Li, Shimin; Maguire, Kimberly M.; Yahya, Moyasar T.; Gerba, Charles P.

    1993-04-01

    In a series of pH 7 continuous-flow column experiments, removal of the bacteriophage MS-2 by attachment to silica beads had a strong, systematic dependence on the amount of hydrophobic surface present on the beads. With no hydrophobic surface, removal of phage at pH 5 was much greater than at pH 7. Release of attached phage at both pH values did occur, but was slow; breakthrough curves exhibited tailing. Poliovirus attached to silica beads at pH 5.5 much more than at pH 7.0, and attachment was also slowly reversible. Time scales for phage and poliovinis attachment were of the order of hours. The sticking efficiency factor (α), reflecting microscaie physicochemical influences on virus attachment, was in the range of 0.0007-0.02. Phage release was small but measurable under steady state conditions. Release was enhanced by lowering ionic strength and by introducing beef extract, a high-ionic-strength protein solution. Results show that viruses experience reversible attachment/detachment (sometimes termed sorption), that large chemical perturbations are needed to induce rapid virus detachment, and that viruses should be quite mobile in sandy porous media. Even small amounts of hydrophobic organic material in the porous media (≥0.001%) can retard virus transport.

  7. Flagella-Mediated Differences in Deposition Dynamics for Azotobacter vinelandii in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Nanxi; Bevard, Tara; Massoudieh, Arash; Zhang, Changyong; Dohnalkova, Alice; Zilles, Julie L.; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2013-05-21

    A multi-scale approach was designed to investigate deposition of flagellated and non-flagellated strains of Azotobacter vinelandii in porous media. In a radial stagnation point flow cell (RSPF), the deposition rate of the flagellated strain (DJ77) on quartz was higher than that of the non-flagellated (Fla-) strain. In contrast, deposition of the Fla- strain exceeded that of DJ77 in two-dimensional silicon microfluidic models (micromodels) and in columns packed with glass beads. Direct cell counts in micromodel experiments showed decreasing values of clean collector removal efficiencies over time, suggesting that approaching cells were blocked from deposition by cells already attached to the collector surface. Column breakthrough curves for both strains also showed a decrease in deposition rates with time. Modeling results showed that blocking becomes effective for DJ77 strain at lower ionic strengths (1mM and 10mM), while for Fla- strain blocking was similar at all ionic strengths. In later stages of micromodel experiments, a ripening effect was also observed, where cells preferentially attached to already attached cells. Ripening happened earlier with the Fla- strain, which suggested that flagella interfered with ripening. Different mechanisms dominate at different stages of bacteria transport in porous media.

  8. Gint2D-T2 correlation NMR of porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    The internal magnetic field gradient induced in porous media by magnetic susceptibility differences at material interfaces impacts diffusion measurements in particular at high magnetic field and can be used to probe the pore structure. Insight about the relationship between pore space and internal gradient Gint can be obtained from 2D Laplace NMR experiments. When measuring distributions of transverse relaxation times T2 in fluid filled porous media, relaxation and diffusion in internal gradients arise simultaneously and data are often interpreted with the assumption that one or the other parameter be constant throughout the sample. To examine this assumption we measure correlations of the distributions of Gint2D and T2 by 2D Laplace NMR for three different kinds of samples, glass beads with different bead diameters saturated with water, glass beads filled with oil and water, and a wet mortar sample. For the first two samples the cases where either the internal gradient or diffusion dominates were examined separately in order to better understand the relationship between Gint and D. These results are useful for assessing the impact of internal gradients and diffusion in unknown samples, such as the mortar sample. The experiments were performed at different magnetic field strengths corresponding to 300 MHz and 700 MHz 1H Larmor frequency to identify the impact of the magnetic field on the internal gradient. Subsequently, spatially resolved Gint2D-T2 maps were obtained to study the sample heterogeneity.

  9. Gint2D-T2 correlation NMR of porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    The internal magnetic field gradient induced in porous media by magnetic susceptibility differences at material interfaces impacts diffusion measurements in particular at high magnetic field and can be used to probe the pore structure. Insight about the relationship between pore space and internal gradient G(int) can be obtained from 2D Laplace NMR experiments. When measuring distributions of transverse relaxation times T(2) in fluid filled porous media, relaxation and diffusion in internal gradients arise simultaneously and data are often interpreted with the assumption that one or the other parameter be constant throughout the sample. To examine this assumption we measure correlations of the distributions of G(int)(2)D and T(2) by 2D Laplace NMR for three different kinds of samples, glass beads with different bead diameters saturated with water, glass beads filled with oil and water, and a wet mortar sample. For the first two samples the cases where either the internal gradient or diffusion dominates were examined separately in order to better understand the relationship between G(int) and D. These results are useful for assessing the impact of internal gradients and diffusion in unknown samples, such as the mortar sample. The experiments were performed at different magnetic field strengths corresponding to 300 MHz and 700 MHz (1)H Larmor frequency to identify the impact of the magnetic field on the internal gradient. Subsequently, spatially resolved Gint(2)D-T(2) maps were obtained to study the sample heterogeneity. PMID:25723135

  10. Characteristic lengths affecting evaporative drying of porous media.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Peter; Assouline, Shmuel; Or, Dani

    2008-05-01

    Evaporation from porous media involves mass and energy transport including phase change, vapor diffusion, and liquid flow, resulting in complex displacement patterns affecting drying rates. Force balance considering media properties yields characteristic lengths affecting the transition in the evaporation rate from a liquid-flow-based first stage limited only by vapor exchange with air to a second stage controlled by vapor diffusion through the medium. The characteristic lengths determine the extent of the hydraulically connected region between the receding drying front and evaporating surface (film region) and the onset of flow rate limitations through this film region. Water is displaced from large pores at the receding drying front to supply evaporation from hydraulically connected finer pores at the surface. Liquid flow is driven by a capillary pressure gradient spanned by the width of the pore size distribution and is sustained as long as the capillary gradient remains larger than gravitational forces and viscous dissipation. The maximum extent of the film region sustaining liquid flow is determined by a characteristic length L_{C} combining the gravity characteristic length L_{G} and viscous dissipation characteristic length L_{V} . We used two sands with particle sizes 0.1-0.5 mm ("fine") and 0.3-0.9 mm ("coarse") to measure the evaporation from columns of different lengths under various atmospheric evaporative demands. The value of L_{G} determined from capillary pressure-saturation relationships was 90 mm for the coarse sand and 140 mm for the fine sand. A significant decrease in drying rate occurred when the drying front reached the predicted L_{G} value (viscous dissipation was negligibly small in sand and L_{C} approximately L_{G} ). The approach enables a prediction of the duration of first-stage evaporation with the highest water losses from soil to the atmosphere. PMID:18643163

  11. Steady Counterflow he II Heat Transfer Through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalban-Canassy, M.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2010-04-01

    We present steady state counterflow measurements performed on porous samples saturated in He II. The experiment is composed of a vacuum insulated open channel whose top extremity is closed to a Minco® heater. The temperature and pressure differences across the plug are measured by two germanium TTR-G Microsensors® thermometers and a Validyne DP10-20 differential pressure sensor. Applied heat fluxes range up to 0.5 kW/m2 of sample cross section. Measurements were performed at temperatures ranging from 1.7 to 2.1 K on highly anisotropic samples provided by Composite Technology Development Inc.: circular pellets (3.08 mm thick and 28.58 mm in diameter) of 20 compressed layers of pre-impregnated woven magnet insulation. In the laminar regime, the permeability is estimated from the pressure drop measurements for comparison with room temperature data. In the turbulent regime, the model based on tortuosity developed previously fails to describe the heat transfer behavior of He II in this type of porous medium.

  12. STEADY COUNTERFLOW HE II HEAT TRANSFER THROUGH POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dalban-Canassy, M.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2010-04-09

    We present steady state counterflow measurements performed on porous samples saturated in He II. The experiment is composed of a vacuum insulated open channel whose top extremity is closed to a Minco registered heater. The temperature and pressure differences across the plug are measured by two germanium TTR-G Microsensors registered thermometers and a Validyne DP10-20 differential pressure sensor. Applied heat fluxes range up to 0.5 kW/m{sup 2} of sample cross section. Measurements were performed at temperatures ranging from 1.7 to 2.1 K on highly anisotropic samples provided by Composite Technology Development Inc.: circular pellets (3.08 mm thick and 28.58 mm in diameter) of 20 compressed layers of pre-impregnated woven magnet insulation. In the laminar regime, the permeability is estimated from the pressure drop measurements for comparison with room temperature data. In the turbulent regime, the model based on tortuosity developed previously fails to describe the heat transfer behavior of He II in this type of porous medium.

  13. FITTING OF THE DATA FOR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS IN UNSATURATED POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    B. Bullard

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate diffusion coefficients in unsaturated porous media for use in the TSPA-VA analyses. Using experimental data, regression techniques were used to curve fit the diffusion coefficient in unsaturated porous media as a function of volumetric water content. This calculation substantiates the model fit used in Total System Performance Assessment-1995 An Evaluation of the Potential Yucca Mountain Repository (TSPA-1995), Section 6.5.4.

  14. Impact of multicomponent ionic transport on pH fronts propagation in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Multicomponent ionic interactions have been increasingly recognized as important factors for the displacement of charged species in porous media under both diffusion- [1,2] and advection-dominated flow regimes [3,4]. In this study we investigate the propagation of pH fronts during multicomponent ionic transport in saturated porous media under flow-through conditions. By performing laboratory bench-scale experiments combined with numerical modeling we show the important influence of Coulombic effects on proton transport in the presence of ionic admixtures. The experiments were performed in a quasi two-dimensional flow-through setup under steady-state flow and transport conditions. Dilute solutions of hydrochloric acid with MgCl2 (1:2 strong electrolyte) were used as tracer solutions to experimentally test the effect of electrochemical cross-coupling on the migration of diffusive/dispersive pH fronts. We focus on two experimental scenarios, with different composition of tracer solutions, causing remarkably different effects on the propagation of the acidic fronts with relative differences in the penetration depth of pH fronts of 36% between the two scenarios and of 25% and 15% for each scenario with respect to the transport of ions at liberated state (i.e., without considering the charge effects). Also significant differences in the dilution of the distinct ionic plumes, quantified using the flux-related dilution index at the laboratory bench scale [5], were measured at the outflow of the flow-through system. The dilution of the pH plumes also changed considerably (26% relative difference) in the two flow-through experiments only due to the different composition of the pore water solution and to the electrostatic coupling of the ions in the flow-through setups. Numerical transport simulations were performed to interpret the laboratory experiments. The simulations were based on a multicomponent ionic formulation accurately capturing the Coulombic interactions between

  15. Feasibility and induced effects of subsurface porous media hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann Pfeiffer, Wolf; Li, Dedong; Wang, Bo; Bauer, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    Fluctuations in energy production from renewable sources like wind or solar power can lead to shortages in energy supply which can be mitigated using energy storage concepts. Underground storage of hydrogen in porous sandstone formations could be a storage option for large amounts of energy over long storage cycles. However, this use of the subsurface requires an analysis of possible interactions with other uses of the subsurface such as geothermal energy storage or groundwater abstraction. This study aims at quantifying the feasibility of porous media hydrogen storage to provide stored energy on a timescale of several days to weeks as well as possible impacts on the subsurface. The hypothetical storage site is based on an anticlinal structure located in Schleswig-Holstein, northern Germany. The storage is injected and extracted using five wells completed in a partially eroded, heterogeneous sandstone layer in the top of the structure at a depth of about 500 m. The storage formation was parameterized based on a local facies model with intrinsic permeabilities of 250-2500 mD and porosities of 35-40%. Storage initialization and subsequent storage cycles, each consisting of a hydrogen injection and extraction, were numerically simulated. The simulation results indicate the general feasibility of this hydrogen storage concept. The simulated sandstone formation is able to provide an average of around 1480 t of hydrogen per week (1830 TJ) which is about 5% of the total weekly energy production or about 10% of the weekly energy consumption of Schleswig-Holstein with the hydrogen production rate being the limiting factor of the overall performance. Induced hydraulic effects are a result of the induced overpressure within the storage formation. Propagation of the pressure signal does not strongly depend on the formation heterogeneity and thus shows approximately radial characteristics with one bar pressure change in distances of about 5 km from the injection wells. Thermal

  16. Multiscale modelling of hydraulic conductivity in vuggy porous media

    PubMed Central

    Daly, K. R.; Roose, T.

    2014-01-01

    Flow in both saturated and non-saturated vuggy porous media, i.e. soil, is inherently multiscale. The complex microporous structure of the soil aggregates and the wider vugs provides a multitude of flow pathways and has received significant attention from the X-ray computed tomography (CT) community with a constant drive to image at higher resolution. Using multiscale homogenization, we derive averaged equations to study the effects of the microscale structure on the macroscopic flow. The averaged model captures the underlying geometry through a series of cell problems and is verified through direct comparison to numerical simulations of the full structure. These methods offer significant reductions in computation time and allow us to perform three-dimensional calculations with complex geometries on a desktop PC. The results show that the surface roughness of the aggregate has a significantly greater effect on the flow than the microstructure within the aggregate. Hence, this is the region in which the resolution of X-ray CT for image-based modelling has the greatest impact. PMID:24511248

  17. Quantitative evaluation of porous media wettability using NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Fleury, M; Deflandre, F

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new method to determine wettability indices from NMR relaxometry. The new method uses the sensitivity of low field NMR relaxometry to the fluid distribution in oil-water saturated porous media. The model is based on the existence of a surface relaxivity for both oil and water, allowing the determination of the amount of surface wetted either by oil or by water. The proposed NMR wettability index requires the measurement of relaxation time distribution at four different saturation states. At the irreducible water saturation, we determine the dominant relaxation time of oil in the presence of a small amount of water, and at the oil residual saturation, we determine the dominant relaxation time of water in the presence of a small amount of oil. At 100% water and 100% oil saturation, we determine the surface relaxivity ratio. The interaction of oil with the surface is also evidenced by the comparison of the spin-lattice (T1) and spin-locking (T1rho) relaxation times. The new NMR index agrees with standard wettability measurements based on drainage-imbibition capillary pressure curves (USBM test) in the range [-0.3-1]. PMID:12850740

  18. Percolation theory and connectivity of multiscale porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, E.; Bird, N.

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that flow and transport properties in porous media vary as non-linear functions of the porosity and that the macroscopic conductivity of a soil sample is stronly dependent on the connectivity of the pore network observed at a microscopic scale. Connectivity is a key parameter which is still difficult to quantify. We present first a review on the basic concepts of percolation theory and on their application to the standard modelling of critical transitions in the connectivity of pore or fracture subnetworks. Then we show how these concepts have to be revisited when the pore network is non longer randomly distributed, and namely when the medium is structured on multiple embedded organisation scales. We finally present some novel research results obtained on multiscale fractal soil models as regards the probability for pore or solid networks to percolate as a function of the type of geometrical organization : in particular we highligt the possibility of high porosity structures supporting impaired flow and transport. The presentation of several computer simulations illustrates the theoretical concepts. In turn, the theoretical formalism will serve as a guide for assessing the asymptotic behavior of multiscale simulated networks, in the growing research field of network modelling applied to complex natural systems.

  19. Quantitative magnetic resonance flow and diffusion imaging in porous media.

    PubMed

    Rajanayagam, V; Yao, S; Pope, J M

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative flow and diffusion measurements have been made for water in model porous media, using magnetic resonance micro-imaging methods. The samples consisted of compacted glass beads of various sizes down to 1 mm diameter. Typical flow and diffusion images exhibited a spatial resolution of 117 microns x 117 microns and velocities in the range 1-2 mm/s. Comparison of volume flow rates calculated from the flow velocity maps with values measured directly yielded good agreement in all cases. There was also good agreement between the mean diffusion coefficient of water calculated from the diffusion maps and the bulk diffusion coefficient for pure water at the same temperature. In addition, the mean diffusion coefficient did not depend on the pore sizes in the bead diameter range of 1-3 mm. Our results also show that partial volume effects can be compensated by appropriate thresholding of the images prior to the final Fourier transformation in the flow-encoding dimension.

  20. Bacterial Deposition in Porous Media: a Surface Thermodynamic Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Strevett, K. A.

    2001-12-01

    A microbial transport study of Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas sp. through a model medium of silica gel demonstrated that bacterial deposition in porous media was determined by interactions between bacteria and the medium (cell-solid interactions) as well as interactions between the deposited and suspended bacterial cells (cell-cell interactions). The clean bed collision efficiency, which represents the probability of a particle to attach upon reaching the collector surface when there are no deposited cells on the medium surface, was a function of the total free energy of the cell-solid interactions at the equilibrium distance. The blocking factor, which depicts the ratio of the blocked area to the geometric area of the medium surface, was a function of the total free energy of the cell-cell interactions at the equilibrium distance. Contact angle measurements and the wicking method were used to quantify bacterial and medium surface thermodynamics, and extended DLVO theory provided the theoretical framework for describing and predicting the interaction free energies. The understanding of these relationships is of significant importance in predicting the fate and transport of microbes in the subsurface area, and in guidance of in-situ bioremediation. Key words: bacterial deposition, van der Waals interactions, Lewis acid/base interactions, electrostatic interactions, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas sp.

  1. Comment on ``Frequency-dependent dispersion in porous media''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davit, Yohan; Quintard, Michel

    2012-07-01

    In a recent paper, Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.84.031201 84, 031201 (2011)] used the technique of volume averaging to derive a “frequency-dependent” dispersion tensor, Dγ*, the goal of which is to describe solute transport in porous media undergoing periodic processes. We describe two issues related to this dispersion tensor. First, we demonstrate that the definition of Dγ* is erroneous and derive a corrected version, Dγ*c. With this modification, the approach of Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez becomes strictly equivalent to the one devised by Moyne [Adv. Water Res.10.1016/S0309-1708(96)00023-1 20, 63 (1997)]. Second, we show that the term “frequency-dependent dispersion” is misleading because Dγ* and Dγ*c do not depend on the process operating frequency, χ. The study carried out by Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez represents a spectral analysis of the relaxation of Dγ* towards its steady-state, independent of any periodic operation or excitation.

  2. Pore network model of electrokinetic transport through charged porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obliger, Amaël; Jardat, Marie; Coelho, Daniel; Bekri, Samir; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    We introduce a method for the numerical determination of the steady-state response of complex charged porous media to pressure, salt concentration, and electric potential gradients. The macroscopic fluxes of solvent, salt, and charge are computed within the framework of the Pore Network Model (PNM), which describes the pore structure of the samples as networks of pores connected to each other by channels. The PNM approach is used to capture the couplings between solvent and ionic flows which arise from the charge of the solid surfaces. For the microscopic transport coefficients on the channel scale, we take a simple analytical form obtained previously by solving the Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations in a cylindrical channel. These transport coefficients are upscaled for a given network by imposing conservation laws for each pores, in the presence of macroscopic gradients across the sample. The complex pore structure of the material is captured by the distribution of channel diameters. We investigate the combined effects of this complex geometry, the surface charge, and the salt concentration on the macroscopic transport coefficients. The upscaled numerical model preserves the Onsager relations between the latter, as expected. The calculated macroscopic coefficients behave qualitatively as their microscopic counterparts, except for the permeability and the electro-osmotic coupling coefficient when the electrokinetic effects are strong. Quantitatively, the electrokinetic couplings increase the difference between the macroscopic coefficients and the corresponding ones for a single channel of average diameter.

  3. Quantifying colloid retention in partially saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevi, Yuniati; Dathe, Annette; Gao, Bin; Richards, Brian K.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2006-12-01

    The transport of colloid-contaminant complexes and colloid-sized pathogens through soil to groundwater is of concern. Visualization and quantification of pore-scale colloid behavior will enable better description and simulation of retention mechanisms at individual surfaces, in contrast to breakthrough curves which only provide an integrated signal. We tested two procedures for quantifying colloid movement and retention as observed in pore-scale image sequences. After initial testing with static images, three series of images of synthetic microbead suspensions passing through unsaturated sand were examined. The region procedure (implemented in ImageJ) and the Boolean procedure (implemented in KS400) yielded nearly identical results for initial test images and for total colloid-covered areas in three image series. Because of electronic noise resulting in pixel-level brightness fluctuations the Boolean procedure tended to underestimate attached colloid counts and conversely overestimate mobile colloid counts. The region procedure had a smaller overestimation error of attached colloids. Reliable quantification of colloid retention at pore scale can be used to improve current understanding on the transport mechanisms of colloids in unsaturated porous media. For example, attachment counts at individual air/water meniscus/solid interface were well described by Langmuir isotherms.

  4. Patterned wettability of oil and water in porous media.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Munish; Fogden, Andrew

    2010-03-16

    The microscopic wettability state of porous media, based on glass bead packings, after crude oil drainage of brine was investigated using X-ray micro-CT, white-light profilometry, and electron microscopy. Tomography revealed that the bulk residual brine occupied around 10% of void space, located in smaller pores and as pendular rings around bead contacts, in agreement with numerical simulations of drainage. The bead packing contained planar slabs of mica, quartz, and oxidized silicon wafer, which after flushing and disassembly of the pack allowed analysis of their wettability alteration due to deposition of asphaltenes from the crude oil. These substrates exhibited an overall pattern of rings with clean interiors, matching the brine pendular ring size inferred from experimental and simulated drainage, and asphaltene deposition in their exteriors, verifying the mixed wet model of oil reservoir wettability. The extent of asphaltene intrusion into ring interiors and completeness of asphaltene coverage of exteriors both increased with overall deposition tendency for the brine composition. The observed dependence on NaCl concentration and pH was consistent with expectations from DLVO and non-DLVO interactions governing brine thin film rupture and subsequent asphaltene deposition. PMID:19916532

  5. Transport of large particles in flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imdakm, A. O.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    1987-12-01

    There is considerable evidence indicating that significant reduction in the efficiency of many processes in porous media, such as enhancing oil recovery, heterogeneous chemical reactions, deep-bed filtration, gel permeation, and liquid chromatography, is due to the reduction in the permeability of the pore space. This reduction is due to the transport of particles, whose sizes are comparable with those of the pores, and the subsequent blocking of the pores by various mechanisms. In this paper we develop a novel Monte Carlo method for theoretical modeling of this phenomenon. Particles of various sizes are injected into the medium, and their migration in the flow field is modeled by a random walk whose transition porbability is proportional to the local pore fluxes. Pores are blocked and their flow capacity is reduced (or vanished) when large particles pass through them (and reduce their flow) or totally block them. The permeability of the medium can ultimately vanish and, therefore, this phenomenon is a percolation process. Various quantities of interest such as the variations of the permeability with process time and the distribution of pore-plugging times are computed. The critical exponent characterizing the vanishing of the permeability near the percolation threshold appears to be different from that of percolation conductivity. The agreement between our results and the available experimental data is excellent.

  6. The Role of Convective and Diffusive Mixing in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Shyam Sunder; Carballido-Landeira, Jorge; de Wit, Anne; Knaepen, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    The classical Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability that triggers convective and diffusive mixing when a denser fluid lies on top of a less dense one is characterised both numerically and experimentally in an ideal two-dimensional porous media. The universal nature of the flow dynamics starting with a stable diffusive regime, that is followed by a linearly unstable regime, and eventually to a nonlinear regime is presented. Though the fundamental behaviour has been studied extensively, the roles of convective and diffusive mixing on the flow features are not yet explored. It has been a long held view that diffusive mixing is significant only during the initial stages, and once the transition has occurred, the dynamics are governed by convection. We show that this is not the case, and both convection and diffusion play an important role even during the nonlinear regime, albeit at different regions of the flow with convection dominant locally at the tip of the fingers, and balanced by diffusion in the rest of the mixing zone. This also provides a quantitative measure for the evolution of the width of the fingers. The computational findings are well supported using our experimental observations, where an excellent agreement on the flow dynamics are obtained.

  7. Microfluidic investigation of the deposition of asphaltenes in porous media.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuntian; Morris, James E; Hartman, Ryan L

    2014-06-21

    The deposition of asphaltenes in porous media, an important problem in science and macromolecular engineering, was for the first time investigated in a transparent packed-bed microreactor (μPBR) with online analytics to generate high-throughput information. Residence time distributions of the μPBR before and after loading with ~29 μm quartz particles were measured using inline UV-Vis spectroscopy. Stable packings of quartz particles with porosity of ~40% and permeability of ~500 mD were obtained. The presence of the packing materials reduced dispersion under the same velocity via estimation of dispersion coefficients and the Bodenstein number. Reynolds number was observed to influence the asphaltene deposition mechanism. For larger Reynolds numbers, mechanical entrapment likely resulted in significant pressure drops for less pore volumes injected and less mass of asphaltenes being retained under the same maximum dimensionless pressure drop. The innovation of packed-bed microfluidics for investigations on asphaltene deposition mechanisms could contribute to society by bridging macromolecular science with microsystems. PMID:24777527

  8. Coupled Flow and Mechanics in Porous and Fractured Media*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M. J.; Newell, P.; Bishop, J.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical models describing subsurface flow through deformable porous materials are important for understanding and enabling energy security and climate security. Some applications of current interest come from such diverse areas as geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, hydro-fracturing for stimulation of hydrocarbon reservoirs, and modeling electrochemistry-induced swelling of fluid-filled porous electrodes. Induced stress fields in any of these applications can lead to structural failure and fracture. The ultimate goal of this research is to model evolving faults and fracture networks and flow within the networks while coupling to flow and mechanics within the intact porous structure. We report here on a new computational capability for coupling of multiphase porous flow with geomechanics including assessment of over-pressure-induced structural damage. The geomechanics is coupled to the flow via the variation in the fluid pore pressures, whereas the flow problem is coupled to mechanics by the concomitant material strains which alter the pore volume (porosity field) and hence the permeability field. For linear elastic solid mechanics a monolithic coupling strategy is utilized. For nonlinear elastic/plastic and fractured media, a segregated coupling is presented. To facilitate coupling with disparate flow and mechanics time scales, the coupling strategy allows for different time steps in the flow solve compared to the mechanics solve. If time steps are synchronized, the controller allows user-specified intra-time-step iterations. The iterative coupling is dynamically controlled based on a norm measuring the degree of variation in the deformed porosity. The model is applied for evaluation of the integrity of jointed caprock systems during CO2 sequestration operations. Creation or reactivation of joints can lead to enhanced pathways for leakage. Similarly, over-pressures can induce flow along faults. Fluid flow rates in fractures are strongly dependent on the

  9. Multiple Tracer Tests in Porous Media During Clogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, A.; Banning, A.; Siegmund, J.; Freye, S.; Goekpinar, T.

    2015-12-01

    Transport processes are known to be governed by the physical and chemical heterogeneity of the subsurface. Clogging processes can alter this heterogeneity as function of time and thus can modify transport. To understand transport under clogging conditions and to unravel the potential of multiple tracer tests to characterize such transport process we perform column and sandbox experiments. Our recently developed column and sandbox experiments are used to perform multiple tracer tests during clogging. In a first set of experiments, a cubic cell of 0.1 m x 0.1 m x 0.1 m is used to experimentally estimate flow and transport characteristics of an unconsolidated sediment through Darcy and tracer experiments. The water streaming through the experiment is amended with ammonium sulfate permanently. Salt tracers are added to the streaming water repeatedly, to be detected at micro electrodes at the inflow and the outflow of the cubic cell. Through repeated syringe injections of a barium chloride solution into the center of the cubic cell clogging processes are forced to occur around the mixing zone of the injected and streaming water by precipitation of barium sulfate. In a second set of experiments, a sandbox model including a sediment body of 0.3 m x 0.3 m x 0.1 m is used. Tracer, streaming, and injection water chemistry is kept similar to the cubic cell experiments. However, tracer breakthrough is now detected at nine positions within the experiment and at the inflow and the outflow of the sandbox model. Injection of barium chloride solution is now at two locations around the center of the sandbox model. Flow and transport characteristics of the sediment body are estimated based on Darcy and tracer experiments, which are performed repeatedly. Combined analysis of local and ensemble breakthrough curves and integrated numerical modeling will be used to understand effective and local flow and transport in a in a porous medium during clogging.

  10. Experimental investigation of the link between pore scale velocities, transport and reactivity in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; Turuban, R.; Jimenez-Martinez, J.; De Anna, P.; Tabuteau, H.; Le Borgne, T.

    2014-12-01

    Pore scale characterization of flow velocities and concentration spatial distributions is a key to understanding non-Fickian transport and mixing in porous media. We present a millifluidic setup aimed at investigating those processes in transparent porous media, at the pore scale. The porous media are quasi-2D, consisting of a Hele-Shaw cell containing cylindrical grains. They are made by soft lithography from a numerical model and provide full control on the geometry (medium porosity, permeability and heterogeneity). The setup allows for the study of primary drainage/imbibition, or the joint continuous injection of two fluids (e. g. water and air). A camera records the distributions of fluid phases, the position of solid tracers, and spatially-resolved images of light emissions inside the flow cell. The pore scale velocity field is thus measured from particle tracking, while pore scale concentration fields are measured accurately in passive transport experiments, using fluorescein; both continuous injection and finite volume solute injections can be achieved. Using two chemo-luminescent liquids, the reaction of which produces photons in addition to the reaction product, we are also able to study the local production rate of the reaction product as the reactive liquids flow through the system [1]. Pressure drops across the medium are also measured. This complete characterization (phase distributions, velocity and concentration fields, pressure drops) of the system allows to explain non-Fickian behaviors and test models that upscale transport and mixing properties from pore scale data. As examples, we shall discuss the upscaling of transport from the knowledge of Lagrangian velocities and the relationships between conservative and reactive transport under mixing-limited conditions (very large Damkhöler number). Other applications include the prediction of the mixing rate from the sole knowledge of the flow stretching [2], and the characterization of mixing by

  11. Biophysical Interactions in Porous Media: an Integrated Experimental and Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, W.; Baveye, P.; Falconer, R.

    2012-12-01

    A critical feature of porous media is that the geometry provides habitats of a complexity that is not seen above ground, offering shelter, food water and gasses to microorganisms, who's spatial and temporal dynamics are shaped by this microscopic heterogeneity. The microbial dynamics, including fungal and bacterial growth, in turn affect the geometry and the hydrological properties, shaping the pore architecture at short and long time scales, altering surface tension, and (partially) blocking pores, thereby affecting the flow paths of water through a structure. Crucially, the majority of these processes occur at microscopic scales with impact on larger scale ecological processes and ecosystem services. The complexity of these interacting processes and feed-back mechanisms at first may seem overwhelming. However, we show in this paper how with recent progress in experimental techniques, integrated with a modelling approach we can begin to understand the importance of microscopic heterogeneity on microbial dynamics. We will demonstrate this integrated approach for fungal dynamics in porous media such as soil through a combination of novel experimental tools and mathematical modelling. Using benchtop X-ray CT systems we present the finer detail of pore structure at scales relevant for microbial processes, and present our recent advances in the use of theoretical tools to rigorously characterise, and quantitatively describe this environment, and present the state-of-the art with respect to visualization of water in porous media. Severe challenges remain with studying the spatial distribution of microorganisms. We present how biological thin sectioning techniques offer a way forward to study the spatial distribution of fungi and bacteria within pore geometries. Through a series of detailed experiments we show how pathways, resulting from connected pore volumes and distribution of water within them, are preferentially explored during fungal invasion. We complement the

  12. Theoretical studies of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu.

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been carried out on the flow behavior of both single and multiple phase non-Newtonian fluids in porous media. This work is divided into three parts: development of numerical and analytical solutions; theoretical studies of transient flow of non-Newtonian fluids in porous media; and applications of well test analysis and displacement efficiency evaluation to field problems. A fully implicit, integral finite difference model has been developed for simulation of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through porous media. Several commonly-used rheological models of power-law and Bingham plastic non-Newtonian fluids have been incorporated in the simulator. A Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution for one-dimensional, immiscible displacement involving non-Newtonian fluids in porous media has been developed. An integral method is also presented for the study of transient flow of Bingham fluids in porous media. In addition, two well test analysis methods have been developed for analyzing pressure transient tests of power-law and Bingham fluids, respectively. Applications are included to demonstrate this new technology. The physical mechanisms involved in immiscible displacement with non-Newtonian fluids in porous media have been studied using the Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution. In another study, an idealized fracture model has been used to obtain some insights into the flow of a power-law fluid in a double-porosity medium. Transient flow of a general pseudoplastic fluid has been studied numerically. 125 refs., 91 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Evaporation-driven transport and precipitation of salt in porous-media: A multi-domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambhekar, Vishal Arun; Schmid, Karen Sophie; Helmig, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    the free-flow porous-media interface and the influence of atmospheric conditions on evaporation dynamics. The model is also capable to handle dissolved salt transport, osmosis, salt-precipitation and changes in porous-media properties (e.g. porosity and permeability). Numerical implementation is performed in the framework of DuMuX. Implicit Euler method is applied for time and BOX scheme is used for spatial discretization. The system is solved implicitly after incorporating the interface conditions. Results: Numerical examples are setup to illustrate evolution of the evaporation rate, cumulative water loss, drying behavior, solute distribution, salinization and changes in porous media properties. The model is applicable to both non-saline and saline cases. Numerical experiments are undertaken for saturated and unsaturated systems with homogeneous and heterogeneous porous structures. The model concept is validated against the experimental data presented by [4]. References [1] Nachshon, U. et. al (2011). Combined evaporation and salt precipitation in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media. WRR, 47. [2] Coussot, P. (2000). Scaling approach of the convective drying of a porous medium. The European Physical Journal B - Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, 15:557-566. [3] Mosthaf, K. et. al (2011). A coupling concept for two-phase compositional porous-medium and single phase compositional free flow. WRR 47. [4] M. Norouzi Rad., N. Shokri, and M. Sahimi. Pore-scale dynamics of salt precipitation in drying porous media. Physical Review E. 2013 September; 88(3).

  14. Pattern density function for reconstruction of three-dimensional porous media from a single two-dimensional image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Mingliang; Teng, Qizhi; He, Xiaohai; Zuo, Chen; Li, ZhengJi

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structures are useful for studying the spatial structures and physical properties of porous media. A 3D structure can be reconstructed from a single two-dimensional (2D) training image (TI) by using mathematical modeling methods. Among many reconstruction algorithms, an optimal-based algorithm was developed and has strong stability. However, this type of algorithm generally uses an autocorrelation function (which is unable to accurately describe the morphological features of porous media) as its objective function. This has negatively affected further research on porous media. To accurately reconstruct 3D porous media, a pattern density function is proposed in this paper, which is based on a random variable employed to characterize image patterns. In addition, the paper proposes an original optimal-based algorithm called the pattern density function simulation; this algorithm uses a pattern density function as its objective function, and adopts a multiple-grid system. Meanwhile, to address the key point of algorithm reconstruction speed, we propose the use of neighborhood statistics, the adjacent grid and reversed phase method, and a simplified temperature-controlled mechanism. The pattern density function is a high-order statistical function; thus, when all grids in the reconstruction results converge in the objective functions, the morphological features and statistical properties of the reconstruction results will be consistent with those of the TI. The experiments include 2D reconstruction using one artificial structure, and 3D reconstruction using battery materials and cores. Hierarchical simulated annealing and single normal equation simulation are employed as the comparison algorithms. The autocorrelation function, linear path function, and pore network model are used as the quantitative measures. Comprehensive tests show that 3D porous media can be reconstructed accurately from a single 2D training image by using the method proposed

  15. Lattice Boltzmann formulation for flows with acoustic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chenghai; Pérot, Franck; Zhang, Raoyang; Lew, Phoi-Tack; Mann, Adrien; Gupta, Vinit; Freed, David M.; Staroselsky, Ilya; Chen, Hudong

    2015-10-01

    Porous materials are commonly used in various industrial systems such as ducts, HVAC, hoods, mufflers, in order to introduce acoustic absorption and to reduce the radiated acoustics levels. For problems involving flow-induced noise mechanisms and explicit interactions between turbulent source regions, numerical approaches remain a challenging task involving, on the one hand, the coupling between unsteady flow calculations and acoustics simulations and, on the other hand, the development of advanced and sensitive numerical schemes. In this paper, acoustic materials are explicitly modeled in lattice Boltzmann simulations using equivalent fluid regions having arbitrary porosity and resistivity. Numerical simulations are compared to analytical derivations as well as experiments and semi-empirical models to validate the approach.

  16. Pressure drop of He II flow through a porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, J. R.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports on measurements of He II pressure drop across two porous SiO2 ceramic filter materials. These materials vary only in porosity, having values of 0.94 and 0.96. The average fiber diameter in both cases is approximately 5 microns. The experiment consists of a glass tube containing a piece of this sponge in one end. The tube is rapidly displaced downward in a bath of helium and the liquid levels are allowed to equilibrate over time producing variable velocities up to 10 cm/sec. The results are compared with those previously obtained using fine mesh screens. Good qualitative agreement is observed for turbulent flow; however, the behavior in the laminar flow regime is not fully understood.

  17. Pressure drop of He II flow through a porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddocks, J. R.; van Sciver, S. W.

    The paper reports on measurements of He II pressure drop across two porous SiO2 ceramic filter materials. These materials vary only in porosity, having values of 0.94 and 0.96. The average fiber diameter in both cases is approximately 5 microns. The experiment consists of a glass tube containing a piece of this sponge in one end. The tube is rapidly displaced downward in a bath of helium and the liquid levels are allowed to equilibrate over time producing variable velocities up to 10 cm/sec. The results are compared with those previously obtained using fine mesh screens. Good qualitative agreement is observed for turbulent flow; however, the behavior in the laminar flow regime is not fully understood.

  18. Hydrodynamic controls on particle transport through heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Silliman, S.E.

    1992-09-30

    The initial stages of this project have been focused on equipment development and preliminary experimental efforts. Among the accomplishments to date are the development of a successful flow cell design, proof of the utility of the UV resin, adjustment of the Laser Particle Counter to produce reliable readings, installation of a low particle content water supply, installation of a microscope for viewing discharge samples, development of a fiber/rod optic system for freezing the UV resin in situ and performance of initial experiments on layered and complex heterogeneities. The work is currently following very closely the original schedule for research efforts. Continuing efforts in year one will include continued efforts in simple and complex heterogeneity in two-dimensions, extension into three-dimensions, consideration of the most appropriate methods for creating geologically realistic structures in the laboratory, interaction with other SSP research programs and organization of the spring meeting on intermediate-scale experimentation to be held at Notre Dame. Efforts in year two will be focused on three-dimensional experiments in saturated media, extension of results into unsaturated media, development of techniques for unsaturated media characterization, and development of research ties with outside research interests.

  19. Simulation of gaseous diffusion in partially saturated porous media under variable gravity with lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Jessica Furrer; Or, Dani; Sukop, Michael C.; Steinberg, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Liquid distributions in unsaturated porous media under different gravitational accelerations and corresponding macroscopic gaseous diffusion coefficients were investigated to enhance understanding of plant growth conditions in microgravity. We used a single-component, multiphase lattice Boltzmann code to simulate liquid configurations in two-dimensional porous media at varying water contents for different gravity conditions and measured gas diffusion through the media using a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann code. The relative diffusion coefficients (D rel) for simulations with and without gravity as functions of air-filled porosity were in good agreement with measured data and established models. We found significant differences in liquid configuration in porous media, leading to reductions in D rel of up to 25% under zero gravity. The study highlights potential applications of the lattice Boltzmann method for rapid and cost-effective evaluation of alternative plant growth media designs under variable gravity.

  20. Flow and dispersion in anisotropic porous media: A lattice-Boltzmann study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiolo, D.; Picano, F.; Guarnieri, M.

    2016-10-01

    Given their capability of spreading active chemical species and collecting electricity, porous media made of carbon fibers are extensively used as diffusion layers in energy storage systems, such as redox flow batteries. In spite of this, the dispersion dynamics of species inside porous media is still not well understood and often lends itself to different interpretations. Actually, the microscopic design of efficient porous media, which can potentially and effectively improve the performances of flow batteries, is still an open challenge. The present study aims to investigate the effect of fibrous media micro-structure on dispersion, in particular the effect of fiber orientation on drag and dispersion dynamics. Several lattice-Boltzmann simulations of flows through differently oriented fibrous media coupled with Lagrangian simulations of particle tracers have been performed. Results show that orienting fibers preferentially along the streamwise direction minimizes the drag and maximizes the dispersion, which is the most desirable condition for diffusion layers in flow batteries' applications.

  1. Simulation of gaseous diffusion in partially saturated porous media under variable gravity with lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Jessica Furrer; Or, Dani; Sukop, Michael C.

    2005-08-01

    Liquid distributions in unsaturated porous media under different gravitational accelerations and corresponding macroscopic gaseous diffusion coefficients were investigated to enhance understanding of plant growth conditions in microgravity. We used a single-component, multiphase lattice Boltzmann code to simulate liquid configurations in two-dimensional porous media at varying water contents for different gravity conditions and measured gas diffusion through the media using a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann code. The relative diffusion coefficients (Drel) for simulations with and without gravity as functions of air-filled porosity were in good agreement with measured data and established models. We found significant differences in liquid configuration in porous media, leading to reductions in Drel of up to 25% under zero gravity. The study highlights potential applications of the lattice Boltzmann method for rapid and cost-effective evaluation of alternative plant growth media designs under variable gravity.

  2. Sub-CMC solubilization of dodecane by rhamnolipid in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhifeng; Yang, Xin; Brusseau, Mark L.; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-09-01

    Experiments were conducted with a two-dimensional flow cell to examine the effect of monorhamnolipid surfactant at sub-CMC concentrations on solubilization of dodecane in porous media under dynamic flow conditions. Quartz sand was used as the porous medium and artificial groundwater was used as the background solution. The effectiveness of the monorhamnolipid was compared to that of SDBS, Triton X-100, and ethanol. The results demonstrated the enhancement of dodecane solubility by monorhamnolipid surfactant at concentrations lower than CMC. The concentrations (50–210 μM) are sufficiently low that they do not cause mobilization of the dodecane. Retention of rhamnolipid in the porous medium and detection of nano-size aggregates in the effluent show that the solubilization is based on a sub-CMC aggregate-formation mechanism, which is significantly stronger than the solubilization caused by the co-solvent effect. The rhamnolipid biosurfactant is more efficient for the solubilization compared to the synthetic surfactants. These results indicate a strategy of employing low concentrations of rhamnolipid for surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR), which may overcome the drawbacks of using surfactants at hyper-CMC concentrations.

  3. Sub-CMC solubilization of dodecane by rhamnolipid in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhifeng; Yang, Xin; Brusseau, Mark L; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with a two-dimensional flow cell to examine the effect of monorhamnolipid surfactant at sub-CMC concentrations on solubilization of dodecane in porous media under dynamic flow conditions. Quartz sand was used as the porous medium and artificial groundwater was used as the background solution. The effectiveness of the monorhamnolipid was compared to that of SDBS, Triton X-100, and ethanol. The results demonstrated the enhancement of dodecane solubility by monorhamnolipid surfactant at concentrations lower than CMC. The concentrations (50-210 μM) are sufficiently low that they do not cause mobilization of the dodecane. Retention of rhamnolipid in the porous medium and detection of nano-size aggregates in the effluent show that the solubilization is based on a sub-CMC aggregate-formation mechanism, which is significantly stronger than the solubilization caused by the co-solvent effect. The rhamnolipid biosurfactant is more efficient for the solubilization compared to the synthetic surfactants. These results indicate a strategy of employing low concentrations of rhamnolipid for surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR), which may overcome the drawbacks of using surfactants at hyper-CMC concentrations. PMID:27619361

  4. Sub-CMC solubilization of dodecane by rhamnolipid in saturated porous media

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhifeng; Yang, Xin; Brusseau, Mark L.; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with a two-dimensional flow cell to examine the effect of monorhamnolipid surfactant at sub-CMC concentrations on solubilization of dodecane in porous media under dynamic flow conditions. Quartz sand was used as the porous medium and artificial groundwater was used as the background solution. The effectiveness of the monorhamnolipid was compared to that of SDBS, Triton X-100, and ethanol. The results demonstrated the enhancement of dodecane solubility by monorhamnolipid surfactant at concentrations lower than CMC. The concentrations (50–210 μM) are sufficiently low that they do not cause mobilization of the dodecane. Retention of rhamnolipid in the porous medium and detection of nano-size aggregates in the effluent show that the solubilization is based on a sub-CMC aggregate-formation mechanism, which is significantly stronger than the solubilization caused by the co-solvent effect. The rhamnolipid biosurfactant is more efficient for the solubilization compared to the synthetic surfactants. These results indicate a strategy of employing low concentrations of rhamnolipid for surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR), which may overcome the drawbacks of using surfactants at hyper-CMC concentrations. PMID:27619361

  5. The single-valued diffusion coefficient for ionic diffusion through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, Sylvie; Voinitchi, Dorinel; Bégué-Escaffit, Pascale; Bourbon, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    The current literature on ionic diffusion through porous media teaches that the diffusion coefficient is a complicated function depending on concentration, concentration gradient, and electrical potential gradient. This paper documents how natural diffusion tests and migration tests (electrically enhanced transport) lead to the measurement of a unique diffusion coefficient for a given ionic species and a given material. Natural diffusion tests for chloride and a ceramic of TiO2 were implemented at two different concentration levels. The experiments were designed to emphasize the impact of the membrane potential in the pore solution on the chloride flux. By accounting for the membrane potential it is shown that the chloride diffusion coefficient is unique for a given material. An iterative method based on a numerical model solving the continuity equations and the current law is proposed to determine the diffusion coefficient. The approach is applied with success to published results on a cement-based material. Migration tests were also performed with chloride in a cementitious material, where the chloride transport is enhanced by an external electrical field. The experimental results reveal the competition between diffusion and electrical effects in the case of noncontaminated porous materials. By varying the electrical potential difference it is shown that the flux of chloride varies linearly with the electrical field, meaning that the chloride diffusion coefficient does not depend on the electrical field. The main conclusion is that there is only one chloride diffusion coefficient for a given porous material.

  6. Sub-CMC solubilization of dodecane by rhamnolipid in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhifeng; Yang, Xin; Brusseau, Mark L; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with a two-dimensional flow cell to examine the effect of monorhamnolipid surfactant at sub-CMC concentrations on solubilization of dodecane in porous media under dynamic flow conditions. Quartz sand was used as the porous medium and artificial groundwater was used as the background solution. The effectiveness of the monorhamnolipid was compared to that of SDBS, Triton X-100, and ethanol. The results demonstrated the enhancement of dodecane solubility by monorhamnolipid surfactant at concentrations lower than CMC. The concentrations (50-210 μM) are sufficiently low that they do not cause mobilization of the dodecane. Retention of rhamnolipid in the porous medium and detection of nano-size aggregates in the effluent show that the solubilization is based on a sub-CMC aggregate-formation mechanism, which is significantly stronger than the solubilization caused by the co-solvent effect. The rhamnolipid biosurfactant is more efficient for the solubilization compared to the synthetic surfactants. These results indicate a strategy of employing low concentrations of rhamnolipid for surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR), which may overcome the drawbacks of using surfactants at hyper-CMC concentrations.

  7. Altered transport of lindane caused by the retention of natural particles in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Ngueleu, Stéphane K; Grathwohl, Peter; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2014-07-01

    Attachment and straining of colloidal particles in porous media result in their reversible and irreversible retention. The retained particles may either increase the retention of hydrophobic pollutants by sorption onto the particles, or enhance pollutant transport when particles, loaded with the pollutants, are remobilized. The present study examines the effects of retained particles on the transport of the hydrophobic pesticide lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane) in saturated porous media. The lignite particles used have median diameters of about 3 μm, 1 μm, 0.8 μm, and 0.2 μm, respectively. Laboratory column experiments were analyzed by numerical modeling in order to identify and understand the processes involved in the transport of the particles and of lindane. Four scenarios were considered in which the solution containing lindane is injected either during or after the elution of the particles. The results show that lignite particles retained in a sandy porous medium alter the transport of the invading lindane. Particle retention was high in all scenarios and increased with increasing particle size. Remobilization of particles occurred due to a change in solution chemistry, and continuous particle detachment was observed over time. Numerical modeling of particle transport suggests that both reversible attachment and irreversible straining affected the transport of the particles. Lindane was retarded in all scenarios due to the strong particle retention in conjunction with the sorption of lindane onto the sand and onto retained particles, and the limited number of mobile particles carrying lindane. Moreover, it was found that intra-particle diffusion limited adsorption/desorption of lindane onto/from both limestone fragments of the sand and lignite particles. We assume that retention of lindane is reversible even though lindane recovery was incomplete over the duration of the experiments. The analysis of the effluent concentration suggests that retained

  8. Fundamental Studies of Fluid Mechanics: Stability in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    George M. Homsy

    2005-04-28

    This work has been concerned with theoretical, computational and experimental studies of a variety of flow and transport problems that are of generic interest and applicability in energy-related and energy-intensive processes. These include the following. (1) Problems associated with oil recovery: the global economy continues to be dependent on the stable and predictable supply of oil and fossil fuels. This will remain the case for the near term, as current estimates are that world production of oil will peak between 2025 and 2100, depending on assumptions regarding growth. Most of these resources reside in porous rocks and other naturally occurring media. Studies of flow-induced instabilities are relevant to the areas of secondary and enhanced oil recovery. (2) Small scale and Stokes flows: flows in microgeometries and involving interfaces and surfactants are of interest in a myriad of energy-related contexts. These include: pore-level modeling of the fundamental processes by which oil held in porous materials is mobilized and produced; heating and cooling energy cycles involving significant expenditure of energy in conditioning of human environments, heat pipes, and compact heat exchangers; and energy efficiency in large scale separation processes such as distillation and absorption-processes that underlie the chemical process industries. (3) Coating flows: these are of interest in information technologies, including the manufacture of integrated circuits and data storage and retrieval devices. It is estimated that 50-70% of the starting raw materials and intermediate devices in information technology processes must be discarded as a result of imperfections and failure to meet specifications. These in turn are often the result of the inability to control fluid-mechanical processes and flow instabilities. Our work over the grant period is primarily fundamental in nature. We are interested in establishing general principles and behaviors that relate to a variety of

  9. Spectral Induced Polarization Signatures of Hydroxide Adsorption and Mineral Precipitation in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chi; Slater, Lee; Redden, George D.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Johnson, Timothy C.; Fox, Don

    2012-04-17

    The spectral induced polarization (SIP) technique is a promising approach for delineating subsurface physical and chemical property changes in a minimally invasive manner. To facilitate the understanding of position and chemical properties of reaction fronts that involve mineral precipitation in porous media, we investigated spatiotemporal variations in complex conductivity during evolution of urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation reaction fronts within a silica gel column. The real and imaginary parts of complex conductivity were shown to be sensitive to changes in both solution chemistry and calcium carbonate precipitation. Distinct changes in imaginary conductivity coincided with increased hydroxide ion concentration during urea hydrolysis. In a separate experiment focused on the effect of hydroxide concentration on interfacial polarization of silica gel and well-sorted sand, we found a significant dependence of the polarization response on pH changes of the solution. We propose a conceptual model describing hydroxide ion adsorption behavior in silica gel and its control on interfacial polarizability. Our results demonstrate the utility of SIP for noninvasive monitoring of reaction fronts, and indicate its potential for quantifying geochemical processes that control the polarization responses of porous media at larger spatial scales in the natural environment.

  10. Transport and remobilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in porous media during dynamic saturation change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P.

    2012-04-01

    Nanotechnology is one of the most important technologies in this century and it is evoking a new industrial revolution. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are important engineered nanoparticles with unique and beneficial properties. As a result, CNT has been used in a wide range of commercial products including electronics, optical devices and drug delivery leading to their disposal in the natural environment. Literature studies have investigated the mobility of CNTs in saturated porous media under differing physical and chemical conditions. However CNT transport in temporarily changing porous media water content has not been investigated thus far (a common scenario with rainfall/infiltration events in the vadose zone). This study investigated the mobilization of multi-walled CNTs (MCNTs) in repeated wetting and drying cycles with varying flow rates and ionic strength of the inflow solution. Imbibition-drainage-imbibition cycle experiments suggest that MCNTs mobilization increased with increase in flow rates. MCNTs mobilization occurred only with first imbibition events at low ionic strengths however less mobilization happened for higher ionic strength inflow solution in the first imbibition cycle and additional MCNTs were found in the outflow solution in second imbibition cycle, using low ionic strength solution. This observation was likely due to the attachment force between MCNTs and sand surface. Most of the MCNT mobilization occurred during liquid-gas interface movement with less chance of MCNTs to jump the energy barrier at higher ionic strength solution. As a result, less detachment of MCNTs occurred from the sand surface during drainage.

  11. Single-source gamma radiation procedures for improved calibration and measurements in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, M.; Hofstee, C.; Dane, H.; Lenhard, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    When dual-energy gamma radiation systems are employed for measurements in porous media, count rates from both sources are often used to compute parameter values. However, for several applications, the count rates of just one source are insufficient. These applications include the determination of volumetric liquid content values in two-liquid systems and salt concentration values in water-saturated porous media. Single-energy gamma radiation procedures for three applications are described in this paper. Through an error analysis, single-source procedures are shown to reduce the probable error in the determinations considerably. Example calculations and simple column experiments were conducted for each application to compare the performance of the new single-source and standard dual-source methods. In all cases, the single-source methods provided more reliable data than the traditional dual-source methods. In addition, a single-source calibration procedure is proposed to determine incident count rates indirectly. This procedure, which requires packing under saturated conditions, can be used in all single- and dual-source applications and yields accurate porosity and dry bulk density values.

  12. Effects of chemical oxidants on perfluoroalkyl acid transport in one-dimensional porous media columns.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Erica R; Siegrist, Robert L; McCray, John E; Higgins, Christopher P

    2015-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a remediation approach that is often used to remediate soil and groundwater contaminated with fuels and chlorinated solvents. At many aqueous film-forming foam-impacted sites, perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) can also be present at concentrations warranting concern. Laboratory experiments were completed using flow-through one-dimensional columns to improve our understanding of how ISCO (i.e., activated persulfate, permanganate, or catalyzed hydrogen peroxide) could affect the fate and transport of PFAAs in saturated porous media. While the resultant data suggest that standard ISCO is not a viable remediation strategy for PFAA decomposition, substantial changes in PFAA transport were observed upon and following the application of ISCO. In general, activated persulfate decreased PFAA transport, while permanganate and catalyzed hydrogen peroxide increased PFAA transport. PFAA sorption increased in the presence of increased aqueous polyvalent cation concentrations or decreased pH. The changes in contaminant mobility were greater than what would be predicted on the basis of aqueous chemistry considerations alone, suggesting that the application of ISCO results in changes to the porous media matrix (e.g., soil organic matter quality) that also influence transport. The application of ISCO is likely to result in changes in PFAA transport, where the direction (increased or decreased transport) and magnitude are dependent on PFAA characteristics, oxidant characteristics, and site-specific factors. PMID:25621878

  13. Saturation-Dependent Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy for Multifluid Systems in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Oostrom, Mart; Ward, Andy L.

    2007-11-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated anisotropic soils has recently been described with a tensorial connectivity-tortuosity (TCT) concept. We extend this concept to unsaturated porous media with two or three immiscible fluids. Mathematical expressions to describe the conductivity of each fluid in anisotropic porous media under unsaturated condition are derived in the form of symmetric second order tensors. The theory is applicable to the combination of any type of saturation-pressure formulation and a generalized hydraulic conductivity model. The extended model shows that the anisotropic coefficient of a fluid is independent of the saturation of other fluids. Synthetic Miller-similar soils having hypothetical anisotropy were defined by allowing the saturated hydraulic conductivity to have different correlation ranges for different directions of flow. The extended TCT concept was tested using synthetic soils with four levels of heterogeneity and four levels of anisotropy. Numerical experiments of infiltration of two liquid phases, i.e., water and the nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) carbon tetrachloride, were carried out to test the extended model. The results show that, similar to water in a two-fluid (air-water) system, NAPL retention curves in a three-fluid (air-NAPL-water) system were independent of flow direction but dependent on soil heterogeneity, while the connectivity-tortuosity coefficients are functions of both soil heterogeneity and anisotropy. The extended TCT model accurately describes unsaturated hydraulic functions of anisotropic soils and can be combined into commonly used relative permeability functions for use in multifluid flow and transport numerical simulations.

  14. Transient behavior of simultaneous flow of gas and surfactant solution in consolidated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Baghdikian, S.Y.; Handy, L.L.

    1991-07-01

    The main objective of this experimental research was to investigate the mechanisms of foam generation and propagation in porous media. Results obtained give an insight into the conditions of foam generation and propagation in porous media. The rate of propagation of foam is determined by the rates of lamellae generation, destruction, and trapping. Several of the factors that contribute to foam generation have studied with Chevron Chaser SD1000 surfactant. Interfacial tension (IFT) measurements were performed using a spinning drop apparatus. The IFT of two surfactant samples of different concentrations were measured with dodecane and crude oil from the Huntington Beach Field as a function of temperature and time. Foam was used as an oil-displacing fluid. However, when displacing oil, foam was not any more effective than simultaneous brine and gas injection. A series of experiments was performed to study the conditions of foam generation in Berea sandstone cores. Results show that foam may be generated in sandstone at low flow velocities after extended incubation periods. The effect of pregenerating foam before injection into the sandstone was also studied. The pressure profiles in the core were monitored using three pressure taps along the length of the core. A systematic study of foaming with different fluid velocities and foam qualities provides extensive data for foam flow conditions. 134 refs., 57 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Equations of motion for isotropic porous media with multiple solid constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.; Pride, S.R.

    1996-04-01

    The volume averaging technique for obtaining macroscopic equations of motion for materials that are microscopically inhomogeneous is extended to the situation in which multiple solid constituents form a porous matrix while a uniform fluid fills the pores. Previous volume averaging efforts of Pride et al. (1992) and others have concentrated on single solid constituent porous media. The analysis for multiple solid constituents is complicated by the presence of internal interfaces between the solid constituents within the averaging volume. These interfaces are characterized by constants that measure the fraction of the interface on which solid touches solid, fluid touches one solid, fluid touches the other solid, or fluid lies on both sides of the interface. These fractions are easily computed if the interface fractions are assumed to be uncorrelated, but real materials may be expected to exhibit some correlation. On the other hand, these interface fractions do not appear in the volume average equations at the macroscopic level. To complete the analysis, it is found that the jacketed and unjacketed tests of Biot and Willis (1957) together with the thought experiments of Berryman and Milton (1991) for solid matrix composed of two constituents are required in order to obtain definite results. Results are found to be in complete agreement with earlier work of Brown and Korringa (1975) concerning the most general possible form of the quasistatic equations for volume deformation and therefore of the equations of motion for wave propagation through such media.

  16. Modelling migration and dissolution of mineral particles in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, A.; Lacroix, E.; Holliger, C.; Barry, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding and predicting the fate in soils and other porous media of solid mineral particles with grain diameters in the micrometer range is important in a number of environmental and civil engineering applications, including subsurface hydrology, wastewater treatment and oil/gas production. In this context, deep-bed filtration theory is commonly applied to model particle detachment and deposition. Most existing models however neglect some processes that can modify groundwater flow patterns, particle concentration and attachment/detachment coefficients. The aim of this work was to develop a mechanistic model to study the transport and mobilization/immobilization of mineral particles in saturated porous media. The model accounts for particle advection and dispersion, deep-bed filtration, porosity and hydraulic conductivity changes associated with deposition and mobilization, and for particle dissolution. In addition, the deep-bed filtration coefficients vary with the characteristics and composition of the pore-solution, ionic strength and pH in particular. The groundwater flow and reactive transport simulator PHAST was used to implement the model. Measurements from a variety of deep-bed filtration and mineral dissolution experiments were used to calibrate and validate the model. A satisfactory comparison was found in most situations. A sensitivity analysis was subsequently performed to identify the conditions in which some of the processes (such as hydraulic conductivity changes and particle dissolution) can be neglected and therefore less sophisticated numerical tools can be used.

  17. Effects of chemical oxidants on perfluoroalkyl acid transport in one-dimensional porous media columns.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Erica R; Siegrist, Robert L; McCray, John E; Higgins, Christopher P

    2015-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a remediation approach that is often used to remediate soil and groundwater contaminated with fuels and chlorinated solvents. At many aqueous film-forming foam-impacted sites, perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) can also be present at concentrations warranting concern. Laboratory experiments were completed using flow-through one-dimensional columns to improve our understanding of how ISCO (i.e., activated persulfate, permanganate, or catalyzed hydrogen peroxide) could affect the fate and transport of PFAAs in saturated porous media. While the resultant data suggest that standard ISCO is not a viable remediation strategy for PFAA decomposition, substantial changes in PFAA transport were observed upon and following the application of ISCO. In general, activated persulfate decreased PFAA transport, while permanganate and catalyzed hydrogen peroxide increased PFAA transport. PFAA sorption increased in the presence of increased aqueous polyvalent cation concentrations or decreased pH. The changes in contaminant mobility were greater than what would be predicted on the basis of aqueous chemistry considerations alone, suggesting that the application of ISCO results in changes to the porous media matrix (e.g., soil organic matter quality) that also influence transport. The application of ISCO is likely to result in changes in PFAA transport, where the direction (increased or decreased transport) and magnitude are dependent on PFAA characteristics, oxidant characteristics, and site-specific factors.

  18. Impact of multicomponent ionic transport on pH fronts propagation in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the propagation of pH fronts during multicomponent ionic transport in saturated porous media under flow-through conditions. By performing laboratory bench-scale experiments combined with numerical modeling, we show the important influence of Coulombic effects on proton transport in the presence of ionic admixtures. The experiments were performed in a quasi two-dimensional flow-through setup under steady-state flow and transport conditions. Dilute solutions of hydrochloric acid with MgCl2 (1:2 strong electrolyte) were used as tracer solutions to experimentally test the effect of electrochemical cross coupling on the migration of diffusive/dispersive pH fronts. We focus on two experimental scenarios, with different composition of tracer solutions, causing remarkably different effects on the propagation of the acidic fronts with relative differences in the penetration depth of pH fronts of 36% between the two scenarios and of 25% and 15% for each scenario with respect to the transport of ions at liberated state (i.e., without considering the charge effects). Also differences in the dilution of the distinct ions plumes up to 28% and 45% in experiment 1 and 2, respectively, were measured at the outflow of the flow-through system. The dilution of the pH plumes also changed considerably (26% relative difference) in the two flow-through experiments only due to the different composition of the pore water solution and to the electrostatic coupling of the ions in the flow-through setups. Numerical transport simulations were performed to interpret the laboratory experiments. The simulations were based on a multicomponent ionic formulation accurately capturing the Coulombic interactions between the transported ions in the flow-through system. The results of purely forward simulations show a very good agreement with the high-resolution measurements performed at the outlet of the flow-through setup and confirms the importance of charge effects on pH transport in

  19. Flow imaging of fluids in porous media by magnetization prepared centric-scan SPRITE.

    PubMed

    Li, Linqing; Chen, Quan; Marble, Andrew E; Romero-Zerón, Laura; Newling, Benedict; Balcom, Bruce J

    2009-03-01

    MRI has considerable potential as a non-destructive probe of porous media, permitting rapid quantification of local fluid content and the possibility of local flow visualization and quantification. In this work we explore a general approach to flow velocity measurement in porous media by combining Cotts pulsed field gradient flow encoding with SPRITE MRI. This technique permits facile and accurate flow and dispersion coefficient mapping of fluids in porous media. This new approach has proven to be robust in characterizing fluid behavior. This method is illustrated through measurements of flow in pipes, flow in sand packs and flow in porous reservoir rocks. Spatially resolved flow maps and local fluid velocity distribution were acquired. PMID:19121591

  20. Targeted Delivery by Smart Capsules for Controlling Two-phase Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Weitz, D.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and controlling two-phase flow in porous media are of particular importance to the relevant industry applications, such as enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration, and groundwater remediation. We develop a variety of smart microcapsules that can deliver and release specific substances to the target location in the porous medium, and therefore change the fluid property or medium geometry at certain locations. In this talk, I will present two types of smart capsules for (a) delivering surfactant to the vicinity of oil-water interface and (b) delivering microgels to the high permeability region and therefore blocking the pore space there, respectively. We also show that flooding these two capsules into porous media effectively reduces the trapped oil and improves the homogeneity of the medium, respectively. Besides of its industrial applications, this technique also opens a new window to study the mechanism of two-phase flow in porous media.

  1. Porous liquids: A promising class of media for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinshui; Chai, Song -Hai; Qiao, Zhen -An; Mahurin, Shannon M.; Chen, Jihua; Fang, Youxing; Wan, Shun; Nelson, Kimberly; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2014-11-17

    In porous liquids with empty cavities we successfully has been successfully fabricated by surface engineering of hollow structures with suitable corona and canopy species. By taking advantage of the liquid-like polymeric matrices as a separation medium and the empty cavities as gas transport pathway, this unique porous liquid can function as a promising candidate for gas separation. A facile synthetic strategy can be further extended to other types of nanostructure-based porous liquid fabrication, opening up new opportunities for preparation of porous liquids with attractive properties for specific tasks.

  2. Impact of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kone, T.; Golfier, F.; Orgogozo, L.; Oltéan, C.; Lefèvre, E.; Block, J. C.; Buès, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    In subsurface systems, biofilm may degrade organic or organometallic pollutants contributing to natural attenuation and soil bioremediation techniques. This increase of microbial activity leads to change the hydrodynamic properties of aquifers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media and more specifically on dispersivity. We pursued this goal by (i) monitoring both spatial concentration fields and solute breakthrough curves from conservative tracer experiments in a biofilm-supporting porous medium, (ii) characterizing in situ the changes in biovolume and visualizing the dynamics of the biological material at the mesoscale. A series of experiments was carried out in a flow cell system (60 cm3) with a silica sand (Φ = 50-70 mesh) as solid carrier and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as bacterial strain. Biofilm growth was monitored by image acquisition with a digital camera. The biofilm volume fraction was estimated through tracer experiments with the Blue Dextran macromolecule as in size-exclusion chromatography, leading to a fair picture of the biocolonization within the flow cell. Biofilm growth was achieved in the whole flow cell in 29 days and up to 50% of void space volume was plugged. The influence of biofilm maturation on porous medium transport properties was evaluated from tracer experiments using Brilliant Blue FCF. An experimental correlation was found between effective (i.e., nonbiocolonized) porosity and biofilm-affected dispersivity. Comparison with values given by the theoretical model of Taylor and Jaffé (1990b) yields a fair agreement.

  3. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics pore-scale simulations of unstable immiscible flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Bandara, Dunusinghe Mudiyanselage Uditha C.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Oostrom, Martinus; Palmer, Bruce J.; Grate, Jay W.; Zhang, Changyong

    2013-12-01

    We have conducted a series of high-resolution numerical experiments using the Pair-Wise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) multiphase flow model. First, we derived analytical expressions relating parameters in the PF-SPH model to the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we used the model to study viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement of immiscible fluids in porous media for a wide range of capillary numbers and viscosity ratios. We demonstrated that the steady state saturation profiles and the boundaries of viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement regions compare favorably with micromodel laboratory experimental results. For displacing fluid with low viscosity, we observed that the displacement pattern changes from viscous fingering to stable displacement with increasing injection rate. When a high viscosity fluid is injected, transition behavior from capillary fingering to stable displacement occurred as the flow rate was increased. These observation also agree with the results of the micromodel laboratory experiments.

  4. Exact Averaging of Stochastic Equations for Flow in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Shvidler, Mark; Karasaki, Kenzi

    2008-03-15

    It is well known that at present, exact averaging of the equations for flow and transport in random porous media have been proposed for limited special fields. Moreover, approximate averaging methods--for example, the convergence behavior and the accuracy of truncated perturbation series--are not well studied, and in addition, calculation of high-order perturbations is very complicated. These problems have for a long time stimulated attempts to find the answer to the question: Are there in existence some, exact, and sufficiently general forms of averaged equations? Here, we present an approach for finding the general exactly averaged system of basic equations for steady flow with sources in unbounded stochastically homogeneous fields. We do this by using (1) the existence and some general properties of Green's functions for the appropriate stochastic problem, and (2) some information about the random field of conductivity. This approach enables us to find the form of the averaged equations without directly solving the stochastic equations or using the usual assumption regarding any small parameters. In the common case of a stochastically homogeneous conductivity field we present the exactly averaged new basic nonlocal equation with a unique kernel-vector. We show that in the case of some type of global symmetry (isotropy, transversal isotropy, or orthotropy), we can for three-dimensional and two-dimensional flow in the same way derive the exact averaged nonlocal equations with a unique kernel-tensor. When global symmetry does not exist, the nonlocal equation with a kernel-tensor involves complications and leads to an ill-posed problem.

  5. Transport in porous and fractured media of the Creede Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    Direct measurement was made of the hydraulic conductivity of Creede Formation rocks using a new experimental method. The UFA{trademark} method employs open-flow centrifugation. Centrifugation, like gravity, has the effect on a material of a whole-body force exerting equal force at all points within the sample. The equivalent gravitational force exerted throughout the sample can be chosen to be from one to four orders of magnitude higher than earth gravity (from 10 to 10,000 g). The result is an increase in rate of fluid flow equally at all points throughout the sample so that hydraulic steady state is obtained in most geologic materials in hours, even under highly unsaturated conditions. This extraordinarily short time allows direct measurement of transport parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity, diffusion coefficient, and retardation factors, in any porous media over the complete range of field moisture contents. Hydraulic conductivities in the Creede Formation rocks ranged from 10{sup {minus}12} cm/s to 10{sup {minus}7} cm/s (10{sup {minus}9} Darcy to 10{sup {minus}4} Darcy) and showed no correlation with any other physical or mineralogical properties including porosity. The high degree of alteration to clay minerals appears to obscure any porosity/permeability relationship of the kind that occurs in many reservoir rocks. However, down-hole neutron porosities correlated well with laboratory-determined porosities. The objective of this investigation is to determine the hydrologic transport parameters of Creede Formation rocks for use in transport model development and for image analysis of transport pathways to produce a porosity/permeability evolution curve in support of geochemical and isotopic water/rock interaction models.

  6. Differential porosimetry and permeametry for random porous media.

    PubMed

    Hilfer, R; Lemmer, A

    2015-07-01

    Accurate determination of geometrical and physical properties of natural porous materials is notoriously difficult. Continuum multiscale modeling has provided carefully calibrated realistic microstructure models of reservoir rocks with floating point accuracy. Previous measurements using synthetic microcomputed tomography (μ-CT) were based on extrapolation of resolution-dependent properties for discrete digitized approximations of the continuum microstructure. This paper reports continuum measurements of volume and specific surface with full floating point precision. It also corrects an incomplete description of rotations in earlier publications. More importantly, the methods of differential permeametry and differential porosimetry are introduced as precision tools. The continuum microstructure chosen to exemplify the methods is a homogeneous, carefully calibrated and characterized model for Fontainebleau sandstone. The sample has been publicly available since 2010 on the worldwide web as a benchmark for methodical studies of correlated random media. High-precision porosimetry gives the volume and internal surface area of the sample with floating point accuracy. Continuum results with floating point precision are compared to discrete approximations. Differential porosities and differential surface area densities allow geometrical fluctuations to be discriminated from discretization effects and numerical noise. Differential porosimetry and Fourier analysis reveal subtle periodic correlations. The findings uncover small oscillatory correlations with a period of roughly 850μm, thus implying that the sample is not strictly stationary. The correlations are attributed to the deposition algorithm that was used to ensure the grain overlap constraint. Differential permeabilities are introduced and studied. Differential porosities and permeabilities provide scale-dependent information on geometry fluctuations, thereby allowing quantitative error estimates.

  7. SURVEY AND EVALUATION OF POROUS POLYETHYLENE MEDIA FINE BUBBLE TUBE AND DISK AERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historically, while alternative media materials have been employed over the years with varying degrees of success, the principal fine pore diffuser medium has been porous ceramic. In the early-to-mid-1970s, diffusers with plastic porus media were installed in secondary treatment...

  8. Vaporization plane dynamics at the onset of stage-2 evaporation from porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Shokri, N.

    2010-12-01

    Early stages of evaporation from porous media are marked by a relatively high and nearly constant evaporation rates supplied by capillary liquid flow from a receding drying front to vaporization surface. At a certain drying front depth, gravity and viscous resistive forces overcome upward capillary drive disrupting hydraulic connectivity and forcing onset of stage-2 evaporation where evaporative flux is supported by vapor diffusion. Observations suggest that the transition involves migration of the vaporization plane from the surface to a certain depth below that may be abrupt or gradual. The primary objective is to quantify the transition and estimate the length of menisci jump to forming internal vaporization plane that defines vapor diffusion length at the onset of stage-2 evaporation. The working hypothesis is that the jump length is linked to the width of a displacement front or the characteristic length of connected clusters that follow a power law with system’s Bond number. We conducted evaporation experiments using sands of different particle size distributions and extract experimental data from literature for model comparison. Preliminary results indicate that the jump length at the end of stage 1 was affected primarily by porous medium properties and not by boundary conditions (although the relative drop in flux was affected by atmospheric conditions). Results show power law relationships between vaporization plane jump and Bond number with exponent of -0.48 in good agreement with percolation theory theoretical exponent of -0.47. The dynamics of the transition are determined by medium pore size distribution, narrower pore size distributions induce more abrupt transition to stage-2. The results provide a means for estimating evaporation rates at the onset of stage-2 evaporation for a range of porous media based on simple diffusion.

  9. Models of water imbibition in untreated and treated porous media validated by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombia, M.; Bortolotti, V.; Brown, R. J. S.; Camaiti, M.; Fantazzini, P.

    2008-05-01

    Fluid imbibition affects almost every activity that directly or indirectly involves porous media, including oil reservoir rocks, soils, building materials, and countless others, including biological materials. In this paper, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been applied to study water imbibition in a porous medium, in which capillary properties are artificially changed. As a model system, samples of Lecce stone, a material of cultural heritage interest, were analyzed before and after treatment with a protective polymer (Silirain-50 or Paraloid PB72). By using MRI, we can visualize the presence of water inside each sample and measure the height z(t ) reached by the wetting front as a function of time during experiments of capillary absorption before and after treatment. The sorptivity S, defined as the initial slope of z versus t1/2, has been determined before treatment and through both treated and untreated faces after treatment. Very good fits to the data were obtained with theoretical and empirical models of absorption kinetics, starting from the Washburn model for capillary rise, adapted by others to homogeneous porous media, and modified by us for application to a sample having a thin low-permeability layer on either surface as a result of a treatment process. This gives us parameters to quantify the effects on imbibition of the changes in the capillary properties. It is known that the Paraloid treatment preferentially affects the larger pore channels and the Silirain the smaller, and our results show this and illustrate the roles played by the different classes of pore sizes.

  10. Migration of buoyant non-wetting fluids in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Parmigiani, A.; Faroughi, S. A.; Bachmann, O.; Karani, H.

    2015-12-01

    The buoyant migration of a non-wetting fluid in porous media occurs in several natural contexts, such as during CO2 sequestration, methane in cold seeps, DNAPLs infiltration in groundwater, oil recovery and magma chambers. In this study, we use numerical modeling and laboratory experiments to investigate the migration of buoyant non-wetting fluids in time-dependent (reactive) or spatially heterogeneous porous media. We find that the stress balance at the pore scale greatly influences the migration dynamics and regime of viscous energy dissipation of the flow (low Re) and therefore impacts the transport of non-wetting fluid even at the field scale. We consider two complementary pore-scale studies. In the first case, the migration of the non-wetting fluid is impacted by the concurrent dissolution of the porous medium because of the reactivity of the buoyant invading fluid. In the second scenario a chemically inert buoyant non-wetting fluid migrates across an heterogeneous medium, from a low porosity (and permeability) layer into a high porosity (high permeability) layer. We find that these two cases lead to a similar and counter-intuitive outcome: the migration of the buoyant non-wetting fluid is reduced at high porosity/permeability. These counter-intuitive results stem from the effect of confinement of the non-wetting fluid (volume available for invasion) and viscosity ratio between the immiscible fluids on the fluid migration at the pore scale. An important solid confinement (low porosity) stabilizes fingering pathways and promotes efficient transport, while high porosity promotes the formation of an emulsion with discrete bubbles or slugs of non-wetting fluids.

  11. Experimental and theoretical investigations of shock-induced flow of reactive porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Graham, R.A.; Anderson, M.U.; Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L.

    1996-11-01

    In this work, the microscale processes of consolidation, deformation and reaction features of shocked porous materials are studied. Time- resolve particle velocities and stress fields associated with dispersive compaction waves are measured in gas-gun experiments. In these tests, a thin porous layer of HMX is shock-loaded at varied levels. At high impact, significant reaction is triggered by the rapid material distortion during compaction. In parallel modeling studies, continuum mixture theory is applied to describe the behavior of averaged wave-fields in heterogeneous media. One-dimensional simulations of gas-gun experiments demonstrate that the wave features and interactions with viscoelastic materials in the gauge package are well described by mixture theory, including reflected wave behavior and conditions where significant reaction is initiated. Numerical simulations of impact on a collection of discrete HMX `crystals` are also presented using shock physics analysis. Three-dimensional simulations indicate that rapid distortion occurs at material contact points; the nature of the dispersive fields includes large amplitude fluctuations of stress with wavelengths of several particle diameters. Localization of energy causes `hot-spots` due to shock focusing and plastic work as material flows into interstitial regions. These numerical experiments demonstrate that `hot-spots` are strongly influenced by multiple crystal interactions. This mesoscale study provides new insights into micromechanical behavior of heterogeneous energetic materials.

  12. Simulation on effects of porosity pattern arrangement of porous media during drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Almon; Vakhguelt, Anatoli

    2012-06-01

    The computational simulation results on the moisture transport within a porous media are presented in this paper. The porous media is simulated using models arranged in two patterns. The models consist of spheres representing the porosity of the media. The remaining void volume within the models is set as water. The spheres are arranged in two patterns, which are in-line cascaded and diagonally-cascaded. These pattern arrangements can aid the observation on the possible different transport paths of the moisture content within the porous media during drying operation. The models are simulated using boundary conditions such as outlet being set as atmospheric condition, materials of the spheres and water temperature. Simulation results are shown in contour plots around the spheres and void volume to illustrate the fluid velocity magnitude during the transport of the moisture content. Comparisons are also presented for the two models with different cascading patterns. Results show differences in magnitudes of velocity which indicates different moisture transport. These simulation results can also help distinguish the effects of different porosity arrangement on the moisture transport within the porous media especially during drying of the porous media. These models can also be used as initial simulation models for materials such as ceramic tiles.

  13. Straining of colloidal particles in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shangping; Gao, Bin; Saiers, James E.

    2006-12-01

    Straining may influence the mobility of colloid-sized particles within groundwater aquifers as well as within granular filters that are used in wastewater treatment. We conducted column transport experiments using latex microspheres as the colloids and quartz sand as the porous medium to investigate the response of colloid straining to changes in colloid diameter (dp) and sand grain diameter (dg). For these experiments the negatively charged microspheres were suspended in deionized water, and the quartz sand was thoroughly cleaned to minimize physicochemical deposition (attachment), which permitted the determination of straining in an unambiguous way. The measurements of strained (immobile phase) and effluent (aqueous phase) colloid concentrations could be described with a transport model that accounted for an exponential decline in straining rates with increasing concentrations of strained colloids. Best fit values of the model coefficient that quantified clean bed straining rates (ko) were negligibly small for dp/dg < 0.008 and, above this threshold, varied linearly with dp/dg. Our findings suggest that accurate inferences on the mobility of colloid-sized particles will require consideration of the effects of straining when dp/dg exceeds 0.008.

  14. Saline Evaporation from Porous Media: Characteristics of Salt Precipitation and Its Effect on Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachshon, U.; Weisbrod, N.; Dragila, M. I.; Grader, A. S.

    2010-12-01

    Salt precipitation as subflorescence or efflorescence crust occurs during saline solutions evaporation from porous media. Non-linear synergy between evaporation and salt precipitation processes results in a complex mechanism that has yet to be quantitatively understood. Presented here is a series of experiments and a mathematical model that shed light on these processes. Experiments include: (1) long-term column evaporation experiments to quantify changes in evaporation rates due to salt precipitation; (2) long-term Hele-Shaw evaporation experiments to visualize salt precipitation at the macro scale; and (3) CT scans of evaporated porous media pre-saturated with NaI solutions to observe salt precipitation at the pore scale. Experiments were conducted for homogeneous and heterogeneous media using a number of saline solutions (NaCl, CaSO4, KCl, CuSO4 and NaI). A mathematical model was developed to explore quantitatively the physical and chemical mechanisms involved in the evaporation-salt precipitation process. The model simulated salt precipitation and it affect on evaporation. Three new stages of evaporation are introduced and defined for saline solutions: SS1, SS2 and SS3. SS1 exhibits a low and gradual decrease in evaporation rate caused by a changing osmotic potential. During SS2, evaporation rate falls precipitously a salt precipitates. SS3 is characterized by a constant, low evaporation rate. The phenomenological similarity to the classical evaporation stages of pure water, S1, S2 and S3, are only coincidental, the three saline stages correspond to entirely different mechanisms. The mathematical model was used to also quantify the diffusion coefficient through a salt crust. Heterogeneity during saline evaporation was found to strongly control the location of salt precipitation: salt precipitation occurred mainly within the fine-pore regions which act as a wick transporting water from the coarser media. Heterogeneity also permits greater saline evaporation by

  15. Natural Convection in Enclosed Porous or Fluid Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saatdjian, Esteban; Lesage, François; Mota, José Paulo B.

    2014-01-01

    In Saatdjian, E., Lesage, F., and Mota, J.P.B, "Transport Phenomena Projects: A Method to Learn and to Innovate, Natural Convection Between Porous, Horizontal Cylinders," "Chemical Engineering Education," 47(1), 59-64, (2013), the numerical solution of natural convection between two porous, concentric, impermeable cylinders was…

  16. The effects of surface aging on nanoparticle fate and transport in natural and engineered porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelman, Anjuliee M.

    Nanomaterials will be subjected to various surface transformations in the environment and within water and wastewater treatment systems. A comprehensive understanding of the fate and transport behavior of "aged" nanomaterials in both natural and engineered porous media is required in order to accurately quantify ecological and human health risks. This research sought to (1) evaluate the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light aging on nanoparticle transport in water-saturated porous media; and (2) assess the effects of influent water quality on silver nanoparticle retention and dissolution in ceramic water filters. Additionally, the value of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) data in nanoparticle fate and transport studies was evaluated by comparing deposition behavior in complementary QCM-D and sand columns experiments. Silver (nAg) and iron oxide nanoparticles exposed to UV light were up to 50% more strongly retained in porous media compared with freshly prepared suspensions due to less negative surface charge and larger aggregate sizes. UV-aged nAg were more prone to dissolution in sand columns, resulting in effluent Ag+ concentrations as high as 1.2 mg/L. In ceramic water filters, dissolution and cation exchange processes controlled silver release into treated water. The use of acidic, high salinity, or high hardness water accelerated oxidative dissolution of the silver coating and resulted in effluent silver concentrations 5-10 times above international drinking water guidelines. Results support the recommendation for a regular filter replacement or silver re-application schedule to ensure ongoing efficacy. Taken in concert, these research findings suggest that oxidative aging of nanomaterial surfaces (either through exposure to UV light or aggressive water chemistries) will alter the fate of nanomaterials in the environment and may decrease the effective lifetime of devices which utilize nanotechnology. Corresponding QCM-D and column experiments revealed that

  17. Study of VOCs transport and storage in porous media and assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing

    Indoor VOCs concentrations are influenced greatly by the transport and storage of VOCs in building and furnishing materials, majority of which belong to porous media. The transport and storage ability of a porous media for a given VOC can be characterized by its diffusion coefficient and partition coefficient, respectively, and such data are currently lacking. Besides, environmental conditions are another important factor that affects the VOCs emission. The main purposes of this dissertation are: (1) validate the similarity hypothesis between the transport of water vapor and VOCs in porous materials, and help build a database of VOC transport and storage properties with the assistance of the similarity hypothesis; (2) investigate the effect of relative humidity on the diffusion and partition coefficients; (3) develop a numerical multilayer model to simulate the VOCs' emission characteristics in both short and long term. To better understand the similarity and difference between moisture and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) diffusion through porous media, a dynamic dual-chamber experimental system was developed. The diffusion coefficients and partition coefficients of moisture and selected VOCs in materials were compared. Based on the developed similarity theory, the diffusion behavior of each particular VOC in porous media is predictable as long as the similarity coefficient of the VOC is known. Experimental results showed that relative humidity in the 80%RH led to a higher partition coefficient for formaldehyde compared to 50%RH. However, between 25% and 50% RH, there was no significant difference in partition coefficient. The partition coefficient of toluene decreased with the increase of humidity due to competition with water molecules for pore surface area and the non-soluble nature of toluene. The solubility of VOCs was found to correlate well with the partition coefficient of VOCs. The partition coefficient of VOCs was not simply inversely proportional to

  18. Micro/macroscopic fluid flow in open cell fibrous structures and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayol, Ali

    Fibrous porous materials are involved in a wide range of applications including composite fabrication, filtration, compact heat exchangers, fuel cell technology, and tissue engineering to name a few. Fibrous structures, such as metalfoams, have unique characteristics such as low weight, high porosity, high mechanical strength, and high surface to volume ratio. More importantly, in many applications the fibrous microstructures can be tailored to meet a range of requirements. Therefore, fibrous materials have the potential to be used in emerging sustainable energy conversion applications. The first step for analyzing transport phenomena in porous materials is to determine the micro/macroscopic flow-field inside the medium. In applications where the porous media is confined in a channel, the system performance is tightly related to the flow properties of the porous medium and its interaction with the channel walls, i.e., macroscopic velocity distribution. Therefore, the focus of the study has been on: developing new mechanistic model(s) for determining permeability and inertial coefficient of fibrous porous materials; investigating the effects of microstructural and mechanical parameters such as porosity, fiber orientation, mechanical compression, and fiber distribution on the flow properties and pressure drop of fibrous structures; determining the macroscopic flow-field in confined porous media where the porous structure fills the channel cross-section totally or partially. A systematic approach has been followed to study different aspects of the flow through fibrous materials. The complex microstructure of real materials has been modelled using unit cells that have been assumed to be repeated throughout the media. Implementing various exact and approximate analytical techniques such as integral technique, point matching, blending rules, and scale analysis the flow properties of such media have been modelled; the targeted properties include permeability and inertial

  19. Effects of Heterogeneity on Transport of Graphene Oxide in Saturated and Unsaturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, S.; Sun, Y.; Shi, X.; Wu, J.; Gao, B.

    2015-12-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has received increasing attention in many fields with its wide applications and rapid growth in production. Therefore, it is expected that GO nanoparticles will inevitably be released into the subsurface and cause the environmental risk subsequently. In view of this, knowledge of the fate for GO in the vadose zone and groundwater systems is indispensable. So far most research has focused on the deposition and transport of GO nanoparticles in one-dimensional homogenous porous media; nonetheless, the complex heterogeneous system is extensively distributed in natural subsurface environment and may not be well represented by the homogeneous packed columns. However, little investigations have been directed toward understanding the transport of GO in heterogeneous porous media. The overarching objective of this study is to advance current understanding of GO transport in structured heterogeneous porous media. The saturated and unsaturated columns packed with different sand combinations and solution ionic strength, were used to examine the breakthrough behavior of GO in heterogeneous porous media. A two-domain model considering GO exchange between zones was developed to describe GO transport in structured, heterogeneous porous media. The experimental data indicate that volumetric moisture content and water flow are the critical factors that control GO transport in heterogeneous porous media. And higher ionic strength decrease the mobility of GO particles in both saturated and unsaturated heterogeneous pore media. Simulations of this two-domain nanoparticle transport model matched experimental breakthrough data well for all the experimental conditions. Experimental and model results show that under saturated conditions, both fast-flow and slow-flow domains affect colloid transport in heterogeneous media. Under unsaturated conditions, however, our results indicate that flows in the fast flow domain dominate the colloid transport and retention processes.

  20. Algebraic multiscale method for flow in heterogeneous porous media with embedded discrete fractures (F-AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ţene, Matei; Al Kobaisi, Mohammed Saad; Hajibeygi, Hadi

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces an Algebraic MultiScale method for simulation of flow in heterogeneous porous media with embedded discrete Fractures (F-AMS). First, multiscale coarse grids are independently constructed for both porous matrix and fracture networks. Then, a map between coarse- and fine-scale is obtained by algebraically computing basis functions with local support. In order to extend the localization assumption to the fractured media, four types of basis functions are investigated: (1) Decoupled-AMS, in which the two media are completely decoupled, (2) Frac-AMS and (3) Rock-AMS, which take into account only one-way transmissibilities, and (4) Coupled-AMS, in which the matrix and fracture interpolators are fully coupled. In order to ensure scalability, the F-AMS framework permits full flexibility in terms of the resolution of the fracture coarse grids. Numerical results are presented for two- and three-dimensional heterogeneous test cases. During these experiments, the performance of F-AMS, paired with ILU(0) as second-stage smoother in a convergent iterative procedure, is studied by monitoring CPU times and convergence rates. Finally, in order to investigate the scalability of the method, an extensive benchmark study is conducted, where a commercial algebraic multigrid solver is used as reference. The results show that, given an appropriate coarsening strategy, F-AMS is insensitive to severe fracture and matrix conductivity contrasts, as well as the length of the fracture networks. Its unique feature is that a fine-scale mass conservative flux field can be reconstructed after any iteration, providing efficient approximate solutions in time-dependent simulations.

  1. Porous media modeling and micro-structurally motivated material moduli determination via the micro-dilatation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, J.; Ramézani, H.; Sardini, P.; Kondo, D.; Ponson, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.

    2015-07-01

    In the present contribution, the porous material modeling and micro-structural material parameters determination are scrutinized via the micro-dilatation theory. The main goal is to take advantage of the micro-dilatation theory which belongs to the generalized continuum media. In the first stage, the thermodynamic laws are entirely revised to reach the energy balance relation using three variables, deformation, porosity change and its gradient underlying the porous media as described in the micro-dilatation theory or so-called void elasticity. Two experiments over cement mortar specimens are performed in order to highlight the material parameters related to the pore structure. The shrinkage due to CO2 carbonation, porosity and its gradient are calculated. The extracted values are verified via 14C-PMMA radiographic image method. The modeling of swelling phenomenon of Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) is studied later on. This issue is performed via the crystallization pressure application using the micro-dilatation theory.

  2. Experimental Investigation and Pore-Scale Modeling of Non-Newtonian Fluid Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauswirth, S.; Dye, A. L.; Miller, C. T.; Tapscott, C.; Schultz, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Systems involving the flow of non-Newtonian fluids in porous media arise in a number of settings, including hydraulic fracturing, enhanced oil recovery, contaminant remediation, and biological systems. Development of accurate macroscale models of such systems requires an understanding of the relationship between the fluid and medium properties at the microscale and averaged macroscale properties. This study investigates the flow of aqueous solutions of guar gum, a major component of hydraulic fracturing fluids that exhibits Cross model rheological behavior. The rheological properties of solutions containing varying concentrations of guar gum were characterized using a rotational rheometer and the data were fit to a model relating viscosity to shear rate and concentration. Flow experiments were conducted in a porous medium-packed column to measure the pressure response during the flow of guar gum solutions at a wide range of flow rates and determine apparent macroscale viscosities and shear rates. To investigate the relationship between the fluid rheology, microscale physics, and the observed macroscale properties, a lattice Boltzmann pore scale simulator incorporating non-Newtonian behavior was developed. The model was validated, then used to simulate systems representative of the column experiments, allowing direct correlation of detailed microscale physics to the macroscale observations.

  3. Analytical and experimental analysis of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Gao, Bin; Tian, Yuan; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media is crucial to monitor contaminant fate and transport in soil and groundwater systems. In this study, we present new findings from experimental and mathematical analysis to improve current understanding of solute transport in structured heterogeneous porous media. Three saturated columns packed with different sand combinations were used to examine the breakthrough behavior of bromide, a conservative tracer. Experimental results showed that bromide had different breakthrough responses in the three types of sand combinations, indicating that heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity has a significant effect on the solute transport in structured heterogeneous porous media. Simulations from analytical solutions of a two-domain solute transport model matched experimental breakthrough data well for all the experimental conditions tested. Experimental and model results show that under saturated flow conditions, advection dominates solute transport in both fast-flow and slow-flow domains. The sand with larger hydraulic conductivity provided a preferential flow path for solute transport (fast-flow domain) that dominates the mass transfer in the heterogeneous porous media. Importantly, the transport in the slow-flow domain and mass exchange between the domains also contribute to the flow and solute transport processes and thus must be considered when investigating contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media. PMID:24279625

  4. Fluid flow in porous media with rough pore-solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Hunt, Allen G.; Daigle, Hugh

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying fluid flow through porous media hinges on the description of permeability, a property of considerable importance in many fields ranging from oil and gas exploration to hydrology. A common building block for modeling porous media permeability is consideration of fluid flow through tubes with circular cross section described by Poiseuille's law in which flow discharge is proportional to the fourth power of the tube's radius. In most natural porous media, pores are neither cylindrical nor smooth; they often have an irregular cross section and rough surfaces. This study presents a theoretical scaling of Poiseuille's approximation for flow in pores with irregular rough cross section quantified by a surface fractal dimension Ds2. The flow rate is a function of the average pore radius to the power 2(3-Ds2) instead of 4 in the original Poiseuille's law. Values of Ds2 range from 1 to 2, hence, the power in the modified Poiseuille's approximation varies between 4 and 2, indicating that flow rate decreases as pore surface roughness (and surface fractal dimension Ds2) increases. We also proposed pore length-radius relations for isotropic and anisotropic fractal porous media. The new theoretical derivations are compared with standard approximations and with experimental values of relative permeability. The new approach results in substantially improved prediction of relative permeability of natural porous media relative to the original Poiseuille equation.

  5. Drop Impingement Induced Dispersal of Microorganisms and Contaminants Within Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Young Soo; Ge, Zhifei; Buie, Cullen

    2014-11-01

    We investigate migration of chemicals and microbes with aerosol generated by drop impingement on porous media. In our previous work we found that aerosol generation from droplets hitting porous media within a specific range of the Weber number (We) and a modified Pelect number (Pe). We and Pe reflect the impact condition of droplets and the wetting properties of porous media, respectively. The relationship between We and Pe can be expressed by a third dimensionless group, the Washburn Reynolds number (ReW = We/Pe). In a specific range of ReW, hundreds of aerosol particles can be generated within milliseconds of drop impingement. In this work we investigate if microbes such as Corynebacterium glutamicum, a soil bacterium, and chemicals such as Rhodamine B can be dispersed by aerosols generated from droplet impact. Experimentally, C. glutamicum and Rhodamine B are permeated into porous media. Then drop impingements are conducted on the porous media with different We and Pe in an airflow tunnel. We quantitatively investigate the volume and speed of aerosol migration as a function of ReW of the drop impingement and Re of the airflow. Results of this study will shed light upon the dispersal of elemental compounds and microbes within soils due to aerosol generated by rainfall.

  6. Dynamics of Coupled Contaminant and Microbial Transport in Heterogeneous Porous Media: Purdue Component

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.

    2000-06-01

    Dynamic microbial attachment/detachment occurs in subsurface systems in response to changing environmental conditions caused by contaminant movement and degradation. Understanding the environmental conditions and mechanisms by which anaerobic bacteria partition between aqueous and solid phases is a critical requirement for designing and evaluating in situ bioremediation efforts. This interdisciplinary research project, of which we report only the Purdue contribution, provides fundamental information on the attachment/detachment dynamics of bacteria in heterogeneous porous media. Fundamental results from the Purdue collaboration are: (a) development of a matched-index method for obtaining 3-D Lagrangian trajectories of microbial sized particles transporting within porous media or microflow cells, (b) application of advanced numerical methods to optimally design a microflow cell for studying anaerobic bacterial attachment/detachment phenomena, (c) development of two types of models for simulating bacterial movement and attachment/detachment in microflow cells and natural porous media, (d) application of stochastic analysis to upscale pore scale microbial attachment/detachment models to natural heterogeneous porous media, and (e) evaluation of the role nonlocality plays in microbial dynamics in heterogeneous porous media.

  7. Dynamics of Coupled Contaminant and Microbial Transport in Heterogeneous Porous Media: Purdue Component

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Madilyn Fletcher

    2000-06-01

    Dynamic microbial attachment/detachment occurs in subsurface systems in response to changing environmental conditions caused by contaminant movement and degradation. Understanding the environmental conditions and mechanisms by which anaerobic bacteria partition between aqueous and solid phases is a critical requirement for designing and evaluating in situ bioremediation efforts. This interdisciplinary research project, of which we report only the Purdue contribution, provides fundamental information on the attachment/detachment dynamics of bacteria in heterogeneous porous media. Fundamental results from the Purdue collaboration are: (a) development of a matched-index method for obtaining 3-D Lagrangian trajectories of microbial sized particles transporting within porous media or microflow cells, (b) application of advanced numerical methods to optimally design a microflow cell for studying anaerobic bacterial attachment/detachment phenomena, (c) development of two types of models for simulating bacterial movement and attachment/detachment in microflow cells and natural porous media, (d) application of stochastic analysis to upscale pore scale microbial attachment/detachment models to natural heterogeneous porous media, and (e) evaluation of the role nonlocality plays in microbial dynamics in heterogeneous porous media

  8. Analytical and experimental analysis of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Gao, Bin; Tian, Yuan; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media is crucial to monitor contaminant fate and transport in soil and groundwater systems. In this study, we present new findings from experimental and mathematical analysis to improve current understanding of solute transport in structured heterogeneous porous media. Three saturated columns packed with different sand combinations were used to examine the breakthrough behavior of bromide, a conservative tracer. Experimental results showed that bromide had different breakthrough responses in the three types of sand combinations, indicating that heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity has a significant effect on the solute transport in structured heterogeneous porous media. Simulations from analytical solutions of a two-domain solute transport model matched experimental breakthrough data well for all the experimental conditions tested. Experimental and model results show that under saturated flow conditions, advection dominates solute transport in both fast-flow and slow-flow domains. The sand with larger hydraulic conductivity provided a preferential flow path for solute transport (fast-flow domain) that dominates the mass transfer in the heterogeneous porous media. Importantly, the transport in the slow-flow domain and mass exchange between the domains also contribute to the flow and solute transport processes and thus must be considered when investigating contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media.

  9. Predicting colloid transport through saturated porous media: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Ian L.; Johnson, William P.; Gerhard, Jason I.; Willson, Clinton S.; O'Carroll, Denis M.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding and predicting colloid transport and retention in water-saturated porous media is important for the protection of human and ecological health. Early applications of colloid transport research before the 1990s included the removal of pathogens in granular drinking water filters. Since then, interest has expanded significantly to include such areas as source zone protection of drinking water systems and injection of nanometals for contaminated site remediation. This review summarizes predictive tools for colloid transport from the pore to field scales. First, we review experimental breakthrough and retention of colloids under favorable and unfavorable colloid/collector interactions (i.e., no significant and significant colloid-surface repulsion, respectively). Second, we review the continuum-scale modeling strategies used to describe observed transport behavior. Third, we review the following two components of colloid filtration theory: (i) mechanistic force/torque balance models of pore-scale colloid trajectories and (ii) approximating correlation equations used to predict colloid retention. The successes and limitations of these approaches for favorable conditions are summarized, as are recent developments to predict colloid retention under the unfavorable conditions particularly relevant to environmental applications. Fourth, we summarize the influences of physical and chemical heterogeneities on colloid transport and avenues for their prediction. Fifth, we review the upscaling of mechanistic model results to rate constants for use in continuum models of colloid behavior at the column and field scales. Overall, this paper clarifies the foundation for existing knowledge of colloid transport and retention, features recent advances in the field, critically assesses where existing approaches are successful and the limits of their application, and highlights outstanding challenges and future research opportunities. These challenges and opportunities

  10. Field GPR monitoring of biostimulation in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlashan, M. A.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Schillig, P. C.; Devlin, J. F.; Roberts, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    plausible mechanism for the changes observed in the aquifer. Therefore, at 200 MHz frequency, biomass formation is observed to cause a decrease of EM wave velocity of propagation suggesting an increase of the bulk dielectric constant of the water saturated medium. This finding is in agreement with published laboratory-scale GPR monitoring of microbial growth in porous media. This study shows that time-lapse GPR along with supporting biogeochemical observations can be used for monitoring of biological activity at the field scale.

  11. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C

    2014-12-14

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ante(k) (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries. PMID:25494741

  12. Dynamics of transition from stage-1 to stage-2 evaporation from porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Nima; Shahraeeni, Ebrahim; Shahabdeen, Rumeena; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    The early stages of evaporation from porous media are marked by a relatively high and constant evaporation rate (the so-called stage-1 evaporation) sustained by capillary liquid flow from the porous medium interior. Following interruption of hydraulic connections at a certain drying front depth, the vaporization plane migrates below the surface leading to transition to stage-2 evaporation limited by vapour diffusion through the porous medium. The nature of the transition and the wide range of transition dynamics from stage-1 to stage-2 were studied using evaporation experiments from sand-filled Hele-Shaw cells (172x81x4 mm) with three mean particle sizes of 0.27, 0.46, and 0.84 mm. The initially water saturated cells were placed on digital balances (cell top exposed to air) to record evaporation rates. Experiments were conducted in an environmental chamber where the relative humidity and temperature could be varied and controlled accurately. The effects of grains size, ambient temperature and relative humidity (both affecting potential evaporation rates) on transition dynamics were systematically evaluated. The results illustrate the role of potential evaporation rate on transition duration and shape transcending the expected scaling with cumulative mass loss that defines the evaporative characteristic length. The transition becomes more abrupt at higher atmospheric demand perhaps due to enhanced role of viscous effects that accelerate pore disconnection. Pore size did not affect the shape of transition much except for the medium sand with prolonged transition (the exact pore size distribution needs to be examined). Interestingly the evaporation rate at the onset of stage 2 was not affected by atmospheric conditions (Shokri and Or, 2011).

  13. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C

    2014-12-14

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ante(k) (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  14. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ant_e^k (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 d