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Sample records for porphyromonas gingivalis haemoglobin

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis: Major Periodontopathic Pathogen Overview

    PubMed Central

    Mysak, Jaroslav; Podzimek, Stepan; Sommerova, Pavla; Lyuya-Mi, Yelena; Bartova, Jirina; Janatova, Tatjana; Prochazkova, Jarmila; Duskova, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe that is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and is a member of more than 500 bacterial species that live in the oral cavity. This anaerobic bacterium is a natural member of the oral microbiome, yet it can become highly destructive (termed pathobiont) and proliferate to high cell numbers in periodontal lesions: this is attributed to its arsenal of specialized virulence factors. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of one of the main periodontal pathogens—Porphyromonas gingivalis. This bacterium, along with Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, constitute the “red complex,” a prototype polybacterial pathogenic consortium in periodontitis. This review outlines Porphyromonas gingivalis structure, its metabolism, its ability to colonize the epithelial cells, and its influence upon the host immunity. PMID:24741603

  2. Gingipain aminopeptidase activities in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Veillard, Florian; Potempa, Barbara; Poreba, Marcin; Drag, Marcin; Potempa, Jan

    2012-12-01

    Bestatin, a specific inhibitor of metalloaminopeptidases,inhibits the growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis. To identify its target enzyme, a library of fluorescent substrates was used but no metalloaminopeptidase activity was found. The aminopeptidase activity of P. gingivalis was bestatin-insensitive and directed exclusively toward N-terminal arginine and lysine substrates. Class-specific inhibitors and gingipain-null mutants showed that gingipains were the only enzymes responsible for this activity.The kinetic constants obtained for Rgps were comparable to those of human aminopeptidases but Kgp aminopeptidase activity was weaker. This finding reveals a new role for gingipains as aminopeptidases in the degradation of proteins and peptides in P. gingivalis.

  3. Functional Advantages of Porphyromonas gingivalis Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Meng-Hsuan; Chen, Chin-Ho; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Wang, Bing-Yan; Xie, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen of periodontitis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been considered as both offense and defense components of this bacterium. Previous studies indicated that like their originating cells, P. gingivalis vesicles, are able to invade oral epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts, in order to promote aggregation of some specific oral bacteria and to induce host immune responses. In the present study, we investigated the invasive efficiency of P. gingivalis OMVs and compared results with that of the originating cells. Results revealed that 70–90% of human primary oral epithelial cells, gingival fibroblasts, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells carried vesicles from P. gingivalis 33277 after being exposed to the vesicles for 1 h, while 20–50% of the host cells had internalized P. gingivalis cells. We also detected vesicle-associated DNA and RNA and a vesicle-mediated horizontal gene transfer in P. gingivalis strains, which represents a novel mechanism for gene transfer between P. gingivalis strains. Moreover, purified vesicles of P. gingivalis appear to have a negative impact on biofilm formation and the maintenance of Streptococcus gordonii. Our results suggest that vesicles are likely the best offence weapon of P. gingivalis for bacterial survival in the oral cavity and for induction of periodontitis. PMID:25897780

  4. A combination of both arginine- and lysine-specific gingipain activity of Porphyromonas gingivalis is necessary for the generation of the micro-oxo bishaem-containing pigment from haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, John W; Thomas, Michael F; Birss, Andrew J; Withnall, Robert; Silver, Jack

    2004-01-01

    The black pigment of Porphyromonas gingivalis is composed of the mu-oxo bishaem complex of Fe(III) protoporphyrin IX (mu-oxo oligomer, dimeric haem), namely [Fe(III)PPIX]2O. P. gingivalis W50 and Rgp (Arg-gingipain)- and Kgp (Lys-gingipain)-deficient mutants K1A, D7, E8 and W501 [Aduse-Opoku, Davies, Gallagher, Hashim, Evans, Rangarajan, Slaney and Curtis (2000) Microbiology 146, 1933-1940] were grown on horse blood/agar for 14 days and examined for the production of mu-oxo bishaem. Mu-oxo Bishaem was detected by UV-visible, Mössbauer and Raman spectroscopies in wild-type W50 and in the black-pigmented RgpA- and RgpB-deficient mutants (W501 and D7 respectively), whereas no haem species were detected in the straw-coloured colonies of Kgp-deficient strain K1A. The dark brown pigment of the double RgpA/RgpB knockout mutant (E8) was not composed of mu-oxo bishaem, but of a high-spin monomeric Fe(III) protoporphyrin IX species (possibly a haem-albumin complex). In vitro incubation of oxyhaemoglobin with cells of the W50 strain and the RgpA- and RgpB-deficient mutants (W501 and D7) resulted in the formation of mu-oxo bishaem via methaemoglobin as an intermediate. Although the Kgp-deficient strain K1A converted oxyhaemoglobin into methaemoglobin, this was not further degraded into mu-oxo bishaem. The double RgpA/RgpB knockout was also not capable of producing mu-oxo bishaem from oxyhaemoglobin, but instead generated a haemoglobin haemichrome. Inhibition of Arg-X protease activity of W50, W501, D7 and K1A with leupeptin, under conditions where Lys-X protease activity was unaffected, prevented the production of mu-oxo bishaem from oxyhaemoglobin, but resulted in the formation of a haemoglobin haemichrome. These results show that one or both of RgpA and RgpB gingipains, in addition to the lysine-specific gingipain, is necessary for the production of mu-oxo bishaem from haemoglobin by whole cells of P. gingivalis. PMID:14741050

  5. Iron and heme utilization in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Olczak, Teresa; Simpson, Waltena; Liu, Xinyan; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2005-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium associated with the initiation and progression of adult periodontal disease. Iron is utilized by this pathogen in the form of heme and has been shown to play an essential role in its growth and virulence. Recently, considerable attention has been given to the characterization of various secreted and surface-associated proteins of P. gingivalis and their contribution to virulence. In particular, the properties of proteins involved in the uptake of iron and heme have been extensively studied. Unlike other Gram-negative bacteria, P. gingivalis does not produce siderophores. Instead it employs specific outer membrane receptors, proteases (particularly gingipains), and lipoproteins to acquire iron/heme. In this review, we will focus on the diverse mechanisms of iron and heme acquisition in P. gingivalis. Specific proteins involved in iron and heme capture will be described. In addition, we will discuss new genes for iron/heme utilization identified by nucleotide sequencing of the P. gingivalis W83 genome. Putative iron- and heme-responsive gene regulation in P. gingivalis will be discussed. We will also examine the significance of heme/hemoglobin acquisition for the virulence of this pathogen.

  6. Quantitative proteomics of intracellular Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qiangwei; Wang, Tiansong; Taub, Fred; Park, Yoonsuk; Capestany, Cindy A.; Lamont, Richard J.; Hackett, Murray

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell quantitative proteomic analyses were conducted to investigate the change from an extracellular to intracellular lifestyle for Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative intracellular pathogen associated with periodontal disease. Global protein abundance data for P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 internalized for 18 hours within human gingival epithelial cells and controls exposed to gingival cell culture medium were obtained at sufficient coverage to provide strong evidence that these changes are profound. A total of 385 proteins were over-expressed in internalized P. gingivalis relative to controls; 240 proteins were shown to be under-expressed. This represented in total about 28% of the protein encoding ORFs annotated for this organism, and slightly less than half of the proteins that were observed experimentally. Production of several proteases, including the classical virulence factors RgpA, RgpB, and Kgp, was decreased. A separate validation study was carried out in which a 16-fold dilution of the P. gingivalis proteome was compared to the undiluted sample in order to assess the quantitative false negative rate (all ratios truly alternative). Truly null (no change) abundance ratios from technical replicates were used to assess the rate of quantitative false positives over the entire proteome. A global comparison between the direction of abundance change observed and previously published bioinformatic gene pair predictions for P. gingivalis will assist with future studies of P. gingivalis gene regulation and operon prediction. PMID:17979175

  7. Novel fimbrilin PGN_1808 in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2017-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontopathic gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, generally expresses two types of fimbriae, FimA and Mfa1. However, a novel potential fimbrilin, PGN_1808, in P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 was recently identified by an in silico structural homology search. In this study, we experimentally examined whether the protein formed a fimbrial structure. Anion-exchange chromatography showed that the elution peak of the protein was not identical to those of the major fimbrilins of FimA and Mfa1, indicating that PGN_1808 is not a component of these fimbriae. Electrophoretic analyses showed that PGN_1808 formed a polymer, although it was detergent and heat labile compared to FimA and Mfa1. Transmission electron microscopy showed filamentous structures (2‒3 nm × 200‒400 nm) on the cell surfaces of a PGN_1808-overexpressing P. gingivalis mutant (deficient in both FimA and Mfa1 fimbriae) and in the PGN_1808 fraction. PGN_1808 was detected in 81 of 84 wild-type strains of P. gingivalis by western blotting, suggesting that the protein is generally present in P. gingivalis.

  8. Novel fimbrilin PGN_1808 in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2017-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontopathic gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, generally expresses two types of fimbriae, FimA and Mfa1. However, a novel potential fimbrilin, PGN_1808, in P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 was recently identified by an in silico structural homology search. In this study, we experimentally examined whether the protein formed a fimbrial structure. Anion-exchange chromatography showed that the elution peak of the protein was not identical to those of the major fimbrilins of FimA and Mfa1, indicating that PGN_1808 is not a component of these fimbriae. Electrophoretic analyses showed that PGN_1808 formed a polymer, although it was detergent and heat labile compared to FimA and Mfa1. Transmission electron microscopy showed filamentous structures (2‒3 nm × 200‒400 nm) on the cell surfaces of a PGN_1808-overexpressing P. gingivalis mutant (deficient in both FimA and Mfa1 fimbriae) and in the PGN_1808 fraction. PGN_1808 was detected in 81 of 84 wild-type strains of P. gingivalis by western blotting, suggesting that the protein is generally present in P. gingivalis. PMID:28296909

  9. Effect of lanthanides on Porphyromonas gingivalis proteases.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Sasi K; Ciancio, Sebastian G; Sojar, Hakimuddin T

    2010-01-01

    Host and bacterial proteases play a vital role in periodontitis. Inhibitors of these proteases are necessary for control of this disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of lanthanides on proteins from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major pathogen in periodontitis. Benzoyl-L-Arg-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA); H-Gly-Pro-pNA x HCl and gelatin were used to evaluate the activity of P. gingivalis proteins in the presence of lanthanides. Proteins extracted from cell surfaces and culture media of P. gingivalis were assessed for activity in the presence of different lanthanides by BAPNA assay. Only gadolinium chloride was used for H-Gly-Pro-pNA x HCl assay and gelatin-zymography. Concentration-dependent reduction of absorbance was observed in the presence of lanthanides with BAPNA and a similar observation was made with gadolinium chloride using H-Gly-Pro-pNa. Collagenolytic activity in cell surface extracts and culture media-precipitated proteins was absent in the presence of gadolinium chloride. These results suggest that the lanthanide gadolinium can be a potential inhibitor of P. gingivalis proteases.

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms persist after chlorhexidine treatment.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Mikiyo; Noiri, Yuichiro; Kuboniwa, Masae; Yamamoto, Reiko; Asahi, Yoko; Maezono, Hazuki; Hayashi, Mikako; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2013-06-01

    Chlorhexidine (CHX) gluconate effectively reduces the viability of biofilm-forming bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis. However, it is impossible to completely remove biofilms. The goal of the present study was to assess the potential pathogenicity of residual P. gingivalis biofilms in vitro after treatment with CHX gluconate. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser imaging revealed that treatment with CHX gluconate disrupted individual biofilm-forming P. gingivalis cells but did not destroy the biofilms. The volumes of the protein and carbohydrate constituents in the residual biofilms were not significantly different from those of the controls. The physical resistance of the residual biofilms to ultrasonication was significantly higher than that of controls. The volume of P. gingivalis adherent to the residual biofilms was higher than that to saliva-coated wells. These findings suggest that although CHX gluconate caused disruption of biofilm-forming cells, the constituents derived from disrupted cells were maintained in the biofilms, which sustained their external structures. Moreover, the residual biofilms could serve as a scaffold for the formation of new biofilms.

  11. Antibacterial action of polyphosphate on Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Hoi; Park, Jae-Hong; Lee, Jin-Yong

    2011-02-01

    Polyphosphate [poly(P)] has antibacterial activity against various Gram-positive bacteria. In contrast, Gram-negative bacteria are generally resistant to poly(P). Here, we describe the antibacterial characterization of poly(P) against a Gram-negative periodontopathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis. The MICs of pyrophosphate (Na(4)P(2)O(7)) and all poly(P) (Na(n + 2)P(n)O(3n + 1); n = 3 to 75) tested for the bacterium by the agar dilution method were 0.24% and 0.06%, respectively. Orthophosphate (Na(2)HPO(4)) failed to inhibit bacterial growth. Poly-P75 was chosen for further study. In liquid medium, 0.03% poly-P75 was bactericidal against P. gingivalis irrespective of the growth phase and inoculum size, ranging from 10(5) to 10(9) cells/ml. UV-visible spectra of the pigments from P. gingivalis grown on blood agar with or without poly-P75 showed that poly-P75 reduced the formation of μ-oxo bisheme by the bacterium. Poly-P75 increased hemin accumulation on the P. gingivalis surface and decreased energy-driven uptake of hemin by the bacterium. The expression of the genes encoding hemagglutinins, gingipains, hemin uptake loci, chromosome replication, and energy production was downregulated, while that of the genes related to iron storage and oxidative stress was upregulated by poly-P75. The transmission electron microscope showed morphologically atypical cells with electron-dense granules and condensed nucleoid in the cytoplasm. Collectively, poly(P) is bactericidal against P. gingivalis, in which hemin/heme utilization is disturbed and oxidative stress is increased by poly(P).

  12. Pyocycanin, a Contributory Factor in Haem Acquisition and Virulence Enhancement of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Benedyk, Malgorzata; Byrne, Dominic P.; Glowczyk, Izabela; Potempa, Jan; Olczak, Mariusz; Olczak, Teresa; Smalley, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Several recent studies show that the lungs infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are often co-colonised by oral bacteria including black-pigmenting anaerobic (BPA) Porphyromonas species. The BPAs have an absolute haem requirement and their presence in the infected lung indicates that sufficient haem, a virulence up-regulator in BPAs, must be present to support growth. Haemoglobin from micro-bleeds occurring during infection is the most likely source of haem in the lung. Porphyromonas gingivalis displays a novel haem acquisition paradigm whereby haemoglobin must be firstly oxidised to methaemoglobin, facilitating haem release, either by gingipain proteolysis or capture via the haem-binding haemophore HmuY. P. aeruginosa produces the blue phenazine redox compound, pyocyanin. Since phenazines can oxidise haemoglobin, it follows that pyocyanin may also facilitate haem acquisition by promoting methaemoglobin production. Here we show that pyocyanin at concentrations found in the CF lung during P. aeruginosa infections rapidly oxidises oxyhaemoglobin in a dose-dependent manner. We demonstrate that methaemoglobin formed by pyocyanin is also susceptible to proteolysis by P. gingivalis Kgp gingipain and neutrophil elastase, thus releasing haem. Importantly, co-incubation of oxyhaemoglobin with pyocyanin facilitates haem pickup from the resulting methemoglobin by the P. gingivalis HmuY haemophore. Mice intra-tracheally challenged with viable P. gingivalis cells plus pyocyanin displayed increased mortality compared to those administered P. gingivalis alone. Pyocyanin significantly elevated both methaemoglobin and total haem levels in homogenates of mouse lungs and increased the level of arginine-specific gingipain activity from mice inoculated with viable P. gingivalis cells plus pyocyanin compared with mice inoculated with P. gingivalis only. These findings indicate that pyocyanin, by promoting haem availability through methaemoglobin formation and stimulating of gingipain

  13. Arginine deiminase inhibits Porphyromonas gingivalis surface attachment.

    PubMed

    Cugini, Carla; Stephens, Danielle N; Nguyen, Daniel; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Davey, Mary E

    2013-02-01

    The oral cavity is host to a complex microbial community whose maintenance depends on an array of cell-to-cell interactions and communication networks, with little known regarding the nature of the signals or mechanisms by which they are sensed and transmitted. Determining the signals that control attachment, biofilm development and outgrowth of oral pathogens is fundamental to understanding pathogenic biofilm development. We have previously identified a secreted arginine deiminase (ADI) produced by Streptococcus intermedius that inhibited biofilm development of the commensal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis through downregulation of genes encoding the major (fimA) and minor (mfa1) fimbriae, both of which are required for proper biofilm development. Here we report that this inhibitory effect is dependent on enzymic activity. We have successfully cloned, expressed and defined the conditions to ensure that ADI from S. intermedius is enzymically active. Along with the cloning of the wild-type allele, we have created a catalytic mutant (ADIC399S), in which the resulting protein is not able to catalyse the hydrolysis of l-arginine to l-citrulline. P. gingivalis is insensitive to the ADIC399S catalytic mutant, demonstrating that enzymic activity is required for the effects of ADI on biofilm formation. Biofilm formation is absent under l-arginine-deplete conditions, and can be recovered by the addition of the amino acid. Taken together, the results indicate that arginine is an important signal that directs biofilm formation by this anaerobe. Based on our findings, we postulate that ADI functions to reduce arginine levels and, by a yet to be identified mechanism, signals P. gingivalis to alter biofilm development. ADI release from the streptococcal cell and its cross-genera effects are important findings in understanding the nature of inter-bacterial signalling and biofilm-mediated diseases of the oral cavity.

  14. Invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis strains into vascular cells and tissue

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Progulske-Fox, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered a major pathogen in adult periodontitis and is also associated with multiple systemic diseases, for example, cardiovascular diseases. One of its most important virulence factors is invasion of host cells. The invasion process includes attachment, entry/internalization, trafficking, persistence, and exit. The present review discusses these processes related to P. gingivalis in cardiovascular cells and tissue. Although most P. gingivalis strains invade, the invasion capacity of strains and the mechanisms of invasion including intracellular trafficking among them differ. This is consistent with the fact that there are significant differences in the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis strains. P. gingivalis invasion mechanisms are also dependent on types of host cells. Although much is known about the invasion process of P. gingivalis, we still have little knowledge of its exit mechanisms. Nevertheless, it is intriguing that P. gingivalis can remain viable in human cardiovascular cells and atherosclerotic plaque and later exit and re-enter previously uninfected host cells. PMID:26329158

  15. Porphyromonas gingivalis genes isolated by screening for epithelial cell attachment.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, M J; Emory, S A; Almira, E C

    1996-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is associated with chronic and severe periodontitis in adults. P. gingivalis and the other periodontal pathogens colonize and interact with gingival epithelial cells, but the genes and molecular mechanisms involved are unknown. To dissect the first steps in these interactions, a P. gingivalis expression library was screened for clones which bound human oral epithelial cells. Insert DNA from the recombinant clones did not contain homology to the P. gingivalis fimA gene, encoding fimbrillin, the subunit protein of fimbriae, but showed various degrees of homology to certain cysteine protease-hemagglutinin genes. The DNA sequence of one insert revealed three putative open reading frames which appeared to be in an operon. The relationship between P. gingivalis attachment to epithelial cells and the activities identified by the screen is discussed. PMID:8751909

  16. Porphyromonas gingivalis Fim-A genotype distribution among Colombians

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Adriana; Parra, Beatriz; Botero, Javier Enrique; Contreras, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Porphyromonas gingivalis is associated with periodontitis and exhibit a wide array of virulence factors, including fimbriae which is encoded by the FimA gene representing six known genotypes. Objetive: To identify FimA genotypes of P. gingivalis in subjects from Cali-Colombia, including the co-infection with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia. Methods: Subgingival samples were collected from 151 people exhibiting diverse periodontal condition. The occurrence of P. gingivalis, FimA genotypes and other bacteria was determined by PCR. Results: P. gingivalis was positive in 85 patients. Genotype FimA II was more prevalent without reach significant differences among study groups (54.3%), FimA IV was also prevalent in gingivitis (13.0%). A high correlation (p= 0.000) was found among P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia co-infection. The FimA II genotype correlated with concomitant detection of T. denticola and T. forsythia. Conclusions: Porphyromonas gingivalis was high even in the healthy group at the study population. A trend toward a greater frequency of FimA II genotype in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis was determined. The FimA II genotype was also associated with increased pocket depth, greater loss of attachment level, and patients co-infected with T. denticola and T. forsythia. PMID:26600627

  17. Evidence for the absence of hyaluronidase activity in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, D; Michaud, J

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of Porphyromonas gingivalis to degrade hyaluronic acid. No hyaluronidase activity was detected using a turbidimetric method, whereas a standard plate assay showed a positive reaction for P. gingivalis. We postulated that the high proteolytic activity of P. gingivalis may account for this observation. A modified plate assay was designed to avoid false-positive reactions caused by proteolytic bacteria. The new assay, based on the formation of a water-insoluble salt between hyaluronic acid and the polyanion cetylpyridinium chloride, indicated that P. gingivalis does not have hyaluronidase activity. By this modified plate method, it was found that among 24 different oral bacterial species tested, Propionibacterium acnes and Prevotella oris were the only species that possess hyaluronidase activity. Images PMID:8394379

  18. FOXO responses to Porphyromonas gingivalis in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Sztukowska, Maryta; Ojo, Akintunde; Scott, David A.; Wang, Huizhi; Lamont, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Porphyromonas gingivalis is a prominent periodontal, and emerging systemic, pathogen that redirects host cell signalling pathways and modulates innate immune responses. In this study, we show that P. gingivalis infection induces the dephosphorylation and activation of forkhead box-O (FOXO)1, 3 and 4 in gingival epithelial cells. In addition, immunofluorescence showed that FOXO1 accumulated in the nucleus of P. gingivalis-infected cells. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR demonstrated that transcription of genes involved in protection against oxidative stress (Cat, Sod2, Prdx3), inflammatory responses (IL1β) and anti-apoptosis (Bcl-6) was induced by P. gingivalis, while small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of FOXO1 suppressed the transcriptional activation of these genes. P. gingivalis-induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β and inhibition of apoptosis were also impeded by FOXO1 knockdown. Neutralization of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by N-acetyl-l-cysteine blocked the activation of FOXO1 by P. gingivalis and concomitantly suppressed the activation of oxidative stress responses, anti-apoptosis programmes and IL-β production. Inhibition of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) either pharmacologically or by siRNA, reduced FOXO1 activation and downstream FOXO1-dependent gene regulation in response to P. gingivalis. The results indicate that P. gingivalis-induced ROS activate FOXO transcription factors through JNK signalling, and that FOXO1 controls oxidative stress responses, inflammatory cytokine production and cell survival. These data position FOXO as an important signalling node in the epithelial cell–P. gingivalis interaction, with particular relevance to cell fate and dysbiotic host responses. PMID:25958948

  19. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola Exhibit Metabolic Symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Helen L.; Pyke, James S.; Meuric, Vincent; Slakeski, Nada; Cleal, Steven M.; Chambers, Jenny L.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola are strongly associated with chronic periodontitis. These bacteria have been co-localized in subgingival plaque and demonstrated to exhibit symbiosis in growth in vitro and synergistic virulence upon co-infection in animal models of disease. Here we show that during continuous co-culture a P. gingivalis:T. denticola cell ratio of 6∶1 was maintained with a respective increase of 54% and 30% in cell numbers when compared with mono-culture. Co-culture caused significant changes in global gene expression in both species with altered expression of 184 T. denticola and 134 P. gingivalis genes. P. gingivalis genes encoding a predicted thiamine biosynthesis pathway were up-regulated whilst genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis were down-regulated. T. denticola genes encoding virulence factors including dentilisin and glycine catabolic pathways were significantly up-regulated during co-culture. Metabolic labeling using 13C-glycine showed that T. denticola rapidly metabolized this amino acid resulting in the production of acetate and lactate. P. gingivalis may be an important source of free glycine for T. denticola as mono-cultures of P. gingivalis and T. denticola were found to produce and consume free glycine, respectively; free glycine production by P. gingivalis was stimulated by T. denticola conditioned medium and glycine supplementation of T. denticola medium increased final cell density 1.7-fold. Collectively these data show P. gingivalis and T. denticola respond metabolically to the presence of each other with T. denticola displaying responses that help explain enhanced virulence of co-infections. PMID:24603978

  20. Prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis four rag locus genotypes in patients of orthodontic gingivitis and periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Yujie; Wang, Lili; Guo, Yang; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered as a major etiological agent in periodontal diseases and implied to result in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. rag locus is a pathogenicity island found in Porphyromonas gingivalis. Four rag locus variants are different in pathogenicity of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Moreover, there are different racial and geographic differences in distribution of rag locus genotypes. In this study, we assessed the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and rag locus genotypes in 102 gingival crevicular fluid samples from 57 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 25 cases of periodontitis patients and 20 cases of periodontally healthy people through a 16S rRNA-based PCR and a multiplex PCR. The correlations between Porphyromona.gingivalis/rag locus and clinical indices were analyzed. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and rag locus genes in periodontitis group was the highest among three groups and higher in orthodontic gingivitis than healthy people (p<0.01). An obviously positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis/rag locus and gingival index. rag-3 and rag-4 were the predominant genotypes in the patients of orthodontic gingivitis and mild-to-moderate periodontitis in Shandong. Porphyromonas.gingivalis carrying rag-1 has the strong virulence and could be associated with severe periodontitis.

  1. Prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis Four rag Locus Genotypes in Patients of Orthodontic Gingivitis and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Yujie; Wang, Lili; Guo, Yang; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered as a major etiological agent in periodontal diseases and implied to result in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. rag locus is a pathogenicity island found in Porphyromonas gingivalis. Four rag locus variants are different in pathogenicity of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Moreover, there are different racial and geographic differences in distribution of rag locus genotypes. In this study, we assessed the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and rag locus genotypes in 102 gingival crevicular fluid samples from 57 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 25 cases of periodontitis patients and 20 cases of periodontally healthy people through a 16S rRNA-based PCR and a multiplex PCR. The correlations between Porphyromona.gingivalis/rag locus and clinical indices were analyzed. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and rag locus genes in periodontitis group was the highest among three groups and higher in orthodontic gingivitis than healthy people (p<0.01). An obviously positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis/rag locus and gingival index. rag-3 and rag-4 were the predominant genotypes in the patients of orthodontic gingivitis and mild-to-moderate periodontitis in Shandong. Porphyromonas.gingivalis carrying rag-1 has the strong virulence and could be associated with severe periodontitis. PMID:23593379

  2. Reducing the bioactivity of Tannerella forsythia lipopolysaccharide by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Sung-Hoon

    2014-08-01

    Tannerella forsythia is considered a pathogen of periodontitis and forms a biofilm with multi-species bacteria in oral cavity. Lipopolysaccharide is a powerful immunostimulator and induces inflammation and shock. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of T. forsythia LPS in its co-cultivation with Fusobacterium nucleatum or Porphyromonas gingivalis. T. forsythia was co-cultured in the presence and absence of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis and then T. forsythia LPS was extracted. The extracts were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and NF-κB reporter CHO cell lines. THP-1 cells were treated with the LPS and evaluated induction of cytokine expression by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. For analysis of the bioactivity of T. forsythia LPS, the binding assay on LPS-binding protein (LBP) and CD14 was processed. The extracts did not contaminate other molecules except LPS and showed TLR4 agonists. Co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with P. gingivalis exhibited a lower level of induction of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 expression than single- or co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with F. nucleatum in the conditions of human serum. However, the three T. forsythia LPS did not show difference of cytokine induction in the serum free conditions. Co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with P. gingivalis exhibited a lower affinity to LBP and CD14 as binding site of O-antigen and attached at a lower level to THP-1 cells compared to single- or co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with F. nucleatum. The virulence of T. forsythia LPS was decreased by co-culturing with P. gingivalis and their affinity to LBP and CD14 was reduced, which may due to modification of O-antigen chain by P. gingivalis.

  3. Protective immunization against experimental Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, P B; Davern, L B; Schifferle, R; Zambon, J J

    1990-01-01

    The effects of immunization in modulating the pathogenesis of Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis infection in a murine model system were examined. BALB/c mice were immunized by intraperitoneal injection with B. gingivalis ATCC 53977 (one injection per week for 3 weeks), or with a lithium diiodosalicylate (LIS) extract (one injection per week for 3 weeks), or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; one intravenous or intraperitoneal injection) from this same strain. Two weeks after the final immunization, the mice were challenged by subcutaneous injection of B. gingivalis ATCC 53977. Mice immunized with bacteria had no secondary lesions and no septicemia, whereas mice immunized with LIS extract had few secondary lesions and no septicemia. Mice immunized with LPS and nonimmunized mice demonstrated secondary abdominal lesions and septicemia after challenge. Bacterial cells and LIS extract, but not LPS, induced serum antibody and antigen reactive lymphocytes, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblot, Western immunoblot transfer, and in vitro lymphoproliferative responses. The present study suggests that immunization with a LIS extract or whole cells may induce a protective response against experimental B. gingivalis infection. Images PMID:2401568

  4. Breaking bad: Manipulation of the host response by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Lamont, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent metagenomic and mechanistic studies are consistent with a new model of periodontal pathogenesis. This model proposes that periodontal disease is initiated by a synergistic and dysbiotic microbial community rather than by a select few bacteria traditionally known as “periopathogens”. Low abundance bacteria with community-wide effects that are critical for the development of dysbiosis are now known as keystone pathogens, the best-documented example of which is Porphyromonas gingivalis. Here we review established mechanisms by which P. gingivalis interferes with host immunity and enables the emergence of dysbiotic communities. We integrate the role of P. gingivalis with that of other bacteria acting upstream and downstream in pathogenesis. Accessory pathogens act upstream to facilitate P. gingivalis colonization and coordinate metabolic activities, whereas commensals-turned-pathobionts act downstream and contribute to destructive inflammation. The recent concepts of keystone pathogens, along with polymicrobial synergy and dysbiosis (PSD), have profound implications for the development of therapeutic options for periodontal disease. PMID:24338806

  5. Silicon Nitride Bioceramics Induce Chemically Driven Lysis in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Bock, Ryan M; McEntire, Bryan J; Jones, Erin; Boffelli, Marco; Zhu, Wenliang; Baggio, Greta; Boschetto, Francesco; Puppulin, Leonardo; Adachi, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kanamura, Narisato; Marunaka, Yoshinori; Bal, B Sonny

    2016-03-29

    Organisms of Gram-negative phylum bacteroidetes, Porphyromonas gingivalis, underwent lysis on polished surfaces of silicon nitride (Si3N4) bioceramics. The antibacterial activity of Si3N4 was mainly the result of chemically driven principles. The lytic activity, although not osmotic in nature, was related to the peculiar pH-dependent surface chemistry of Si3N4. A buffering effect via the formation of ammonium ions (NH4(+)) (and their modifications) was experimentally observed by pH microscopy. Lysis was confirmed by conventional fluorescence spectroscopy, and the bacteria's metabolism was traced with the aid of in situ Raman microprobe spectroscopy. This latter technique revealed the formation of peroxynitrite within the bacterium itself. Degradation of the bacteria's nucleic acid, drastic reduction in phenilalanine, and reduction of lipid concentration were observed due to short-term exposure (6 days) to Si3N4. Altering the surface chemistry of Si3N4 by either chemical etching or thermal oxidation influenced peroxynitrite formation and affected bacteria metabolism in different ways. Exploiting the peculiar surface chemistry of Si3N4 bioceramics could be helpful in counteracting Porphyromonas gingivalis in an alkaline pH environment.

  6. Endothelin Regulates Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Production of Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hye; Lee, Dong Eun; Kang, Si-Mook; Lee, So Yun; Choi, Lin; Sun, Ji Su; Kim, Seul Ki; Park, Wonse; Kim, Baek Il; Yoo, Yun-Jung; Chang, Inik; Shin, Dong Min

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a very common oral inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of supporting connective and osseous tissues of the teeth. Although the exact etiology is still unclear, Gram-negative bacteria, especially Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival pockets are thought to be one of the major etiologic agents of periodontitis. Endothelin (ET) is a family of three 21-amino acid peptides, ET-1, -2, and -3, that activate G protein-coupled receptors, ETA and ETB. Endothelin is involved in the occurrence and progression of various inflammatory diseases. Previous reports have shown that ET-1 and its receptors, ETA and ETB are expressed in the periodontal tissues and, that ET-1 levels in gingival crevicular fluid are increased in periodontitis patients. Moreover, P. gingivalis infection has been shown to induce the production of ET-1 along with other inflammatory cytokines. Despite these studies, however, the functional significance of endothelin in periodontitis is still largely unknown. In this study, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms of ET-1 action in periodontitis using human gingival epithelial cells (HGECs). ET-1 and ETA, but not ETB, were abundantly expressed in HGECs. Stimulation of HGECs with P. gingivalis or P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide increased the expression of ET-1 and ETA suggesting the activation of the endothelin signaling pathway. Production of inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β, TNFα, and IL-6, was significantly enhanced by exogenous ET-1 treatment, and this effect depended on the mitogen-activated protein kinases via intracellular Ca2+ increase, which resulted from the activation of the phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway. The inhibition of the endothelin receptor-mediated signaling pathway with the dual receptor inhibitor, bosentan, partially ameliorated alveolar bone loss and immune cell infiltration. These results suggest that endothelin plays an important role in P. gingivalis

  7. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in young Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Mombelli, A; Gmür, R; Frey, J; Meyer, J; Zee, K Y; Tam, J O; Lo, E C; Di Rienzo, J; Lang, N P; Corbet, E F

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence or absence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in young Chinese adults and to examine the A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates from positive subjects with regard to the serotype distribution, presence of the leukotoxin gene lktA and the promoter for the leukotoxin operon as well as the incidence of phage Aa phi 23. Sixty subjects, working in a knitting factory in the Province of Guangzhou, People's Republic of China, were investigated. Subgingival microbial samples were taken from both upper first molars. They were cultured both anaerobically and in 5% CO2. P. gingivalis was found in 33 subjects. On average, it constituted 7% of the total anaerobic cultivable counts. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in 37 subjects of which seven yielded counts > 10(5). Twenty-one subjects were positive for both organisms. A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype a was found in 9 subjects, serotype c was found in 23 and serotype e in 5. A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes b and d were not detected in any subjects. Presence of the leukotoxin gene lktA was demonstrated for all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates; however, none of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains from the present study had a deletion in the promoter region of the leukotoxin operon. The results of this investigation show a high frequency of the putative periodontal pathogens P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans and corroborate the concept that there is variation in virulence and pathogenic potential among isolates from different subjects.

  8. HmuY haemophore and gingipain proteases constitute a unique syntrophic system of haem acquisition by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Smalley, John W; Byrne, Dominic P; Birss, Andrew J; Wojtowicz, Halina; Sroka, Aneta; Potempa, Jan; Olczak, Teresa

    2011-02-17

    Haem (iron protoporphyrin IX) is both an essential growth factor and virulence regulator for the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, which acquires it mainly from haemoglobin via the sequential actions of the R- and K-specific gingipain proteases. The haem-binding lipoprotein haemophore HmuY and its cognate receptor HmuR of P. gingivalis, are responsible for capture and internalisation of haem. This study examined the role of the HmuY in acquisition of haem from haemoglobin and the cooperation between HmuY and gingipain proteases in this process. Using UV-visible spectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, HmuY was demonstrated to wrest haem from immobilised methaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin. Haem extraction from oxyhaemoglobin was facilitated after oxidation to methaemoglobin by pre-treatment with the P. gingivalis R-gingipain A (HRgpA). HmuY was also capable of scavenging haem from oxyhaemoglobin pre-treated with the K-gingipain (Kgp). This is the first demonstration of a haemophore working in conjunction with proteases to acquire haem from haemoglobin. In addition, HmuY was able to extract haem from methaemalbumin, and could bind haem, either free in solution or from methaemoglobin, even in the presence of serum albumin.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis-related genes are required for colony pigmentation of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keiko; Kido, Nobuo; Murakami, Yukitaka; Hoover, Charles I; Nakayama, Koji; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2009-04-01

    The periodontopathic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis forms pigmented colonies when incubated on blood agar plates as a result of accumulation of mu-oxo haem dimer on the cell surface. Gingipain-adhesin complexes are responsible for production of mu-oxo haem dimer from haemoglobin. Non-pigmented mutants (Tn6-5, Tn7-1, Tn7-3 and Tn10-4) were isolated from P. gingivalis by Tn4351 transposon mutagenesis [Hoover & Yoshimura (1994), FEMS Microbiol Lett 124, 43-48]. In this study, we found that the Tn6-5, Tn7-1 and Tn7-3 mutants carried Tn4351 DNA in a gene homologous to the ugdA gene encoding UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, a gene encoding a putative group 1 family glycosyltransferase and a gene homologous to the rfa gene encoding ADP heptose-LPS heptosyltransferase, respectively. The Tn10-4 mutant carried Tn4351 DNA at the same position as that for Tn7-1. Gingipain activities associated with cells of the Tn7-3 mutant (rfa) were very weak, whereas gingipain activities were detected in the culture supernatants. Immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses also revealed that gingipains, including their precursor forms, were present in the culture supernatants. A lipopolysaccharide (LPS) fraction of the rfa deletion mutant did not show the ladder pattern that was usually seen for the LPS of the wild-type P. gingivalis. A recombinant chimera gingipain was able to bind to an LPS fraction of the wild-type P. gingivalis in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the rfa gene product is associated with biosynthesis of LPS and/or cell-surface polysaccharides that can function as an anchorage for gingipain-adhesin complexes.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a minor fimbria from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, N; Sojar, H T; Cho, M I; Genco, R J

    1996-01-01

    We have discovered two distinctly different fimbriae expressed by the same Porphyromonas gingivalis strain. The construction of a fimA mutant of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 has previously been reported by N. Hamada et al. (Infect. Immun. 62:1696-1704, 1994). Expression of fimbriae on the surface of the fimA mutant and the wild-type strain, ATCC 33277, were investigated by electron microscopy. The wild-type strain produced long fimbrial structures extending from the cell surface, whereas those structures were not observed on the fimA mutant. However, short fimbrial structures were seen on the surface of the fimA mutant. The short fimbrial protein was purified from the fimA mutant by selective protein precipitation and chromatography on DEAE Sepharose CL-6B. We have found that the second fimbrial structure of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 is distinct from the 41-kDa (43-kDa) major fimbrial protein (FimA). We provisionally call this protein minor fimbriae. The molecular mass of the minor fimbriae is 67 kDa as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions after boiling at 100 degrees C. The component shows a ladder-like pattern at 80 degrees C under nonreducing conditions, suggesting a tendency to aggregate or polymerize. In immunoblotting analysis, anti-minor fimbria serum reacted with both the 100 degrees C- and the 80 degrees C-treated minor fimbriae. The anti-minor fimbria serum also reacts with the same-molecular-size fimbrial preparation from the wild-type strain. Immunogold electron microscopy showed that the anti-minor fimbria serum bound to the minor fimbria on the cell surface of the wild-type strain. This is the first report on the identification of the minor fimbria produced by P. gingivalis. These results suggest that the minor fimbriae appearing on the fimA mutant strain are produced together with numerous long major fimbriae on the wild-type strain. Moreover, the minor fimbriae are different in size and

  11. Update on Actinobacillus Actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in human periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Slots, J

    1999-10-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is an important pathogen of periodontitis in young individuals. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen of severe adult periodontitis. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis can be transmitted from family member to family member and may cause periodontitis in the recipient individual. In the USA, A. actinomycetemcomitans occurs more frequently in Hispanics and Asians than in Caucasians. P. gingivalis is more common in Hispanics, Asians and Blacks than in Caucasians. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis strains differ in genotype, serotype, toxin and enzyme production, and cellular invasiveness. Variation in virulence may help explain differing clinical outcomes of periodontal A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis infections. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis cannot be eradicated from the great majority of deep periodontal pockets by mechanical debridement alone. A. actinomycetemcomitans may be removed from subgingival sites by adjunctive systemic amoxicillin-metronidazole or other appropriate antibiotic therapies. Subgingival eradication of P. gingivalis may require periodontal surgery as well as antibiotic therapy.

  12. Dipeptide utilization by the periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Sato, T

    2002-02-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens and Fusobacterium nucleatum, which can frequently be isolated from periodontal pockets, preferentially utilize proteins and peptides as growth substrates. In this study, we determined the size of peptide that is preferentially utilized as a source of energy and material for cell growth by P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, P. nigrescens and F. nucleatum using various sizes of poly amino acids consisting of two to approximately 100 molecules of aspartate or glutamate. Resting cells of P. gingivalis, P. intermedia and P. nigrescens utilized aspartylaspartate, while cells of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum utilized glutamylglutamate. The addition of aspartylaspartate to the culture medium increased the growth of P. gingivalis, P. intermedia and P. nigrescens, while the addition of glutamylglutamate promoted the growth of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. These results clearly indicate that dipeptides such as aspartylaspartate and glutamylglutamate can be utilized as growth substrates for P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, P. nigrescens and F. nucleatum.

  13. Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence factors involved in subversion of leukocytes and microbial dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Zenobia, Camille; Hajishengallis, George

    2015-01-01

    The oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has special nutrient requirements due to its asaccharolytic nature subsisting on small peptides cleaved from host proteins. Using proteases and other virulence factors, P. gingivalis thrives as a component of a polymicrobial community in nutritionally favorable inflammatory environments. In this regard, P. gingivalis has a number of strategies that subvert the host immune response in ways that promote its colonization and facilitate the outgrowth of the surrounding microbial community. The focus of this review is to discuss at the molecular level how P. gingivalis subverts leukocytes to create a favorable environment for a select community of bacteria that, in turn, adversely affects the periodontal tissues.

  14. Selection and phenotypic characterization of nonhemagglutinating mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Chandad, F; Mayrand, D; Grenier, D; Hinode, D; Mouton, C

    1996-01-01

    To further investigate the relationship between fimbriae and the hemagglutinating adhesin HA-Ag2 of Porphyromonas gingivalis, three spontaneous mutants of the type strain ATCC 33277 were selected by a hemadsorption procedure. They were characterized for hemagglutination, trypsin-like and lectin-binding activities, and hydrophobicity and for the presence of fimbriae. The presence of the 42-kDa (the fimbrilin subunit) and the 43- and 49-kDa (the HA-Ag2 components) polypeptides was investigated by immunoblotting using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies directed to fimbriae and to the hemagglutinating adhesin HA-Ag2. Cells from two of the three mutants (M1 and M2) exhibited no or little hemagglutination activity and very low trypsin-like activity and did not show the 43- and 49-kDa polypeptides. Abnormal fimbriation in M1 was deduced from the following observations of cells grown for 18 h: absence of the 42-kDa polypeptide and of a 14-kDa polypeptide and no fimbriae visible on electron micrographs. While the cells of mutant M2, irrespective of the age of the culture, were found to lack the 43- and 49-kDa polypeptides and hemagglutination activity, the supernatants of cultures grown for 72 h had high hemagglutination and trypsin-like activities and revealed the presence of the 42-, 43-, and 49-kDa polypeptides. This suggests that M2 may be missing some molecules which anchor the components to the cell surface. Mutant M3 showed levels of activities similar to those of the parental strain but lacked the 43-kDa polypeptide. Other pleiotropic effects observed for the mutants included loss of dark pigmentation and lower hydrophobicity. The data from this study fuel an emerging consensus whereby fimbriation, hemagglutination, and proteolytic activities, as well as other functions in P. gingivalis, are intricate. PMID:8641806

  15. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Prevotella nigrescens in chronic endodontic infection.

    PubMed

    Tomazinho, Luiz Fernando; Avila-Campos, Mario J

    2007-02-01

    Black-pigmented anaerobic rods such as Prevotella spp. and Porphyromonas spp. are involved in the etiology and perpetuation of endodontic infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of these species in chronic endodontic infections by using culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. Samples of 100 patients with root canals displaying chronic endodontic infections were obtained by sterilized paper points. Bacterial identification was performed by using culture and PCR techniques. By culture, in 33% of the samples, P. intermedia-P. nigrescens (75.8%), P. gingivalis (27.3%), and P. endodontalis (9.1%) were identified, and by PCR 60% of the samples harbored P. nigrescens (43.3%), P. gingivalis (43.3%), P. intermedia (31.7%), and P. endodontalis (23.3%). The presence of these black-pigmented anaerobic rods alone or in association in chronic endodontic infections seems to be frequent. PCR is a very sensitive technique for detecting DNA from bacterial cells. Culturing is only able to reveal living bacteria and is less sensitive for the identification of low numbers of bacterial cells.

  16. Porphyromonas gulae Has Virulence and Immunological Characteristics Similar to Those of the Human Periodontal Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Lenzo, Jason C.; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M.; Orth, Rebecca K.; Mitchell, Helen L.; Dashper, Stuart G.

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a significant problem in companion animals, and yet little is known about the disease-associated microbiota. A major virulence factor for the human periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis is the lysyl- and arginyl-specific proteolytic activity of the gingipains. We screened several Porphyromonas species isolated from companion animals—P. asaccharolytica, P. circumdentaria, P. endodontalis, P. levii, P. gulae, P. macacae, P. catoniae, and P. salivosa—for Lys- and Arg-specific proteolytic activity and compared the epithelial and macrophage responses and induction of alveolar bone resorption of the protease active species to that of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Only P. gulae exhibited Lys-and Arg-specific proteolytic activity. The genes encoding the gingipains (RgpA/B and Kgp) were identified in the P. gulae strain ATCC 51700 and all publicly available 12 draft genomes of P. gulae strains. P. gulae ATCC 51700 induced levels of alveolar bone resorption in an animal model of periodontitis similar to those in P. gingivalis W50 and exhibited a higher capacity for autoaggregation and binding to oral epithelial cells with induction of apoptosis. Macrophages (RAW 264.7) were found to phagocytose P. gulae ATCC 51700 and the fimbriated P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 at similar levels. In response to P. gulae ATCC 51700, macrophages secreted higher levels of cytokines than those induced by P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 but lower than those induced by P. gingivalis W50, except for the interleukin-6 response. Our results indicate that P. gulae exhibits virulence characteristics similar to those of the human periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis and therefore may play a key role in the development of periodontitis in companion animals. PMID:27354442

  17. Proteomic peptide scan of porphyromonas gingivalis fima type ii for searching potential b-cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    LUCCHESE, A.; GUIDA, A.; CAPONE, G.; DONNARUMMA, G.; LAINO, L.; PETRUZZI, M.; SERPICO, R.; SILVESTRE, F.; GARGARI, M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose To identify potential antigenic targets for Porphyromonas gingivalis vaccine development. Materials and methods In the present study, we analyzed the Porphyromonas gingivalis, fimA type II primary amino acid sequence and characterized the similarity to the human proteome at the pentapeptide level. Results We found that exact peptide-peptide profiling of the fimbrial antigen versus the human proteome shows that only 19 out of 344 fimA type II pentapeptides are uniquely owned by the bacterial protein. Conclusions The concept that protein immunogenicity is allocated in rare peptide sequences and the search the Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA type II sequence for peptides unique to the bacterial protein and absent in the human host, might be used in new therapeutical approaches as a significant adjunct to current periodontal therapies. PMID:28042435

  18. Functional differences of Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae in determining periodontal disease pathogenesis: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Sandra; Contreras, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is implicated in chronic and aggressive periodontitis. This bacterium has numerous virulence factors and one is the Fimbriae, which is quite important for bacterial colonization. Fimbriae are appendices that anchor to the bacterial wall and are comprised of the protein FimBriline encoded by the FimA gene. Thus far, six genotypes have been identified, FimA I to V and Ib. Genotypes II and IV are associated with periodontal disease, while genotype I is related to gingival health. Genotype identification of P. gingivalis FimA in periodontitis would be important to confirm the pathogenic genotypes and to establish risk at population level. This review is about the P. gingivalis FimA genotype prevalence worldwide. A systematic search using Pubmed, Hinary, and Science Direct within the following descriptors: Porphyromonas gingivalis, bacterial adhesion, periodontitis, Fimbriae, FimA, genotipification was performed to April 2011.

  19. Functional differences of Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae in determining periodontal disease pathogenesis: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is implicated in chronic and aggressive periodontitis. This bacterium has numerous virulence factors and one is the Fimbriae, which is quite important for bacterial colonization. Fimbriae are appendices that anchor to the bacterial wall and are comprised of the protein FimBriline encoded by the FimA gene. Thus far, six genotypes have been identified, FimA I to V and Ib. Genotypes II and IV are associated with periodontal disease, while genotype I is related to gingival health. Genotype identification of P. gingivalis FimA in periodontitis would be important to confirm the pathogenic genotypes and to establish risk at population level. This review is about the P. gingivalis FimA genotype prevalence worldwide. A systematic search using Pubmed, Hinary, and Science Direct within the following descriptors: Porphyromonas gingivalis, bacterial adhesion, periodontitis, Fimbriae, FimA, genotipification was performed to April 2011. PMID:24892323

  20. Genome Sequence of Porphyromonas gingivalis Strain A7A1-28

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gary; Bélanger, Myriam; Kumar, Dibyendu; Whitlock, Joan A.; Liu, Li; Farmerie, William G.; Zeng, Collin L.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Han, Cliff S.; Brettin, Thomas S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porphyromonas gingivalis is an oral opportunistic pathogen. Sequenced P. gingivalis laboratory strains display limited diversity in antigens that modulate host responses. Here, we present the genome sequence of A7A1-28, a strain possessing atypical fimbrillin and capsule types, with a single contig of 2,249,024 bp and a G+C content of 48.58%. PMID:28280013

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis: keeping the pathos out of the biont

    PubMed Central

    Cugini, Carla; Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Rackaityte, Elze; Riggs, James E.; Davey, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of the human microbiome initiative has been to increase our understanding of the structure and function of our indigenous microbiota and their effects on human health and predisposition to disease. Because of its clinical importance and accessibility for in vivo study, the oral biofilm is one of the best-understood microbial communities associated with the human body. Studies have shown that there is a succession of select microbial interactions that directs the maturation of a defined community structure, generating the formation of dental plaque. Although the initiating factors that lead to disease development are not clearly defined, in many individuals there is a fundamental shift from a health-associated biofilm community to one that is pathogenic in nature and a central player in the pathogenic potential of this community is the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis. This anaerobic bacterium is a natural member of the oral microbiome, yet it can become highly destructive (termed pathobiont) and proliferate to high cell numbers in periodontal lesions, which is attributed to its arsenal of specialized virulence factors. Hence, this organism is regarded as a primary etiologic agent of periodontal disease progression. In this review, we summarize some of the latest information regarding what is known about its role in periodontitis, including pathogenic potential as well as ecological and nutritional parameters that may shift this commensal to a virulent state. We also discuss parallels between the development of pathogenic biofilms and the human cellular communities that lead to cancer, specifically we frame our viewpoint in the context of ‘wounds that fail to heal’. PMID:23565326

  2. Periodontitis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in Preclinical Stage of Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Motomu; Yamazaki, Toru; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Morimoto, Takeshi; Yamori, Masashi; Asai, Keita; Isobe, Yu; Furu, Moritoshi; Ito, Hiromu; Fujii, Takao; Terao, Chikashi; Mori, Masato; Matsuo, Takashi; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Wataru; Bessho, Kazuhisa; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the presence of periodontitis (PD) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) in the subgingival biofilm associates with the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in treatment naïve preclinical stage of arthritis patients. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 72 consecutive patients with arthralgia who had never been treated with any anti-rheumatic drugs or glucocorticoids. Periodontal status at baseline was assessed by dentists. PD was defined stringently by the maximal probing depth≧4 mm, or by the classification by the 5th European Workshop in Periodontology (EWP) in 2005 using attachment loss. Up to eight plaque samples were obtained from each patient and the presence of Pg was determined by Taqman PCR. The patients were followed up for 2 years and introduction rate of methotrexate (MTX) treatment on the diagnosis of RA was compared in patients with or without PD or Pg. Results Patients with PD (probing depth≧4mm) had higher arthritis activity (p = 0.02) and higher risk for future introduction of MTX treatment on the diagnosis of RA during the follow up than patients without PD (Hazard ratio 2.68, p = 0.03). Arthritis activity and risk for MTX introduction increased with the severity of PD assessed by EWP, although not statistically significant. On the other hand, presence of Pg was not associated with arthritis activity (p = 0.72) or the risk for MTX introduction (p = 0.45). Conclusion In treatment naïve arthralgia patients, PD, but not the presence of Pg, associates with arthritis activity and future requirement of MTX treatment on the diagnosis of RA. PMID:25849461

  3. Prevalence of fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis and other periodontal bacteria in a Spanish population with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Silla, Miriam; Dasí-Fernánde, Francisco; Montiel-Company, José-María

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the different fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis in adult Spanish patients with chronic periodontitis, patients with gingivitis and periodontally healthy subjects, and the relationship between these genotypes and other periodontopathogenic bacteria. Study design: Samples of subgingival plaque were taken from 86 patients (33 with chronic periodontitis, 16 with gingivitis, and 37 periodontally healthy) in the course of a full periodontal examination. PCR was employed to determine the presence of the 6 fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis (I-V and Ib) and of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola. Results: Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotypes II and Ib were present in significantly higher percentages in periodontal patients (39.4% and 12.1% respectively) than in healthy or gingivitis subjects. The prevalence of Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotype IV was significantly higher in the group that presented bleeding greater than 30%. A positive correlation was found between Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotype IV and Treponema denticola. Conclusions: A strong association between Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotypes II and Ib and chronic periodontitis exists in the Spanish population. The most prevalent genotype in periodontal patients is II. Key words:Periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, fimA genotype, periodontal bacteria, polymerase chain reaction. PMID:22549664

  4. Experimental Porphyromonas gingivalis infection in nonimmune athymic BALB/c mice.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, P B; Davern, L B; Aguirre, A

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to study the role of T lymphocytes following injection of Porphyromonas gingivalis in a mouse abscess model. Three invasive P. gingivalis isolates (ATCC 53977, W83, and AJW4) were injected into athymic BALB/c mice and their heterozygous (nu/+) littermates. The athymic BALB/c (nu/nu) mice were able to localize the invasive P. gingivalis isolates at the injection site. By comparison, the heterozygous BALB/c (nu/+) littermates developed hemorrhagic secondary lesions within 24 h after subcutaneous injection of the same invasive P. gingivalis isolates. These results suggest that naive T lymphocytes may contribute to the pathology associated with P. gingivalis infection. PMID:1657788

  5. Transcriptional profiling of human smooth muscle cells infected with gingipain and fimbriae mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boxi; Sirsjö, Allan; Khalaf, Hazem; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is considered to be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the role of different virulence factors produced by P. gingivalis in this process is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional profiling of human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) infected with wild type, gingipain mutants or fimbriae mutants of P. gingivalis. AoSMCs were exposed to wild type (W50 and 381), gingipain mutants (E8 and K1A), or fimbriae mutants (DPG-3 and KRX-178) of P. gingivalis. We observed that wild type P. gingivalis changes the expression of a considerable larger number of genes in AoSMCs compare to gingipain and fimbriae mutants, respectively. The results from pathway analysis revealed that the common differentially expressed genes for AoSMCs infected by 3 different wild type P. gingivalis strains were enriched in pathways of cancer, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and MAPK signaling pathway. Disease ontology analysis showed that various strains of P. gingivalis were associated with different disease profilings. Our results suggest that gingipains and fimbriae, especially arginine-specific gingipain, produced by P. gingivalis play important roles in the association between periodontitis and other inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26907358

  6. In vitro invasion and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in gingival fibroblasts; role of the capsule.

    PubMed

    Irshad, Muhammad; van der Reijden, Wil A; Crielaard, Wim; Laine, Marja L

    2012-12-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium involved in periodontitis and peri-implantitis that can invade and survive inside host cells in vitro. P. gingivalis can invade human gingival fibroblasts (GF), but no data are available about the role of P. gingivalis' capsule in GF invasion. In the current study, we aimed to determine the ability of three strains of P. gingivalis (encapsulated wild type W83, non-encapsulated HG91 and the non-encapsulated insertional isogenic knockout mutant of W83, ΔEpsC) to invade GF and the ability of internalized P. gingivalis to survive in vitro antibiotic treatment. The ability of P. gingivalis strains to invade GF was tested using an antibiotic protection assay at multiplicity of infection (MOI) 100 and 1000. The survival of internalized P. gingivalis cells was further analyzed by subsequent in vitro treatment with either metronidazole or amoxicillin alone or a combination of metronidazole and amoxicillin and anaerobic culture viability counts. All strains of P. gingivalis used in this study were able to invade GFs. The non-encapsulated mutant of W83 (ΔEpsC mutant) was significantly more invasive than the wild type W83 at MOI 100 (p value 0.025) and MOI 1000 (p value 0.038). Furthermore, internalized P. gingivalis was able to resist in vitro antibiotic treatment. As demonstrated by the differences in invasion efficiencies of P. gingivalis strain W83 and its isogenic mutant ΔEpsC, the capsule of P. gingivalis makes it less efficient in invading gingival fibroblasts. Moreover, internalized P. gingivalis can survive antibiotic treatment in vitro.

  7. The peptidylarginine deiminase gene is a conserved feature of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Gabarrini, Giorgio; de Smit, Menke; Westra, Johanna; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Vissink, Arjan; Zhou, Kai; A. Rossen, John W.; Stobernack, Tim; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Jan van Winkelhoff, Arie

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infective process that ultimately leads to destruction of the soft and hard tissues that support the teeth (the periodontium). Periodontitis has been proposed as a candidate risk factor for development of the autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major periodontal pathogen, is the only known prokaryote expressing a peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD) enzyme necessary for protein citrullination. Antibodies to citrullinated proteins (anti-citrullinated protein antibodies, ACPA) are highly specific for RA and precede disease onset. Objective of this study was to assess P. gingivalis PAD (PPAD) gene expression and citrullination patterns in representative samples of P. gingivalis clinical isolates derived from periodontitis patients with and without RA and in related microbes of the Porphyromonas genus. Our findings indicate that PPAD is omnipresent in P. gingivalis, but absent in related species. No significant differences were found in the composition and expression of the PPAD gene of P. gingivalis regardless of the presence of RA or periodontal disease phenotypes. From this study it can be concluded that if P. gingivalis plays a role in RA, it is unlikely to originate from a variation in PPAD gene expression. PMID:26403779

  8. Humoral immune response to an antigen from Porphyromonas gingivalis 381 in periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, H; Nishimura, F; Nakamura, T; Nakagawa, M; Tanimoto, I; Nomura, Y; Kokeguchi, S; Kato, K; Murayama, Y

    1991-01-01

    The humoral immune responses of patients with periodontitis were evaluated to characterize the host response to Porphyromonas gingivalis. A sonic extract of P. gingivalis 381 from whole cells was fractionated by gel chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography. The fractionated extracts were evaluated by Western blot (immunoblot) analyses with patient sera. A dominant antigen was identified from the sonic extract with an apparent molecular mass of 53 kDa. The 53-kDa protein antigen (Ag53) was purified by affinity chromatography by using a monoclonal antibody. Ag53 was detected on the vesicle surface of P. gingivalis 381 by immunoelectron microscopy by using the monoclonal antibody and was detected as a major protein in the outer membrane and in vesicles by Western blot analysis. Monoclonal antibody cross-reactivity to Ag53 in the sonic extracts of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, P. gingivalis 1021, and Porphyromonas endodontalis ATCC 35406 was revealed. Seventy-seven patients with periodontitis were examined for their responses to Ag53. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) from 54 patients reacted strongly to Ag53; however, serum IgG from the remaining 23 patients did not exhibit detectable reactivity at all to Ag53, even though the patients had high serum IgG titers to the sonic extract. Ag53 is a new marker that represents an interesting aspect of the humoral immune response to P. gingivalis in patients with periodontitis. Images PMID:1855992

  9. Lipid raft-dependent uptake, signaling, and intracellular fate of Porphyromonas gingivalis in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Hajishengallis, George

    2009-01-01

    Summary Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enriched microdomains involved in cellular trafficking and implicated as portals for certain pathogens. We sought to determine whether the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis enters macrophages via lipid rafts, and if so, to examine the impact of raft entry on its intracellular fate. Using J774A.1 mouse macrophages, we found that P. gingivalis colocalizes with lipid rafts in a cholesterol-dependent way. Depletion of cellular cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin resulted in about 50% inhibition of P. gingivalis uptake, although this effect was reversed by cholesterol reconstitution. The intracellular survival of P. gingivalis was dramatically inhibited in cholesterol-depleted cells relative to untreated or cholesterol-reconstituted cells, even when infections were adjusted to allow equilibration of the initial intracellular bacterial load. P. gingivalis thus appeared to exploit raft-mediated uptake for promoting its survival. Consistent with this, lipid raft disruption enhanced the colocalization of internalized P. gingivalis with lysosomes. In contrast, raft disruption did not affect the expression of host receptors interacting with P. gingivalis, although it significantly inhibited signal transduction. In summary, P. gingivalis uses macrophage lipid rafts as signaling and entry platforms, which determine its intracellular fate to the pathogen’s own advantage. PMID:18547335

  10. Inhibitory Effect of Enterococcus faecium WB2000 on Volatile Sulfur Compound Production by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Takuya; Nakajima, Masato; Fujimoto, Akie; Hanioka, Takashi; Hirofuji, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced by oral anaerobes are the major compounds responsible for oral malodor. Enterococcus faecium WB2000 is recognized as an antiplaque probiotic bacterium. In this study, the effect of E. faecium WB2000 on VSC production by Porphyromonas gingivalis was evaluated, and the mechanism of inhibition of oral malodor was investigated. P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 was cultured in the presence of four lactic acid bacteria, including E. faecium WB2000. Subsequently, P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, W50, W83, and two clinical isolates were cultured in the presence or absence of E. faecium WB2000, and the emission of VSCs from spent culture medium was measured by gas chromatography. The number of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 in mixed culture with E. faecium WB2000 decreased at 6 h, and the rate of decrease was higher than that in mixed cultures with the other lactic acid bacteria. The numbers of five P. gingivalis strains decreased at similar rates in mixed culture with E. faecium WB2000. The concentration of methyl mercaptan was lower in spent culture medium from P. gingivalis and E. faecium WB2000 cultures compared with that from P. gingivalis alone. Therefore, E. faecium WB2000 may reduce oral malodor by inhibiting the growth of P. gingivalis and neutralizing methyl mercaptan. PMID:27799940

  11. Surface interactions between two of the main periodontal pathogens: Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia have been implicated as the major etiologic agents of periodontal disease. These two bacteria are frequently isolated together from the periodontal lesion, and it has been suggested that their interaction may increase each one’s virulence potential. The purpose of this study was to identify proteins on the surface of these organisms that are involved in interbacterial binding. Methods Biotin labeling of surface proteins of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis was performed to identify surface proteins involved in the coaggregating activity between P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. Results It was found that three major T. forsythia proteins sized 161, 100, and 62 kDa were involved in binding to P. gingivalis, and P. gingivalis proteins sized 35, 32, and 26 kDa were involved in binding to T. forsythia cells. Conclusions LC-MS/MS analysis identified one T. forsythia surface protein (TonB-linked outer membrane protein) involved in interbacterial binding to P. gingivalis. However, the nature of other T. forsythia and P. gingivalis surface proteins identified by biotin labeling could not be determined. Further analysis of these proteins will help elucidate the molecular mechanisms that mediate coaggregation between P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. PMID:26937289

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbria-dependent activation of inflammatory genes in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-Hua; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Davey, Michael; Takahashi, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Takanari; Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline A

    2005-09-01

    Epidemiological and pathological studies have suggested that infection with the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis can potentiate atherosclerosis and human coronary heart disease. Furthermore, infection with invasive, but not noninvasive P. gingivalis has been demonstrated to accelerate atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice and to accelerate local inflammatory responses in aortic tissue. In the present study, using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays, we have defined the gene expression profile of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) after infection with invasive and noninvasive P. gingivalis. After infection of HAEC with invasive P. gingivalis strain 381, we observed the upregulation of 68 genes. Genes coding for the cytokines Gro2 and Gro3; the adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, and ELAM-1 (E-selectin); the chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8); and the proinflammatory molecules IL-6 and cyclooxygenase-2 were among the most highly upregulated genes in P. gingivalis 381-infected HAEC compared to uninfected HAEC control. Increased mRNA levels for signaling molecules, transcriptional regulators, and cell surface receptors were also observed. Of note, only 4 of these 68 genes were also upregulated in HAEC infected with the noninvasive P. gingivalis fimA mutant. Reverse transcription-PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis confirmed the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-/P-selectins, IL-6, and IL-8 in HAEC infected with invasive P. gingivalis. We also demonstrated that increased expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in aortic tissue of ApoE(-/-) mice orally challenged with invasive P. gingivalis but not with the noninvasive P. gingivalis fimA mutant by immunohistochemical analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that P. gingivalis fimbria-mediated invasion upregulates inflammatory gene expression in HAEC and in aortic

  13. Polymerase chain reaction of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia in primary endodontic infections.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Brenda P F A; Montagner, Francisco; Jacinto, Rogério Castilho; Zaia, Alexandre A; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi; Souza-Filho, Francisco J

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between endodontic clinical signs and symptoms and the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia or their association by nested polymerase chain reaction assay. Microbial samples were taken from 50 cases with necrotic pulp tissues in primary infections. DNA was extracted from the samples, which were analyzed for the presence of three endodontic pathogens by using species-specific primers. P gingivalis, T denticola, and T forsythia were detected in 46%, 38%, and 22% of the symptomatic cases, respectively. The bacterial complex composed by T forsythia, P gingivalis, and T denticola was found in 14% of the cases with spontaneous pain, tenderness to percussion, swelling, and pain on palpation. The high prevalence of P gingivalis, T denticola, and T forsythia in the samples examined suggests that these bacteria are related to the etiology of symptomatic periradicular diseases.

  14. Gingipain-dependent interactions with the host are important for survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Shaun M.; Robles-Price, Antonette G.; McKenzie, Rachelle M. E.; Casiano, Carlos A.; Fletcher, Hansel M.

    2012-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major periodontal pathogen, must acquire nutrients from host derived substrates, overcome oxidative stress and subvert the immune system. These activities can be coordinated via the gingipains which represent the most significant virulence factor produced by this organism. In the context of our contribution to this field, we will review the current understanding of gingipain biogenesis, glycosylation, and regulation, as well as discuss their role in oxidative stress resistance and apoptosis. We can postulate a model, in which gingipains may be part of the mechanism for P. gingivalis virulence. PMID:18508429

  15. Lactobacillus rhamnosus could inhibit Porphyromonas gingivalis derived CXCL8 attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Mendi, Ayşegül; Köse, Sevil; Uçkan, Duygu; Akca, Gülçin; Yilmaz, Derviş; Aral, Levent; Gültekin, Sibel Elif; Eroğlu, Tamer; Kiliç, Emine; Uçkan, Sina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An increasing body of evidence suggests that the use of probiotic bacteria is a promising intervention approach for the treatment of inflammatory diseases with a polymicrobial etiology. P. gingivalis has been noted to have a different way of interacting with the innate immune response of the host compared to other pathogenic bacteria, which is a recognized feature that inhibits CXCL8 expression. Objective The aim of the study was to determine if P. gingivalis infection modulates the inflammatory response of gingival stromal stem cells (G-MSSCs), including the release of CXCL8, and the expression of TLRs and if immunomodulatory L. rhamnosus ATCC9595 could prevent CXCL8 inhibition in experimental inflammation. Material and Methods G-MSSCs were pretreated with L. rhamnosus ATCC9595 and then stimulated with P. gingivalis ATCC33277. CXCL8 and IL-10 levels were investigated with ELISA and the TLR-4 and 2 were determined through flow cytometer analysis. Results CXCL8 was suppressed by P. gingivalis and L. rhamnosus ATCC9595, whereas incubation with both strains did not abolish CXCL8. L. rhamnosus ATCC9595 scaled down the expression of TLR4 and induced TLR2 expression when exposed to P. gingivalis stimulation (p<0.01). Conclusions These findings provide evidence that L. rhamnosus ATCC9595 can modulate the inflammatory signals and could introduce P. gingivalis to immune systems by inducing CXCL8 secretion. PMID:27008259

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Low-Passage Clinical Isolate Porphyromonas gingivalis MP4-504.

    PubMed

    To, Thao T; Liu, Quanhui; Watling, Michael; Bumgarner, Roger E; Darveau, Richard P; McLean, Jeffrey S

    2016-04-07

    We present the draft genome ofPorphyromonas gingivalisMP4-504, a low-passage clinical isolate obtained from a periodontitis patient. The genome is composed of 92 contigs for a length of 2,373,453 bp and a G+C of 48.3%. ThetraA-Qconjugative transfer locus is genetically distinct from W83 but highly similar to ATCC 33277.

  17. Evidence that Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis fimbriae function in adhesion to Actinomyces viscosus.

    PubMed Central

    Goulbourne, P A; Ellen, R P

    1991-01-01

    Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis adheres to gram-positive bacteria, such as Actinomyces viscosus, when colonizing the tooth surface. However, little is known of the adhesins responsible for this interaction. A series of experiments were performed to determine whether P. gingivalis fimbriae function in its coadhesion with A. viscosus. Fimbriae typical of P. gingivalis were isolated from strain 2561 (ATCC 33277) by the method of Yoshimura et al. (F. Yoshimura, K. Takahashi, Y. Nodasaka, and T. Suzuki, J. Bacteriol. 160:949-957, 1984) in fractions enriched with a 40-kDa subunit, the fimbrillin monomer, P. gingivalis-A. viscosus coaggregation was inhibited by purified rabbit antifimbrial immunoglobulin G (IgG) at dilutions eightfold higher than those of preimmune IgG, providing indirect evidence implicating P. gingivalis fimbriae in coadhesion. Three types of direct binding assays further supported this observation. (i) Mixtures of isolated P. gingivalis fimbriae and A. viscosus WVU627 cells were incubated for 1 h, washed vigorously with phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.2), and subjected to electrophoresis. Transblots onto nitrocellulose were probed with antifimbrial antiserum. Fimbrillin labeled positively on these blots. No reaction occurred with the control protein, porcine serum albumin, when blots were exposed to anti-porcine serum albumin, (ii) A. viscosus cells incubated with P. gingivalis fimbriae were agglutinated only after the addition of antifimbrial antibodies. (iii) Binding curves generated from an enzyme immunoassay demonstrated concentration-dependent binding of P. gingivalis fimbriae to A. viscosus cells. From these lines of evidence, P. gingivalis fimbriae appear to be capable of binding to A. viscosus and mediating the coadhesion of these species. Images PMID:1679428

  18. Phagocytosis of virulent Porphyromonas gingivalis by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes requires specific immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, C W; Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1991-01-01

    No studies to date clearly define the interactions between Porphyromonas gingivalis and human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), nor has a protective role for antibody to P. gingivalis been defined. Using a fluorochrome phagocytosis microassay, we investigated PMN phagocytosis and killing of P. gingivalis as a function of P. gingivalis-specific antibody. Sera from a nonimmune rabbit and a healthy human subject were not opsonic for virulent P. gingivalis A7436, W83, and HG405; phagocytosis of these strains (but not 33277) required opsonization with hyperimmune antiserum (RaPg). Diluting RaPg with a constant complement source decreased proportionally the number of P. gingivalis A7436 cells phagocytosed per phagocytic PMN. Enriching for the immunoglobulin G fraction of RAPg A7436 enriched for opsonic activity toward A7436. An opsonic evaluation of 18 serum samples from adult periodontitis patients revealed that only 3 adult periodontitis sera of 17 with elevated immunoglobulin G to P. gingivalis A7436 were opsonic for A7436 and, moreover, that the serum sample with the highest enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titer was most opsonic (patient 1). However, the opsonic activity of serum from patient 1 was qualitatively and not just quantitatively different from that of the nonopsonic human sera (but was less effective opsonin than RaPg). Strain variability was observed in resistance of P. gingivalis to phagocytosis, and opsonization was strain specific for some, but not all, strains tested. An evaluation of killing of A7436 revealed that serum killing and extracellular killing of P. gingivalis were less effective alone when compared with intracellular PMN killing alone. PMID:2037370

  19. The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis sensitises human blood platelets to epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Nylander, M; Lindahl, T L; Bengtsson, T; Grenegård, M

    2008-08-01

    Recent studies indicate connections between periodontitis and atherothrombosis, and the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has been found within atherosclerotic lesions. P. gingivalis-derived proteases, designated gingipains activate human platelets, probably through a "thrombin-like" activity on protease-activated receptors (PARs). However, the potential interplay between P. gingivalis and other physiological platelet activators has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to elucidate consequences and mechanisms in the interaction between P. gingivalis and the stress hormone epinephrine. By measuring changes in light transmission through platelet suspensions, we found that P. gingivalis provoked aggregation, whereas epinephrine alone never had any effect. Intriguingly, pre-treatment of platelets with a low, sub-threshold number of P. gingivalis (i.e. a density that did not directly provoke platelet aggregation) resulted in a marked aggregation response when epinephrine was added. This synergistic action was not inhibited by the cyclooxygenas inhibitor aspirin. Furthermore, fura-2-measurements revealed that epinephrine caused an intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in P. gingivalis pre-treated platelets, whereas epinephrine alone had no effect. Inhibition of the arg-specific gingipains, but not the lys-specific gingipains, abolished the aggregation and the Ca(2+) response provoked by epinephrine. Similar results were achieved by separate blockage of platelet alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors and PARs. In conclusion, the present study shows that a sub-threshold number of P. gingivalis sensitizes platelets to epinephrine. We suggest that P. gingivalis-derived arg-specific gingipains activates a small number of PARs on the surface of the platelets. This leads to an unexpected Ca(2+) mobilization and a marked aggregation response when epinephrine subsequently binds to the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor. The present results are consistent with a direct

  20. Macrophage depletion abates Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced alveolar bone resorption in mice.

    PubMed

    Lam, Roselind S; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Lenzo, Jason C; Holden, James A; Brammar, Gail C; Walsh, Katrina A; McNaughtan, Judith E; Rowler, Dennis K; Van Rooijen, Nico; Reynolds, Eric C

    2014-09-01

    The role of the macrophage in the immunopathology of periodontitis has not been well defined. In this study, we show that intraoral inoculation of mice with Porphyromonas gingivalis resulted in infection, alveolar bone resorption, and a significant increase in F4/80(+) macrophages in gingival and submandibular lymph node tissues. Macrophage depletion using clodronate-liposomes resulted in a significant reduction in F4/80(+) macrophage infiltration of gingival and submandibular lymph node tissues and significantly (p < 0.01) less P. gingivalis-induced bone resorption compared with controls in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. In both mouse strains, the P. gingivalis-specific IgG Ab subclass and serum cytokine [IL-4, IL-10, IFN-γ, and IL-12 (p70)] responses were significantly (p < 0.01) lower in the macrophage-depleted groups. Macrophage depletion resulted in a significant reduction in the level of P. gingivalis infection, and the level of P. gingivalis infection was significantly correlated with the level of alveolar bone resorption. M1 macrophages (CD86(+)), rather than M2 macrophages (CD206(+)), were the dominant macrophage phenotype of the gingival infiltrate in response to P. gingivalis infection. P. gingivalis induced a significant (p < 0.01) increase in NO production and a small increase in urea concentration, as well as a significant increase in the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 (p70), eotaxin, G-CSF, GM-CSF, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-α and -β, and TNF-α in isolated murine macrophages. In conclusion, P. gingivalis infection induced infiltration of functional/inflammatory M1 macrophages into gingival tissue and alveolar bone resorption. Macrophage depletion reduced P. gingivalis infection and alveolar bone resorption by modulating the host immune response.

  1. Attenuation of Porphyromonas gingivalis oral infection by α-amylase and pentamidine.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Miao, Yu-Song; Fu, Yun; Li, Xi-Ting; Yu, Shao-Jie

    2015-08-01

    The Porphyromonas gingivalis bacterium is one of the most influential pathogens in oral infections. In the current study, the antimicrobial activity of α-amylase and pentamidine against Porphyromonas gingivalis was evaluated. Their in vitro inhibitory activity was investigated with the agar overlay technique, and the minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations were determined. Using the bactericidal concentration, the antimicrobial actions of the inhibitors were investigated. In the present study, multiple techniques were utilized, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), general structural analysis and differential gene expression analysis. The results obtained from SEM and bactericidal analysis indicated a notable observation; the pentamidine and α-amylase treatment destroyed the structure of the bacterial cell membranes, which led to cell death. These results were used to further explore these inhibitors and the mechanisms by which they act. Downregulated expression levels were observed for a number of genes coding for hemagglutinins and gingipains, and various genes involved in hemin uptake, chromosome replication and energy production. However, the expression levels of genes associated with iron storage and oxidative stress were upregulated by α-amylase and pentamidine. A greater effect was noted in response to pentamidine treatment. The results of the present study demonstrate promising therapeutic potential for α-amylases and pentamidine. These molecules have the potential to be used to develop novel drugs and broaden the availability of pharmacological tools for the attenuation of oral infections caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

  2. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Various Essential Oils at Varying Concentrations against Periopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Deswal, Himanshu; Agarwal, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.gingivalis) is a notorious perio-pathogen with the ability to evade host defense mechanism and invade into the periodontal tissues. Many antimicrobial agents have been tested that curb its growth, although these agents tend to produce side effects such as antibiotic resistance and opportunistic infections. Therefore search for naturally occurring anti-microbials with lesser side effects is the need of the hour. Aim The aim of this study was to substantiate the antimicrobial activity of various essential oils; eucalyptus oil, chamomile oil, tea tree oil and turmeric oil against P. gingivalis. Materials and Methods Pure cultures of P. gingivalis were grown on selective blood agar. Antimicrobial efficacy of various concentrations of essential oils (0%, 25%, 50% and 100%) was assessed via disc diffusion test. Zone of inhibition were measured around disc after 48 hours in millimeters. Results Zones of inhibition were directly proportional to the concentration of essential oils tested. At 100% concentration all the tested oils possess antimicrobial activity against P.gingivalis with eucalyptus oil being most effective followed by tea tree oil, chamomile oil and turmeric oil. Conclusion All essential oils tested were effective against P.gingivalis. After testing for their clinical safety they could be developed into local agents to prevent and treat periodontitis. PMID:27790572

  3. Intercellular spreading of Porphyromonas gingivalis infection in primary gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Verbeke, Philippe; Lamont, Richard J; Ojcius, David M

    2006-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important periodontal pathogen, is an effective colonizer of oral tissues. The organism successfully invades, multiplies in, and survives for extended periods in primary gingival epithelial cells (GECs). It is unknown whether P. gingivalis resides in the cytoplasm of infected cells throughout the infection or can spread to adjacent cells over time. We developed a technique based on flow cytofluorometry and fluorescence microscopy to study propagation of the organism at different stages of infection of GECs. Results showed that P. gingivalis spreads cell to cell and that the amount of spreading increases gradually over time. There was a very low level of propagation of bacteria to uninfected cells early in the infection (3 h postinfection), but there were 20-fold and 45-fold increases in the propagation rate after 24 h and 48 h, respectively, of infection. Immunofluorescence microscopy of infected cells suggested that intercellular translocation of P. gingivalis may be mediated through actin-based membrane protrusions, bypassing the need for release of bacteria into extracellular medium. Consistent with these observations, cytochalasin D treatment of infected cells resulted in significant inhibition of bacterial spreading. This study shows for the first time that P. gingivalis disseminates from cell to cell without passing through the extracellular space. This mechanism of spreading may allow P. gingivalis to colonize oral tissues without exposure to the humoral immune response.

  4. Gingipains: critical factors in the development of aspiration pneumonia caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Benedyk, Małgorzata; Mydel, Piotr; Delaleu, Nicolas; Płaza, Karolina; Gawron, Katarzyna; Milewska, Aleksandra; Maresz, Katarzyna; Koziel, Joanna; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Potempa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aspiration pneumonia is a life-threatening infectious disease often caused by oral anaerobic and periodontal pathogens such as Porphyromonas gingivalis. This organism produces proteolytic enzymes, known as gingipains, which manipulate innate immune responses and promote chronic inflammation. Here, we challenged mice with P. gingivalis W83 and examined the role of gingipains in bronchopneumonia, lung abscess formation, and inflammatory responses. Although gingipains were not required for P. gingivalis colonization and survival in the lungs, they were essential for manifestation of clinical symptoms and infection-related mortality. Pathologies caused by wild-type (WT) P. gingivalis W83, including hemorrhage, necrosis, and neutrophil infiltration, were absent from lungs infected with gingipain-null isogenic strains or WT bacteria preincubated with gingipain-specific inhibitors. Damage to lung tissue correlated with systemic inflammatory responses, as manifested by elevated levels of TNF, IL-6, IL-17, and C-reactive protein. These effects were unequivocally dependent on gingipain activity. Gingipain activity was also implicated in the observed increase in IL-17 in lung tissues. Furthermore, gingipains increased platelet counts in the blood and activated platelets in the lungs. Arginine-specific gingipains made a greater contribution to P. gingivalis-related morbidity and mortality than lysine-specific gingipains. Thus, inhibiting gingipain may be a useful adjunct treatment for P. gingivalis-mediated aspiration pneumonia. PMID:26613585

  5. Gingipains: Critical Factors in the Development of Aspiration Pneumonia Caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Benedyk, Małgorzata; Mydel, Piotr Mateusz; Delaleu, Nicolas; Płaza, Karolina; Gawron, Katarzyna; Milewska, Aleksandra; Maresz, Katarzyna; Koziel, Joanna; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Potempa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aspiration pneumonia is a life-threatening infectious disease often caused by oral anaerobic and periodontal pathogens such as Porphyromonas gingivalis. This organism produces proteolytic enzymes, known as gingipains, which manipulate innate immune responses and promote chronic inflammation. Here, we challenged mice with P. gingivalis W83 and examined the role of gingipains in bronchopneumonia, lung abscess formation, and inflammatory responses. Although gingipains were not required for P. gingivalis colonization and survival in the lungs, they were essential for manifestation of clinical symptoms and infection-related mortality. Pathologies caused by wild-type (WT) P. gingivalis W83, including hemorrhage, necrosis, and neutrophil infiltration, were absent from lungs infected with gingipain-null isogenic strains or WT bacteria preincubated with gingipain-specific inhibitors. Damage to lung tissue correlated with systemic inflammatory responses, as manifested by elevated levels of TNF, IL-6, IL-17, and C-reactive protein. These effects were unequivocally dependent on gingipain activity. Gingipain activity was also implicated in the observed increase in IL-17 in lung tissues. Furthermore, gingipains increased platelet counts in the blood and activated platelets in the lungs. Arginine-specific gingipains made a greater contribution to P. gingivalis-related morbidity and mortality than lysine-specific gingipains. Thus, inhibition of gingipain may be a useful adjunct treatment for P. gingivalis-mediated aspiration pneumonia.

  6. Susceptibility of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans to Antibacterial Effect from Mammea americana

    PubMed Central

    Herrera Herrera, Alejandra; Franco Ospina, Luis; Fang, Luis; Díaz Caballero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The development of periodontal disease and dental caries is influenced by several factors, such as microorganisms of bacterial biofilm or commensal bacteria in the mouth. These microorganisms trigger inflammatory and immune responses in the host. Currently, medicinal plants are treatment options for these oral diseases. Mammea americana extracts have reported antimicrobial effects against several microorganisms. Nevertheless, this effect is unknown against oral bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of M. americana extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans. For this, an experimental study was conducted. Ethanolic extract was obtained from seeds of M. americana (one oil phase and one ethanolic phase). The strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were exposed to this extract to evaluate its antibacterial effect. Antibacterial activity was observed with the two phases of M. americana extract on P. gingivalis and S. mutans with lower MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration). Also, bactericidal and bacteriostatic activity was detected against S. mutans, depending on the concentration of the extract, while on M. americana extract presented only bacteriostatic activity against P. gingivalis. These findings provide important and promising information allowing for further exploration in the future. PMID:24864137

  7. Susceptibility of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans to Antibacterial Effect from Mammea americana.

    PubMed

    Herrera Herrera, Alejandra; Franco Ospina, Luis; Fang, Luis; Díaz Caballero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The development of periodontal disease and dental caries is influenced by several factors, such as microorganisms of bacterial biofilm or commensal bacteria in the mouth. These microorganisms trigger inflammatory and immune responses in the host. Currently, medicinal plants are treatment options for these oral diseases. Mammea americana extracts have reported antimicrobial effects against several microorganisms. Nevertheless, this effect is unknown against oral bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of M. americana extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans. For this, an experimental study was conducted. Ethanolic extract was obtained from seeds of M. americana (one oil phase and one ethanolic phase). The strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were exposed to this extract to evaluate its antibacterial effect. Antibacterial activity was observed with the two phases of M. americana extract on P. gingivalis and S. mutans with lower MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration). Also, bactericidal and bacteriostatic activity was detected against S. mutans, depending on the concentration of the extract, while on M. americana extract presented only bacteriostatic activity against P. gingivalis. These findings provide important and promising information allowing for further exploration in the future.

  8. Monitoring of dnaK gene expression in Porphyromonas gingivalis by oxygen stress using DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Araki, Makoto; Hiratsuka, Koichi; Kiyama-Kishikawa, Michiko; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2004-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobe associated with adult periodontitis, expresses numerous potential virulence factors. dnaK, a member of the heat shock protein family, functions as a molecular chaperone and plays a role in microbial pathogenicity. However, little is known regarding its gene expression caused by oxygen stress in P. gingivalis. In the present study, a custom-made DNA microarray was designed and used to monitor dnaK gene expression in P. gingivalis caused by oxygen stress. The results demonstrated that dnaK mRNA was up-regulated in a short time, and the DNA microarray results were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. These findings suggest that oxygen stress stimulates gene expression of dnaK and may have a relationship to the aerotolerance activity of this organism as well as its expression of pathogenesis.

  9. Porphyromonas gingivalis-mediated signaling through TLR4 mediates persistent HIV infection of primary macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Agosto, Luis M.; Hirnet, Juliane B.; Michaels, Daniel H.; Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yazdani B.; Gibson, Frank C.; Viglianti, Gregory; Henderson, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal infections contribute to HIV-associated co-morbidities in the oral cavity and provide a model to interrogate the dysregulation of macrophage function, inflammatory disease progression, and HIV replication during co-infections. We investigated the effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis on the establishment of HIV infection in monocyte-derived macrophages. HIV replication in macrophages was significantly repressed in the presence of P. gingivalis. This diminished viral replication was due partly to a decrease in the expression of integrated HIV provirus. HIV repression depended upon signaling through TLR4 as knock-down of TLR4 with siRNA rescued HIV expression. Importantly, HIV expression was reactivated upon removal of P. gingivalis. Our observations suggest that exposure of macrophages to Gram-negative bacteria influence the establishment and maintenance of HIV persistence in macrophages through a TLR4-dependent mechanism. PMID:27639573

  10. Antibody responses to Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Mikuls, Ted R.; Payne, Jeffrey B.; Reinhardt, Richard A.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Maziarz, Eileen; Cannella, Amy C.; Holers, V. Michael; Kuhn, Kristine A.; O'Dell, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Antibody titers to P. gingivalis are increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and are associated with disease-specific autoimmunity. Background Periodontitis (PD) has been implicated as a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We sought to characterize antibody titers to P. gingivalis (a pathogen in PD) in subjects with RA, PD, and in healthy controls and to examine their relationship with disease autoantibodies. Methods P. gingivalis antibody was measured in subjects with RA (n = 78), PD (n = 39), and in controls (n = 40). Group frequencies of bacterial titer elevations were compared using the Chi-square test and antibody titers were compared using non-parametric tests. Correlations of P. gingivalis titer with C-reactive protein (CRP), antibody to cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP), and rheumatoid factor (RF) were examined in those with RA while CRP and autoantibody concentrations were compared based on seropositivity to P. gingivalis. Results Antibody titers to P. gingivalis were highest in PD, lowest in controls, and intermediate in RA (p = 0.0003). Elevations in P. gingivalis (titer ≥ 800) were more common in RA and PD (67% and 77%, respectively) than in controls (40%) (p = 0.002). In RA, there were significant correlations with P. gingivalis titer with CRP, anti-CCP-IgM, and -IgG-2. CRP (p = 0.006), anti-CCP-IgM (p = 0.01) and -IgG2 (p = 0.04) concentrations were higher in RA cases with P. gingivalis titers ≥ 800 compared to cases with titers < 800. Conclusion Antibodies to P. gingivalis are more common in RA subjects than controls, although lower than that in PD. Associations of P. gingivalis titers with RA-related autoantibody and CRP concentrations suggests that infection with this organism plays a role in disease risk and progression in RA. PMID:18848647

  11. Gingipain-dependent augmentation by Porphyromonas gingivalis of phagocytosis of Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y-J; Jun, H-K; Choi, B-K

    2016-12-01

    In the pathogenesis of periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis plays a role as a keystone pathogen that manipulates host immune responses leading to dysbiotic oral microbial communities. Arg-gingipains (RgpA and RgpB) and Lys-gingipain (Kgp) are responsible for the majority of bacterial proteolytic activity and play essential roles in bacterial virulence. Therefore, gingipains are often considered as therapeutic targets. This study investigated the role of gingipains in the modulation by P. gingivalis of phagocytosis of Tannerella forsythia by macrophages. Phagocytosis of T. forsythia was significantly enhanced by coinfection with P. gingivalis in a multiplicity of infection-dependent and gingipain-dependent manner. Mutation of either Kgp or Rgp in the coinfecting P. gingivalis resulted in attenuated enhancement of T. forsythia phagocytosis. Inhibition of coaggregation between the two bacterial species reduced phagocytosis of T. forsythia in mixed infection, and this coaggregation was dependent on gingipains. Inhibition of gingipain protease activities in coinfecting P. gingivalis abated the coaggregation and the enhancement of T. forsythia phagocytosis. However, the direct effect of protease activities of gingipains on T. forsythia seemed to be minimal. Although most of the phagocytosed T. forsythia were cleared in infected macrophages, more T. forsythia remained in cells coinfected with gingipain-expressing P. gingivalis than in cells coinfected with the gingipain-null mutant or infected only with T. forsythia at 24 and 48 h post-infection. Collectively, these results suggest that P. gingivalis, mainly via its gingipains, alters the clearance of T. forsythia, and provide some insights into the role of P. gingivalis as a keystone pathogen.

  12. A 55-kilodalton immunodominant antigen of Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 has arisen via horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Hanley, S A; Aduse-Opoku, J; Curtis, M A

    1999-03-01

    A 55-kDa outer membrane protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 is a significant target of the serum immunoglobulin G antibody response of periodontal disease patients and hence may play an important role in host-bacterium interactions in periodontal disease. The gene encoding the 55-kDa antigen (ragB, for receptor antigen B) was isolated on a 9.5-kb partial Sau3AI fragment of P. gingivalis W50 chromosomal DNA in pUC18 by immunoscreening with a monoclonal antibody to this antigen. The 1.6-kb open reading frame (ORF) encoding RagB was located via subcloning and nested-deletion analysis. Sequence analysis demonstrated the presence of an upstream 3.1-kb ORF (ragA) which is cotranscribed with ragB. A number of genetic characteristics suggest that the ragAB locus was acquired by a horizontal gene transfer event. These include a significantly reduced G+C content relative to that of the P. gingivalis chromosome (42 versus 48%) and the presence of mobility elements flanking this locus in P. gingivalis W50. Furthermore, Southern blotting and PCR analyses showed a restricted distribution of this locus in laboratory and clinical isolates of this bacterium. The association of ragAB+ P. gingivalis with clinical status was examined by PCR analysis of subgingival samples. ragAB+ was not detected in P. gingivalis-positive shallow pockets from periodontal disease patients but was present in 36% of the P. gingivalis-positive samples from deep pockets. These data suggest that the ragAB locus was acquired by certain P. gingivalis strains via horizontal gene transfer and that the acquisition of this locus may facilitate the survival of these strains at sites of periodontal destruction.

  13. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens in endodontic lesions detected by culture and by PCR.

    PubMed

    Gomes, B P F A; Jacinto, R C; Pinheiro, E T; Sousa, E L R; Zaia, A A; Ferraz, C C R; Souza-Filho, F J

    2005-08-01

    he aim of this study was to investigate the presence of four black-pigmented bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens, in endodontic infections by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. Microbial samples were obtained from 50 teeth with untreated necrotic pulps (primary infection) and from 50 teeth with failing endodontic treatment (secondary infection). Microbiological strict anaerobic techniques were used for serial dilution, plating, incubation, and identification. For PCR detection, the samples were analyzed using species-specific primers of 16S rDNA and the downstream intergenic spacer region. Culture and PCR detected the test species in 13/100 and 50/100 of the study teeth, respectively. The organisms were cultured from 11/50 (22%) of primarily infected root canal samples and from 2/50 (4%) of secondary root canal samples. PCR detection identified the target species in 32/50 (64%) and 18/50 (36%) of primary and secondary infections, respectively. P. gingivalis was rarely isolated by culture methods (1%), but was the most frequently identified test species by PCR (38%). Similarly, P. endodontalis was not recovered by culture from any tooth studied, but was detected by PCR in 25% of the sampled teeth. PCR-based identification also showed higher detection rates of P. intermedia (33%) and P. nigrescens (22%) than culture (13%). In conclusion, P. gingivalis, P. endodontalis, P. intermedia, and P. nigrescens were identified more frequently in teeth with necrotic pulp than in teeth with failing endodontic treatment. Also, a higher frequency of black-pigmented species was detected by PCR than by culture.

  14. Role of vimA in cell surface biogenesis in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Osbourne, Devon O.; Aruni, Wilson; Roy, Francis; Perry, Christopher; Sandberg, Lawrence; Muthiah, Arun; Fletcher, Hansel M.

    2010-01-01

    The Porphyromonas gingivalis vimA gene has been previously shown to play a significant role in the biogenesis of gingipains. Further, in P. gingivalis FLL92, a vimA-defective mutant, there was increased auto-aggregation, suggesting alteration in membrane surface proteins. In order to determine the role of the VimA protein in cell surface biogenesis, the surface morphology of P. gingivalis FLL92 was further characterized. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated abundant fimbrial appendages and a less well defined and irregular capsule in FLL92 compared with the wild-type. In addition, atomic force microscopy showed that the wild-type had a smoother surface compared with FLL92. Western blot analysis using anti-FimA antibodies showed a 41 kDa immunoreactive protein band in P. gingivalis FLL92 which was missing in the wild-type P. gingivalis W83 strain. There was increased sensitivity to globomycin and vancomycin in FLL92 compared with the wild-type. Outer membrane fractions from FLL92 had a modified lectin-binding profile. Furthermore, in contrast with the wild-type strain, nine proteins were missing from the outer membrane fraction of FLL92, while 20 proteins present in that fraction from FLL92 were missing in the wild-type strain. Taken together, these results suggest that the VimA protein affects capsular synthesis and fimbrial phenotypic expression, and plays a role in the glycosylation and anchorage of several surface proteins. PMID:20378652

  15. Evaluation of efficacy of probiotic (BIFILAC) on Porphyromonas gingivalis: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Suthanthiran, Thangakumaran; Thangavelu, Arthiie; Kanagaraj, Shiva Shangkharii; Mohandas, Lakshmi; Sekar, Santhosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periodontitis is inflammation of the periodontium and causes destruction of the connective tissue attachment of the teeth and alveolar bone. Porphyromonas gingivalis is the primary pathogen for the destructive periodontal diseases. The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of probiotic on P. gingivalis. Materials and Methods: An in vitro study was done to analyze the effectiveness of probiotic BIFILAC on P. gingivalis was determined using disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration for BIFILAC lozenges was also determined using microdilution method. Results: In disc diffusion method, the antibacterial activity of BIFILAC was analyzed using various concentrations such as 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μg/ml, of which 20 μg/ml was proved to have a maximum inhibitory zone of 22 mm. In microdilution method, concentration ranging from 7.25 to 100 μg/ml was used and 25 μg/ml was found to have the minimum inhibitory effect on P. gingivalis. Conclusion: The present in vitro study confirms that probiotic BIFILAC has an antimicrobial effect against P. gingivalis. Thus, proving that BIFILAC probiotic can be used as an adjunctive therapeutic modality in periodontitis. PMID:27829746

  16. Unprimed, M1 and M2 Macrophages Differentially Interact with Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Lenzo, Jason C.; Fong, Shao B.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis. Tissue macrophages are amongst the first immune cells to respond to bacteria and depending on the cytokine profile at the infection site, macrophages are primed to react to infection in different ways. Priming of naive macrophages with IFN-γ produces a classical pro-inflammatory, antibacterial M1 macrophage after TLR ligation, whereas priming with IL-4 induces an anti-inflammatory tissue-repair M2 phenotype. Previous work has shown that M1 are preferentially generated in gingival tissue following infection with P. gingivalis. However, few studies have investigated the interactions of macrophage subsets with P. gingivalis cells. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of naive, M1 and M2 macrophages to phagocytose P. gingivalis and investigate how this interaction affects both the bacterial cell and the macrophage. M1 and M2 macrophages were both found to have enhanced phagocytic capacity compared with that of naive macrophages, however only the naive and M1 macrophages were able to produce a respiratory burst in order to clear the bacteria from the phagosome. P. gingivalis was found to persist in naive and M2, but not M1 macrophages for 24 hours. Phagocytosis of P. gingivalis also induced high levels of TNF-α, IL-12 and iNOS in M1 macrophages, but not in naive or M2 macrophages. Furthermore, infection of macrophages with P. gingivalis at high bacteria to macrophage ratios, while inducing an inflammatory response, was also found to be deleterious to macrophage longevity, with high levels of apoptotic cell death found in macrophages after infection. The activation of M1 macrophages observed in this study may contribute to the initiation and maintenance of a pro-inflammatory state during chronic periodontitis. PMID:27383471

  17. Adhesion of Actinomyces viscosus to Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis-coated hexadecane droplets.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, M; Buivids, I A; Ellen, R P

    1991-01-01

    Interbacterial adhesion (coadhesion) is considered a major determinant of dental plaque ecology. In this report, we studied several aspects of the adhesion of Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis to hexadecane in order to use the liquid hydrocarbon as a convenient substratum for coadhesion assays. Washed suspensions of hydrophobic P. gingivalis 2561 cells were vortexed with hexadecane to yield highly stable cell-coated droplets. Kinetics of coadhesion between Actinomyces viscosus cells and P. gingivalis-coated hexadecane droplets (PCHD) was subsequently studied. Aliquots of PCHD were added to A. viscosus suspensions, and the mixtures were gently rotated. Avid adhesion of A. viscosus cells to the immobilized P. gingivalis layer could be readily measured by the decrease in turbidity in the aqueous phase, following phase separation. Despite the ability of A. viscosus cells to adsorb to hexadecane following vigorous mixing, gentle mixing did not appreciably promote adhesion to bare hexadecane. Moreover, extensive microscopic examinations revealed that A. viscosus cells adhered exclusively to the bound P. gingivalis cells rather than to exposed areas of hexadecane. Coadhesion of A. viscosus to the PCHD appeared to follow first-order kinetics, attaining 80% levels within 30 min. Electron micrographs revealed A. viscosus cells adhering to the P. gingivalis cell layer adsorbed at the hexadecane-water interface. Interestingly, P. gingivalis cells did not appear to penetrate the hexadecane. A viscosus mutants lacking type 1 or type 2 fimbriae or both were still able to bind to the PCHD. No obvious correlation was observed between relative hydrophobicity of A. viscosus strains and their binding to PCHD. However, defatted bovine serum albumin, an inhibitor of hydrophobic interactions, was the most potent inhibitor among those tested. The data suggest that this approach provides a simple, quantitative technique for studying kinetics of bacterial coadhesion which is amenable

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis: An Overview of Periodontopathic Pathogen below the Gum Line

    PubMed Central

    How, Kah Yan; Song, Keang Peng; Chan, Kok Gan

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease represents a group of oral inflammatory infections initiated by oral pathogens which exist as a complex biofilms on the tooth surface and cause destruction to tooth supporting tissues. The severity of this disease ranges from mild and reversible inflammation of the gingiva (gingivitis) to chronic destruction of connective tissues, the formation of periodontal pocket and ultimately result in loss of teeth. While human subgingival plaque harbors more than 500 bacterial species, considerable research has shown that Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, is the major etiologic agent which contributes to chronic periodontitis. This black-pigmented bacterium produces a myriad of virulence factors that cause destruction to periodontal tissues either directly or indirectly by modulating the host inflammatory response. Here, this review provides an overview of P. gingivalis and how its virulence factors contribute to the pathogenesis with other microbiome consortium in oral cavity. PMID:26903954

  19. Case of a cerebral abscess caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis in a subject with periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Grisar, Koenraad; Maes, Honorine; Politis, Constantinus

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 65-year-old man presenting with generalised seizures after developing a right frontal brain abscess. Stereotactic aspiration and subsequent matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight analyzer (MALDI-TOF) spectrometry revealed Porphyromonas gingivalis as the only causative anaerobe microorganism. Secondary incision and drainage was required due to neurological deterioration with increased dimensions of the abscess, intracranial pressure and formation of a subdural occipitoparietal empyema. Oral imaging was positive for apical periodontitis of multiple elements; therefore, the remaining dentition was removed. Targeted antibiotic treatment included intravenous ceftriaxone and ornidazole. The patient was discharged to our revalidation unit 59 days after admission to make a full recovery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case of P. gingivalis causing an intracranial abscess and the third case of a true intracerebral parenchymal abscess caused by this bacterium. PMID:28228396

  20. Porphyromonas gingivalis gingipain is involved in the detachment and aggregation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilm.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, A; Miura, M; Fujise, O; Hamachi, T; Nishimura, F

    2014-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are major periodontal pathogens that cause several types of periodontal disease. Our previous study suggested that P. gingivalis gingipains secreted in the subgingival environment are related to the detachment of A.actinomycetemcomitans biofilms. However, it remains unclear whether arginine-specific cysteine proteinase (Rgp) and lysine-specific proteinase (Kgp) play different roles in the detachment of A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm. The aim of this study was to investigate possible disruptive roles of Kgp and Rgp in the aggregation and attachment of A. actinomycetemcomitans. While P. gingivalis ATCC33277 culture supernatant has an ability to decrease autoaggregation and coaggregation of A. actinomycetemcomitans cells, neither the boiled culture supernatant of ATCC33277 nor the culture supernatant of KDP136 showed this ability. The addition of KYT-1 and KYT-36, specific inhibitors of Rgp and Kgp, respectively, showed no influence on the ability of P. gingivalis culture supernatant. The result of gelatin zymography suggested that other proteases processed by gingipains mediated the decrease of A. actinomycetemcomitans aggregations. We also examined the biofilm-destructive effect of gingipains by assessing the detachment of A. actinomycetemcomitans from polystyrene surfaces. Scanning electron microscope analysis indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans cells were detached by P. gingivalis Kgp. The quantity of A. actinomycetemcomitans in biofilm was decreased in co-culture with P. gingivalis. However, this was not found after the addition of KYT-36. These findings suggest that Kgp is a critical component for the detachment and decrease of A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms.

  1. The core genome of the anaerobic oral pathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Gram negative anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has long been recognized as a causative agent of periodontitis. Periodontitis is a chronic infectious disease of the tooth supporting tissues eventually leading to tooth-loss. Capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of P. gingivalis has been shown to be an important virulence determinant. Seven capsular serotypes have been described. Here, we used micro-array based comparative genomic hybridization analysis (CGH) to analyze a representative of each of the capsular serotypes and a non-encapsulated strain against the highly virulent and sequenced W83 strain. We defined absent calls using Arabidopsis thaliana negative control probes, with the aim to distinguish between aberrations due to mutations and gene gain/loss. Results Our analyses allowed us to call aberrant genes, absent genes and divergent regions in each of the test strains. A conserved core P. gingivalis genome was described, which consists of 80% of the analyzed genes from the sequenced W83 strain. The percentage of aberrant genes between the test strains and control strain W83 was 8.2% to 13.7%. Among the aberrant genes many CPS biosynthesis genes were found. Most other virulence related genes could be found in the conserved core genome. Comparing highly virulent strains with less virulent strains indicates that hmuS, a putative CobN/Mg chelatase involved in heme uptake, may be a more relevant virulence determinant than previously expected. Furthermore, the description of the 39 W83-specific genes could give more insight in why this strain is more virulent than others. Conclusion Analyses of the genetic content of the P. gingivalis capsular serotypes allowed the description of a P. gingivalis core genome. The high resolution data from three types of analysis of triplicate hybridization experiments may explain the higher divergence between P. gingivalis strains than previously recognized. PMID:20920246

  2. Porphyromonas gingivalis Uses Specific Domain Rearrangements and Allelic Exchange to Generate Diversity in Surface Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dashper, Stuart G.; Mitchell, Helen L.; Seers, Christine A.; Gladman, Simon L.; Seemann, Torsten; Bulach, Dieter M.; Chandry, P. Scott; Cross, Keith J.; Cleal, Steven M.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2017-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen of chronic periodontitis. The virulence of P. gingivalis is reported to be strain related and there are currently a number of strain typing schemes based on variation in capsular polysaccharide, the major and minor fimbriae and adhesin domains of Lys-gingipain (Kgp), amongst other surface proteins. P. gingivalis can exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic variability of P. gingivalis strains sourced from international locations over a 25-year period and to determine if variability in surface virulence factors has a phylogenetic basis. Whole genome sequencing was performed on 13 strains and comparison made to 10 previously sequenced strains. A single nucleotide polymorphism-based phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a shallow tri-lobed phylogeny. There was a high level of reticulation in the phylogenetic network, demonstrating extensive horizontal gene transfer between the strains. Two highly conserved variants of the catalytic domain of the major virulence factor the Kgp proteinase (KgpcatI and KgpcatII) were found. There were three variants of the fourth Kgp C-terminal cleaved adhesin domain. Specific variants of the cell surface proteins FimA, FimCDE, MfaI, RagAB, Tpr, and PrtT were also identified. The occurrence of all these variants in the P. gingivalis strains formed a mosaic that was not related to the SNP-based phylogeny. In conclusion P. gingivalis uses domain rearrangements and genetic exchange to generate diversity in specific surface virulence factors. PMID:28184216

  3. Porphyromonas gingivalis mediated periodontal disease and atherosclerosis: disparate diseases with commonalities in pathogenesis through TLRs.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline A

    2007-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a group of pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors, which play an important role in innate immune signaling in response to microbial infection. It has been demonstrated that TLRs are differentially up regulated in response to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Furthermore hyperlipidemic mice deficient in TLR2, TLR4, and MyD88 signaling exhibit diminished inflammatory responses and decreased atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence has implicated specific infectious agents including the periodontal disease pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis in the progression of atherosclerosis. Evidence in humans suggesting that periodontal infection predisposes to atherosclerosis is derived from studies demonstrating that the periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis resides in the wall of atherosclerotic vessels and seroepidemiological studies demonstrating an association between pathogen-specific IgG antibodies and atherosclerosis. We have established that the inflammatory signaling pathways that P. gingivalis utilizes is dependent on the cell type and this specificity clearly influences innate immune signaling in the context of local and distant chronic inflammation induced by this pathogen. We have demonstrated that P. gingivalis requires TLR2 to induce oral inflammatory bone lose in mice. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that P. gingivalis infection accelerates atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice with an associated increase in expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in atherosclerotic lesions. Our recent work with P. gingivalis has demonstrated the effectiveness of specific intervention strategies (immunization) in the prevention of pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis. Improved understanding of the mechanisms driving infection, and chronic inflammation during atherosclerosis may ultimately provide new targets for therapy.

  4. Inhibitory effects of lactoferrin on growth and biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Koji; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2009-08-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is an iron-binding antimicrobial protein present in saliva and gingival crevicular fluids, and it is possibly associated with host defense against oral pathogens, including periodontopathic bacteria. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro effects of LF-related agents on the growth and biofilm formation of two periodontopathic bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, which reside as biofilms in the subgingival plaque. The planktonic growth of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia was suppressed for up to 5 h by incubation with >or=130 microg/ml of human LF (hLF), iron-free and iron-saturated bovine LF (apo-bLF and holo-bLF, respectively), and >or=6 microg/ml of bLF-derived antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin B (LFcin B); but those effects were weak after 8 h. The biofilm formation of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia over 24 h was effectively inhibited by lower concentrations (>or=8 microg/ml) of various iron-bound forms (the apo, native, and holo forms) of bLF and hLF but not LFcin B. A preformed biofilm of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia was also reduced by incubation with various iron-bound bLFs, hLF, and LFcin B for 5 h. In an examination of the effectiveness of native bLF when it was used in combination with four antibiotics, it was found that treatment with ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, and minocycline in combination with native bLF for 24 h reduced the amount of a preformed biofilm of P. gingivalis compared with the level of reduction achieved with each agent alone. These results demonstrate the antibiofilm activity of LF with lower iron dependency against P. gingivalis and P. intermedia and the potential usefulness of LF for the prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases and as adjunct therapy for periodontal diseases.

  5. A Porphyromonas gingivalis haloacid dehalogenase family phosphatase interacts with human phosphoproteins and is important for invasion.

    PubMed

    Tribble, Gena D; Mao, Song; James, Chloe E; Lamont, Richard J

    2006-07-18

    Haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) family phosphatases are widespread in prokaryotes and are generally involved in metabolic processes. Porphyromonas gingivalis, an invasive periodontal pathogen, secretes the HAD family phosphoserine phosphatase SerB653 when in contact with gingival epithelial cells. Here we characterize the structure and enzymatic activity of SerB653 and show that a SerB653 allelic replacement mutant of P. gingivalis is deficient in internalization and persistence in gingival epithelial cells. In contrast, mutation of a second HAD family serine phosphatase of P. gingivalis (SerB1170), or of a serine transporter, did not affect invasion. A pull-down assay identified GAPDH and heat-shock protein 90 as potential substrates for SerB653. Furthermore, exogenous phosphatase regulated microtubule dynamics in host cells. These data indicate that P. gingivalis has adapted a formerly metabolic enzyme to facilitate entry into host cells by modulating host cytoskeletal architecture. Our findings define a virulence-related role of a HAD family phosphatase and reveal an invasin of an important periodontal pathogen.

  6. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus intermedius in chronic periodontitis patients by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    De La Garza-Ramos, Myriam A; Galán-Wong, Luis J; Caffesse, Raúl G; González-Salazar, Francisco; Pereyra-Alférez, Benito

    2008-01-01

    A Multiplex PCR assay for the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus intermedius in chronic periodontitis is presented. A total of 180 samples from 65 adults with untreated periodontitis and 17 healthy volunteers were taken and processed in a simple boiling step. Cell lysates were used as DNA source for multiplex PCR assays. Primers were designed from 16S rRNA gene sequences from the GenBank-EMBL database showing specificity for target pathogens. This multiplex PCR system could detect 8.2 P gingivalis and S. intermedius cells. In untreated periodontitis patients, only 78.5% were positive for one or both bacteria; 37% were positive for P gingivalis only, 17% for S. intermedius and 24.5% for both. P. gingivalis was detected in 23.5% of healthy volunteers, while S. intermedius was not detected in the same patients. The distribution of these bacteria was related to the periodontal probing depth, while 95.23% of patients with pockets wih 6 to 7 mm deep were positive for either or both, only 70.45% of of them with 4 to 5 mm pockets were positive.

  7. Comparison of inherently essential genes of Porphyromonas gingivalis identified in two transposon-sequencing libraries.

    PubMed

    Hutcherson, J A; Gogeneni, H; Yoder-Himes, D; Hendrickson, E L; Hackett, M; Whiteley, M; Lamont, R J; Scott, D A

    2016-08-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobe and keystone periodontal pathogen. A mariner transposon insertion mutant library has recently been used to define 463 genes as putatively essential for the in vitro growth of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 in planktonic culture (Library 1). We have independently generated a transposon insertion mutant library (Library 2) for the same P. gingivalis strain and herein compare genes that are putatively essential for in vitro growth in complex media, as defined by both libraries. In all, 281 genes (61%) identified by Library 1 were common to Library 2. Many of these common genes are involved in fundamentally important metabolic pathways, notably pyrimidine cycling as well as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan, pantothenate and coenzyme A biosynthesis, and nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism. Also in common are genes encoding heat-shock protein homologues, sigma factors, enzymes with proteolytic activity, and the majority of sec-related protein export genes. In addition to facilitating a better understanding of critical physiological processes, transposon-sequencing technology has the potential to identify novel strategies for the control of P. gingivalis infections. Those genes defined as essential by two independently generated TnSeq mutant libraries are likely to represent particularly attractive therapeutic targets.

  8. In Situ Anabolic Activity of Periodontal Pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Filifactor alocis in Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Spooner, Ralee; Weigel, Kris M.; Harrison, Peter L.; Lee, KyuLim; Cangelosi, Gerard A.; Yilmaz, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Filifactor alocis are fastidious anaerobic bacteria strongly associated with chronic forms of periodontitis. Our understanding of the growth activities of these microorganisms in situ is very limited. Previous studies have shown that copy numbers of ribosomal-RNA precursor (pre-rRNA) of specific pathogen species relative to genomic-DNA (gDNA) of the same species (P:G ratios) are greater in actively growing bacterial cells than in resting cells. The method, so-called steady-state pre-rRNA-analysis, represents a novel culture-independent approach to study bacteria. This study employed this technique to examine the in situ growth activities of oral bacteria in periodontitis before and after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Sub-gingival paper-point samples were taken at initial and re-evaluation appointments. Pre-rRNA and gDNA levels of P. gingivalis and F. alocis were quantified and compared using reverse-transcriptase qPCR. The results indicate significantly reduced growth activity of P. gingivalis, but not F. alocis, after therapy. The P:G ratios of P. gingivalis and F. alocis were compared and a low-strength, but statistically significant inter-species correlation was detected. Our study demonstrates that steady-state pre-rRNA-analysis can be a valuable culture-independent approach to studying opportunistic bacteria in periodontitis. PMID:27642101

  9. Structures of the Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domain explain differences in expression of the OxyR regulon in Escherichia coli and P. gingivalis

    SciTech Connect

    Svintradze, David V.; Peterson, Darrell L.; Collazo-Santiago, Evys A.; Lewis, Janina P.; Wright, H. Tonie

    2013-10-01

    Differences in OxyR regulated expression of oxidative stress genes between Escherichia coli and Porphyromonas gingivalis are explained by very minor differences in structure and amino-acid sequence of the respective oxidized and reduced OxyR regulatory domains. These differences affect OxyR quaternary structures and are predicted from model building of full length OxyR–DNA complexes to confer distinct modes of DNA binding on this transcriptional regulator. OxyR transcriptionally regulates Escherichia coli oxidative stress response genes through a reversibly reducible cysteine disulfide biosensor of cellular redox status. Structural changes induced by redox changes in these cysteines are conformationally transmitted to the dimer subunit interfaces, which alters dimer and tetramer interactions with DNA. In contrast to E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain structures, crystal structures of Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domains show minimal differences in dimer configuration on changes in cysteine disulfide redox status. This locked configuration of the P. gingivalis OxyR regulatory-domain dimer closely resembles the oxidized (activating) form of the E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain dimer. It correlates with the observed constitutive activation of some oxidative stress genes in P. gingivalis and is attributable to a single amino-acid insertion in P. gingivalis OxyR relative to E. coli OxyR. Modelling of full-length P. gingivalis, E. coli and Neisseria meningitidis OxyR–DNA complexes predicts different modes of DNA binding for the reduced and oxidized forms of each.

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis suppresses adaptive immunity in periodontitis, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ingar; Taubman, Martin A; Singhrao, Sim K

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen in chronic periodontitis, has been found to associate with remote body organ inflammatory pathologies, including atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although P. gingivalis has a plethora of virulence factors, much of its pathogenicity is surprisingly related to the overall immunosuppression of the host. This review focuses on P. gingivalis aiding suppression of the host's adaptive immune system involving manipulation of cellular immunological responses, specifically T cells and B cells in periodontitis and related conditions. In periodontitis, this bacterium inhibits the synthesis of IL-2 and increases humoral responses. This reduces the inflammatory responses related to T- and B-cell activation, and subsequent IFN-γ secretion by a subset of T cells. The T cells further suppress upregulation of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1)-receptor on CD(+)cells and its ligand PD-L1 on CD11b(+)-subset of T cells. IL-2 downregulates genes regulated by immune response and induces a cytokine pattern in which the Th17 lineage is favored, thereby modulating the Th17/T-regulatory cell (Treg) imbalance. The suppression of IFN-γ-stimulated release of interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) chemokine ligands [ITAC (CXCL11) and Mig (CXCL9)] by P. gingivalis capsular serotypes triggers distinct T cell responses and contributes to local immune evasion by release of its outer membrane vesicles. In atherosclerosis, P. gingivalis reduces Tregs, transforms growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ-1), and causes imbalance in the Th17 lineage of the Treg population. In AD, P. gingivalis may affect the blood-brain barrier permeability and inhibit local IFN-γ response by preventing entry of immune cells into the brain. The scarcity of adaptive immune cells in AD neuropathology implies P. gingivalis infection of the brain likely causing impaired clearance of insoluble amyloid and inducing immunosuppression. By the effective manipulation of the armory of

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis suppresses adaptive immunity in periodontitis, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Taubman, Martin A.; Singhrao, Sim K.

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen in chronic periodontitis, has been found to associate with remote body organ inflammatory pathologies, including atherosclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although P. gingivalis has a plethora of virulence factors, much of its pathogenicity is surprisingly related to the overall immunosuppression of the host. This review focuses on P. gingivalis aiding suppression of the host’s adaptive immune system involving manipulation of cellular immunological responses, specifically T cells and B cells in periodontitis and related conditions. In periodontitis, this bacterium inhibits the synthesis of IL-2 and increases humoral responses. This reduces the inflammatory responses related to T- and B-cell activation, and subsequent IFN-γ secretion by a subset of T cells. The T cells further suppress upregulation of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1)-receptor on CD+cells and its ligand PD-L1 on CD11b+-subset of T cells. IL-2 downregulates genes regulated by immune response and induces a cytokine pattern in which the Th17 lineage is favored, thereby modulating the Th17/T-regulatory cell (Treg) imbalance. The suppression of IFN-γ-stimulated release of interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) chemokine ligands [ITAC (CXCL11) and Mig (CXCL9)] by P. gingivalis capsular serotypes triggers distinct T cell responses and contributes to local immune evasion by release of its outer membrane vesicles. In atherosclerosis, P. gingivalis reduces Tregs, transforms growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ-1), and causes imbalance in the Th17 lineage of the Treg population. In AD, P. gingivalis may affect the blood–brain barrier permeability and inhibit local IFN-γ response by preventing entry of immune cells into the brain. The scarcity of adaptive immune cells in AD neuropathology implies P. gingivalis infection of the brain likely causing impaired clearance of insoluble amyloid and inducing immunosuppression. By the effective manipulation of the armory of

  12. The effect of spiramycin on Porphyromonas gingivalis and other "classic" periopathogens.

    PubMed

    Chiappe, Verónica; Gómez, Mariel; Fernández-Canigia, Liliana; Romanelli, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    In clinical trials, Spiramycin has shown additional benefit overscaling and root planing on pocket depth reduction, but its effect on periodontal microbiota was evaluated only by darkfield microscopy. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effect of Spiramycin administration on Porphyromonas gingivalis and other periodontopathic bacteria using 16S rARN PCR technique. Thirty two non-smoker adults with untreated periodontitis and pocket depth > or = 7 mm. were evaluated to participate in this randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial. Clinical measurements were performed on day -15, 15, 30 and 90 from baseline. Subgingival samples were analyzed for detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (TJ), Treponema denticola (Td) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) on days -15, 30 and 90. On day 0, 25 Pg positive subjects were randomly assigned to receive either systemically administered Spiramycinfor 7 days (Test group SP) or identical placebo tablets (Placebo group PL). After Spiramycin administration Pg, Tf and Td were suppressed showingstatistically significant difference (p<0.05) with the Placebo group. None of the groups showed changes in Aa detection. These data indicate that bacteria currently associated with advanced periodontitis (Pg, Tf and Td) are suppressed after 7 days of systemic administration of Spiramycin.

  13. Peptidyl Arginine Deiminase from Porphyromonas gingivalis Abolishes Anaphylatoxin C5a Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Bielecka, Ewa; Scavenius, Carsten; Kantyka, Tomasz; Jusko, Monika; Mizgalska, Danuta; Szmigielski, Borys; Potempa, Barbara; Enghild, Jan J.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Blom, Anna M.; Potempa, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Evasion of killing by the complement system, a crucial part of innate immunity, is a key evolutionary strategy of many human pathogens. A major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, the Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, produces a vast arsenal of virulence factors that compromise human defense mechanisms. One of these is peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD), an enzyme unique to P. gingivalis among bacteria, which converts Arg residues in polypeptide chains into citrulline. Here, we report that PPAD citrullination of a critical C-terminal arginine of the anaphylatoxin C5a disabled the protein function. Treatment of C5a with PPAD in vitro resulted in decreased chemotaxis of human neutrophils and diminished calcium signaling in monocytic cell line U937 transfected with the C5a receptor (C5aR) and loaded with a fluorescent intracellular calcium probe: Fura-2 AM. Moreover, a low degree of citrullination of internal arginine residues by PPAD was also detected using mass spectrometry. Further, after treatment of C5 with outer membrane vesicles naturally shed by P. gingivalis, we observed generation of C5a totally citrullinated at the C-terminal Arg-74 residue (Arg74Cit). In stark contrast, only native C5a was detected after treatment with PPAD-null outer membrane vesicles. Our study suggests reduced antibacterial and proinflammatory capacity of citrullinated C5a, achieved via lower level of chemotactic potential of the modified molecule, and weaker cell activation. In the context of previous studies, which showed crosstalk between C5aR and Toll-like receptors, as well as enhanced arthritis development in mice infected with PPAD-expressing P. gingivalis, our findings support a crucial role of PPAD in the virulence of P. gingivalis. PMID:25324545

  14. Functional Analysis of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 CRISPR-Cas Systems

    PubMed Central

    Burmistrz, Michał; Dudek, Bartosz; Staniec, Dominika; Rodriguez Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Bochtler, Matthias; Potempa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated genes) system provides prokaryotic cells with an adaptive and heritable immune response to foreign genetic elements, such as viruses, plasmids, and transposons. It is present in the majority of Archaea and almost half of species of Bacteria. Porphyromonas gingivalis is an important human pathogen that has been proven to be an etiological agent of periodontitis and has been linked to systemic conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular disease. At least 95% of clinical strains of P. gingivalis carry CRISPR arrays, suggesting that these arrays play an important function in vivo. Here we show that all four CRISPR arrays present in the P. gingivalis W83 genome are transcribed. For one of the arrays, we demonstrate in vivo activity against double-stranded DNA constructs containing protospacer sequences accompanied at the 3′ end by an NGG protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM). Most of the 44 spacers present in the genome of P. gingivalis W83 share no significant similarity with any known sequences, although 4 spacers are similar to sequences from bacteria found in the oral cavity and the gastrointestinal tract. Four spacers match genomic sequences of the host; however, none of these is flanked at its 3′ terminus by the appropriate PAM element. IMPORTANCE The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated genes) system is a unique system that provides prokaryotic cells with an adaptive and heritable immunity. In this report, we show that the CRISPR-Cas system of P. gingivalis, an important human pathogen associated with periodontitis and possibly also other conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular disease, is active and provides protection from foreign genetic elements. Importantly, the data presented here may be useful for better understanding the communication between cells in larger bacterial

  15. Comparative gene expression analysis of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 in planktonic and biofilms states

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, MC.; Ribeiro-Vidal, H.; Llama-Palacios, A.; Figuero, E.; Herrera, D.; Sanz, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen in the onset and progression of periodontitis. Its pathogenicity has been related to its presence and survival within the subgingival biofilm. The aim of the present study was to compare the genome-wide transcription activities of P. gingivalis in biofilm and in planktonic growth, using microarray technology. Material and methods P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 was incubated in multi-well culture plates at 37°C for 96 hours under anaerobic conditions using an in vitro static model to develop both the planktonic and biofilm states (the latter over sterile ceramic calcium hydroxyapatite discs). The biofilm development was monitored by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). After incubation, the bacterial cells were harvested and total RNA was extracted and purified. Three biological replicates for each cell state were independently hybridized for transcriptomic comparisons. A linear model was used for determining differentially expressed genes and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to confirm differential expression. The filtering criteria of ≥ ±2 change in gene expression and significance p-values of <0.05 were selected. Results A total of 92 out of 1,909 genes (4.8%) were differentially expressed by P. gingivalis growing in biofilm compared to planktonic. The 54 up-regulated genes in biofilm growth were mainly related to cell envelope, transport, and binding or outer membranes proteins. Thirty-eight showed decreased expression, mainly genes related to transposases or oxidative stress. Conclusion The adaptive response of P. gingivalis in biofilm growth demonstrated a differential gene expression. PMID:28369099

  16. Divergence of the systemic immune response following oral infection with distinct strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Marchesan, J T; Morelli, T; Lundy, S K; Jiao, Y; Lim, S; Inohara, N; Nunez, G; Fox, D A; Giannobile, W V

    2012-12-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial oral infection characterized by the destruction of tooth-supporting structures that can be linked to systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacterium implicated in the etiology of periodontitis, has shown variation in inducing T-cell responses among different strains. Therefore, in this study we investigated the strain-specific immune response using a murine experimental model of periodontitis. Periodontitis was induced by P. gingivalis strains A7A1-28, W83 and W50, and later confirmed by the presence of P. gingivalis in the oral microflora and by alveolar bone resorption. Splenocytes were evaluated for gene expression, cellular proteins and cytokine expression. Dendritic cells were stimulated in vitro for T helper cell-cytokine profiling. Results showed that P. gingivalis had the ability to alter the systemic immune response after bacterial exposure. Strains W50 and W83 were shown to induce alveolar bone loss, whereas the A7A1-28 strain did not significantly promote bone resorption in mice. Splenocytes derived from mice infected with strains W50 and W83 induced expression of high levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4) but A7A1-28 stimulated increased IL-10. Stimulation of dendritic cells in vitro showed a similar pattern of cytokine expression of IL-12p40, IL-6 and transforming growth factor-β among strains. A distinct systemic response in vivo was observed among different strains of P. gingivalis, with IL-10 associated with the least amount of alveolar bone loss. Evaluation of pathogen-driven systemic immune responses associated with periodontal disease pathogenesis may assist in defining how periodontitis may impact other diseases.

  17. Porphyromonas gingivalis galE is involved in lipopolysaccharide O-antigen synthesis and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Ryoma; Senpuku, Hidenobu; Watanabe, Haruo

    2006-11-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a crucial component of complex plaque biofilms that form in the oral cavity, resulting in the progression of periodontal disease. To elucidate the mechanism of periodontal biofilm formation, we analyzed the involvement of several genes related to the synthesis of polysaccharides in P. gingivalis. Gene knockout P. gingivalis mutants were constructed by insertion of an ermF-ermAM cassette; among these mutants, the galE mutant showed some characteristic phenotypes involved in the loss of GalE activity. As expected, the galE mutant accumulated intracellular carbohydrates in the presence of 0.1% galactose and did not grow in the presence of galactose at a concentration greater than 1%, in contrast to the parental strain. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) analysis indicated that the length of the O-antigen chain of the galE mutant was shorter than that of the wild type. It was also demonstrated that biofilms generated by the galE mutant had an intensity 4.5-fold greater than those of the wild type. Further, the galE mutant was found to be significantly susceptible to some antibiotics in comparison with the wild type. In addition, complementation of the galE mutation led to a partial recovery of the parental phenotypes. We concluded that the galE gene plays a pivotal role in the modification of LPS O antigen and biofilm formation in P. gingivalis and considered that our findings of a relationship between the function of the P. gingivalis galE gene and virulence phenotypes such as biofilm formation may provide clues for understanding the mechanism of pathogenicity in periodontal disease.

  18. In Vitro Effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis Methionine Gamma Lyase on Biofilm Composition and Oral Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Abish S.; Millhouse, Emma; Sherry, Leighann; Aduse-Opoku, Joseph; Culshaw, Shauna; Ramage, Gordon; Bradshaw, David J.; Burnett, Gary R.; Allaker, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Methanethiol (methyl mercaptan) is an important contributor to oral malodour and periodontal tissue destruction. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Fusobacterium nucleatum are key oral microbial species that produce methanethiol via methionine gamma lyase (mgl) activity. The aim of this study was to compare an mgl knockout strain of P. gingivalis with its wild type using a 10-species biofilm co-culture model with oral keratinocytes and its effect on biofilm composition and inflammatory cytokine production. A P. gingivalis mgl knockout strain was constructed using insertion mutagenesis from wild type W50 with gas chromatographic head space analysis confirming lack of methanethiol production. 10-species biofilms consisting of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus intermedius, Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp polymorphum, Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp vincentii, Veillonella dispar, Actinomyces naeslundii, Prevotella intermedia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans with either the wild type or mutant P. gingivalis were grown on Thermanox cover slips and used to stimulate oral keratinocytes (OKF6-TERT2), under anaerobic conditions for 4 and 24 hours. Biofilms were analysed by quantitative PCR with SYBR Green for changes in microbial ecology. Keratinocyte culture supernatants were analysed using a multiplex bead immunoassay for cytokines. Significant population differences were observed between mutant and wild type biofilms; V. dispar proportions increased (p<0.001), whilst A. naeslundii (p<0.01) and Streptococcus spp. (p<0.05) decreased in mutant biofilms. Keratinocytes produced less IL-8, IL-6 and IL-1α when stimulated with the mutant biofilms compared to wild type. Lack of mgl in P. gingivalis has been shown to affect microbial ecology in vitro, giving rise to a markedly different biofilm composition, with a more pro-inflammatory cytokine response from the keratinocytes observed. A possible role for methanethiol in biofilm formation

  19. Effects of Porphyromonas gingivalis LipopolysaccharideTolerized Monocytes on Inflammatory Responses in Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang; Cheng, Xiao-fan; Qiu, Jia-ying; Xu, Yan; Sun, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease induced by bacteria. Exposure of the host to periodontal pathogens and their virulence factors induces a state of hyporesponsiveness to subsequent stimulations, which is termed endotoxin tolerance. The role and mechanism of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–tolerized monocytes in inflammatory responses in neutrophils are currently unclear. Here, conditioned supernatants were collected from THP-1 cells treated with or without repeated 1 μg/ml Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.gingivalis) LPS. The chemotactic response of freshly isolated neutrophils recruited by supernatants was determined by a transwell migration assay, which demonstrated a reduced migration of neutrophils stimulated with supernatants from tolerized THP-1 cells in comparison to non-tolerized THP-1 cells. In addition, there was a marked increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and a significant decrease in Caspase 3 activities in neutrophils treated with supernatants from THP-1 cells that were treated repeatedly with P.gingivalis LPS in comparison to single treatment. A cytokine antibody array was then used to assess cytokine expression patterns in THP-1 cells. In tolerized THP-1 cells, 43 cytokine (43/170) expression levels were decreased, including chemokine ligand 23 (CCL23) and IFN-γ, while 11 cytokine (11/170) expression levels were increased, such as death receptor 6 (DR6). Furthermore, there was decreased production of IFN-γ and epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78 (ENA-78) in THP-1 cells after stimulation with repeated P. gingivalis LPS in comparison to single challenge, which was confirmed by ELISA. Therefore, P.gingivalis LPS- tolerized THP-1 cells were able to depress neutrophil chemotaxis and apoptosis, and contribute to respiratory burst, which might be related to the changes in cytokine expression patterns in THP-1 cells. PMID:27536946

  20. Peptidyl arginine deiminase from Porphyromonas gingivalis abolishes anaphylatoxin C5a activity.

    PubMed

    Bielecka, Ewa; Scavenius, Carsten; Kantyka, Tomasz; Jusko, Monika; Mizgalska, Danuta; Szmigielski, Borys; Potempa, Barbara; Enghild, Jan J; Prossnitz, Eric R; Blom, Anna M; Potempa, Jan

    2014-11-21

    Evasion of killing by the complement system, a crucial part of innate immunity, is a key evolutionary strategy of many human pathogens. A major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, the Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, produces a vast arsenal of virulence factors that compromise human defense mechanisms. One of these is peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD), an enzyme unique to P. gingivalis among bacteria, which converts Arg residues in polypeptide chains into citrulline. Here, we report that PPAD citrullination of a critical C-terminal arginine of the anaphylatoxin C5a disabled the protein function. Treatment of C5a with PPAD in vitro resulted in decreased chemotaxis of human neutrophils and diminished calcium signaling in monocytic cell line U937 transfected with the C5a receptor (C5aR) and loaded with a fluorescent intracellular calcium probe: Fura-2 AM. Moreover, a low degree of citrullination of internal arginine residues by PPAD was also detected using mass spectrometry. Further, after treatment of C5 with outer membrane vesicles naturally shed by P. gingivalis, we observed generation of C5a totally citrullinated at the C-terminal Arg-74 residue (Arg74Cit). In stark contrast, only native C5a was detected after treatment with PPAD-null outer membrane vesicles. Our study suggests reduced antibacterial and proinflammatory capacity of citrullinated C5a, achieved via lower level of chemotactic potential of the modified molecule, and weaker cell activation. In the context of previous studies, which showed crosstalk between C5aR and Toll-like receptors, as well as enhanced arthritis development in mice infected with PPAD-expressing P. gingivalis, our findings support a crucial role of PPAD in the virulence of P. gingivalis.

  1. Role of the Porphyromonas gingivalis iron-binding protein PG1777 in oxidative stress resistance

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Rachelle M. E.; Henry, Leroy G.; Boutrin, Marie-Claire; Ximinies, Alexia

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing of the response of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 to hydrogen peroxide revealed an upregulation of several uncharacterized, novel genes. Under conditions of prolonged oxidative stress in P. gingivalis, increased expression of a unique transcriptional unit carrying the grpE, dnaJ and three other hypothetical genes (PG1777, PG1778 and PG1779) was observed. The transcriptional start site of this operon appears to be located 91 bp upstream of the translational start, with a potential − 10 region at − 3 nt and a − 35 region at − 39 nt. Isogenic P. gingivalis mutants FLL273 (PG1777 : : ermF-ermAM) and FLL293 (PG1779 : : ermF-ermAM) showed increased sensitivity to and decreased survival after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. P. gingivalis FLL273 showed a fivefold increase in the formation of spontaneous mutants when compared with the parent strain after exposure to hydrogen peroxide. The recombinant PG1777 protein displayed iron-binding properties when incubated with FeSO4 and Fe(NH4)2(SO4).6H2O. The rPG1777 protein protected DNA from degradation when exposed to hydrogen peroxide in the presence of iron. Taken together, the data suggest that the grpE-dnaJ-PG1777-PG1778-PG1779 transcriptional unit may play an important role in oxidative stress resistance in P. gingivalis via its ability to protect against DNA damage. PMID:26581883

  2. Periodontitis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mikuls, Ted R.; Payne, Jeffrey B.; Yu, Fang; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Reynolds, Richard J.; Cannon, Grant W.; Markt, Jeffrey; McGowan, David; Kerr, Gail S.; Redman, Robert S.; Reimold, Andreas; Griffiths, Garth; Beatty, Mark; Gonzalez, Shawneen; Bergman, Debra A.; Hamilton, Bartlett C.; Erickson, Alan R.; Sokolove, Jeremy; Robinson, William; Walker, Clay; Chandad, Fatiha; O’Dell, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the degree to which shared risk factors explain the relationship of periodontitis (PD) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to examine associations of PD and Porphyomonas gingivalis (Pg) with disease features. Methods RA cases (N=287) and controls (N=330) underwent a standardized periodontal examination. HLA-DRB1 status was imputed using SNPs from the extended MHC. Circulating anti-Pg antibody was measured using ELISA and subgingival plaque was assessed for the presence of Pg using PCR. Associations of PD with RA were examined using multivariable regression. Results PD was more common in RA (35%, p = 0.022) and aCCP positive RA (n=240; 37%; p = 0.006) vs. controls (26%). There were no RA-control differences in anti-Pg or the frequency of Pg positivity by PCR. Anti-Pg antibody showed weak but statistically significant associations with both anti-CCP (r=0.14, p=0.022) and RF (r=0.19, p=0.001). PD was associated with increased swollen joint counts (p=0.004), DAS-28-CRP (p=0.045), total Sharp scores (p=0.015), aCCP (p=0.011), and RF (p<0.001). Select anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA; including antibody to citrullinated filaggrin) were higher in patients with subgingival Pg and higher anti-Pg antibody levels irrespective of smoking. Associations of PD with established seropositive RA were independent of all covariates examined including evidence of Pg infection. Conclusions Both PD and Pg appear to shape RA-related autoreactivity in RA. In addition, PD demonstrates an independent relationship with established seropositive RA. PMID:24782175

  3. Variability of the fimA gene in Porphyromonas gingivalis isolated from periodontitis and non-periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    León, Rubén; Blanc, Vanessa; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to determine the genetic variability of the fimA gene in Porphyromonas gingivalis isolates from Spanish patients. Study Design: Pooled subgingival samples were taken, processed and cultured in non-selective blood agar medium. Pure cultures of one to six isolates per patient were obtained and PCR and PCR-RFLP were used for fimbrillin gene (fimA) type determination of the extracted genomic (DNA). Results: Two hundred and twenty four Porphyromonas gingivalis isolates from 65 patients were analyzed consisting of 15 non-periodontitis patients (66 isolates) and 50 with periodontitis (158 isolates). Genotype II was the most prevalent (50.9%), while the other types of fimbriae did not exceed fifteen percent of prevalence. Isolates with types II and IV of fimbriae were significantly more prevalent in periodontitis patients than isolates with genotype I. Co-infection was observed in 17.65% of the patients analyzed. Conclusion: The results suggest that in this population Porphyromonas gingivalis with type II of fimbriae are significantly more predominant in periodontitis patients than genotype I. Key words:Fimbriae, genotype, porphyromonas gingivalis, periodontitis. PMID:23229246

  4. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with PCR and immunohistochemistry for detecting Porphyromonas gingivalis in periapical periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Taiichi; Mikami, Yoshikazu; Iwase, Takashi; Asano, Masatake; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is important in the development of marginal periodontitis. However, the precise role and localization of P. gingivalis in chronic periapical periodontitis remain unclear. Thus, methods that can detect P. gingivalis in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples are needed. We assessed a technique combining loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with PCR (PCR-LAMP) for detection of P. gingivalis, using 110 FFPE tissue samples of chronic apical periodontitis. PCR-LAMP specifically detected P. gingivalis with high sensitivity in FFPE tissue samples, and the sensitivity of the technique was higher than that of PCR or LAMP alone. The results of immunohistochemistry (IHC) confirmed the specificity of PCR-LAMP. IHC showed that P. gingivalis was localized in a granular layer of chronic apical periodontitis, a region that correlated with the localization of macrophages. This is the first study to describe the localization of P. gingivalis in human periapical periodontitis. In conclusion, PCR-LAMP was an effective tool for detecting P. gingivalis in periapical periodontitis. In addition, IHC results improve our understanding of the role of P. gingivalis in the progression of periapical periodontitis. (J Oral Sci 58, 163-169, 2016).

  5. Porphyromonas gingivalis oral infection exacerbates the development and severity of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Clinical studies suggest a direct influence of periodontal disease (PD) on serum inflammatory markers and disease assessment of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the influence of PD on arthritis development remains unclear. This investigation was undertaken to determine the contribution of chronic PD to immune activation and development of joint inflammation using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Methods DBA1/J mice orally infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis were administered with collagen II (CII) emulsified in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) to induce arthritis. Arthritis development was assessed by visual scoring of paw swelling, caliper measurement of the paws, mRNA expression, paw micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis, histology, and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase for osteoclast detection (TRAP)-positive immunohistochemistry. Serum and reactivated splenocytes were evaluated for cytokine expression. Results Mice induced for PD and/or arthritis developed periodontal disease, shown by decreased alveolar bone and alteration of mRNA expression in gingival tissues and submandibular lymph nodes compared to vehicle. P. gingivalis oral infection increased paw swelling and osteoclast numbers in mice immunized with CFA/CII. Arthritis incidence and severity were increased by P. gingivalis in mice that received IFA/CII immunizations. Increased synovitis, bone erosions, and osteoclast numbers in the paws were observed following IFA/CII immunizations in mice infected with P gingivalis. Furthermore, cytokine analysis showed a trend toward increased serum Th17/Th1 ratios when P. gingivalis infection was present in mice receiving either CFA/CII or IFA/CII immunizations. Significant cytokine increases induced by P. gingivalis oral infection were mostly associated to Th17-related cytokines of reactivated splenic cells, including IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-22 in the CFA

  6. The Unique hmuY Gene Sequence as a Specific Marker of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Mackiewicz, Paweł; Radwan-Oczko, Małgorzata; Kantorowicz, Małgorzata; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria; Frąszczak, Magdalena; Bielecki, Marcin; Olczak, Mariusz; Olczak, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, acquires heme from host hemoproteins using the HmuY hemophore. The aim of this study was to develop a specific P. gingivalis marker based on a hmuY gene sequence. Subgingival samples were collected from 66 patients with chronic periodontitis and 40 healthy subjects and the entire hmuY gene was analyzed in positive samples. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that both the amino acid sequence of the HmuY protein and the nucleotide sequence of the hmuY gene are unique among P. gingivalis strains/isolates and show low identity to sequences found in other species (below 50 and 56%, respectively). In agreement with these findings, a set of hmuY gene-based primers and standard/real-time PCR with SYBR Green chemistry allowed us to specifically detect P. gingivalis in patients with chronic periodontitis (77.3%) and healthy subjects (20%), the latter possessing lower number of P. gingivalis cells and total bacterial cells. Isolates from healthy subjects possess the hmuY gene-based nucleotide sequence pattern occurring in W83/W50/A7436 (n = 4), 381/ATCC 33277 (n = 3) or TDC60 (n = 1) strains, whereas those from patients typically have TDC60 (n = 21), W83/W50/A7436 (n = 17) and 381/ATCC 33277 (n = 13) strains. We observed a significant correlation between periodontal index of risk of infectiousness (PIRI) and the presence/absence of P. gingivalis (regardless of the hmuY gene-based sequence pattern of the isolate identified [r = 0.43; P = 0.0002] and considering particular isolate pattern [r = 0.38; P = 0.0012]). In conclusion, we demonstrated that the hmuY gene sequence or its fragments may be used as one of the molecular markers of P. gingivalis. PMID:23844074

  7. VimA mediates multiple functions that control virulence in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Aruni, A. Wilson; Robles, A.; Fletcher, H.M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Porphyromonas gingivalis, a black-pigmented, gram-negative anaerobe, is an important etiological agent of periodontal disease. Its ability to survive in the periodontal pocket and orchestrate the microbial/host activities that can lead to disease suggest that P. gingivalis possesses a complex regulatory network involving transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. The vimA (virulence modulating) gene is part of the 6.15-kb bcp-recA-vimA-vimE-vimF-aroG locus and plays a role in oxidative stress resistance. In addition to the glycosylation and anchorage of several surface proteins including the gingipains, VimA can also modulate sialylation, acetyl coenzyme A transfer, lipid A and its associated proteins and may be involved in protein sorting and transport. In this review, we examine the multifunctional role of VimA and discuss its possible involvement in a major regulatory network important for survival and virulence regulation in P. gingivalis. It is postulated that the multifunction of VimA is modulated via a post-translational mechanism involving acetylation. PMID:23279905

  8. Role of Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY in Immunopathogenesis of Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes-Filho, I. S.; Meyer, R.; Olczak, T.; Xavier, M. T.; Trindade, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a multifactorial disease, with participation of bacterial, environmental, and host factors. It results from synergistic and dysbiotic multispecies microorganisms, critical “keystone pathogens,” affecting the whole bacterial community. The purpose of this study was to review the role of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the immunopathogenesis of chronic periodontitis, with special attention paid to HmuY. The host response during periodontitis involves the innate and adaptive immune system, leading to chronic inflammation and progressive destruction of tooth-supporting tissues. In this proinflammatory process, the ability of P. gingivalis to evade the host immune response and access nutrients in the microenvironment is directly related to its survival, proliferation, and infection. Furthermore, heme is an essential nutrient for development of these bacteria, and HmuY is responsible for its capture from host heme-binding proteins. The inflammatory potential of P. gingivalis HmuY has been shown, including induction of high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and CCL2, decreased levels of IL-8, and increased levels of anti-HmuY IgG and IgG1 antibodies in individuals with chronic periodontitis. Therefore, the HmuY protein might be a promising target for therapeutic strategies and for development of diagnostic methods in chronic periodontitis, especially in the case of patients with chronic periodontitis not responding to treatment, monitoring, and maintenance therapy. PMID:27403039

  9. Porphyromonas gingivalis manipulates complement and TLR signaling to uncouple bacterial clearance from inflammation and promote dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Tomoki; Krauss, Jennifer L; Abe, Toshiharu; Jotwani, Ravi; Triantafilou, Martha; Triantafilou, Kathy; Hashim, Ahmed; Hoch, Shifra; Curtis, Michael A; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Lambris, John D; Hajishengallis, George

    2014-06-11

    Certain low-abundance bacterial species, such as the periodontitis-associated oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, can subvert host immunity to remodel a normally symbiotic microbiota into a dysbiotic, disease-provoking state. However, such pathogens also exploit inflammation to thrive in dysbiotic conditions. How these bacteria evade immunity while maintaining inflammation is unclear. As previously reported, P. gingivalis remodels the oral microbiota into a dysbiotic state by exploiting complement. Now we show that in neutrophils P. gingivalis disarms a host-protective TLR2-MyD88 pathway via proteasomal degradation of MyD88, whereas it activates an alternate TLR2-Mal-PI3K pathway. This alternate TLR2-Mal-PI3K pathway blocks phagocytosis, provides "bystander" protection to otherwise susceptible bacteria, and promotes dysbiotic inflammation in vivo. This mechanism to disengage bacterial clearance from inflammation required an intimate crosstalk between TLR2 and the complement receptor C5aR and can contribute to the persistence of microbial communities that drive dysbiotic diseases.

  10. Identification of an O-antigen chain length regulator, WzzP, in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Mikio; Yukitake, Hideharu; Sato, Keiko; Shibata, Yasuko; Naito, Mariko; Aduse-Opoku, Joseph; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Curtis, Michael A; Nakayama, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has two different lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) designated O-LPS and A-LPS, which are a conventional O-antigen polysaccharide and an anionic polysaccharide that are both linked to lipid A-cores, respectively. However, the precise mechanisms of LPS biosynthesis remain to be determined. In this study, we isolated a pigment-less mutant by transposon mutagenesis and identified that the transposon was inserted into the coding sequence PGN_2005, which encodes a hypothetical protein of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277. We found that (i) LPSs purified from the PGN_2005 mutant were shorter than those of the wild type; (ii) the PGN_2005 protein was located in the inner membrane fraction; and (iii) the PGN_2005 gene conferred Wzz activity upon an Escherichia coli wzz mutant. These results indicate that the PGN_2005 protein, which was designated WzzP, is a functional homolog of the Wzz protein in P. gingivalis. Comparison of amino acid sequences among WzzP and conventional Wzz proteins indicated that WzzP had an additional fragment at the C-terminal region. In addition, we determined that the PGN_1896 and PGN_1233 proteins and the PGN_1033 protein appear to be WbaP homolog proteins and a Wzx homolog protein involved in LPS biosynthesis, respectively. PMID:23509024

  11. High in vitro antibacterial activity of Pac-525 against Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms cultured on titanium.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-yin; Wang, Xue-jin; Wang, Li-na; Ying, Xiao-xia; Ren, Xiang; Liu, Hui-ying; Xu, Li; Ma, Guo-wu

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the potential of short antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as alternative antibacterial agents during the treatment of peri-implantitis, the cytotoxic activity of three short AMPs, that is, Pac-525, KSL-W, and KSL, was determined using the MTT assay. The antimicrobial activity of these AMPs, ranging in concentration from 0.0039 mg/mL to 0.5 mg/mL, against the predominant planktonic pathogens, including Streptococcus sanguis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, involved in peri-implantitis was investigated. Furthermore, 2-day-old P. gingivalis biofilms cultured on titanium surfaces were treated with Pac-525 and subsequently observed and analysed using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The average cell proliferation curve indicated that there was no cytotoxicity due to the three short AMPs. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values of Pac-525 were 0.0625 mg/mL and 0.125 mg/mL, respectively, for P. gingivalis and 0.0078 mg/mL and 0.0156 mg/mL, respectively, for F. nucleatum. Using CLSM, we confirmed that compared to 0.1% chlorhexidine, 0.5 mg/mL of Pac-525 caused a significant decrease in biofilm thickness and a decline in the percentage of live bacteria. These data indicate that Pac-525 has unique properties that might make it suitable for the inhibition the growth of pathogenic bacteria around dental implants.

  12. VimA – dependent modulation of the secretome in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Osbourne, D.; Aruni, A.Wilson; Dou, Y.; Perry, C.; Boskovic, D.S.; Roy, F.; Fletcher, H. M.

    2012-01-01

    The VimA protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis is a multifunctional protein involved in cell surface biogenesis. To further determine if its acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) transfer and putative sorting functions can affect the secretome, its role in peptidoglycan biogenesis and effects on the extracellular proteins of P. gingivalis FLL92, a vimA-defective mutant, were evaluated. There were structural and compositional differences in the peptidoglycan of P. gingivalis FLL92 compared to the wild-type strain. Sixty-eight proteins were present only in the extracellular fraction of FLL92. Fifteen proteins present in the extracellular fraction of the parent strain were missing in the vimA-defective mutant. These proteins had protein sorting characteristics which included a C terminal motif with a common consensus Gly-Gly – Cterm pattern and polar tail consisting of aromatic amino acid residues. These observations suggest that the VimA protein is likely involved in peptidoglycan synthesis, and corroborates our previous report, which suggests a role in protein sorting. PMID:23134608

  13. Phenotypic characterization of human and animal biotypes within the species Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Fournier, D; Mouton, C

    1993-01-01

    Ninety-nine strains of Gram-negative black-pigmented anaerobic rods, grown on Todd-Hewitt blood agar plates, were identified and characterized according to a typing scheme including UV fluorescence, catalase, trypsin-like and haemagglutinating activities, biochemical tests with the ATB 32A kit, and gas-liquid chromatography. To determine the taxonomic position of the Porphyromonas gingivalis biotypes, 68 strains (31 of human origin and 37 of animal origin) were compared to 31 strains of closely related species or of uncertain generic status. Most animal strains were isolated in our laboratory by subculturing samples from the oral cavity of five mammalian species (bear, cat, coyote, dog and wolf). Those strains differed from human P. gingivalis strains in that they were positive for catalase, beta-galactosidase and glutamyl-glutamic acid arylamidase; from Bacteroides macacae by more rapid pigmentation, positive haemagglutination, failure to produce propionic acid, and negative alpha-galactosidase; and from Bacteroides salivosus by more rapid pigmentation, positive haemagglutination and failure to produce propionic acid. These data demonstrate that phenotypic heterogeneity within the taxon P. gingivalis can be resolved into two biotypes, each corresponding to a human source or an animal source.

  14. Antibacterial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis and biological characteristics of antibacterial stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Ren, Ling; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Nan; Yang, Ke; Zhong, Ming

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the possibility of an alternative to the traditional orthodontic stainless steel implants, the antibacterial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and the related cytotoxicity of a type 304 Cu bearing antibacterial stainless steel were studied. The results indicated that the antibacterial stainless steel showed excellent antibacterial property against P. gingivalis, compared with the control steel (a purchased medical grade 304 stainless steel). Compared to the control steel, there were fewer bacteria on the surface of the antibacterial stainless steel, with significant difference in morphology. The cytotoxicities of the antibacterial stainless steel to both MG-63 and KB cells were all grade 1, the same as those of the control steel. There were no significant differences in the apoptosis rates on MG-63 and KB cells between the antibacterial stainless steel and the control steel. This study demonstrates that the antibacterial stainless steel is possible to reduce the incidence of implant-related infections and can be a more suitable material for the micro-implant than the conventional stainless steel in orthodontic treatment.

  15. Structure determination and analysis of a haemolytic gingipain adhesin domain from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Yun, P.; Nadkarni, M.A.; Ghadikolaee, N.B.; Nguyen, K.A.; Lee, M.; Hunter, N.; Collyer, C.A.

    2010-08-27

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is an obligately anaerobic bacterium recognized as an aetiological agent of adult periodontitis. P. gingivalis produces cysteine proteinases, the gingipains. The crystal structure of a domain within the haemagglutinin region of the lysine gingipain (Kgp) is reported here. The domain was named K2 as it is the second of three homologous structural modules in Kgp. The K2 domain structure is a 'jelly-roll' fold with two anti-parallel {beta}-sheets. This fold topology is shared with adhesive domains from functionally diverse receptors such as MAM domains, ephrin receptor ligand binding domains and a number of carbohydrate binding modules. Possible functions of K2 were investigated. K2 induced haemolysis of erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner that was augmented by the blocking of anion transport. Further, cysteine-activated arginine gingipain RgpB, which degrades glycophorin A, sensitized erythrocytes to the haemolytic effect of K2. Cleaved K2, similar to that found in extracted Kgp, lacks the haemolytic activity indicating that autolysis of Kgp may be a staged process which is artificially enhanced by extraction of the protein. The data indicate a functional role for K2 in the integrated capacity conferred by Kgp to enable the porphyrin auxotroph P. gingivalis to capture essential haem from erythrocytes.

  16. Comprehensive Transcriptome Analysis of the Periodontopathogenic Bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis W83

    PubMed Central

    Høvik, Hedda; Yu, Wen-Han; Olsen, Ingar

    2012-01-01

    High-density tiling microarray and RNA sequencing technologies were used to analyze the transcriptome of the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis. The compiled P. gingivalis transcriptome profiles were based on total RNA samples isolated from three different laboratory culturing conditions, and the strand-specific transcription profiles generated covered the entire genome, including both protein coding and noncoding regions. The transcription profiles revealed various operon structures, 5′- and 3′-end untranslated regions (UTRs), differential expression patterns, and many novel, not-yet-annotated transcripts within intergenic and antisense regions. Further transcriptome analysis identified the majority of the genes as being expressed within operons and most 5′ and 3′ ends to be protruding UTRs, of which several 3′ UTRs were extended to overlap genes carried on the opposite/antisense strand. Extensive antisense RNAs were detected opposite most insertion sequence (IS) elements. Pairwise comparative analyses were also performed among transcriptome profiles of the three culture conditions, and differentially expressed genes and metabolic pathways were identified. With the growing realization that noncoding RNAs play important biological functions, the discovery of novel RNAs and the comprehensive transcriptome profiles compiled in this study may provide a foundation to further understand the gene regulation and virulence mechanisms in P. gingivalis. The transcriptome profiles can be viewed at and downloaded from the Microbial Transcriptome Database website, http://bioinformatics.forsyth.org/mtd. PMID:22037400

  17. Porphyromonas gingivalis manipulates complement and TLR signaling to uncouple bacterial clearance from inflammation and promote dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Tomoki; Krauss, Jennifer L.; Abe, Toshiharu; Jotwani, Ravi; Triantafilou, Martha; Triantafilou, Kathy; Hashim, Ahmed; Hoch, Shifra; Curtis, Michael A.; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Lambris, John D.; Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Certain low-abundance bacterial species, such as the periodontitis-associated oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis can subvert host immunity to remodel a normally symbiotic microbiota into a dysbiotic, disease-provoking state. However, such pathogens also exploit inflammation to thrive in dysbiotic conditions. How these bacteria evade immunity while maintaining inflammation is unclear. As previously reported, P. gingivalis remodels the oral microbiota into a dysbiotic state by exploiting complement. Now we show that in neutrophils P. gingivalis disarms a host-protective TLR2-MyD88 pathway via proteasomal degradation of MyD88, whereas it activates an alternate TLR2-Mal-PI3K pathway. This alternate TLR2-Mal-PI3K pathway blocks phagocytosis, provides ‘bystander’ protection to otherwise susceptible bacteria, and promotes dysbiotic inflammation in vivo. This mechanism to disengage bacterial clearance from inflammation required an intimate crosstalk between TLR2 and the complement receptor C5aR, and can contribute to the persistence of microbial communities that drive dysbiotic diseases. PMID:24922578

  18. Arg-Gingipain A DNA Vaccine Induces Protective Immunity against Infection by Porphyromonas gingivalis in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Hideo; Ishihara, Kazuyuki; Okuda, Katsuji

    2001-01-01

    Arginine-specific cysteine proteinases (RgpA and RgpB) produced by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis are suspected virulence factors and are involved in interrupting host defense mechanisms as well as in penetrating and destroying periodontal connective tissues. To induce a protective immune response against P. gingivalis, we constructed an rgpA DNA vaccine. BALB/c mice were immunized intradermally by Gene Gun with plasmid DNA carrying rgpA. Antibody responses against P. gingivalis were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The rgpA DNA vaccine induced high levels of serum antibodies against P. gingivalis. Sera from the rgpA DNA vaccine-immunized mice diminished the proteolytic activity of RgpA and RgpB and inhibited the binding of P. gingivalis to a type I collagen sponge. Moreover, the sera effectively reduced the hemagglutination of P. gingivalis, indicating that the hemagglutinin activity of the organism is associated with RgpA. We found with a murine abscess model that mice immunized with the rgpA DNA vaccine were resistant to an invasive P. gingivalis W50 challenge. These results suggest that the rgpA DNA vaccine induced specific antibodies against the enzyme and that this vaccine could confer protective immunity against P. gingivalis infection. PMID:11292699

  19. Plant-derived pectin nanocoatings to prevent inflammatory cellular response of osteoblasts following Porphyromonas gingivalis infection

    PubMed Central

    Meresta, Anna; Folkert, Justyna; Gaber, Timo; Miksch, Korneliusz; Buttgereit, Frank; Detert, Jacqueline; Pischon, Nicole; Gurzawska, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Background Bioengineered plant-derived Rhamnogalacturonan-Is (RG-Is) from pectins are potential candidates for surface nanocoating of medical devices. It has recently been reported that RG-I nanocoatings may prevent bacterial infection and improve the biocompatibility of implants. The aim of the study was to evaluate in vitro impact of bioengineered RG-I nanocoatings on osteogenic capacity and proinflammatory cytokine response of murine osteoblasts following Porphyromonas gingivalis infection. Methods Murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts and isolated primary calvarial osteoblasts from C57BL/6J (B6J osteoblasts) mice were infected with P. gingivalis and incubated on tissue culture polystyrene plates with or without nanocoatings of unmodified RG-Is isolated from potato pulps (PU) or dearabinanated RG-Is (PA). To investigate a behavior of infected osteoblasts cultured on RG-Is cell morphology, proliferation, metabolic activity, mineralization and osteogenic and pro-inflammatory gene expression were examined. Results Following P. gingivalis infection, PA, but not PU, significantly promoted MC3T3-E1 and BJ6 osteoblasts proliferation, metabolic activity, and calcium deposition. Moreover, Il-1b, Il-6, TNF-α, and Rankl gene expressions were downregulated in cells cultured on PU and to a higher extent on PA as compared to the corresponding control, whereas Runx, Alpl, Col1a1, and Bglap gene expressions were upregulated vice versa. Conclusion Our data clearly showed that pectin RG-Is nanocoating with high content of galactan (PA) reduces the osteoblastic response to P. gingivalis infection in vitro and may, therefore, reduce a risk of inflammation especially in immunocompromised patients with rheumatoid or periodontal disorders. PMID:28138240

  20. Por Secretion System-Dependent Secretion and Glycosylation of Porphyromonas gingivalis Hemin-Binding Protein 35

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Mikio; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Kondo, Yoshio; Narita, Yuka; Kadowaki, Tomoko; Naito, Mariko; Nakayama, Koji

    2011-01-01

    The anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen in severe forms of periodontal disease and refractory periapical perodontitis. We have recently found that P. gingivalis has a novel secretion system named the Por secretion system (PorSS), which is responsible for secretion of major extracellular proteinases, Arg-gingipains (Rgps) and Lys-gingipain. These proteinases contain conserved C-terminal domains (CTDs) in their C-termini. Hemin-binding protein 35 (HBP35), which is one of the outer membrane proteins of P. gingivalis and contributes to its haem utilization, also contains a CTD, suggesting that HBP35 is translocated to the cell surface via the PorSS. In this study, immunoblot analysis of P. gingivalis mutants deficient in the PorSS or in the biosynthesis of anionic polysaccharide-lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS) revealed that HBP35 is translocated to the cell surface via the PorSS and is glycosylated with A-LPS. From deletion analysis with a GFP-CTD[HBP35] green fluorescent protein fusion, the C-terminal 22 amino acid residues of CTD[HBP35] were found to be required for cell surface translocation and glycosylation. The GFP-CTD fusion study also revealed that the CTDs of CPG70, peptidylarginine deiminase, P27 and RgpB play roles in PorSS-dependent translocation and glycosylation. However, CTD-region peptides were not found in samples of glycosylated HBP35 protein by peptide map fingerprinting analysis, and antibodies against CTD-regions peptides did not react with glycosylated HBP35 protein. These results suggest both that the CTD region functions as a recognition signal for the PorSS and that glycosylation of CTD proteins occurs after removal of the CTD region. Rabbits were used for making antisera against bacterial proteins in this study. PMID:21731719

  1. Impaired immune tolerance to Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide promotes neutrophil migration and decreased apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zaric, Svetislav; Shelburne, Charles; Darveau, Richard; Quinn, Derek J; Weldon, Sinéad; Taggart, Clifford C; Coulter, Wilson A

    2010-10-01

    Periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the tissues supporting the teeth, is characterized by an exaggerated host immune and inflammatory response to periopathogenic bacteria. Toll-like receptor activation, cytokine network induction, and accumulation of neutrophils at the site of inflammation are important in the host defense against infection. At the same time, induction of immune tolerance and the clearance of neutrophils from the site of infection are essential in the control of the immune response, resolution of inflammation, and prevention of tissue destruction. Using a human monocytic cell line, we demonstrate that Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which is a major etiological factor in periodontal disease, induces only partial immune tolerance, with continued high production of interleukin-8 (IL-8) but diminished secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) after repeated challenge. This cytokine response has functional consequences for other immune cells involved in the response to infection. Primary human neutrophils incubated with P. gingivalis LPS-treated naïve monocyte supernatant displayed a high migration index and increased apoptosis. In contrast, neutrophils treated with P. gingivalis LPS-tolerized monocyte supernatant showed a high migration index but significantly decreased apoptosis. Overall, these findings suggest that induction of an imbalanced immune tolerance in monocytes by P. gingivalis LPS, which favors continued secretion of IL-8 but decreased TNF-α production, may be associated with enhanced migration of neutrophils to the site of infection but also with decreased apoptosis and may play a role in the chronic inflammatory state seen in periodontal disease.

  2. In silico Comparison of 19 Porphyromonas gingivalis Strains in Genomics, Phylogenetics, Phylogenomics and Functional Genomics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsute; Siddiqui, Huma; Olsen, Ingar

    2017-01-01

    Currently, genome sequences of a total of 19 Porphyromonas gingivalis strains are available, including eight completed genomes (strains W83, ATCC 33277, TDC60, HG66, A7436, AJW4, 381, and A7A1-28) and 11 high-coverage draft sequences (JCVI SC001, F0185, F0566, F0568, F0569, F0570, SJD2, W4087, W50, Ando, and MP4-504) that are assembled into fewer than 300 contigs. The objective was to compare these genomes at both nucleotide and protein sequence levels in order to understand their phylogenetic and functional relatedness. Four copies of 16S rRNA gene sequences were identified in each of the eight complete genomes and one in the other 11 unfinished genomes. These 43 16S rRNA sequences represent only 24 unique sequences and the derived phylogenetic tree suggests a possible evolutionary history for these strains. Phylogenomic comparison based on shared proteins and whole genome nucleotide sequences consistently showed two groups with closely related members: one consisted of ATCC 33277, 381, and HG66, another of W83, W50, and A7436. At least 1,037 core/shared proteins were identified in the 19 P. gingivalis genomes based on the most stringent detecting parameters. Comparative functional genomics based on genome-wide comparisons between NCBI and RAST annotations, as well as additional approaches, revealed functions that are unique or missing in individual P. gingivalis strains, or species-specific in all P. gingivalis strains, when compared to a neighboring species P. asaccharolytica. All the comparative results of this study are available online for download at ftp://www.homd.org/publication_data/20160425/.

  3. Hemoglobinase activity of the lysine gingipain protease (Kgp) of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J P; Dawson, J A; Hannis, J C; Muddiman, D; Macrina, F L

    1999-08-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important periodontal disease pathogen, forms black-pigmented colonies on blood agar. Pigmentation is believed to result from accumulation of iron protoporphyrin IX (FePPIX) derived from erythrocytic hemoglobin. The Lys-X (Lys-gingipain) and Arg-X (Arg-gingipain) cysteine proteases of P. gingivalis bind and degrade erythrocytes. We have observed that mutations abolishing activity of the Lys-X-specific cysteine protease, Kgp, resulted in loss of black pigmentation of P. gingivalis W83. Because the hemagglutinating and hemolytic potentials of mutant strains were reduced but not eliminated, we hypothesized that this protease played a role in acquisition of FePPIX from hemoglobin. In contrast to Arg-gingipain, Lys-gingipain was not inhibited by hemin, suggesting that this protease played a role near the cell surface where high concentrations of hemin confer the black pigmentation. Human hemoglobin contains 11 Lys residues in the alpha chain and 10 Lys residues in the beta chain. In contrast, there are only three Arg residues in each of the alpha and beta chains. These observations are consistent with human hemoglobin being a preferred substrate for Lys-gingipain but not Arg-gingipain. The ability of the Lys-gingipain to cleave human hemoglobin at Lys residues was confirmed by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of hemoglobin fragments resulting from digestion with the purified protease. We were able to detect several of the predicted hemoglobin fragments rendered by digestion with purified Lys-gingipain. Thus, we postulate that the Lys-gingipain of P. gingivalis is a hemoglobinase which plays a role in heme and iron uptake by effecting the accumulation of FePPIX on the bacterial cell surface.

  4. In silico Comparison of 19 Porphyromonas gingivalis Strains in Genomics, Phylogenetics, Phylogenomics and Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsute; Siddiqui, Huma; Olsen, Ingar

    2017-01-01

    Currently, genome sequences of a total of 19 Porphyromonas gingivalis strains are available, including eight completed genomes (strains W83, ATCC 33277, TDC60, HG66, A7436, AJW4, 381, and A7A1-28) and 11 high-coverage draft sequences (JCVI SC001, F0185, F0566, F0568, F0569, F0570, SJD2, W4087, W50, Ando, and MP4-504) that are assembled into fewer than 300 contigs. The objective was to compare these genomes at both nucleotide and protein sequence levels in order to understand their phylogenetic and functional relatedness. Four copies of 16S rRNA gene sequences were identified in each of the eight complete genomes and one in the other 11 unfinished genomes. These 43 16S rRNA sequences represent only 24 unique sequences and the derived phylogenetic tree suggests a possible evolutionary history for these strains. Phylogenomic comparison based on shared proteins and whole genome nucleotide sequences consistently showed two groups with closely related members: one consisted of ATCC 33277, 381, and HG66, another of W83, W50, and A7436. At least 1,037 core/shared proteins were identified in the 19 P. gingivalis genomes based on the most stringent detecting parameters. Comparative functional genomics based on genome-wide comparisons between NCBI and RAST annotations, as well as additional approaches, revealed functions that are unique or missing in individual P. gingivalis strains, or species-specific in all P. gingivalis strains, when compared to a neighboring species P. asaccharolytica. All the comparative results of this study are available online for download at ftp://www.homd.org/publication_data/20160425/. PMID:28261563

  5. Honey – a potential agent against Porphyromonas gingivalis: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Honey has been discussed as a therapeutic option in wound healing since ancient time. It might be also an alternative to the commonly used antimicrobials in periodontitis treatment. The in-vitro study was aimed to determine the antimicrobial efficacy against Porphyromonas gingivalis as a major periodontopathogen. Methods One Manuka and one domestic beekeeper honey have been selected for the study. As a screening, MICs of the honeys against 20 P. gingivalis strains were determined. Contents of methylglyoxal and hydrogen peroxide as the potential antimicrobial compounds were determined. These components (up to 100 mg/l), propolis (up to 200 mg/l) as well as the two honeys (up to 10% w/v) were tested against four P. gingivalis strains in planktonic growth and in a single-species biofilm. Results 2% of Manuka honey inhibited the growth of 50% of the planktonic P. gingivalis, the respective MIC50 of the German beekeeper honey was 5%. Manuka honey contained 1.87 mg/kg hydrogen peroxide and the domestic honey 3.74 mg/kg. The amount of methylglyoxal was found to be 2 mg/kg in the domestic honey and 982 mg/kg in the Manuka honey. MICs for hydrogen peroxide were 10 mg/l - 100 mg/l, for methylglyoxal 5 – 20 mg/l, and for propolis 20 mg/l – 200 mg/l. 10% of both types of honey inhibited the formation of P. gingivalis biofilms and reduced the numbers of viable bacteria within 42 h-old biofilms. Neither a total prevention of biofilm formation nor a complete eradication of a 42 h-old biofilm by any of the tested compounds and the honeys were found. Conclusions Honey acts antibacterial against P. gingivalis. The observed pronounced effects of Manuka honey against planktonic bacteria but not within biofilm can be attributed to methylglyoxal as the characteristic antimicrobial component. PMID:24666777

  6. Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis fimbrillin: size, amino-terminal sequence, and antigenic heterogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J Y; Sojar, H T; Bedi, G S; Genco, R J

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial fimbriae mediate cell adhesion and are important in colonization. Fimbrial proteins from strains of Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis isolated from different individuals were compared for their size, amino-terminal sequence, and antigenic diversity. Two major protein components of the crude fimbrial preparations differed in apparent molecular mass, ranging from 41 to 49 kDa for the fimbrillin monomer and from 61 to 78 kDa for the other major protein. The amino-terminal sequence of the antigenically related group of proteins of the fimbrillin monomer in the 41- to 49-kDa range showed significant homology; however, minor sequence heterogeneity was observed, mainly in residues 4 to 6. One of the observed amino-terminal sequences, AFGVGDDESKVAKLTVMVYNG, resembled the deduced sequence of P. gingivalis 381 (D.P. Dickinson, M. K. Kubiniec, F. Yoshimura, and R.J. Genco, J. Bacteriol. 170:1658-1665, 1988). Fimbriae from all the strains of P. gingivalis showing this sequence contained a fimbrillin monomer of 43 kDa and showed a strong reaction with both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies directed to the fimbriae from P. gingivalis 2561 (381). Fimbriae from strains showing amino-terminal sequence variations in residues 4 to 6 (i.e., substitution of VGD with either E or NAG) were more diverse in their molecular sizes. Most of these variant fimbriae showed weak reactions with the polyclonal antibodies and no reaction with the monoclonal antibodies induced to the fimbriae of strain 2561. No correlation could be established between the molecular size and immunological reactivity of the fimbrillin monomer of P. gingivalis strains. Strains 9-14K-1 and HG 564 not only showed markedly different sequences from the other three amino-terminal sequences but also did not react with either polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies to the fimbriae of strain 2561. Strains W50, W83, and AJW 5 failed to show any immunological reactivity with the antibodies to fimbrillin or fimbriae

  7. Luteolin and fisetin inhibit the effects of lipopolysaccharide obtained from Porphyromonas gingivalis in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Sánchez, Anabel

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory process of infectious origin that affects the gums and, in severe cases, destroys connective tissue, leading to loss of the dental organ. Gram-negative Porphyromonas gingivalis bacteria are recovered from patients with chronic periodontitis. The polysaccharide obtained from these bacteria induces the expression of interleukin (IL)-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor, and IL-6. Flavonoids are molecules that participate in the control of inflammatory processes. We studied the role of the flavonoids fisetin, luteolin, myricetin, and morin in inhibiting the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and AKT as well as their role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) transcription. All four of these flavonoids were found to inhibit MAPK and AKT. Fisetin and luteolin blocked the activation of MAPK and AKT to levels below basal levels. All of these flavonoids also blocked LPS-mediated COX-2 expression.

  8. Heme environment in HmuY, the heme-binding protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, Halina; Wojaczynski, Jacek; Olczak, Mariusz; Kroliczewski, Jaroslaw; Latos-Grazynski, Lechoslaw; Olczak, Teresa

    2009-05-29

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium implicated in the development and progression of chronic periodontitis, acquires heme for growth by a novel mechanism composed of HmuY and HmuR proteins. The aim of this study was to characterize the nature of heme binding to HmuY. The protein was expressed, purified and detailed investigations using UV-vis absorption, CD, MCD, and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy were carried out. Ferric heme bound to HmuY may be reduced by sodium dithionite and re-oxidized by potassium ferricyanide. Heme complexed to HmuY, with a midpoint potential of 136 mV, is in a low-spin Fe(III) hexa-coordinate environment. Analysis of heme binding to several single and double HmuY mutants with the methionine, histidine, cysteine, or tyrosine residues replaced by an alanine residue identified histidines 134 and 166 as potential heme ligands.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Ippei; Tateoka, Chika; Roppongi, Saori; Fujimoto, Mayu; Gouda, Hiroaki; Nonaka, Takamasa; Ogasawara, Wataru; Tanaka, Nobutada

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis (PgDPP11) preferentially cleaves substrate peptides with Asp and Glu at the P1 position [NH2–P2–P1(Asp/Glu)–P1′–P2′…]. For crystallographic studies, PgDPP11 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data to 1.82 Å resolution were collected from an orthorhombic crystal form belonging to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 99.33, b = 103.60, c = 177.33 Å. Structural analysis by the multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction method is in progress. PMID:25664797

  10. Intraspecies Variability Affects Heterotypic Biofilms of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia: Evidences of Strain-Dependence Biofilm Modulation by Physical Contact and by Released Soluble Factors.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Graziela Murta; Colombo, Andrea Vieira; Rodrigues, Paulo Henrique; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzetti

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that strain and virulence diversity exist within the population structure of Porphyromonas gingivalis. In the present study we investigate intra- and inter-species variability in biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and partners Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. All strains tested showed similar hydrophobicity, except for P. gingivalis W83 which has roughly half of the hydrophobicity of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. An intraspecies variability in coaggregation of P. gingivalis with P. intermedia was also found. The association P. gingivalis W83/P. intermedia 17 produced the thickest biofilm and strain 17 was prevalent. In a two-compartment system P. gingivalis W83 stimulates an increase in biomass of strain 17 and the latter did not stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis W83. In addition, P. gingivalis W83 also stimulates the growth of P. intermedia ATCC25611 although strain W83 was prevalent in the association with P. intermedia ATCC25611. P. gingivalis ATCC33277 was prevalent in both associations with P. intermedia and both strains of P. intermedia stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. FISH images also showed variability in biofilm structure. Thus, the outcome of the association P. gingivalis/P. intermedia seems to be strain-dependent, and both soluble factors and physical contact are relevant. The association P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens ATCC33563 produced larger biomass than each monotypic biofilm, and P. gingivalis was favored in consortia, while no differences were found in the two-compartment system. Therefore, in consortia P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens physical contact seems to favor P. gingivalis growth. The intraspecies variability found in our study suggests strain-dependence in ability of microorganisms to recognize molecules in other bacteria which may further elucidate the dysbiosis event during periodontitis development giving additional explanation for periodontal bacteria, such as P. gingivalis and P

  11. Intraspecies Variability Affects Heterotypic Biofilms of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia: Evidences of Strain-Dependence Biofilm Modulation by Physical Contact and by Released Soluble Factors

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Graziela Murta; Colombo, Andrea Vieira; Rodrigues, Paulo Henrique; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzetti

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that strain and virulence diversity exist within the population structure of Porphyromonas gingivalis. In the present study we investigate intra- and inter-species variability in biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and partners Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. All strains tested showed similar hydrophobicity, except for P. gingivalis W83 which has roughly half of the hydrophobicity of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. An intraspecies variability in coaggregation of P. gingivalis with P. intermedia was also found. The association P. gingivalis W83/P. intermedia 17 produced the thickest biofilm and strain 17 was prevalent. In a two-compartment system P. gingivalis W83 stimulates an increase in biomass of strain 17 and the latter did not stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis W83. In addition, P. gingivalis W83 also stimulates the growth of P. intermedia ATCC25611 although strain W83 was prevalent in the association with P. intermedia ATCC25611. P. gingivalis ATCC33277 was prevalent in both associations with P. intermedia and both strains of P. intermedia stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. FISH images also showed variability in biofilm structure. Thus, the outcome of the association P. gingivalis/P. intermedia seems to be strain-dependent, and both soluble factors and physical contact are relevant. The association P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens ATCC33563 produced larger biomass than each monotypic biofilm, and P. gingivalis was favored in consortia, while no differences were found in the two-compartment system. Therefore, in consortia P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens physical contact seems to favor P. gingivalis growth. The intraspecies variability found in our study suggests strain-dependence in ability of microorganisms to recognize molecules in other bacteria which may further elucidate the dysbiosis event during periodontitis development giving additional explanation for periodontal bacteria, such as P. gingivalis and P

  12. Innate immune-stimulatory activity of Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae is eliminated by phase separation using Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Nozoe, Kohji; Sanui, Terukazu; Takeshita, Masaaki; Fukuda, Takao; Haraguchi, Akira; Aida, Yoshitomi; Nishimura, Fusanori

    2017-02-01

    Fimbriae are virulence factors of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). In this study, the action of fimbriae on neutrophil respiratory burst and cytokine production by mononuclear cells (MNC) were investigated. Native or denatured form of purified P. gingivalis fimbriae contained endotoxin at an equivalence of 1-3μglipopolysaccharides(LPS)/mg protein. The endotoxin could be reduced to the equivalent of 1ng-LPS/mg protein by phase separation using Triton X-114. Unfractionated fimbriae caused serum-dependent priming of neutrophils for enhanced respiratory burst, but both native and denatured forms of Triton X-114-fractionated fimbriae were not active at 100μg/mL. Unfractionated fimbriae induced serum-dependent production of IL-1β by MNC. Triton X-114-fractionated fimbriae (10μg/mL)-induced production of IL-1β, IL-8 or TNF-α was much lower than that induced by unfractionated fimbriae or 10ng/mL P. gingivalis-LPS preparation. Triton X-114-fractionated fimbriae immobilized on polystyrene tubes induced adhesion-stimulated superoxide release by LPS-primed neutrophils in a β2 integrin-dependent manner. P. gingivalis cells caused priming of neutrophils; however, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 antagonists did not affect this response. Thus, P. gingivalis fimbriae were ineffective in inducing innate immune response in leukocytes; however, they induced β2 integrin-mediated response by neutrophils. Immune-stimulatory components of P. gingivalis might be recognized by receptors other than TLR4.

  13. Characterization of Innate Immune Responses of Human Endothelial Cells Induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Their Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Meng-Hsuan; Guo, Zhong-Mao; Chunga, Julio; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Xie, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the blood vessels, is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Involvement of Porphyromonas gingivalis in atherosclerosis is supported by observations from epidemiological, clinical, immunological, and molecular studies. Previously we reported that P. gingivalis vesicles have a much higher invasive efficiency than their originating cells. Here, we further compare the role of P. gingivalis cells and their vesicles in expression of chemoattractant proteins including CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCL8, and adhesive molecules such as E-selectin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Both P. gingivalis 33277 cells and vesicles were able to up-regulate expression of these molecules, while the vesicles acted as more potent inducers of the inflammatory response associated with the development of atherosclerosis, consequently resulting in significant monocyte adhesion to a monolayer of HUVECs. Interestingly, we found that elevated expression of CXCL8 and E-selectin in endothelial cells induced by P. gingivalis correlated with the invasive ability of P. gingivalis cells and vesicles. Non-invasive bacterial cells and vesicles had no effect on expression of these genes. This study highlights the potential risk of P. gingivalis cells and vesicles in initiation of atherosclerosis and provides a potential target for the development of novel therapeutics against bacteria-associated atherosclerosis. PMID:27826542

  14. Persistent Exposure to Porphyromonas gingivalis Promotes Proliferative and Invasion Capabilities, and Tumorigenic Properties of Human Immortalized Oral Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Fengxue; Liu, Junchao; Guo, Yan; Li, Chen; Wang, Hongyang; Wang, Hongyan; Zhao, Haijiao; Pan, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies revealed a significant association between oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major pathogen of periodontal disease. As a keystone pathogen of periodontitis, P. gingivalis is known not only to damage local periodontal tissues, but also to evade the host immune system and eventually affect systemic health. However, its role in OSCC has yet to be defined. To explore the underlying effect of chronic P. gingivalis infection on OSCC and to identify relevant biomarkers as promising targets for therapy and prevention, we established a novel model by exposing human immortalized oral epithelial cells (HIOECs) to P. gingivalis at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI) for 5–23 weeks. The P. gingivalis infected HIOECs were monitored for tumor biological alteration by proliferation, wound healing, transwell invasion, and gelatin zymography assays. Microarray and proteomic analyses were performed on HIOECs infected with P. gingivalis for 15 weeks, and some selected data were validated by quantitative real-time PCR and (or) western blot on cells infected for 15 and 23 weeks. Persistent exposure to P. gingivalis caused cell morphological changes, increased proliferation ability with higher S phase fraction in the cell cycle, and promoted cell migratory and invasive properties. In combining results of bioinformatics analyses and validation assays, tumor-related genes such as NNMT, FLI1, GAS6, lncRNA CCAT1, PDCD1LG2, and CD274 may be considered as the key regulators in tumor-like transformation in response to long-time exposure of P. gingivalis. In addition, some useful clinical biomarkers and novel proteins were also presented. In conclusion, P. gingivalis could promote tumorigenic properties of HIOECs, indicating that chronic P. gingivalis infection may be considered as a potential risk factor for oral cancer. The key regulators detected from the present model might be used in monitoring the development of OSCC with

  15. Identification and Characterization of MicroRNA Differentially Expressed in Macrophages Exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis Infection.

    PubMed

    Huck, Olivier; Al-Hashemi, Jacob; Poidevin, Laetitia; Poch, Olivier; Davideau, Jean-Luc; Tenenbaum, Henri; Amar, Salomon

    2017-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, noncoding RNAs involved in the regulation of several processes associated with inflammatory diseases and infection. Bacterial infection modulates miRNA expression to subvert any innate immune response. In this study we analyzed, using microarray analysis, the bacterial modulation of miRNAs in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) in which activity was induced by infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis The expression of several miRNAs was modulated 3 h postinfection (at a multiplicity of infection of 25). A bioinformatic analysis was performed to further identify pathways related to the innate immune host response under the influence of selected miRNAs. To assess the effects of the miRNAs identified on cytokine secretion (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] and interleukin-10 [IL-10]), BMMs were transfected with selected miRNA mimics and inhibitors. Transfection with mmu-miR-155 and mmu-miR-2137 did not modify TNF-α secretion, while their inhibitors increased it. Inhibitors of mmu-miR-2137 and mmu-miR-7674 increased the secretion of the anti-inflammatory factor IL-10. In P. gingivalis-infected BMMs, mmu-miR-155-5p significantly decreased TNF-α secretion while inhibitor of mmu-miR-2137 increased IL-10 secretion. In vivo, in a mouse model of P. gingivalis-induced calvarial bone resorption, injection of mmu-miR-155-5p or anti-mmu-miR-2137 reduced the size of the lesion significantly. Furthermore, anti-mmu-miR-2137 significantly reduced inflammatory cell infiltration, osteoclast activity, and bone loss. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that pathways related to cytokine- and chemokine-related pathways but also osteoclast differentiation may be involved in the effects observed. This study contributes further to our understanding of P. gingivalis-induced modulation of miRNAs and their physiological effects. It highlights the potential therapeutic merits of targeting mmu-miR-155-5p and mmu-miR-2137 to control inflammation induced by P

  16. Serine dipeptide lipids of Porphyromonas gingivalis inhibit osteoblast differentiation: Relationship to Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Nemati, Reza; Anstadt, Emily; Liu, Yaling; Son, Young; Zhu, Qiang; Yao, Xudong; Clark, Robert B; Rowe, David W; Nichols, Frank C

    2015-12-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a periodontal pathogen strongly associated with loss of attachment and supporting bone for teeth. We have previously shown that the total lipid extract of P. gingivalis inhibits osteoblast differentiation through engagement of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and that serine dipeptide lipids of P. gingivalis engage both mouse and human TLR2. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether these serine lipids inhibit osteoblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo and whether TLR2 engagement is involved. Osteoblasts were obtained from calvaria of wild type or TLR2 knockout mouse pups that also express the Col2.3GFP transgene. Two classes of serine dipeptide lipids, termed Lipid 654 and Lipid 430, were tested. Osteoblast differentiation was monitored by cell GFP fluorescence and osteoblast gene expression and osteoblast function was monitored as von Kossa stained mineral deposits. Osteoblast differentiation and function were evaluated in calvarial cell cultures maintained for 21 days. Lipid 654 significantly inhibited GFP expression, osteoblast gene expression and mineral nodule formation and this inhibition was dependent on TLR2 engagement. Lipid 430 also significantly inhibited GFP expression, osteoblast gene expression and mineral nodule formation but these effects were only partially attributed to engagement of TLR2. More importantly, Lipid 430 stimulated TNF-α and RANKL gene expression in wild type cells but not in TLR2 knockout cells. Finally, osteoblast cultures were observed to hydrolyze Lipid 654 to Lipid 430 and this likely occurs through elevated PLA2 activity in the cultured cells. In conclusion, our results show that serine dipeptide lipids of P. gingivalis inhibit osteoblast differentiation and function at least in part through engagement of TLR2. The Lipid 430 serine class also increased the expression of genes that could increase osteoclast activity. We conclude that Lipid 654 and Lipid 430 have the potential

  17. Protein Analysis of Sapienic Acid-Treated Porphyromonas gingivalis Suggests Differential Regulation of Multiple Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Deborah V.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Drake, David R.; Wertz, Philip W.; Brogden, Kim A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipids endogenous to skin and mucosal surfaces exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Our previous work demonstrated the antimicrobial activity of the fatty acid sapienic acid (C16:1Δ6) against P. gingivalis and found that sapienic acid treatment alters both protein and lipid composition from those in controls. In this study, we further examined whole-cell protein differences between sapienic acid-treated bacteria and untreated controls, and we utilized open-source functional association and annotation programs to explore potential mechanisms for the antimicrobial activity of sapienic acid. Our analyses indicated that sapienic acid treatment induces a unique stress response in P. gingivalis resulting in differential expression of proteins involved in a variety of metabolic pathways. This network of differentially regulated proteins was enriched in protein-protein interactions (P = 2.98 × 10−8), including six KEGG pathways (P value ranges, 2.30 × 10−5 to 0.05) and four Gene Ontology (GO) molecular functions (P value ranges, 0.02 to 0.04), with multiple suggestive enriched relationships in KEGG pathways and GO molecular functions. Upregulated metabolic pathways suggest increases in energy production, lipid metabolism, iron acquisition and processing, and respiration. Combined with a suggested preferential metabolism of serine, which is necessary for fatty acid biosynthesis, these data support our previous findings that the site of sapienic acid antimicrobial activity is likely at the bacterial membrane. IMPORTANCE P. gingivalis is an important opportunistic pathogen implicated in periodontitis. Affecting nearly 50% of the population, periodontitis is treatable, but the resulting damage is irreversible and eventually progresses to tooth loss. There is a great need for natural products that can be used to treat and/or prevent the overgrowth of

  18. The chronicles of Porphyromonas gingivalis: the microbium, the human oral epithelium and their interplay.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozlem

    2008-10-01

    The microbiota of the human oral mucosa consists of a myriad of bacterial species that normally exist in commensal harmony with the host. Porphyromonas gingivalis, an aetiological agent in severe forms of periodontitis (a chronic inflammatory disease), is a prominent component of the oral microbiome and a successful colonizer of the oral epithelium. This Gram-negative anaerobe can also exist within the host epithelium without the existence of overt disease. Gingival epithelial cells, the outer lining of the gingival mucosa, which function as an important part of the innate immune system, are among the first host cells colonized by P. gingivalis. This review describes recent studies implicating the co-existence and intracellular adaptation of the organism in these target host cells. Specifically, recent findings on the putative mechanisms of persistence, intercellular dissemination and opportunism are highlighted. These new findings may also represent an original and valuable model for mechanistic characterization of other successful host-adapted, self-limiting, persistent intracellular bacteria in human epithelial tissues.

  19. Identification of Small-Molecule Inhibitors against Meso-2, 6-Diaminopimelate Dehydrogenase from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Victoria N.; Parikh, Hardik I.; El-rami, Fadi; Ge, Xiuchun; Chen, Weihau; Zhang, Yan; Kellogg, Glen E.; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Species-specific antimicrobial therapy has the potential to combat the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance and alteration of the human microbiome. We therefore set out to demonstrate the beginning of a pathogen-selective drug discovery method using the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis as a model. Through our knowledge of metabolic networks and essential genes we identified a “druggable” essential target, meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase, which is found in a limited number of species. We adopted a high-throughput virtual screen method on the ZINC chemical library to select a group of potential small-molecule inhibitors. Meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase from P. gingivalis was first expressed and purified in Escherichia coli then characterized for enzymatic inhibitor screening studies. Several inhibitors with similar structural scaffolds containing a sulfonamide core and aromatic substituents showed dose-dependent inhibition. These compounds were further assayed showing reasonable whole-cell activity and the inhibition mechanism was determined. We conclude that the establishment of this target and screening strategy provides a model for the future development of new antimicrobials. PMID:26544875

  20. Porphyromonas gingivalis Periodontal Infection and Its Putative Links with Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Singhrao, Sim K.; Harding, Alice; Poole, Sophie; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Crean, StJohn

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are inflammatory conditions affecting the global adult population. In the pathogenesis of PD, subgingival complex bacterial biofilm induces inflammation that leads to connective tissue degradation and alveolar bone resorption around the teeth. In health, junctional epithelium seals the gingiva to the tooth enamel, thus preventing bacteria from entering the gingivae. Chronic PD involves major pathogens (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia) which have an immune armoury that can circumvent host's immune surveillance to create and maintain an inflammatory mediator rich and toxic environment to grow and survive. The neurodegenerative condition, AD, is characterised by poor memory and specific hallmark proteins; periodontal pathogens are increasingly being linked with this dementing condition. It is therefore becoming important to understand associations of periodontitis with relevance to late-onset AD. The aim of this review is to discuss the relevance of finding the keystone periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis in AD brains and its plausible contribution to the aetiological hypothesis of this dementing condition. PMID:26063967

  1. Distribution of Porphyromonas gingivalis biotypes defined by alleles of the kgp (Lys-gingipain) gene.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Mangala A; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Chapple, Cheryl C; DeCarlo, Arthur A; Jacques, Nicholas A; Hunter, Neil

    2004-08-01

    Paired subgingival plaque samples representing the most-diseased and least-diseased sites were collected from 34 adult patients with diagnosed chronic periodontitis. The percentage of Porphyromonas gingivalis relative to the total anaerobic and gram-negative bacterial load at each site was determined by real-time PCR. Based on variations in the noncatalytic C terminus of the Lys-gingipain (Kgp), it was reasoned that DNA sequence variation in the 3'-coding region of the kgp gene might determine functional biotypes. Perusal of the available sequence information in GenBank indicated three such forms of the kgp gene corresponding to P. gingivalis strains HG66, 381, and W83. Analysis of patient samples revealed the presence of a fourth genotype (W83v) that showed duplication of a sequence recognized by the W83 reverse primer. The four biotypes, HG66, 381, W83, and W83v, were present in the study group in the ratio 8:11:6:5, respectively. Each subject was colonized by one predominant biotype, and only three patients were colonized by a trace amount of a second biotype.

  2. Pyrano-isoflavans from Glycyrrhiza uralensis with antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Villinski, Jacquelyn R; Bergeron, Chantal; Cannistra, Joseph C; Gloer, James B; Coleman, Christina M; Ferreira, Daneel; Azelmat, Jabrane; Grenier, Daniel; Gafner, Stefan

    2014-03-28

    Continuing investigation of fractions from a supercritical fluid extract of Chinese licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis) roots has led to the isolation of 12 phenolic compounds, of which seven were described previously from this extract. In addition to these seven metabolites, four known components, 1-methoxyerythrabyssin II (4), 6,8-diprenylgenistein, gancaonin G (5), and isoglycyrol (6), and one new isoflavan, licorisoflavan C (7), were characterized from this material for the first time. Treatment of licoricidin (1) with palladium chloride afforded larger amounts of 7 and also yielded two new isoflavans, licorisoflavan D (8), which was subsequently detected in the licorice extract, and licorisoflavan E (9). Compounds 1-9 were evaluated for their antibacterial activities against the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and the periodontopathogenic Porphyromonas gingivalis. Licoricidin (1), licorisoflavan A (2), and 7-9 showed antibacterial activity against P. gingivalis (MICs of 1.56-12.5 μg/mL). The most potent activity against S. mutans was obtained with 7 (MIC of 6.25 μg/mL), followed by 1 and 9 (MIC of 12.5 μg/mL). This study provides further evidence for the therapeutic potential of licorice extracts for the treatment and prevention of oral infections.

  3. Porphyromonas gingivalis is the most abundant species detected in coronary and femoral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Mougeot, J-L. C.; Stevens, C. B.; Paster, B. J.; Brennan, M. T.; Lockhart, P. B.; Mougeot, F. K. B

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT An association between oral bacteria and atherosclerosis has been postulated. A limited number of studies have used 16S RNA gene sequencing-based metagenomics approaches to identify bacteria at the species level from atherosclerotic plaques in arterial walls. The objective of this study was to establish detailed oral microbiome profiles, at both genus and species level, of clinically healthy coronary and femoral artery tissues from patients with atherosclerosis. Tissue specimens were taken from clinically non-atherosclerotic areas of coronary or femoral arteries used for attachment of bypass grafts in 42 patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Bacterial DNA was sequenced using the MiSeq platform, and sequence reads were screened in silico for nearly 600 oral species using the HOMINGS ProbeSeq species identification program. The number of sequence reads matched to species or genera were used for statistical analyses. A total of 230 and 118 species were detected in coronary and femoral arteries, respectively. Unidentified species detected by genus-specific probes consisted of 45 and 30 genera in coronary and in femoral artery tissues, respectively. Overall, 245 species belonging to 95 genera were detected in coronary and femoral arteries combined. The most abundant species were Porphyromonas gingivalis, Enterococcus faecalis, and Finegoldia magna based on species probes. Porphyromonas, Escherichia, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, and Streptococcus genera represented 88.5% mean relative abundance based on combined species and genus probe detections. Porphyromonas was significantly more abundant than Escherichia (i.e. 46.8% vs. 19.3%; p = 0.0005). This study provides insight into the presence and types of oral microbiome bacterial species found in clinically non-atherosclerotic arteries. PMID:28326156

  4. Identification of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seulggie; Baik, Jung Eun; Jeon, Jun Ho; Cho, Kun; Seo, Deog-Gyu; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2011-09-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis causes periodontal diseases and its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is considered as a major virulence factor responsible for pathogenesis. Since initial recognition of P. gingivalis LPS (Pg.LPS) in the oral cavity might be crucial for the host response, we identified Pg.LPS-binding proteins (Pg.LPS-BPs) using Pg.LPS-immobilized beads and a high-resolution mass spectrometry. LPS purified from P. gingivalis was conjugated onto N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-Sepharose(®) 4 Fast Flow beads. Notably, Pg.LPS-conjugated beads could stimulate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) as determined by a TLR2-depdendent reporter expression system using CHO/CD14/TLR2. In addition, the Pg.LPS-conjugated beads induced the production of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide and interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 in the macrophage cell-line, RAW 264.7. These results imply that Pg.LPS retained its immunological properties during the conjugation process. Then, the Pg.LPS-conjugated beads were mixed with a pool of saliva obtained from nine human subjects to capture Pg.LPS-BPs and molecular identities were determined by LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid fourier transform mass spectrometry. Pg.LPS-BPs captured at high frequencies included alpha-amylase, cystatin, prolactin-inducible protein, lysozyme C, immunoglobulin components, serum albumin, lipocalin-1, and submaxillary gland androgen-regulated protein 3B. These proteins are known to be involved in bacterial adhesion and colonization, anti-microbial functions or modulation of immune responses.

  5. Role of the Porphyromonas gingivalis ECF sigma factor, SigH

    PubMed Central

    Yanamandra, Sai S.; Sarrafee, Sara S.; Anaya-Bergman, Cecilia; Jones, Kevin; Lewis, Janina P.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms that allow Porphyromonas gingivalis to survive in the oral cavity. Here we characterize the sigma factor SigH, one of six extracytoplasmic (ECF) sigma (σ) factors encoded in the P. gingivalis genome. Our results indicate that sigH expression is upregulated by exposure to molecular oxygen, suggesting that sigH plays a role in adaptation of P. gingivalis to oxygen. Furthermore, several genes involved in oxidative stress protection, such as sod, trx, tpx, ftn, feoB2 and the hemin uptake hmu locus, are downregulated in mutant deficient in SigH designated as V2948. ECF σ consensus sequences were identified upstream of the transcriptional start sites of these genes, consistent with the SigH-dependent regulation of these genes. Growth of V2948 was inhibited in the presence of 6% oxygen when compared to the wild-type W83 strain, while in anaerobic conditions both strains were able to grow. In addition, reduced growth of V2948 was observed in the presence of peroxide and thiol-oxidizing reagent, diamide when compared to the W83 strain. The SigH-deficient strain V2948 also exhibited reduced hemin uptake, consistent with the observed reduced expression of genes involved in hemin uptake. Finally, survival of V2948 was reduced in the presence of host cells compared to the wild-type W83 strain. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that SigH is a positive regulator of gene expression required for survival of the bacterium in the presence of oxygen and oxidative stress, hemin uptake, and virulence. PMID:22520389

  6. Engagement of specific innate immune signaling pathways during Porphyromonas gingivalis induced chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frank C; Ukai, Takashi; Genco, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a group of pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors, which play an important role in innate immune signaling in response to microbial infection. It has been demonstrated that TLRs are differentially up regulated in response to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The expression of TLRs are markedly augmented in human atherosclerotic lesions and this occurs preferentially by endothelial cells and macrophages in areas infiltrated with inflammatory cells. Furthermore polymorphisms in the human gene encoding one TLR receptor (TLR4) which attenuates receptor signaling and diminishes the inflammatory response to gram-negative pathogens, is associated with low levels of certain circulating mediators of inflammation and a decreased risk for atherosclerosis in humans. Recent advances have established a fundamental role for inflammation in mediating all stages of atherosclerosis. However, the triggers that initiate and sustain the inflammatory process have not been definitively identified. Although definitive proof of a role of infection contributing to atherogenesis is lacking, multiple investigations have demonstrated that infectious agents evoke cellular and molecular changes supportive of such a role. Evidence in humans suggesting that periodontal infection predisposes to atherosclerosis is derived from studies demonstrating that the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis resides in the wall of atherosclerotic vessels and seroepidemiological studies demonstrating an association between pathogen-specific IgG antibodies and atherosclerosis. Our recent work with P. gingivalis has demonstrated the effectiveness of specific intervention strategies (immunization) in the prevention of pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis. We have also established that the inflammatory signaling pathways that P. gingivalis utilizes is dependent on the cell type and this specificity clearly influences innate

  7. Expression, purification and characterization of enoyl-ACP reductase II, FabK, from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    SciTech Connect

    Hevener, Kirk E.; Mehboob, Shahila; Boci, Teuta; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2012-10-25

    The rapid rise in bacterial drug resistance coupled with the low number of novel antimicrobial compounds in the discovery pipeline has led to a critical situation requiring the expedient discovery and characterization of new antimicrobial drug targets. Enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid synthesis pathway, FAS-II, are distinct from their mammalian counterparts, FAS-I, in terms of both structure and mechanism. As such, they represent attractive targets for the design of novel antimicrobial compounds. Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase II, FabK, is a key, rate-limiting enzyme in the FAS-II pathway for several bacterial pathogens. The organism, Porphyromonas gingivalis, is a causative agent of chronic periodontitis that affects up to 25% of the US population and incurs a high national burden in terms of cost of treatment. P. gingivalis expresses FabK as the sole enoyl reductase enzyme in its FAS-II cycle, which makes this a particularly appealing target with potential for selective antimicrobial therapy. Herein we report the molecular cloning, expression, purification and characterization of the FabK enzyme from P. gingivalis, only the second organism from which this enzyme has been isolated. Characterization studies have shown that the enzyme is a flavoprotein, the reaction dependent upon FMN and NADPH and proceeding via a Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism to reduce the enoyl substrate. A sensitive assay measuring the fluorescence decrease of NADPH as it is converted to NADP{sup +} during the reaction has been optimized for high-throughput screening. Finally, protein crystallization conditions have been identified which led to protein crystals that diffract x-rays to high resolution.

  8. Genetic exchange of fimbrial alleles exemplifies the adaptive virulence strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jennifer E; Abramian, Jared R; Dao, Doan-Hieu V; Rigney, Todd W; Fritz, Jamie; Pham, Tan; Gay, Isabel; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Wang, Bing-yan; Zhang, Wenjian; Tribble, Gena D

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed "keystone" pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions.

  9. Synthesis of Sphingolipids Impacts Survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis and the Presentation of Surface Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Moye, Zachary D.; Valiuskyte, Kornelija; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Nichols, Frank C.; Davey, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria alter the biophysical properties of their membrane lipids in response to environmental cues, such as shifts in pH or temperature. In essence, lipid composition determines membrane structure, which in turn influences many basic functions, such as transport, secretion, and signaling. Like other members of the phylum Bacteroidetes, the oral anaerobe Porphyromonas gingivalis possesses the ability to synthesize a variety of novel membrane lipids, including species of dihydroceramides that are distinct, yet similar in structure to sphingolipids produced by the human host. The role of dihydroceramides in the physiology and pathogenic potential of the human microbiota is only beginning to be explored; yet there is increasing data indicating that these lipids play a role in human diseases, such as periodontitis and multiple sclerosis. Here, we report on the identification of a gene (PG1780) in the chromosome of P. gingivalis strain W83 encoding a putative serine palmitoyltransferase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in sphingolipid biosynthesis. While we were able to detect dihydroceramides in whole lipid extracts of P. gingivalis cells as well as crude preparations of outer membrane vesicles, sphingolipids were absent in the PG1780 mutant strain. Moreover, we show that the synthesis of sphingolipids plays an essential role in the long-term survival of the organism as well as its resistance to oxidative stress. Further, a PG1780 mutant displayed much lower activity of cell-associated arginine and lysine gingipains, yet slightly higher activity in the corresponding culture supernates, which we hypothesize is due to altered membrane properties and anchoring of these proteases to the cell surface. In addition, we determined that sphingolipid production is critical to the presentation of surface polysaccharides, with the mutant strain displaying less K-antigen capsule and more anionic polysaccharide (APS). Overall, we have discovered that, in addition to their

  10. Genetic Exchange of Fimbrial Alleles Exemplifies the Adaptive Virulence Strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jennifer E.; Abramian, Jared R.; Dao, Doan-Hieu V.; Rigney, Todd W.; Fritz, Jamie; Pham, Tan; Gay, Isabel; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Wang, Bing-yan; Zhang, Wenjian; Tribble, Gena D.

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram–negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed “keystone” pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions. PMID:24626479

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis as a Model Organism for Assessing Interaction of Anaerobic Bacteria with Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Wunsch, Christopher M; Lewis, Janina P

    2015-12-17

    Anaerobic bacteria far outnumber aerobes in many human niches such as the gut, mouth, and vagina. Furthermore, anaerobic infections are common and frequently of indigenous origin. The ability of some anaerobic pathogens to invade human cells gives them adaptive measures to escape innate immunity as well as to modulate host cell behavior. However, ensuring that the anaerobic bacteria are live during experimental investigation of the events may pose challenges. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobe, is capable of invading a variety of eukaryotic non-phagocytic cells. This article outlines how to successfully culture and assess the ability of P. gingivalis to invade human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Two protocols were developed: one to measure bacteria that can successfully invade and survive within the host, and the other to visualize bacteria interacting with host cells. These techniques necessitate the use of an anaerobic chamber to supply P. gingivalis with an anaerobic environment for optimal growth. The first protocol is based on the antibiotic protection assay, which is largely used to study the invasion of host cells by bacteria. However, the antibiotic protection assay is limited; only intracellular bacteria that are culturable following antibiotic treatment and host cell lysis are measured. To assess all bacteria interacting with host cells, both live and dead, we developed a protocol that uses fluorescent microscopy to examine host-pathogen interaction. Bacteria are fluorescently labeled with 2',7'-Bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM) and used to infect eukaryotic cells under anaerobic conditions. Following fixing with paraformaldehyde and permeabilization with 0.2% Triton X-100, host cells are labeled with TRITC phalloidin and DAPI to label the cell cytoskeleton and nucleus, respectively. Multiple images taken at different focal points (Z-stack) are obtained for temporal

  12. VimA-Dependent Modulation of Acetyl Coenzyme A Levels and Lipid A Biosynthesis Can Alter Virulence in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Aruni, A. Wilson; Lee, J.; Osbourne, D.; Dou, Y.; Roy, F.; Muthiah, A.; Boskovic, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    The Porphyromonas gingivalis VimA protein has multifunctional properties that can modulate several of its major virulence factors. To further characterize VimA, P. gingivalis FLL406 carrying an additional vimA gene and a vimA-defective mutant in a different P. gingivalis genetic background were evaluated. The vimA-defective mutant (FLL451) in the P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 genetic background showed a phenotype similar to that of the vimA-defective mutant (FLL92) in the P. gingivalis W83 genetic background. In contrast to the wild type, gingipain activity was increased in P. gingivalis FLL406, a vimA chimeric strain. P. gingivalis FLL451 had a five times higher biofilm-forming capacity than the parent strain. HeLa cells incubated with P. gingivalis FLL92 showed a decrease in invasion, in contrast to P. gingivalis FLL451 and FLL406, which showed increases of 30 and 40%, respectively. VimA mediated coenzyme A (CoA) transfer to isoleucine and reduced branched-chain amino acid metabolism. The lipid A content and associated proteins were altered in the vimA-defective mutants. The VimA chimera interacted with several proteins which were found to have an LXXTG motif, similar to the sorting motif of Gram-positive organisms. All the proteins had an N-terminal signal sequence with a putative sorting signal of L(P/T/S)X(T/N/D)G and two unique signatures of EXGXTX and HISXXGXG, in addition to a polar tail. Taken together, these observations further confirm the multifunctional role of VimA in modulating virulence possibly through its involvement in acetyl-CoA transfer and lipid A synthesis and possibly by protein sorting. PMID:22144476

  13. Fimbria-dependent activation of pro-inflammatory molecules in Porphyromonas gingivalis infected human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Davey, Michael; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2006-05-01

    Epidemiological studies support that chronic periodontal infections are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Previously, we reported that the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis accelerated atherosclerotic plaque formation in hyperlipidemic apoE-/- mice, while an isogenic fimbria-deficient (FimA-) mutant did not. In this study, we utilized 41 kDa (major) and 67 kDa (minor) fimbria mutants to demonstrate that major fimbria are required for efficient P. gingivalis invasion of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that only invasive P. gingivalis strains induced HAEC production of pro-inflammatory molecules interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, vascular cellular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and E-selectin. The purified native forms of major and minor fimbria induced chemokine and adhesion molecule expression similar to invasive P. gingivalis, but failed to elicit IL-1beta production. In addition, the major and minor fimbria-mediated production of MCP-1 and IL-8 was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Both P. gingivalis LPS and heat-killed organisms failed to stimulate HAEC. Treatment of endothelial cells with cytochalasin D abolished the observed pro-inflammatory MCP-1 and IL-8 response to invasive P. gingivalis and both purified fimbria, but did not affect P. gingivalis induction of IL-1beta. These results suggest that major and minor fimbria elicit chemokine production in HAEC through actin cytoskeletal rearrangements; however, induction of IL-1beta appears to occur via a separate mechanism. Collectively, these data support that invasive P. gingivalis and fimbria stimulate endothelial cell activation, a necessary initial event in the development of atherogenesis.

  14. Porphyromonas gingivalis facilitates the development and progression of destructive arthritis through its unique bacterial peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD).

    PubMed

    Maresz, Katarzyna J; Hellvard, Annelie; Sroka, Aneta; Adamowicz, Karina; Bielecka, Ewa; Koziel, Joanna; Gawron, Katarzyna; Mizgalska, Danuta; Marcinska, Katarzyna A; Benedyk, Malgorzata; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Jonsson, Roland; Alzabin, Saba; Venables, Patrick J; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Mydel, Piotr; Potempa, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis are two prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases in humans and are associated with each other both clinically and epidemiologically. Recent findings suggest a causative link between periodontal infection and rheumatoid arthritis via bacteria-dependent induction of a pathogenic autoimmune response to citrullinated epitopes. Here we showed that infection with viable periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83 exacerbated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in a mouse model, as manifested by earlier onset, accelerated progression and enhanced severity of the disease, including significantly increased bone and cartilage destruction. The ability of P. gingivalis to augment CIA was dependent on the expression of a unique P. gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD), which converts arginine residues in proteins to citrulline. Infection with wild type P. gingivalis was responsible for significantly increased levels of autoantibodies to collagen type II and citrullinated epitopes as a PPAD-null mutant did not elicit similar host response. High level of citrullinated proteins was also detected at the site of infection with wild-type P. gingivalis. Together, these results suggest bacterial PAD as the mechanistic link between P. gingivalis periodontal infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. The profile of Porphyromonas gingivalis kgp biotype and fimA genotype mosaic in subgingival plaque samples.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Mangala A; Chhour, Kim-Ly; Chapple, Cheryl C; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Hunter, Neil

    2014-12-01

    Combined analysis of allelic variation of the virulence-associated, strain-specific lys-gingipain gene (kgp) and major fimbrial gene (fimA) of Porphyromonas gingivalis was undertaken in 116 subgingival plaque samples to understand the kgp biotype and fimA genotype profile in a subject-specific manner. Allelic variation in the polyadhesin domain of kgp from P. gingivalis strains 381 (ATCC 33277), HG66 and W83 generated four isoforms corresponding to four biotypes of P. gingivalis. Similarly, variation in the fimA subunit of the fimA gene cluster of P. gingivalis resulted in six fimA genotypes. Strain-specific differential PCR was performed for kgp and fimA using DNA isolated from subgingival plaque samples. Our findings demonstrate that all of the P. gingivalis kgp biotypes detected in this study were predominantly associated with the fimA II genotype. Dominance of kgp biotypes 381 or HG66 combined with fimA II fimbriae could imply an adaptive strategy by P. gingivalis to generate the fittest strains for survival in the host environment.

  16. Detection of antimicrobial activity of banana peel (Musa paradisiaca L.) on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Suraj Premal; Pudakalkatti, Pushpa S.; Shivanaikar, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim: Banana is used widely because of its nutritional values. In past, there are studies that show banana plant parts, and their fruits can be used to treat the human diseases. Banana peel is a part of banana fruit that also has the antibacterial activity against microorganisms but has not been studied extensively. Since, there are no studies that relate the antibacterial activity of banana peel against periodontal pathogens. Hence, the aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of banana peel extract on Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans). Material and Methods: Standard strains of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were used in this study which was obtained from the in-house bacterial bank of Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology at Maratha Mandal's Nathajirao G. Halgekar Institute of Dental Sciences and Research Centre. The banana peel extract was prepared, and the antibacterial activity was assessed using well agar diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration was assessed using serial broth dilution method. Results: In the current study, both the tested microorganisms showed antibacterial activity. In well diffusion method, P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans showed 15 mm and 12 mm inhibition zone against an alcoholic extract of banana peel, respectively. In serial broth dilution method P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were sensitive until 31.25 μg/ml dilutions. Conclusion: From results of the study, it is suggested that an alcoholic extract of banana peel has antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:26681854

  17. Clonal diversity of the taxon Porphyromonas gingivalis assessed by random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, C; Mouton, C

    1995-01-01

    A total of 97 strains of the periopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis were collected. This collection included laboratory strains and clinical isolates of human origin with diverse clinical and geographical origins. Biological diversity was further increased by including 32 strains isolated from the oral cavities of nine different animal species. Genomic fingerprints of the 129 strains were generated as random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) by the technique of PCR amplification with a single primer of arbitrary sequence. Four nonameric oligonucleotides were used as single primers, and the banding patterns of the DNA products separated on agarose gels were compared after ethidium ethidium bromide staining. Distance coeffients based on the positions of the major DNA fragments were calculated, and dendrograms were generated. We identified 102 clonal types (CTs) that could be assembled into three main groups by cluster analysis by the unweighted pair group method with mathematic averages. Group I (n = 79 CTs) included all 97 human strains and 6 monkey isolates. The strains in group II (n = 22 CTs) and III (n = 1 CT) were strongly differentiated from those in group I and included only strains of animal origin; they likely represent two cryptic species within the present P. gingivalis taxon. We observed that strains from Old World monkeys clustered together with the human genotype, whereas strains from New World monkeys clustered with the animal genotype. Our results with human strains also indicated that (i) the population structure is basically clonal, (ii) no dominant or widespread CT could be observed, and (iii) no relationship could be established between specific clusters of CTs and the periodontal status of the host. Our results corroborate previous findings by B. G. Loos, D. W. Dyer, T. S. Whittam, and R. K. Selander (Infect. Immun. 61:204-212, 1993) and suggest that P. gingivalis should be considered a commensal of the oral cavity acting as an opportunistic

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis Type IX Secretion Substrates Are Cleaved and Modified by a Sortase-Like Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dina; Seers, Christine A.; Mitchell, Helen A.; Chen, Yu-Yen; Glew, Michelle D.; Dashper, Stuart G.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    The type IX secretion system (T9SS) of Porphyromonas gingivalis secretes proteins possessing a conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) to the cell surface. The C-terminal signal is essential for these proteins to translocate across the outer membrane via the T9SS. On the surface the CTD of these proteins is cleaved prior to extensive glycosylation. It is believed that the modification on these CTD proteins is anionic lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS), which enables the attachment of CTD proteins to the cell surface. However, the exact site of modification and the mechanism of attachment of CTD proteins to the cell surface are unknown. In this study we characterized two wbaP (PG1964) mutants that did not synthesise A-LPS and accumulated CTD proteins in the clarified culture fluid (CCF). The CTDs of the CTD proteins in the CCF were cleaved suggesting normal secretion, however, the CTD proteins were not glycosylated. Mass spectrometric analysis of CTD proteins purified from the CCF of the wbaP mutants revealed the presence of various peptide/amino acid modifications from the growth medium at the C-terminus of the mature CTD proteins. This suggested that modification occurs at the C-terminus of T9SS substrates in the wild type P. gingivalis. This was confirmed by analysis of CTD proteins from wild type, where a 648 Da linker was identified to be attached at the C-terminus of mature CTD proteins. Importantly, treatment with proteinase K released the 648 Da linker from the CTD proteins demonstrating a peptide bond between the C-terminus and the modification. Together, this is suggestive of a mechanism similar to sortase A for the cleavage and modification/attachment of CTD proteins in P. gingivalis. PG0026 has been recognized as the CTD signal peptidase and is now proposed to be the sortase-like protein in P. gingivalis. To our knowledge, this is the first biochemical evidence suggesting a sortase-like mechanism in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26340749

  19. A Dual Role for P2X7 Receptor during Porphyromonas gingivalis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Junior, E.S.; Morandini, A.C.; Almeida-da-Silva, C.L.C.; Franco, E.J.; Potempa, J.; Nguyen, K.A.; Oliveira, A.C.; Zamboni, D.S.; Ojcius, D.M.; Scharfstein, J.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a role for purinergic signaling in the activation of multiprotein intracellular complexes called inflammasomes, which control the release of potent inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL) -1β and -18. Porphyromonas gingivalis is intimately associated with periodontitis and is currently considered one of the pathogens that can subvert the immune system by limiting the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. We recently showed that P. gingivalis can dampen eATP-induced IL-1β secretion by means of its fimbriae in a purinergic P2X7 receptor–dependent manner. Here, we further explore the role of this purinergic receptor during eATP-induced IL-1β processing and secretion by P. gingivalis–infected macrophages. We found that NLRP3 was necessary for eATP-induced IL-1β secretion as well as for caspase 1 activation irrespective of P. gingivalis fimbriae. Additionally, although the secretion of IL-1β from P. gingivalis–infected macrophages was dependent on NLRP3, its adaptor protein ASC, or caspase 1, the cleavage of intracellular pro-IL-1β to the mature form was found to occur independently of NLRP3, its adaptor protein ASC, or caspase 1. Our in vitro findings revealed that P2X7 receptor has a dual role, being critical not only for eATP-induced IL-1β secretion but also for intracellular pro-IL-1β processing. These results were relevant in vivo since P2X7 receptor expression was upregulated in a P. gingivalis oral infection model, and reduced IFN-γ and IL-17 were detected in draining lymph node cells from P2rx7-/- mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that P2X7 receptor and NLRP3 transcription were modulated in human chronic periodontitis. Overall, we conclude that the P2X7 receptor has a role in periodontal immunopathogenesis and suggest that targeting of the P2X7/NLRP3 pathway should be considered in future therapeutic interventions in periodontitis. PMID:26152185

  20. Evidence of mutualism between two periodontal pathogens: co-operative haem acquisition by the HmuY haemophore of Porphyromonas gingivalis and the cysteine protease interpain A (InpA) of Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Byrne, D P; Potempa, J; Olczak, T; Smalley, J W

    2013-06-01

    Haem (iron protoporphyrin IX) is both an essential growth factor and a virulence regulator of the periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, which acquire it through the proteolytic degradation of haemoglobin and other haem-carrying plasma proteins. The haem-binding lipoprotein HmuY haemophore and the gingipain proteases of P. gingivalis form a unique synthrophic system responsible for capture of haem from haemoglobin and methaemalbumin. In this system, methaemoglobin is formed from oxyhaemoglobin by the activities of gingipain proteases and serves as a facile substrate from which HmuY can capture haem. This study examined the possibility of cooperation between HmuY and the cysteine protease interpain A (InpA) of Pr. intermedia in the haem acquisition process. Using UV-visible spectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, HmuY was demonstrated to be resistant to proteolysis and so able to cooperate with InpA to extract haem from haemoglobin, which was proteolytically converted to methaemoglobin by the protease. Spectroscopic pH titrations showed that both the iron(II) and iron(III) protoporphyrin IX-HmuY complexes were stable over the pH range 4-10, demonstrating that the haemophore could function over a range of pH that may be encountered in the dental plaque biofilm. This is the first demonstration of a bacterial haemophore working in conjunction with a protease from another bacterial species to acquire haem from haemoglobin and may represent mutualism between P. gingivalis and Pr. intermedia co-inhabiting the periodontal pocket.

  1. Structural dissection and in vivo effectiveness of a peptide inhibitor of Porphyromonas gingivalis adherence to Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Daep, Carlo Amorin; Novak, Elizabeth A; Lamont, Richard J; Demuth, Donald R

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of the minor fimbrial antigen (Mfa) with streptococcal antigen I/II (e.g., SspB) facilitates colonization of the dental biofilm by Porphyromonas gingivalis. We previously showed that a 27-mer peptide derived from SspB (designated BAR) resembles the nuclear receptor (NR) box protein-protein interacting domain and potently inhibits this interaction in vitro. Here, we show that the EXXP motif upstream of the NR core α-helix contributes to the Mfa-SspB interaction and that BAR reduces P. gingivalis colonization and alveolar bone loss in vivo in a murine model of periodontitis. Substitution of Gln for Pro(1171) or Glu(1168) increased the α-helicity of BAR and reduced its inhibitory activity in vitro by 10-fold and 2-fold, respectively. To determine if BAR prevents P. gingivalis infection in vivo, mice were first infected with Streptococcus gordonii and then challenged with P. gingivalis in the absence and presence of BAR. Animals that were infected with either 10(9) CFU of S. gordonii DL-1 or 10(7) CFU of P. gingivalis 33277 did not show a statistically significant increase in alveolar bone resorption over sham-infected controls. However, infection with 10(9) CFU of S. gordonii followed by 10(7) CFU of P. gingivalis induced significantly greater bone loss (P < 0.01) than sham infection or infection of mice with either organism alone. S. gordonii-infected mice that were subsequently challenged with 10(7) CFU of P. gingivalis in the presence of BAR exhibited levels of bone resorption similar to those of sham-infected animals. Together, these results indicate that both EXXP and the NR box are important for the Mfa-SspB interaction and that BAR peptide represents a potential therapeutic that may limit colonization of the oral cavity by P. gingivalis.

  2. Porphyromonas gingivalis Evasion of Autophagy and Intracellular Killing by Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells Involves DC-SIGN-TLR2 Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    El-Awady, Ahmed R.; Miles, Brodie; Scisci, Elizabeth; Kurago, Zoya B.; Palani, Chithra D.; Arce, Roger M.; Waller, Jennifer L.; Genco, Caroline A.; Slocum, Connie; Manning, Matthew; Schoenlein, Patricia V.; Cutler, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed on professional antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), is crucial to the fate of engulfed microbes. Among the many PRRs expressed by DCs are Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectins such as DC-SIGN. DC-SIGN is targeted by several major human pathogens for immune-evasion, although its role in intracellular routing of pathogens to autophagosomes is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of DC-SIGN and TLRs in evasion of autophagy and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). We employed a panel of P. gingivalis isogenic fimbriae deficient strains with defined defects in Mfa-1 fimbriae, a DC-SIGN ligand, and FimA fimbriae, a TLR2 agonist. Our results show that DC-SIGN dependent uptake of Mfa1+P. gingivalis strains by MoDCs resulted in lower intracellular killing and higher intracellular content of P. gingivalis. Moreover, Mfa1+P. gingivalis was mostly contained within single membrane vesicles, where it survived intracellularly. Survival was decreased by activation of TLR2 and/or autophagy. Mfa1+P. gingivalis strain did not induce significant levels of Rab5, LC3-II, and LAMP1. In contrast, P. gingivalis uptake through a DC-SIGN independent manner was associated with early endosomal routing through Rab5, increased LC3-II and LAMP-1, as well as the formation of double membrane intracellular phagophores, a characteristic feature of autophagy. These results suggest that selective engagement of DC-SIGN by Mfa-1+P. gingivalis promotes evasion of antibacterial autophagy and lysosome fusion, resulting in intracellular persistence in myeloid DCs; however TLR2 activation can overcome autophagy evasion and pathogen persistence in DCs. PMID:25679217

  3. Identification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of epithelial cells as a second molecule that binds to Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Sojar, Hakimuddin T; Genco, Robert J

    2005-07-01

    Binding of Porphyromonas gingivalis to the host cells is an essential step in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. P. gingivalis binds to and invades epithelial cells, and fimbriae are thought to be involved in this process. In our earlier studies, two major epithelial cell components of 40 and 50 kDa were identified as potential fimbrial receptors. Sequencing of a cyanogen bromide digestion fragment of the 50-kDa component resulted in an internal sequence identical to keratin I molecules, and hence this cytokeratin represents one of the epithelial cell receptors for P. gingivalis fimbriae. In this study, the 40-kDa component of KB cells was isolated and its amino-terminal sequence determined. The N-terminal amino sequence was found to be GKVKVGVNGF and showed perfect homology with human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Furthermore, purified P. gingivalis fimbriae were found to bind to rabbit muscle GAPDH. Antibodies directed against internal peptide 49-68 and 69-90 of fimbrillin were shown to inhibit the binding of P. gingivalis and of fimbriae to epithelial cells. Antibodies against these peptides also inhibited the binding of fimbriae to GAPDH. Our results confirmed that the amino-terminal domain corresponding to amino residues 49-68 of the fimbrillin protein is the major GAPDH binding domain. These studies point to GAPDH as a major receptor for P. gingivalis major fimbriae and, as such, GAPDH likely plays a role in P. gingivalis adherence and colonization of the oral cavity, as well as triggering host cell processes involved in the pathogenesis of P. gingivalis infections.

  4. Porphyromonas gingivalis evasion of autophagy and intracellular killing by human myeloid dendritic cells involves DC-SIGN-TLR2 crosstalk.

    PubMed

    El-Awady, Ahmed R; Miles, Brodie; Scisci, Elizabeth; Kurago, Zoya B; Palani, Chithra D; Arce, Roger M; Waller, Jennifer L; Genco, Caroline A; Slocum, Connie; Manning, Matthew; Schoenlein, Patricia V; Cutler, Christopher W

    2015-02-01

    Signaling via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed on professional antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), is crucial to the fate of engulfed microbes. Among the many PRRs expressed by DCs are Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectins such as DC-SIGN. DC-SIGN is targeted by several major human pathogens for immune-evasion, although its role in intracellular routing of pathogens to autophagosomes is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of DC-SIGN and TLRs in evasion of autophagy and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). We employed a panel of P. gingivalis isogenic fimbriae deficient strains with defined defects in Mfa-1 fimbriae, a DC-SIGN ligand, and FimA fimbriae, a TLR2 agonist. Our results show that DC-SIGN dependent uptake of Mfa1+P. gingivalis strains by MoDCs resulted in lower intracellular killing and higher intracellular content of P. gingivalis. Moreover, Mfa1+P. gingivalis was mostly contained within single membrane vesicles, where it survived intracellularly. Survival was decreased by activation of TLR2 and/or autophagy. Mfa1+P. gingivalis strain did not induce significant levels of Rab5, LC3-II, and LAMP1. In contrast, P. gingivalis uptake through a DC-SIGN independent manner was associated with early endosomal routing through Rab5, increased LC3-II and LAMP-1, as well as the formation of double membrane intracellular phagophores, a characteristic feature of autophagy. These results suggest that selective engagement of DC-SIGN by Mfa-1+P. gingivalis promotes evasion of antibacterial autophagy and lysosome fusion, resulting in intracellular persistence in myeloid DCs; however TLR2 activation can overcome autophagy evasion and pathogen persistence in DCs.

  5. Sequence Diversity and Antigenic Variation at the rag Locus of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Lucinda M. C.; Fawell, Stuart C.; Shi, Xiaoju; Faray-Kele, Marie-Claire; Aduse-Opoku, Joseph; Whiley, Robert A.; Curtis, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    The rag locus of Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 encodes RagA, a predicted tonB-dependent receptor protein, and RagB, a lipoprotein that constitutes an immunodominant outer membrane antigen. The low G+C content of the locus, an association with mobility elements, and an apparent restricted distribution in the species suggested that the locus had arisen by horizontal gene transfer. In the present study, we have demonstrated that there are four divergent alleles of the rag locus. The original rag allele found in W50 was renamed rag-1, while three novel alleles, rag-2 to rag-4, were found in isolates lacking rag-1. The three novel alleles encoded variants of RagA with 63 to 71% amino acid identity to RagA1 and each other and variants of RagB with 43 to 56% amino acid identity. The RagA/B proteins have homology to numerous Bacteroides proteins, including SusC/D, implicated in polysaccharide uptake. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies raised against RagB1 of P. gingivalis W50 did not cross-react with proteins from isolates carrying different alleles. In a laboratory collection of 168 isolates, 26% carried rag-1, 36% carried rag-2, 25% carried rag-3, and 14% carried rag-4 (including the type strain, ATCC 33277). Restriction profiles of the locus in different isolates demonstrated polymorphism within each allele, some of which is accounted for by the presence or absence of insertion sequence elements. By reference to a previously published study on virulence in a mouse model (M. L. Laine and A. J. van Winkelhoff, Oral Microbiol. Immunol. 13:322-325, 1998), isolates that caused serious disease in mice were significantly more likely to carry rag-1 than other rag alleles. PMID:15972517

  6. Isolation and characterization of fimbriae from a sparsely fimbriated strain of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Sojar, H T; Hamada, N; Genco, R J

    1997-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 (ATCC 53978) possesses the gene for fimbriae; however, the surface-expressed fimbriae are sparse and have not been previously isolated and characterized. We purified fimbriae from strain W50 to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography [H. T. Sojar, N. Hamada, and R. J. Genco, Protein Expr. Purif. 9(1):49-52, 1997]. Negative staining of purified fimbriae viewed by electron microscopy revealed that the fimbriae were identical in diameter to fimbriae of other P. gingivalis strains, such as 2561, but were shorter in length. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis, the apparent molecular weight of isolated fimbrillin from strain W50 was found to be identical to that of the fimbrillin molecule of strain 2561. Unlike 2561 fimbriae, W50 fimbriae, under reducing condition, exhibited a monomeric structure on SDS-PAGE at room temperature. However, under nonreduced conditions, even at 100 degrees C, no monomer was observed. In immunoblot analysis as well as immunogold labeling of isolated fimbriae, polyclonal antibodies against 2561 fimbriae, as well as antibodies against peptide I (V-V-M-A-N-T-G-A-M-E-V-G-K-T-L-A-E-V-K-Cys) and peptide J (A-L-T-T-E-L-T-A-E-N-Q-E-A-A-G-L-I-M-T-A-E-P-Cys), reacted. However, antifimbrial antibodies against strain 2561 reacted very weakly compared to anti-peptide I and anti-peptide J. Negative staining of whole W50 cells, as well as immunogold electron microscopy with anti-peptide I and anti-peptide J, showed fimbriae shorter in length and very few in number compared to those of strain 2561. Purified fimbriae showed no hemagglutinating activity. Amino acid composition was very similar to that of previously reported fimbriae of the 2561 strain. PMID:9172351

  7. Asp- and Glu-specific novel dipeptidyl peptidase 11 of Porphyromonas gingivalis ensures utilization of proteinaceous energy sources.

    PubMed

    Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Shimoyama, Yu; Kimura, Shigenobu; Kon, Asako; Haraga, Hiroshi; Ono, Toshio; Nemoto, Takayuki K

    2011-11-04

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Porphyromonas endodontalis, asaccharolytic black-pigmented anaerobes, are predominant pathogens of human chronic and periapical periodontitis, respectively. They incorporate di- and tripeptides from the environment as carbon and energy sources. In the present study we cloned a novel dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) gene of P. endodontalis ATCC 35406, designated as DPP11. The DPP11 gene encoded 717 amino acids with a molecular mass of 81,090 Da and was present as a 75-kDa form with an N terminus of Asp(22). A homology search revealed the presence of a P. gingivalis orthologue, PGN0607, that has been categorized as an isoform of authentic DPP7. P. gingivalis DPP11 was exclusively cell-associated as a truncated 60-kDa form, and the gene ablation retarded cell growth. DPP11 specifically removed dipeptides from oligopeptides with the penultimate N-terminal Asp and Glu and has a P2-position preference to hydrophobic residues. Optimum pH was 7.0, and the k(cat)/K(m) value was higher for Asp than Glu. Those activities were lost by substitution of Ser(652) in P. endodontalis and Ser(655) in P. gingivalis DPP11 to Ala, and they were consistently decreased with increasing NaCl concentration. Arg(670) is a unique amino acid completely conserved in all DPP11 members distributed in the genera Porphyromonas, Bacteroides, and Parabacteroides, whereas this residue is converted to Gly in all authentic DPP7 members. Substitution analysis suggested that Arg(670) interacts with an acidic residue of the substrate. Considered to preferentially utilize acidic amino acids, DPP11 ensures efficient degradation of oligopeptide substrates in these Gram-negative anaerobic rods.

  8. The capacity of Porphyromonas gingivalis to multiply under iron-limiting conditions correlates with its pathogenicity in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Grenier, D; Goulet, V; Mayrand, D

    2001-07-01

    Isolates of Porphyromonas gingivalis have various abilities to induce infections in an animal model. The hypothesis of this study was that pathogenic strains of P. gingivalis could multiply under iron-limiting conditions, while non-pathogenic strains could not. Three pathogenic strains (W50, W83, and ATCC 49417) grew to a final optical density (660 nm) > 2 in horse serum, while the growth of the 3 non-pathogenic strains (ATCC 33277, LB13D-2, and HW24D-1) was negligible. When an excess of hemin or ferric chloride was added to the serum, significant growth of the non-pathogenic strains occurred. Under iron-limiting conditions, the pathogenic strains of P. gingivalis had a much lower requirement for human iron-loaded transferrin and hemin than the non-pathogenic strains. Proteolytic degradation of transferrin, which may be associated with the release of iron, was not markedly different for pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. In addition, no relationship could be established between the level of 55Fe uptake from 55Fe-transferrin and the pathogenicity of strains. Our study provided evidence that the ability of P. gingivalis to multiply in vitro under iron-limiting conditions may be correlated with its ability to induce infections in an animal model. Isolates of P. gingivalis possessing a low requirement for iron are likely to have a higher potential for initiating periodontal infections.

  9. Subcutaneous vaccination with Porphyromonas gingivalis ameliorates periodontitis by modulating Th17/Treg imbalance in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linyuan; Guan, Ning; Jin, Ying; Lin, Xiaoping; Gao, Hong

    2015-03-01

    To date, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) vaccination has been studied only in animals, and no effective prophylactic human periodontal vaccine has been developed, with the reason for the failure of prophylactic human periodontal vaccines unknown. T helper 17 cell (Th17)/regulatory T (Treg) cell responses play an important role in the development of periodontitis, and a Th17/Treg imbalance causes the pathogenesis of periodontitis. However, whether vaccination with P. gingivalis can prevent periodontitis through modulation of the Th17/Treg imbalance remains unknown. In this study, mice were subcutaneously vaccinated with formalin-killed P. gingivalis and then orally challenged with P. gingivalis. The vaccination protected the mice from alveolar bone resorption and inflammation. These protective effects might be ascribed to downregulation of Th17 cells and interleukin (IL)-17A production, upregulation of Treg and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)(+)CD4(+)T cells, and IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 production, and inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation. Our findings may provide a direction for the development of a vaccine or therapy against periodontitis by alteration of the Th17/Treg imbalance.

  10. Comparison of Experimental Diabetic Periodontitis Induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Aprecio, Ray; Zhang, Dongjiao; Li, Hao; Ji, Ning; Mohamed, Omaima; Zhang, Wu; Li, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is one of the severe complications in diabetic patients and gingival epithelium plays an initial role on the onset and progression of this disease. However the potential mechanism is yet sufficiently understood. Meanwhile, the research on the correlational experimental animal models was also insufficient. Here, we established periodontitis with type 2 diabetes in db/db and Tallyho/JngJ (TH) mice and periodontitis with type 1 diabetes in streptozotocin induced diabetes C57BL/6J (STZ-C57) mice by oral infection of periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis W50. We demonstrated that periodontal infected mice with high blood glucose levels showed dramatically more alveolar bone loss than their counterparts, in which infected db/db mice exhibited the most bone defects. No contrary impact could be observed between this periodontal infection and onset and severity of diabetes. The expressions of PTPN2 were inhibited whereas the expression of JAK1, STAT1, and STAT3 increased dramatically in gingival epithelia and the serum TNF-α also significantly increased in the mice with diabetic periodontitis. Our results indicated that the variations of inflammation-related protein expressions in gingival epithelia might lead to the phenotype differences in the mice with diabetic periodontitis. PMID:27995146

  11. Role of Superoxide Dismutase Activity in the Physiology of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Michael C.; Kuramitsu, Howard K.

    1999-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative, obligate anaerobe strongly associated with chronic adult periodontitis. A previous study has demonstrated that this organism requires superoxide dismutase (SOD) for its modest aerotolerance. In this study, we have constructed a mutant deficient in SOD activity by insertional inactivation as well as a sod::lacZ reporter translational fusion construct to study the regulation of expression of this gene. We have confirmed that SOD is essential for tolerance to atmospheric oxygen but does not appear to be protective against hydrogen peroxide or exogenously generated reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, the sod mutant appeared to be no more sensitive to killing by neutrophils than the parental strain 381. SOD appears to be protective against oxygen-dependent DNA damage as measured by increased mutation to rifampin resistance by the sod mutant. Use of the sod::lacZ construct confirmed that SOD expression is maximal at mid-log phase and is influenced by oxygen, temperature, and pH. However, expression does not appear to be significantly affected by iron depletion, osmolarity, or nutrient depletion. The transcription start site of the sod gene was determined to be 315 bp upstream of the sod start codon and to be within an upstream open reading frame. Our studies demonstrate the essential role that SOD plays in aerotolerance of this organism as well as the selective induction of this enzyme by environmental stimuli. PMID:10377114

  12. Wild Bitter Melon Leaf Extract Inhibits Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Inflammation: Identification of Active Compounds through Bioassay-Guided Isolation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tzung-Hsun; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Ying, How-Ting; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Shen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Yin-Ku; Tsai, Po-Jung

    2016-04-06

    Porphyromonas gingivalis has been identified as one of the major periodontal pathogens. Activity-directed fractionation and purification processes were employed to identify the anti-inflammatory active compounds using heat-killed P. gingivalis-stimulated human monocytic THP-1 cells in vitro. Five major fractions were collected from the ethanol/ethyl acetate extract of wild bitter melon (Momordica charantia Linn. var. abbreviata Ser.) leaves and evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity against P. gingivalis. Among the test fractions, Fraction 5 effectively decreased heat-killed P. gingivalis-induced interleukin (IL)-8 and was subjected to separation and purification by using chromatographic techniques. Two cucurbitane triterpenoids were isolated from the active fraction and identified as 5β,19-epoxycucurbita-6,23-diene-3β,19,25-triol (1) and 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23-dien-19-al (2) by comparing spectral data. Treatments of both compounds in vitro potently suppressed P. gingivalis-induced IL-8, IL-6, and IL-1β levels and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in THP-1 cells. Both compounds effectively inhibited the mRNA levels of IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in P. gingivalis-stimulated gingival tissue of mice. These findings imply that 5β,19-epoxycucurbita-6,23-diene-3β,19,25-triol and 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23-dien-19-al could be used for the development of novel therapeutic approaches against P. gingivalis infections.

  13. CXCR4 signaling in macrophages contributes to periodontal mechanical hypersensitivity in Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced periodontitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Hidekazu; Honda, Kuniya; Kamio, Noriaki; Watanabe, Masahiro; Suzuki, Tatsuro; Sugano, Naoyuki; Sato, Shuichi; Iwata, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease accompanied by alveolar bone loss and progressive inflammation without pain. However, the potential contributors eliminating pain associated with gingival inflammation are unknown. Results we examined the involvement of CXC chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) on the mechanical sensitivity of inflamed periodontal tissue, using a mouse model of periodontitis established by the ligation of the tooth cervix of a maxillary second molar and inoculation with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). Infiltration of inflammatory cells into gingival tissue was not observed following the inoculation. Under light anesthesia, the mechanical head withdrawal threshold (MHWT) on the buccal gingiva was measured using an electronic von Frey anesthesiometer. No significant changes in MHWT were observed in the mice with P. gingivalis-induced periodontitis during the experimental period. Continuous administration of CXCR4 neutralizing antibody to the gingival tissue significantly decreased MHWT and increased the number of gingival CXCR4 immunoreactive macrophages in the periodontitis group. Nitric oxide metabolites in the gingival tissue were significantly increased after the inoculation of P. gingivalis and were reduced by gingival CXCR4 neutralization. Gingival L-arginine administration induced gingival mechanical allodynia in naive animals. Moreover, the decrease in MHWT after treatment with P. gingivalis and CXCR4 neutralization was partially reversed by nitric oxide synthase inhibition in the gingival tissue. Nuclear factor-kappa B was expressed in infiltrating macrophages after inoculation of P. gingivalis and administration of the nuclear factor-kappa B activator betulinic acid induced gingival mechanical allodynia in naive mice. Conclusions These findings suggest that CXCR4 signaling inhibits nitric oxide release from infiltrating macrophages and is involved in modulation of the mechanical sensitivity in the periodontal tissue

  14. Occurrence of porphyromonas gingivalis and its antibacterial susceptibility to metronidazole and tetracycline in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gamboa, Fredy; Acosta, Adriana; García, Dabeiba-Adriana; Velosa, Juliana; Araya, Natalia; Ledergerber, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a multifactorial infectious disease associated with Gram-negative strict anaerobes which are immersed in the subgingival biofilm. Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important periodontal pathogen, is frequently detected in patients with chronic periodontitis. Although isolates of P. gingivalis tend to be susceptible to most antimicrobial agents, relatively little information is available on its in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of P. gingivalis in patients with chronic periodontitis and to assess antimicrobial susceptibility in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of clinical isolates to metronidazole and tetracycline. A descriptive, observational study was performed including 87 patients with chronic periodontitis. Samples were taken from the periodontal pocket using paper points, which were placed in thioglycollate broth. Samples were incubated for 4 hours at 37°C in anaerobic conditions and finally replated on Wilkins-Chalgren anaerobic agar (Oxoid). Bacteria were identified using the RapIDTMANAII system (Remel) and antimicrobial susceptibility was determined with the M.I.C. Evaluator test (MICE, Oxoid). P. gingivalis was identified in 30 of the 87 patients with chronic periodontitis, which represents a frequency of 34.5%. All 30 isolates (100%) were sensitive to metronidazole, with MIC values ranging from 0015-4ug/ml. Regarding tetracycline, 27 isolates (90%) were sensitive, with MIC values ranging from <0.015 to 4 ug /ml, the remaining three isolates (10%) were resistant to tetracycline with MIC values of 8ug/ ml. There was no statistically significant difference in age, gender, pocket depth, clinical attachment level and severity of periodontitis between the group of patients with chronic periodontitis and P. gingivalis and the group of patients with chronic periodontitis without P. gingivalis. In conclusion, P. gingivalis was found at a frequency of 34.5% in patients

  15. Melatonin Receptor Agonists as the “Perioceutics” Agents for Periodontal Disease through Modulation of Porphyromonas gingivalis Virulence and Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cai-Lian; He, Zhi-Yan; Liang, Jing-Ping; Song, Zhong-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Aim “Perioceutics” including antimicrobial therapy and host modulatory therapy has emerged as a vital adjunctive treatment of periodontal disease. Melatonin level was significantly reduced in patients with periodontal diseases suggesting melatonin could be applied as a potential “perioceutics” treatment of periodontal diseases. This study aims to investigate the effects of melatonin receptor agonists (melatonin and ramelteon) on Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence and Porphyromonas gingivalis-derived lipopolysaccharide (Pg-LPS)-induced inflammation. Methods Effects of melatonin receptor agonists on Porphyromonas gingivalis planktonic cultures were determined by microplate dilution assays. Formation, reduction, and viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms were detected by crystal violet staining and MTT assays, respectively. Meanwhile, biofilms formation was also observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The effects on gingipains and hemolytic activities of Porphyromonas gingivalis were evaluated using chromogenic peptides and sheep erythrocytes. The mRNA expression of virulence and iron/heme utilization was assessed using RT-PCR. In addition, cell viability of melatonin receptor agonists on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was evaluated by MTT assays. After pretreatment of melatonin receptor agonists, HGFs were stimulated with Pg-LPS and then release of cytokines (IL-6 and lL-8) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Melatonin and ramelteon did exhibit antimicrobial effects against planktonic culture. Importantly, they inhibited biofilm formation, reduced the established biofilms, and decreased biofilm viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Furthermore, they at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) concentrations markedly inhibited the proteinase activities of gingipains and hemolysis in a dose-dependent manner. They at sub-MIC concentrations significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of virulence

  16. Assessing the Antimicrobial Effect of the Essential Oil of Myrtus communis on the Clinical Isolates of Porphyromonas gingivalis: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati, Azita; Khosropanah, Hengameh; Bazargani, Abdollah; Abed, Molud; Emami, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the major diseases affecting the oral health is periodontal disease. Various therapeutic methods have been introduced to eliminate the periodonto-pathic subgingival microflora. Among these, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) has a major role in the pathogenesis of different forms of periodontal diseases. Objectives The present study investigated the antimicrobial effect of the essential oil of Myrtus communis on Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) as the most destructive periodontal pathogens. Materials and Methods The subjects included 27 male and 3 female patients with advanced chronic periodontitis. The mean age of the patients was 47.6 ± 2.0 years old. P. gingivalis was isolated from the samples and identified by various diagnostic tests, including Gram staining, Indol test, and fluorescent test. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the essential oil against isolated P. gingivalis was determined by broth micro-dilution method. Results In this study, 0.12 - 64 μL/mL Myrtus communis essence were used for 30 P. gingivalis isolates and the MIC50 and MIC90 concentration of Myrtus communis essence against the isolates was equal to 1 and 8 μL/mL respectively. Conclusions The results showed that Myrtus communis has antimicrobial effects against P. gingivalis. Further studies are suggested to include this essence in therapeutic protocols of periodontal disease. PMID:24624208

  17. Porphyromonas gingivalis induces CCR5-dependent transfer of infectious HIV-1 from oral keratinocytes to permissive cells

    PubMed Central

    Giacaman, Rodrigo A; Asrani, Anil C; Gebhard, Kristin H; Dietrich, Elizabeth A; Vacharaksa, Anjalee; Ross, Karen F; Herzberg, Mark C

    2008-01-01

    Background Systemic infection with HIV occurs infrequently through the oral route. The frequency of occurrence may be increased by concomitant bacterial infection of the oral tissues, since co-infection and inflammation of some cell types increases HIV-1 replication. A putative periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis selectively up-regulates expression of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 on oral keratinocytes. We, therefore, hypothesized that P. gingivalis modulates the outcome of HIV infection in oral epithelial cells. Results Oral and tonsil epithelial cells were pre-incubated with P. gingivalis, and inoculated with either an X4- or R5-type HIV-1. Between 6 and 48 hours post-inoculation, P. gingivalis selectively increased the infectivity of R5-tropic HIV-1 from oral and tonsil keratinocytes; infectivity of X4-tropic HIV-1 remained unchanged. Oral keratinocytes appeared to harbor infectious HIV-1, with no evidence of productive infection. HIV-1 was harbored at highest levels during the first 6 hours after HIV exposure and decreased to barely detectable levels at 48 hours. HIV did not appear to co-localize with P. gingivalis, which increased selective R5-tropic HIV-1 trans infection from keratinocytes to permissive cells. When CCR5 was selectively blocked, HIV-1 trans infection was reduced. Conclusion P. gingivalis up-regulation of CCR5 increases trans infection of harbored R5-tropic HIV-1 from oral keratinocytes to permissive cells. Oral infections such as periodontitis may, therefore, increase risk for oral infection and dissemination of R5-tropic HIV-1. PMID:18371227

  18. Prevalence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia in Japanese patients with generalized chronic and aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Sachiyo; Komiya-Ito, Akiyo; Imamura, Kentaro; Kita, Daichi; Ota, Koki; Takayama, Saori; Makino-Oi, Asako; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Ota, Mikio; Saito, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and levels of major periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia in subgingival plaque samples of a group of Japanese patients with aggressive periodontitis (AgP) and chronic periodontitis (CP). A total of 40 patients with clinical diagnosis of AgP or CP and 10 periodontally healthy volunteers were subjected to clinical and microbiological analysis. Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia with a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The prevalence of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia was relatively high in patients with periodontitis: over 60% of AgP or CP patients harbored these pathogens whereas they were not detected in the subgingival plaque samples from periodontally healthy individuals. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were relatively frequently detected together in AgP and CP patients. No significant differences in the prevalence or level of the 3 pathogens were found between periodontitis groups. The proportion of T. forsythia was approximately 4-fold higher in CP group than in AgP group (P = 0.02). In periodontitis patients, a significant positive correlation was found between periodontal parameters (probing depth and clinical attachment level) and the numbers of total bacteria, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. No distinct pattern of the subgingival profile of these pathogens was discerned between the two disease entities, except for the difference in the proportion of T. forsythia. The red complex bacteria, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were highly prevalent in this population of Japanese AgP and CP patients, collaborating their roles in periodontitis.

  19. Quantification of Porphyromonas gingivalis in chronic periodontitis patients associated with diabetes mellitus using real-time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Padmalatha, GV; Bavle, Radhika M; Satyakiran, Gadavalli Vera Venkata; Paremala, K; Sudhakara, M; Makarla, Soumya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periodontal diseases, if left untreated, can lead to tooth loss and affect at least one tooth in 80% of adults worldwide, with the main cause being a bacterial plaque. Among subgingival plaque bacterial species, Porphyromonas gingivalis has been implicated as a major etiological agent causing tooth loss. Diabetics and smokers are two patient groups at high risk for periodontal disease. The increase in the number of this organism with the coexistence of other pathogenic microbes leads to rapid destruction of the periodontium, premature loss of teeth and also because of its virulence has implications in systemic pathology. Our aim was to observe the involvement of P. gingivalis in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients associated with periodontitis with and without tobacco-associated habits and to compare them with periodontitis patients having no other systemic pathologies. Materials and Methods: Subgingival plaque samples from a total of seventy subjects were included in the study. DNA was isolated from the collected sample and was quantified using spectrophotometer for standardizing the polymerase chain reaction. The quantity of the isolated DNA was checked in a ultraviolet-visible spectrophotomer. Statistics: One-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple post hoc procedures were carried out. Results: The maximum score of P. gingivalis was seen in periodontitis patients having DM, whereas the least score was seen in periodontitis patients having DM with tobacco smoking habit compared to the other groups. Conclusion: P. gingivalis count is significantly reduced in periodontitis patients having DM with smoking habit; it is concluded that P. gingivalis might not be a key causative organism responsible for the periodontal destruction in case of smokers despite the DM condition. The decrease in counts may be attributed to change in the local environment like chemical (tobacco nitrosamines) and physical changes preventing the growth of P. gingivalis. PMID:27721606

  20. The Periodontal Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis Preferentially Interacts with Oral Epithelial Cells in S Phase of the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Al-Taweel, Firas B.; Douglas, C. W. Ian

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a key periodontal pathogen, is capable of invading a variety of cells, including oral keratinocytes, by exploiting host cell receptors, including alpha-5 beta-1 (α5β1) integrin. Previous studies have shown that P. gingivalis accelerates the cell cycle and prevents apoptosis of host cells, but it is not known whether the cell cycle phases influence bacterium-cell interactions. The cell cycle distribution of oral keratinocytes was characterized by flow cytometry and BrdU (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine) staining following synchronization of cultures by serum starvation. The effect of cell cycle phases on P. gingivalis invasion was measured by using antibiotic protection assays and flow cytometry, and these results were correlated with gene and surface expression levels of α5 integrin and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). There was a positive correlation (R = 0.98) between the number of cells in S phase and P. gingivalis invasion, the organism was more highly associated with cells in S phase than with cells in G2 and G1 phases, and S-phase cells contained 10 times more bacteria than did cells that were not in S phase. Our findings also show that α5 integrin, but not uPAR, was positively correlated with cells in S phase, which is consistent with previous reports indicating that P. gingivalis invasion of cells is mediated by α5 integrin. This study shows for the first time that P. gingivalis preferentially associates with and invades cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. The mechanism of targeting stable dividing cells may have implications for the treatment of periodontal diseases and may partly explain the persistence of this organism at subgingival sites. PMID:27091929

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis and related bacteria: from colonial pigmentation to the type IX secretion system and gliding motility

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, K

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative, non-motile, anaerobic bacterium implicated as a major pathogen in periodontal disease. P. gingivalis grows as black-pigmented colonies on blood agar, and many bacteriologists have shown interest in this property. Studies of colonial pigmentation have revealed a number of important findings, including an association with the highly active extracellular and surface proteinases called gingipains that are found in P. gingivalis. The Por secretion system, a novel type IX secretion system (T9SS), has been implicated in gingipain secretion in studies using non-pigmented mutants. In addition, many potent virulence proteins, including the metallocarboxypeptidase CPG70, 35 kDa hemin-binding protein HBP35, peptidylarginine deiminase PAD and Lys-specific serine endopeptidase PepK, are secreted through the T9SS. These findings have not been limited to P. gingivalis but have been extended to other bacteria belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Many Bacteroidetes species possess the T9SS, which is associated with gliding motility for some of these bacteria. PMID:25546073

  2. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-09-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces.

  3. Punica granatum L. (Pomegranate) Extract: In Vivo Study of Antimicrobial Activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis in Galleria mellonella Model

    PubMed Central

    Aparecida Procópio Gomes, Livia; Alves Figueiredo, Lívia Mara; Corrêa Geraldo, Barbara Maria; Isler Castro, Kelly Cristine; Ruano de Oliveira Fugisaki, Luciana; Olavo Cardoso Jorge, Antônio; Dias de Oliveira, Luciane; Campos Junqueira, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increase of bacterial resistance, medicinal alternatives are being explored. Punica granatum L. is an effective herbal extract with broad spectrum of action and bactericidal, antifungal, anthelmintic potential and being able to modulate the immune response. The aim was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of pomegranate glycolic extract (PGE) against the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis by using Galleria mellonella as in vivo model. Fifteen larvae were used per group. Injection of high concentration (200, 100, and 25 mg/mL) of PGE showed a toxic effect, leading them to death. A suspension of P. gingivalis (106 cells/mL) was inoculated in the left last proleg and PGE (12.5, 6.25, 3.1, and 2.5 mg/mL) were injected into the right proleg. The larvae were then kept at 37°C under the dark. Injection of PGE at any dose statistically improved larvae survival rates. The data were analysed (log-rank test, Mantel-Cox, P < 0.05) and showed that all concentrations of PGE (12.5, 6.25, 3.1, and 2.5 mg/mL) presented higher larval survival rates, with significant statistical difference in relation to control group (P. gingivalis). In conclusion, the PGE had antimicrobial action against P. gingivalis in vivo model using G. mellonella. PMID:27668280

  4. Saliva Enables the Antimicrobial Activity of LL-37 in the Presence of Proteases of Porphyromonas gingivalis ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gutner, Michal; Chaushu, Stella; Balter, Daniela; Bachrach, Gilad

    2009-01-01

    Proteolysis is a common microbial virulence mechanism that enables the destruction of host tissue and evasion from host defense mechanisms. Antimicrobial peptides, also known as host defense peptides, are effector molecules of the innate immunity that demonstrate a broad range of antimicrobial and immunoregulatory activities. Deficiency of the human LL-37 antimicrobial peptide was previously correlated with severe periodontal disease. Porphyromonas gingivalis, the major pathogen associated with periodontitis, is highly proteolytic. In this study, P. gingivalis was found capable of degrading LL-37 by utilizing its arginine-specific gingipains. Saliva collected from volunteers with a healthy periodontium protected LL-37 from proteolysis by P. gingivalis. Salivary protection of LL-37 was heat resistant and specific and enabled LL-37 to inhibit growth of Escherichia coli in the presence of the P. gingivalis proteases. Previously, saliva and other body fluids have been shown to inhibit the antimicrobial activity of LL-37. Here we demonstrate that at a cost of a small reduction in the bactericidal activity of LL-37, saliva enables the antibacterial activity of LL-37 despite the presence of proteases secreted by the main periodontopathogen. PMID:19805540

  5. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces. PMID:23867843

  6. Chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis infection accelerates the occurrence of age-related granules in ApoE– / – mice brains

    PubMed Central

    Singhrao, Sim K.; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Poole, Sophie; Velsko, Irina; Crean, St John; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study explored the origin of age-related granules in the apolipoprotein E gene knockout (ApoE−/−) B6 background mice brains following chronic gingival infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis for 24 weeks. Intracerebral localization of P. gingivalis was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and its protease by immunohistochemistry. The age-related granules were observed by periodic acid–Schiff (PAS), silver impregnation, and immunostaining. FISH showed intracerebral dissemination of P. gingivalis cells (p = 0.001). PAS and silver impregnation demonstrated the presence of larger inclusions restricted to the CA1, CA2, and dentate gyrus sectors of the hippocampus. A specific monoclonal antibody to bacterial peptidoglycan detected clusters of granules with variable sizes in mice brains infected with P. gingivalis (p = 0.004), and also highlighted areas of diffuse punctate staining equating to physical tissue damage. Mouse immunoglobulin G was observed in the capillaries of the cerebral parenchyma of all P. gingivalis–infected brains (p = 0.001), and on pyramidal neurons in some severely affected mice, compared with the sham-infected mice. Gingipains was also observed in microvessels of the hippocampus in the infected mice. This study supports the possibility of early appearance of age-related granules in ApoE−/− mice following inflammation-mediated tissue injury, accompanied by loss of cerebral blood-brain barrier integrity. PMID:28326151

  7. Porphyromonas gingivalis and related bacteria: from colonial pigmentation to the type IX secretion system and gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K

    2015-02-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative, non-motile, anaerobic bacterium implicated as a major pathogen in periodontal disease. P. gingivalis grows as black-pigmented colonies on blood agar, and many bacteriologists have shown interest in this property. Studies of colonial pigmentation have revealed a number of important findings, including an association with the highly active extracellular and surface proteinases called gingipains that are found in P. gingivalis. The Por secretion system, a novel type IX secretion system (T9SS), has been implicated in gingipain secretion in studies using non-pigmented mutants. In addition, many potent virulence proteins, including the metallocarboxypeptidase CPG70, 35 kDa hemin-binding protein HBP35, peptidylarginine deiminase PAD and Lys-specific serine endopeptidase PepK, are secreted through the T9SS. These findings have not been limited to P. gingivalis but have been extended to other bacteria belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Many Bacteroidetes species possess the T9SS, which is associated with gliding motility for some of these bacteria.

  8. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola in chronic and aggressive periodontitis patients: A comparative polymerase chain reaction study

    PubMed Central

    Kumawat, Ramniwas M.; Ganvir, Sindhu M.; Hazarey, Vinay K.; Qureshi, Asifa; Purohit, Hemant J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The detection frequency of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola in chronic periodontitis (CP) and aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is not explored well in Indian population. Aim: The study was undertaken to detect P. gingivalis and T. denticola in CP as well as in AgP patients using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and to determine the relationship between the frequency of these two microorganisms and the severity of clinical periodontal parameters. Materials and Methods: Subgingival plaque samples were collected from ninety participants (thirty CP patients, thirty AgP patients, and thirty healthy participants) and the aforementioned two microorganisms were detected using PCR. Results: However, when CP and AgP were compared for the detection frequency of two microorganisms, no statistically significant difference was noted. A statistically significant increase in the number of bacteria-positive sites increased as the score of plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), and clinical attachment level of CP and AgP patients increased. Coexistence of P. gingivalis and T. denticola was frequently observed in deep periodontal pockets. Conclusions: Study findings suggest that P. gingivalis and T. denticola are significantly associated with the severity of periodontal tissue destruction. Statistically significant association exists between clinical periodontal parameters such as PI, GI, periodontal pocket depth (PPD), and clinical attachment loss and presence of both the microorganisms. PMID:27994415

  9. Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae dampen P2X7-dependent IL-1β secretion

    PubMed Central

    Morandini, Ana Carolina; Ramos-Junior, Erivan S.; Potempa, Jan; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Bellio, Maria; Ojcius, David M.; Scharfstein, Julio; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of periodontitis, an infection-driven inflammatory disease that leads to bone destruction. This pathogen stimulates pro-IL-1β synthesis but not mature IL-1β secretion, unless the P2X7 receptor is activated by extracellular ATP. Here, we investigated the role of Pg fimbriae in eATP-induced IL-1β release. Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) from wild type (WT) or P2X7-deficient mice were infected with Pg (strain 381) or isogenic fimbriae deficient (strain DPG3) with or without subsequent eATP stimulation. DPG3 induced higher IL-1β secretion after eATP stimulation compared to 381 in WT BMDMs, but not in P2X7-deficient cells. This mechanism was dependent of K+ efflux and Ca2+-iPLA2 activity. Accordingly, non-fimbriated Pg failed to inhibit apoptosis via eATP/P2X7-pathway. Furthermore, Pg-driven stimulation of IL-1β was TLR2- and MyD88-dependent, and irrespective of fimbriae expression. Fimbriae-dependent down-modulation of IL-1β was selective, as levels of other cytokines remained unaffected by P2X7 deficiency. Confocal microscopy demonstrated the presence of discrete P2X7 expression in the absence of Pg stimulation which was enhanced by 381-stimulated cells. Notably, DPG3-infected macrophages revealed a distinct pattern of P2X7 receptor expression with a markedly foci formation. Collectively, these data demonstrate that eATP-induced IL-1β secretion is impaired by Pg fimbriae in a P2X7-dependent manner. PMID:24925032

  10. DNA from Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia induce cytokine production in human monocytic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sahingur, S E; Xia, X-J; Alamgir, S; Honma, K; Sharma, A; Schenkein, H A

    2010-04-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) expression is increased in periodontally diseased tissues compared with healthy sites indicating a possible role of TLR9 and its ligand, bacterial DNA (bDNA), in periodontal disease pathology. Here, we determine the immunostimulatory effects of periodontal bDNA in human monocytic cells (THP-1). THP-1 cells were stimulated with DNA of two putative periodontal pathogens: Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia. The role of TLR9 in periodontal bDNA-initiated cytokine production was determined either by blocking TLR9 signaling in THP-1 cells with chloroquine or by measuring IL-8 production and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation in HEK293 cells stably transfected with human TLR9. Cytokine production (IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha) was increased significantly in bDNA-stimulated cells compared with controls. Chloroquine treatment of THP-1 cells decreased cytokine production, suggesting that TLR9-mediated signaling pathways are operant in the recognition of DNA from periodontal pathogens. Compared with native HEK293 cells, TLR9-transfected cells demonstrated significantly increased IL-8 production (P < 0.001) and NF-kappaB activation in response to bDNA, further confirming the role of TLR9 in periodontal bDNA recognition. The results of PCR arrays demonstrated upregulation of proinflammatory cytokine and NF-kappaB genes in response to periodontal bDNA in THP-1 cells, suggesting that cytokine induction is through NF-kappaB activation. Hence, immune responses triggered by periodontal bacterial nucleic acids may contribute to periodontal disease pathology by inducing proinflammatory cytokine production through the TLR9 signaling pathway.

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis within Placental Villous Mesenchyme and Umbilical Cord Stroma Is Associated with Adverse Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Vanterpool, Sizzle F.; Been, Jasper V.; Houben, Michiel L.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; De Krijger, Ronald R.; Zimmermann, Luc J. I.; Kramer, Boris W.; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Reyes, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), a common oral pathobiont, is implicated in preterm birth. Our aim was to determine if the location of Pg within placental and/or umbilical cord sections was associated with a specific delivery diagnosis at preterm delivery (histologic chorioamnionitis, chorioamnionitis with funisitis, preeclampsia, and preeclampsia with HELLP-syndrome, small for gestational age). The prevalence and location of Pg within archived placental and umbilical cord specimens from preterm (25 to 32 weeks gestation) and term control cohorts were evaluated by immunofluorescent histology. Detection of Pg was performed blinded to pregnancy characteristics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate independent effects of gestational age, being small for gestational age, specific preterm delivery diagnosis, antenatal steroids, and delivery mode, on the odds of having Pg in the preterm tissue. Within the preterm cohort, 49 of 97 (51%) placentas and 40 of 97 (41%) umbilical cord specimens were positive for Pg. Pg within the placenta was significantly associated with shorter gestation lengths (OR 0.63 (95%CI: 0.48–0.85; p = 0.002) per week) and delivery via caesarean section (OR 4.02 (95%CI: 1.15–14.04; p = 0.03), but not with histological chorioamnionitis or preeclampsia. However, the presence of Pg in the umbilical cord was significantly associated with preeclampsia: OR 6.73 (95%CI: 1.31–36.67; p = 0.02). In the term cohort, 2 of 35 (6%) placentas and no umbilical cord term specimens were positive for Pg. The location of Pg within the placenta was different between preterm and term groups in that Pg within the villous mesenchyme was only detected in the preterm cohort, whereas Pg associated with syncytiotrophoblasts was found in both preterm and term placentas. Taken together, our results suggest that the presence of Pg within the villous stroma or umbilical cord may be an important determinant in Pg-associated adverse pregnancy

  12. Effects of Intravenous Injection of Porphyromonas gingivalis on Rabbit Inflammatory Immune Response and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gengbing; Chen, Shuai; Lei, Lang; You, Xiaoqing; Huang, Min; Luo, Lan; Li, Yanfen; Zhao, Xin; Yan, Fuhua

    2015-01-01

    The effects of intravenous injection of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) on rabbit inflammatory immune response and atherosclerosis were evaluated by establishing a microamount Pg bacteremia model combined with high-fat diet. Twenty-four New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into Groups A-D (n = 6). After 14 weeks, levels of inflammatory factors (C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)) in peripheral blood were detected by ELISA. The aorta was subjected to HE staining. Local aortic expressions of toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2), TLR-4, TNF-α, CRP, IL-6, matrix metallopeptidase-9, and MCP-1 were detected by real-time PCR, and those of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65, phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) proteins were detected by Western blot. Intravenous injection of Pg to the bloodstream alone induced atherosclerotic changes and significantly increased systemic and local aortic expressions of inflammatory factors, NF-κB p65, phospho-p38-MAPK, and JNK, especially in Group D. Injection of microamount Pg induced inflammatory immune response and accelerated atherosclerosis, in which the NF-κB p65, p38-MAPK, and JNK signaling pathways played important roles. Intravenous injection of Pg is not the same as Pg from human periodontitis entering the blood stream. Therefore, our results cannot be extrapolated to human periodontitis. PMID:26063970

  13. Inhibition of Osteoblastic Cell Differentiation by Lipopolysaccharide Extract from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Kadono, Hiroyuki; Kido, Jun-Ichi; Kataoka, Masatoshi; Yamauchi, Noriyuki; Nagata, Toshihiko

    1999-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P-LPS), an important pathogenic bacterium, is closely associated with inflammatory destruction of periodontal tissues. P-LPS induces the release of cytokines and local factors from inflammatory cells, stimulates osteoclastic-cell differentiation, and causes alveolar bone resorption. However, the effect of P-LPS on osteoblastic-cell differentiation remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of P-LPS extract prepared by the hot-phenol–water method, on the differentiation of primary fetal rat calvaria (RC) cells, which contain a subpopulation of osteoprogenitor cells, into osteoblastic cells. P-LPS extract significantly inhibited bone nodule (BN) formation and the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALPase), an osteoblastic marker, in a dose-dependent manner (0 to 100 ng of P-LPS extract per ml). P-LPS extract (100 ng/ml) significantly decreased BN formation to 27% of the control value and inhibited ALPase activity to approximately 60% of the control level on days 10 to 21 but did not affect RC cell proliferation and viability. P-LPS extract time-dependently suppressed the expression of ALPase mRNA, with an inhibitory pattern similar to that of enzyme activity. The expression of mRNAs for osteocalcin and osteopontin, matrix proteins related to bone metabolism, was markedly suppressed by P-LPS extract. Furthermore, P-LPS extract increased the expression of mRNAs for CD14, LPS receptor, and interleukin-1β in RC cells. These results indicate that P-LPS inhibits osteoblastic-cell differentiation and suggest that LPS-induced bone resorption in periodontal disease may be mediated by effects on osteoblastic as well as osteoclastic cells. PMID:10338489

  14. Antibacterial Effect of an Herbal Product Persica on Porphyromonas Gingivalis and Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jelvehgaran Esfahani, Zahra; Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Seyed Saeed; Salehi Surmaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The plant Salvadora persica is used for oral hygiene in many parts of the world. It has been suggested that it has antibacterial properties, in addition to its ability to mechanically remove plaques. The aim of this study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of the herbal product Persica containing Salvadora persica against periodontopathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in vitro. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with moderate and severe periodontitis were recruited. Using paper points, subgingival plaque samples were taken from pockets with attachment loss ≥ 3mm. The samples were subjected to microbial culture to yield P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The ditch plate method was used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the bacteria to Persica compared to chlorhexidine and distilled water. The growth inhibition zones of microorganisms around the ditches were measured in millimeters. The data were analyzed using SPSS 16. Freidman test and Wilcoxon signed ranks test with Bonferroni adjustment were used for analysis of variance with 5% significance level. P<0.05 for main comparisons and P< 0.017 for multiple comparisons were considered statistically significant. Results: P. gingivalis was sensitive to chlorhexidine and persica. There was a significant difference (P=0.001) between antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (mean 28.733mm, SD 5.216) and Persica (mean 16.333mm, SD 5.259) compared to water against P. gingivalis. There was a significant difference (P< 0.001) between the antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (24.045mm, SD 3.897) and Persica (0.545mm, SD 2.558) with respect to A. actinomycetemcomitans. There was no significant difference (P=0.317) between the antimicrobial activity of Persica and water against A. actinomycetemcomitans. Conclusion: The herbal product Persica had significant antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and negligible antimicrobial activity against A

  15. Characterization of Wheat Germ Agglutinin Lectin-Reactive Glycosylated OmpA-Like Proteins Derived from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the common posttranslational modifications in eukaryotes. Recently, glycosylated proteins have also been identified in prokaryotes. A few glycosylated proteins, including gingipains, have been identified in Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major pathogen associated with chronic periodontitis. However, no other glycosylated proteins have been found. The present study identified glycoproteins in P. gingivalis cell lysates by lectin blotting. Whole-cell lysates reacted with concanavalin A (ConA), Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA-E4), and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), suggesting the presence of mannose-, N-acetylgalactosamine-, or N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-modified proteins. Next, glycoproteins were isolated by ConA-, LCA-, PHA-E4-, or WGA-conjugated lectin affinity chromatography although specific proteins were enriched only by the WGA column. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that an OmpA-like, heterotrimeric complex formed by Pgm6 and Pgm7 (Pgm6/7) was the major glycoprotein isolated from P. gingivalis. Deglycosylation experiments and Western blotting with a specific antibody indicated that Pgm6/7 was modified with O-GlcNAc. When whole-cell lysates from P. gingivalis mutant strains with deletions of Pgm6 and Pgm7 were applied to a WGA column, homotrimeric Pgm7, but not Pgm6, was isolated. Heterotrimeric Pgm6/7 had the strongest affinity for fibronectin of all the extracellular proteins tested, whereas homotrimeric Pgm7 showed reduced binding activity. These findings suggest that the heterotrimeric structure is important for the biological activity of glycosylated WGA-binding OmpA-like proteins in P. gingivalis. PMID:25135681

  16. Inhibitory Effect of Dodonaea viscosa var. angustifolia on the Virulence Properties of the Oral Pathogens Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Owotade, Foluso John

    2013-01-01

    Aim. This study investigated the effect of Dodonaea viscosa var. angustifolia (DVA) on the virulence properties of cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis implicated in periodontal diseases. Methods. S. mutans was cultured in tryptone broth containing a crude leaf extract of DVA for 16 hours, and the pH was measured after 10, 12, 14, and 16 h. Biofilms of S. mutans were grown on glass slides for 48 hours and exposed to plant extract for 30 minutes; the adherent cells were reincubated and the pH was measured at various time intervals. Minimum bactericidal concentration of the extracts against the four periodontal pathogens was determined. The effect of the subinhibitory concentration of plant extract on the production of proteinases by P. gingivalis was also evaluated. Results. DVA had no effect on acid production by S. mutans biofilms; however, it significantly inhibited acid production in planktonic cells. Periodontal pathogens were completely eliminated at low concentrations ranging from 0.09 to 0.02 mg/mL of crude plant extracts. At subinhibitory concentrations, DVA significantly reduced Arg-gingipain (24%) and Lys-gingipain (53%) production by P. gingivalis (P ≤ 0.01). Conclusions. These results suggest that DVA has the potential to be used to control oral infections including dental caries and periodontal diseases. PMID:24223061

  17. Increased levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis are associated with ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease in humans: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    GHIZONI, Janaina Salomon; TAVEIRA, Luís Antônio de Assis; GARLET, Gustavo Pompermaier; GHIZONI, Marcos Flávio; PEREIRA, Jefferson Ricardo; DIONÍSIO, Thiago José; BROZOSKI, Daniel Thomas; SANTOS, Carlos Ferreira; SANT'ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the role of periodontal disease in the development of stroke or cerebral infarction in patients by evaluating the clinical periodontal conditions and the subgingival levels of periodontopathogens. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with ischemic (I-CVA) or hemorrhagic (H-CVA) cerebrovascular episodes (test group) and 60 systemically healthy patients (control group) were evaluated for: probing depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing and plaque index. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were both identified and quantified in subgingival plaque samples by conventional and real-time PCR, respectively. Results: The test group showed a significant increase in each of the following parameters: pocket depth, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, plaque index and number of missing teeth when compared to control values (p<0.05, unpaired t-test). Likewise, the test group had increased numbers of sites that were contaminated with P. gingivalis (60%x10%; p<0.001; chi-squared test) and displayed greater prevalence of periodontal disease, with an odds ratio of 48.06 (95% CI: 5.96-387.72; p<0.001). Notably, a positive correlation between probing depth and the levels of P. gingivalis in ischemic stroke was found (r=0.60; p=0.03; Spearman's rank correlation coefficient test). A. actinomycetemcomitans DNA was not detected in any of the groups by conventional or real-time PCR. Conclusions: Stroke patients had deeper pockets, more severe attachment loss, increased bleeding on probing, increased plaque indexes, and in their pockets harbored increased levels of P. gingivalis. These findings suggest that periodontal disease is a risk factor for the development of cerebral hemorrhage or infarction. Early treatment of periodontitis may counteract the development of cerebrovascular episodes. PMID:22437687

  18. LuxS-Based Signaling in Streptococcus gordonii: Autoinducer 2 Controls Carbohydrate Metabolism and Biofilm Formation with Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    McNab, Roderick; Ford, Suzannah K.; El-Sabaeny, Azza; Barbieri, Bruno; Cook, Guy S.; Lamont, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Communication based on autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is widespread among gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, and the AI-2 pathway can control the expression of genes involved in a variety of metabolic pathways and pathogenic mechanisms. In the present study, we identified luxS, a gene responsible for the synthesis of AI-2, in Streptococcus gordonii, a major component of the dental plaque biofilm. S. gordonii conditioned medium induced bioluminescence in an AI-2 reporter strain of Vibrio harveyi. An isogenic mutant of S. gordonii, generated by insertional inactivation of the luxS gene, was unaffected in growth and in its ability to form biofilms on polystyrene surfaces. In contrast, the mutant strain failed to induce bioluminescence in V. harveyi and was unable to form a mixed species biofilm with a LuxS-null strain of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Complementation of the luxS mutation in S. gordonii restored normal biofilm formation with the luxS-deficient P. gingivalis. Differential display PCR demonstrated that the inactivation of S. gordonii luxS downregulated the expression of a number of genes, including gtfG, encoding glucosyltransferase; fruA, encoding extracellular exo-β-d-fructosidase; and lacD encoding tagatose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase. However, S. gordonii cell surface expression of SspA and SspB proteins, previously implicated in mediating adhesion between S. gordonii and P. gingivalis, was unaffected by inactivation of luxS. The results suggest that S. gordonii produces an AI-2-like signaling molecule that regulates aspects of carbohydrate metabolism in the organism. Furthermore, LuxS-dependent intercellular communication is essential for biofilm formation between nongrowing cells of P. gingivalis and S. gordonii. PMID:12486064

  19. Carbohydrates act as receptors for the periodontitis-associated bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis: a study of bacterial binding to glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Ulrika; Hallberg, Eva C; Sandros, Jens; Rydberg, Lennart; Bäcker, Annika E

    2004-06-01

    In this study we show for the first time the use of carbohydrate chains on glycolipids as receptors for the periodontitis-associated bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis. Previous studies have shown that this bacterium has the ability to adhere to and invade the epithelial lining of the dental pocket. Which receptor(s) the adhesin of P. gingivalis exploit in the adhesion to epithelial cells has not been shown. Therefore, the binding preferences of this specific bacterium to structures of carbohydrate origin from more than 120 different acid and nonacid glycolipid fractions were studied. The bacteria were labeled externally with (35)S and used in a chromatogram binding assay. To enable detection of carbohydrate receptor structures for P. gingivalis, the bacterium was exposed to a large number of purified total glycolipid fractions from a variety of organs from different species and different histo-blood groups. P. gingivalis showed a preference for fractions of human and pig origin for adhesion. Both nonacid and acid glycolipids were used by the bacterium, and a preference for shorter sugar chains was noticed. Bacterial binding to human acid glycolipid fractions was mainly obtained in the region of the chromatograms where sulfated carbohydrate chains usually are found. However, the binding pattern to nonacid glycolipid fractions suggests a core chain of lactose bound to the ceramide part as a tentative receptor structure. The carbohydrate binding of the bacterium might act as a first step in the bacterial invasion process of the dental pocket epithelium, subsequently leading to damage to periodontal tissue and tooth loss.

  20. Selective substitution of amino acids limits proteolytic cleavage and improves the bioactivity of an anti-biofilm peptide that targets the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Daep, Carlo Amorin; Novak, Elizabeth A; Lamont, Richard J; Demuth, Donald R

    2010-12-01

    The interaction of the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis, with oral streptococci such as Streptococcus gordonii precedes colonization of the subgingival pocket and represents a target for limiting P. gingivalis colonization of the oral cavity. Previous studies showed that a synthetic peptide (designated BAR) derived from the antigen I/II protein of S. gordonii was a potent competitive inhibitor of P. gingivalis adherence to S. gordonii and subsequent biofilm formation. Here we show that despite its inhibitory activity, BAR is rapidly degraded by intact P. gingivalis cells in vitro. However, in the presence of soluble Mfa protein, the P. gingivalis receptor for BAR, the peptide is protected from proteolytic degradation suggesting that the affinity of BAR for Mfa is higher than for P. gingivalis proteases. The rate of BAR degradation was reduced when the P. gingivalis lysine-specific gingipain was inhibited using the specific protease inhibitor, z-FKcK, or when the gene encoding the Lys-gingipain was inactivated. In addition, substituting d-Lys for l-Lys residues in BAR prevented degradation of the peptide when incubated with the Lys-gingipain and increased its specific adherence inhibitory activity in a S. gordonii-P. gingivalis dual species biofilm model. These results suggest that Lys-gingipain accounts in large part for P. gingivalis-mediated degradation of BAR and that more effective peptide inhibitors of P. gingivalis adherence to streptococci can be produced by introducing modifications that limit the susceptibility of BAR to the Lys-gingipain and other P. gingivalis associated proteases.

  1. Selective substitution of amino acids limits proteolytic cleavage and improves the bioactivity of an anti-biofilm peptide that targets the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Daep, Carlo Amorin; Novak, Elizabeth A.; Lamont, Richard J.; Demuth, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis with oral streptococci such as Streptococcus gordonii precedes colonization of the subgingival pocket and represents a target for limiting P. gingivalis colonization of the oral cavity. Previous studies showed that a synthetic peptide (designated BAR) derived from the antigen I/II protein of S. gordonii was a potent competitive inhibitor of P. gingivalis adherence to S. gordonii and subsequent biofilm formation. Here we show that despite its inhibitory activity, BAR is rapidly degraded by intact P. gingivalis cells in vitro. However, in the presence of soluble Mfa protein, the P. gingivalis receptor for BAR, the peptide is protected from proteolytic degradation suggesting that the affinity of BAR for Mfa is higher than for P. gingivalis proteases. The rate of BAR degradation was reduced when the P. gingivalis lysine-specific gingipain was inhibited using the specific protease inhibitor, z-FKcK, or when the gene encoding the Lys-gingipain was inactivated. In addition, substituting D-Lys for L-Lys residues in BAR prevented degradation of the peptide when incubated with the Lys-gingipain and increased its specific adherence inhibitory activity in a S. gordonii-P. gingivalis dual species biofilm model. These results suggest that Lys-gingipain accounts in large part for P. gingivalis-mediated degradation of BAR and that more effective peptide inhibitors of P. gingivalis adherence to streptococci can be produced by introducing modifications that limit the susceptibility of BAR to the Lys–gingipain and other P. gingivalis associated proteases. PMID:20800634

  2. [Pathogenic potential of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, the red bacterial complex associated with periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Bodet, C; Chandad, F; Grenier, D

    2007-01-01

    Periodontitis are mixed bacterial infections leading to destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, including periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Among over 500 bacterial species living in the oral cavity, a bacterial complex named "red complex" and made of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia has been strongly related to advanced periodontal lesions. While periodontopathogenic bacteria are the primary etiologic factor of periodontitis, tissue destruction essentially results from the host immune response to the bacterial challenge. Members of the red complex are Gram negative anaerobic bacteria expressing numerous virulence factors allowing bacteria to colonize the subgingival sites, to disturb the host defense system, to invade and destroy periodontal tissue as well as to promote the immunodestructive host response. This article reviews current knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms of bacteria of the red complex leading to tissue and alveolar bone destruction observed during periodontitis.

  3. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-07-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility.

  4. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility. PMID:27457788

  5. Roles of oral bacteria in cardiovascular diseases--from molecular mechanisms to clinical cases: Porphyromonas gingivalis is the important role of intimal hyperplasia in the aorta.

    PubMed

    Hokamura, Kazuya; Umemura, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that DNA of oral bacterial species, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans, was detected frequently in specimens of arteriosclerotic vessels. However, the source of DNA, whether from live intact bacteria or a part of the bacteria, has not been identified yet. Moreover, there was no precise evidence concerning involvement of oral bacteria in the progression of arteriosclerosis. We tried to clarify the involvement of P. gingivalis on the mechanisms of development of aortic intimal hyperplasia. Intravenous administration of P. gingivalis dramatically induced intimal hyperplasia in the mouse model with photochemical impairment of the femoral artery. However there were no changes identified in the mice without aortic impairment, even with the P. gingivalis infection. Concomitantly, S100 calcium-binding protein A9 (S100A9) and the embryonic isoform of myosin heavy chain (SMemb), a proliferative phenotypic marker of smooth muscle cells, were significantly overexpressed on the surfaces of smooth muscle cells present in the injured blood vessels. Similarly, increased expressions of S100A9 and SMemb proteins were observed in aneurismal specimens obtained from P. gingivalis-infected patients. We found that bacteremia induced by P. gingivalis leads to intimal hyperplasia associated with overexpressions of S100A9 and SMemb. Our results strongly suggest that oral-hematogenous spreading of P. gingivalis is a causative event in the development of aortic hyperplasia in periodontitis patients.

  6. Determination of Active Phagocytosis of Unopsonized Porphyromonas gingivalis by Macrophages and Neutrophils Using the pH-Sensitive Fluorescent Dye pHrodo

    PubMed Central

    Lenzo, Jason C.; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M.; Cecil, Jessica; Holden, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis of pathogens is an important component of the innate immune system that is responsible for the removal and degradation of bacteria as well as their presentation via the major histocompatibility complexes to the adaptive immune system. The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis exhibits strain heterogeneity, which may affect a phagocyte's ability to recognize and phagocytose the bacterium. In addition, P. gingivalis is reported to avoid phagocytosis by antibody and complement degradation and by invading phagocytic cells. Previous studies examining phagocytosis have been confounded by both the techniques employed and the potential of the bacteria to invade the cells. In this study, we used a novel, pH-sensitive dye, pHrodo, to label live P. gingivalis strains and examine unopsonized phagocytosis by murine macrophages and neutrophils and human monocytic cells. All host cells examined were able to recognize and phagocytose unopsonized P. gingivalis strains. Macrophages had a preference to phagocytose P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 over other strains and clinical isolates in the study, whereas neutrophils favored P. gingivalis W50, ATCC 33277, and one clinical isolate over the other strains. This study revealed that all P. gingivalis strains were capable of being phagocytosed without prior opsonization with antibody or complement. PMID:27021243

  7. Determination of Active Phagocytosis of Unopsonized Porphyromonas gingivalis by Macrophages and Neutrophils Using the pH-Sensitive Fluorescent Dye pHrodo.

    PubMed

    Lenzo, Jason C; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Cecil, Jessica; Holden, James A; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-06-01

    Phagocytosis of pathogens is an important component of the innate immune system that is responsible for the removal and degradation of bacteria as well as their presentation via the major histocompatibility complexes to the adaptive immune system. The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis exhibits strain heterogeneity, which may affect a phagocyte's ability to recognize and phagocytose the bacterium. In addition, P. gingivalis is reported to avoid phagocytosis by antibody and complement degradation and by invading phagocytic cells. Previous studies examining phagocytosis have been confounded by both the techniques employed and the potential of the bacteria to invade the cells. In this study, we used a novel, pH-sensitive dye, pHrodo, to label live P. gingivalis strains and examine unopsonized phagocytosis by murine macrophages and neutrophils and human monocytic cells. All host cells examined were able to recognize and phagocytose unopsonized P. gingivalis strains. Macrophages had a preference to phagocytose P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 over other strains and clinical isolates in the study, whereas neutrophils favored P. gingivalis W50, ATCC 33277, and one clinical isolate over the other strains. This study revealed that all P. gingivalis strains were capable of being phagocytosed without prior opsonization with antibody or complement.

  8. Heterogeneous Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS modulates immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Herath, Thanuja D. K.; Darveau, Richard P.; Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Yu; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal (gum) disease is a highly prevalent infection and inflammation accounting for the majority of tooth loss in adult population worldwide. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone periodontal pathogen and its lipopolysaccharide (PgLPS) acts as a major virulence attribute to the disease. Herein, we deciphered the overall host response of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) to two featured isoforms of tetra-acylated PgLPS1435/1449 and penta-acylated PgLPS1690 with reference to E. coli LPS through quantitative proteomics. This study unraveled differentially expressed novel biomarkers of immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in HGFs. PgLPS1690 greatly upregulated inflammatory proteins (e.g. cyclophilin, inducible nitric oxide synthase, annexins, galectin, cathepsins and heat shock proteins), whereas the anti-inflammatory proteins (e.g. Annexin A2 and Annexin A6) were significantly upregulated by PgLPS1435/1449. Interestingly, the antioxidants proteins such as mitochondrial manganese-containing superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin 5 were only upregulated by PgLPS1690. The cytoskeletal rearrangement-related proteins like myosin were differentially regulated by these PgLPS isoforms. The present study gives new insight into the biological properties of P. gingivalis LPS lipid A moiety that could critically modulate immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in HGFs, and thereby enhances our understanding of periodontal pathogenesis. PMID:27538450

  9. Fur homolog regulates Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence under low-iron/heme conditions through a complex regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Ciuraszkiewicz, J; Smiga, M; Mackiewicz, P; Gmiterek, A; Bielecki, M; Olczak, M; Olczak, T

    2014-12-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a key pathogen responsible for initiation and progression of chronic periodontitis. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of iron and heme uptake that allow P. gingivalis to express virulence factors and survive in the hostile environment of the oral cavity, so we initiated characterization of a P. gingivalis Fur homolog (PgFur). Many Fur paralogs found in microbial genomes, including Bacteroidetes, confirm that Fur proteins have a tendency to be subjected to a sub- or even neofunctionalization process. PgFur revealed extremely high sequence divergence, which could be associated with its functional dissimilarity in comparison with other Fur homologs. A fur mutant strain constructed by insertional inactivation exhibited retarded growth during the early growth phase and a significantly lower tendency to form a homotypic biofilm on abiotic surfaces. The mutant also showed significantly weaker adherence and invasion to epithelial cells and macrophages. Transcripts of many differentially regulated genes identified in the fur mutant strain were annotated as hypothetical proteins, suggesting that PgFur can play a novel role in the regulation of gene expression. Inactivation of the fur gene resulted in decreased hmuY gene expression, increased expression of other hmu components and changes in the expression of genes encoding hemagglutinins and proteases (mainly gingipains), HtrA, some extracytoplasmic sigma factors and two-component systems. Our data suggest that PgFur can influence in vivo growth and virulence, at least in part by affecting iron/heme acquisition, allowing efficient infection through a complex regulatory network.

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis gingipains cause defective macrophage migration towards apoptotic cells and inhibit phagocytosis of primary apoptotic neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Castro, Sowmya A; Collighan, Russell; Lambert, Peter A; Dias, Irundika Hk; Chauhan, Parbata; Bland, Charlotte E; Milic, Ivana; Milward, Michael R; Cooper, Paul R; Devitt, Andrew

    2017-03-02

    Periodontal disease is a prevalent chronic inflammatory condition characterised by an aberrant host response to a pathogenic plaque biofilm resulting in local tissue damage and frustrated healing that can result in tooth loss. Cysteine proteases (gingipains) from the key periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been implicated in periodontal disease pathogenesis by inhibiting inflammation resolution and are linked with systemic chronic inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells is essential for the resolution of inflammation and tissue restoration. Here we sought to characterise the innate immune clearance of apoptotic cells and its modulation by gingipains. We examined the capacity of gingipain-treated macrophages to migrate towards and phagocytose apoptotic cells. Lysine gingipain treatment of macrophages impaired macrophage migration towards apoptotic neutrophils. Furthermore, lysine gingipain treatment reduced surface expression levels of CD14, a key macrophage receptor for apoptotic cells, which resulted in reduced macrophage interactions with apoptotic cells. Additionally, while apoptotic cells and their derived secretome were shown to inhibit TNF-α-induced expression by P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide, we demonstrated that gingipain preparations induced a rapid inflammatory response in macrophages that was resistant to the anti-inflammatory effects of apoptotic cells or their secretome. Taken together, these data indicate that P. gingivalis may promote the chronic inflammation seen in periodontal disease patients by multiple mechanisms, including rapid, potent gingipain-mediated inflammation, coupled with receptor cleavage leading to defective clearance of apoptotic cells and reduced anti-inflammatory responses. Thus, gingipains represent a potential therapeutic target for intervention in the management of chronic periodontal disease.

  11. Heightened immune response to autocitrullinated Porphyromonas gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase: a potential mechanism for breaching immunologic tolerance in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Quirke, Anne-Marie; Lugli, Elena Birgitta; Wegner, Natalia; Hamilton, Bart C; Charles, Peter; Chowdhury, Muslima; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Zubarev, Roman A; Potempa, Jan; Culshaw, Shauna; Guo, Yonghua; Fisher, Benjamin A; Thiele, Geoffrey; Mikuls, Ted R; Venables, Patrick JW

    2014-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by autoimmunity to citrullinated proteins, and there is increasing epidemiologic evidence linking Porphyromonas gingivalis to RA. P gingivalis is apparently unique among periodontal pathogens in possessing a citrullinating enzyme, peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD) with the potential to generate antigens driving the autoimmune response. Objectives To examine the immune response to PPAD in patients with RA, individuals with periodontitis (PD) and controls (without arthritis), confirm PPAD autocitrullination and identify the modified arginine residues. Methods PPAD and an inactivated mutant (C351A) were cloned and expressed and autocitrullination of both examined by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. ELISAs using PPAD, C351A and another P gingivalis protein arginine gingipain (RgpB) were developed and antibody reactivities examined in patients with RA (n=80), individuals with PD (n=44) and controls (n=82). Results Recombinant PPAD was a potent citrullinating enzyme. Antibodies to PPAD, but not to Rgp, were elevated in the RA sera (median 122 U/ml) compared with controls (median 70 U/ml; p<0.05) and PD (median 60 U/ml; p<0.01). Specificity of the anti-peptidyl citrullinated PPAD response was confirmed by the reaction of RA sera with multiple epitopes tested with synthetic citrullinated peptides spanning the PPAD molecule. The elevated antibody response to PPAD was abolished in RA sera if the C351A mutant was used on ELISA. Conclusions The peptidyl citrulline-specific immune response to PPAD supports the hypothesis that, as a bacterial protein, it might break tolerance in RA, and could be a target for therapy. PMID:23463691

  12. Induction of antibody response in the oral cavity of dogs following intraocular (eye drop) immunization with Porphyromonas gingivalis cell lysate incorporated in pH-sensitive fusogenic polymer-modified liposomes

    PubMed Central

    SHIMIZU, Yosuke; IWASAKI, Tadashi; TAJIMA, Tomoko; YUBA, Eiji; KONO, Kenji; WATARAI, Shinobu

    2016-01-01

    Induction of mucosal immune responses against Porphyromonas gingivalis within the oral cavity of dogs was studied by immunizing with pH-sensitive fusogenic polymer (MGluPG)-modified liposome-associated cell lysate. Dogs immunized with P. gingivalis cell lysate-containing MGluPG-modified liposomes by intraocular (eye drop) route displayed significant levels of P. gingivalis cell lysate-specific serum IgG and IgA as well as mucosal IgA antibodies in saliva secretion. Serum and salivary antibodies generated by intraocularly immunized with MGluPG-modified liposome-associated P. gingivalis cell lysate revealed a significant aggregation activity against P. gingivalis, whereas serum and saliva from dogs receiving MGluPG-modified liposomes unentrapping P. gingivalis cell lysate did not show the aggregation activity against P. gingivalis. Furthermore, P. gingivalis-specific antibodies in saliva of immunized dogs inhibited the adherence of P. gingivalis to cultured HeLa cells. More importantly, salivary antibodies induced by intraocular immunization with P. gingivalis cell lysate-containing MGluPG-modified liposomes significantly inhibited the coaggregation of P. gingivalis with Actinomyces naeslundii and the cell damage activity of P. gingivalis against FaDu cells, an oral epithelial cell. These results suggest that intraocularly administered P. gingivalis cell lysate-containing MGluPG-modified liposomes should be an effective mucosal vaccine against P. gingivalis infection in dogs and may be an important tool for the prevention of periodontitis. PMID:27916762

  13. Prolonged and repetitive exposure to Porphyromonas gingivalis increases aggressiveness of oral cancer cells by promoting acquisition of cancer stem cell properties.

    PubMed

    Ha, Na Hee; Woo, Bok Hee; Kim, Da Jeong; Ha, Eun Sin; Choi, Jeom Il; Kim, Sung Jo; Park, Bong Soo; Lee, Ji Hye; Park, Hae Ryoun

    2015-12-01

    Periodontitis is the most common chronic inflammatory condition occurring in the human oral cavity, but our knowledge on its contribution to oral cancer is rather limited. To define crosstalk between chronic periodontitis and oral cancer, we investigated whether Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major pathogen of chronic periodontitis, plays a role in oral cancer progression. To mimic chronic irritation by P. gingivalis in the oral cavity, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells were infected with P. gingivalis twice a week for 5 weeks. Repeated infection of oral cancer cells by P. gingivalis resulted in morphological changes of host cancer cells into an elongated shape, along with the decreased expression of epithelial cell markers, suggesting acquisition of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. The prolonged exposure to P. gingivalis also promoted migratory and invasive properties of OSCC cells and provided resistance against a chemotherapeutic agent, all of which are described as cellular characteristics undergoing EMT. Importantly, long-term infection by P. gingivalis induced an increase in the expression level of CD44 and CD133, well-known cancer stem cell markers, and promoted the tumorigenic properties of infected cancer cells compared to non-infected controls. Furthermore, increased invasiveness of P. gingivalis-infected OSCC cells was correlated with enhanced production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-10 that was stimulated by interleukin-8 (IL-8) release. This is the first report demonstrating that P. gingivalis can increase the aggressiveness of oral cancer cells via epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like changes and the acquisition of stemness, implicating P. gingivalis as a potential bacterial risk modifier.

  14. Dual Action of Myricetin on Porphyromonas gingivalis and the Inflammatory Response of Host Cells: A Promising Therapeutic Molecule for Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Daniel; Chen, Huangqin; Ben Lagha, Amel; Fournier-Larente, Jade; Morin, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis that affects the underlying structures of the periodontium, including the alveolar bone, is a multifactorial disease, whose etiology involves interactions between specific bacterial species of the subgingival biofilm and the host immune components. In the present study, we investigated the effects of myricetin, a flavonol largely distributed in fruits and vegetables, on growth and virulence properties of Porphyromonas gingivalis as well as on the P. gingivalis-induced inflammatory response in host cells. Minimal inhibitory concentration values of myricetin against P. gingivalis were in the range of 62.5 to 125 μg/ml. The iron-chelating activity of myricetin may contribute to the antibacterial activity of this flavonol. Myricetin was found to attenuate the virulence of P. gingivalis by reducing the expression of genes coding for important virulence factors, including proteinases (rgpA, rgpB, and kgp) and adhesins (fimA, hagA, and hagB). Myricetin dose-dependently prevented NF-κB activation in a monocyte model. Moreover, it inhibited the secretion of IL-6, IL-8 and MMP-3 by P. gingivalis-stimulated gingival fibroblasts. In conclusion, our study brought clear evidence that the flavonol myricetin exhibits a dual action on the periodontopathogenic bacterium P. gingivalis and the inflammatory response of host cells. Therefore, myricetin holds promise as a therapeutic agent for the treatment/prevention of periodontitis. PMID:26121135

  15. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA Type I Genotype in Gingivitis by Real-Time PCR–A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Mahalakshmi; Chandrasekaran, S.C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Published literature till date reveals a high prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA type I genotype among healthy subjects. Quite a few studies have reported its prevalence also in periodontitis patients. Nevertheless incidence of this genotype in gingivitis is lacking in adult population. Aim The present study was chosen to detect P. gingivalis fimA type I genotype among chronic gingivitis patients. Materials and Methods A total of 46 subgingival plaque samples collected from chronic marginal gingivitis (n=23) and chronic periodontitis subjects (control group) (n=23) were subjected to Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction to detect the P. gingivalis fimA type I gene. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square test. Results Prevalence of P. gingivalis fimA type I gene among chronic periodontitis and chronic gingivitis patients were 8.7% and 30.4% respectively. P. gingivalis fimA type I genotype prevalence was found to be statistically insignificant between the two study groups (p=0.135). Conclusion The avirulent P. gingivalis fimA type I genotype, occurred in high prevalence among chronic gingivitis patients, while its presence was low in chronic periodontitis patients. Presence of this avirulent genotype in chronic marginal gingivitis signifies its reversible condition. PMID:27504406

  16. Vitamin D reduces the inflammatory response by Porphyromonas gingivalis infection by modulating human β-defensin-3 in human gingival epithelium and periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Anna; Fiorentino, Margherita; Guida, Luigi; Annunziata, Marco; Nastri, Livia; Rizzo, Antonietta

    2017-04-03

    Periodontitis is a multifactorial polymicrobial infection characterized by a destructive inflammatory process. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative black-pigmented anaerobe, is a major pathogen in the initiation and progression of periodontitis; it produces several virulence factors that stimulate human gingival epithelium (HGE) cells and human periodontal ligament (HPL) cells to produce various inflammatory mediators. A variety of substances, such as vitamin D, have growth-inhibitory effects on some bacterial pathogens and have shown chemo-preventive and anti-inflammatory activity. We used a model with HGE and HPL cells infected with P. gingivalis to determine the influence of vitamin D on P. gingivalis growth and adhesion and the immunomodulatory effect on TNF-α, IL-8, IL-12 and human-β-defensin 3 production. Our results demonstrated, firstly, the lack of any cytotoxic effect on the HGE and HPL cells when treated with vitamin D; in addition, vitamin D inhibited P. gingivalis adhesion and infectivity in HGE and HPL cells. Our study then showed that vitamin D reduced TNF-α, IL-8, IL-12 production in P. gingivalis-infected HGE and HPL cells. In contrast, a significant upregulation of the human-β-defensin 3 expression in HGE and HPL cells induced by P. gingivalis was demonstrated. Our results indicate that vitamin D specifically enhances the production of the human-β-defensin 3 antimicrobial peptide and exerts an inhibitory effect on the pro-inflammatory cytokines, thus suggesting that vitamin D may offer possible therapeutic applications for periodontitis.

  17. The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis harnesses the chemistry of the mu-oxo bishaem of iron protoporphyrin IX to protect against hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Smalley, J W; Birss, A J; Silver, J

    2000-02-01

    The major haem component in the black pigment of Porphyromonas gingivalis is the mu-oxo bishaem of iron protoporphyrin IX and formation and cell-surface binding of this haem species is proposed as an extracellular buffer against reactive oxidants [Smalley, J.W. et al. (1998) Biochem. J. 331, 681-685]. P. gingivalis cells grown in the presence of the mu-oxo bishaem were protected against H(2)O(2) compared to control cells grown without it. When added to the growth medium, soluble mu-oxo bishaem inactivated H(2)O(2) and supported cell growth. Cells carrying a surface layer of mu-oxo bishaem were less susceptible to peroxidation by H(2)O(2). Cell-surface haems were slowly destroyed during reaction with H(2)O(2). Binding of mu-oxo bishaem by P. gingivalis may aid survival during neutrophil attack through inactivation of hydrogen peroxide.

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis Infection during Pregnancy Increases Maternal Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha, Suppresses Maternal Interleukin-10, and Enhances Fetal Growth Restriction and Resorption in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dongming; Smith, Mary Alice; Champagne, Catherine; Elter, John; Beck, James; Offenbacher, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a potential association between maternal periodontitis and pregnancy complications. We used a pregnant murine model to study the effect of infection with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis on pregnancy outcomes. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated with heat-killed P. gingivalis (109 CFU) in a subcutaneous chamber and mated 2 weeks later. At gestation day (GD) 7.5, mice were challenged with live P. gingivalis (107 CFU) (n = 20) or broth (control; n = 8) and sacrificed at GD 16.5. Fetal growth restriction (FGR, <0.46 g) was defined as fetuses with weights 2 standard deviations (SD) smaller than controls (0.56 ± 0.05 g [mean ± SD]). Among the 20 challenged mice, 8 had both normal-weight (0.51 ± 0.11 g) and FGR (0.34 ± 0.1 g) fetuses within the same litter. All other challenged dams had normal-weight fetuses (0.57 ± 0.04 g). Maternal liver, uterus, and spleen samples were examined for P. gingivalis DNA using a PCR technique. Of the eight challenged mice with FGR fetuses, three had PCR signals for P. gingivalis in liver and uterus, but not in the spleen. Liver, uterus, and spleen were negative for P. gingivalis DNA among all other challenged and control mice. In serum of dams with FGR fetuses, tumor necrosis factor alpha levels were elevated significantly, while interluekin-10 levels were significantly reduced compared to levels in dams with normal fetuses. P. gingivalis-specific serum immunoglobulin G levels were significantly elevated in dams with FGR fetuses compared to dams without any FGR fetuses. These data demonstrate that P. gingivalis-induced murine FGR is associated with systemic dissemination of the organism and activated maternal immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:12933859

  19. Unique Structure and Stability of HmuY, a Novel Heme-Binding Protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Wójtowicz, Halina; Guevara, Tibisay; Tallant, Cynthia; Olczak, Mariusz; Sroka, Aneta; Potempa, Jan; Solà, Maria; Olczak, Teresa; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Infection, survival, and proliferation of pathogenic bacteria in humans depend on their capacity to impair host responses and acquire nutrients in a hostile environment. Among such nutrients is heme, a co-factor for oxygen storage, electron transport, photosynthesis, and redox biochemistry, which is indispensable for life. Porphyromonas gingivalis is the major human bacterial pathogen responsible for severe periodontitis. It recruits heme through HmuY, which sequesters heme from host carriers and delivers it to its cognate outer-membrane transporter, the TonB-dependent receptor HmuR. Here we report that heme binding does not significantly affect the secondary structure of HmuY. The crystal structure of heme-bound HmuY reveals a new all-β fold mimicking a right hand. The thumb and fingers pinch heme iron through two apical histidine residues, giving rise to highly symmetric octahedral iron co-ordination. The tetrameric quaternary arrangement of the protein found in the crystal structure is consistent with experiments in solution. It shows that thumbs and fingertips, and, by extension, the bound heme groups, are shielded from competing heme-binding proteins from the host. This may also facilitate heme transport to HmuR for internalization. HmuY, both in its apo- and in its heme-bound forms, is resistant to proteolytic digestion by trypsin and the major secreted proteases of P. gingivalis, gingipains K and R. It is also stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. In conclusion, these studies reveal novel molecular properties of HmuY that are consistent with its role as a putative virulence factor during bacterial infection. PMID:19424422

  20. A Porphyromonas gingivalis Periplasmic Novel Exopeptidase, Acylpeptidyl Oligopeptidase, Releases N-Acylated Di- and Tripeptides from Oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takayuki K; Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Shimoyama, Yu; Kimura, Shigenobu

    2016-03-11

    Exopeptidases, including dipeptidyl- and tripeptidylpeptidase, are crucial for the growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontopathic asaccharolytic bacterium that incorporates amino acids mainly as di- and tripeptides. In this study, we identified a novel exopeptidase, designated acylpeptidyl oligopeptidase (AOP), composed of 759 amino acid residues with active Ser(615) and encoded by PGN_1349 in P. gingivalis ATCC 33277. AOP is currently listed as an unassigned S9 family peptidase or prolyl oligopeptidase. Recombinant AOP did not hydrolyze a Pro-Xaa bond. In addition, although sequence similarities to human and archaea-type acylaminoacyl peptidase sequences were observed, its enzymatic properties were apparently distinct from those, because AOP scarcely released an N-acyl-amino acid as compared with di- and tripeptides, especially with N-terminal modification. The kcat/Km value against benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Lys-Met-4-methycoumaryl-7-amide, the most potent substrate, was 123.3 ± 17.3 μm(-1) s(-1), optimal pH was 7-8.5, and the activity was decreased with increased NaCl concentrations. AOP existed predominantly in the periplasmic fraction as a monomer, whereas equilibrium between monomers and oligomers was observed with a recombinant molecule, suggesting a tendency of oligomerization mediated by the N-terminal region (Met(16)-Glu(101)). Three-dimensional modeling revealed the three domain structures (residues Met(16)-Ala(126), which has no similar homologue with known structure; residues Leu(127)-Met(495) (β-propeller domain); and residues Ala(496)-Phe(736) (α/β-hydrolase domain)) and further indicated the hydrophobic S1 site of AOP in accord with its hydrophobic P1 preference. AOP orthologues are widely distributed in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, suggesting its importance for processing of nutritional and/or bioactive oligopeptides.

  1. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  2. A Porphyromonas gingivalis Periplasmic Novel Exopeptidase, Acylpeptidyl Oligopeptidase, Releases N-Acylated Di- and Tripeptides from Oligopeptides*

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Takayuki K.; Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Shimoyama, Yu; Kimura, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    Exopeptidases, including dipeptidyl- and tripeptidylpeptidase, are crucial for the growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontopathic asaccharolytic bacterium that incorporates amino acids mainly as di- and tripeptides. In this study, we identified a novel exopeptidase, designated acylpeptidyl oligopeptidase (AOP), composed of 759 amino acid residues with active Ser615 and encoded by PGN_1349 in P. gingivalis ATCC 33277. AOP is currently listed as an unassigned S9 family peptidase or prolyl oligopeptidase. Recombinant AOP did not hydrolyze a Pro-Xaa bond. In addition, although sequence similarities to human and archaea-type acylaminoacyl peptidase sequences were observed, its enzymatic properties were apparently distinct from those, because AOP scarcely released an N-acyl-amino acid as compared with di- and tripeptides, especially with N-terminal modification. The kcat/Km value against benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Lys-Met-4-methycoumaryl-7-amide, the most potent substrate, was 123.3 ± 17.3 μm−1 s−1, optimal pH was 7–8.5, and the activity was decreased with increased NaCl concentrations. AOP existed predominantly in the periplasmic fraction as a monomer, whereas equilibrium between monomers and oligomers was observed with a recombinant molecule, suggesting a tendency of oligomerization mediated by the N-terminal region (Met16–Glu101). Three-dimensional modeling revealed the three domain structures (residues Met16–Ala126, which has no similar homologue with known structure; residues Leu127–Met495 (β-propeller domain); and residues Ala496–Phe736 (α/β-hydrolase domain)) and further indicated the hydrophobic S1 site of AOP in accord with its hydrophobic P1 preference. AOP orthologues are widely distributed in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, suggesting its importance for processing of nutritional and/or bioactive oligopeptides. PMID:26733202

  3. Involvement of an Skp-Like Protein, PGN_0300, in the Type IX Secretion System of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Yuko; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Inoue, Tetsuyoshi; Nakayama, Masaaki; Naito, Mariko; Kondo, Yoshio; Kano, Konami; Hoshino, Tomonori; Nakayama, Koji; Takashiba, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    The oral Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis is an important pathogen involved in chronic periodontitis. Among its virulence factors, the major extracellular proteinases, Arg-gingipain and Lys-gingipain, are of interest given their abilities to degrade host proteins and process other virulence factors. Gingipains possess C-terminal domains (CTDs) and are translocated to the cell surface or into the extracellular milieu by the type IX secretion system (T9SS). Gingipains contribute to the colonial pigmentation of the bacterium on blood agar. In this study, Omp17, the PGN_0300 gene product, was found in the outer membrane fraction. A mutant lacking Omp17 did not show pigmentation on blood agar and showed reduced proteolytic activity of the gingipains. CTD-containing proteins were released from bacterial cells without cleavage of the CTDs in the omp17 mutant. Although synthesis of the anionic polysaccharide (A-LPS) was not affected in the omp17 mutant, the processing of and A-LPS modification of CTD-containing proteins was defective. PorU, a C-terminal signal peptidase that cleaves the CTDs of other CTD-containing proteins, was not detected in any membrane fraction of the omp17 mutant, suggesting that the defective maturation of CTD-containing proteins by impairment of Omp17 is partly due to loss of function of PorU. In the mouse subcutaneous infection experiment, the omp17 mutant was less virulent than the wild type. These results suggested that Omp17 is involved in P. gingivalis virulence. PMID:26502912

  4. Porphyromonas gingivalis infection modifies oral microcirculation and aortic vascular function in the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP).

    PubMed

    Funaki, Seiko; Tokutomi, Fumiaki; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Maehata, Yojiro; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Toyama, Toshizo; Sato, Takenori; Hamada, Nobushiro; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il; Takahashi, Shun-suke

    2016-03-01

    The functional modulation of vascular endothelial cells associated with stroke and periodontal disease has not yet been clarified. The objective of this study is to analyze the vascular endothelial function of periodontitis and stroke animal models. We examined endothelial function and gingival blood flow in oral microcirculation in vivo and measured the isometric tension in vitro of the aorta in animal models for lifestyle-related diseases, such as periodontitis and stroke. Gingival reactive hyperemia (GRH) was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) were used as control animals; Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) infected WKY (WKY + Pg) as the periodontitis model; stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP) as the stroke model; and a final group consisting of P. gingivalis infected SHRSP (SHRSP + Pg). Furthermore, for each group, the relaxation of descending aortic ring preparations was measured using a force transducer. The GRH was estimated by maximum response (peak), time taken for the maximum response to fall to one half (T1/2), and increased total amount of blood flow (mass). The relative change in T1/2 and mass increased in SHRSP + Pg compared to WKY. However, mass significantly increased in WKY (758.59 ± 88.21 ml/min/100 g s to 1755.55 ± 226.10 ml/min/100 g s) and SHRSP (1214.87 ± 141.61 ml/min/100 g s to 2674.32 ± 675.48 ml/min/100 g s) after treatment with acetylcholine. In addition, T1/2 and mass significantly increased in WKY + Pg (624.18 ± 96.36 ml/min/100 g s to 2629.90 ± 612.01 ml/min/100 g s) and SHRSP + Pg (1116.36 ± 206.24 ml/min/100 g s to 1952.76 ± 217.39 ml/min/100 g s) after treatment with nitroglycerin. Furthermore, the endothelium-dependent relaxation of ring preparations, evoked by acetylcholine, was attenuated in SHRSP compared with WKY, but not in SHRSP + Pg. This attenuation effect in SHRSP could be prevented by superoxide dismutase pretreatment. Our results suggest altered endothelial

  5. Flavan-3-ols and proanthocyanidins from Limonium brasiliense inhibit the adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis to epithelial host cells by interaction with gingipains.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Caleare, Angelo; Hensel, Andreas; Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Pinha, Andressa Blainski; Panizzon, Gean Pier; Lechtenberg, Matthias; Petereit, Frank; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2017-03-11

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a pathogen strongly involved in chronic and aggressive forms of periodontitis. Natural products, mainly polyphenols, have been described for advanced treatment of periodontitis by inhibition of the bacterial adhesion of P. gingivalis to the epithelial host cells. An acetone:water extract (LBE) from the rhizomes of Limonium brasiliense (Boiss.) Kuntze was tested under in vitro conditions for potential antiadhesive effects against P. gingivalis to human KB cells and for inhibition of the proteolytic activity of gingipains, the main virulence factor of P. gingivalis. LBE≤100μg/mL had no cytotoxicity against the bacteria and did not influence the cell physiology of human epithelial KB cells. At 100μg/mL LBE reduced the adhesion of P. gingivalis to KB cells significantly by about 80%. LBE at 20μg/mL reduced the proteolytic activity of the arginin-specific Rgp gingipain by about 75%. Chemical profiling of LBE indicated the presence of gallic acid, epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate and samarangenins A and B as lead compounds. UHPLC by using MS and UV detection displays a suitable method for quality control of the extract for identification and quantification of the lead compounds.

  6. Identification of amino acid residues involved in heme binding and hemoprotein utilization in the Porphyromonas gingivalis heme receptor HmuR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyan; Olczak, Teresa; Guo, Hwai-Chen; Dixon, Dabney W; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2006-02-01

    We have previously identified and characterized a heme/hemoglobin receptor, HmuR, in Porphyromonas gingivalis. To analyze the conserved amino acid residues of HmuR that may be involved in hemin/hemoprotein binding and utilization, we constructed a series of P. gingivalis A7436 hmuR mutants with amino acid replacements and characterized the ability of these mutants to utilize hemin and hemoproteins. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to introduce mutations H95A, H434A, H95A-H434A, YRAP420-423YAAA, and NPDL442-445NAAA into HmuR in both P. gingivalis and Escherichia coli. Point mutations at H95 and H434 and in the NPDL motif of HmuR resulted in decreased binding to hemin, hemoglobin, and human serum albumin-hemin complex. Notably, mutations of these conserved sites and motifs led to reduced growth of P. gingivalis when human serum was used as the heme source. Analysis using a three-dimensional homology model of HmuR indicated that H95, H434, and the NPDL motif are present on apical or extracellular loops of HmuR, while the YRAP motif is present on the barrel wall. Taken together, these results support a role for H95, H434, and the NPDL motif of the P. gingivalis HmuR protein in heme binding and utilization of serum hemoproteins and the HmuR YRAP motif in serum hemoprotein utilization.

  7. Cholesterol crystals enhance TLR2- and TLR4-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine responses of monocytes to the proatherogenic oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Køllgaard, Tania; Enevold, Christian; Bendtzen, Klaus; Hansen, Peter R.; Givskov, Michael; Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus H.

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol deposits and pro-inflammatory cytokines play an essential role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, a predominant cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Epidemiological evidence has linked periodontal disease (PD) with atherosclerotic CVD. Accordingly, viable periodontal pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, have been found in atherosclerotic plaques in humans and mice. We aimed to determine whether cholesterol crystals (CHCs) and oral bacteria synergize in the stimulation of human monocytes. Incubation of human monocytes with CHCs induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, and IL-8. Moreover, CHCs markedly enhanced secretion of IL-1β by monocytes stimulated with the toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 agonist Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the TLR2 agonist Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid. Notably, CHCs also enhanced IL-1β secretion induced by P. gingivalis LPS and IL-1β secretion induced by whole P. gingivalis bacteria. This enhancement was abrogated by the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors Z-YVAD-FMK and glibenclamide. CHCs had no effect on cytokine production induced by P. gingivalis gingipains. Taken together, our findings support that CHCs, via stimulation of NLRP3 inflammasomes, act in synergy with the periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis to promote monocyte secretion of pro-atherogenic cytokines. PMID:28235036

  8. Structural and mutational analyses of dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis reveal the molecular basis for strict substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Ippei; Tateoka, Chika; Roppongi, Saori; Fujimoto, Mayu; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Yamada, Mitsugu; Ohta, Kazunori; Gouda, Hiroaki; Nonaka, Takamasa; Ogasawara, Wataru; Tanaka, Nobutada

    2015-01-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis (PgDPP11) belongs to the S46 family of serine peptidases and preferentially cleaves substrates with Asp/Glu at the P1 position. The molecular mechanism underlying the substrate specificity of PgDPP11, however, is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of PgDPP11. The enzyme contains a catalytic domain with a typical double β-barrel fold and a recently identified regulatory α-helical domain. Crystal structure analyses, docking studies, and biochemical studies revealed that the side chain of Arg673 in the S1 subsite is essential for recognition of the Asp/Glu side chain at the P1 position of the bound substrate. Because S46 peptidases are not found in mammals and the Arg673 is conserved among DPP11s, we anticipate that DPP11s could be utilised as targets for antibiotics. In addition, the present structure analyses could be useful templates for the design of specific inhibitors of DPP11s from pathogenic organisms. PMID:26057589

  9. Histatin 5 binds to Porphyromonas gingivalis hemagglutinin B (HagB) and alters HagB-induced chemokine responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgwardt, Derek S.; Martin, Aaron D.; van Hemert, Jonathan R.; Yang, Jianyi; Fischer, Carol L.; Recker, Erica N.; Nair, Prashant R.; Vidva, Robinson; Chandrashekaraiah, Shwetha; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Drake, David; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Vali, Shireen; Zhang, Yang; Brogden, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Histatins are human salivary gland peptides with anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we hypothesized that histatin 5 binds to Porphyromonas gingivalis hemagglutinin B (HagB) and attenuates HagB-induced chemokine responses in human myeloid dendritic cells. Histatin 5 bound to immobilized HagB in a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy-based biosensor system. SPR spectroscopy kinetic and equilibrium analyses, protein microarray studies, and I-TASSER structural modeling studies all demonstrated two histatin 5 binding sites on HagB. One site had a stronger affinity with a KD1 of 1.9 μM and one site had a weaker affinity with a KD2 of 60.0 μM. Binding has biological implications and predictive modeling studies and exposure of dendritic cells both demonstrated that 20.0 μM histatin 5 attenuated (p < 0.05) 0.02 μM HagB-induced CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β, and TNFα responses. Thus histatin 5 is capable of attenuating chemokine responses, which may help control oral inflammation.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis clinical strains reveals a clear species clustering.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, Peter; Frey, Joachim; Lang, Niklaus P; Mayfield, Lisa

    2002-07-01

    Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis are oral pathogens from the family Bacteroidaceae, regularly isolated from cases of gingivitis and periodontitis. In this study, the phylogenetic variability of these three bacterial species was investigated by means of 16S rRNA (rrs) gene sequence comparisons of a set of epidemiologically and geographically diverse isolates. For each of the three species, the rrs gene sequences of 11 clinical isolates as well as the corresponding type strains was determined. Comparison of all rrs sequences obtained with those of closely related species revealed a clear clustering of species, with only a little intraspecies variability but a clear difference in the rrs gene with respect to the next related taxon. The results indicate that the three species form stable, homogeneous genetic groups, which favours an rrs-based species identification of these oral pathogens. This is especially useful given the 7% sequence divergence between Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens, since phenotypic distinction between the two Prevotella species is inconsistent or involves techniques not applicable in routine identification.

  11. Effects of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide on the expression of key genes involved in cholesterol metabolism in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fen; Wang, Yi; Xu, Jing; Liu, Fangqiang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular diseases are positively correlated with periodontal disease. However, the molecular mechanisms linking atherosclerosis and periodontal infection are not clear. This study aimed to determine whether Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (Pg-LPS) altered the expression of genes regulating cholesterol metabolism in macrophages in the presence of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Material and methods THP-1-derived macrophages were exposed to different concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 µg/ml) of LPS in the presence of 50 µg/ml native LDL. Macrophages were also incubated with 1 µg/ml LPS for varying times (0, 24, 48, or 72 h) in the presence of native LDL. Foam cell formation was determined by oil red O staining and cholesterol content quantification. CD36, lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1), and acetyl CoA acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) expression levels were measured by western blot and qRT-PCR. Results Foam cell formation was induced in a time- and concentration-dependent manner as assessed by both morphological and biochemical criteria. Pg-LPS caused downregulation of CD36 and ABCG1 but upregulation of ACAT1, while LOX-1 expression was not affected (p = 0.137). Conclusions Pg-LPS appears to be an important link in the development of atherosclerosis by mechanisms targeting cholesterol homeostasis, namely, excess cholesterol ester formation via ACAT1 and reduced cellular cholesterol efflux via ABCG1. PMID:27695485

  12. Gingipains from the Periodontal Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis Play a Significant Role in Regulation of Angiopoietin 1 and Angiopoietin 2 in Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Hazem; Sirsjö, Allan; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    Angiopoietin 1 (Angpt1) and angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2) are the ligands of tyrosine kinase (Tie) receptors, and they play important roles in vessel formation and the development of inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative periodontal bacterium that is thought to contribute to the progression of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of P. gingivalis infection in the modulation of Angpt1 and Angpt2 in human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs). We exposed AoSMCs to wild-type (W50 and 381), gingipain mutant (E8 and K1A), and fimbrial mutant (DPG-3 and KRX-178) P. gingivalis strains and to different concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). The atherosclerosis risk factor TNF was used as a positive control in this study. We found that P. gingivalis (wild type, K1A, DPG3, and KRX178) and TNF upregulated the expression of Angpt2 and its transcription factor ETS1, respectively, in AoSMCs. In contrast, Angpt1 was inhibited by P. gingivalis and TNF. However, the RgpAB mutant E8 had no effect on the expression of Angpt1, Angpt2, or ETS1 in AoSMCs. The results also showed that ETS1 is critical for P. gingivalis induction of Angpt2. Exposure to Angpt2 protein enhanced the migration of AoSMCs but had no effect on proliferation. This study demonstrates that gingipains are crucial to the ability of P. gingivalis to markedly increase the expressed Angpt2/Angpt1 ratio in AoSMCs, which determines the regulatory role of angiopoietins in angiogenesis and their involvement in the development of atherosclerosis. These findings further support the association between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26283334

  13. Defining essential genes and identifying virulence factors of Porphyromonas gingivalis by massively-parallel sequencing of transposon libraries (Tn-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Brian A.; Duncan, Margaret J.; Hu, Linden T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen in the development and progression of periodontal disease. Obstacles to the development of saturated transposon libraries have previously limited transposon mutant-based screens as well as essential gene studies. We have developed a system for efficient transposon mutagenesis of P. gingivalis using a modified mariner transposon. Tn-seq is a technique that allows for quantitative assessment of individual mutants within a transposon mutant library by sequencing the transposon-genome junctions and then compiling mutant presence by mapping to a base genome. Using Tn-seq, it is possible to quickly define all the insertional mutants in a library and thus identify non-essential genes under the conditions in which the library was produced. Identification of fitness of individual mutants under specific conditions can be performed by exposing the library to selective pressures. PMID:25636611

  14. Induction of lethal shock and tolerance by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide in D-galactosamine-sensitized C3H/HeJ mice.

    PubMed

    Tanamoto, K

    1999-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) obtained from Porphyromonas gingivalis was found to exhibit marked lethal toxicity in galactosamine-sensitized C3H/HeJ mice. Although no lethality was observed in mice intraperitoneally challenged with 1 mg of P. gingivalis LPS without galactosamine, when they were sensitized with 30 mg of galactosamine, challenge with 1 and 10 micrograms of LPS resulted in 67 and 100% lethality, respectively. The lethal dose of LPS was almost the same in LPS-responsive C57BL/6 mice and non-LPS-responsive C3H/HeJ mice. Furthermore, when 1 microgram of P. gingivalis LPS was administered to each mouse 90 min before the challenge with the same LPS with galactosamine, tolerance to the lethal action of LPS was induced, and the mice were completely protected from death, even at a dose 100-fold greater than the lethal dose of LPS. Neither a lethal effect nor induction of tolerance to the lethality of P. gingivalis LPS was exhibited by Salmonella LPS in galactosamine-sensitized C3H/HeJ mice. A protein-LPS complex derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which exhibited strong lethality and induced tolerance to a subsequent challenge with a lethal dose of LPS in galactosamine-sensitized LPS-responsive mice, did not exhibit lethal toxicity in galactosamine-sensitized C3H/HeJ mice and failed to induce tolerance in these mice to the lethality of P. gingivalis LPS. These results indicate that P. gingivalis LPS plays the central role in the activation of non-LPS-responsive C3H/HeJ mice.

  15. Prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotypes in the peri-implant sulcus of Koreans assessed using a new primer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA is a virulence factor associated with periodontal diseases, but its role in the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between the condition of peri-implant tissue and the distribution of P. gingivalis fimA genotypes in Koreans using a new primer. Methods A total of 248 plaque samples were taken from the peri-implant sulci of 184 subjects. The control group consisted of sound implants with a peri-implant probing depth (PD) of 5 mm or less with no bleeding on probing (BOP). Test group I consisted of implants with a peri-implant PD of 5 mm or less and BOP, and test group II consisted of implants with a peri-implant PD of more than 5 mm and BOP. DNA was extracted from each sample and analyzed a using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with P. gingivalis-specific primers, followed by an additional PCR assay to differentiate the fimA genotypes in P. gingivalis-positive subjects. Results The Prevalence of P. gingivalis in each group did not significantly differ (P>0.05). The most predominant fimA genotype in all groups was type II. The prevalence of type Ib fimA was significantly greater in test group II than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions The fimA type Ib genotype of P. gingivalis was found to play a critical role in the destruction of peri-implant tissue, suggesting that it may be a distinct risk factor for peri-implantitis. PMID:26937292

  16. Structural Insights into the PorK and PorN Components of the Porphyromonas gingivalis Type IX Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Gorasia, Dhana G.; Veith, Paul D.; Hanssen, Eric G.; Glew, Michelle D.; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Nakayama, Koji; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    The type IX secretion system (T9SS) has been recently discovered and is specific to Bacteroidetes species. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen for periodontitis, utilizes the T9SS to transport many proteins including the gingipain virulence factors across the outer membrane and attach them to the cell surface via a sortase-like mechanism. At least 11 proteins have been identified as components of the T9SS including PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN and PorP, however the precise roles of most of these proteins have not been elucidated and the structural organization of these components is unknown. In this study, we purified PorK and PorN complexes from P. gingivalis and using electron microscopy we have shown that PorN and the PorK lipoprotein interact to form a 50 nm diameter ring-shaped structure containing approximately 32–36 subunits of each protein. The formation of these rings was dependent on both PorK and PorN, but was independent of PorL, PorM and PorP. PorL and PorM were found to form a separate stable complex. PorK and PorN were protected from proteinase K cleavage when present in undisrupted cells, but were rapidly degraded when the cells were lysed, which together with bioinformatic analyses suggests that these proteins are exposed in the periplasm and anchored to the outer membrane via the PorK lipid. Chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed the interaction between PorK and PorN and further revealed that they interact with the PG0189 outer membrane protein. Furthermore, we established that PorN was required for the stable expression of PorK, PorL and PorM. Collectively, these results suggest that the ring-shaped PorK/N complex may form part of the secretion channel of the T9SS. This is the first report showing the structural organization of any T9SS component. PMID:27509186

  17. Structural Insights into the PorK and PorN Components of the Porphyromonas gingivalis Type IX Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Gorasia, Dhana G; Veith, Paul D; Hanssen, Eric G; Glew, Michelle D; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Nakayama, Koji; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-08-01

    The type IX secretion system (T9SS) has been recently discovered and is specific to Bacteroidetes species. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen for periodontitis, utilizes the T9SS to transport many proteins including the gingipain virulence factors across the outer membrane and attach them to the cell surface via a sortase-like mechanism. At least 11 proteins have been identified as components of the T9SS including PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN and PorP, however the precise roles of most of these proteins have not been elucidated and the structural organization of these components is unknown. In this study, we purified PorK and PorN complexes from P. gingivalis and using electron microscopy we have shown that PorN and the PorK lipoprotein interact to form a 50 nm diameter ring-shaped structure containing approximately 32-36 subunits of each protein. The formation of these rings was dependent on both PorK and PorN, but was independent of PorL, PorM and PorP. PorL and PorM were found to form a separate stable complex. PorK and PorN were protected from proteinase K cleavage when present in undisrupted cells, but were rapidly degraded when the cells were lysed, which together with bioinformatic analyses suggests that these proteins are exposed in the periplasm and anchored to the outer membrane via the PorK lipid. Chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed the interaction between PorK and PorN and further revealed that they interact with the PG0189 outer membrane protein. Furthermore, we established that PorN was required for the stable expression of PorK, PorL and PorM. Collectively, these results suggest that the ring-shaped PorK/N complex may form part of the secretion channel of the T9SS. This is the first report showing the structural organization of any T9SS component.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the C-terminal fragment of PorM, a subunit of the Porphyromonas gingivalis type IX secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Stathopulos, Julien; Cambillau, Christian; Cascales, Eric; Roussel, Alain; Leone, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    PorM is a membrane protein involved in the assembly of the type IX secretion system (T9SS) from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major bacterial pathogen responsible for periodontal disease in humans. The periplasmic domain of PorM was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. A fragment of the purified protein was obtained by limited proteolysis. Crystals of this fragment belonged to the tetragonal space group P43212. Native and MAD data sets were recorded to 2.85 and 3.1 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. PMID:25615973

  19. HmuY is an important virulence factor for Porphyromonas gingivalis growth in the heme-limited host environment and infection of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Olczak, Teresa; Sosicka, Paulina; Olczak, Mariusz

    2015-11-27

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, the main etiologic agent and key pathogen responsible for initiation and progression of chronic periodontitis, is a haem auxotroph, and the uptake of this compound is essential for its survival and the ability to establish an infection. The aim of this study was to examine the role of a hemophore-like HmuY protein in P. gingivalis growth and infection of macrophages. Inactivation of the hmuY gene caused reduced P. gingivalis growth in vitro in the presence of serum as a heme sole source, as well as in vivo co-cultures with THP-1-derived macrophages. This resulted in diminished invasion efficiency of macrophages by live bacteria lacking functional hmuY gene. Both features were partially restored after addition of the purified HmuY protein, which was internalized when added either together with the hmuY mutant strain or alone to macrophage cultures. We conclude that HmuY is an important virulence factor of P. gingivalis for infection of macrophages in a heme-limited host environment.

  20. The role of phagocytosis, oxidative burst and neutrophil extracellular traps in the interaction between neutrophils and the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, K; Demirel, I; Khalaf, H; Bengtsson, T

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophils are regarded as the sentinel cells of innate immunity and are found in abundance within the gingival crevice. Discovery of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) within the gingival pockets prompted us to probe the nature of the interactions of neutrophils with the prominent periopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Some of the noted virulence factors of this Gram-negative anaerobe are gingipains: arginine gingipains (RgpA/B) and lysine gingipain (Kgp). The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of gingipains in phagocytosis, formation of reactive oxygen species, NETs and CXCL8 modulation by using wild-type strains and isogenic gingipain mutants. Confocal imaging showed that gingipain mutants K1A (Kgp) and E8 (RgpA/B) induced extracellular traps in neutrophils, whereas ATCC33277 and W50 were phagocytosed. The viability of both ATCC33277 and W50 dwindled as the result of phagocytosis and could be salvaged by cytochalasin D, and the bacteria released high levels of lipopolysaccharide in the culture supernatant. Porphyromonas gingivalis induced reactive oxygen species and CXCL8 with the most prominent effect being that of the wild-type strain ATCC33277, whereas the other wild-type strain W50 was less effective. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed a significant CXCL8 expression by E8. All the tested P. gingivalis strains increased cytosolic free calcium. In conclusion, phagocytosis is the primary neutrophil response to P. gingivalis, although NETs could play an accessory role in infection control. Although gingipains do not seem to directly regulate phagocytosis, NETs or oxidative burst in neutrophils, their proteolytic properties could modulate the subsequent outcomes such as nutrition acquisition and survival by the bacteria.

  1. Biochemical characterization of the arginine-specific proteases of Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 suggests a common precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, M; Smith, S J; U, S; Curtis, M A

    1997-01-01

    Extracellular proteases of Porphyromonas gingivalis specific for arginyl peptide bonds are considered to be important virulence factors in periodontal disease. In order to determine the number, inter-relationship and kinetic properties of these proteases, extracellular enzymes with this peptide-bond specificity were purified and characterized from P. gingivalis W50. Three forms, which we denote RI, RI-A and RI-B, accounted for all of the activity in the supernatant. All three enzymes contain an alpha chain of approximately 54 kDa with the same N-terminal amino acid sequence. RI is a heterodimer of non-covalently linked alpha and beta chains which migrate to the same position on SDS/PAGE but which can be resolved by 8 M urea/PAGE. RI-A and RI-B are both monomeric, but the molecular mass of RI-B (70-80 kDa) is significantly increased due to post-translational modification with lipopolysaccharide. All forms show absolute specificity for peptide bonds with Arg in the P1 position and are also capable of hydrolysing N-terminal Arg and C-terminal Arg-Arg peptide bonds. Thus they show limited amino- and carboxy-peptidase activity. For the hydrolysis of Nalpha-benzoyl-L-Arg-p-nitroanilide, the pH optimum is 8.0 at 30 degrees C. The Vmax for all three enzymes is controlled by ionization of two residues with apparent pKas at 30 degrees C of 6. 5+/-0.05 and 9.7+/-0.05, and DeltaH values of approximately 29 kJ/mol and approximately 24 kJ/mol in the enzyme-substrate complex. By analogy with papain, the pKa of 6.5 could be ascribed to a Cys and the pKa of 9.7 to a His residue. E-64 [L-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamide-4-(4-guanidino)butane] is a competitive inhibitor of RI, RI-A and RI-B. Based on physical properties and kinetic behaviour, RI-A appears to be analogous to gingipain from P. gingivalis HG66. However the alpha/beta structure of RI differs significantly from that of the high-molecular-mass multimeric complex of gingipain containing four haemagglutinins described by

  2. Relationship between quantitative measurement of Porphyromonas gingivalis on dental plaque with periodontal status of patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwiyanti, Stephani; Soeroso, Yuniarti; Sunarto, Hari; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary heart disease is a narrowing of coronary artery due to plaque build-up. [1] Chronic periodontitis increases risk of cardiovascular disease. P.gingivalis is linked to both diseases. Objective: to analyse quantitative difference of P.gingivalis on dental plaque and its relationship with periodontal status of CHD patient and control. Methods: Periodontal status of 66 CHD patient and 40 control was checked. Subgingival plaque was isolated and P.gingivalis was measured using real-time PCR. Result: P.gingivalis of CHD patient differs from control. P.gingivalis is linked to pocket depth of CHD patient. Conclusion: P.gingivalis count of CHD patient is higher than control. P.gingivalis count is not linked to any periodontal status, except for pocket depth of CHD patient.

  3. Lethal effect of blue light-activated hydrogen peroxide, curcumin and erythrosine as potential oral photosensitizers on the viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Habiboallh, Ghanbari; Mahbobeh, Naderi Nasab; Mina, Zareian Jahromi; Majid, Zakeri; Nooshin, Arjmand

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been introduced as a new modality in oral bacterial decontamination. Current research aims to evaluate the effect of photodynamic killing of visible blue light in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, curcumin and erythrosine as potential oral photosensitizers on Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with periodontal bone loss and Fusobacterium nucleatum associated with soft tissue inflammation. Materials and methods: Standard suspension of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum were exposed to Light Emitting Diode (LED) (440–480 nm) in combination with erythrosine (22 µm), curcumin (60 µM) and hydrogen peroxide (0.3 mM) for 5 min. Bacterial samples from each treatment groups (radiation-only group, photosensitizer-only group and blue light-activated photosensitizer group) were subcultured onto the surface of agar plates. Survival of these bacteria was determined by counting the number of colony forming units (CFU) after incubation. Results: Results for antibacterial assays on P. gingivalis confirmed that curcumin, Hydrogen peroxide and erythrosine alone exerted a moderate bactericidal effect which enhanced noticeably in conjugation with visible light. The survival rate of P. gingivalis reached zero present when the suspension exposed to blue light-activated curcumin and hydrogen peroxide for 2 min. Besides, curcumin exerted a remarkable antibacterial activity against F. nucleatum in comparison with erythrosine and hydrogen peroxide (P=0.00). Furthermore, the bactericidal effect of visible light alone on P. gingivalis as black-pigmented bacteria was significant. Conclusion: Our result suggested that visible blue light in the presence of erythrosine, curcumin and hydrogen peroxide would be consider as a potential approach of PDT to kill the main gramnegative periodontal pathogens. From a clinical standpoint, this regimen could be established as an additional minimally invasive antibacterial treatment of plaque induced

  4. Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein-1c Regulates Inflammasome Activation in Gingival Fibroblasts Infected with High-Glucose-Treated Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Te-Chuan; Lee, Ko-Chao; Lee, Kam-Fai; Chen, Cheng-Nan; Yu, Hong-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Background: Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major bacterial species implicated in the progression of periodontal disease, which is recognized as a common complication of diabetes. The interleukin (IL)-1β, processed by the NLR family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, has been identified as a target for pathogenic infection of the inflammatory response. However, the effect of P. gingivalis in a high-glucose situation in the modulation of inflammasome activation in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) is not well-understood. Methods: P. gingivalis strain CCUG25226 was used to study the mechanisms underlying the regulation of HGF NLRP3 expression by the infection of high-glucose-treated P. gingivalis (HGPg). Results: HGF infection with HGPg increases the expression of IL-1β and NLRP3. We further demonstrated that the upregulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c by activation of the Akt and p70S6K pathways is critical for HGPg-induced NLRP3 expression. We showed that the inhibition of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) blocks the Akt- and p70S6K-mediated SREBP-1c, NLRP3, and IL-1β expression. The effect of HGPg on HGF signaling and NLRP3 expression is mediated by β1 integrin. In addition, gingival tissues from diabetic patients with periodontal disease exhibited higher NLRP3 and SREBP-1c expression. Conclusions: Our findings identify the molecular pathways underlying HGPg-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome expression in HGFs, providing insight into the effect of P. gingivalis invasion in HGFs. PMID:28083517

  5. Role of gallium and silver from phosphate-based glasses on in vitro dual species oral biofilm models of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Valappil, Sabeel P; Coombes, Marc; Wright, Lucy; Owens, Gareth J; Lynch, Richard J M; Hope, Christopher K; Higham, Susan M

    2012-05-01

    Phosphate-based glasses (PBGs) are excellent controlled delivery agents for antibacterial ions such as silver and gallium. The aim of this study was to assess the potential utility of novel PBGs combining both gallium and silver for use in periodontal therapy. To this end, an in vitro biofilm model with the putative periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and an initial colonizer, Streptococcus gordonii, was established. The effect of increasing calcium content in gallium-silver-doped PBG on the susceptibility of P. gingivalis was examined. A decrease in degradation rates (30.34, 25.19, 21.40 μg mm(-2) h(-1)) with increasing PBG calciumcontent (10, 11, 12 mol.% respectively) was observed, correlating well with gallium and silver ion release and antimicrobial activity against planktonic P. gingivalis (approximately 5.4log(10) colony-forming units (CFU) reduction after 24h by the C10 glass compared with controls) and S. gordonii (total growth inhibition after 32h by C10, C11 and C12 glasses compared with controls). The most potent PBG (C10) was evaluated for its ability to inhibit the biofilm growth of P. gingivalis in a newly established constant-depth film fermentor model. The simultaneous release of silver and gallium from the glass reduced P. gingivalis biofilm growth with a maximum effect (1.92log(10) CFU reduction) after 168 h. Given the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and dearth of new antibiotics in development, the glasses, especially C10, would offer effective alternatives to antibiotics or may complement current therapies through controlled, localized delivery of gallium and silver ions at infected sites in the oral cavity.

  6. Enhancing Specific-Antibody Production to the ragB Vaccine with GITRL That Expand Tfh, IFN-γ+ T Cells and Attenuates Porphyromonas gingivalis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhaoliang; Kong, Fanzhi; Shi, Xiaoju; Tong, Jia; Shen, Pei; Peng, Tianqing; Wang, Shengjun; Xu, Huaxi

    2013-01-01

    The outer membrane protein RagB is one of the major virulence factors of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). In order to induce protective immune response against P. gingivalis infection, an mGITRL gene-linked ragB DNA vaccine (pIRES-ragB-mGITRL ) was constructed. Six-week-old female BALB/c mice were immunized with pIRES-ragB-mGITRL through intramuscular injection and then challenged by subcutaneous injection in the abdomen with P. gingivalis. RagB-specific antibody-forming cells were evaluated by an Enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot, and specific antibody was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, the frequencies of Tfh and IFN-γ+ T cells in spleen were measured using flow cytometer, and the levels of IL-21 and IFN-γ mRNA or proteins were detected by real time RT-PCR or ELISA. The data showed that the mGITRL-linked ragB DNA vaccine induced higher levels of RagB-specific IgG in serum and RagB-specific antibody-forming cells in spleen. The frequencies of Tfh and IFN-γ+ T cells were obviously expanded in mice immunized by pIRES-ragB-mGITRL compared with other groups (pIRES or pIRES-ragB ). The levels of Tfh and IFN-γ+ T cells associated cytokines were also significantly increased in pIRES-ragB-mGITRL group. Therefore, the mice immunized with ragB plus mGITRL showed the stronger resistant to P. gingivalis infection and a significant reduction of the lesion size caused by P. gingivalis infection comparing with other groups. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that intramuscular injection of DNA vaccine ragB together with mGITRL induced protective immune response dramatically by increasing Tfh and IFN-γ+ T cells and antibody production to P. gingivalis. PMID:23560053

  7. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Heme Oxygenase-1 Toward Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide in Macrophages Exposed to Gomisins A, G, and J

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Eun Yeon; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Sun Gun; Park, Da Jung; Kang, Jum Soon; Kim, Young Hun; Seetharaman, Rajaseker

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory periodontal disease that develops from gingivitis, is caused by periodontal pathogenic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis. Recent studies have focused on the antioxidant, anti–human immunodeficiency virus, anticarcinogenic, and anti-inflammatory properties of gomisins. However, the anti-inflammatory activities of gomisin plants through heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) signals remain poorly defined. We found that gomisins' anti-inflammatory activity occurs via the induction of HO-1 expression. Gomisins G and J inhibit the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 and also block nuclear factor-κB activation in Raw264.7 cells stimulated with P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine production is inhibited through the induction of HO-1 expression. HO-1 expression is induced by all gomisins, but their anti-inflammatory activity via HO-1 signaling is observed with gomisins G and J, and not A. We found that gomisins G and J extracted from Schisandria chinensis can inhibit the P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide induced-inflammatory responses in Raw264.7 cells. PMID:22145771

  8. Porphyromonas gingivalis vesicles enhance attachment, and the leucine-rich repeat BspA protein is required for invasion of epithelial cells by "Tannerella forsythia".

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Satoru; Onishi, Shinsuke; Kuramitsu, Howard K; Sharma, Ashu

    2006-09-01

    The human oral cavity harbors more than 500 species of bacteria. Periodontitis, a bacterially induced inflammatory disease that leads to tooth loss, is believed to result from infection by a select group of gram-negative periodontopathogens that includes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and "Tannerella forsythia" (opinion on name change from Tannerella forsythensis pending; formerly Bacteroides forsythus). Epithelial cell invasion by periodontopathogens is considered to be an important virulence mechanism for evasion of the host defense responses. Further, the epithelial cells with invading bacteria also serve as reservoirs important in recurrent infections. The present study was therefore undertaken to address the epithelial cell adherence and invasion properties of T. forsythia and the role of the cell surface-associated protein BspA in these processes. Further, we were interested in determining if P. gingivalis, one of the pathogens frequently found associated in disease, or its outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) could modulate the epithelial cell adherence and invasion abilities of T. forsythia. Here we show that epithelial cell attachment and invasion by T. forsythia are dependent on the BspA protein. In addition, P. gingivalis or its OMVs enhance the attachment and invasion of T. forsythia to epithelial cells. Thus, interactions between these two bacteria may play important roles in virulence by promoting host cell attachment and invasion.

  9. Disease severity associated with presence in subgingival plaque of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Tannerella forsythia, singly or in combination, as detected by nested multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Ready, D; D'Aiuto, F; Spratt, D A; Suvan, J; Tonetti, M S; Wilson, M

    2008-10-01

    This study used a nested multiplex PCR method to detect three periodontal pathogens in subgingival plaque collected before treatment and at 2 and 6 months posttreatment from 107 patients with severe, generalized periodontitis. The proportions of the patients who harbored these bacteria before periodontal treatment were as follows: Tannerella forsythia, 81%; Porphyromonas gingivalis, 78%; and Aggregatibacter (formerly Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, 47%. At 2 months posttreatment there was a significant reduction in the numbers of patients harboring P. gingivalis (46%; P < 0.001) or T. forsythia (63%; P = 0.043) but not A. actinomycetemcomitans (50%) compared to pretreatment data. At 6 months posttreatment, significantly fewer patients harbored P. gingivalis (43%; P < 0.001); A. actinomycetemcomitans, (31%; P = 0.025), or T. forsythia (63%; P = 0.030). Interestingly, at baseline and at 2 months posttherapy, subjects who harbored only a single pathogen had a greater level of periodontal disease than subjects who harbored two, or all three, of these periodontal pathogens. These data suggest that a reduction in the number of species present may be associated with an increase in the severity of periodontal diseases.

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis Differentially Modulates Cell Death Profile in Ox-LDL and TNF-α Pre-Treated Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bugueno, Isaac Maximiliano; Khelif, Yacine; Seelam, Narendra; Morand, David-Nicolas; Tenenbaum, Henri; Davideau, Jean-Luc; Huck, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Objective Clinical studies demonstrated a potential link between atherosclerosis and periodontitis. Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), one of the main periodontal pathogen, has been associated to atheromatous plaque worsening. However, synergism between infection and other endothelial stressors such as oxidized-LDL or TNF-α especially on endothelial cell (EC) death has not been investigated. This study aims to assess the role of Pg on EC death in an inflammatory context and to determine potential molecular pathways involved. Methods Human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) were infected with Pg (MOI 100) or stimulated by its lipopolysaccharide (Pg-LPS) (1μg/ml) for 24 to 48 hours. Cell viability was measured with AlamarBlue test, type of cell death induced was assessed using Annexin V/propidium iodide staining. mRNA expression regarding caspase-1, -3, -9, Bcl-2, Bax-1 and Apaf-1 has been evaluated with RT-qPCR. Caspases enzymatic activity and concentration of APAF-1 protein were evaluated to confirm mRNA results. Results Pg infection and Pg-LPS stimulation induced EC death. A cumulative effect has been observed in Ox-LDL pre-treated ECs infected or stimulated. This effect was not observed in TNF-α pre-treated cells. Pg infection promotes EC necrosis, however, in infected Ox-LDL pre-treated ECs, apoptosis was promoted. This effect was not observed in TNF-α pre-treated cells highlighting specificity of molecular pathways activated. Regarding mRNA expression, Pg increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes including caspases-1,-3,-9, Bax-1 and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In Ox-LDL pre-treated ECs, Pg increased significantly the expression of Apaf-1. These results were confirmed at the protein level. Conclusion This study contributes to demonstrate that Pg and its Pg-LPS could exacerbate Ox-LDL and TNF-α induced endothelial injury through increase of EC death. Interestingly, molecular pathways are differentially modulated by the infection in function of the

  11. Inflammatory responses of a macrophage/epithelial cell co-culture model to mono and mixed infections with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Bodet, Charles; Chandad, Fatiha; Grenier, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Accumulated evidence points to Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia as three major etiologic agents of chronic periodontitis. Epithelial cells and macrophages play a major role in the host response to periodontopathogens, and the secretion of inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by these host cells is believed to contribute to periodontal tissue destruction. The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory response of a macrophage/epithelial cell co-culture model following mono or mixed infections with the above three periodontopathogens. An in vitro co-culture model composed of epithelial-like transformed cells (HeLa cell line) and macrophage-like cells (phorbol myristic acid-differentiated U937 monocytic cell line) was challenged with whole cells or lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia, individually and in combination. Following stimulation, the production of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and MMP-9 were quantified by enzyme-linked immunoassays. We observed that mono or mixed infections of the co-culture model induced the secretion of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, PGE2, and MMP-9. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia induced an increase in RANTES secretion, whereas T. denticola alone or in combination resulted in a significant decrease in RANTES levels. All LPS challenges induced an increase in chemokine, MMP-9, and PGE2 production. No synergistic effect on the production of cytokines, chemokines, PGE2, and MMP-9 was observed for any of the bacterial or LPS mixtures tested. This study supports the view that P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia may induce high levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and MMP-9 in periodontal lesions, thus contributing to the progression of periodontitis.

  12. Morbidly obese patient with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-related cirrhosis who died from sepsis caused by dental infection of Porphyromonas gingivalis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yuno; Kitamoto, Mikiya; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Yamanoue, Takao; Tada, Yoshihiro; Boku, Noriko; Nishisaka, Takashi; Miyauchi, Mutsumi; Takata, Takashi; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-03-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is associated with increased risks of developing lifestyle-related diseases including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cerebral vessel disease. While the two-hit hypothesis and, recently, multiple parallel hits hypothesis of NASH pathogenesis were proposed, further details have not emerged. Recently, dental infection of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) has been reported as a critical risk factor for NASH progression, which acts as multiple parallel hits to induce inflammation and fibrogenic responses in steatosis. We describe here a 54-year-old woman who died from sepsis and was diagnosed with NASH. Briefly, her body mass index (BMI) at the age of 35 years old had been 25.6 kg/m(2) , but she became obese after withdrawing into her home at the age of 45 years. Severe obesity continued over 19 years without diabetes mellitus. She was admitted to our hospital due to a sudden disturbance of consciousness. On admission, her BMI was 48.5 kg/m(2) . Computed tomography revealed cirrhotic liver with massive ascites, and laboratory data indicated increased inflammatory responses, renal failure and C grade Child-Pugh classification, suggesting the diagnosis of sepsis. Also, severe periodontal disease was present, because the patient's front teeth fell out easily during intubation. Although the focus of infection was not specified, the oral flora Parvimonas micra, a periodontal pathogen, was detected in venous blood. In spite of intensive care including artificial respiration management and continuous hemodiafiltration, she died on the 43rd day after admission. Surprisingly, P. gingivalis was detected in her hepatocytes. This case may represent the significance of P. gingivalis in the progress to cirrhosis in NASH patients.

  13. The GroEL protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis regulates atherogenic phenomena in endothelial cells mediated by upregulating toll-like receptor 4 expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Yao; Shih, Chun-Ming; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Lin, Yi-Wen; Shih, Chun-Che; Chiang, Kuang-Hsing; Shyue, Song-Kun; Chang, Yu-Jia; Hsieh, Chi-Kun; Lin, Feng-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is a bacterial species that causes periodontitis. GroEL from P. gingivalis may possess biological activity and may be involved in the destruction of periodontal tissues. However, it is unclear whether P. gingivalis GroEL enhances the appearance of atherogenic phenomena in endothelial cells and vessels. Here, we constructed recombinant GroEL from P. gingivalis to investigate its effects in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) in vitro and on aortas of high-cholesterol (HC)-fed B57BL/6 and B57BL/6-Tlr4lps-del mice in vivo. The results showed that GroEL impaired tube-formation capacity under non-cytotoxic conditions in HCAECs. GroEL increased THP-1 cell/HCAEC adhesion by increasing the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and vascular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in endothelial cells. Additionally, GroEL increased DiI-oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake, which may be mediated by elevated lectin-like oxLDL receptor (LOX)-1 but not scavenger receptor expressed by endothelial cells (SREC) and scavenger receptor class B1 (SR-B1) expression. Furthermore, GroEL interacts with toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and plays a causal role in atherogenesis in HCAECs. Human antigen R (HuR), an RNA-binding protein with a high affinity for the 3’ untranslated region (3’UTR) of TLR4 mRNA, contributes to the up-regulation of TLR4 induced by GroEL in HCAECs. In a GroEL animal administration study, GroEL elevated ICAM-1, VCAM-1, LOX-1 and TLR4 expression in the aortas of HC diet-fed wild C57BL/6 but not C57BL/6-Tlr4lps-del mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that P. gingivalis GroEL may contribute to cardiovascular disorders by affecting TLR4 expression. PMID:27158334

  14. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bharath, Nagaraj; Sowmya, Nagur Karibasappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. Results: MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Conclusion: Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease. PMID:26097349

  15. Differential quantitative proteomics of Porphyromonas gingivalis by linear ion trap mass spectrometry: Non-label methods comparison, q-values and LOWESS curve fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qiangwei; Wang, Tiansong; Park, Yoonsuk; Lamont, Richard J.; Hackett, Murray

    2007-01-01

    Differential analysis of whole cell proteomes by mass spectrometry has largely been applied using various forms of stable isotope labeling. While metabolic stable isotope labeling has been the method of choice, it is often not possible to apply such an approach. Four different label free ways of calculating expression ratios in a classic "two-state" experiment are compared: signal intensity at the peptide level, signal intensity at the protein level, spectral counting at the peptide level, and spectral counting at the protein level. The quantitative data were mined from a dataset of 1245 qualitatively identified proteins, about 56% of the protein encoding open reading frames from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative intracellular pathogen being studied under extracellular and intracellular conditions. Two different control populations were compared against P. gingivalis internalized within a model human target cell line. The q-value statistic, a measure of false discovery rate previously applied to transcription microarrays, was applied to proteomics data. For spectral counting, the most logically consistent estimate of random error came from applying the locally weighted scatter plot smoothing procedure (LOWESS) to the most extreme ratios generated from a control technical replicate, thus setting upper and lower bounds for the region of experimentally observed random error.

  16. Structure of the fimbrial protein Mfa4 from Porphyromonas gingivalis in its precursor form: implications for a donor-strand complementation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kloppsteck, Patrik; Hall, Michael; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Persson, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are chronic inflammatory diseases that can lead to tooth loss. One of the causes of these diseases is the Gram-negative Porphyromonas gingivalis. This periodontal pathogen is dependent on two fimbriae, FimA and Mfa1, for binding to dental biofilm, salivary proteins, and host cells. These fimbriae are composed of five proteins each, but the fimbriae assembly mechanism and ligands are unknown. Here we reveal the crystal structure of the precursor form of Mfa4, one of the accessory proteins of the Mfa1 fimbria. Mfa4 consists of two β-sandwich domains and the first part of the structure forms two well-defined β-strands that run over both domains. This N-terminal region is cleaved by gingipains, a family of proteolytic enzymes that encompass arginine- and lysine-specific proteases. Cleavage of the N-terminal region generates the mature form of the protein. Our structural data allow us to propose that the new N-terminus of the mature protein may function as a donor strand in the polymerization of P. gingivalis fimbriae. PMID:26972441

  17. The outer-membrane export signal of Porphyromonas gingivalis type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a conserved C-terminal β-sandwich domain

    PubMed Central

    de Diego, Iñaki; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Mizgalska, Danuta; Koneru, Lahari; Golik, Przemyslaw; Szmigielski, Borys; Nowak, Magdalena; Nowakowska, Zuzanna; Potempa, Barbara; Houston, John A.; Enghild, Jan J.; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Gao, Jinlong; Kwan, Ann H.; Trewhella, Jill; Dubin, Grzegorz; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Potempa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In the recently characterized Type IX Secretion System (T9SS), the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) in secreted proteins functions as an outer membrane translocation signal for export of virulence factors to the cell surface in the Gram-negative Bacteroidetes phylum. In the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, the CTD is cleaved off by PorU sortase in a sequence-independent manner, and anionic lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS) is attached to many translocated proteins, thus anchoring them to the bacterial surface. Here, we solved the atomic structure of the CTD of gingipain B (RgpB) from P. gingivalis, alone and together with a preceding immunoglobulin-superfamily domain (IgSF). The CTD was found to possess a typical Ig-like fold encompassing seven antiparallel β-strands organized in two β-sheets, packed into a β-sandwich structure that can spontaneously dimerise through C-terminal strand swapping. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) revealed no fixed orientation of the CTD with respect to the IgSF. By introducing insertion or substitution of residues within the inter-domain linker in the native protein, we were able to show that despite the region being unstructured, it nevertheless is resistant to general proteolysis. These data suggest structural motifs located in the two adjacent Ig-like domains dictate the processing of CTDs by the T9SS secretion pathway. PMID:27005013

  18. Bactericidal effect of visible light in the presence of erythrosine on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum compared with diode laser, an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Habiboallah, Ghanbari; Mahdi, Zakeri; Mahbobeh, Naderi Nasab; Mina, Zareian Jahromi; Sina, Faghihi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been introduced as a new modality in oral bacterial decontamination. Besides, the ability of laser irradiation in the presence of photosensitizing agent to lethal effect on oral bacteria is well documented. Current research aims to evaluate the effect of photodynamic killing of visible blue light in the presence of plaque disclosing agent erythrosine as photosensitizer on Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with periodontal bone loss and Fusobacterium nucleatum associated with soft tissue inflammation, comparing with the near-infrared diode laser. Materials and methods: Standard suspension of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum were exposed to Light Emitting Diode (LED) (440–480 nm) used to photopolymerize composite resine dental restoration in combination with erythrosine (22 µm) up to 5 minutes. Bacterial sample were also exposed to a near-infrared diode laser (wavelength, 830 nm), using identical irradiation parameters for comparison. Bacterial samples from each treatment groups (radiation-only group, erythrosine-only group and light or laser with erythrosine group) were subcultured onto the surface of agar plates. Survival of these bacteria was determined by counting the number of colony forming units (CFU) after incubation. Results: Exposure to visible blue light and diode laser in conjugation with erythrosine significantly reduced both species examined viability, whereas erythrosine-treated samples exposed to visible light suggested a statically meaningful differences comparing to diode laser. In addition, bactericidal effect of visible light or diode laser alone on P. gingivalis as black-pigmented bacteria possess endogenous porphyrins was noticeably. Conclusion: Our result suggested that visible blue light source in the presence of plaque disclosing agent erythrosine could can be consider as potential approach of PDT to kill the main gram-negative periodontal pathogens. From a clinical standpoint, this

  19. The Hemoglobin Receptor Protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis Inhibits Receptor Activator NF-κB Ligand-Induced Osteoclastogenesis from Bone Marrow Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Yuji; Hotokezaka, Hitoshi; Ohara, Naoya; Naito, Mariko; Sakai, Eiko; Yoshimura, Mamiko; Narita, Yuka; Kitaura, Hideki; Yoshida, Noriaki; Nakayama, Koji

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular proteinaceous factors of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, that influence receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow macrophages were investigated. The culture supernatant of P. gingivalis had the ability to inhibit RANKL-induced in vitro osteoclastogenesis. A major protein of the culture supernatant, hemoglobin receptor protein (HbR), suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent fashion. HbR markedly inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis when present in the culture for the first 24 h after addition of RANKL, whereas no significant inhibition was observed when HbR was added after 24 h or later, implying that HbR might interfere with only the initial stage of RANKL-mediated differentiation. HbR tightly bound to bone marrow macrophages and had the ability to induce phosphorylation of ERK, p38, NF-κB, and Akt. RANKL-induced phosphorylation of ERK, p38, and NF-κB was not suppressed by HbR, but that of Akt was markedly suppressed. HbR inhibited RANKL-mediated induction of c-Fos and NFATc1. HbR could induce beta interferon (IFN-β) from bone marrow macrophages, but the induction level of IFN-β might not be sufficient to suppress RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis, implying presence of an IFN-β-independent pathway in HbR-mediated inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Since rapid and extensive destruction of the alveolar bone causes tooth loss, resulting in loss of the gingival crevice that is an anatomical niche for periodontal pathogens such as P. gingivalis, the suppressive effect of HbR on osteoclastogenesis may help the microorganism exist long in the niche. PMID:16622189

  20. Gallium(III), cobalt(III) and copper(II) protoporphyrin IX exhibit antimicrobial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis by reducing planktonic and biofilm growth and invasion of host epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Olczak, Teresa; Maszczak-Seneczko, Dorota; Smalley, John W; Olczak, Mariusz

    2012-08-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis acquires heme for growth, and initiation and progression of periodontal diseases. One of its heme acquisition systems consists of the HmuR and HmuY proteins. This study analyzed the antimicrobial activity of non-iron metalloporphyrins against P. gingivalis during planktonic growth, biofilm formation, epithelial cell adhesion and invasion, and employed hmuY, hmuR and hmuY-hmuR mutants to assess the involvement of HmuY and HmuR proteins in the acquisition of metalloporphyrins. Iron(III) mesoporphyrin IX (mesoheme) and iron(III) deuteroporphyrin IX (deuteroheme) supported planktonic growth of P. gingivalis cells, biofilm accumulation, as well as survival, adhesion and invasion of HeLa cells in a way analogous to protoheme. In contrast, cobalt(III), gallium(III) and copper(II) protoporphyrin IX exhibited antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis, and thus represent potentially useful antibacterial compounds with which to target P. gingivalis. P. gingivalis hmuY, hmuR and hmuY-hmuR mutants showed decreased growth and infection of epithelial cells in the presence of all metalloporphyrins examined. In conclusion, the HmuY protein may not be directly involved in transport of free metalloporphyrins into the bacterial cell, but it may also play a protective role against metalloporphyrin toxicity by binding an excess of these compounds.

  1. Coordinate expression of the Porphyromonas gingivalis lysine-specific gingipain proteinase, Kgp, arginine-specific gingipain proteinase, RgpA, and the heme/hemoglobin receptor, HmuR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyan; Sroka, Aneta; Potempa, Jan; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2004-11-01

    Heme utilization in Porphyromonas gingivalis requires the participation of an outer membrane hemin/hemoglobin receptor, HmuR, the lysine-specific gingipain proteinase (Kgp) and arginine-specific gingipain proteinase (Rgp). In this study, the expression of hmuR , kgp and rgpA genes in response to growth with different heme sources was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunoassay. Coordinate regulation of hmuR , kgp and rgpA gene expression was evaluated through utilization of P. gingivalis hmuR and kgp mutants or by selective inactivation of proteinases with Kgp- and Rgp-specific inhibitors. We observed that expression of the kgp and rgpA genes was not tightly regulated by heme, but rather by the growth phase. In contrast, expression of the hmuR gene was negatively regulated by heme, while growth of P. gingivalis with human serum resulted in increased hmuR expression. A P. gingivalis kgp isogenic mutant demonstrated significantly increased hmuR gene expression, and inactivation of Kgp and Rgp activity by specific inhibitors up-regulated hmuR gene transcription. Moreover, inactivation of Kgp up-regulated rgpA transcription. Finally, a P. gingivalis hmuR mutant exhibited repressed kgp gene expression and lysine-specific proteinase activity. Collectively, these results indicate that kgp , rgpA and hmuR gene transcription is coordinately regulated and may facilitate greater efficiency of heme utilization in P. gingivalis .

  2. MicroRNAs responsive to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS modulate expression of genes regulating innate immunity in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Afsar R; Fordham, Jezrom B; Khan, Asma; Nares, Salvador

    2014-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, noncoding RNAs that regulate post-transcriptional expression of their respective target genes and are responsive to various stimuli, including LPS. Here we examined the early (4 h) miRNA responses of THP1-differentiated macrophages challenged with LPS derived from the periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis or environmentally-modified LPS obtained from P. gingivalis grown in cigarette smoke extract. Predicted miRNA-gene target interactions for LPS-responsive miR-29b and let-7f were confirmed using dual-luciferase assays and by transfection experiments using miRNA mimics and inhibitors. Convergent and divergent miRNA profiles were observed in treated samples where differences in miRNA levels related to the type, concentration and incubation times of LPS challenge. Dual-luciferase experiments revealed miR-29b targeting of interleukin-6 receptorα (IL-6Rα) and IFN-γ inducible protein 30 and let-7f targeting of suppressor of cytokine signaling 4 and thrombospondin-1. Transfection experiments confirmed miR-29b and let-7f modulation of IL-6Rα and SOCS4 protein expression levels, respectively. Thus, we have demonstrated convergent/divergent miRNA responses to wild type LPS and its environmentally-modified LPS, and demonstrate miRNA targeting of key genes linked to inflammation and immunity. Our data indicate that these LPS-responsive miRNAs may play a key role in fine-tuning the host response to periodontal pathogens.

  3. Genome of the pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis recovered from a biofilm in a hospital sink using a high-throughput single-cell genomics platform

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Jeffrey S.; Lombardo, Mary-Jane; Ziegler, Michael G.; Novotny, Mark; Yee-Greenbaum, Joyclyn; Badger, Jonathan H.; Tesler, Glenn; Nurk, Sergey; Lesin, Valery; Brami, Daniel; Hall, Adam P.; Edlund, Anna; Allen, Lisa Z.; Durkin, Scott; Reed, Sharon; Torriani, Francesca; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Pevzner, Pavel A.; Friedman, Robert; Venter, J. Craig; Lasken, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    Although biofilms have been shown to be reservoirs of pathogens, our knowledge of the microbial diversity in biofilms within critical areas, such as health care facilities, is limited. Available methods for pathogen identification and strain typing have some inherent restrictions. In particular, culturing will yield only a fraction of the species present, PCR of virulence or marker genes is mainly focused on a handful of known species, and shotgun metagenomics is limited in the ability to detect strain variations. In this study, we present a single-cell genome sequencing approach to address these limitations and demonstrate it by specifically targeting bacterial cells within a complex biofilm from a hospital bathroom sink drain. A newly developed, automated platform was used to generate genomic DNA by the multiple displacement amplification (MDA) technique from hundreds of single cells in parallel. MDA reactions were screened and classified by 16S rRNA gene PCR sequence, which revealed a broad range of bacteria covering 25 different genera representing environmental species, human commensals, and opportunistic human pathogens. Here we focus on the recovery of a nearly complete genome representing a novel strain of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis JCVI SC001) using the single-cell assembly tool SPAdes. Single-cell genomics is becoming an accepted method to capture novel genomes, primarily in the marine and soil environments. Here we show for the first time that it also enables comparative genomic analysis of strain variation in a pathogen captured from complex biofilm samples in a healthcare facility. PMID:23564253

  4. Social stress enhances IL-1beta and TNF-alpha production by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated CD11b+ cells.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Michael T; Kinsey, Steven G; Padgett, David A; Sheridan, John F; Leblebicioglu, Binnaz

    2009-09-07

    Psychological stress is associated with an increased expression of markers of peripheral inflammation, and there is a growing literature describing a link between periodontal pathogens and systemic inflammation. The hypothesis of the present work is that exposing mice to the social stressor, called social disruption (SDR), would enhance the inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from the oral pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis. Mice were exposed to SDR for 2h per day on 6 consecutive days. On the morning following the last cycle of SDR, mice were tested for anxiety-like behavior in the open field test and novel object test. The mice were sacrificed the following day and their spleens harvested. Spleen cells were stimulated with LPS derived from P. gingivalis in the absence or presence of increasing doses of corticosterone. Social disruption resulted in anxiety-like behavior, and the production of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha was significantly higher in spleen cells from mice exposed to SDR in comparison to levels from non-stressed control mice. In addition, the viability of spleen cells from mice exposed to SDR was significantly greater than the viability of cells from non-stressed control mice, even in the presence of high doses of corticosterone. The use of cultures enriched for CD11b+ cells indicated that the stressor was affecting the activity of splenic myeloid cells. This study demonstrates that social stress enhances the inflammatory response to an oral pathogen and could provide a critical clue in the reported associations between stress, inflammation, and oral pathogens.

  5. Proteomic mapping of stimulus-specific signaling pathways involved in THP-1 cells exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis or its purified components.

    PubMed

    Saba, Julian A; McComb, Mark E; Potts, Donna L; Costello, Catherine E; Amar, Salomon

    2007-06-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease initiated by host-parasite interactions which contributes to connective tissue destruction and alveolar bone resorption. Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.), a black-pigmented Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, is a major pathogen in the development and progression of periodontitis. To characterize the role that P. gingivalis and its cell surface components play in disease processes, we investigated the differential expression of proteins induced by live P.g., P.g. LPS, and P.g. FimA, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in combination with mass spectrometry. We have tested whether, at the level of protein expression, unique signaling pathways are differentially induced by the bacterial components P.g. LPS and P.g. FimA, as compared to live P.g. We found that P.g. LPS stimulation of THP-1 up-regulated the expression of a set of proteins compared to control: deoxyribonuclease, actin, carbonic anhydrase 2, alpha enolase, adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP1), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), glucose regulated protein (grp78), and 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), whereas FimA treatment did not result in statistically significant changes to protein levels versus the control. Live P.g. stimulation resulted in 12 differentially expressed proteins: CAP1, tubulin beta-2 chain, ATP synthase beta chain, tubulin alpha-6 chain, PDI, vimentin, 60-kDa heat shock protein, and nucleolin were found to be up-regulated, while carbonic anhydrase II, beta-actin, and HSP70 were down-regulated relative to control. These differential changes by the bacteria and its components are interpreted as preferential signal pathway activation in host immune/inflammatory responses to P.g. infection.

  6. Convergent Synthesis of Novel Muramyl Dipeptide Analogues: Inhibition of Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Pro-inflammatory Effects by High Doses of Muramyl Dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bin; Panek, James S; Amar, Salomon

    2016-07-28

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.)-induced TNF-α can be affected by muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in a biphasic concentration-dependent manner. We found that in P.g.-exposed macrophages, treatment with 10 μg/mL of MDP (MDP-low) up-regulated TNF-α by 29%, while 100 μg/mL or higher (MDP-high) significantly decreased it (16% to 38%). MDP-high was found to affect the ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 and activator protein 1 (AP1). An AP1 binding site was found in the promoter region of A20. A20 promoter activity was up-regulated after transfection of AP1 cDNA in cells. Four analogues of MDP (3-6) were prepared through a convergent strategy involving the synthesis of two unique carbohydrate fragments, 7a and 7b, using the peptide coupling reagents, EDCI and HOAt. Analogue 4 improved MDP function and P.g.-induced activities. We propose a new signaling pathway for TNF-α induction activated after exposing macrophages to both P.g. and MDP-high or analogue 4.

  7. Kinetic Parameters and Cytotoxic Activity of Recombinant Methionine γ-Lyase from Clostridium tetani, Clostridium sporogenes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Citrobacter freundii

    PubMed Central

    Morozova, E. A.; Kulikova, V. V.; Yashin, D. V.; Anufrieva, N. V.; Anisimova, N. Y.; Revtovich, S. V.; Kotlov, M. I.; Belyi, Y. F.; Pokrovsky, V. S.; Demidkina, T. V.

    2013-01-01

    The steady-state kinetic parameters of pyridoxal 5’-phosphate-dependent recombinant methionine γ -lyase from three pathogenic bacteria, Clostridium tetani, Clostridium sporogenes, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, were determined in β- and γ-elimination reactions. The enzyme from C. sporogenes is characterized by the highest catalytic efficiency in the γ-elimination reaction of L-methionine. It was demonstrated that the enzyme from these three sources exists as a tetramer. The N-terminal poly-histidine fragment of three recombinant enzymes influences their catalytic activity and facilitates the aggregation of monomers to yield dimeric forms under denaturing conditions. The cytotoxicity of methionine γ-lyase from C. sporogenes and C. tetani in comparison with Citrobacter freundii was evaluated using K562, PC-3, LnCap, MCF7, SKOV-3, and L5178y tumor cell lines. K562 (IC50=0.4–1.3 U/ml), PC-3 (IC50=0.1–0.4 U/ml), and MCF7 (IC50=0.04–3.2 U/ml) turned out to be the most sensitive cell lines. PMID:24303205

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of gingipain R2 from Porphyromonas gingivalis in complex with H-D-Phe-Phe-Arg-chloromethylketone.

    PubMed Central

    Banbula, A.; Potempa, J.; Travis, J.; Bode, W.; Medrano, F. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gingipain R2 is a 50 kDa proteinase from the oral pathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis. This proteinase, which displays no significant sequence homology to any protein previously analyzed by X-ray crystallography, has been crystallized using the vapor diffusion method. Two different crystal forms were obtained from a solution containing polyethylene glycol (MW 8,000) (space group P2(1)2(1)2(1)) or magnesium sulfate (space group R3) as precipitating agent. Complete diffraction data sets have been collected up to 2.0 and 2.9 A resolution, respectively. Cell dimensions are a = 51.9 A, b = 79.9 A, and c = 99.6 A (P2(1)2(1)2(1)), and a = b = 176.6 A, and c = 143.4 A (R3). Considerations of the possible values of Vm accounts for the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit in the case of the orthorhombic crystal form, whereas the rhombohedral crystal form, together with the analysis of the self-rotation function, could accommodate a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. PMID:9605333

  9. Structural and functional probing of PorZ, an essential bacterial surface component of the type-IX secretion system of human oral-microbiomic Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Lasica, Anna M.; Goulas, Theodoros; Mizgalska, Danuta; Zhou, Xiaoyan; de Diego, Iñaki; Ksiazek, Mirosław; Madej, Mariusz; Guo, Yonghua; Guevara, Tibisay; Nowak, Magdalena; Potempa, Barbara; Goel, Apoorv; Sztukowska, Maryta; Prabhakar, Apurva T.; Bzowska, Monika; Widziolek, Magdalena; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Enghild, Jan J.; Simonian, Mary; Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W.; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a member of the human oral microbiome abundant in dysbiosis and implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontal (gum) disease. It employs a newly described type-IX secretion system (T9SS) for secretion of virulence factors. Cargo proteins destined for secretion through T9SS carry a recognition signal in the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD), which is removed by sortase PorU during translocation. Here, we identified a novel component of T9SS, PorZ, which is essential for surface exposure of PorU and posttranslational modification of T9SS cargo proteins. These include maturation of enzyme precursors, CTD removal and attachment of anionic lipopolysaccharide for anchorage in the outer membrane. The crystal structure of PorZ revealed two β-propeller domains and a C-terminal β-sandwich domain, which conforms to the canonical CTD architecture. We further documented that PorZ is itself transported to the cell surface via T9SS as a full-length protein with its CTD intact, independently of the presence or activity of PorU. Taken together, our results shed light on the architecture and possible function of a novel component of the T9SS. Knowledge of how T9SS operates will contribute to our understanding of protein secretion as part of host-microbiome interactions by dysbiotic members of the human oral cavity. PMID:27883039

  10. Kinetic Parameters and Cytotoxic Activity of Recombinant Methionine γ-Lyase from Clostridium tetani, Clostridium sporogenes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Morozova, E A; Kulikova, V V; Yashin, D V; Anufrieva, N V; Anisimova, N Y; Revtovich, S V; Kotlov, M I; Belyi, Y F; Pokrovsky, V S; Demidkina, T V

    2013-07-01

    The steady-state kinetic parameters of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent recombinant methionine γ -lyase from three pathogenic bacteria, Clostridium tetani, Clostridium sporogenes, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, were determined in β- and γ-elimination reactions. The enzyme from C. sporogenes is characterized by the highest catalytic efficiency in the γ-elimination reaction of L-methionine. It was demonstrated that the enzyme from these three sources exists as a tetramer. The N-terminal poly-histidine fragment of three recombinant enzymes influences their catalytic activity and facilitates the aggregation of monomers to yield dimeric forms under denaturing conditions. The cytotoxicity of methionine γ-lyase from C. sporogenes and C. tetani in comparison with Citrobacter freundii was evaluated using K562, PC-3, LnCap, MCF7, SKOV-3, and L5178y tumor cell lines. K562 (IC50=0.4-1.3 U/ml), PC-3 (IC50=0.1-0.4 U/ml), and MCF7 (IC50=0.04-3.2 U/ml) turned out to be the most sensitive cell lines.

  11. Structural significance of the β1K396 residue found in the Porphyromonas gingivalis sialidase β-propeller domain: a computational study with implications for novel therapeutics against periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Cueno, Marni E; Kamio, Noriaki; Imai, Kenichi; Ohya, Manabu; Tamura, Muneaki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2014-09-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis sialidase activity is associated with virulence and initiated by sialic acid (SA) binding to the β-propeller domain (BPD). Sialidase BPD is structurally conserved in various bacterial species and the protein binding interfaces have the tendency to form salt bridges, whereas uncommitted charged residues may affect binding and protein structure. However, it is not clear whether the sialidase BPD of varying strains of the same bacterial species differ, particularly with regards to salt bridge formation. Here, we determined the P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and W50 sialidase homology models and sialidase activities, while the putative salt bridge residues found in the sialidase BPDs were compared. We established that both ATCC 33277 and W50 have different sialidase homology models and activities, whereas, the BPD (β1-6) is structurally conserved with most salt bridge-forming residues following a common orientation. Moreover, β2D444-β6K338 distance measurement in ATCC 33277 (5.99 Å) and W50 (3.09 Å) differ, while β1K396A substitution alters the β2D444-β6K338 distance measurements in ATCC 33277 (3.09 Å) and W50 (3.01 Å) consequentially affecting each model. P. gingivalis plays a major role in periodontitis induction and its virulence is greatly influenced by the sialidase enzyme wherein the sialidase BPD is highly conserved. Our results suggest that alterations in the salt bridge formation within the BPD interface may affect the P. gingivalis sialidase structure. This would imply that disrupting the salt bridge formation within the P. gingivalis sialidase BPD could serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of P. gingivalis-related periodontitis.

  12. Comparison of the benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide (BANA) test, DNA probes, and immunological reagents for ability to detect anaerobic periodontal infections due to Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Bacteroides forsythus.

    PubMed Central

    Loesche, W J; Lopatin, D E; Giordano, J; Alcoforado, G; Hujoel, P

    1992-01-01

    Most forms of periodontal disease are associated with the presence or overgrowth of anaerobic species that could include Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Bacteroides forsythus among others. These three organisms are among the few cultivable plaque species that can hydrolyze the synthetic trypsin substrate benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide (BANA). In turn, BANA hydrolysis by the plaque can be associated with periodontal morbidity and with the presence of these three BANA-positive organisms in the plaque. In this investigation, the results of the BANA test, which simultaneously detects one or more of these organisms, were compared with the detection of these organisms by (i) highly specific antibodies to P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and B. forsythus; (ii) whole genomic DNA probes to P. gingivalis and T. denticola; and (iii) culturing or microscopic procedures. The BANA test, the DNA probes, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or an indirect immunofluorescence assay procedure exhibited high sensitivities, i.e., 90 ot 96%, and high accuracies, i.e., 83 to 92%, in their ability to detect combinations of these organisms in over 200 subgingival plaque samples taken from the most periodontally diseased sites in 67 patients. This indicated that if P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and B. forsythus are appropriate marker organisms for an anaerobic periodontal infection, then the three detection methods are equally accurate in their ability to diagnose this infection. The same statement could not be made for the culturing approach, where accuracies of 50 to 62% were observed. PMID:1311335

  13. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans after Systemic Administration of Amoxicillin Plus Metronidazole as an Adjunct to Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dakic, Aleksandar; Boillot, Adrien; Colliot, Cyrille; Carra, Maria-Clotilde; Czernichow, Sébastien; Bouchard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the variations in the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and/or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans before and after systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole in association with non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT). Background: The adjunctive use of antibiotics has been advocated to improve the clinical outcomes of NSPT. However, no systematic review has investigated the microbiological benefit of this combination. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was conducted up to December 2015. Randomized clinical trials comparing the number of patients testing positive for P. gingivalis and/or A. actinomycetemcomitans before and after NSPT with (test group) or without (control group) amoxicillin plus metronidazole were included. The difference between groups in the variation of positive patients was calculated using the inverse variance method with a random effects model. Results: The frequency of patients positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans was decreased by 30% (p = 0.002) and by 25% (p = 0.01) in the test group compared to the control group at 3- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Similar findings were observed when considering the frequency of patients positive for Porphyromonas gingivalis, with a reduction by 28% (p < 0.0001), 32% (p < 0.0001), and 34% (p = 0.03) in the test group compared to the control group at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, respectively. Conclusion: The systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole as an adjunct to NSPT significantly decreased the number of patients positive for P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with periodontal therapy alone or with a placebo. PMID:27594851

  14. Serum Immunoglobulin G Levels to Porphyromonas gingivalis Peptidylarginine Deiminase Affect Clinical Response to Biological Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drug in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Ito, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Shimada, Atsushi; Narita, Ichiei; Murasawa, Akira; Nakazono, Kiyoshi; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether serum immunity to Porphyromonas gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD) affects the clinical response to biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods In a retrospective study, rheumatologic and periodontal conditions of 60 patients with RA who had been treated with conventional synthetic DMARD were evaluated before (baseline) and after 3 and 6 months of bDMARD therapy. After serum levels of anti-PPAD immunoglobulin G (IgG) were determined at baseline, the patients were respectively divided into two groups for high and low anti-PPAD IgG titers according to the median measurements. Genotypes at 8 functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to RA were also determined. Results After 3 and 6 months of therapy, patients with low anti-PPAD IgG titers showed a significantly greater decrease in changes in the Disease Activity Score including 28 joints using C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) (P = 0.04 for both) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) IgG levels (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04) than patients with high anti-PPAD IgG titers, although these parameter values were comparable at baseline. The anti-PPAD IgG titers were significantly positively correlated with changes in the DAS28-CRP (P = 0.01 for both) and the anti-CCP IgG levels (P = 0.02 for both) from baseline to 3 and 6 months later. A multiple regression analysis revealed a significantly positive association between the anti-PPAD IgG titers and changes in the DAS28-CRP after 6 months of bDMARD therapy (P = 0.006), after adjusting for age, gender, smoking, periodontal condition, and RA-related SNPs. Conclusion The serum IgG levels to PPAD affect the clinical response to bDMARD in patients with RA. PMID:27111223

  15. Intragingival injection of Porphyromonas gingivalis-derived lipopolysaccharide induces a transient increase in gingival tumour necrosis factor-α, but not interleukin-6, in anaesthetised rats.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Hiroko; Aono, Yuri; Kawato, Takayuki; Asano, Masatake; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Saigusa, Tadashi

    2015-09-14

    This study used in vivo microdialysis to examine the effects of intragingival application of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg-LPS) on gingival tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 levels in rats. A microdialysis probe with an injection needle attached to the surface of the dialysis membrane was implanted into the gingiva of the upper incisor. For comparison, the effects of LPS derived from Escherichia coli (Ec-LPS) on IL-6 and TNF-α levels were also analysed. Pg-LPS (1 μg/1 μL) or Ec-LPS (1 or 6 μg/1 μL) was applied by microsyringe, with gingival dialysates collected every hour. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that gingival dialysates contained approximately 389 pg·mL⁻¹ of IL-6 basally; basal TNF-α levels were lower than the detection limit of the ELISA. Pg-LPS failed to alter IL-6 levels but markedly increased TNF-α levels, which remained elevated for 2 h after treatment. Neither IL-6 nor TNF-α were affected by Ec-LPS. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that the gingiva expresses Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 mRNA. Immunohistochemical examination showed that TLR2 and TLR4 are expressed by gingival epithelial cells. The present study provides in vivo evidence that locally applied Pg-LPS, but not Ec-LPS, into the gingiva transiently increases gingival TNF-α without affecting IL-6. The present results suggest that TLR2 but not TLR4 expressed on gingival epithelial cells may mediate the Pg-LPS-induced increase in gingival TNF-α in rats.

  16. Periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum promote tumor progression in an oral-specific chemical carcinogenesis model

    PubMed Central

    Gallimidi, Adi Binder; Fischman, Stuart; Revach, Brurya; Bulvik, Raanan; Maliutina, Alina; Rubinstein, Ariel M.

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a lethal disease whose incidence is increasing. Epidemiologic studies demonstrate an association between periodontitis and oral cancer, and periodontal pathogens are implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and gastrointestinal malignancies. Nevertheless, a causal role for periodontal pathogens in OSCC has not been shown, partly due to the lack of an appropriate animal model. Here, utilizing a newly-established murine model of periodontitis-associated oral tumorigenesis, we report that chronic bacterial infection promotes OSCC, and that augmented signaling along the IL-6-STAT3 axis underlies this effect. Our results indicate that periodontal pathogens P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum stimulate tumorigenesis via direct interaction with oral epithelial cells through Toll-like receptors. Furthermore, oral pathogens stimulate human OSCC proliferation and induce expression of key molecules implicated in tumorigenesis. To the best of our knowledge, these findings represent the first demonstration of a mechanistic role for oral bacteria in chemically induced OSCC tumorigenesis. These results are highly relevant for the design of effective prevention and treatment strategies for OSCC. PMID:26158901

  17. A Novel Approach for Purification and Selective Capture of Membrane Vesicles of the Periodontopathic Bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis: Membrane Vesicles Bind to Magnetic Beads Coated with Epoxy Groups in a Noncovalent, Species-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Ryoma; Kikushima, Kenji; Higuchi, Hideo; Obana, Nozomu; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Bai, Dongying; Ohnishi, Makoto; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2014-01-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) of Porphyromonas gingivalis are regarded as an offensive weapon of the bacterium, leading to tissue deterioration in periodontal disease. Therefore, isolation of highly purified MVs is indispensable to better understand the pathophysiological role of MVs in the progression of periodontitis. MVs are generally isolated by a conventional method based on ultracentrifugation of the bacterial culture supernatant. However, the resulting MVs are often contaminated with co-precipitating bacterial appendages sheared from the live bacteria. Here, we report an intriguing property of P. gingivalis MVs–their ability to bind superparamagnetic beads coated with epoxy groups (SB-Epoxy). Analysis of fractions collected during the purification revealed that all MVs of five tested P. gingivalis stains bound to SB-Epoxy. In contrast, free fimbriae in the crude MV preparation did not bind to the SB-Epoxy. The SB-Epoxy-bound MVs were easily dissociated from the SB-Epoxy using a mild denaturation buffer. These results suggest that the surface chemistry conferred by epoxy on the beads is responsible for the binding, which is mediated by noncovalent bonds. Both the structural integrity and purity of the isolated MVs were confirmed by electron microscopy. The isolated MVs also caused cell detachment from culture dishes at a physiologically relevant concentration. Assays of competitive binding between the SB-Epoxy and mixtures of MVs from five bacterial species demonstrated that only P. gingivalis MVs could be selectively eliminated from the mixtures. We suggest that this novel approach enables efficient purification and selective elimination of P. gingivalis MVs. PMID:24830438

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population.

    PubMed

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7-3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2-23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4-9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5-3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td and Pi

  19. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population

    PubMed Central

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7–3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2–23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4–9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5–3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td

  20. Nasal Vaccination with the 40-Kilodalton Outer Membrane Protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis and a Nontoxic Chimeric Enterotoxin Adjuvant Induces Long-Term Protective Immunity with Reduced Levels of Immunoglobulin E Antibodies▿

    PubMed Central

    Momoi, Fumiki; Hashizume, Tomomi; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated that the 40-kDa outer membrane protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis (40-kDa OMP) nasally administered with a nontoxic chimeric adjuvant that combines the A subunit of mutant cholera toxin E112K with the pentameric B subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (mCTA/LTB) elicited a long-term protective immune response. Immunization with the 40-kDa OMP and mCTA/LTB induced high levels of 40-kDa-OMP-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies (Abs) in sera and elicited a significant IgA anti-40-kDa OMP Ab response in saliva. These Ab responses were maintained for at least 1 year after the immunization. Although using adjuvant mCTA/LTB gave Ab responses in the saliva comparable to those obtained using native cholera toxin (nCT) as the adjuvant, the levels of total IgE and 40-kDa-OMP-specific IgE Abs as well as interleukin-4 levels induced by the immunization with mCTA/LTB were lower than those induced by the immunization with nCT. Importantly, IgG Abs generated by nasal immunization with the 40-kDa OMP plus mCTA/LTB inhibited the coaggregation and hemagglutinin activities of P. gingivalis. Furthermore, the mice given nasal 40-kDa OMP plus mCTA/LTB showed a significant reduction of alveolar bone loss caused by oral infection with P. gingivalis even 1 year after the immunization compared to the loss in unimmunized mice. Because mCTA/LTB is nontoxic, nasally administered 40-kDa OMP together with mCTA/LTB should be an effective and safe mucosal vaccine against P. gingivalis infection in humans and may be an important tool for the prevention of chronic periodontitis. PMID:18411288

  1. The Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY haemophore binds gallium(iii), zinc(ii), cobalt(iii), manganese(iii), nickel(ii), and copper(ii) protoporphyrin IX but in a manner different to iron(iii) protoporphyrin IX.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Halina; Bielecki, Marcin; Wojaczyński, Jacek; Olczak, Mariusz; Smalley, John W; Olczak, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, acquires haem from host haemoproteins through a haem transporter HmuR and a haemophore HmuY. The aim of this study was to analyse the binding specificity of HmuY towards non-iron metalloporphyrins which may be employed as antimicrobials to treat periodontitis. HmuY binds gallium(iii), zinc(ii), cobalt(iii), manganese(iii), nickel(ii), and copper(ii) protoporphyrin IX but in a manner different to iron(iii) protoporphyrin IX which uses His(134) and His(166) as axial ligands. The metal ions in Ga(iii)PPIX and Zn(ii)PPIX can accept only His(166) as an axial ligand, whereas nickel(ii) and copper(ii) interact exclusively with His(134). Two forms of pentacoordinate manganese(iii) are present in the Mn(iii)PPIX-HmuY complex since the metal accepts either His(134) or His(166) as a single axial ligand. The cobalt ion is hexacoordinate in the Co(iii)PPIX-HmuY complex and binds His(134) and His(166) as axial ligands; however, some differences in their environments exist. Despite different coordination modes of the central metal ion, gallium(iii), zinc(ii), cobalt(iii), and manganese(iii) protoporphyrin IX bound to the HmuY haemophore cannot be displaced by excess haem. All of the metalloporphyrins examined bind to a P. gingivalis wild-type strain with higher ability compared to a mutant strain lacking a functional hmuY gene, thus corroborating binding of non-iron metalloporphyrins to purified HmuY protein. Our results further clarify the basis of metalloporphyrin acquisition by P. gingivalis and add to understanding of the interactions with porphyrin derivatives which exhibit antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis.

  2. Toll-like receptor agonists Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS and CpG differentially regulate IL-10 competency and frequencies of mouse B10 cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Zhiqiang; HU, Yang; YU, Pei; LIN, Mei; HUANG, Grace; KAWAI, Toshihisa; TAUBMAN, Martin; WANG, Zuomin; Xiaozhe, HAN

    2017-01-01

    Abstract IL-10 expressing regulatory B cells (B10) play a key role in immune system balance by limiting excessive inflammatory responses. Effects of toll-like receptor signaling and co-stimulatory molecules on B10 activity during innate and adaptive immune responses are not fully understood. Objective This study is to determine the effects of P. gingivalis LPS and CpG on B10 cell expansion and IL-10 competency in vitro. Material and Methods Spleen B cells were isolated from C57BL/6J mice with or without formalin-fixed P. gingivalis immunization. B cells were cultured for 48 hours under the following conditions: CD40L, CD40L+LPS, CD40L+CpG, and CD40L+LPS+CpG in the presence or absence of fixed P. gingivalis. Percentages of CD1dhiCD5+ B cells were measured by flow cytometry. IL-10 mRNA expression and secreted IL-10 were measured by real-time quantitative PCR and by ELISA respectively. Results P. gingivalis LPS plus CD40L significantly increased CD1dhiCD5+ B cell percentages and secreted IL-10 levels in both immunized and non-immunized mice B cells in the presence or absence of P. gingivalis, compared with control group. Secreted IL-10 levels were significantly increased in CD40L+LPS treated group compared with CD40L treatment group in the absence of P. gingivalis. CpG plus CD40L significantly decreased CD1dhiCD5+ B cell percentages, but greatly elevated secreted IL-10 levels in immunized and non-immunized mice B cells in the absence of P. gingivalis, compared with CD40L treatment group. Conclusions P. gingivalis LPS and CpG differentially enhance IL-10 secretion and expansion of mouse B10 cells during innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:28198981

  3. Sublingual vaccination with fusion protein consisting of the functional domain of hemagglutinin A of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein elicits protective immunity in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Yuzawa, Satoshi; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Hashizume, Tomomi; Kobayashi, Ryoki; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2012-03-01

    This study demonstrated that sublingual immunization with a fusion protein, 25k-hagA-MBP, which consists of a 25-kDa antigenic region of hemagglutinin A purified from Porphyromonas gingivalis fused to maltose-binding protein (MBP) originating from Escherichia coli as an adjuvant, elicited protective immune responses. Immunization with 25k-hagA-MBP induced high levels of antigen-specific serum IgG and IgA, as well as salivary IgA. High level titers of serum IgG and IgA were also induced for almost 1 year. In an IgG subclass analysis, sublingual immunization with 25k-hagA-MBP induced both IgG1 and IgG2b antibody responses. Additionally, numerous antigen-specific IgA antibody-forming cells were detected from the salivary gland 7 days after the final immunization. Mononuclear cells isolated from submandibular lymph nodes (SMLs) showed significant levels of proliferation upon restimulation with 25k-hagA-MBP. An analysis of cytokine responses showed that antigen-specific mononuclear cells isolated from SMLs produced significantly high levels of IL-4, IFN-γ, and TGF-β. These results indicate that sublingual immunization with 25k-hagA-MBP induces efficient protective immunity against P. gingivalis infection in the oral cavity via Th1-type and Th2-type cytokine production.

  4. The Tla protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis W50: a homolog of the RI protease precursor (PrpRI) is an outer membrane receptor required for growth on low levels of hemin.

    PubMed

    Aduse-Opoku, J; Slaney, J M; Rangarajan, M; Muir, J; Young, K A; Curtis, M A

    1997-08-01

    The prpR1 gene of Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 encodes the polyprotein precursor (PrpRI) of an extracellular arginine-specific protease. PrpRI is organized into four distinct domains (pro, alpha, beta, and gamma) and is processed to a heterodimeric protease (RI) which comprises the alpha and beta components in a noncovalent association. The alpha component contains the protease active site, whereas the beta component appears to have a role in adherence and hemagglutination processes. DNA sequences homologous to the coding region for the RI beta component are present at multiple loci on the P. gingivalis chromosome and may represent a family of related genes. In this report, we describe the cloning, sequence analysis, and characterization of one of these homologous loci isolated in plasmid pJM7. The 6,041-bp P. gingivalis DNA fragment in pJM7 contains a major open reading frame of 3,291 bp with coding potential for a protein with an Mr 118,700. An internal region of the deduced sequence (V304 to N768) shows 98% identity to the beta domain of PrpRI, and the recombinant product of pJM7 is immunoreactive with an antibody specific to the RI beta component. The N terminus of the deduced sequence has regional similarity to TonB-linked receptors which are frequently involved in periplasmic translocation of hemin, iron, colicins, or vitamin B12 in other bacteria. We have therefore designated this gene tla (TonB-linked adhesin). In contrast to the parent strain, an isogenic mutant of P. gingivalis W50 in which the tla was insertionally inactivated was unable to grow in medium containing low concentrations of hemin (<2.5 mg liter(-1)), and hemin-depleted cells of this mutant failed to respond to hemin in an agar diffusion plate assay. These data suggest a role for this gene product in hemin acquisition and utilization. Furthermore, the mutant produced significantly less arginine- and lysine-specific protease activities than the parent strain, indicating that there may be a

  5. The PorX Response Regulator of the Porphyromonas gingivalis PorXY Two-Component System Does Not Directly Regulate the Type IX Secretion Genes but Binds the PorL Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Maxence S.; Durand, Eric; Cascales, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a versatile multi-protein complex restricted to bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum and responsible for the secretion or cell surface exposition of diverse proteins that participate to S-layer formation, gliding motility or pathogenesis. The T9SS is poorly characterized but a number of proteins involved in the assembly of the secretion apparatus in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been identified based on genome substractive analyses. Among these proteins, PorY, and PorX encode typical two-component system (TCS) sensor and CheY-like response regulator respectively. Although the porX and porY genes do not localize at the same genetic locus, it has been proposed that PorXY form a bona fide TCS. Deletion of porX in P. gingivalis causes a slight decrease of the expression of a number of other T9SS genes, including sov, porT, porP, porK, porL, porM, porN, and porY. Here, we show that PorX and the soluble cytoplasmic domain of PorY interact. Using electrophoretic mobility shift, DNA-protein co-purification and heterologous host expression assays, we demonstrate that PorX does not bind T9SS gene promoters and does not directly regulate expression of the T9SS genes. Finally, we show that PorX interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of PorL, a component of the T9SS membrane core complex and propose that the CheY-like PorX protein might be involved in the dynamics of the T9SS. PMID:27630829

  6. Hemoglobin receptor protein from Porphyromonas gingivalis induces interleukin-8 production in human gingival epithelial cells through stimulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yuki; Nakayama, Masaaki; Naito, Mariko; Yamachika, Eiki; Inoue, Tetsuyoshi; Nakayama, Koji; Iida, Seiji; Ohara, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of polymicrobial origin affecting the tissues supporting the tooth. The oral anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, which is implicated as an important pathogen for chronic periodontitis, triggers a series of host inflammatory responses that promote the destruction of periodontal tissues. Among the virulence factors of P. gingivalis, hemoglobin receptor protein (HbR) is a major protein found in culture supernatants. In this study, we investigated the roles of HbR in the production of inflammatory mediators. We found that HbR induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in the human gingival epithelial cell line Ca9-22. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) were activated in HbR-stimulated Ca9-22 cells. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK (SB203580) and Erk1/2 (PD98059) blocked HbR-induced IL-8 production. Additionally, HbR stimulated the translocation of NF-κB-p65 to the nucleus, consistent with enhancement of IL-8 expression by activation of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) or cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) inhibited HbR-induced IL-8 production. Moreover, pretreatment with SB203580 and PD98059 reduced HbR-induced phosphorylation of CREB and ATF-2, respectively. Combined pretreatment with an inhibitor of NF-κB (BAY11-7082) and SB203580 was more efficient in inhibiting the ability of HbR to induce IL-8 production than pretreatment with either BAY11-7082 or SB203580 alone. Thus, in Ca9-22 cells, the direct activation of p38 MAPK and Erk1/2 by HbR caused the activation of the transcription factors ATF-2, CREB, and NF-κB, thus resulting in the induction of IL-8 production.

  7. Extract from Rumex acetosa L. for Prophylaxis of Periodontitis: Inhibition of Bacterial In Vitro Adhesion and of Gingipains of Porphyromonas gingivalis by Epicatechin-3-O-(4β→8)-Epicatechin-3-O-Gallate (Procyanidin-B2-Di-Gallate)

    PubMed Central

    Schmuch, Jana; Beckert, Sabine; Brandt, Simone; Löhr, Gesine; Hermann, Fabian; Schmidt, Thomas J.; Beikler, Thomas; Hensel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background The aerial parts of Rumex acetosa L. have been used in traditional European medicine for inflammatory diseases of the mouth epithelial tissue. The following study aimed to investigate the influence of a proanthocyanidin-enriched extract from R. acetosa extract against the adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), a pathogen strongly involved in chronic and aggressive periodontitis. A further goal was to define the bioactive lead structures responsible for a potential antiadhesive activity and to characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms of the antiadhesive effects. Methodology An extract of R. acetosa (RA1) with a defined mixture of flavan-3-ols, oligomeric proanthocyanidins and flavonoids, was used. Its impact on P. gingivalis adhesion to KB cells was studied by flow cytometry, confocal laser scanning microscopy and in situ adhesion assay using murine buccal tissue. RA1 and its compounds 1 to 15 were further investigated for additional effects on gingipain activity, hemagglutination and gene expression by RT-PCR. Principal Findings RA1 (5 to 15 μg/mL) reduced P. gingivalis adhesion in a dose-dependent manner to about 90%. Galloylated proanthocyanidins were confirmed to be responsible for this antiadhesive effect with epicatechin-3-O-gallate-(4β,8)-epicatechin-3’-O-gallate (syn. procyanidin B2-di-gallate) being the lead compound. Ungalloylated flavan-3-ols and oligomeric proanthocyanidins were inactive. RA1 and the galloylated proanthocyanidins strongly interact with the bacterial virulence factor Arg-gingipain, while the corresponding Lys-gingipain was hardly influenced. RA1 inhibited also hemagglutination. In silico docking studies indicated that epicatechin-3-O-gallate-(4β,8)-epicatechin-3’-O-gallate interacts with the active side of Arg-gingipain and hemaglutinin from P. gingivalis; the galloylation of the molecule seems to be responsible for fixation of the ligand to the protein. In conclusion, the proanthocyanidin

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of Porphyromonas species isolated from the oral cavity of Australian marsupials.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Deirdre; Milinovich, Gabriel J; Burrell, Paul C; Huynh, Sharnan C; Pettett, Lyndall M; Blackall, Linda L; Trott, Darren J; Bird, Philip S

    2008-09-01

    Porphyromonas species are frequently isolated from the oral cavity and are associated with periodontal disease in both animals and humans. Black, pigmented Porphyromonas spp. isolated from the gingival margins of selected wild and captive Australian marsupials with varying degrees of periodontal disease (brushtail possums, koalas and macropods) were compared phylogenetically to Porphyromonas strains from non-marsupials (bear, wolf, coyote, cats and dogs) and Porphyromonas gingivalis strains from humans using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The results of the phylogenetic analysis identified three distinct groups of strains. A monophyletic P. gingivalis group (Group 1) contained only strains isolated from humans and a Porphyromonas gulae group (Group 2) was divided into three distinct subclades, each containing both marsupial and non-marsupial strains. Group 3, which contained only marsupial strains, including all six strains isolated from captive koalas, was genetically distinct from P. gulae and may constitute a new Porphyromonas species.

  9. Isolation of a variant Porphyromonas sp. from polymicrobial infections in central bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Bemis, David A; Greenacre, Cheryl B; Bryant, Mary Jean; Jones, Rebekah D; Kania, Stephen A

    2011-01-01

    Isolates of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria from reptiles have only occasionally been identified to the genus and species level in the veterinary medical literature. In particular, reports identifying Porphyromonas spp. from infections in reptiles are scarce. The present report describes unique Porphyromonas isolates obtained from necrosuppurative infections in central bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps). The isolates grew in the presence of oxygen, were strongly hemolytic, and did not produce detectable black, iron porphyrin pigment. Biochemical identification kit numeric biocodes gave high but unreliable probabilities (>99.9%) for identification as Porphyromonas gingivalis. Partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences of the isolates were identical to each other and shared 91% identity with those of Porphyromonas gulae. The isolates may represent a new reptile-associated Porphyromonas species.

  10. Porphyromonas loveana sp. nov., isolated from the oral cavity of Australian marsupials.

    PubMed

    Bird, Philip S; Trott, Darren J; Mikkelsen, Deirdre; Milinovich, Gabriel J; Hillman, Kristine M; Burrell, Paul C; Blackall, Linda L

    2016-10-01

    An obligatory anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative coccobacillus with black-pigmented colonies was isolated from the oral cavity of selected Australian marsupial species. Phenotypic and molecular criteria showed that this bacterium was a distinct species within the genus Porphyromonas, and was closely related to Porphyromonas gingivalis and Porphyromonas gulae. This putative novel species and P. gulae could be differentiated from P. gingivalis by catalase activity. Further characterization by multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis of glutamate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase enzyme mobility and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight MS showed that this putative novel species could be differentiated phenotypically from P. gingivalis and P. gulae. Definitive identification by 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that this bacterium belonged to a unique monophyletic lineage, phylogenetically distinct from P. gingivalis (94.9 % similarity) and P. gulae (95.5 %). This also was supported by 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and glutamate dehydrogenase gene sequencing. A new species epithet, Porphyromonas loveana sp. nov., is proposed for this bacterium, with DSM 28520T (=NCTC 13658T=UQD444T=MRK101T), isolated from a musky rat kangaroo, as the type strain.

  11. High antibody levels to P. gingivalis in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bohnstedt, S; Cullinan, M P; Ford, P J; Palmer, J E; Leishman, S J; Westerman, B; Marshall, R I; West, M J; Seymour, G J

    2010-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that strain variation in the serum IgG response to Porphyromonas gingivalis occurs in periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aimed to test the hypothesis that different P. gingivalis strains would elicit different levels of IgG, depending on a patient's cardiovascular (CV) and periodontal health. For CVD patients, serum antibody levels increased significantly with increasing numbers of deep pockets for all strains of P. gingivalis, except W50 (p < 0.001). We used a two-way analysis of variance to examine differences in antibody responses across several CV and periodontal groups simultaneously. There was a significant interaction effect (p < 0.05) between periodontal status and CV status for antibody levels to ATCC33277, UQD605, and Su63. This study shows variation in strain type with respect to serum IgG response in several CV and periodontal categories, providing further support for the role of the immune response to P. gingivalis in the relationship between periodontal disease and CVD.

  12. Culture-based identification of pigmented Porphyromonas and Prevotella species in primary endodontic infections

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Anuradha; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S.; Somannavar, Pradeep D.; Ingalagi, Preeti; Bhat, Kishore

    2016-01-01

    Background. The most common species isolated from primary endodontic infections are black-pigmented bacteria. These species are implicated in apical abscess formation due to their proteolytic activity and are fastidious in nature. Therefore, the present study was carried out to evaluate the presence and identification of various pigmented Porphyromonas and Prevotella species in the infected root canal through culture-based techniques. Methods. Thirty-one patients with primary endodontic infections were selected. Using sterile paper points, samples were collected from the root canals after access opening and prior to obturation, which were cultured using blood and kanamycin blood agar. Subsequently, biochemical test was used to identify the species and the results were analyzed using percentage comparison analysis, McNemar and chi-squared tests, Wilcoxon match pair test and paired t-test. Results. Out of 31 samples 26 were positive for black-pigmented organisms; the predominantly isolated species were Prevotella followed by Porphyromonas. In Porphyromonas only P. gingivalis was isolated. One of the interesting features was isolation of P. gingivalis through culture, which is otherwise very difficult to isolate through culture. Conclusion. The presence of Prevotella and Porphyromonas species suggests that a significant role is played by these organisms in the pathogenesis of endodontic infections. PMID:27651878

  13. Haemoglobin scavenging after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Durnford, A; Dunbar, J; Galea, J; Bulters, D; Nicoll, J A R; Boche, D; Galea, I

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and effective clearance of cell-free haemoglobin after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is important to prevent vasospasm and neurotoxicity and improve long-term outcome. Haemoglobin is avidly bound by haptoglobin, and the complex is cleared by CD163 expressed on the membrane surface of macrophages. We studied the kinetics of haemoglobin and haptoglobin in cerebrospinal fluid after SAH. We show that haemoglobin levels rise gradually after SAH. Haptoglobin levels rise acutely with aneurysmal rupture as a result of injection of blood into the subarachnoid space. Although levels decline as haemoglobin scavenging occurs, complete depletion of haptoglobin does not occur and levels start rising again, indicating saturation of CD163 sites available for haptoglobin-haemoglobin clearance. In a preliminary neuropathological study we demonstrate that meningeal CD163 expression is upregulated after SAH, in keeping with a proinflammatory state. However, loss of CD163 occurs in meningeal areas with overlying blood compared with areas without overlying blood. Becauses ADAM17 is the enzyme responsible for shedding membrane-bound CD163, its inhibition may be a potential therapeutic strategy after SAH.

  14. Soluble CD14 Enhances the Response of Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells to P. gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Andrukhov, Oleh; Andrukhova, Olena; Özdemir, Burcu; Haririan, Hady; Müller-Kern, Michael; Moritz, Andreas; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are lacking membrane CD14, which is an important component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling through toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. In the present study we investigated the effect of soluble CD14 on the response of human PDLSCs to LPS of Porphyromonas (P.) gingivalis. Human PDLSCs (hPDLSCs) were stimulated with P. gingivalis LPS in the presence or in the absence of soluble CD14 (sCD14) and the production of interleukin (IL)-6, chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 8 (CXCL8), and chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2) was measured. The response to P. gingivalis LPS was compared with that to TLR4 agonist Escherichia coli LPS and TLR2-agonist Pam3CSK4. The response of hPDLSCs to both P. gingivalis LPS and E. coli LPS was significantly enhanced by sCD14. In the absence of sCD14, no significant difference in the hPDLSCs response to two kinds of LPS was observed. These responses were significantly lower compared to that to Pam3CSK4. In the presence of sCD14, the response of hPdLSCs to P. gingivalis LPS was markedly higher than that to E. coli LPS and comparable with that to Pam3CSK4. The response of hPdLSCs to bacterial LPS is strongly augmented by sCD14. Local levels of sCD14 could be an important factor for modulation of the host response against periodontal pathogens. PMID:27504628

  15. Hypoxia and P. gingivalis Synergistically Induce HIF-1 and NF-κB Activation in PDL Cells and Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gölz, L.; Memmert, S.; Rath-Deschner, B.; Jäger, A.; Appel, T.; Baumgarten, G.; Götz, W.; Frede, S.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is characterized by deep periodontal pockets favoring the proliferation of anaerobic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), a periodontal pathogen frequently observed in patients suffering from periodontal inflammation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the signaling pathways activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of P. gingivalis (LPS-PG) and hypoxia in periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. The relevant transcription factors nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) were determined. In addition, we analyzed the expression of interleukin- (IL-) 1β, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in PDL cells on mRNA and protein level. This was accomplished by immunohistochemistry of healthy and inflamed periodontal tissues. We detected time-dependent additive effects of LPS-PG and hypoxia on NF-κB and HIF-1α activation in PDL cells followed by an upregulation of IL-1β, MMP-1, and VEGF expression. Immunohistochemistry performed on tissue samples of gingivitis and periodontitis displayed an increase of NF-κB, HIF-1, and VEGF immunoreactivity in accordance with disease progression validating the importance of the in vitro results. To conclude, the present study underlines the significance of NF-κB and HIF-1α and their target genes VEGF, IL-1β, and MMP-1 in P. gingivalis and hypoxia induced periodontal inflammatory processes. PMID:25861162

  16. Structure of the haptoglobin-haemoglobin complex.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Torvund-Jensen, Morten; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; de Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto; Hersleth, Hans-Petter; Andersen, Niels Højmark; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Andersen, Gregers Rom; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2012-09-20

    Red cell haemoglobin is the fundamental oxygen-transporting molecule in blood, but also a potentially tissue-damaging compound owing to its highly reactive haem groups. During intravascular haemolysis, such as in malaria and haemoglobinopathies, haemoglobin is released into the plasma, where it is captured by the protective acute-phase protein haptoglobin. This leads to formation of the haptoglobin-haemoglobin complex, which represents a virtually irreversible non-covalent protein-protein interaction. Here we present the crystal structure of the dimeric porcine haptoglobin-haemoglobin complex determined at 2.9 Å resolution. This structure reveals that haptoglobin molecules dimerize through an unexpected β-strand swap between two complement control protein (CCP) domains, defining a new fusion CCP domain structure. The haptoglobin serine protease domain forms extensive interactions with both the α- and β-subunits of haemoglobin, explaining the tight binding between haptoglobin and haemoglobin. The haemoglobin-interacting region in the αβ dimer is highly overlapping with the interface between the two αβ dimers that constitute the native haemoglobin tetramer. Several haemoglobin residues prone to oxidative modification after exposure to haem-induced reactive oxygen species are buried in the haptoglobin-haemoglobin interface, thus showing a direct protective role of haptoglobin. The haptoglobin loop previously shown to be essential for binding of haptoglobin-haemoglobin to the macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 (ref. 3) protrudes from the surface of the distal end of the complex, adjacent to the associated haemoglobin α-subunit. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements of human haptoglobin-haemoglobin bound to the ligand-binding fragment of CD163 confirm receptor binding in this area, and show that the rigid dimeric complex can bind two receptors. Such receptor cross-linkage may facilitate scavenging and explain the increased functional affinity of

  17. Haemoglobin Hasharon in a north Italian community.

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, R; Mariuzzi, G M; Marinucci, M; Bruni, E; Tenteri, L

    1975-01-01

    A survey of haemoglobin variants undertakin in an Italian community (Polesine) has revealed the presence of haemoglobin Hasharon (alpha2 47 Asp yields His beta2) in 108 subjects from 40 families. The variant accounted for 30 to 40% of the total haemoglobin. In subjects doubly heterozygous for Hb Hasharon and beta thalassaemia, the proportion was 17 to 19%. Though there was some evidence that the variant was unstable in vitro, there was no obvious haemoglobinopathy in vivo. Images PMID:1177281

  18. Nucleoside-Diphosphate-Kinase of P. gingivalis is Secreted from Epithelial Cells In the Absence of a Leader Sequence Through a Pannexin-1 Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Kalina; Lee, Jungnam; Roberts, JoAnn; Lee, Kyulim; Ojcius, David M; Yilmaz, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoside-diphosphate-kinases (NDKs) are leaderless, multifunctional enzymes. The mode(s) of NDK secretion is currently undefined, while extracellular translocation of bacterial NDKs is critical for avoidance of host pathogen clearance by opportunistic pathogens such as Porphyromonas gingivalis. P. gingivalis-NDK during infection inhibits extracellular-ATP (eATP)/P2X7-receptor mediated cell death in gingival epithelial cells (GECs) via eATP hydrolysis. Furthermore, depletion of pannexin-1-hemichannel (PNX1) coupled with P2X7-receptor blocks the infection-induced eATP release in GECs, and P. gingivalis-NDK impacts this pathway. Ultrastructural and confocal microscopy of P. gingivalis-co-cultured GECs or green-fluorescent-protein (GFP)-P. gingivalis-NDK transfected GECs revealed a perinuclear/cytoplasmic localization of NDK. eATP stimulation induced NDK recruitment to the cell periphery. Depletion of PNX1 by siRNA or inhibition by probenecid resulted in significant blocking of extracellular NDK activity and secretion using ATPase and ELISA assays. Co-immunoprecipitation-coupled Mass-spectrometry method revealed association of P. gingivalis-NDK to the myosin-9 motor molecule. Interestingly, inhibition of myosin-9, actin, and lipid-rafts, shown to be involved in PNX1-hemichannel function, resulted in marked intracellular accumulation of NDK and decreased NDK secretion from infected GECs. These results elucidate for the first time PNX1-hemichannels as potentially main extracellular translocation pathway for NDKs from an intracellular pathogen, suggesting that PNX1-hemichannels may represent a therapeutic target for chronic opportunistic infections. PMID:27883084

  19. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lantz, M S; Allen, R D; Vail, T A; Switalski, L M; Hook, M

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains (M. S. Lantz, R. D. Allen, P. Bounelis, L. M. Switalski, and M. Hook, J. Bacteriol. 172:716-726, 1990). We now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37 degrees C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (Mr, 150,000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with 125I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4 degrees C but did occur at 22 and 37 degrees C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37 degrees C, two major fibrinogen fragments (Mr, 97,000 and 50,000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (Mr, 120,000 and 150,000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the Mr-120,000 and -150,000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate. Images PMID:1987144

  20. Laser antisepsis of Phorphyromonas gingivalis in vitro with dental lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.

    2004-05-01

    It has been shown that both pulsed Nd:YAG (1064nm) and continuous diode (810nm) dental lasers kill pathogenic bacteria (laser antisepsis), but a quantitative method for determining clinical dosimetry does not exist. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to quantify the efficacy of ablation of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) in vitro for two different lasers. The ablation thresholds for the two lasers were compared in the following manner. The energy density was measured as a function of distance from the output of the fiber-optic delivery system. Pg cultures were grown on blood agar plates under standard anaerobic conditions. Blood agar provides an approximation of gingival tissue for the wavelengths tested in having hemoglobin as a primary absorber. Single pulses (Nd:YAG: 100- Œs diode: 100-msec) of laser energy were delivered to Pg colonies and the energy density was increased until the appearance of a small plume was observed coincident with a laser pulse. The energy density at this point defines the ablation threshold. Ablation thresholds to a single pulse were determined for both Pg and for blood agar alone. The large difference in ablation thresholds between the pigmented pathogen and the host matrix for pulsed-Nd:YAG represented a significant therapeutic ratio and Pg was ablated without visible effect on the blood agar. Near threshold the 810-nm diode laser destroyed both the pathogen and the gel. Clinically, the pulsed Nd:YAG may selectively destroy pigmented pathogens leaving the surrounding tissue intact. The 810-nm diode laser may not demonstrate this selectivity due to its longer pulse length and greater absorption by hemoglobin.

  1. Molecular evolution of plant haemoglobin: two haemoglobin genes in Nymphaeaceae Euryale ferox.

    PubMed

    Guldner, E; Desmarais, E; Galtier, N; Godelle, B

    2004-01-01

    We isolated and sequenced two haemoglobin genes from the early-branching angiosperm Euryale ferox (Nymphaeaceae). The two genes belong to the two known classes of plant haemoglobin. Their existence in Nymphaeaceae supports the theory that class 1 haemoglobin was ancestrally present in all angiosperms, and is evidence for class 2 haemoglobin being widely distributed. These sequences allowed us to unambiguously root the angiosperm haemoglobin phylogeny, and to corroborate the hypothesis that the class 1/class 2 duplication event occurred before the divergence between monocots and eudicots. We addressed the molecular evolution of plant haemoglobin by comparing the synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates in various groups of genes. Class 2 haemoglobin genes of legumes (functionally involved in a symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria) show a higher nonsynonymous substitution rate than class 1 (nonsymbiotic) haemoglobin genes. This suggests that a change in the selective forces applying to plant haemoglobins has occurred during the evolutionary history of this gene family, potentially in relation with the evolution of symbiosis.

  2. Molecular diagnosis of haemoglobin disorders.

    PubMed

    Clark, B E; Thein, S L

    2004-06-01

    The haemoglobinopathies refer to a diverse group of inherited disorders characterized by a reduced synthesis of one or more globin chains (thalassaemias) or the synthesis of a structurally abnormal haemoglobin (Hb). In prevalent regions, the thalassaemias often coexist with a variety of structural Hb variants giving rise to complex genotypes and an extremely wide spectrum of clinical and haematological phenotypes. An appreciation of these phenotypes is needed to facilitate the definitive diagnosis of the causative mutations to inform management and counselling. Haematological and biochemical investigations, and family studies provide essential clues to the different interactions and are fundamental to DNA diagnostics of the Hb disorders. With the exception of a few rare deletions and rearrangements, the molecular lesions causing haemoglobinopathies are all identifiable by PCR-based techniques. Although a full spectrum of >1000 mutations causing haemoglobinopathies has been documented, in practice only a limited number are associated with disease states and clinical significance. Furthermore, each at-risk ethnic group has its own combination of common Hb variants and thalassaemia mutations. Prior identification of the ethnic origin is thus an important part of the diagnostic strategy which becomes less reliable in the UK because of the large ethnic mix. Although the current approach using a combination of different PCR-based techniques seems to work in most laboratories, practice pressures with the imminent implementation of universal antenatal screening for clinically significant Hb disorders in the UK will require a higher throughput approach for DNA diagnostics in the near future. The complex mutational spectrum and the compactness of the globin genes places them in an ideal position for the different non-gel based analytical platforms.

  3. Haemoglobin D Punjab (D Los Angeles)

    PubMed Central

    Vella, F.; Lehmann, H.

    1974-01-01

    A search for haemoglobin variants undertaken in Canada revealed 21 unrelated instances of Hb D Punjab amongst 207,300 specimens tested. Of these, eight came from East Indian immigrants and the rest from Canadians of United Kingdom origin. No instances of Hb D Punjab were found in 14,500 specimens from Canadian Indians that were tested. The geographical origins of 27 instances of Hb D Punjab characterized at the MRC Abnormal Haemoglobin Unit, Cambridge are presented. Of these five were natives of the British Isles. The results of surveys undertaken in the United Kingdom are summarized. The global distribution of Hb D Punjab is discussed. PMID:4613830

  4. Synthesis of Human Haemoglobin by Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyesom, I.

    2006-01-01

    Haemoglobin, Hb is the red, protein pigment in blood that transports oxygen round the body. Decreased quantity could lead to anaemia, and when the anaemic condition turns severe, blood transfusion becomes inevitable. However, the safety of human source has become questionable in recent times, and this has aroused the interest of scientists to…

  5. Expression and evolution of functionally distinct haemoglobin genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Hunt, P W; Watts, R A; Trevaskis, B; Llewelyn, D J; Burnell, J; Dennis, E S; Peacock, W J

    2001-11-01

    Haemoglobin genes have been found in a number of plant species, but the number of genes known has been too small to allow effective evolutionary inferences. We present nine new non-symbiotic haemoglobin sequences from a range of plants, including class 1 haemoglobins from cotton, Citrus and tomato, class 2 haemoglobins from cotton, tomato, sugar beet and canola and two haemoglobins from the non-vascular plants, Marchantia polymorpha (a liverwort) and Physcomitrella patens (a moss). Our molecular phylogenetic analysis of all currently known non-symbiotic haemoglobin genes and a selection of symbiotic haemoglobins have confirmed the existence of two distinct classes of haemoglobin genes in the dicots. It is likely that all dicots have both class 1 and class 2 non-symbiotic haemoglobin genes whereas in monocots we have detected only class 1 genes. The symbiotic haemoglobins from legumes and Casuarina are related to the class 2 non-symbiotic haemoglobins, whilst the symbiotic haemoglobin from Parasponia groups with the class 1 non-symbiotic genes. Probably, there have been two independent recruitments of symbiotic haemoglobins. Although the functions of the two non-symbiotic haemoglobins remain unknown, their patterns of expression within plants suggest different functions. We examined the expression in transgenic plants of the two non-symbiotic haemoglobins from Arabidopsis using promoter fusions to a GUS reporter gene. The Arabidopsis GLB1 and GLB2 genes are likely to be functionally distinct. The class 2 haemoglobin gene (GLB2) is expressed in the roots, leaves and inflorescence and can be induced in young plants by cytokinin treatment in contrast to the class 1 gene (GLB1) which is active in germinating seedlings and can be induced by hypoxia and increased sucrose supply, but not by cytokinin treatment.

  6. Rapid electrophoresis and quantitation of haemoglobins on cellulose acetate

    PubMed Central

    Marengo-Rowe, A. J.

    1965-01-01

    A rapid and reproducible electrophoretic method for the separation and quantitation of haemoglobins on cellulose acetate is described. The accuracy of the method and its possible sources of error are discussed. The normal range for haemoglobin A2 by this method is 1% to 3% of the total haemoglobin concentration. Blood samples from 32 thalassaemic patients showed haemoglobin A2 values of 3·5% to 7%. Images PMID:5844210

  7. Interactions of Bacteroides gingivalis with fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lantz, M S; Rowland, R W; Switalski, L M; Höök, M

    1986-01-01

    Results of previous studies from our laboratory have shown that a strain of Bacteroides intermedius isolated originally from a patient with acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis binds and degrades human fibrinogen (M.S. Lantz, L.M. Switalski, K.S. Kornman, and M. Hook, J. Bacteriol. 163:623-628, 1985). We report that strains of Bacteroides gingivalis, an organism implicated in the etiology of several forms of periodontitis, also bind and degrade fibrinogen. The binding is rapid, reversible, saturable, and specific. The number of fibrinogen-binding sites per cell varies from 500 to 1,500 in different batches of bacteria, and the dissociation constant for the complex is on the order of 10(-8) M. B. gingivalis possesses cell-associated fibrinogenolytic activity that is activated by dithiothreitol and blocked by thiol protease inhibitors. Interaction with fibrinogen may mediate colonization and establishment of these organisms in the periodontal microbiota. Images PMID:3096886

  8. Oral Administration of P. gingivalis Induces Dysbiosis of Gut Microbiota and Impaired Barrier Function Leading to Dissemination of Enterobacteria to the Liver.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Mayuka; Arimatsu, Kei; Kato, Tamotsu; Matsuda, Yumi; Minagawa, Takayoshi; Takahashi, Naoki; Ohno, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Although periodontitis has been implicated as a risk factor for various systemic diseases, the precise mechanisms by which periodontitis induces systemic disease remain to be elucidated. We have previously revealed that repeated oral administration of Porphyromonas gingivalis elicits endotoxemia via changes in the gut microbiota of the ileum, and thereby induces systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. However, it is not clear to what extent a single administration of P. gingivalis could affect gut microbiota composition, gut barrier function, and subsequent influx of gut microbiota into the liver. Therefore, in the present study, C57BL/6 mice were orally administered P. gingivalis (strain W83) once and compared to sham-inoculated mice. The phylogenetic structure and diversity of microbial communities in the gut and liver were analyzed by pyrosequencing the 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Serum endotoxin activity was determined by a Limulus amebocyte lysate test. Gene expression in the intestine and expression of 16S rRNA genes in the blood and liver were examined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Administration of P. gingivalis significantly altered gut microbiota, with an increased proportion of phylum Bacteroidetes, a decreased proportion of phylum Firmicutes, and increased serum endotoxin levels. In the intestinal tissues, gene expression of tjp-1 and occludin, which are involved in intestinal permeability, were downregulated. Higher amounts of bacterial DNA were detected in the liver of infected mice. Importantly, changes in gut microbiota preceded systemic inflammatory changes. These results further support the idea that disturbance of the gut microbiota composition by orally derived periodontopathic bacteria may be a causal mechanism linking periodontitis and systemic disease.

  9. Oral Administration of P. gingivalis Induces Dysbiosis of Gut Microbiota and Impaired Barrier Function Leading to Dissemination of Enterobacteria to the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Mayuka; Arimatsu, Kei; Kato, Tamotsu; Matsuda, Yumi; Minagawa, Takayoshi; Takahashi, Naoki; Ohno, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Although periodontitis has been implicated as a risk factor for various systemic diseases, the precise mechanisms by which periodontitis induces systemic disease remain to be elucidated. We have previously revealed that repeated oral administration of Porphyromonas gingivalis elicits endotoxemia via changes in the gut microbiota of the ileum, and thereby induces systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. However, it is not clear to what extent a single administration of P. gingivalis could affect gut microbiota composition, gut barrier function, and subsequent influx of gut microbiota into the liver. Therefore, in the present study, C57BL/6 mice were orally administered P. gingivalis (strain W83) once and compared to sham-inoculated mice. The phylogenetic structure and diversity of microbial communities in the gut and liver were analyzed by pyrosequencing the 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Serum endotoxin activity was determined by a Limulus amebocyte lysate test. Gene expression in the intestine and expression of 16S rRNA genes in the blood and liver were examined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Administration of P. gingivalis significantly altered gut microbiota, with an increased proportion of phylum Bacteroidetes, a decreased proportion of phylum Firmicutes, and increased serum endotoxin levels. In the intestinal tissues, gene expression of tjp-1 and occludin, which are involved in intestinal permeability, were downregulated. Higher amounts of bacterial DNA were detected in the liver of infected mice. Importantly, changes in gut microbiota preceded systemic inflammatory changes. These results further support the idea that disturbance of the gut microbiota composition by orally derived periodontopathic bacteria may be a causal mechanism linking periodontitis and systemic disease. PMID:26218067

  10. Haemoglobin sickle D disease: A presentation with ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Hasnain; Umair, Syed Farrukh

    2016-03-01

    Haemoglobin-D, Los Angeles or Haemoglobin D-Punjab is not a rare variant of haemoglobin worldwide especially in Punjab, North western India, and South Asian continent. It can be inherited rarely as homozygous causing no symptoms or heterozygous with Haemoglobin A, commonly not related to clinical symptomatology. However, these variants can co-exist rarely with other haemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia or haemoglobin-S. We describe the case of doubly heterozygous Hb-SD Punjab in a 8 year old girl who presented with ischaemic stroke. Before this case, only one case has been reported but it was with reversible hyperbilirubinaemia in Hb-SD from Rawalpindi, Pakistan. This case images the propensity for occurrence of rare phenotype within our population and underlines the importance of genotyping to avoid erroneous management and poor counseling hence preventing life altering complications which our case developed.

  11. Haemoglobin Porto Alegre in a Cuban family.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, G; Lima, F; Wade, M; Estrada, M; Colombo, B; Heredero, L; Granda, H

    1977-01-01

    During a screening programme for abnormal haemoglobins in Habana, one case of Hb Porto Alegre was found in 23 000 cases analysed. The ability of this variant to polymerise in vitro and the absence of clinical features in the carriers have been confirmed. These observations are now explained by the findings of high levels of glutathione in the red cells of subjects heterozygous for Hb Porto Alegre: it is suggested that the increase of glutathione is responsible for the absence of in vivo polymerisation and accounts for the lack of clinical symptoms. Images PMID:604493

  12. Evaluation of the Haemoglobin Colour Scale and comparison with the HemoCue haemoglobin assay.

    PubMed Central

    Paddle, J. J.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the Haemoglobin Colour Scale developed by WHO for estimating haemoglobin concentration and to compare the results obtained using it and the HemoCue assay with those determined using a reference method, the Technicon H3 analyser. METHODS: The Colour Scale and HemoCue assay were used to test 408 blood samples. Subsequently, Bland-Altman plots were determined and the proximity of the test results to those obtained using the reference method was determined. FINDINGS: The mean difference between the Haemoglobin Colour Scale and the reference method was 0.19 g/dl (95% confidence interval: 3.50 g/dl below to 3.11 g/dl above); the corresponding value for the HemoCue assay was 0.50 g/dl (1.16 g/dl below to 0.16 g/dl above). Only 46.08% of the results obtained by means of the Colour Scale were within 1.0 g/dl of the reference method, whereas 95.34% of the HemoCue results fell within this limit; 22.79% of the Colour Scale results but none of the HemoCue results lay more than 2.0 g/dl from the reference method. CONCLUSION: The Haemoglobin Colour Scale test is too inaccurate for general use, particularly if devices such as the HemoCue are available. PMID:12471402

  13. First Human Case of Fatal Halicephalobus gingivalis Meningoencephalitis in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, April; Moore, Casey V.; Gasser, Robin B.; Nelson, Renjy; Koehler, Anson V.; Bradbury, Richard S.; Speare, Rick; Dhatrak, Deepak; Weldhagen, Gerhard F.

    2015-01-01

    Halicephalobus gingivalis (previously Micronema deletrix) is a free-living nematode known to cause opportunistic infections, mainly in horses. Human infections are very rare, but all cases described to date involved fatal meningoencephalitis. Here we report the first case of H. gingivalis infection in an Australian human patient, confirmed by nematode morphology and sequencing of ribosomal DNA. The implications of this case are discussed, particularly, the need to evaluate real-time PCR as a diagnostic tool. PMID:25694532

  14. Functional Properties of Nonhuman Primate Antibody to Prophyromonas Gingivalis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    Active PMN Total Non -Vital P. gingivalis (attached or ingested) per Active PMN 78 FIGURE 34 Kinetics Assay Percentage of PMNs Active Against P...to be specific for the organisms found in the periodontal pocket (Ebersole and Holt, 1988) and not just part of a non - specific host response. The... bactericidal activity of serum in combination with complement, appears to be limited when used in vitro against P. gingivalis, with direct killing decreasing

  15. Antibacterial TAP-mimic Electrospun Polymer Scaffold – Effects on P. gingivalis-Infected Dentin Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Maria Tereza P.; Evans, Joshua D.; Gregory, Richard L.; Valera, Marcia C.; Bottino, Marco C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to investigate, in-vitro, the effects of a recently developed triple antibiotic paste (TAP)-mimic polymer nanofibrous scaffold against Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg)-infected dentin biofilm. Materials and Methods Dentin specimens (4×4×1mm3) were prepared from human canines. The specimens were sterilized, inoculated with Pg (ATCC 33277), and incubated for one week to allow for biofilm formation. Infected dentin specimens were exposed for 3 days to the following treatments: antibiotic-free polydioxanone scaffold (PDS, control), PDS+25wt.%TAP (25 mg of each antibiotic [metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and minocycline] per mL of the PDS polymer solution), or a saturated TAP-based solution (50 mg of each antibiotic per mL of saline solution). In order to serve as the negative control, infected dentin specimens were left untreated (bacteria only). To determine the antimicrobial efficacy of the TAP-mimic scaffold, a colony-forming unit (CFU/mL) (n=10/group) measurement was performed. Furthermore, additional specimens (n=2/group) were prepared to qualitatively study biofilm inhibition via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistics were performed and significance was set at the 5% level. Results Both the TAP-mimic scaffold and the positive control (TAP solution) led to complete bacterial elimination, differing statistically (p<0.05) from the negative control group (bacteria only). No statistical differences were observed for CFU/mL data between antibiotic-free scaffolds (2.7 log10 CFU/mL) and the negative control (5.9 log10 CFU/mL). Conclusions The obtained data revealed significant antimicrobial properties of the novel PDS-based TAP-mimic scaffold against an established Pg-infected dentin biofilm. Clinical relevance Collectively, the data suggest that the proposed nanofibrous scaffold might be used as an alternative to the advocated clinical gold standard (i.e., TAP) for intracanal disinfection prior to regenerative endodontics. PMID:26319981

  16. A molecular survey of S. mutans and P. gingivalis oral microbial burden in human saliva using Relative Endpoint Polymerase Chain Reaction (RE-PCR) within the population of a Nevada dental school revealed disparities among minorities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Dental Medicine recently opened an orthodontic treatment clinic to address the needs of the racially and ethnically diverse population of Southern Nevada, primarily focusing on the treatment and care of low-income and minority patients. Although orthodontic treatment and therapy has been shown to induce changes in the oral cavity, much of this evidence was collected from traditional White, teenage orthodontic clinic populations. The primary goal of this study was to describe the microbial burden of the cariogenic and periodontal pathogens, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis within the UNLV-SDM patient population. Methods Representative saliva samples were collected from healthy adult patients for DNA isolation. Relative endpoint polymerase chain reaction (RE-PCR) was performed to ascertain the presence and relative microbial burden of these oral pathogens. Results Nearly one quarter (13/56) or 23.3% of these patients had elevated levels of S. mutans, while (10/56) and 17.8% of these samples were found to have elevated levels of P. gingivalis, - with (90%) of P. gingivalis-positive samples from minority patients (X2 = 17.921, d.f. = 1; p < 0.0001). Conclusions These findings of elevated P. gingivalis levels, primarily among minority patients, may suggest underlying oral health practices contributing to adverse oral health conditions within this population. Oral health knowledge and practices among minority patients may be strongly influenced by other factors, including education and socioeconomic status, suggesting additional research may be needed to accurately determine the most appropriate standards for care and oral health education within this patient population. PMID:22925755

  17. LPS from P. gingivalis and Hypoxia Increases Oxidative Stress in Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts and Contributes to Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gölz, L.; Memmert, S.; Rath-Deschner, B.; Jäger, A.; Appel, T.; Baumgarten, G.; Götz, W.; Frede, S.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is characterized by an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and plays a key role in the progression of inflammatory diseases. We hypothesize that hypoxic and inflammatory events induce oxidative stress in the periodontal ligament (PDL) by activating NOX4. Human primary PDL fibroblasts were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (LPS-PG), a periodontal pathogen bacterium under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. By quantitative PCR, immunoblot, immunostaining, and a specific ROS assay we determined the amount of NOX4, ROS, and several redox systems. Healthy and inflamed periodontal tissues were collected to evaluate NOX4 and redox systems by immunohistochemistry. We found significantly increased NOX4 levels after hypoxic or inflammatory stimulation in PDL cells (P < 0.001) which was even more pronounced after combination of the stimuli. This was accompanied by a significant upregulation of ROS and catalase (P < 0.001). However, prolonged incubation with both stimuli induced a reduction of catalase indicating a collapse of the protective machinery favoring ROS increase and the progression of inflammatory oral diseases. Analysis of inflamed tissues confirmed our hypothesis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the interplay of NOX4 and redox systems is crucial for ROS formation which plays a pivotal role during oral diseases. PMID:25374447

  18. Modulation of oxidative stability of haemoglobin inside liposome-encapsulated haemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Yadav, Vivek R; Goins, Beth; Phillips, William T

    2013-01-01

    The major hurdle in the formulation of liposome-encapsulated haemoglobin (LEH) is the oxidation of haemoglobin (Hb) into methaemoglobin during storage and after administration. In order to reduce this oxidative degradation, we tested various reducing conditions in the presence of catalase. We found that at 37°C more than 50% of Hb oxidized to methaemoglobin within 24 h, whereas in presence of catalase, the oxidation was significantly reduced. The effect of catalase was further enhanced by a reduction mixture containing β-NAD, d-glucose, adenine, inosine, MgCl2, KCl, KH2PO4 and Na2HPO4−, only 14% methaemoglobin was generated in the presence of catalase and reduction mixture (CRM). Contrary to the expectation, glutathione, deferoxamine and homocysteine enhanced Hb oxidation. The presence of CRM inside liposomes (250 nm) significantly decreased Hb oxidation. The results suggest that catalase and a well-defined mixture of co-factors may help control Hb oxidation for improvement in the functional life of LEH. PMID:23231644

  19. Alpha-haemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) stabilizes apo-α-haemoglobin in a partially folded state

    PubMed Central

    Krishna Kumar, Kaavya; Dickson, Claire F.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Mackay, Joel P.; Gell, David A.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS To produce functional haemoglobin, nascent α-globin (αo) and β-globin (βo) chains must each bind a single haem molecule (to form αh and βh) and interact together to form heterodimers. The precise sequence of binding events is unknown, and it has been suggested that additional factors might enhance the efficiency of Hb folding. The α-haemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) has previously been shown to bind αh and regulate redox activity of the haem iron. Here, we use a combination of classical and dynamic light scattering and NMR spectroscopy to demonstrate that AHSP forms a heterodimeric complex with αo that inhibits αo aggregation and promotes αo folding in the absence of haem. These findings indicate that AHSP may function as an αo-specific chaperone, and suggest an important role for αo in guiding Hb assembly by stabilizing βo and inhibiting off-pathway self-association of βh. PMID:20860551

  20. Haemoglobin-E in the presence of oxidative substances from fava bean may be protective against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Kitayaporn, D; Nelson, K E; Charoenlarp, P; Pholpothi, T

    1992-01-01

    A case-control study was carried out at a community hospital in eastern Thailand in order to study the association between haemoglobin E and Plasmodium falciparum malaria; 271 P. falciparum cases and 271 controls were enrolled. After adjusting for age, sex, time since last malaria attack, history of mosquito net use, and history of fava bean consumption in the previous month, neither heterozygous nor homozygous haemoglobin E provided significant protection against P. falciparum infection, with odds ratios (OR) = 0.91 (95% confidence limits = 0.61, 1.36) and 0.78 (0.34, 1.82) respectively when compared to persons with haemoglobin A who were not consumers of fava beans. However, haemoglobin E carriers who ate fava beans were significantly protected against P. falciparum malaria with OR = 0.26 (0.09, 0.76) and OR = 0.001 (0.00, 1120.59) for subjects with heterozygous and homozygous haemoglobin E, respectively. The study suggests a possible synergistic protective effect of haemoglobin E on the risk of P. falciparum malaria in subjects who have consumed fava beans.

  1. Comparison of haemoglobin estimates using direct & indirect cyanmethaemoglobin methods

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Priyanka Gupta; Toteja, Gurudayal Singh; Bhatia, Neena; Gupta, Sanjeev; Kaur, Manpreet; Adhikari, Tulsi; Garg, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Estimation of haemoglobin is the most widely used method to assess anaemia. Although direct cyanmethaemoglobin method is the recommended method for estimation of haemoglobin, but it may not be feasible under field conditions. Hence, the present study was undertaken to compare indirect cyanmethaemoglobin method against the conventional direct method for haemoglobin estimation. Methods: Haemoglobin levels were estimated for 888 adolescent girls aged 11-18 yr residing in an urban slum in Delhi by both direct and indirect cyanmethaemoglobin methods, and the results were compared. Results: The mean haemoglobin levels for 888 whole blood samples estimated by direct and indirect cyanmethaemoglobin method were 116.1 ± 12.7 and 110.5 ± 12.5 g/l, respectively, with a mean difference of 5.67 g/l (95% confidence interval: 5.45 to 5.90, P<0.001); which is equivalent to 0.567 g%. The prevalence of anaemia was reported as 59.6 and 78.2 per cent by direct and indirect methods, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of indirect cyanmethaemoglobin method were 99.2 and 56.4 per cent, respectively. Using regression analysis, prediction equation was developed for indirect haemoglobin values. Interpretation & conclusions: The present findings revealed that indirect cyanmethaemoglobin method overestimated the prevalence of anaemia as compared to the direct method. However, if a correction factor is applied, indirect method could be successfully used for estimating true haemoglobin level. More studies should be undertaken to establish agreement and correction factor between direct and indirect cyanmethaemoglobin methods. PMID:28256465

  2. Variation of haemoglobin extinction coefficients can cause errors in the determination of haemoglobin concentration measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. G.; Liu, H.

    2007-10-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy or imaging has been extensively applied to various biomedical applications since it can detect the concentrations of oxyhaemoglobin (HbO2), deoxyhaemoglobin (Hb) and total haemoglobin (Hbtotal) from deep tissues. To quantify concentrations of these haemoglobin derivatives, the extinction coefficient values of HbO2 and Hb have to be employed. However, it was not well recognized among researchers that small differences in extinction coefficients could cause significant errors in quantifying the concentrations of haemoglobin derivatives. In this study, we derived equations to estimate errors of haemoglobin derivatives caused by the variation of haemoglobin extinction coefficients. To prove our error analysis, we performed experiments using liquid-tissue phantoms containing 1% Intralipid in a phosphate-buffered saline solution. The gas intervention of pure oxygen was given in the solution to examine the oxygenation changes in the phantom, and 3 mL of human blood was added twice to show the changes in [Hbtotal]. The error calculation has shown that even a small variation (0.01 cm-1 mM-1) in extinction coefficients can produce appreciable relative errors in quantification of Δ[HbO2], Δ[Hb] and Δ[Hbtotal]. We have also observed that the error of Δ[Hbtotal] is not always larger than those of Δ[HbO2] and Δ[Hb]. This study concludes that we need to be aware of any variation in haemoglobin extinction coefficients, which could result from changes in temperature, and to utilize corresponding animal's haemoglobin extinction coefficients for the animal experiments, in order to obtain more accurate values of Δ[HbO2], Δ[Hb] and Δ[Hbtotal] from in vivo tissue measurements.

  3. Vessel calibre and haemoglobin effects on pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    McEwen, M P; Bull, G P; Reynolds, K J

    2009-09-01

    Despite its success as a clinical monitoring tool, pulse oximetry may be improved with respect to the need for empirical calibration and the reports of biases in readings associated with peripheral vasoconstriction and haemoglobin concentration. To effect this improvement, this work aims to improve the understanding of the photoplethysmography signal-as used by pulse oximeters-and investigates the effect of vessel calibre and haemoglobin concentration on pulse oximetry. The digital temperature and the transmission of a wide spectrum of light through the fingers of 57 people with known haemoglobin concentrations were measured and simulations of the transmission of that spectrum of light through finger models were performed. Ratios of pulsatile attenuations of light as used in pulse oximetry were dependent upon peripheral temperature and on blood haemoglobin concentration. In addition, both the simulation and in vivo results showed that the pulsatile attenuation of light through fingers was approximately proportional to the absorption coefficients of blood, only when the absorption coefficients were small. These findings were explained in terms of discrete blood vessels acting as barriers to light transmission through tissue. Due to the influence of discrete blood vessels on light transmission, pulse oximeter outputs tend to be dependent upon haemoglobin concentration and on the calibre of pulsing blood vessels-which are affected by vasoconstriction/vasodilation. The effects of discrete blood vessels may account for part of the difference between the Beer-Lambert pulse oximetry model and empirical calibration.

  4. Haemoglobin biosynthesis site in rabbit embryo erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Cianciarullo, Aurora M; Bertho, Alvaro L; Soares, Maurilio J; Hosoda, Tânia M; Nogueira-Silva, Simone; Beçak, Willy

    2003-01-01

    Properly metabolized globin synthesis and iron uptake are indispensable for erythroid cell differentiation and maturation. Mitochondrial participation is crucial in the process of haeme synthesis for cytochromes and haemoglobin. We studied the final biosynthesis site of haemoglobin using an ultrastructural approach, with erythroid cells obtained from rabbit embryos, in order to compare these results with those of animals treated with saponine or phenylhydrazine. Our results are similar to those obtained in assays with adult mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and fish, after induction of haemolytic anaemia. Therefore, the treatment did not interfere with the process studied, confirming our previous findings. Immunoelectron microscopy showed no labelling of mitochondria or other cellular organelles supposedly involved in the final biosynthesis of haemoglobin molecules, suggesting instead that it occurs free in the cytoplasm immediately after the liberation of haeme from the mitochondria, by electrostatic attraction between haeme and globin chains.

  5. Bacteroides gingivalis-specific serum IgG and IgA subclass antibodies in periodontal diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, T; Kusumoto, Y; Hamada, S; McGhee, J R; Kiyono, H

    1990-01-01

    The level of serum IgM, IgG and IgA antibodies including IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgA1 and IgA2 subclass-specific antibodies to Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis fimbriae and to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were analysed in patients with different forms of periodontal disease (PD) and control subjects by ELISA. Among PD subjects, sera obtained from adult periodontitis (AP), rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) and gingivitis contained high titres of fimbriae-specific IgG antibodies (7500-15,000 ELISA units) followed by IgA (90-700 units) and IgM (30-90 units). In contrast, sera from localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP) subjects exhibited much lower titres of fimbriae-specific IgG (89 +/- 11 units), IgA (31 +/- 5 units) and IgM (17 +/- 3 units) antibodies. A similar response pattern was also seen in sera from normal subjects aged 35-41 years who practice normal oral hygiene, while sera of younger adults (aged 18-24) with superior hygiene did not have any antigen-specific antibodies. Analysis of IgG subclass anti-fimbriae responses revealed that the major response was IgG3 followed by IgG1, IgG2 and IgG4 in AP, RPP and gingivitis. Although lower, a similar pattern of IgG subclass titre was seen in LJP and normal subjects aged 35-41 years. When IgA subclass responses were measured in AP and RPP, higher titres of the fimbriae-specific response were noted with IgA1 when compared with IgA2. However, lower but approximately equal levels of fimbriae-specific IgA1 and IgA2 titres were seen in other PD groups. When anti-B. gingivalis LPS-specific responses were measured, the sera of AP patients contained high levels of IgG antibodies (2265 +/- 224 units) followed by IgA (411 +/- 90 units) and IgM (214 +/- 56 units). Further, IgG anti-LPS responses were mainly IgG2 followed by IgG4, IgG3 and IgG1. For IgA subclass responses, higher titres of anti-LPS-specific antibodies were noted in IgA2 subclass over IgA1. These results showed that higher anti-B. gingivalis antibody

  6. C-Terminal Domain Residues Important for Secretion and Attachment of RgpB in Porphyromonas gingivalis▿

    PubMed Central

    Slakeski, Nada; Seers, Christine A.; Ng, Kaiting; Moore, Caroline; Cleal, Steven M.; Veith, Paul D.; Lo, Alvin W.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, expresses a group of surface proteins with a common C-terminal domain (CTD) that are exported by a novel secretion system to the surface, where they are covalently attached. Using RgpB as a model CTD protein, we have produced a series of site-directed mutations in the CTD sequence at conserved residues and at residues that may be modified and, hence, surface attached. The mutant RgpB proteins were expressed in a P. gingivalis host lacking functional RgpB and RgpA Arg-specific proteases. The RgpB mutants produced were Y674F, Y674F Y718F, T675Q S679Q T682Q T684Q, T693Q, F695A, D696A, N698A, G699P, G716P, T724Q, T728Q T730Q, and K732Q and a protein with a deletion of residues 692 to 702 (Δ692-702). The mutants were characterized for cell-associated Arg-specific protease activity and for cellular distribution using anti-Rgp antibodies and Western blotting of culture fractions. All the mutants exhibited cell-associated Arg-specific activity similar to that of the positive control except for the D696A and Δ692-702 mutants. For all mutants, except D696A and Δ692-702, the RgpB proteins were found modified and attached to the cell surface, which was the same profile found in the positive-control strain. Only trace amounts of the precursor form of the Δ692-702 mutant were detected in the outer membrane, with none detected in the periplasm or culture fluid although cell transcript levels were normal. The results suggest that residues 692 to 702 of the CTD, in particular, residue D696, have an important role in the attachment of RgpB at the cell surface and that without attachment secretion does not occur. PMID:20971915

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human glycosylated haemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Syakhovich, Vitaly E.; Saraswathi, N. T.; Ruff, Marc; Bokut, Sergey B.; Moras, Dino

    2006-02-01

    Non enzymatic modification of haemoglobin by glucose plays an important role in diabetes pathogenesis. Here the purification, characterization and crystallization of human glycosylated haemoglobin are reported. Human glycosylated haemoglobin A{sub 1C} is a stable minor variant formed in vivo by post-translational modification of the main form of haemoglobin by glucose. Crystals of oxyHbA{sub 1C} were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and PEG as precipitant. The diffraction pattern of the crystal extends to a resolution of 2.3 Å at 120 K. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 237.98, b = 59.27, c = 137.02 Å, α = 90.00, β = 125.40, γ = 90.00°. The presence of two and a half molecules per asymmetric unit gives a crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 9.70 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 49%.

  8. Unusual pattern in haemoglobin electrophoresis in Croatian population: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Segulja, Dragana; Matisic, Danica; Honovic, Lorena; Batinic, Josip; Rogic, Dunja

    2016-01-01

    Haemoglobinopathies are hereditary disorders of globin chain synthesis and are the most common inherited diseases worldwide. Haemoglobin E is a structural haemoglobin variant characteristic for South East Asian population. We present a rare and unusual finding of haemoglobin E detected in University Hospital Centre Zagreb by capillary zone electrophoresis. Detection of haemoglobin structural variant helped to avoid misdiagnosis of sideropenic anemia and thus potentially harmful therapeutic intervention. In today’s European multiethnic population haemoglobinopathies are a public health issue and Croatian laboratory professionals should be aware of a possibility of finding an unusual haemoglobin pattern. PMID:27812312

  9. Detection of the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis in periodontal pockets.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Mark; Amard, Véronique; Bar-Pinatel, Charlotte; Charpentier, Frédéric; Chatard, Jean-Michel; Desmuyck, Yvan; Ihler, Serge; Rochet, Jean-Pierre; Roux de La Tribouille, Véronique; Saladin, Luc; Verdy, Marion; Gironès, Núria; Fresno, Manuel; Santi-Rocca, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a public health issue, being one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unclear: genetics of patients cannot explain the dispersed or isolated localisation of gingival pockets, while bacteria-based models are insufficient to distinguish gingivitis and periodontitis. The possible role of parasites in the establishment of periodontitis has been poorly studied until now. The aim of this project was to study a potential link between colonisation of gingival crevices by the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis and periodontitis. In eight different dental clinics in France, samples were taken in periodontal pockets (72) or healthy sites (33), and submitted to microscopic observation and molecular identification by PCR with a new set of primers designed to specifically detect E. gingivalis. This blind sample analysis showed the strong sensitivity of PCR compared with clinical diagnosis (58/72 = 81%), and microscopy (51/65 = 78%). The results of this work show that the parasites detected by microscopy mainly - if not exclusively - belong to the species E. gingivalis and that the presence of the parasite is correlated with periodontitis.

  10. Detection of the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis in periodontal pockets

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Mark; Amard, Véronique; Bar-Pinatel, Charlotte; Charpentier, Frédéric; Chatard, Jean-Michel; Desmuyck, Yvan; Ihler, Serge; Rochet, Jean-Pierre; Roux de La Tribouille, Véronique; Saladin, Luc; Verdy, Marion; Gironès, Núria; Fresno, Manuel; Santi-Rocca, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a public health issue, being one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unclear: genetics of patients cannot explain the dispersed or isolated localisation of gingival pockets, while bacteria-based models are insufficient to distinguish gingivitis and periodontitis. The possible role of parasites in the establishment of periodontitis has been poorly studied until now. The aim of this project was to study a potential link between colonisation of gingival crevices by the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis and periodontitis. In eight different dental clinics in France, samples were taken in periodontal pockets (72) or healthy sites (33), and submitted to microscopic observation and molecular identification by PCR with a new set of primers designed to specifically detect E. gingivalis. This blind sample analysis showed the strong sensitivity of PCR compared with clinical diagnosis (58/72 = 81%), and microscopy (51/65 = 78%). The results of this work show that the parasites detected by microscopy mainly – if not exclusively – belong to the species E. gingivalis and that the presence of the parasite is correlated with periodontitis. PMID:24983705

  11. Extracellular vesicles in the circulation: are erythrocyte microvesicles a confounder in the plasma haemoglobin assay?

    PubMed

    de Vooght, Karen M K; Lau, Cedric; de Laat, Pim P M; van Wijk, Richard; van Solinge, Wouter W; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2013-02-01

    Blood contains a mixture of extracellular vesicles from different cell types, primarily platelets, endothelial cells, leucocytes and erythrocytes. Erythrocytes are the most abundant cell type in blood and could, especially in certain pathologies, represent an important source of vesicles. Since erythrocytes contain the haemoglobin components iron and haem, which are potentially toxic, it is important to investigate the contribution of vesicle-associated haemoglobin to total cell-free haemoglobin levels. To our knowledge, this is the first time that cell-free plasma haemoglobin has been differentiated into vesicle-associated and molecular species. We investigated the contribution of vesicle-associated haemoglobin in residual patient material that was routinely analysed for total cell-free plasma haemoglobin. All patient samples included in the study were haemolytic with total cell-free haemoglobin concentration ranging from 80 to 2500 mg/l. In the majority of the samples, total cell-free haemoglobin concentration was between 100 and 200 mg/l. No haemoglobin could be detected in the vesicle fraction, indicating that the contribution of vesicle-associated haemoglobin to total cell free-haemoglobin levels in plasma is negligible. It is important to investigate whether erythrocyte vesicles are not formed in blood or that their production is not increased during pathologies associated with haemolysis or that the clearance rate of the vesicles surpasses the formation rate.

  12. Inherited haemoglobin disorders: an increasing global health problem.

    PubMed Central

    Weatherall, D. J.; Clegg, J. B.

    2001-01-01

    Despite major advances in our understanding of the molecular pathology, pathophysiology, and control and management of the inherited disorders of haemoglobin, thousands of infants and children with these diseases are dying through lack of appropriate medical care. This problem will undoubtedly increase over the next 20 years because, as the result of a reduction in childhood mortality due to infection and malnutrition, more babies with haemoglobin disorders will survive to present for treatment. Although WHO and various voluntary agencies have tried to disseminate information about these diseases, they are rarely mentioned as being sufficiently important to be included in setting health care priorities for the future. It takes considerable time to establish expertise in developing programmes for the control and management of these conditions, and the lessons learned in developed countries will need to be transmitted to those countries in which they occur at a high frequency. PMID:11545326

  13. Studies on carbon monoxide binding by shark haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, F M; Gibson, Q H

    1981-01-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of Pacific-porbeagle haemoglobin with CO were studied by flash-photolysis and stopped-flow methods, and the equilibrium binding curves for CO were measured in spectrophotometric titrations. Measurements were made in the pH range 6-8 and in the temperature range 0-40 degrees C. The results are discussed in terms of the allosteric model proposed by Monod, Wyman & Changeux [(1965) J. Mol. Biol. 12, 88-118]. Within this framework the results indicate that in the R-state the haem groups fall into two classes of different reactivity with different spectral characteristics, but that in the T-state the groups may be essentially equivalent. The physiological importance of the temperature-insensitivity of the equilibrium ligand-binding curves for porbeagle haemoglobin is discussed. PMID:7325965

  14. Probing the interaction of bovine haemoglobin with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Sun, L; Weng, J; Chen, L; Zhang, Q

    2012-03-01

    The interaction between gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and bovine haemoglobin (BHb) was studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum demonstrated that there was interaction between GNPs and BHb, but no direct interaction between GNPs and haem groups of BHb. The fluorescence data revealed that GNPs effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of BHb via static quenching. The binding of GNPs to BHb occurred at a single site. The binding process was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure, in which hydrophobic force and hydrogen bonds played a major role. The alternations of protein secondary structure in the presence of GNPs were also determined by CD spectroscopy. This work is helpful to understand the interaction mechanism of GNPs with haemoglobin, which can guide the applications of GNPs in biomedicine.

  15. The current status of haemoglobin-based blood substitutes.

    PubMed

    Cohn, S M

    1997-10-01

    Haemoglobin-based red cell substitutes have recently passed a myriad of safety studies and are now undergoing efficacy evaluation. There are numerous potential benefits with use of these solutions: they are readily available and have a long shelf-life; do not require typing and cross-matching; are free of viral or bacterial contamination; lack the immunosuppressive effects of blood; and have a much lower viscosity than blood. One-third of the 10 million units of blood transfused in the United States each year is utilized in the emergency setting. Therefore, a safe, effective substitute for blood should have significant impact upon the way we resuscitate bleeding patients. In this article, the current status of the various haemoglobin-based red cell substitutes is reviewed.

  16. Study of haemoglobin saturation with Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortalli, I.; Pedrazzi, G.; Mangoni, L.; Rizzoli, V.

    1988-10-01

    Red blood cells from normal subjects, Hodgkin's lymphoma and acute leukaemia have been investigated. Preliminary Mössbauer spectroscopy results in seven patients have shown a high haedmoglobin saturation. Independent measurements of pH, pCO2, pO2, DPG and P50, are in agreement with the Mössbauer data. These results give indication that the evaluation of haemoglobin saturation could be an information to be used in the clinical follow up of these hematological malignancies.

  17. Anaemia in the sow: a cohort study to assess factors with an impact on haemoglobin concentration, and the influence of haemoglobin concentration on the reproductive performance.

    PubMed

    Normand, V; Perrin, H; Auvigne, V; Robert, N; Laval, A

    2012-10-06

    The aim of this study was to conduct a descriptive study of haemoglobin concentration found on high-prolificacy sows, to study the relationship between the concentration of haemoglobin and body reserves, and to determine whether anaemia is a risk factor for reproductive performance. A cohort of 308 sows from seven farms was followed from the last third of gestation to the confirmation of the following gestation. Haemoglobin concentration was assessed at four stages of the reproductive cycle: seven and four weeks before farrowing, a few days and three weeks after farrowing. Backfat thickness (BFT) was measured at parturition. The results were analysed using linear mixed-effect models. The mean haemoglobin concentration was 108.4 g/l. The mean modellised haemoglobin concentration of parity 1 sows with a BFT of 16 mm, sampled seven weeks before farrowing, was 118 g/l. Haemoglobin concentration of sows of parity 6 or higher was 8.0 g/l lower than those of parity 1 sows (95% confidence interval -11.0 to -5.1). Haemoglobin concentration is lower in sows with a lower BFT, whatever parity rank. There is no evidence of a relation between haemoglobin concentration and the number of total born, stillborn or number of piglets alive at three weeks and the next breeding performance.

  18. Haemoglobin E trait and probable alpha-thalassaemia in a black American family: a family study.

    PubMed Central

    El-Shirbiny, A F; Parkhurst, S; Bettigole, R E; Tourbaf, K D

    1980-01-01

    This is a report of haemoglobin E trait in a black American family with no known Asian ancestory. The father appears to be heterozygous for both haemoglobin E and alpha-thalassaemia. The mother is normal both clinically and haematologically. These children carry Hb E trait alone. The youngest son has a normal haemoglobin pattern and appears to have alpha-thalassaemia. Images PMID:7205904

  19. Haemoglobin-based red cell substitutes: current status.

    PubMed

    Ogden, J E; Mac Donald, S L

    1995-01-01

    Chemically modified haemoglobin solutions represent a potential alternative to the transfusion of donor blood. The theoretical advantages of these products include an oxygen delivery potential greater than that of conventional plasma expanders, prolonged shelf-life, universal compatibility and the absence of pathogenic viruses. Principal concerns have been safety issues including renal toxicity, coagulopathy and vasoactivity. The proposed indications for these solutions are primarily resuscitation of patients in haemorrhagic shock and perioperative haemodilution during elective surgery. Three products have now undergone phase I safety trials in human subjects and phase II safety and efficacy trials are planned in the near future.

  20. The use of haemoglobin concentrations to assess physiological condition in birds: a review

    PubMed Central

    Minias, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Total blood haemoglobin concentration is increasingly being used to assess physiological condition in wild birds, although it has not been explicitly recognized how reliably this parameter reflects different components of individual quality. Thus, I reviewed over 120 published studies linking variation in haemoglobin concentrations to different measures of condition and other phenotypic or ecological traits. In most of the studied avian species, haemoglobin concentrations were positively correlated with other commonly used indices of condition, such as body mass and fat loads, as well as with quality of the diet. Also, chick haemoglobin concentrations reliably reflected the intensity of nest infestation by parasitic arthropods, and haemoglobin was suggested to reflect parasitism by haematophagous ectoparasites much more precisely than haematocrit. There was also some evidence for the negative effect of helminths on haemoglobin levels in adult birds. Finally, haemoglobin concentrations were found to correlate with such fitness-related traits as timing of arrival at breeding grounds, timing of breeding, egg size, developmental stability and habitat quality, although these relationships were not always consistent between species. In consequence, I recommend the total blood haemoglobin concentration as a relatively robust indicator of physiological condition in birds, although this parameter is also strongly affected by age, season and the process of moult. Thus, researchers are advised to control fully for these confounding effects while using haemoglobin concentrations as a proxy of physiological condition in both experimental and field studies on birds. PMID:27293692

  1. Haemoglobin adducts of aromatic amines: diamines and polyaromatic amines.

    PubMed

    Sabbioni, G; Beyerbach, A

    2000-07-21

    Aromatic amines and nitroarenes are important antioxidants and intermediates in the synthesis of dyes, pesticides and plastics. In the present paper we introduce methods for the synthesis of deuterated standards: 3-[2H8]aminofluoranthene, 3,3'-dimethyl-[2H4]benzidine, [2H4]benzidine, N'-acetyl-[2H4]benzidine, 2,4-[2H6]toluenediamine, 2,6-[2H6]toluenediamine. These standards have been used for the quantification of haemoglobin adducts of diamines and polyaromatic amines. Haemoglobin was hydrolysed in 0.1 M sodium hydroxide and the hydrolysate extracted with dichloromethane. The extracts were derivatised with heptafluorobutyric anhydride and analysed by GC-MS with negative chemical ionisation. In one run up to 15 aromatic amines can be determined: 6-aminochrysene, 3-aminofluoranthene, 2-aminofluorene, 1-aminopyrene, benzidine, 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine, 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine, 3,3'-dimethylbenzidine, 3,3'-methylenedianiline, 4,4'-methylenedianiline, N'-acetyl-benzidine, N'-acetyl-4,4'-methylenedianiline, 4,4'-methylene bis(2-chloroaniline), 2,4-toluenediamine and 2,6-toluenediamine.

  2. Identification of haemoglobin New York by haemoglobin A1c measurement using the Sebia Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing system.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yan; Wan, Zemin; Wu, Xiaobin; Qiu, Feng; Wu, Xinzhong; Wang, Yunxiu; Ke, Peifeng; Xu, Jianhua; Zhuang, Junhua; Huang, Xianzhang

    2017-01-01

    Haemoglobinopathies may interfere with the haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement, leading to incorrect diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. It is essential that HbA1c assays are capable of identifying haemoglobinopathies. We report two cases of haemoglobin New York (HbNY) discovered through HbA1c analysis using capillary electrophoresis (Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing [C2FP], Sebia). We used these samples to evaluate the ability of three other HbA1c assays to identify this variant: ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (Variant II Turbo [VII-T], Bio-Rad); boronate affinity high-performance liquid chromatography (Ultra(2), Trinity Biotech) and immunoassay (Cobas c501 Tina-quant Generation 3, Roche Diagnostics). Each method was used for HbA1c assay of in samples from two cases of heterozygous haemoglobinopathy: β(0)-thalassemia/HbNY (Case 1) and HbA/NY (Case 2). Only the C2FP system detected HbNY (an additional peak appeared between HbA1c and HbA0). Clinical laboratories should be aware of the limitations of their HbA1c assay methods especially in geographic areas, where haemoglobinopathy prevalence is high.

  3. α-Haemoglobin regulates sympathoadrenal cell metabolism to maintain a catecholaminergic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Almaraz, María T; Rodríguez-Gómez, José A; López-Barneo, José; Pascual, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Discovery of haemoglobin A expression outside of the erythroid cell lineage suggests that oxygen transport is the main, but not the unique, function of adult haemoglobin chains in mammals. The contribution of haemoglobin A to antioxidant defences has been proposed in the territories where it is expressed. Catecholaminergic cells rely on an active oxidative metabolism to accomplish their biological function, but are exposed to strong oxidative stress due to metabolism of catecholaminergic transmitters. We show in the present study that peripheral catecholaminegic cells express the α- and not the β-haemoglobin A chains, and that α-haemoglobin expression could modulate the antioxidant capabilities of these cells. We also show that α-haemoglobin overexpression in PC12 cells leads to a selective increase of tyrosine hydroxylase synthesis and activity. This is achieved by means of a reorganization of antioxidant defences, decreasing cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase, and increasing mitochondrial peroxidase. Moreover, α-haemoglobin induces a decrease in lipogenesis and increase in lipid degradation, situations that help save NAD(P)H and favour supply of acetyl-CoA to the tricarboxylic acid cycle and production of reducing equivalents in the cell. All of these results point to a role for α-haemoglobin as a regulator of catecholaminergic cell metabolism required for phenotype acquisition and maintenance.

  4. Structural analysis of haemoglobin binding by HpuA from the Neisseriaceae family.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi T; Xu, Yingqi; Gupta, Akshari; Garnett, James A; Matthews, Steve J; Hare, Stephen A

    2015-12-16

    The Neisseriaceae family of bacteria causes a range of diseases including meningitis, septicaemia, gonorrhoea and endocarditis, and extracts haem from haemoglobin as an important iron source within the iron-limited environment of its human host. Herein we report crystal structures of apo- and haemoglobin-bound HpuA, an essential component of this haem import system. The interface involves long loops on the bacterial receptor that present hydrophobic side chains for packing against the surface of haemoglobin. Interestingly, our structural and biochemical analyses of Kingella denitrificans and Neisseria gonorrhoeae HpuA mutants, although validating the interactions observed in the crystal structure, show how Neisseriaceae have the fascinating ability to diversify functional sequences and yet retain the haemoglobin binding function. Our results present the first description of HpuA's role in direct binding of haemoglobin.

  5. Structural analysis of haemoglobin binding by HpuA from the Neisseriaceae family

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi T.; Xu, Yingqi; Gupta, Akshari; Garnett, James A.; Matthews, Steve J.; Hare, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    The Neisseriaceae family of bacteria causes a range of diseases including meningitis, septicaemia, gonorrhoea and endocarditis, and extracts haem from haemoglobin as an important iron source within the iron-limited environment of its human host. Herein we report crystal structures of apo- and haemoglobin-bound HpuA, an essential component of this haem import system. The interface involves long loops on the bacterial receptor that present hydrophobic side chains for packing against the surface of haemoglobin. Interestingly, our structural and biochemical analyses of Kingella denitrificans and Neisseria gonorrhoeae HpuA mutants, although validating the interactions observed in the crystal structure, show how Neisseriaceae have the fascinating ability to diversify functional sequences and yet retain the haemoglobin binding function. Our results present the first description of HpuA's role in direct binding of haemoglobin. PMID:26671256

  6. The structure of α-haemoglobin in complex with a haemoglobin-binding domain from Staphylococcus aureus reveals the elusive α-haemoglobin dimerization interface.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kaavya Krishna; Jacques, David A; Guss, J Mitchell; Gell, David A

    2014-08-01

    Adult haemoglobin (Hb) is made up of two α and two β subunits. Mutations that reduce expression of the α- or β-globin genes lead to the conditions α- or β-thalassaemia, respectively. Whilst both conditions are characterized by anaemia of variable severity, other details of their pathophysiology are different, in part owing to the greater stability of the β chains that is conferred through β self-association. In contrast, α subunits interact weakly, and in the absence of stabilizing quaternary interactions the α chain (α) is prone to haem loss and denaturation. The molecular contacts that confer weak self-association of α have not been determined previously. Here, the first structure of an α2 homodimer is reported in complex with one domain of the Hb receptor from Staphylococcus aureus. The α2 dimer interface has a highly unusual, approximately linear, arrangement of four His side chains within hydrogen-bonding distance of each other. Some interactions present in the α1β1 dimer interface of native Hb are preserved in the α2 dimer. However, a marked asymmetry is observed in the α2 interface, suggesting that steric factors limit the number of stabilizing interactions that can form simultaneously across the interface.

  7. A Japanese Family with Congenital Erythrocytosis Caused by Haemoglobin Bethesda.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinobu; Tamura, Tadahiko; Gima, Hiroya; Nishikawa, Akinori; Okamoto, Yukiharu; Kanazawa, Nobuo; Relvas, Luis; Cunha, Elizabete; Frances McMullin, Mary; Bento, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    We herein present a case of congenital erythrocytosis caused by haemoglobin (Hb) Bethesda in a Japanese family. A 55-year-old asymptomatic man was referred to our hospital for the investigation of erythrocytosis, which was present in other members of his family. The patient's serum erythropoietin level was normal, and the JAK2 V617F mutation was not detected. His P50 value was mildly decreased, thus we suspected the presence of an Hb variant with a high oxygen affinity. The high-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed an abnormal Hb, and by direct sequencing we identified the Hb Bethesda variant in this patient. For the differential diagnosis, we recommend the estimation of the P50 value as a practical and useful test.

  8. Measured fraction of carboxyhaemoglobin depends on oxygen saturation of haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Hütler, M; Beneke, R; Littschwager, A; Böning, D

    2001-02-01

    The use of the OSM3 oximeter for measurement of the fraction of carboxyhaemoglobin (FCOHb) in blood allows for estimation of total circulating haemoglobin mass (Hb(tot)) by using the carbon monoxide rebreathing method. To ensure high accuracy of Hb(tot) estimation, potential sources of analytical errors should be identified and adjusted for. Based on observed differences in results of measured FCOHb between simultaneously sampled, arterialized and venous blood samples we investigated the influence of haemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) on results of measured FCOHb. Blood from nine healthy non-smokers was tonometered with gas mixtures containing 94% N2 or air and 6% CO2. The resulting oxygenated and deoxygenated specimens were mixed in different proportions to obtain varying sO2 values in the same blood. sO2, fractions of dyshaemoglobins, pO2, pCO2 and pH were measured at each step. FCOHb was significantly (p<0.001) higher in oxygenated (median, range: 0.6%, 0.4-0.9%) compared to deoxygenated (-0.2%, -0.5-0.0%) blood. Regression analysis identified the sO2 as the most important factor explaining 86% of the variance in observed changes in FCOHb. The observed sO2 effect has important implications on calibration procedure of OSM3, accuracy of measured FCOHb, and FCOHb dependent calculations such as estimation of Hb(tot) and related quantities. If the highest accuracy of FCOHb measurement is needed, an sO2 effect on results of measured FCOHb has to be considered and adjusted for.

  9. First evidence of genetic intraspecific variability and occurrence of Entamoeba gingivalis in HIV(+)/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Cembranelli, Sibeli B S; Souto, Fernanda O; Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Richinho, Túlio T; Nunes, Poliana L; Nascentes, Gabriel A N; Ferreira, Thatiana B; Correia, Dalmo; Lages-Silva, Eliane

    2013-01-01

    Entamoeba gingivalis is considered an oral commensal but demonstrates a pathogenic potential associated with periodontal disease in immunocompromised individuals. Therefore, this study evaluated the occurrence, opportunistic conditions, and intraspecific genetic variability of E. gingivalis in HIV(+)/AIDS patients. Entamoeba gingivalis was studied using fresh examination (FE), culture, and PCR from bacterial plaque samples collected from 82 HIV(+)/AIDS patients. Genetic characterization of the lower ribosomal subunit of region 18S (18S-SSU rRNA) was conducted in 9 positive samples using low-stringency single specific primer PCR (LSSP-PCR) and sequencing analysis. Entamoeba gingivalis was detected in 63.4% (52/82) of the samples. No association was detected between the presence of E. gingivalis and the CD4(+) lymphocyte count (≤200 cells/mm(3) (p = 0.912) or viral load (p = 0.429). The LSSP-PCR results helped group E. gingivalis populations into 2 polymorphic groups (68.3% similarity): group I, associated with 63.6% (7/11) of the samples, and group II, associated with 36.4% (4/11) of the samples, which shared 74% and 83.7% similarity and association with C and E isolates from HIV(-) individuals, respectively. Sequencing of 4 samples demonstrated 99% identity with the reference strain ATCC 30927 and also showed 2 divergent clusters, similar to those detected by LSSP-PCR. Opportunistic behavior of E. gingivalis was not detected, which may be related to the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy by all HIV(+)/AIDS patients. The high occurrence of E. gingivalis in these patients can be influenced by multifactorial components not directly related to the CD4(+) lymphocyte counts, such as cholesterol and the oral microbiota host, which could mask the potential opportunistic ability of E. gingivalis. The identification of the 18S SSU-rRNA polymorphism by LSSP-PCR and sequencing analysis provides the first evidence of genetic variability in E. gingivalis

  10. Periodontitis‐associated pathogens P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans activate human CD14+ monocytes leading to enhanced Th17/IL‐17 responses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wan‐Chien; van Asten, Saskia D.; Burns, Lachrissa A.; Evans, Hayley G.; Walter, Gina J.; Hashim, Ahmed; Hughes, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    The Th17/IL‐17 pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis (PD), however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We investigated the mechanism by which the periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) promote a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro, and studied IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in gingival tissue and peripheral blood from patients with PD versus periodontally healthy controls. Addition of Pg or Aa to monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures promoted a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro in a dose‐ and time‐dependent manner. Pg or Aa stimulation of monocytes resulted in increased CD40, CD54 and HLA‐DR expression, and enhanced TNF‐α, IL‐1β, IL‐6 and IL‐23 production. Mechanistically, IL‐17 production in Pg‐stimulated co‐cultures was partially dependent on IL‐1β, IL‐23 and TLR2/TLR4 signalling. Increased frequencies of IL‐17+ cells were observed in gingival tissue from patients with PD compared to healthy subjects. No differences were observed in IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in peripheral blood. In vitro, Pg induced significantly higher IL‐17 production in anti‐CD3 mAb‐stimulated monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures from patients with PD compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that periodontal pathogens can activate monocytes, resulting in increased IL‐17 production by human CD4+ T cells, a process that appears enhanced in patients with PD. PMID:27334899

  11. Bacteroides gingivalis-Actinomyces viscosus cohesive interactions as measured by a quantitative binding assay

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, S.; Ellen, R.P.; Grove, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    There is limited evidence, mostly indirect, to suggest that the adherence of Bacteroides gingivalis to teeth may be enhanced by the presence of gram-positive dental plaque bacteria like Actinomyces viscosus. The purpose of this study was to carry out direct quantitative assessments of the cohesion of B gingivalis and A. viscosus by using an in vitro assay modeled on the natural sequence in which these two species colonize the teeth. The assay allowed comparisons to be made of the adherence of /sup 3/H-labeled B. gingivalis 2561 and 381 to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads (S-HA) and A. viscosus WVU627- or T14V-coated S-HA (actinobeads) in equilibrium and kinetics binding studies. A series of preliminary binding studies with 3H-labeled A. viscosus and parallel studies by scanning electron microscopy with unlabeled A. viscosus were conducted to establish a protocol by which actinobeads suitable for subsequent Bacteroides adherence experiments could be prepared. By scanning electron microscopy, the actinobeads had only small gaps of exposed S-HA between essentially irreversibly bound A. viscosus cells. Furthermore, B. gingivalis cells appeared to bind preferentially to the Actinomyces cells instead of the exposed S-HA. B. gingivalis binding to both S-HA and actinobeads was saturable with at least 2 X 10(9) to 3 X 10(9) cells per ml, and equilibrium with saturating concentrations was reached within 10 to 20 min. B. gingivalis always bound in greater numbers to the actinobeads than to S-HA. These findings provide direct measurements supporting the concept that cohesion with dental plaque bacteria like A. viscosus may foster the establishment of B. gingivalis on teeth by enhancing its adherence.

  12. Comparative evaluation of haemoglobin estimation amongst pregnant women in Ibadan: Hemocue - B haemoglobin analyzer versus haemiglobincyanide (standard) method as the gold standard.

    PubMed

    Ojengbede, O A; Okonkwo, S N; Morhason-Bello, I O

    2008-08-01

    This was a comparative crossectional study that was conducted among 557 antenatal women at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria between 1st April and 30th May 2006. The study compared the accuracy of haemoglobin estimation using an automated HemoCue B analyzer kit with a standard laboratory method (haemogloincyanide) as the gold standard. The result showed a positive correlation of HaemoCue haemoglobin results when compared with the standard methods (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.892; p value = 0.000). We concluded that the use of the automated HemoCue kit for haemoglobin estimation gives an objective assessment which overcomes the challenge of extra skilled manpower or power outages in rural areas thereby enhancing access to quality of care in resource poor countries.

  13. Identification of a rare variant haemoglobin (Hb Sinai-Baltimore) causing spuriously low haemoglobin A(1c) values on ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geoff; Murray, Heather; Brennan, Stephen O

    2013-01-01

    Commonly used methods for assay of haemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) are susceptible to interference from the presence of haemoglobin variants. In many systems, the common variants can be identified but scientists and pathologists must remain vigilant for more subtle variants that may result in spuriously high or low HbA(1c) values. It is clearly important to recognize these events whether HbA(1c) is being used as a monitoring tool or, as is increasingly the case, for diagnostic purposes. We report a patient with a rare haemoglobin variant (Hb Sinai-Baltimore) that resulted in spuriously low values of HbA(1c) when assayed using ion exchange chromatography, and the steps taken to elucidate the nature of the variant.

  14. Haemoglobin F modulation in childhood sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Trompeter, Sara; Roberts, Irene

    2009-02-01

    While supportive care remains the best option for most well children with sickle cell disease (SCD), increasing awareness of early signs of chronic organ damage in childhood has focused attention on therapy which modulates the natural history of the disease. Since cure by stem cell transplantation is only feasible for a minority and gene therapy remains developmental, pharmacological modification by Haemoglobin F (HbF)-inducers, is the most widely used approach in SCD. Currently, the only HbF modulator with a clear place in the management of childhood SCD is hydroxycarbamide for which the main indications are frequent painful crises and recurrent acute chest syndrome. In the majority of SCD children treated with hydroxycarbamide there is clear evidence of clinical benefit and the drug is well tolerated. The main disadvantages are the need for frequent monitoring and uncertainity about long-term risks of carcinogenicity and impaired fertility, although these risks appear to be very low. The role of hydroxycarbamide in sickle-associated central nervous system disease remains to be established. Decitabine and butyrate derivatives show some promise although robust data in children with SCD are lacking. A number of other drugs are currently under investigation for their effects on HbF production including thalidomide and lenolidamide.

  15. The effects of injury and illness on haemoglobin mass.

    PubMed

    Gough, C E; Sharpe, K; Garvican, L A; Anson, J M; Saunders, P U; Gore, C J

    2013-09-01

    This study sought to quantify the effects of reduced training, surgery and changes in body mass on haemoglobin mass (Hbmass) in athletes. Hbmass of 15 athletes (6 males, 9 females) was measured 9±6 (mean±SD) times over 162±198 days, during reduced training following injury or illness. Additionally, body mass (n=15 athletes) and episodes of altitude training (n=2), iron supplementation (n=5), or surgery (n=3) were documented. Training was recorded and compared with pre-injury levels. Analysis used linear mixed models for ln(Hbmass), with Sex, Altitude, Surgery, Iron, Training and log(Body Mass) as fixed effects, and Athlete as a fixed and random effect. Reduced training and surgery led to 2.3% (p=0.02) and 2.7% (p=0.04) decreases in Hbmass, respectively. Altitude and iron increased Hbmass by 2.4% (p=0.03) and 4.2% (p=0.05), respectively. The effect of changes in body mass on Hbmass was not statistically significant (p=0.435).The estimates for the effects of surgery and altitude on Hbmass should be confirmed by future research using a larger sample of athletes. These estimates could be used to inform the judgements of experts examining athlete biological passports, improving their interpretation of Hbmass perturbations, which athletes claim are related to injury, thereby protecting innocent athletes from unfair sanctioning.

  16. Modification by simetryn sulphoxide of a specific thiol group in rat haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, G J; de Jong, C; Fischer, R W; Winterhalter, K H; Wilson, K J

    1981-01-01

    Native rat haemoglobins were found to bind simetryn sulphoxide to an extent 40-fold greater than human haemoglobin. This specific behaviour was studied by using only high-pressure ('performance') liquid chromatography for the preparative separation of globin chains and the isolation of peptides resulting from chemical and enzymic degradation. High recoveries (greater than 80%) of peptides throughout the procedures in combination with microsequence techniques, allow a definitive assignment of the residue undergoing modification. The haemoglobin beta-chain cystine-125 residue, with a stoichiometry of one per tetramer of rat haemoglobin, was found to be modified. Stereochemical implications of this finding are discussed. Simetryn sulphoxide would appear to be useful as a specific reagent for the mapping of exposed thiol residues in proteins. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:7337714

  17. Raman and SERS recognition of β-carotene and haemoglobin fingerprints in human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Casella, Michele; Lucotti, Andrea; Tommasini, Matteo; Bedoni, Marzia; Forvi, Elena; Gramatica, Furio; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2011-09-01

    The present work reports on Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) vibrational fingerprints of β-carotene and haemoglobin in fresh whole blood (i.e. right after blood test) with different laser excitations, i.e. visible (514 nm) and near-infrared (NIR, 785 nm). The use of colloidal silver nanoparticles significantly increases the Raman signal, thus providing a clear SERS spectrum of blood. The collected spectra have been examined and marker bands of β-carotene and of the haem prosthetic group of haemoglobin have been found. In particular, the fundamental features of β-carotene (514 nm excitation), blood proteins and haem molecules (785 nm excitation) were recognized and assigned. Moreover haemoglobin SERS signals can be identified and related with its oxygenation state (oxy-haemoglobin). The data reported show the prospects of Raman and SERS techniques to detect important bio-molecules in a whole blood sample with no pre-treatment.

  18. The Use of Haemoglobin as a Model for Teaching the Relationship Between Structure and Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diggins, F. W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Presents information about an atomic model of haemoglobin and describes the oxygenation mechanism as a teaching principle to illustrate the relationship between structure and function at the molecular level. (Author/PEB)

  19. Studies with primaquine in vitro: superoxide radical formation and oxidation of haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, M; Tudhope, G R

    1978-01-01

    1. The production of superoxide radicals from primaquine diphosphate in aqueous solution has been demonstrated, using as indicator the reduction of cytochrome C with inhibition of the reaction by superoxide dismutase. 2. Primaquine-mediated oxidation of haemoglobin to methaemoglobin was reduced by the addition of catalase and increased by superoxide dismutase. Mannitol, a hydroxyl radical scavenger, abolished the increase in methaemoglobin observed in the presence of superoxide dismutase. EDTA reduced the oxidation of haemoglobin with and without superoxide dismutase. 3. Although the oxidation of haemoglobin in the presence of primaquine includes the effects of hydrogen peroxide, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals and metal ions, the results indicate that hydrogen peroxide, rather than the superoxide radical, is the main oxidizing species. The increase in haemoglobin oxidation occurring with superoxide dismutase may result from the augmented rate of hydrogen peroxide formation from superoxide radicals. PMID:212091

  20. The structure of haemoglobin bound to the haemoglobin receptor IsdH from Staphylococcus aureus shows disruption of the native α-globin haem pocket.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Claire F; Jacques, David A; Clubb, Robert T; Guss, J Mitchell; Gell, David A

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common and serious cause of infection in humans. The bacterium expresses a cell-surface receptor that binds to, and strips haem from, human haemoglobin (Hb). The binding interface has previously been identified; however, the structural changes that promote haem release from haemoglobin were unknown. Here, the structure of the receptor-Hb complex is reported at 2.6 Å resolution, which reveals a conformational change in the α-globin F helix that disrupts the haem-pocket structure and alters the Hb quaternary interactions. These features suggest potential mechanisms by which the S. aureus Hb receptor induces haem release from Hb.

  1. Physical, biochemical and functional characterization of haemoglobin from three strains of Artemia.

    PubMed

    Sugumar, Vasudevan; Munuswamy, Natesan

    2007-02-01

    The brine shrimp, Artemia, an inhabitant of coastal and inland salterns, encounter fluctuations in the salinity which in turn influences the oxygen availability of their habitat. Hence, experiments were performed to analyze variations in haemoglobin structure and patterns of three strains of Artemia from South India and also to reflect the effect of varying oxygen levels in their habitat. Haemoglobins were purified on a DEAE-Sephadex column and haemoglobin types were analyzed by comparing their relative mobility on a non-denaturing medium. Furthermore, their molecular masses were determined by gel filtration in Sepharose column and by dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results clearly reveal the presence of three distinct extracellular haemoglobins Hb I, Hb II and Hb III in Tuticorin strain while the other strains displayed only trails or the complete absence of Hb III and Hb II. Estimated molecular masses of these haemoglobins are 235,000-250,000 Da. Denaturation of the reduced and alkylated haemoglobins revealed apparently one polypeptide chain with a molecular mass of 124,000 Da. Upon denaturing gel electrophoresis of native haemoglobin Hb II, it was found that the 124,000 Da, polypeptide was cleaved specifically into two unequally-sized fragments of 50,400 and 79,800 Da. With regard to oxygen affinity, Hb III has a very high affinity for oxygen, an almost negligible Bohr effect and a good physiological adaptation to temperature changes. By combining the three haemoglobins in different proportions Artemia strains must be able to withstand diverging environmental conditions. In particular, the absence of Hb III in Puthalam and its occurrence as a faint band in Thamaraikulam could be correlated to the oxygen levels of their habitats.

  2. Correlation of haemoglobin-acrylamide adducts with airborne exposure: an occupational survey.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kate; Garfitt, Sarah; Emms, Vicky; Warren, Nick; Cocker, John; Farmer, Peter

    2006-04-10

    This paper reports an occupational hygiene survey of exposure to acrylamide comparing acrylamide haemoglobin adduct measurements with personal air monitoring and glove liner analysis. The air monitoring data showed that exposure to acrylamide was well-controlled with all samples below the UK maximum exposure limit (MEL) of 300 microg/m(3) with mean exposure about one tenth of the MEL. Each worker provided two blood samples approximately 3 months apart. These samples were well correlated (r=0.61) with a slope of 0.74, indicating that exposure was reasonably constant. Mean personal airborne acrylamide levels and mean acrylamide haemoglobin adduct levels were well correlated (r=0.72, N=46) and using the calculated linear correlation, exposure at the MEL would be expected to give rise to a haemoglobin adduct level of 1,550 pmol/g globin. Smoking status did not affect the correlation. There was also a correlation between levels of acrylamide detected on gloves and haemoglobin adduct levels. A combined regression model between haemoglobin adducts, airborne acrylamide and acrylamide glove contamination was significant for both airborne acrylamide and gloves with a regression coefficient of 0.89. The study showed that haemoglobin adduct level was a good biomarker of acrylamide exposure which correlated to both inhaled and potentially skin absorbed acrylamide estimates. There was excellent discrimination between well-controlled occupational levels and environmental levels from diet and smoking, allowing haemoglobin adduct measurement to be used to determine even low level exposures. Due to the complexity of the current methodology, new techniques would be useful in making haemoglobin adducts more widely applicable.

  3. Evaluation of haemoglobin in blister fluid as an indicator of paediatric burn wound depth.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, Catherine; Sampson, Dayle L; Broadbent, James A; Cuttle, Leila; Kempf, Margit; Kimble, Roy M; Upton, Zee; Parker, Tony J

    2015-08-01

    The early and accurate assessment of burns is essential to inform patient treatment regimens; however, this first critical step in clinical practice remains a challenge for specialist burns clinicians worldwide. In this regard, protein biomarkers are a potential adjunct diagnostic tool to assist experienced clinical judgement. Free circulating haemoglobin has previously shown some promise as an indicator of burn depth in a murine animal model. Using blister fluid collected from paediatric burn patients, haemoglobin abundance was measured using semi-quantitative Western blot and immunoassays. Although a trend was observed in which haemoglobin abundance increased with burn wound severity, several patient samples deviated significantly from this trend. Further, it was found that haemoglobin concentration decreased significantly when whole cells, cell debris and fibrinous matrix was removed from the blister fluid by centrifugation; although the relationship to depth was still present. Statistical analyses showed that haemoglobin abundance in the fluid was more strongly related to the time between injury and sample collection and the time taken for spontaneous re-epithelialisation. We hypothesise that prolonged exposure to the blister fluid microenvironment may result in an increased haemoglobin abundance due to erythrocyte lysis, and delayed wound healing.

  4. Humoral immune response to Bacteroides gingivalis fimbrial antigen in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, T; Shimauchi, H; Kusumoto, Y; Hamada, S

    1990-01-01

    Bacteroides gingivalis fimbrial antigen incorporated into liposomes, but not in Tris-HCl buffer, significantly raised the levels of anti-fimbriae antibodies in serum, particularly of the IgG class, after oral primary and booster immunizations in BALB/c mice. An approximately linear relationship was observed between the dose of fimbrial antigen and the level of fimbriae-specific antibodies produced; antibody production reached its maximum at an immunization dosage of 500 micrograms of fimbriae per mouse. Fimbriae-specific antibody production was enhanced by use of a semi-synthetic adjuvant, a stearoyl derivative of sodium beta-N-acetylglucosaminyl-(1----4)-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutaminyl-(L) - stearoyl-(D)-meso-diamino-pimelic acid-(D)-amide-D-alanine (GM)-53) in liposomes. High anti-fimbriae antibody levels in serum and saliva were maintained for several months in the mice that had received two orally administered boosters of fimbrial antigen with GM-53 in liposomes. Salivary anti-fimbriae antibody levels, particularly of the IgA class, were markedly raised. PMID:1968885

  5. An assessment of techniques suitable for the diagnosis of sickle-cell disease and haemoglobin C disease in cord blood samples

    PubMed Central

    Yawson, G. I.; Huntsman, R. G.; Metters, J. S.

    1970-01-01

    Agar gel, cellulose acetate, and starch gel electrophoresis are all capable of diagnosing sickle-cell anaemia, sickle-cell haemoglobin C disease, and haemoglobin C disease in cord blood samples. Of these three electrophoretic techniques, agar gel is the easiest to interpret. Paper electrophoresis can reliably and rapidly detect sickle haemoglobin and haemoglobin C in cord blood samples. Being incapable of differentiating foetal and normal adult haemoglobin, the value of paper electrophoresis is limited to an initial screening procedure. Images PMID:5476880

  6. Serum Iron and Haemoglobin Estimation in Oral Submucous Fibrosis and Iron Deficiency Anaemia: A Diagnostic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dinkar, Ajit D; Satoskar, Sujata K; Desai, Sapna Raut

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral Submucous Fibrosis (OSMF) is a premalignant condition with potential malignant behaviour characterized by juxta-epithelial fibrosis of the oral cavity. In the process of collagen synthesis, iron gets utilized, by the hydroxylation of proline and lysine, leading to decreased serum iron levels. The trace element like iron is receiving much attention in the detection of oral cancer and precancerous condition like OSMF as it was found to be significantly altered in these conditions. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the haemoglobin and serum iron values of OSMF subjects with that of iron deficiency anaemia subjects. Materials and Methods Total of 120 subjects were included, 40 subjects with the OSMF, 40 with the iron deficiency anemia without tobacco chewing habit, 40 healthy control subjects without OSMF and iron deficiency anaemia. A total of 5ml of venous blood was withdrawn from all the subjects and serum iron and haemoglobin levels were estimated for all the subjects. Estimation of iron was done using Ferrozine method and haemoglobin by Sahli’s method. The statistical method applied were Kruskal Wallis, Mann Whitney and Pearson correlation coefficient test. Results There was a statistically significant difference in serum iron and haemoglobin level in all three groups (p<0.05). The serum iron level was lowest in OSMF group and haemoglobin was lowest in iron deficiency anaemia group. A progressive decrease in serum iron and haemoglobin levels from Stage I of OSMF to the Stage IV of OSMF was also observed. The iron deficiency anaemia group was not found to be suffering from OSMF in the absence of areca-nut or tobacco chewing habits, but OSMF patients with chewing habits were found to be suffering from iron deficiency anaemia. Conclusion There is a progressive decrease in serum iron and haemoglobin levels from Stage I of OSMF to the Stage IV of OSMF so it can be used as an auxillary test in assessment of prognosis of the disease. PMID

  7. Chapter 1: building the ground for the first two protein structures: myoglobin and haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Bror

    2009-09-11

    Fifty years ago, Max Perutz and John Kendrew at Cambridge University achieved something that many people at the time considered impossible: they were the first to use x-ray crystallography to decipher the molecular structures of proteins: haemoglobin and myoglobin. They found that both molecules were built from Linus Pauling's alpha helices, but folded and packed together in a complicated manner that never could have been deciphered by any other technique.With structure information in hand they could then explain how haemoglobin in the bloodstream binds and releases oxygen on cue, how it passes its cargo on to the related storage protein myoglobin, and how a single amino acid mutation can produce the catastrophe known as sickle-cell anemia. Perutz and Kendrew also observed that the folding of helices was identical in myoglobin and the two chains of haemoglobin, and this along with the simultaneously evolving new technique of amino acid sequence analysis established for the first time the concept of molecular evolution. The crystallographic puzzle was "cracked" by Perutz when he demonstrated that the binding of only two heavy metal atoms to horse haemoglobin changed the x-ray pattern enough to allow him to solve the "phase problem" and circumvent the main obstacle to protein crystal structure analysis. Because myoglobin has a single chain whereas haemoglobin has four, Kendrew's work with myoglobin progressed more rapidly; a low resolution structure appeared in 1956 and the high resolution structure in 1959. That same year saw the low resolution picture of haemoglobin, and the high resolution structure followed shortly thereafter. Much of the work in structure analysis was carried out by visiting postdoctoral fellows and technicians, under the watchful eye of Perutz and Kendrew. This celebratory review has been written by three of those former postdoctorals: Strandberg and Dickerson from the myoglobin project, and Rossmann from the haemoglobin.

  8. Within-subject haemoglobin variation in elite athletes: a longitudinal investigation of 13 887 haemoglobin concentration readings.

    PubMed

    Lobigs, Louisa M; Knight, Emma J; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; Gore, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    The Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) estimates individualized reference ranges for key blood markers, such as haemoglobin concentration ([Hb]), using predetermined population mean, between- and within-subject variances. Here, we aim to reassess previously published estimates for within-subject [Hb] variance and determine whether sex-, analyzer-, sport-, or season-specific values are required. Our reference population contains 7723 male (mean ± SD, 22.3 ± 4.6 years of age) and 6164 female (21.6 ± 4.3) athlete observations from 49 sports. [Hb] was calculated using one of three cytometers; Bayer-H3 (1997-1999, n = 4554), ADVIA-120 (1999-2010, n = 8636) and Sysmex XT-2000i (2010-2012, n = 697). The final model was a linear mixed model for [Hb] with analyzer (H3, ADVIA, Sysmex), sex (male, female), sport (power-endurance, endurance, skill, team, disabled and non-athletes), season (summer, winter), and the interaction between sex and sport as fixed effects and athlete as a random effect. The model included an exponential correlation structure to allow for within-subject autocorrelation, and allowed different within-subject variances for each sport. Within-subject [Hb] variance (g(2) /L(2) ) was significantly less for power endurance (35.09, 95% CI 33.50 to 36.76), disabled (25.82, 95% CI 21.71 to 35.28) and non-athletes (34.30, 95% CI 28.53 to 35.87) than for endurance (40.35, 95% CI 39.62 to 47.22) and team sports (38.70, 95% CI 37.68 to 39.76) athletes. No new evidence was found to justify adjusting the current within-subject [Hb] variance estimate.

  9. The measurement of the intrinsic alkaline Bohr effect of various human haemoglobins by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Poyart, C F; Guesnon, P; Bohn, B M

    1981-05-01

    We have used isoelectric focusing to measure the differences between the pI values of various normal and mutant human haemoglobins when completely deoxygenated and when fully liganded with CO. It was assumed that the DeltapI(deox.-ox.) values might correspond quantitatively to the intrinsic alkaline Bohr effect, as most of the anionic cofactors of the haemoglobin molecule are ;stripped' off during the electrophoretic process. In haemoglobins known to exhibit a normal Bohr coefficient (DeltalogP(50)/DeltapH) in solutions, the DeltapI(deox.-ox.) values are lower the higher their respective pI(ox.) values. This indicates that for any particular haemoglobin the DeltapI(deox.-ox.) value accounts for the difference in surface charges at the pH of its pI value. This was confirmed by measuring, by the direct-titration technique, the difference in pH of deoxy and fully liganded haemoglobin A(0) (alpha(2)beta(2)) solutions in conditions approximating those of the isoelectric focusing, i.e. at 5 degrees C and very low concentration of KCl. The variation of the DeltapH(deox.-ox.) curve as a function of pH (ox.) was similar to the isoelectric-focusing curve relating the variation of DeltapI(deox.-ox.) versus pI(ox.) in various haemoglobins with Bohr factor identical with that of haemoglobin A(0). In haemoglobin A(0) the DeltapI(deox.-ox.) value is 0.17 pH unit, which corresponds to a difference of 1.20 positive charges between the oxy and deoxy states of the tetrameric haemoglobin. This value compares favourably with the values of the intrinsic Bohr effect estimated in back-titration experiments. The DeltapI(deox.-ox.) values of mutant or chemically modified haemoglobins carrying an abnormality at the N- or C-terminus of the alpha-chains are decreased by 30% compared with the DeltapI value measured in haemoglobin A(0). When the C-terminus of the beta-chains is altered, as in Hb Nancy (alpha(2)beta(Tyr-145-->Asp) (2)), we observed a 70% decrease in the DeltapI value compared

  10. Glycosylated haemoglobin for screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Eileen; Al-Barazan, Abdul Majeed; Nikakis, Irena; Radford, Andrea; Clarkson, Wade; Trevett, Clinton; Brain, Terry; Gebski, Val; Corbould, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is a cumbersome test that is time consuming, labour intensive and often poorly tolerated by pregnant women. To date, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is the most accepted measure of chronic glycaemia outside of pregnancy. HbA1c is an uncomplicated test, less time consuming, does not require any specific patient preparation and is considered straightforward compared with the OGTT. Therefore, we prospectively tested the utility of the HbA1c when used as a screening tool in pregnancy for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Settings Primary health care. Single tertiary referral centre, Tasmania, Australia. Participants A direct comparison between HbA1c levels and the OGTT results in pregnant women, tested concurrently at the 24–28 gestational week, was undertaken. A full profile of 480 pregnant women during the period from September 2012 to July 2014 was completed. Median and mean age of participants was 29 years (range 18–47 years). Interventions A simultaneous prospective assessment of HbA1c versus standard OGTT in a cohort of consecutive pregnant women presenting to our institute was performed. Results The number of women who had GDM according to OGTT criteria was 57, representing 11.9% of the evaluated 480 pregnant women. Using a cut-off value for HbA1c at 5.1% (32 mmol/mol) for detecting GDM showed sensitivity of 61% and specificity of 68% with negative predictive value (NPV) of 93%, versus sensitivity of 27% and specificity of 95% with NPV of 91% when using HbA1c cut-off value of 5.4% (36 mmol/mol). Conclusions Our results suggest that pregnant women with an HbA1c of≥5.4% (36 mmol/mol) should proceed with an OGTT. This may result in a significant reduction in the burden of testing on both patients and testing facility staff and resources. Further investigations are required to integrate and optimise the HbA1c as a single, non-fasting, screening tool for GDM. Trial registration number ACTRN

  11. Whale (Balaenoptera physalus) haemoglobin: primary structure, functional characterisation and computer modelling studies.

    PubMed

    Corda, Marcella; Tamburrini, Maurizio; De Rosa, Maria C; Sanna, Maria T; Fais, Antonella; Olianas, Alessandra; Pellegrini, Mariagiuseppina; Giardina, Bruno; di Prisco, Guido

    2003-01-01

    The functional properties of haemoglobin from the Mediterranean whale Balaenoptera physalus have been studied as functions of heterotropic effector concentration and temperature. Particular attention has been given to the effect of carbon dioxide and lactate since the animal is specialised for prolonged dives often in cold water. The molecular basis of the functional behaviour and in particular of the weak interaction with 2,3-diphosphoglycerate is discussed in the light of the primary structure and of computer modelling. On these bases, it is suggested that the A2 (Pro-->Ala) substitution observed in the beta chains of whale haemoglobin may be responsible for the displacement of the A helix known to be a key structural feature in haemoglobins that display an altered interaction with 2,3-diphosphoglycerate as compared with human haemoglobin. The functional and structural results, discussed in the light of a previous study on the haemoglobin from the Arctic whale Balaenoptera acutorostrata, give further insights into the regulatory mechanisms of the interactive effects of temperature, carbon dioxide and lactate.

  12. Direct In Vivo Electrochemical Detection of Haemoglobin in Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Rou Jun; Peng, Weng Kung; Han, Jongyoon; Pumera, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The electrochemical behavior of iron ion in haemoglobin provides insight to the chemical activity in the red blood cell which is important in the field of hematology. Herein, the detection of haemoglobin in human red blood cells on glassy carbon electrode (GC) was demonstrated. Red blood cells or raw blood cells was immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode surface with Nafion films employed to sandwich the layer of biological sample firmly on the electrode surface. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) analyses revealed a well-defined reduction peak for haemoglobin at about -0.30 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) at the red blood cell (GC-Nf-RBC-3Nf) and blood (GC-Nf-B-3Nf) film modified GCE in a pH 3.5 phosphate buffer solution. We further demonstrated that the complex biological conditions of a human red blood cell displayed no interference with the detection of haemoglobin. Such findings shall have an implication on the possibilities of studying the electrochemical behaviour of haemoglobin directly from human blood, for various scientific and clinical purposes.

  13. Interaction of nitrobenzoates with haemoglobin in red blood cells and a haemolysate.

    PubMed

    Norambuena, E; Videla, L A; Lissi, E A

    1994-05-01

    Haemoglobin, either in the intact red blood cells or in their haemolysate, readily reacts with mono- and di-nitrobenzoates. For all the nitroaromatics considered, the rate of the process is faster in the haemolysate than in the whole red blood cell. At low (< 8 mM) concentrations, almost quantitative production of methaemoglobin is observed and the process follows second order kinetics. At higher concentrations, the kinetics become complex and other haemoglobin derivatives are produced. The bimolecular rate constants obtained at low substrate concentrations show little relationship to the nitroaromatic reduction potential. The data indicate that mono-nitrobenzoate derivatives are very active in oxidizing haemoglobin in in vitro erythrocyte suspensions, the activities being similar to that of 3,5-dinitrobenzoate. The measured reactivity follows the order m-nitrobenzoate > 3,5-dinitrobenzoate > p-nitrobenzoate > o-nitrobenzoate and the reactivity of all the compounds is considerably larger than that of nitrobenzene. The present results constitute the first kinetic data bearing on the reactivity of nitroaromatics with haemoglobin, both free and incorporated in the intact red cell. Furthermore, they indicate that the interaction of the nitroaromatics with haemoglobin, leading to total oxidation and transformation, in spite of the total disruption of the membrane, does not produce significant lipid-peroxidation, as measured by chemiluminescence emission, production of TBA reactive material and oxygen consumption.

  14. Direct In Vivo Electrochemical Detection of Haemoglobin in Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Rou Jun; Peng, Weng Kung; Han, Jongyoon; Pumera, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of iron ion in haemoglobin provides insight to the chemical activity in the red blood cell which is important in the field of hematology. Herein, the detection of haemoglobin in human red blood cells on glassy carbon electrode (GC) was demonstrated. Red blood cells or raw blood cells was immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode surface with Nafion films employed to sandwich the layer of biological sample firmly on the electrode surface. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) analyses revealed a well-defined reduction peak for haemoglobin at about −0.30 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) at the red blood cell (GC-Nf-RBC-3Nf) and blood (GC-Nf-B-3Nf) film modified GCE in a pH 3.5 phosphate buffer solution. We further demonstrated that the complex biological conditions of a human red blood cell displayed no interference with the detection of haemoglobin. Such findings shall have an implication on the possibilities of studying the electrochemical behaviour of haemoglobin directly from human blood, for various scientific and clinical purposes. PMID:25163492

  15. Unsuccessful treatment of a horse with mandibular granulomatous osteomyelitis due to Halicephalobus gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Robin; van Dreumel, Tony; Keystone, Jay S.; Manning, Alan; Malatestinic, Andrea; Caswell, Jeff L.; Peregrine, Andrew S.

    2008-01-01

    An 8-year-old horse was presented with a submandibular swelling. Biopsy of the lesion indicated granulomatous osteomyelitis due to Halicephalobus gingivalis. In the absence of evidence of involvement of the central nervous system at the time of diagnosis, the horse was treated with ivermectin. Unfortunately, the horse did not survive. PMID:19183732

  16. Utilization of haem from the haptoglobin-haemoglobin complex by Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Otto, B R; Sparrius, M; Wors, D J; de Graaf, F K; MacLaren, D M

    1994-09-01

    Possession of specialized iron acquisition systems is a prerequisite for the survival of pathogenic bacteria in their host. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Bacteroides fragilis, a clinically important Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, possesses a specific haem-uptake system. Growth studies indicated that this microorganism can utilize haem from either haemoglobin or haptoglobin-haemoglobin as its sole source of iron. Iron-repressible haem-binding protein complexes (HBP complexes), involved in the uptake of haem from haptoglobin-haemoglobin were detected by means of lithium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (LDS-PAGE). Four polypeptides of approximately 60, 58, 49 and 35 kDa, which are part of these HBP complexes, were identified as haem-binding proteins. A 44 kDa iron-repressible outer-membrane protein is needed for a functional HBP complex, but the exact role of this protein in the uptake of haem is still unknown.

  17. A multi-wavelength spectrophotometric method for the simultaneous determination of five haemoglobin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zwart, A; Buursma, A; van Kampen, E J; Oeseburg, B; van der Ploeg, P H; Zijlstra, W G

    1981-07-01

    A method is described by which the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin, oxyhaemoglobin, carboxyhaemoglobin, haemoglobin and sulfhaemoglobin in a human blood sample is determined by passing the haemolysate without air contact through a coarse filter and subsequently measuring the absorbance at lambda = 500, 569, 577, 620 and 760 nm. The ensuing set of equations is solved by matrix calculation with the aid of a simple computer program. The method has been tested by comparing it with conventional methods for the determination of the various haemoglobin derivatives separately.

  18. Haemoglobin recovery among HIV-1 infected patients on zidovudine-based antiretroviral therapy and other regimens in north-central Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Deidra D; Blevins, Meridith; Megazzini, Karen M; Shepherd, Bryan E; Mohammed, Mukhtar Y; Wester, C William; Vermund, Sten H; Aliyu, Muktar H

    2014-04-01

    We conducted a study to assess trends in haemoglobin recovery among HIV-infected patients initiated on zidovudine-based combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) stratified by baseline haemoglobin level. Haemoglobin data from non-pregnant adult patients initiating cART in rural north-central Nigeria between June 2009 and May 2011 were analysed using a linear mixed effects model to assess the interaction between time, zidovudine-containing regimen and baseline haemoglobin level on the outcome of subsequent haemoglobin level. Best-fit curves were created for baseline haemoglobin in the 10th, 25th, 75th and 90th percentiles. We included 313 patients with 736 measures of haemoglobin in the analysis (239 on zidovudine and 74 on non-zidovudine-containing regimens). Median haemoglobin increased over time in both groups, with differences in haemoglobin response over time related to baseline haemoglobin levels and zidovudine use (p = 0.003). The groups of patients on zidovudine at the 10th and 90th percentiles had downward sloping curves while all other groups had upward trending haemoglobin levels. Although haemoglobin levels increased overall for patients on zidovudine-containing regimens, for those in the 10th and 90th percentiles haemoglobin levels trended downward over time. These results have implications for decisions regarding when to initiate, switch from or avoid the use of zidovudine.

  19. Liposomes as potential masking agents in sport doping. Part 2: Detection of liposome-entrapped haemoglobin by flow cytofluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Simone; Colicchia, Sonia; de la Torre, Xavier; Donati, Francesco; Mazzarino, Monica; Botrè, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    This work presents an analytical procedure for the identification and characterization of liposome-entrapped haemoglobins, based on flow cytofluorimetry. Flow cytofluorimetric detection is carried out following labelling by two distinct fluorescent reagents, an anti-haemoglobin antibody, fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated, and an anti-poly(ethylene glycol) antibody, streptavidin-phycoerythrin conjugated. This experimental strategy allows the detection of liposome-entrapped haemoglobins in aqueous media, including plasma; the efficacy of the proposed approach has been verified on whole blood samples added with the liposomal formulation (ex-vivo). Additionally, the proposed technique allows the characterization of several key parameters in the study of liposomal haemoglobins, including, for instance (1) the determination of the degree of haemoglobin entrapment by liposomes; (2) the poly(ethylene glycol) insertion efficiency; and (3) the evaluation of liposome-entrapped haemoglobins stability following storage at 4 °C, allowing to follow both the process of haemoglobin loss from liposomes and the liposome degradation. The procedure is proposed for the detection and characterization of liposome-entrapped haemoglobin formulations to control their misuse in sport, but is also suggested for further applications in biological and clinical laboratory investigations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. First report of fatal systemic Halicephalobus gingivalis infection in two Lipizzaner horses from Romania: clinical, pathological, and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Taulescu, Marian A; Ionicã, Angela M; Diugan, Eva; Pavaloiu, Alexandra; Cora, Roxana; Amorim, Irina; Catoi, Cornel; Roccabianca, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Halicephalobus gingivalis (H. gingivalis) causes a rare and fatal infection in horses and humans. Despite the zoonotic potential and severity of the disease, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of halicephalobiasis are still poorly understood. Several European cases of equine halicephalobiasis have been documented; however, in South-Eastern European countries, including Romania, equine neurohelminthiasis caused by H. gingivalis has not been previously described. Two Lipizzaner horses with a clinical history of progressive neurological signs were referred to the Pathology Department of the Cluj-Napoca (Romania) for necropsy. Both horses died with severe neurological signs. Gross examination and cytological, histological, and molecular analyses were performed. The stallions came from two different breeding farms. No history of traveling outside Romania was recorded. At necropsy, granulomatous and necrotizing lesions were observed in the kidneys, lymph nodes, brain, retroperitoneal adipose tissue, and lungs, indicating a systemic infection. Parasitological and histopathological analyses evidenced larval and adult forms of rhabditiform nematodes consistent with Halicephalobus species. Parasites were observed in both lymph and blood vessels of different organs and were also identified in urine samples. A subunit of the large-subunit ribosomal RNA gene (LSU rDNA) of H. gingivalis (673 bp) was amplified from lesions in both horses.To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of equine systemic H. gingivalis infection in Romania and in South-Eastern Europe. Our findings provide new insights into the geographic distribution of specific genetic lineages of H. gingivalis, while also raising public health awareness, as the parasite is zoonotic.

  1. The Prevalence of Self-Reported Health Problems and Haemoglobin Status of Sudanese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moukhyer, M. E.; de Vries, N. K.; Bosma, H.; van Eijk, J. Th. M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we describe self-reported health problems and haemoglobin status among 1200 Sudanese adolescents (53.2% females, 46.8% males). Many adolescents report their general health as excellent and good (84%). A large number, however, report separate physical and psychological complaints. Report of psychological complaints is equal for both…

  2. An evaluation of the HemoCue for measuring haemoglobin in field studies in Jamaica.

    PubMed Central

    Hudson-Thomas, M.; Bingham, K. C.; Simmons, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    The HemoCue system utilizes the principle of oxidation of haemoglobin to hemiglobin by sodium nitrite and the subsequent conversion of hemiglobin to hemiglobinazide by sodium azide. The reagents for these reactions are contained within a small disposable microcuvette of approximately 10 microliters in volume. A venous or capillary sample is introduced into the microcuvette by capillary action and, after reaction with the reagents, the absorbance is read in the HemoCue photometer at 565 and 880 nm. The haemoglobin concentration is then displayed as a digital reading, in either g/dl or mmol/l in 15-45 seconds. We compared haemoglobin values obtained by the HemoCue system with those from the Coulter Counter S-Plus IV in 366 pregnant women in urban Jamaica, and found a highly significant correlation (r = 0.78, P < 0.01). However, because of the convenience and ease of use of this instrument and considering the relatively high cost, we recommend it for use only as a research tool in field studies where accurate and rapid haemoglobin determinations are required. PMID:8062400

  3. Close tetrapod relationships of the coelacanth Latimeria indicated by haemoglobin sequences.

    PubMed

    Gorr, T; Kleinschmidt, T; Fricke, H

    1991-05-30

    The origin of tetrapods has been debated for many years. In traditional systematics, the extinct lobe-finned bony fish (Rhipidistia) are regarded as the closest relatives of tetrapods. Among living fish, the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae (Actinistia), which is the only recent representative of the Crossopterygii (Actinistia and Rhipidistia), the lungfish (Dipnoi) and ray-finned fish (Actinopterygii), have each been considered as sister-groups of the tetrapods. We have now determined the sequence of the alpha- and beta-globin chains of coelacanth haemoglobin and compared them with all known haemoglobins of bony and cartilaginous fish as well as those of tadpoles and adult amphibians. Haemoglobins of bony fish match more closely those of larval than adult amphibians. The beta chains of Latimeria match those of tadpoles more closely (54%) than do those of any other fish, whereas the alpha chains of Latimeria (45.4%), and especially of teleosts (49.2%), are closer to those of larval amphibians than are those of lungfish (39.8%). If only synapomorphous sequence matches (those at derived positions shared by one bony fish and tadpoles but not by any other bony fish) are considered, both Latimeria globin chains have distinctly more identities with phase of tadpoles than do those of any bony fish. Thus the primary structure of Latimeria haemoglobin indicates that the coelacanth is the closest living relative of tetrapods.

  4. Fetal haemoglobin in sickle-cell disease: from genetic epidemiology to new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Lettre, Guillaume; Bauer, Daniel E

    2016-06-18

    Sickle-cell disease affects millions of individuals worldwide, but the global incidence is concentrated in Africa. The burden of sickle-cell disease is expected to continue to rise over the coming decades, adding to stress on the health infrastructures of many countries. Although the molecular cause of sickle-cell disease has been known for more than half a century, treatment options remain greatly limited. Allogeneic haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation is the only existing cure but is limited to specialised clinical centres and remains inaccessible for most patients. Induction of fetal haemoglobin production is a promising strategy for the treatment of sickle-cell disease. In this Series paper, we review scientific breakthroughs in epidemiology, genetics, and molecular biology that have brought reactivation of fetal haemoglobin to the forefront of sickle-cell disease research. Improved knowledge of the regulation of fetal haemoglobin production in human beings and the development of genome editing technology now support the design of innovative therapies for sickle-cell disease that are based on fetal haemoglobin.

  5. Catabolism of haemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes in haemolytic uraemia-like syndromes of different etiologies.

    PubMed

    Brandslund, I; Petersen, P H; Brinkløv, M M; Andersen, P K; Parlev, E

    1982-10-01

    The catabolism of haemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes was studied in four patients with increased vascular haemolysis as part of acute or subacute haemolytic uraemic syndromes. The apparent volumic substance elimination rates for haemoglobin (Fe) bound to haptoglobin in plasma were 1.1 mumol/h/l and 2.9 mumol/h/l in two patients suffering from sublimate and hydrochloric acid poisoning, respectively. This is estimated to correspond to a normal catabolism, when the increased haptoglobin synthesis is taken into account. In the other two patients suffering from serum-sickness there was reduced clearance and thereby an accumulation of haemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes in plasma during penicillin administration. When the offending drug was withdrawn the plasma concentration of haemoglobin bound to haptoglobin remained high for about three days and then fell rapidly (approximately with 3.8 mumol/l/h and 1.9 mumol/l/h). Thus, also in these patients the clearance capacity could be normalized after discontinuation of the drug.

  6. Establishing traceability of photometric absorbance values for accurate measurements of the haemoglobin concentration in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, K.; Wolf, H. U.; Heuck, C.; Kammel, M.; Kummrow, A.; Neukammer, J.

    2013-10-01

    Haemoglobin concentration in blood is one of the most frequently measured analytes in laboratory medicine. Reference and routine methods for the determination of the haemoglobin concentration in blood are based on the conversion of haeme, haemoglobin and haemiglobin species into uniform end products. The total haemoglobin concentration in blood is measured using the absorbance of the reaction products. Traceable absorbance measurement values on the highest metrological level are a prerequisite for the calibration and evaluation of procedures with respect to their suitability for routine measurements and their potential as reference measurement procedures. For this purpose, we describe a procedure to establish traceability of spectral absorbance measurements for the haemiglobincyanide (HiCN) method and for the alkaline haematin detergent (AHD) method. The latter is characterized by a higher stability of the reaction product. In addition, the toxic hazard of cyanide, which binds to the iron ion of the haem group and thus inhibits the oxygen transport, is avoided. Traceability is established at different wavelengths by applying total least-squares analysis to derive the conventional quantity values for the absorbance from the measured values. Extrapolation and interpolation are applied to get access to the spectral regions required to characterize the Q-absorption bands of the HiCN and AHD methods, respectively. For absorbance values between 0.3 and 1.8, the contributions of absorbance measurements to the total expanded uncertainties (95% level of confidence) of absorbance measurements range from 1% to 0.4%.

  7. Selective disappearance of individuals with high levels of glycated haemoglobin in a free-living bird.

    PubMed

    Récapet, Charlotte; Sibeaux, Adélaïde; Cauchard, Laure; Doligez, Blandine; Bize, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Although disruption of glucose homeostasis is a hallmark of ageing in humans and laboratory model organisms, we have little information on the importance of this process in free-living animals. Poor control of blood glucose levels leads to irreversible protein glycation. Hence, levels of protein glycation are hypothesized to increase with age and to be associated with a decline in survival. We tested these predictions by measuring blood glycated haemoglobin in 274 adult collared flycatchers of known age and estimating individual probability of recapture in the following 2 years. Results show a strong decrease in glycated haemoglobin from age 1 to 5 years and an increase thereafter. Individuals with high levels of glycated haemoglobin had a lower probability of recapture, even after controlling for effects of age and dispersal. Altogether, our findings suggest that poor control of glucose homoeostasis is associated with lower survival in this free-living bird population, and that the selective disappearance of individuals with the highest glycation levels could account for the counterintuitive age-related decline in glycated haemoglobin in the early age categories.

  8. Haemoglobin as a buoyancy regulator and oxygen supply in the backswimmer (Notonectidae, Anisops).

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philip G D; Seymour, Roger S

    2008-12-01

    Unlike all other diving insects, backswimmers of the genus Anisops can exploit the pelagic zone by temporarily achieving near-neutral buoyancy during the course of a dive. They begin a dive positively buoyant due to the large volume of air carried in their ventral air-stores, but rapidly enter a protracted period of near-neutral buoyancy before becoming negatively buoyant. This dive profile is due to haemoglobin found in large tracheated cells in the abdomen. Fibre optic oxygen probes placed in the air-stores of submerged bugs revealed that oxygen partial pressure (P(O(2))) dropped in a sigmoid curve, where a linear decline preceded a plateau between 5.1 and 2.0 kPa, before a final drop. Buoyancy measurements made by attaching backswimmers to a sensitive electronic balance showed the same three phases. Inactivating the haemoglobin by fumigating backswimmers with 15% CO eliminated both buoyancy and P(O(2)) plateaus. Oxygen unloaded from the haemoglobin stabilises the air-store during the neutrally buoyant phase after a decrease in volume of between 16% and 19%. Using measurements of air-store P(O(2)) and volume, it was calculated that during a dive the haemoglobin and air-store contribute 0.25 and 0.26 microl of oxygen, respectively.

  9. Use of a topical haemoglobin spray for oxygenating pressure ulcers: healing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Joy; Bateman, Sharon Dawn

    2015-12-01

    A published evaluation ( Tickle, 2015 ) of the use of a topical haemoglobin spray plus standard care in 18 patients with pressure ulcers showed that, following 4 weeks of treatment, the wound size reduced in 17 wounds and there was a progression toward healing in all 18. All but one of the wounds were over 2 months in duration at baseline. This article reports the results of the healing rates at 3 months of the 11 patients who continued to be treated with the haemoglobin spray. Nine of the 11 wounds healed, and 2 reduced in size by week 12 (i.e. 1 wound reduced from 30 cm(2) at baseline to 7 cm(2), while the other reduced from 6 cm(2) to 4 cm(2)). Of the 10 patients who were experiencing wound pain at baseline, 9 were pain free by week 8. Rapid elimination of slough was observed in all patients. The 82% healing rate achieved at 3 months and the fact that most patients continued to receive the same standard care as they had in the 4 weeks before recruitment into the evaluation increases the likelihood that the clinical outcomes observed here can be attributed to the haemoglobin spray. Topical haemoglobin shows promise in terms of its ability to accelerate healing in chronic pressure ulcers.

  10. The impact of HFE mutations on haemoglobin and iron status in individuals experiencing repeated iron loss through blood donation*.

    PubMed

    Mast, Alan E; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Schlumpf, Karen S; Wright, David J; Johnson, Bryce; Carrick, Danielle M; Cable, Ritchard G; Kiss, Joseph E; Glynn, Simone A; Steele, Whitney R; Murphy, Edward L; Sacher, Ronald; Busch, Michael P

    2012-02-01

    Frequent blood donors become iron deficient. HFE mutations are present in over 30% of donors. A 24-month study of 888 first time/reactivated donors and 1537 frequent donors measured haemoglobin and iron status to assess how HFE mutations impact the development of iron deficiency erythropoiesis. Donors with two HFE mutations had increased baseline haemoglobin and iron stores as did those with one mutation, albeit to a lesser extent. Over multiple donations haemoglobin and iron status of donors with HFE mutations paralleled those lacking mutations. The prevalence of HFE mutations was not increased in higher intensity donors. Thus, in general, HFE mutations do not temper donation-induced changes in haemoglobin and iron status. However, in Black donors there was an increase of H63D carriers at baseline, from 3·7% in first time/reactivated donors to 15·8% in frequent donors, suggesting that the relative effects of HFE mutations on iron absorption may vary between racial/ethnic groups. In secondary analyses, venous haemoglobin decreased more slowly in donors with ferritin ≥12μg/l; and haemoglobin recovery time was shorter in donors with reticulocyte haemoglobin (CHr) ≥32·6pg, indicating that these biochemical measures are better indicators of a donor's response to phlebotomy than their HFE mutation status.

  11. Purification and properties of hemagglutinin from culture supernatant of Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, K; Yamamoto, A; Naito, Y; Takazoe, I; Slots, J; Genco, R J

    1986-01-01

    The hemagglutinating factor (hemagglutinin) of Bacteroides gingivalis was prepared from the supernatant of a 5-day diffusate broth culture by ammonium sulfate precipitation and column chromatography with a hydrophobic column of Phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, DEAE-Sephadex A-50, and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. The hemagglutinating activity of the preparation was 53.3 times higher than that of ammonium sulfate precipitate. In electron microphotographs, hemagglutinin appears to have a vesicle or tubelike structure. The hemagglutinating activity of intact cells was completely destroyed by heating at 100 degrees C for 10 min, but the activity of extracted hemagglutinin was heat stable. The activity of hemagglutinin was inhibited by L-arginine and L-lysine and partially inhibited by phospholipase D, but it was not affected by proteolytic enzymes, neuraminidase, hyaluronidase, lipase, phospholipase A and C, or sugars. The B. gingivalis hemagglutinin appeared to be comprised mainly of a 40,000-molecular-weight material. The Fab fragment of immunoglobulin G prepared from rabbit antiserum to whole cells of B. gingivalis and monoclonal antibody against the hemagglutinin bound to the cell surface and inhibited the hemagglutinating activity of both the cells and the purified hemagglutinin. Images PMID:3781621

  12. Predictors of serum ferritin and haemoglobin during pregnancy, in a malaria-endemic area of western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Alusala, D N; Estambale, B B A; Magnussen, P; Friis, H; Luoba, A I; Mwaniki, D

    2008-06-01

    Between 2000 and 2004, a cross-sectional survey was conducted, as part of a prospective cohort study, among the women attending antenatal-care clinics in Bondo district, a malaria-endemic area of western Kenya. The aim was to assess the prevalence of iron deficiency and determine the predictors of haemoglobin and serum ferritin concentrations in the women who had a gestational age between 14 and 24 weeks. A standardized questionnaire was used to collect and store the relevant bio-data for the study. Haemoglobin and ferritin concentrations were evaluated, sickle-cell status was determined, and malarial parasitaemias were detected and evaluated, using blood samples collected at enrollment. Multiple regression analysis was then used to test for significant predictors of the haemoglobin and serum ferritin concentrations. Although 842 women were enrolled in the prospective cohort study, haemoglobin concentrations were evaluated for only 828 of them, serum ferritin levels for 621, and levels of parasitaemia for 812. The mean haemoglobin concentration recorded was 10.9 g/dl. Although 37.9% of the subjects had mild-moderate anaemia (7.0-10.5 g haemoglobin/dl), only 0.5% were severely anaemic (<7.0 g haemoglobin/dl). The geometric mean serum ferritin concentration recorded was 18.9 microg/litre, and 32.3% of the subjects evaluated had low serum concentrations of ferritin (<12 microg/litre). Among the parasitaemic primigravidae (but not the parasitaemic multigravidae), those found positive for sickle-cell trait had significantly lower haemoglobin concentrations than those found negative in a sickling test (P=0.01). Among the pregnant women of Bondo district, gravidity, malarial infection and sickle cell appear to be key predictors of haemoglobin concentration.

  13. The relationship between helminth infections and low haemoglobin levels in Ethiopian children with blood type A.

    PubMed

    Degarege, A; Yimam, Y; Madhivanan, P; Erko, B

    2017-05-01

    The current study was conducted to evaluate the nature of association of ABO blood type with helminth infection and related reduction in haemoglobin concentration. Stool samples were collected from 403 school-age children attending Tikur Wuha Elementary School from February to April 2011. Helminth infection was examined using formol-ether concentration and thick Kato-Katz (two slides per stool specimen) techniques. Haemoglobin level was determined using a HemoCue machine and ABO blood type was determined using the antisera haemagglutination test. Nutritional status was assessed using height and weight measurements. Out of 403 children examined, 169, 120, 96 and 18 had blood type O, A, B and AB, respectively. The prevalences of helminth infections were 46.9% for hookworm, 24.6% for Schistosoma mansoni, 4.2% for Ascaris lumbricoides, 1.7% for Trichuris trichiura and 58.3% for any helminth species. The relative odds of infection with at least one helminth species was significantly higher among children with blood type A (adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 2.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.28-3.45) or blood type B (AOR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.22-3.56) as compared to children with blood type O. Among children infected with helminths, mean haemoglobin concentration was lower in those with blood type A than those with blood type O (β, -0.36; 95% CI, -0.72 to -0.01). The relative odds of hookworm infection (AOR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.08-2.92) and related reduction in haemogobin levels (β, -0.45; 95% CI, -0.84 to -0.04) was higher among children with blood type A as compared to those with blood type O. Although the difference was not significant, the relative odds of S. mansoni or A. lumbricoides infections and related reduction in haemoglobin levels was also higher in children with blood type A or B as compared to children with blood type O. In conclusion, children with blood type A are associated with an increased risk of helminth, particularly hookworm, infection and related reduction

  14. A rare haemoglobin variant (Hb Phnom Penh) manifesting as a falsely high haemoglobin A1c value on ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Fen; Tai, Yen-Kuang

    2014-08-01

    Most haemoglobin (Hb) variants are clinically silent. However, some Hb variants may interfere with the measurement of haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), resulting in spurious values depending on the assays used. We herein report the case of a 53-year-old Taiwanese man with type 2 diabetes mellitus, who presented with an abnormal HbA1c peak on ion-exchange chromatography. Additional investigations, including intensified self-monitored blood glucose tests, an alternative HbA1c assay, and a glycaemic indicator based on a different method, revealed that the HbA1c values were falsely elevated. Subsequent DNA analysis confirmed that the patient was heterozygous for the insertion of an isoleucine residue at codons 117/118 of the a1-globin gene, Hb Phnom Penh. Clinical laboratorians should be aware of the interfering factors in their HbA1c analysis. Cautious inspection of the chromatogram may provide a valuable clue to the presence of an Hb variant.

  15. Ion trap mass spectrometry in the structural analysis of haemoglobin peptides modified by epichlorohydrin and diepoxybutane.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Nadia; Basile, Adriana; Pieri, Maria; Acampora, Antonio; Malorni, Livia; De Giulio, Beatrice; Sannolo, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Ion trap mass spectrometry has been shown to be particularly suitable for the structural analysis of high molecular weight peptides directly fragmented in the mass analyser without needing further sub-digestion reactions. Here we report the advantages of using multi-stage ion trap mass spectrometry in the structural characterisation of haemoglobin alkylated with epichlorohydrin and diepoxybutane. Alkylated globins were digested with trypsin and the peptide mixtures were analysed by MS(3). This technique allows the sequential fragmentation of peptides under analysis, giving rise to MS(3) product ion spectra with additional information with respect to MS(2) mass spectra. The results obtained complete the previously reported structural characterisation of alkylated haemoglobin, demonstrating the potential of ion trap mass spectrometry.

  16. Diagnosing anaemia in pregnancy in rural clinics: assessing the potential of the Haemoglobin Colour Scale.

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, N. R.; Ntonya, C.; Mhango, E.; White, S. A.

    1999-01-01

    Anaemia in pregnancy is a common and severe problem in many developing countries. Because of lack of resources and staff motivation, screening for anaemia is often solely by clinical examination of the conjunctiva or is not carried out at all. A new colour scale for the estimation of haemoglobin concentration has been developed by WHO. The present study compares the results obtained using the new colour scale on 729 women visiting rural antenatal clinics in Malawi with those obtained by HemoCue haemoglobinometer and electronic Coulter Counter and with the assessment of anaemia by clinical examination of the conjunctiva. Sensitivity using the colour scale was consistently better than for conjunctival inspection alone and interobserver agreement and agreement with Coulter Counter measurements was good. The Haemoglobin Colour Scale is simple to use, well accepted, cheap and gives immediate results. It shows considerable potential for use in screening for anaemia in antenatal clinics in settings where resources are limited. PMID:10063656

  17. Evaluation of an automatic HPLC analyser for thalassemia and haemoglobin variants screening

    PubMed Central

    Barella, S.; Gasperini, D.; Perseu, L.; Paglietti, E.; Sollaino, C.; Paderi, L.; Pirroni, M. G.; Maccioni, L.; Mosca, A.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the authors report the evolution of a new automatic HPLC analyser for screening haemoglobinopathies. HbA2 and F determinations are accurate and reproducible. The analysis time is short (6.5 min) and there is a good separation between the HbA2 values of β-thalassemia carriers from normals and α-thalassemia carriers, with no overlap between these groups. In addition, the system is also able to detect and quantitate most of the haemoglobin variants, particularly those (HbS, HbC, HbE and Hb Lepore) able to interact with β-thalassemia and could make haemoglobin electrophoresis unnecessary in all samples. The ease of operation and the limited technical work make this system especially suitable for laboratories with a high workload and allow the cost of screening to be reduced. PMID:18925016

  18. Sodium, potassium, water, and haemoglobin in the packed red cells of severe thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Choremis, C.; Economou-Mavrou, Cleopatra; Tsenghi, Christina

    1961-01-01

    Sodium, potassium, water, and the mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration were determined in the packed erythrocytes of children with severe thalassaemia. The concentration of sodium in the packed red cells was higher than normal in a significant proportion of children with thalassaemia whereas potassium in the packed cells and sodium and potassium in the plasma were normal. On average, the cell water content was a little higher and the mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration a little lower than normal. The cation concentrations in the packed cells of thalassaemia are compared with those in other anaemias. Similarities are pointed out between the sodium concentrations in the packed cells of thalassaemia and those from the foetus and children suffering from malnutrition. PMID:13879177

  19. A successful anaemia management algorithm that achieves and maintains optimum haemoglobin status.

    PubMed

    Benton, Sharon

    2008-06-01

    The paper describes the need for the introduction of an anaemia management algorithm. It discussed the problems which the unit had in constant reviewing and re-prescribing ESA to maintain optimum haemoglobin levels for the unit's patients. The method used to create and use the algorithm is explained. The findings demonstrate the beneficial effects of using the algorithm. The paper concludes with the recommendation that algorithms should be more widely used for better treatment outcomes.

  20. Free serum haemoglobin is associated with brain atrophy in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background A major cause of disability in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) is progressive brain atrophy, whose pathogenesis is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to identify protein biomarkers of brain atrophy in SPMS. Methods We used surface-enhanced laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry to carry out an unbiased search for serum proteins whose concentration correlated with the rate of brain atrophy, measured by serial MRI scans over a 2-year period in a well-characterized cohort of 140 patients with SPMS. Protein species were identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Results There was a significant (p<0.004) correlation between the rate of brain atrophy and a rise in the concentration of proteins at 15.1 kDa and 15.9 kDa in the serum. Tandem mass spectrometry identified these proteins as alpha-haemoglobin and beta-haemoglobin, respectively.  The abnormal concentration of free serum haemoglobin was confirmed by ELISA (p<0.001). The serum lactate dehydrogenase activity was also highly significantly raised (p<10-12) in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Conclusions An underlying low-grade chronic intravascular haemolysis is a potential source of the iron whose deposition along blood vessels in multiple sclerosis plaques contributes to the neurodegeneration and consequent brain atrophy seen in progressive disease. Chelators of free serum iron will be ineffective in preventing this neurodegeneration, because the iron (Fe2+) is chelated by haemoglobin. PMID:27996064

  1. Free serum haemoglobin is associated with brain atrophy in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Alex; Hamilton, Shea; Witkover, Aviva; Langford, Paul; Nicholas, Richard; Chataway, Jeremy; Bangham, Charles R M

    2016-11-15

    Background A major cause of disability in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) is progressive brain atrophy, whose pathogenesis is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to identify protein biomarkers of brain atrophy in SPMS. Methods We used surface-enhanced laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry to carry out an unbiased search for serum proteins whose concentration correlated with the rate of brain atrophy, measured by serial MRI scans over a 2-year period in a well-characterized cohort of 140 patients with SPMS. Protein species were identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Results There was a significant (p<0.004) correlation between the rate of brain atrophy and a rise in the concentration of proteins at 15.1 kDa and 15.9 kDa in the serum. Tandem mass spectrometry identified these proteins as alpha-haemoglobin and beta-haemoglobin, respectively.  The abnormal concentration of free serum haemoglobin was confirmed by ELISA (p<0.001). The serum lactate dehydrogenase activity was also highly significantly raised (p<10(-12)) in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Conclusions An underlying low-grade chronic intravascular haemolysis is a potential source of the iron whose deposition along blood vessels in multiple sclerosis plaques contributes to the neurodegeneration and consequent brain atrophy seen in progressive disease. Chelators of free serum iron will be ineffective in preventing this neurodegeneration, because the iron (Fe(2+)) is chelated by haemoglobin.

  2. Nutrient Patterns Associated with Fasting Glucose and Glycated Haemoglobin Levels in a Black South African Population

    PubMed Central

    Chikowore, Tinashe; Pisa, Pedro T.; van Zyl, Tertia; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Wentzel-Viljoen, Edelweiss; Conradie, Karin R.

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) burden is increasing globally. However, evidence regarding nutrient patterns associated with the biomarkers of T2D is limited. This study set out to determine the nutrient patterns associated with fasting glucose and glycated haemoglobin the biomarkers of T2D. Factor analysis was used to derive nutrient patterns of 2010 participants stratified by urban/rural status and gender. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to 25 nutrients, computed from the quantified food frequency questionnaires (QFFQ). Three nutrient patterns per stratum, which accounted for 73% of the variation of the selected nutrients, were identified. Multivariate linear regression models adjusted for age, BMI, smoking, physical activity, education attained, alcohol intake, seasonality and total energy intake were computed. Starch, dietary fibre and B vitamins driven nutrient pattern was significantly associated with fasting glucose (β = −0.236 (−0.458; −0.014); p = 0.037) and glycated haemoglobin levels (β = −0.175 (−0.303; −0.047); p = 0.007) in rural women. Thiamine, zinc and plant protein driven nutrient pattern was associated with significant reductions in glycated haemoglobin and fasting glucose ((β = −0.288 (−0.543; −0.033); p = 0.027) and (β = −0.382 (−0.752; −0.012); p = 0.043), respectively) in rural men. Our results indicate that plant driven nutrient patterns are associated with low fasting glucose and glycated haemoglobin levels. PMID:28106816

  3. Growth and change in blood haemoglobin concentration among underweight Malawian infants receiving fortified spreads for 12 weeks: a preliminary trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fortified spreads (FSs) have proven effective in the rehabilitation of severely malnourished children. We examined acceptability, growth and change in blood haemoglobin (Hb) concentration among moderately underweight ambulatory infants given FS. This was a randomised, controlled, parallel-group, inv...

  4. The effects of residual pump blood on patient plasma free haemoglobin levels post cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Schotola, H; Wetz, A J; Popov, A F; Bergmann, I; Danner, B C; Schöndube, F A; Bauer, M; Bräuer, A

    2016-09-01

    At the end of cardiopulmonary bypass, there are invariably several hundred millilitres of residual pump blood in the reservoir, which can either be re-transfused or discarded. The objective of this prospective observational study was to investigate the quality of the residual pump blood, focusing on plasma free haemoglobin (pfHb) and blood cell counts. Fifty-one consecutive patients were included in the study. Forty-nine units of residual pump blood and 58 units of transfused red blood cell (RBC) concentrates were analysed. The mean preoperative pfHb of the patients was 0.057 ± 0.062 g/l, which increased gradually to 0.55 ± 0.36 g/l on arrival in the intensive care unit postoperatively. On the first postoperative day, the mean pfHb had returned to within the normal range. Our data showed that haemoglobin, haematocrit, and erythrocyte counts of residual pump blood were approximately 40% of the values in standardised RBC concentrates. Plasma free haemoglobin was significantly higher in residual pump blood compared to RBC concentrates, and nearly twice as high as the pfHb in patient blood samples taken contemporaneously. Our findings indicate that residual pump blood pfHb levels are markedly higher compared to patients' blood and RBC concentrates, but that its administration does not significantly increase patients' pfHb levels.

  5. Structural basis for ligand and innate immunity factor uptake by the trypanosome haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Serff, Harriet; MacGregor, Paula; Lowe, Edward D; Carrington, Mark; Higgins, Matthew K

    2014-01-01

    The haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) of African trypanosomes allows acquisition of haem and provides an uptake route for trypanolytic factor-1, a mediator of innate immunity against trypanosome infection. In this study, we report the structure of Trypanosoma brucei HpHbR in complex with human haptoglobin-haemoglobin (HpHb), revealing an elongated ligand-binding site that extends along its membrane distal half. This contacts haptoglobin and the β-subunit of haemoglobin, showing how the receptor selectively binds HpHb over individual components. Lateral mobility of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored HpHbR, and a ∼50o kink in the receptor, allows two receptors to simultaneously bind one HpHb dimer. Indeed, trypanosomes take up dimeric HpHb at significantly lower concentrations than monomeric HpHb, due to increased ligand avidity that comes from bivalent binding. The structure therefore reveals the molecular basis for ligand and innate immunity factor uptake by trypanosomes and identifies adaptations that allow efficient ligand uptake in the context of the complex trypanosome cell surface. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05553.001 PMID:25497229

  6. Capillary crystallization and molecular-replacement solution of haemoglobin II from the clam Lucina pectinata

    SciTech Connect

    Gavira, José A.; Jesus, Walleska de; Camara-Artigas, Ana; López-Garriga, Juan; García-Ruiz, Juan M.

    2006-03-01

    The haemoglobin II from the clam L. pectinata has been crystallized using counter-diffusion in single capillary in the presence of agarose to improve crystal quality. Initial phases have been obtained by molecular replacement. Haemoglobin II is one of three haemoglobins present in the cytoplasm of the Lucina pectinata mollusc that inhabits the Caribbean coast. Using HBII purified from its natural source, crystallization screening was performed using the counter-diffusion method with capillaries of 0.2 mm inner diameter. Crystals of HbII suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown in the presence of agarose at 0.1%(w/v) in order to improve their quality. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.92, c = 152.35 Å, and diffracted X-rays to a resolution of better than 2.0 Å. The asymmetric unit is a homodimer with a corresponding Matthews coefficient (V{sub M}) of 3.15 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 61% by volume.

  7. Erythrocyte morphology and haemoglobin types of neonatal roan antelopes (Hippotragus equinus) with hypochromic poikilocytic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Parsons, S D C; Penzhorn, B L; Reyers, F; Steyl, J C A; Becker, P J

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal, poikilocytic anaemia in some members of the Hippotragini has previously been documented but not fully investigated. This study was undertaken to describe the erythrocyte morphology of roan antelopes (Hippotragus equinus) during the first 4 weeks after birth and to identify aspects of haemoglobin (Hb) production that might be implicated in this syndrome. Twenty-nine roan antelope calves were sampled on, or close to, 1, 7, 14 and 28 days after birth. Erythrocyte morphology was characterized, and microhaematocrit values and Hb parameters determined, for each sampling occasion. Findings indicated a significant change in erythrocyte morphology during the neonatal period and two haemoglobin types, fetal and adult, were identified. The perinatal onset of adult Hb synthesis was delayed relative to the termination of fetal Hb production, resulting in the observed anaemia. Haemoglobin concentration and erythrocyte morphology were significantly correlated. These findings suggest an intimate relationship between Hb synthesis and the observed poikilocytosis. An imbalance in the synthesis of the alpha- and beta-globin chains of Hb (a thalassaemia) may prove to be the underlying pathophysiology of this syndrome.

  8. Structural basis for ligand and innate immunity factor uptake by the trypanosome haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor.

    PubMed

    Lane-Serff, Harriet; MacGregor, Paula; Lowe, Edward D; Carrington, Mark; Higgins, Matthew K

    2014-12-12

    The haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) of African trypanosomes allows acquisition of haem and provides an uptake route for trypanolytic factor-1, a mediator of innate immunity against trypanosome infection. In this study, we report the structure of Trypanosoma brucei HpHbR in complex with human haptoglobin-haemoglobin (HpHb), revealing an elongated ligand-binding site that extends along its membrane distal half. This contacts haptoglobin and the β-subunit of haemoglobin, showing how the receptor selectively binds HpHb over individual components. Lateral mobility of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored HpHbR, and a ∼50° kink in the receptor, allows two receptors to simultaneously bind one HpHb dimer. Indeed, trypanosomes take up dimeric HpHb at significantly lower concentrations than monomeric HpHb, due to increased ligand avidity that comes from bivalent binding. The structure therefore reveals the molecular basis for ligand and innate immunity factor uptake by trypanosomes and identifies adaptations that allow efficient ligand uptake in the context of the complex trypanosome cell surface.

  9. Influence of haemoglobin concentration and peripheral muscle pO2 on tumour oxygenation in advanced head and neck tumours.

    PubMed

    Clavo, Bernardino; Pérez, Juan L; López, Laura; Suárez, Gerardo; Lloret, Marta; Morera, Jesús; Macías, David; Martínez, José C; Santana, Maite; Hernández, María A; Robaina, Francisco; Günderoth, Martina

    2003-01-01

    Haemoglobin concentrations and tumour-pO(2) were evaluated pre-therapy in 30 patients with head and neck cancers. Anterior tibialis muscle-pO(2) was additionally measured in 16 of these patients. Tumour-pO(2) was lower in the most anaemic patients (P=0.032) and correlated with muscle-pO(2) (r=0.809, P<0.001). These results suggest that haemoglobin concentration influences tumour-oxygenation.

  10. Simultaneous imaging of haemoglobin oxygenation and blood flow with RGB reflectometry and LASCA during stroke in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimers, A.; Gramer, M.; Takagaki, M.; Graf, R.; Kohl-Bareis, M.

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous mapping of haemoglobin oxygenation and blood flow changes of human skin and the exposed cortex in rats by broad-band reflectometry and laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA). A hard- and software set-up is realized with a high temporal resolution achieved by techniques of multi- and manycore computing. Spatial and temporal resolved changes of haemoglobin oxygenation and blood flow in rats are observed in response to middle cerebral artery occlusion and cortical spreading depression.

  11. Evaluation of haemoglobin (erythrogen): for improved somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv. SVPR 2).

    PubMed

    Ganesan, M; Jayabalan, N

    2004-10-01

    Somatic embryogenesis in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is accelerated when the plant regeneration medium is supplemented with haemoglobin (erythrogen). In cotton SVPR 2 lines, a higher frequency of embryoid formation was observed when the medium contained 400 mg/l haemoglobin. Fresh weight of the callus, rate of embryoid induction, number of embryoids formed and the percentage of plant regeneration from somatic embryos were increased. Among the two different cultivars tested, MCU 11 showed no response to the presence of haemoglobin when compared to SVPR 2, and embryogenic callus formation was completely absent in the former. Medium containing MS salts, 100 mg/l myo-inositol , 0.3 mg/l thiamine-HCL, 0.3 mg/l Picloram (PIC), 0.1 mg/l kinetin and 400 mg/l haemoglobin effected a better response with respect to embryogenic callus induction. After 8 weeks of culture, a high frequency of embryoid induction was observed on medium containing MS basal salts, 100 mg/l myo-inositol, 0.3 mg/l PIC , 0.1 mg/l isopentenyl adenine, 1.0 g/l NH4NO3 and 400 mg/l haemoglobin. Plant regeneration was observed in 75.8% of the mature somatic embryos, and whole plant regeneration was achieved within 6-7 months of culture. The regenerated plantlets were fertile and similar to in vivo-grown, seed-derived plants except that they were phenotypically smaller. A positive influence of haemoglobin was observed at concentrations up to 400 mg/l at all stages of somatic embryogenesis. The increase in the levels of antioxidant enzyme activities, for example superoxide dismutase and peroxidase, indicated the presence of excess oxygen uptake and the stressed condition of the plant tissues that arose from haemoglobin supplementation. This increased oxygen uptake and haemoglobin-mediated stress appeared to accelerate somatic embryogenesis in cotton.

  12. Continuous monitoring of haemoglobin concentration after in-vivo adjustment in patients undergoing surgery with blood loss.

    PubMed

    Frasca, D; Mounios, H; Giraud, B; Boisson, M; Debaene, B; Mimoz, O

    2015-07-01

    Non-invasive monitoring of haemoglobin concentration provides real-time measurement of haemoglobin concentration (SpHb) using multi-wavelength pulse co-oximetry. We hypothesised that in-vivo adjustment using the mean of three haemoglobinometer (HemoCue®) measurements from an arterial blood sample at the first SpHb measurement (HCueART) would increase the accuracy of the monitor. The study included 41 adults for a total of 173 measurements of haemoglobin concentration. In-vivo adjusted SpHb was automatically calculated by the following formula: in-vivo adjusted SpHb = unadjusted SpHb - (SpHb - HCueART). The accuracy of in-vivo adjusted SpHb was compared with SpHb retrospectively adjusted using the same formula, except for haemoglobin level which was assessed at the central laboratory and then compared with all other available invasive methods of haemoglobin measurement (co-oximetry, HbSAT; arterial HemoCue, HCueART; capillary HemoCue, HCueCAP). Compared with laboratory measurement of haemoglobin concentration, bias (precision) for unadjusted SpHb, in-vivo adjusted SpHb, retrospectively adjusted SpHb, HbSAT, HCueART and HCueCAP were -0.4 (1.4), -0.3 (1.1), -0.3 (1.1), -0.6 (0.7), 0.0 (0.4) and -0.5 (1.2) g.dl(-1) , respectively. In-vivo adjustment of SpHb values using the mean of three arterial HemoCue measurements improved the accuracy of the device similar to those observed after a retrospective adjustment using central laboratory haemoglobin level.

  13. Using longitudinal data from the Health Survey for England to resolve discrepancies in thresholds for haemoglobin in older adults.

    PubMed

    Mindell, Jennifer; Moody, Alison; Ali, Ayesha; Hirani, Vasant

    2013-02-01

    Anaemia increases with age and is common among older people. Due to its relationship with morbidity and mortality, accurate diagnosis is important. Thresholds defining the diagnosis of anaemia have been the subject of considerable scientific debate, with both higher and lower cut-offs proposed. High haemoglobin is also a health risk in some but not all studies. Using nationally representative data of 5,329 adults aged 65 + years (Health Survey for England 1998, 2005, 2006), linked to administrative mortality data, this paper describes the relationship between haemoglobin levels and mortality, adjusted for age and other confounders. Among men, a reverse J shaped relationship was observed: relative to the modal group (140-149 g/l), those with 'mild anaemia' of 120-129 g/l haemoglobin had a 56% (95% confidence interval 24-96%) greater mortality hazard, and those with 'severe anaemia', haemoglobin <120 g/l, had an 87% (39-153%) greater hazard. At the other end of the range, those with haemoglobin ≥160 g/l had 32% (2-70%) greater mortality hazard. Haemoglobin levels in women showed a similar but smaller, non-significant pattern: hazard ratio 1·32 (0·91-1·92) for severe anaemia (<110 g/l), and 1·30 (0·95-1·79) for high haemoglobin (≥150 g/l). This research supports the use of the World Health Organization thresholds (130 g/l for men, 120 g/l for women).

  14. Crystallization and diffraction patterns of the oxy and cyano forms of the Lucina pectinata haemoglobins complex

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Martínez, Carlos R.; Nieves-Marrero, Carlos A.; Estremera-Andújar, Rafael A.; Gavira, José A.; González-Ramírez, Luis A.; López-Garriga, Juan; García-Ruiz, Juan M.

    2009-01-01

    The native oxygen-carrier haemoglobins complex (HbII–III) is composed of haemoglobin II (HbII) and haemoglobin III (HbIII), which are found in the ctenidia tissue of the bivalve mollusc Lucina pectinata. This protein complex was isolated and purified from its natural source and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion and capillary counter-diffusion methods. Oxy and cyano derivatives of the complex crystallized using several conditions, but the best crystals in terms of quality and size were obtained from sodium formate pH 5 using the counter-diffusion method in a single capillary. Crystals of the oxy and cyano complexes, which showed a ruby-red colour and nonsingular prismatic shapes, scattered X-­rays to resolution limits of 2.15 and 2.20 Å, respectively, using a 0.886 Å synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal system, space group P42212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 74.07, c = 152.07 and a = b = 73.83, c = 152.49 Å for the oxy and cyano complexes, respectively. The asymmetric unit of both crystals is composed of a single copy of the heterodimer, with Matthew coefficients (V M) of 3.08 and 3.06 Å3 Da−1 for the oxy and cyano complexes, respectively, which correspond to a solvent content of approximately 60.0% by volume. PMID:19153450

  15. Temperature dependence of haemoglobin-oxygen affinity in heterothermic vertebrates: mechanisms and biological significance.

    PubMed

    Weber, R E; Campbell, K L

    2011-07-01

    As demonstrated by August Krogh et al. a century ago, the oxygen-binding reaction of vertebrate haemoglobin is cooperative (described by sigmoid O(2) equilibrium curves) and modulated by CO(2) and protons (lowered pH) that - in conjunction with later discovered allosteric effectors (chloride, lactate and organic phosphate anions) - enhance O(2) unloading from blood in relatively acidic and oxygen-poor tissues. Based on the exothermic nature of the oxygenation of the haem groups, haemoglobin-O(2) affinity also decreases with rising temperature. This thermal sensitivity favours oxygen unloading in warm working muscles, but may become detrimental in regionally heterothermic animals, for example in cold-tolerant birds and mammals and warm-bodied fish, where it may perturb the balance between O(2) unloading and O(2) requirement in organs with substantially different temperatures than at the respiratory organs and thus commonly is reduced or obliterated. Given that the oxygenation of haemoglobin is linked with the endothermic release of allosteric effectors, increased effector interaction is an effective strategy that is widely exploited to achieve adaptive reductions in the temperature dependence of blood-O(2) affinity. The molecular mechanisms implicated in heterothermic vertebrates from different taxonomic groups reveal remarkable variability, both as regards the effectors implicated (protons in tunas, organic phosphates in sharks and billfish, chloride ions in ruminants and chloride and phosphate anions in the extinct woolly mammoth, etc.) and binding sites for the same effectors, indicating multiple evolutionary origins, but convergent physiological functionality (reductions in temperature dependence of O(2) -binding affinity that safeguard tissue O(2) supply).

  16. Changes in cerebral oxygen saturation and haemoglobin concentration during paediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Suemori, T; Horton, S B; Bottrell, S; Skowno, J J; Davidson, A

    2017-03-01

    Although near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) enables bedside assessment of cerebral oxygenation, it provides little information on the cause of deoxygenation. The authors aimed to investigate the changes in cerebral oxygenation and haemoglobin concentration and their associations during paediatric cardiac surgery in order to elucidate the physiology underlying cerebral deoxygenation. An observational retrospective study on 399 patients who underwent paediatric cardiac surgery was conducted. With use of NIRS, cerebral oxygen saturation as expressed by tissue oxygen index (TOI) before and after surgery, concentration changes in oxygenated haemoglobin (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxygenated haemoglobin (Δ[HHb]) after surgery were studied as were the associations between these values and clinical variables. TOI decreased after surgery (preoperative versus postoperative value, 66.0% [56.9, 71.3] versus 63.2% [54.3, 69.4], median [25th, 75th percentile], P <0.001) and the decrease was greater in higher category groups in the Risk Adjusted Classification for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1). [HHb] increased from its baseline (+1.74 μmol/l [-1.57, +5.84], P <0.001) and the increase was greater in higher risk category groups. On the contrary, there was no evidence for a change in [HbO2] (+0.45 μmol/l [-4.76, +5.30], P=0.42). Cerebral oxygen saturation decreased after paediatric cardiac surgery and the decrease was greater in patients of higher risk groups. The increase in [HHb] was considered to play a predominant role in the cerebral deoxygenation noted, in particular in higher RACHS-1 category groups.

  17. Inactivation of key factors of the plasma proteinase cascade systems by Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, T; Carlsson, J; Sundqvist, G

    1985-01-01

    The effect of Bacteroides gingivalis W83 on various key components of the human plasma proteinase cascade systems was studied. When purified C1-inhibitor was incubated with the bacterium, the inhibitor was rapidly inactivated by limited proteolytic cleavage. In citrated whole plasma, C1-inhibitor, antithrombin, plasminogen, prekallikrein, prothrombinase complex, the clotting factor X, and most of the alpha 2-antiplasmin were functionally eliminated after 30 min of incubation with the bacterium. Fibrinogen disappeared from the plasma almost immediately upon mixing with the bacterial suspension. In contrast, there was no appreciable decrease in the bulk of other plasma proteins, such as various transport proteins (albumin, prealbumin, transferrin) and immunoglobulins, during 4 h of incubation with the bacterium. Most of the observed effects can be assigned to the proteolytic activity of the bacterium itself, since there was little evidence for generation of intrinsic plasma proteinase activity, despite the loss of proteinase inhibitory activities. B. gingivalis W83 thus seems to be equipped with proteolytic enzyme systems which selectively recognize and rapidly inactivate the most important proteinase inhibitors and proenzymes present in human plasma. This bacterium therefore seems to be able to efficiently paralyze the host's various defenses against invading microorganisms. Images PMID:3902645

  18. Growth inhibitory effects of endotoxins from Bacteroides gingivalis and intermedius on human gingival fibroblasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Layman, D.L.; Diedrich, D.L.

    1987-06-01

    Purified endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide from Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius caused a similar dose-dependent inhibition of growth of cultured human gingival fibroblasts as determined by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation and direct cell count. Approximately 200 micrograms/ml endotoxin caused a 50% reduction in /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake of logarithmically growing cells. Inhibition of growth was similar in cultures of fibroblasts derived from either healthy or diseased human gingiva. When examining the change in cell number with time of exposure in culture, the rate of proliferation was significantly suppressed during the logarithmic phase of growth. However, the cells recovered so that the rate of proliferation, although reduced, was sufficient to produce a cell density similar to the control cells with prolonged culture. The endotoxins were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The profiles of the Bacteroides endotoxins were different. B. gingivalis endotoxin showed a wide range of distinct bands indicating a heterogeneous distribution of molecular species. Endotoxin from B. intermedius exhibited a few discrete low molecular weight bands, but the majority of the lipopolysaccharides electrophoresed as a diffuse band of high molecular weight material. The apparent heterogeneity of the two Bacteroides endotoxins and the similarity in growth inhibitory capacity suggest that growth inhibitory effects of these substances cannot be attributed to any polysaccharide species of endotoxin.

  19. A comparative study of glycosylated haemoglobin level in the Arabian camel (Camelus dromedarius) during different seasons.

    PubMed

    al-Ali, A K; Rehaimi, A; Saba, R; Power, D M

    1990-01-01

    1. The extent of haemoglobin glycosylation from 60 camels has been determined (4.39%) in blood samples drawn during winter. 2. Phosphate (9.45 mg/dl), DPG (2.9 mumol/ml) and glucose (138 mg/dl) levels were also recorded. 3. In addition the P50 at pH 7.4 was measured (22.8 Torrs). 4. The data obtained compared with human blood levels and with levels reported for camels during summer sampling. 5. Despite the fact that camels have higher blood glucose levels than humans, the extent of glycosylation is much less in camel blood than in human blood.

  20. Core structures of haemosiderins deposited in various organs in β-thalassaemia/haemoglobin e disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Pierre, T. G.; Tran, K. C.; Webb, J.; Macey, D. J.; Pootrakul, P.; Dickson, D. P. E.

    1992-04-01

    Mössbauer spectra were recorded of tissue from β-thalassaemia/haemoglobin E spleen, liver, pancreas and heart and of crude haemosiderins (insoluble iron fractions) isolated from the organs. Iron in the crude haemosiderins from the spleen and heart remains paramagnetic below 4.2K indicating that the iron is in a non-crystalline form. Superparamagnetic behaviour of the crude haemosiderins from the pancreas and liver indicate the presence of ferrihydrite cores with some cores with a structure based on defect-goethite.

  1. Purification and properties of a 75-kilodalton major protein, an immunodominant surface antigen, from the oral anaerobe Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, F; Watanabe, K; Takasawa, T; Kawanami, M; Kato, H

    1989-01-01

    A 75-kilodalton major protein (75K protein) was purified to homogeneity from the cell lysate fraction and the envelope of Bacteroides gingivalis 381. The 75K protein was originally present in the outer membrane or the outermost part of this organism as a large, stable complex with an apparent molecular weight of about 2,000,000. Heating at 80 degrees C and at higher temperatures in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate was needed to completely dissociate it to monomers. Amino acid analysis revealed that the 75K protein had about 50% nonpolar amino acids. Various strains of B. gingivalis but not other bacteria, including oral Bacteroides species tested, contained serologically related 75K proteins when tested in Western blotting (immunoblotting) analysis. The abundance and localization of the 75K protein in this organism suggest that it has the potential to participate in the host-parasite interaction in infection. The 75K protein was, indeed, strongly recognized in patients with adult periodontal diseases. Immunoblotting with sera from patients and with rabbit antisera generated by intravenous inoculations of whole B. gingivalis cells revealed that the 75K protein was an immunodominant antigen on the surface of B. gingivalis. Images PMID:2553610

  2. The Effect of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy on Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba Gingivalis in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi Maybodi, Fahimeh; Haerian Ardakani, Ahmad; Fattahi Bafghi, Ali; Haerian Ardakani, Alireza; Zafarbakhsh, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Trichomonas tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis are commensal protozoa which inhabit the human oral cavity. These parasites are found in patients with poor oral hygiene and might be a reason for progressive periodontal diseases. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on the frequency of these protozoa in saliva and plaque samples. Materials and Method In this clinical trial, samples of saliva and dental plaque were collected from 46 patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis before and after periodontal therapy. The samples were assessed for the frequency of parasites. Results The frequency of Entamoeba gingivalis was reduced in saliva (p= 0.007) and plaque (p= 0.027) three weeks after the treatment. Likewise, the frequency of Trichomonas tenax reduced in saliva (p= 0.030); however, the decrease was not significant in plaque (p= 0.913). Trichomonas tenax frequency in dental plaque directly related to the severity of periodontitis (r= 0.565, p≤ 0.000). In contrast, the number of Entamoeba gingivalis in both saliva (r= -0.405, p≤ 0.005) and plaque (r= -0.304, p= 0.040) was inversely related with the severity of the periodontal disease. Conclusion Nonsurgical periodontal treatment could reduce the number of Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis in the oral environment of patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:27602391

  3. The mode of insertion of umbilical cord and vessels: association with maternal haemoglobin genotype, neonatal factors, and placental component volumes.

    PubMed

    Addai, F K; Quashie, F J; Ockleford, C D

    1994-02-01

    We investigated whether variations in mode of attachment of umbilical cords and vessels coincided with differences in maternal haemoglobin genotype and neonatal factors or placental micro-volumetric composition. The incidence of placentae with marginally inserted cords, or those in which umbilical vessels separated prior to insertion, was not statistically different in samples from sickle cell patients having haemoglobin-SS and haemoglobin-SC genotypes, as compared with haemoglobin-AA controls. Results obtained from analysis of variance (ANOVA) suggest that the mode of insertion (status) of umbilical vessels may have clinical significance, because it produced differences in the main effects associated with neonatal gestational age, placental weight, and placental index. Point counting stereology was employed to estimate the microscopic compartment volumes of placentae prior to an assessment of statistical association between the data obtained and the status of umbilical vessels and maternal haemoglobin genotype. Furcate placentae (with separated umbilical vessels) had statistically greater than normal volumes of villi, villous trophoblast, and syncytial knots. We deduce that furcate placentae are prone to early delivery, because they are heavier, having more voluminous villi with more trophoblast and syncytial knots than controls.

  4. Ascorbate removes key precursors to oxidative damage by cell-free haemoglobin in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Jacqueline; Caron, Alexis; Menu, Patrick; Alayash, Abdu I; Buehler, Paul W; Wilson, Michael T; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu; Faivre, Beatrice; Cooper, Chris E

    2006-11-01

    Haemoglobin initiates free radical chemistry. In particular, the interactions of peroxides with the ferric (met) species of haemoglobin generate two strong oxidants: ferryl iron and a protein-bound free radical. We have studied the endogenous defences to this reactive chemistry in a rabbit model following 20% exchange transfusion with cell-free haemoglobin stabilized in tetrameric form [via cross-linking with bis-(3,5-dibromosalicyl)fumarate]. The transfusate contained 95% oxyhaemoglobin, 5% methaemoglobin and 25 microM free iron. EPR spectroscopy revealed that the free iron in the transfusate was rendered redox inactive by rapid binding to transferrin. Methaemoglobin was reduced to oxyhaemoglobin by a slower process (t(1/2) = 1 h). No globin-bound free radicals were detected in the plasma. These redox defences could be fully attributed to a novel multifunctional role of plasma ascorbate in removing key precursors of oxidative damage. Ascorbate is able to effectively reduce plasma methaemoglobin, ferryl haemoglobin and globin radicals. The ascorbyl free radicals formed are efficiently re-reduced by the erythrocyte membrane-bound reductase (which itself uses intra-erythrocyte ascorbate as an electron donor). As well as relating to the toxicity of haemoglobin-based oxygen carriers, these findings have implications for situations where haem proteins exist outside the protective cell environment, e.g. haemolytic anaemias, subarachnoid haemorrhage, rhabdomyolysis.

  5. [Evaluation of HbA1c using different methods in haemoglobin variant, Hb J-Bangkok].

    PubMed

    Sawaragi, Wakana; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Suzuki, Haruki; Shimizu, Chikara; Matsuno, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-01

    A 31-year-old Japanese man with haemoglobin variant, Hb J-Bangkok [beta56 (D7) Gly-->Asp], was found by discrepant values between HbA1c and glycated-albumin. We measured HbA1c using three different methods, HPLC, enzyme assay and turbidimetric immunoassay. HbA1c value measured by HPLC was much lower than those by others. Furthermore, we estimated calculated glyco-haemoglobin value measured by high-resolution HPLC, revealing that HbA1c values measured by enzyme assay and turbidimetric immunoassay were comparable with calculated value. When measuring HbA1c value in haemoglobin variant, Hb J Bangkok, enzyme assay and turbidimetric immunoassay are useful methods.

  6. Purification, crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and molecular-replacement studies of great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesan, G; Malathy, P; Gunasekaran, K; Harikrishna Etti, S; Aravindhan, S

    2014-11-01

    Haemoglobin is the iron-containing oxygen-transport metalloprotein that is present in the red blood cells of all vertebrates. In recent decades, there has been substantial interest in attempting to understand the structural basis and functional diversity of avian haemoglobins. Towards this end, purification, crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and molecular-replacement studies have been carried out on cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) haemoglobin. Crystals were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350, NaCl and glycerol as precipitants. The crystals belonged to the trigonal system P3₁21, with unit-cell parameters a=b=55.64, c=153.38 Å, β=120.00°; a complete data set was collected to a resolution of 3.5 Å. Matthews coefficient analysis indicated that the crystals contained a half-tetramer in the asymmetric unit.

  7. Adaptive phylogeography: functional divergence between haemoglobins derived from different glacial refugia in the bank vole

    PubMed Central

    Kotlík, Petr; Marková, Silvia; Vojtek, Libor; Stratil, Antonín; Šlechta, Vlastimil; Hyršl, Pavel; Searle, Jeremy B.

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, researchers have used presumptively neutral molecular variation to infer the origins of current species' distributions in northern latitudes (especially Europe). However, several reported examples of genic and chromosomal replacements suggest that end-glacial colonizations of particular northern areas may have involved genetic input from different source populations at different times, coupled with competition and selection. We investigate the functional consequences of differences between two bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) haemoglobins deriving from different glacial refugia, one of which partially replaced the other in Britain during end-glacial climate warming. This allows us to examine their adaptive divergence and hence a possible role of selection in the replacement. We determine the amino acid substitution Ser52Cys in the major expressed β-globin gene as the allelic difference. We use structural modelling to reveal that the protein environment renders the 52Cys thiol a highly reactive functional group and we show its reactivity in vitro. We demonstrate that possessing the reactive thiol in haemoglobin increases the resistance of bank vole erythrocytes to oxidative stress. Our study thus provides striking evidence for physiological differences between products of genic variants that spread at the expense of one another during colonization of an area from different glacial refugia. PMID:24827438

  8. Computational analyses of CO-rebreathing methods for estimating haemoglobin mass in humans.

    PubMed

    Chada, Kinnera E; Bruce, Eugene N

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of haemoglobin mass (M(Hb)) is used to quantify alterations in oxygen delivery during exercise training or acclimatization to altitude. Uptake of carbon monoxide by haemoglobin is the basis of the common non-radioactive methods to determine M(Hb) in humans. This study used a validated mathematical model to simulate CO uptake during rebreathing protocols and to determine sources of errors in estimation of M(Hb). Our previously published model was validated using experimentally measured carboxyhaemoglobin levels (%HbCO) from arterial, capillary and venous blood sites of human subjects during CO-rebreathing protocols. This model was then used to simulate various CO-rebreathing protocols in 24 human subjects with known M(Hb). Using variables generated by the model, M(Hb) was estimated on the basis of assumptions typically made for calculating the volume of CO bound to myoglobin, the volume of CO exhaled and the volume of CO in the rebreathing system. It was found that inaccurate estimation of the volume of CO bound to myoglobin was the major source of error in determination of M(Hb). Additionally, the size of the error was found to depend on the site of blood sampling because of differences in %HbCO. Regression equations were developed to improve the estimation of volume of CO bound to myoglobin, and a new protocol that is less dependent on the site of blood sampling is proposed.

  9. IthaGenes: An Interactive Database for Haemoglobin Variations and Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Kountouris, Petros; Lederer, Carsten W.; Fanis, Pavlos; Feleki, Xenia; Old, John; Kleanthous, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Inherited haemoglobinopathies are the most common monogenic diseases, with millions of carriers and patients worldwide. At present, we know several hundred disease-causing mutations on the globin gene clusters, in addition to numerous clinically important trans-acting disease modifiers encoded elsewhere and a multitude of polymorphisms with relevance for advanced diagnostic approaches. Moreover, new disease-linked variations are discovered every year that are not included in traditional and often functionally limited locus-specific databases. This paper presents IthaGenes, a new interactive database of haemoglobin variations, which stores information about genes and variations affecting haemoglobin disorders. In addition, IthaGenes organises phenotype, relevant publications and external links, while embedding the NCBI Sequence Viewer for graphical representation of each variation. Finally, IthaGenes is integrated with the companion tool IthaMaps for the display of corresponding epidemiological data on distribution maps. IthaGenes is incorporated in the ITHANET community portal and is free and publicly available at http://www.ithanet.eu/db/ithagenes. PMID:25058394

  10. Effects of haemoglobin levels on the sublingual microcirculation in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Sharawy, Nivin; Hussein, Ahmed; Hossny, Osama; Refaa, Amera; Saka, Ahmed; Mukhtar, Ahmed; Whynot, Sara; George, Ron; Lehmann, Christian

    2016-11-25

    Anemia in pregnant women is associated with increased maternal and perinatal mortality and represents an important economic burden in many developing countries. Our goal was to evaluate the impact of anemia on the capillary network during pregnancy. Therefore, we compared microcirculatory parameters of anemic pregnant study participants to that of non-anemic pregnant women employing sublingual microcirculation video imaging technology and novel automated video analysis software.Non-anemic (n = 7) and anemic (n = 44) pregnant women were enrolled in the study at second and third trimesters. Video imaging was applied to the sublingual mucosal surface in five visual fields. The resultant videos were analyzed automatically, avoiding observer bias. Total vessel density (TVD), perfused vessel density (PVD) and proportion of perfused vessels (PPV) were calculated by the software. Both, mean TVD and PVD were significantly increased in the anemic pregnant group, while the PPV was not significantly different. Significant negative correlations were observed between haemoglobin (Hb) levels and both, TVD and PVD. Haemoglobin level seems to play an important determinant role in restructuring the capillary network. An effect that could compensate the impaired tissue oxygen delivery associated with anemia during pregnancy.

  11. Haemoglobin degradation underpins the sensitivity of early ring stage Plasmodium falciparum to artemisinins

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Stanley C.; Dogovski, Con; Hanssen, Eric; Chiu, Francis; Yang, Tuo; Crespo, Maria P.; Stafford, Che; Batinovic, Steven; Teguh, Silvia; Charman, Susan; Klonis, Nectarios; Tilley, Leann

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Current first-line artemisinin antimalarials are threatened by the emergence of resistant Plasmodium falciparum. Decreased sensitivity is evident in the initial (early ring) stage of intraerythrocytic development, meaning that it is crucial to understand the action of artemisinins at this stage. Here, we examined the roles of iron (Fe) ions and haem in artemisinin activation in early rings using Fe ion chelators and a specific haemoglobinase inhibitor (E64d). Quantitative modelling of the antagonism accounted for its complex dependence on the chemical features of the artemisinins and on the drug exposure time, and showed that almost all artemisinin activity in early rings (>80%) is due to haem-mediated activation. The surprising implication that haemoglobin uptake and digestion is active in early rings is supported by identification of active haemoglobinases (falcipains) at this stage. Genetic down-modulation of the expression of the two main cysteine protease haemoglobinases, falcipains 2 and 3, renders early ring stage parasites resistant to artemisinins. This confirms the important role of haemoglobin-degrading falcipains in artemisinin activation, and shows that changes in the rate of artemisinin activation could mediate high-level artemisinin resistance. PMID:26675237

  12. Brain venular pattern by 7T MRI correlates with memory and haemoglobin in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Novelli, Enrico M; Elizabeth Sarles, C; Jay Aizenstein, Howard; Ibrahim, Tamer S; Butters, Meryl A; Connelly Ritter, Anne; Erickson, Kirk I; Rosano, Caterina

    2015-07-30

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a hereditary hemoglobinopathy characterised by extensive vascular dysfunction that stems from inflammation, thrombosis and occlusion of post-capillary venules. Cognitive impairment is a neurological complication of SCA whose pathogenesis is unknown. We hypothesised that cerebral venular abnormalities are linked to cognitive impairment in SCA. Thus, we employed 7T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine the association between venular density and cognitive function in homozygous SCA. We quantified the density of total, long, and short venules in pre-defined regions of interest between the frontal and occipital cornu on each hemisphere. Cognitive function was assessed using the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test - Revised (HVLT-R) test of learning and memory. Patients (n=11) were compared with race, age and gender-equated controls (n=7). Compared to controls, patients had an overall venular rarefaction, with significantly lower density of long venules and greater density of short venules which was inversely related to HVLT-R performance and haemoglobin. To our knowledge, this is the first 7T MRI study in SCA and first report of associations between cerebral venular patterns and cognitive performance and haemoglobin. Future studies should examine whether these novel neuroimaging markers predict cognitive impairment longitudinally and are mechanistically linked to severity of anaemia.

  13. Haemoglobin polymorphism in Gadus morhua: Genotypic differences in maturing age and within-season gonad maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mork, J.; Giskeödegård, R.; Sundnes, G.

    1983-09-01

    276 specimens of Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua L.) were caught during spawning in a restricted area of the Trondheimsfjord, Norway, in April and May 1979. Genotypes at the polymorphic haemoglobin locus Hbl differed significantly with respect to mean age at maturation (in males) and mean gonadic development stage (in females). There was no indication of population mixing in the genotypic composition at Hbl or at any of the 4 polymorphic tissue enzyme loci investigated ( LDH-3, IDH-1, PGM, and PGI-1. The findings obtained were considered with regard to temperature-related differences in the functional properties of Hbl molecules, and genotypic differences in growth, age at maturation, and fishing mortality. At the present stage of investigation, the natural selection pattern seems directional and strong. However, the Hbl allele frequencies observed in cod from the examined areas reveal no detectable changes over a period of two decades (˜ 4 generations). The current pattern of commercial exploitation causes, through size selection, a modification of the rate of erosion of the inferior allele, but additional factors must be in force, which play a role in its current abundance in an evolutionary perspective. The observed Hbl genotypic differences in the exact within-season time for spawning might be one such factor. A potential sexual difference in genotypic fitness might be another, but this has yet to be confirmed. The apparent existence of considerable natural and artificial selection forces acting upon cod haemoglobin genotypes makes Hbl allele frequencies unreliable for use in population structure analyses.

  14. The influence of haemoglobin and iron on in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Rachel; O’Shea, Matthew K.; White, Andrew D.; Müller, Julius; Harrington-Kandt, Rachel; Matsumiya, Magali; Dennis, Mike J.; Parizotto, Eneida A.; Harris, Stephanie; Stylianou, Elena; Naranbhai, Vivek; Bettencourt, Paulo; Drakesmith, Hal; Sharpe, Sally; Fletcher, Helen A.; McShane, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The current vaccine against tuberculosis, live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG, has variable efficacy, but development of an effective alternative is severely hampered by the lack of an immune correlate of protection. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in functional in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays (MGIAs), which provide a measure of a range of different immune mechanisms and their interactions. We identified a positive correlation between mean corpuscular haemoglobin and in vitro growth of BCG in whole blood from healthy UK human volunteers. Mycobacterial growth in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both humans and macaques was increased following the experimental addition of haemoglobin (Hb) or ferric iron, and reduced following addition of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO). Expression of Hb genes correlated positively with mycobacterial growth in whole blood from UK/Asian adults and, to a lesser extent, in PBMC from South African infants. Taken together our data indicate an association between Hb/iron levels and BCG growth in vitro, which may in part explain differences in findings between whole blood and PBMC MGIAs and should be considered when using such assays. PMID:28256545

  15. What is the evidence for gender differences in ferritin and haemoglobin?

    PubMed

    Rushton, D Hugh; Barth, Julian H

    2010-01-01

    Reference ranges for haemoglobin and ferritin in women of reproductive age are widely reported showing values that are lower than equivalent aged males. Similar values would be expected in the absence of different biological requirements. While reference ranges have been derived from data on large populations, it is likely that these populations have included significant numbers of women who are iron deficient in view of menstrual blood loss and poor dietary intake. Populations with a daily iron intake in excess of 100mg have shown that iron deficiency in females is rare. Studies reporting bone marrow with iron stains from 50 years ago pointed out that significant numbers of women were iron deficient and more recently serum ferritin studies have confirmed this. However, a large number of women in the Western world spend a significant part of their lives in a negative iron balance due to a combination of poor diet and menstrual blood loss. The presence of haem iron in the diet of humans enhances non-haem iron absorption but dietary surveys consistently report that women's diet is deficient in iron. Furthermore, the typical Western diet contains many common foods that limit iron absorption. It appears that lower haemoglobin and ferritin values in menstruating women have been accepted as normal rather than possibly representing widespread iron deficiency. Reference ranges should be re-evaluated in populations proven to be iron replete.

  16. The distribution of haemoglobin C and its prevalence in newborns in Africa.

    PubMed

    Piel, Frédéric B; Howes, Rosalind E; Patil, Anand P; Nyangiri, Oscar A; Gething, Peter W; Bhatt, Samir; Williams, Thomas N; Weatherall, David J; Hay, Simon I

    2013-01-01

    Haemoglobin C (HbC) is one of the commonest structural haemoglobin variants in human populations. Although HbC causes mild clinical complications, its diagnosis and genetic counselling are important to prevent inheritance with other haemoglobinopathies. Little is known about its contemporary distribution and the number of newborns affected. We assembled a global database of population surveys. We then used a Bayesian geostatistical model to create maps of HbC frequency across Africa and paired our predictions with high-resolution demographics to calculate heterozygous (AC) and homozygous (CC) newborn estimates and their associated uncertainty. Data were too sparse outside Africa for this methodology to be applied. The highest frequencies were found in West Africa but HbC was commonly found in other parts of the continent. The expected annual numbers of AC and CC newborns in Africa were 672,117 (interquartile range (IQR): 642,116-705,163) and 28,703 (IQR: 26,027-31,958), respectively. These numbers are about two times previous estimates.

  17. Notes on the apparent discordance of pulse oximetry and multi-wavelength haemoglobin photometry.

    PubMed

    Nijland, R; Jongsma, H W; Nijhuis, J G; Oeseburg, B; Zijlstra, W G

    1995-01-01

    Multi-wavelength photometers, blood gas analysers and pulse oximeters are widely used to measure various oxygen-related quantities. The definitions of these quantities are not always correct. This paper gives insight in the various definitions for oxygen quantities. Furthermore, the possible influences of dyshaemoglobins and fetal haemoglobin on the accuracy of pulse oximetry are discussed. As pulse oximeters are constructed for the determination of arterial oxygen saturation, they should be validated with sample oxygen saturation values and not with the oxyhaemoglobin fraction. The influence of carboxyhaemoglobin is insubstantial over an oxygen saturation range of 0% to 100%. Through the presence of methaemoglobin, pulse oximetry will give an underestimation above 70% and an overestimation below 70% oxygen saturation. The influence of fetal haemoglobin is insignificant in the neonatal use of pulse oximetry, in the range of 75% to 100% arterial oxygen saturation. However, a pulse oximeter underestimates the arterial oxygen saturation at the 25% level with 5%, if the pulse oximeter has been calibrated in human adults. Such a low level of arterial oxygen saturation can be present in the fetus during labor.

  18. Carrier screening for inherited haemoglobin disorders among secondary school students and young adults in Latium, Italy.

    PubMed

    Amato, Antonio; Cappabianca, Maria Pia; Lerone, Maria; Colosimo, Alessia; Grisanti, Paola; Ponzini, Donatella; Di Biagio, Paola; Perri, Maria; Gianni, Debora; Rinaldi, Silvana; Piscitelli, Roberta

    2014-07-01

    To reduce the incidence of β-thalassaemia major and other severe haemoglobin-related disorders by the early identification of healthy carriers, the Centro Studi Microcitemie Roma has been organising since 1975 a prevention programme in Latium, an Italian central region. This programme entails two different types of carrier screening on a voluntary basis: a universal screening offered to secondary school students and a screening offered to young adults. In 36 years of scholastic screening (from 1975 until 2011), 1,466,100 students have been examined and 26,786 (1.8 %) carriers of non-α thalassaemia have been identified. In the extra-scholastic screening, 388,690 adult subjects (including the carriers' relatives) have been examined and a total of 38,457 (9.9 %) carriers of non-α thalassaemia have been detected. These results demonstrate that the precocious identification of healthy carriers allowed the identification of at-risk couples and reduced to zero the birth of affected babies in the Latium native population. This programme does not involve huge resources and is relatively inexpensive and, as such, it is essential to be offered to the total Latium scholastic and extra-scholastic population, which is epidemiologically changing due to migratory fluxes from countries in which haemoglobin disorders are common.

  19. Antioxidant status in haemoglobin E carriers after acute and chronic strenuous exercises.

    PubMed

    Palasuwan, Attakorn; Soogarun, Suphan; Suksom, Daroonwan; Pitaksathienkul, Chatchadaporn; Rousseau, Anne-Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Haemoglobin E (HbE), an unstable haemoglobin, is highly susceptible to oxidative damages. We examined how acute or chronic physiological challenge induced by exercise affects antioxidant response in HbE carriers. Two independent studies were conducted in individuals with HbE trait and paired normal Hb. In study 1, sedentary participants were tested in a graded maximal exercise and blood samples were collected before, immediately after, and 45 minutes after an acute exercise. Our data showed that erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity failed to recover in HbE carriers after 45 minutes of rest. In study 2, athletes were trained in a 10-week strenuous training and blood samples were collected before and after training period. We found that athletes with HbE carriers showed a larger increase in plasma GPx activity compared to those with normal Hb. These data suggest that HbE carriers could cope with exercise-induced oxidative stress by adjusting endogenous antioxidant markers.

  20. A topical haemoglobin spray for oxygenating pressure ulcers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Joy

    2015-03-01

    The effect of pressure ulcers on patient quality of life have been recognised as a real problem for many years, and the need for robust and effective management of pressure ulcers is now a prominent national health-care issue. Myriad different interventions exist for the treatment of pressure ulcers, including clinically effective dressings and pressure-relieving devices, yet many pressure ulcers still do not heal and often become a chronic wound. This is the second of a series of articles (Norris, 2014) discussing the clinical evaluation of a topical oxygen therapy in practice. It describes a small evaluation involving 18 patients with pressure ulcers. The study set out to determine the effect of a topical oxygen therapy on wound size. The therapy comprises a canister that sprays pure haemoglobin in a water solution into or onto the wound. The haemoglobin spray needs to be used at least once every 3 days, does not require training on its use and can be used in any care setting. Overall, results identified wound healing progression in all 18 wounds and wound size reduction in 17 of the 18 wounds.

  1. From tissue iron retention to low systemic haemoglobin levels, new pathophysiological biomarkers of human abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Pinna, R; Lindholt, J S; Madrigal-Matute, J; Blanco-Colio, L M; Esteban-Salan, M; Torres-Fonseca, M M; Lefebvre, T; Delbosc, S; Laustsen, J; Driss, F; Vega de Ceniga, M; Gouya, L; Weiss, G; Egido, J; Meilhac, O; Michel, J-B; Martin-Ventura, J

    2014-07-03

    Iron deposits are observed in tissue of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients, although the underlying mechanisms are not completely elucidated. Therefore we explored circulating markers of iron metabolism in AAA patients, and tested if they could serve as biomarkers of AAA. Increased red blood cell (RBC)-borne iron retention and transferrin, transferrin receptor and ferritin expression was observed in AAA tissue compared to control aorta (immunohistochemistry and western blot). In contrast, decreased circulating iron, transferrin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and haemoglobin concentration, along with circulating RBC count, were observed in AAA patients (aortic diameter >3 cm, n=114) compared to controls (aortic diameter <3 cm, n=88) (ELISA), whereas hepcidin concentrations were increased in AAA subjects (MS/MS assay). Moreover, iron, transferrin and haemoglobin levels were negatively, and hepcidin positively, correlated with aortic diameter in AAA patients. The association of low haemoglobin with AAA presence or aortic diameter was independent of specific risk factors. Moreover, MCHC negatively correlated with thrombus area in another cohort of AAA patients (aortic diameter 3-5 cm, n=357). We found that anaemia was significantly more prevalent in AAA patients (aortic diameter >5 cm, n=8,912) compared to those in patients with atherosclerotic aorto-iliac occlusive disease (n=17,737) [adjusted odds ratio=1.77 (95% confidence interval: 1.61;1.93)]. Finally, the mortality risk among AAA patients with anaemia was increased by almost 30% [adjusted hazard ratio: 1.29 (95% confidence interval: 1.16;1.44)] as compared to AAA subjects without anaemia. In conclusion, local iron retention and altered iron recycling associated to high hepcidin and low transferrin systemic concentrations could lead to reduced circulating haemoglobin levels in AAA patients. Low haemoglobin levels are independently associated to AAA presence and clinical outcome.

  2. Extraction of haemoglobin from human blood by affinity precipitation using a haptoglobin-based stimuli-responsive affinity macroligand.

    PubMed

    Stocker-Majd, Gisela; Hilbrig, Frank; Freitag, Ruth

    2008-06-13

    Affinity precipitation was compared to affinity chromatography and batch adsorption as the final purification step in a protocol for the isolation of haemoglobin from human blood. Haptoglobin was the affinity ligand. The first steps on the process were realized by traditional methods (lyses of red blood cells followed by ammonium sulphate precipitation). For affinity chromatography (and batch adsorption) the ligand was linked to Sepharose, for affinity precipitation to a thermoresponsive polymer, namely poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). Five haptoglobin-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) bioconjugates (affinity macroligands) were constructed with different polymer: haptoglobin-coupling ratios. Conjugation of haptoglobin to the soluble poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) apparently does not change the interaction thermodynamics with haemoglobin, as the haemoglobin binding constants calculated by a Scatchard analysis for the affinity macroligand were of the same order of magnitude as those described in the literature for the haemoglobin-haptoglobin complex in solution. Two elution protocols were used for haemoglobin release from the various affinity materials, one at pH 2, the other with 5 M urea at pH 11. Both affinity chromatography and affinity precipitation yielded a pure haemoglobin of high quality. Compared to the affinity chromatography, affinity precipitation showed a significantly higher ligand efficiency (ratio of the experimental capacity to the theoretical one). The method thus makes better use of the expensive affinity ligands. As affinity precipitation only requires small temperature changes to bring about precipitation/redissolution of the affinity complexes and a centrifugation step for recovery of the precipitate, the method in addition has advantages in term of scalability and simplicity.

  3. Porphyromonas pogonae sp. nov., an anaerobic but low concentration oxygen adapted coccobacillus isolated from lizards (Pogona vitticeps) or human clinical specimens, and emended description of the genus Porphyromonas Shah and Collins 1988.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Kuwabara, Saki; Kania, Stephen A; Kato, Hisayuki; Hamagishi, Manami; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Sato, Takuichi; Tomida, Junko; Tanaka, Kaori; Bemis, David A

    2015-03-01

    During the process of identifying a Gram-negative coccobacillus isolated from a human clinical specimen, we found that the isolate's 16S rRNA gene had very close sequence identity with that of a variant Porphyromonas isolated from polymicrobial infections in the central bearded dragon, a species of lizard [2]. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the human isolate and of six isolates from lizards were nearly identical (99.9-100%). Phylogenetic analysis placed all of these isolates in a single phylogenetic cluster well separated from other species in the genus Porphyromonas. The closest species was Porphyromonas catoniae with 90.7-90.9% sequence identity, although there was less than 6% DNA similarity between the P. catoniae type strain and our representative isolates from lizards (PAGU 1787(T)) and human (PAGU 1776). These isolates could grow under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions (6% O2 atmosphere). The isolates were positive for catalase and very strong β-hemolytic activity, but did not show black or brown pigmentation. Biochemically, the isolates could be differentiated from closely related species by pyroglutamic acid arylamidase and glycine arylamidase activity, and some others. The fermentation products mainly included succinic acid and propionic acid. The major fatty acids detected in cells of the isolates were iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0, and 3OH-iso-C17:0. The G+C content was 43.0 ± 0.62 mol%. The species name Porphyromonas pogonae sp. nov. is proposed for these isolates with the type strain of PAGU 1787(T) (=MI 10-1288(T)=JCM 19732(T)=ATCC BAA-2643(T)).

  4. Serendipity: A Rare Discovery of Haemoglobin D-Iran in An Indian Female During Routine Antenatal Screening for β-Thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Chandel, Rittu Surjit; Roy, Abhishek; Abichandani, Leela Gul

    2015-07-01

    Haemoglobin D is a rare form of haemoglobinopathy in homozygous form. However, the heterozygous form of the disease is clinically silent and relatively easier to find in North-West India, Pakistan and Iran. Haemoglobin D is sometimes found to be coexistent with Haemoglobin S and/or Thalassaemia leading to clinically significant conditions like sickle cell anaemia with mild to moderate splenomegaly. In India the more prevalent form is Haemoglobin D-Punjab (also known as Hb D- Los Angeles) which has a prevalence of 2% in Punjab and around 1% in Gujarat. However, the variant, Haemoglobin D- Iran is very rare in India in heterozygous as well as homozygous forms. This report is of a 36-year-old female, who visited for an antenatal check up. On analysing the blood sample using Agarose Gel Electrophoresis in Alkaline media, the migration of abnormal haemoglobin to haemoglobin S/D/G region was observed. Sickle cell solubility test was negative. On capillary electrophoresis, peak in the Haemoglobin D Zone was seen.

  5. Molecular cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, D P; Kubiniec, M A; Yoshimura, F; Genco, R J

    1988-01-01

    The gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis 381, fimbrilin, has been cloned and sequenced. The gene was present as a single copy on the bacterial chromosome, and the codon usage in the gene conformed closely to that expected for an abundant protein. The predicted size of the mature protein was 35,924 daltons, and the secretory form may have had a 10-amino-acid, hydrophilic leader sequence similar to the leader sequences of the MePhe fimbriae family. The protein sequence had no marked similarity to known fimbrial sequences, and no homologous sequences could be found in other black-pigmented Bacteroides species, suggesting that fimbrillin represents a class of fimbrial subunit protein of limited distribution. Images PMID:2895100

  6. Effect of environmental pH on enzyme activity and growth of Bacteroides gingivalis W50.

    PubMed Central

    McDermid, A S; McKee, A S; Marsh, P D

    1988-01-01

    Since the pH of the gingival crevice increases from below neutrality in health to above pH 8 in disease, we decided to investigate the effect of environmental pH on the growth and enzyme activity of Bacteroides gingivalis W50. Cells were grown in a chemostat under hemin-excess conditions over a range of pH values; stable growth was observed only between pH 6.7 and 8.3, with the maximum yields obtained between pH 7.0 and 8.0. The enzyme profile of cells varied markedly with pH. Enzymes with a specificity for gingival connective tissue (collagenase, hyaluronidase) were produced optimally at or below neutral pH, whereas trypsinlike activity increased with the growth pH and was maximal at pH 8.0. Chymotrypsinlike activity was generally low, although its activity was highest at the extremes of growth pH, i.e., at pH 6.7 and 8.3. Inhibitor studies provided evidence that the breakdown of collagen involved the concerted action of both a collagenase and the trypsinlike enzyme. The ratio of trypsin to collagenolytic activity rose from 1:1 during growth at neutral pH and below to almost 7:1 during growth at pH 8.3. Thus B. gingivalis appears to be uniquely adapted as a periodontopathic organism in that under environmental conditions likely to prevail during the initial stages of pocket development it produces maximally those enzymes with a tissue-damaging potential. Then, as the pH of the pocket rises during the host inflammatory response, the activity of the trypsinlike enzyme increases markedly, which may enable cells to inactivate key components of the host defenses such as immunoglobulins and complement. PMID:3281900

  7. Haemoglobin phenotypes of the wild European mouflon sheep living on the island of Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Naitana, S; Ledda, S; Cocco, E; Manca, L; Masala, B

    1991-01-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) phenotypes have been studied in 100 wild European mouflons living on the island of Sardinia by means of isoelectric focusing (pH 6.7-7.7 range) of the native tetramers, acid-urea-Triton gel-electrophoresis, and reversed-phase HPLC of globin chains. The result indicates the presence of two beta-globin alleles one of which, corresponding to the beta B, being the most common (f = 0.94). None were carriers of the earlier described Hb A. The new Hb was provisionally named Hb M. Severely anaemic mouflons were able to synthesize Hb C at expense of the Hb B alone, thus suggesting structural and physiological homologies between mouflon beta B and sheep beta A globin genes, and between the newly observed beta M allele and the beta B of the domestic Sardinian sheep.

  8. A Rare Haemoglobin Variant Identified as K Woolwich in a Pakistani Male.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sidra Asad; Ali, Natasha

    2015-10-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) K Woolwich is a rare Hb variant which was first described in a family from West Indies and its occurrence was later reported mainly in Black families from many African countries. We report a case of a young male who came for evaluation of anemia. His complete blood count showed hypochromic, microcytic anemia and his serum ferritin was low. Hb electrophoresis done as part of initial workup showed an abnormal band which moved faster than HbA. For further evaluation, Hb analysis by high performance liquid chromatography was subsequently performed and revealed Hb K Woolwich. This is a rare Hb variant recognized in Pakistani population for the first time through careful interpretation of the chromatographic behavior of the Hb.

  9. Microwaving Blood as a Non-Destructive Technique for Haemoglobin Measurements on Microlitre Samples

    PubMed Central

    Basey-Fisher, Toby H.; Guerra, Nadia; Triulzi, Chiara; Gregory, Andrew; Hanham, Stephen M.; Stevens, Molly M.; Maier, Stefan A.; Klein, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The non-destructive ex vivo determination of haemoglobin (Hgb) concentration offers the capability to conduct multiple red blood cell haematological measurements on a single sample, an advantage that current optical techniques are unable to offer. Here, a microwave method and device for the accurate and non-destructive determination of Hgb concentration in microlitre blood samples are described. Using broadband microwave spectroscopy, a relationship is established between the dielectric properties of murine blood and Hgb concentration that is utilized to create a technique for the determination of Hgb concentration. Subsequently, a microwave dielectric resonator-microfluidic system is implemented in the analysis of 52 murine samples with microlitre volumes and Hgb concentrations ranging from 0 to 17 g dL−1. Using the characterized relationship, independent and minimally invasive Hgb measurements are made on nine healthy mice as well as seven with mutations in the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene that leads to colorectal cancer and consequently anaemia. PMID:24002989

  10. Removal of N-terminal methionine from haemoglobin nascent peptides by a membrane-bound rat liver methionine aminopeptidase.