Science.gov

Sample records for portable test bench

  1. LISA Optical Bench Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröbs, M.; d'Arcio, L.; Barke, S.; Bogenstahl, J.; Diekmann, C.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Gerberding, O.; Hennig, J.; Hey, F. G.; Hogenhuis, H.; Killow, C. J.; Lieser, M.; Lucarelli, S.; Nikolov, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Pijnenburg, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Sohmer, A.; Taylor, A.; Ward, H.; Weise, D.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2013-01-01

    Each LISA satellite carries optical benches, one for each test mass, that measure the distance to the local test mass and to the remote optical bench on the distant satellite. Currently, an elegant bread board of the optical bench is developed for the European Space Agency (ESA) by EADS Astrium, TNO Science and Technology, University of Glasgow and the Albert Einstein Institute. To test the optical bench the two interferometers mentioned above must be completed by an external simulator, the test mass and telescope simulator. We give an overview of the simulator layout and performance predictions.

  2. The VORTEX coronagraphic test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, A.; Piron, P.; Huby, E.; Absil, O.; Delacroix, C.; Mawet, D.; Surdej, J.; Habraken, S.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we present the infrared coronagraphic test bench of the University of Liège named VODCA (Vortex Optical Demonstrator for Coronagraphic Applications). The goal of the bench is to assess the performances of the Annular Groove Phase Masks (AGPMs) at near- to mid-infrared wavelengths. The AGPM is a subwavelength grating vortex coronagraph of charge two (SGVC2) made out of diamond. The bench is designed to be completely achromatic and will be composed of a super continuum laser source emitting in the near to mid-infrared, several parabolas, diaphragms and an infrared camera. This way, we will be able to test the different AGPMs in the M, L, K and H bands. Eventually, the bench will also allow the computation of the incident wavefront aberrations on the coronagraph. A reflective Lyot stop will send most of the stellar light to a second camera to perform low-order wavefront sensing. This second system coupled with a deformable mirror will allow the correction of the wavefront aberrations. We also aim to test other pre- and/or post-coronagraphic concepts such as optimal apodization.

  3. Piezoelectric energy harvesting computer controlled test bench.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Rodriguez, M; Jiménez, F J; de Frutos, J; Alonso, D

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a new computer controlled (C.C.) laboratory test bench is presented. The patented test bench is made up of a C.C. road traffic simulator, C.C. electronic hardware involved in automating measurements, and test bench control software interface programmed in LabVIEW™. Our research is focused on characterizing electronic energy harvesting piezoelectric-based elements in road traffic environments to extract (or "harvest") maximum power. In mechanical to electrical energy conversion, mechanical impacts or vibrational behavior are commonly used, and several major problems need to be solved to perform optimal harvesting systems including, but no limited to, primary energy source modeling, energy conversion, and energy storage. It is described a novel C.C. test bench that obtains, in an accurate and automatized process, a generalized linear equivalent electrical model of piezoelectric elements and piezoelectric based energy store harvesting circuits in order to scale energy generation with multiple devices integrated in different topologies.

  4. Piezoelectric energy harvesting computer controlled test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Rodriguez, M.; Jiménez, F. J.; de Frutos, J.; Alonso, D.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a new computer controlled (C.C.) laboratory test bench is presented. The patented test bench is made up of a C.C. road traffic simulator, C.C. electronic hardware involved in automating measurements, and test bench control software interface programmed in LabVIEW™. Our research is focused on characterizing electronic energy harvesting piezoelectric-based elements in road traffic environments to extract (or "harvest") maximum power. In mechanical to electrical energy conversion, mechanical impacts or vibrational behavior are commonly used, and several major problems need to be solved to perform optimal harvesting systems including, but no limited to, primary energy source modeling, energy conversion, and energy storage. It is described a novel C.C. test bench that obtains, in an accurate and automatized process, a generalized linear equivalent electrical model of piezoelectric elements and piezoelectric based energy store harvesting circuits in order to scale energy generation with multiple devices integrated in different topologies.

  5. Inspiratory oscillatory flow with a portable ventilator: a bench study

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Guenther E; Trimmel, Helmut; Fitzgerald, Robert D

    2005-01-01

    Introduction We observed an oscillatory flow while ventilating critically ill patients with the Dräger Oxylog 3000™ transport ventilator during interhospital transfer. The phenomenon occurred in paediatric patients or in adult patients with severe airway obstruction ventilated in the pressure-regulated or pressure-controlled mode. As this had not been described previously, we conducted a bench study to investigate the phenomenon. Methods An Oxylog 3000™ intensive care unit ventilator and a Dräger Medical Evita-4 NeoFlow™ intensive care unit ventilator were connected to a Dräger Medical LS800™ lung simulator. Data were registered by a Datex-S5™ Monitor with a D-fend™ flow and pressure sensor, and were analysed with a laptop using S5-Collect™ software. Clinical conditions were simulated using various ventilatory modes, using various ventilator settings, using different filters and endotracheal tubes, and by changing the resistance and compliance. Data were recorded for 258 combinations of patient factors and respirator settings to detect thresholds for the occurrence of the phenomenon and methods to overcome it. Results Under conditions with high resistance in pressure-regulated ventilation with the Oxylog 3000™, an oscillatory flow during inspiration produced rapid changes of the airway pressure. The phenomenon resulted in a jerky inspiration with high peak airway pressures, higher than those set on the ventilator. Reducing the inspiratory flow velocity was effective to terminate the phenomenon, but resulted in reduced tidal volumes. Conclusion Oscillatory flow with potentially harmful effects may occur during ventilation with the Dräger Oxylog 3000™, especially in conditions with high resistance such as small airways in children (endotracheal tube internal diameter <6 mm) or severe obstructive lung diseases or airway diseases in adult patients. PMID:16137343

  6. An MCAO test bench for NFIRAOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turri, Paolo; Andersen, David R.; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Spanò, Paolo; Rosensteiner, Matthias; McVeigh, Eric A.

    2014-08-01

    At NRC Herzberg - Astronomy we are developing a closed-loop multi-conjugate adaptive optics bench to simulate a scaled-down version of NFIRAOS, the first light MCAO system on the Thirty Meter Telescope. The current bench consists of four laser guide stars, an evenly spaced array of natural guide stars, two magnetic deformable mirrors, a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a science camera at the focal plane for the evaluation of the performance and the tip-tilt measurements. Three phase screens conjugated at different altitudes simulate the atmospheric perturbation over the telescope. We can recreate the spot elongation on the SHWFS by defocusing the ground DM and at the same time modulating the intensity of the LGS spots in order to simulate the timevarying density profile of the sodium layer. The goals of this experiment are to compare the experimental performance on the bench with the predicted results of NFIRAOS models and to test the robustness of the tomographic reconstruction under conditions including the use of faint guide stars, non-uniform density profiles of the sodium layer and known non-common path aberrations. In this paper we present an update on the status of the bench and some first results.

  7. Bench Evaluation of Four Portable Oxygen Concentrators Under Different Conditions Representing Altitudes of 2438, 4200, and 8000 m.

    PubMed

    Bunel, Vincent; Shoukri, Amr; Choin, Frederic; Roblin, Serge; Smith, Cindy; Similowski, Thomas; Morélot-Panzini, Capucine; Gonzalez, Jesus

    2016-12-01

    Bunel, Vincent, Amr Shoukri, Frederic Choin, Serge Roblin, Cindy Smith, Thomas Similowski, Capucine Morélot-Panzini, and Jésus Gonzalez. Bench evaluation of four portable oxygen concentrators under different conditions representing altitudes of 2438, 4200, and 8000 m. High Alt Med Biol. 17:370-374, 2016.-Air travel is responsible for a reduction of the partial pressure of oxygen (O2) as a result of the decreased barometric pressure. This hypobaric hypoxia can be dangerous for passengers with respiratory diseases, requiring initiation or intensification of oxygen therapy during the flight. In-flight oxygen therapy can be provided by portable oxygen concentrators, which are less expensive and more practical than oxygen cylinders, but no study has evaluated their capacity to concentrate oxygen under simulated flight conditions. We tested four portable oxygen concentrators during a bench test study. The O2 concentrations (FO2) produced were measured under three different conditions: in room air at sea level, under hypoxia due to a reduction of the partial pressure of O2 (normobaric hypoxia, which can be performed routinely), and under hypoxia due to a reduction of atmospheric pressure (hypobaric hypoxia, using a chamber manufactured by Airbus Defence and Space). The FO2 obtained under conditions of hypobaric hypoxia (chamber) was lower than that measured in room air (0.92 [0.89-0.92] vs. 0.93 [0.92-0.94], p = 0.029), but only one portable oxygen concentrator was unable to maintain an FO2 ≥ 0.90 (0.89 [0.89-0.89]). In contrast, under conditions of normobaric hypoxia (tent) simulating an altitude of 2438 m, none of the apparatuses tested was able to achieve an FO2 greater than 0.76. (0.75 [0.75-0.76] vs. 0.93 [0.92-0.94], p = 0.029). Almost all portable oxygen concentrators were able to generate a sufficient quantity of O2 at simulated altitudes of 2438 m and can therefore be used in the aircraft cabin. Unfortunately, verification of the reliability and

  8. Portable Health Algorithms Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Wong, Edmond; Fulton, Christopher E.; Sowers, Thomas S.; Maul, William A.

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses the Portable Health Algorithms Test (PHALT) System, which has been designed as a means for evolving the maturity and credibility of algorithms developed to assess the health of aerospace systems. Comprising an integrated hardware-software environment, the PHALT system allows systems health management algorithms to be developed in a graphical programming environment, to be tested and refined using system simulation or test data playback, and to be evaluated in a real-time hardware-in-the-loop mode with a live test article. The integrated hardware and software development environment provides a seamless transition from algorithm development to real-time implementation. The portability of the hardware makes it quick and easy to transport between test facilities. This hard ware/software architecture is flexible enough to support a variety of diagnostic applications and test hardware, and the GUI-based rapid prototyping capability is sufficient to support development execution, and testing of custom diagnostic algorithms. The PHALT operating system supports execution of diagnostic algorithms under real-time constraints. PHALT can perform real-time capture and playback of test rig data with the ability to augment/ modify the data stream (e.g. inject simulated faults). It performs algorithm testing using a variety of data input sources, including real-time data acquisition, test data playback, and system simulations, and also provides system feedback to evaluate closed-loop diagnostic response and mitigation control.

  9. Diesel injector fouling bench test methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinoha, Leon L.; Yost, Douglas M.; Lestz, Sidney J.

    1992-06-01

    Compared to conventional compression ignition (CI) engine operation with the fuel being delivered at approximately 149 C (300 F), adiabatic engine operation potentially may deliver the fuel at temperatures as high as 260 C (500 F). Hypergolic CI engine combustion systems now in theoretical design stages will deliver fuel at temperatures approaching 427 to 538 C (800 to 1000 F). The ability of a fuel to resist formation of deposits on internal injector system surfaces is a form of thermal oxidative stability for which test methodology will be required. The injector Fouling Bench Test (IFBT) methodology evaluated in this report will assist in defining fuel contribution to injector fouling and control of fuel thermal stability in procurement specifications. The major observations from this project are discussed. Forty-hour cyclic IFB tests employing both Bosch APE 113 and Detroit Diesel (DD) N70 injectors are viable procedures for evaluating fuel effects on injector fouling. Cyclic operation appears to be superior to steady-state operation for both type injectors. Eighty-hour cyclic tests are more discriminating than 40-hour cyclic tests using the Bosch APE 113 injectors. JFTOT tests of fuels provide directional information on thermal stability-related deposits and filter plugging but show limited good correlation with IFBT DD N70 ratings, and none with IFBT Bosch APE 113 injector ratings. Deposition on injector pintles was more realistically rated by optical microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) than conventional visual and bench rating methods. High-sulfur fuel readily caused sticking of Detroit Diesel injectors. Injector sticking is an important mode of injector fouling.

  10. Driving Torque Control for a Nacelle Test Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassmann, Uwe; Reiter, Matthias; Abel, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Recently wind industry paid a lot of attention to ground testing facilities in order to improve reliability of wind turbines by undergoing overall system tests at an early stage of development. Some experience has been gained during the last years with drive train test benches, that allow for pure mechanical and electrical tests of the turbine's components. Since the loads occurring inside a wind turbine significantly depend on its control strategy, the natural extension of drive train test benches are so-called nacelle test benches, which also include the wind turbine's controller. The worldwide first nacelle test bench was installed and launched at RWTH Aachen University in 2013. This nacelle test bench was set up as a demonstrator and has a rated power of 1 MW. For the demonstrator test bench a gearbox-based drive train concept, which does not intrinsically meet the high dynamic requirements of the real-time aerodynamics simulation, was chosen. In this paper the mechanical concept is reviewed from a control engineering point of view and a detailed control model is presented and validated using measurement data. In order to minimize the impact this mechanical limitations have and to achieve the dynamics and accuracy required, a driving torque controller is proposed. Due to the communication layout at the nacelle test bench, time delay in data transfer cannot be omitted for controller design. Experiments confirm that the driving torque controller allows to operate a wind turbine at the nacelle test bench and suppresses unrealistic, test bench-related torque dynamics.

  11. BENCH TEST OF A RESIDUAL GAS IONIZATION PROFILE MONITOR (RGIPM)

    SciTech Connect

    W.C. SELLYEY; J.D. GILPATRICK; R. SENIOR

    2001-06-01

    An RGIPM has been designed, constructed and bench tested to verify that all components are functioning properly and that the desired resolution of about 50 {micro}m rms can be achieved. This paper will describe major considerations that went into the bench test and some results.

  12. Test bench development for the radiation Hard GBTX ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitao, P.; Feger, S.; Porret, D.; Baron, S.; Wyllie, K.; Barros Marin, M.; Figueiredo, D.; Francisco, R.; Da Silva, J. C.; Grassi, T.; Moreira, P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of the GBTX radiation hard ASIC test bench. Developed for the LHC accelerator upgrade programs, the GBTX implements a bidirectional 4.8 Gb/s link between the radiation hard on-detector custom electronics and the off-detector systems. The test bench was used for functional testing of the GBTX and to evaluate its performance in a radiation environment, by conducting Total Ionizing Dose and Single-Event Upsets tests campaigns.

  13. Portable basketball rim testing device

    DOEpatents

    Abbott, W. Bruce; Davis, Karl C.

    1993-01-01

    A portable basketball rim rebound testing device 10 is illustrated in two preferred embodiments for testing the rebound or energy absorption characteristics of a basketball rim 12 and its accompanying support to determine likely rebound or energy absorption charcteristics of the system. The apparatus 10 includes a depending frame 28 having a C-clamp 36 for releasably rigidly connecting the frame to the basketball rim 12. A glide weight 60 is mounted on a guide rod 52 permitting the weight 60 to be dropped against a calibrated spring 56 held on an abutment surface on the rod to generate for deflecting the basketball rim and then rebounding the weight upwardly. A photosensor 66 is mounted on the depending frame 28 to sense passage of reflective surfaces 75 on the weight to thereby obtain sufficient data to enable a processing means 26 to calculate the rebound velocity and relate it to an energy absorption percentage rate of the rim system 12. A readout is provided to display the energy absorption percentage.

  14. Orbit attitude processor. STS-1 bench program verification test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    A plan for the static verification of the STS-1 ATT PROC ORBIT software requirements is presented. The orbit version of the SAPIENS bench program is used to generate the verification data. A brief discussion of the simulation software and flight software modules is presented along with a description of the test cases.

  15. CMC Bench Scale Material Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Fitzsimmons; Gerard Pelletier; Dave Grimmett

    2006-05-30

    The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 3.5 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed this test plan with technical assistance from ceramic scientists at the Dept. of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Albany Research Center who will perform the environmental exposure tests.

  16. Characterization of Flow Bench Engine Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voris, Alex; Riley, Lauren; Puzinauskas, Paul

    2015-11-01

    This project was an attempt at characterizing particle image velocimetry (PIV) and swirl-meter test procedures. The flow direction and PIV seeding were evaluated for in-cylinder steady state flow of a spark ignition engine. For PIV seeding, both wet and dry options were tested. The dry particles tested were baby powder, glass particulate, and titanium dioxide. The wet particles tested were fogs created with olive oil, vegetable oil, DEHS, and silicon oil. The seeding was evaluated at 0.1 and 0.25 Lift/Diameter and at cylinder pressures of 10, 25 and 40 inches of H2O. PIV results were evaluated through visual and fluid momentum comparisons. Seeding particles were also evaluated based on particle size and cost. It was found that baby powder and glass particulate were the most effective seeding options for the current setup. The oil fogs and titanium dioxide were found to deposit very quickly on the mock cylinder and obscure the motion of the particles. Based on initial calculations and flow measurements, the flow direction should have a negligible impact on PIV and swirl-meter results. The characterizations found in this project will be used in future engine research examining the effects of intake port geometry on in-cylinder fluid motion and exhaust gas recirculation tolerances. Thanks to NSF site grant #1358991.

  17. Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter bench test module

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, L.L.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the design, fabrication, and test of a Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter Bench Test Module. The work presented in this document was conducted as a part of Heat Engine Task of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program. The objective of this task is the development and evaluation of heat engine technologies applicable to distributed receiver systems, in particular, dish electric systems.

  18. Questions of testing rate and flexibility of rocket test benches, discussed on the basis of the test benches of Nitrochemie GMBH in Aschau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LEGRAND

    1987-01-01

    The rocket test benches are used to study burnup behavior by various methods. In the first ten months of 1966, 1578 shots were performed to test propellants, and 920 to test 14 thrust and pressure measurement projects.

  19. Questions of testing rate and flexibility of rocket test benches, discussed on the basis of the test benches of Nitrochemie GMBH in Aschau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LEGRAND

    1987-01-01

    The rocket test benches are used to study burnup behavior by various methods. In the first ten months of 1966, 1578 shots were performed to test propellants, and 920 to test 14 thrust and pressure measurement projects.

  20. Diesel Injector Fouling Bench Test Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    INDICATE DD N 70 IFBT TEST NUMBER 25 Uj z 06 [24-D] 0 K 150[2DJ0[4D 0 18-D] 10 0[21 -D] 0L 0129-D] a [25-D] [26-D31 z (L 0 0) [22-D] 0E [23-D1 200 225 250... Vimal D 1500, Fuel Desrption Test No hr mg/100 mL mp/L mg/100 mL mgKOH/g mas% Ap Color AL-12624-F 6-B 40 ND 74.9* 28.4 0.04 0.29 Dark >8.0 1% Sulfur...Peacock 2771.381 6364 No 3.0 232 125 in 22.4 min 40 at 54 ɜ Peacock 168 K 38 332 No 3.0 260 125 in7.1 min 50+ at 28-58 4 Peacock 2411 at38 5030 Yes 3.0

  1. Molecular Sieve Bench Testing and Computer Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, Habib; DaLee, Robert C.; Blackmon, James B.

    1995-01-01

    The design of an efficient four-bed molecular sieve (4BMS) CO2 removal system for the International Space Station depends on many mission parameters, such as duration, crew size, cost of power, volume, fluid interface properties, etc. A need for space vehicle CO2 removal system models capable of accurately performing extrapolated hardware predictions is inevitable due to the change of the parameters which influences the CO2 removal system capacity. The purpose is to investigate the mathematical techniques required for a model capable of accurate extrapolated performance predictions and to obtain test data required to estimate mass transfer coefficients and verify the computer model. Models have been developed to demonstrate that the finite difference technique can be successfully applied to sorbents and conditions used in spacecraft CO2 removal systems. The nonisothermal, axially dispersed, plug flow model with linear driving force for 5X sorbent and pore diffusion for silica gel are then applied to test data. A more complex model, a non-darcian model (two dimensional), has also been developed for simulation of the test data. This model takes into account the channeling effect on column breakthrough. Four FORTRAN computer programs are presented: a two-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a one-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a model of thermal vacuum desorption; and a model of a tri-sectional packed bed with two different sorbent materials. The programs are capable of simulating up to four gas constituents for each process, which can be increased with a few minor changes.

  2. Bench Scale Saltcake Dissolution Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTOLD, D.B.; PACQUET, E.A.

    2000-12-06

    A potential scenario for retrieving saltcake from single shell tanks is the ''Rainbird{reg_sign} sprinkler'' method. Water is distributed evenly across the surface of the saltcake and allowed to percolate by gravity through the waste. The salt dissolves in the water, forming a saturated solution. The saturated liquid is removed by a saltwell pump situated near the bottom of the tank. By this method, there is never a large inventory of liquid in the tank that could pose a threat of leakage. There are many variables or factors that can influence the hydrodynamics of this retrieval process. They include saltcake porosity; saltwell pumping rate; salt dissolution chemistry; factors that could promote flow channeling (e.g. tank walls, dry wells, inclusions or discontinuities in the saltcake); method of water distribution; plug formation due to crystal formations or accumulation of insoluble solids. A brief literature search indicates that very little experimental data exist on these aspects of saltcake dissolution (Wiersma 1996, 1997). The tests reported here were planned (Herting, 2000) to provide preliminary data and information for planning future, scaled-up tests of the sprinkler method.

  3. On-sky AO test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brousseau, Denis; Thibault, Simon; Lavigne, Jean-François; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    With the upcoming construction of ELTs, several existing technologies are being pushed beyond their performance limit and it became essential to develop and evaluate alternatives. We present a specifically designed focal plane box which will allow to evaluate, directly on-sky, the performance of a number of next generation adaptive optics related technologies The system will able us to compare the performance of several new wavefront sensors in contrast to a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor. The system has been designed for the "Observatoire du Mont Mégantic" (OMM) which hosts a telescope having a 1.6-meter diameter primary. The OMM telescope, located halfway between Montreal and Quebec City, is known to be an excellent location to develop and test precursor instruments which can then be upscaled to larger telescopes (ex. SPIOMM which led to SITELLE at the CFHT). We present the results of the first run made at the telescope and also identify problems that were encountered. We also propose a series of modifications to the system that will help to solve these issues.

  4. Validating induced seismicity forecast models—Induced Seismicity Test Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király-Proag, Eszter; Zechar, J. Douglas; Gischig, Valentin; Wiemer, Stefan; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Doetsch, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Induced earthquakes often accompany fluid injection, and the seismic hazard they pose threatens various underground engineering projects. Models to monitor and control induced seismic hazard with traffic light systems should be probabilistic, forward-looking, and updated as new data arrive. In this study, we propose an Induced Seismicity Test Bench to test and rank such models; this test bench can be used for model development, model selection, and ensemble model building. We apply the test bench to data from the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-Forêts 2004 geothermal stimulation projects, and we assess forecasts from two models: Shapiro and Smoothed Seismicity (SaSS) and Hydraulics and Seismics (HySei). These models incorporate a different mix of physics-based elements and stochastic representation of the induced sequences. Our results show that neither model is fully superior to the other. Generally, HySei forecasts the seismicity rate better after shut-in but is only mediocre at forecasting the spatial distribution. On the other hand, SaSS forecasts the spatial distribution better and gives better seismicity rate estimates before shut-in. The shut-in phase is a difficult moment for both models in both reservoirs: the models tend to underpredict the seismicity rate around, and shortly after, shut-in.

  5. 47 CFR 73.1530 - Portable test stations [Definition].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable test stations . 73.1530 Section 73.1530 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1530 Portable test stations . A portable test station is one that is moved from place...

  6. ORNL/IAT ARMATURE DIAGNOSTICS DEMONSTRATION TEST REPORT: PART TWO: BENCH DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Stephen W; Cates, Michael R; Goedeke, Shawn; Crawford, M. T.; Ferraro, S. B.; Surls, D.; Stewart, J.

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of the present effort was to demonstrate 'on the fly' temperature measurement of railgun armatures on a bench top railgun. The effort builds on the previous test that utilized a portable unit with armature speeds ranging from 50 to 90 m/s. The tests described here involved higher speeds, ranging from 300 to 500 m/s. The method to accomplish the measurement involves pulsed laser illumination of a phosphor-coated armature. The duration of the ensuing fluorescence indicates temperature. The measured temperatures, obtained both inside the muzzle and outside in free flight, ranged between 80 to 110 C. The required pulsed fluorescence was made possible by successfully sensing the position of the armature while traveling within the laser illumination and fluorescence sensing fields-of-view. A high-speed camera also captured images of the moving armatures after exiting the railgun. These images sometimes included the fluorescing region of the phosphor coating.

  7. Design of a Test Bench for Intraocular Lens Optical Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba-Bueno, Francisco; Vega, Fidel; Millán, María S.

    2011-01-01

    The crystalline lens is the responsible for focusing at different distances (accommodation) in the human eye. This organ grows throughout life increasing in size and rigidity. Moreover, due this growth it loses transparency through life, and becomes gradually opacified causing what is known as cataracts. Cataract is the most common cause of visual loss in the world. At present, this visual loss is recoverable by surgery in which the opacified lens is destroyed (phacoemulsification) and replaced by the implantation of an intraocular lens (IOL). If the IOL implanted is mono-focal the patient loses its natural capacity of accommodation, and as a consequence they would depend on an external optic correction to focus at different distances. In order to avoid this dependency, multifocal IOLs designs have been developed. The multi-focality can be achieved by using either, a refractive surface with different radii of curvature (refractive IOLs) or incorporating a diffractive surface (diffractive IOLs). To analyze the optical quality of IOLs it is necessary to test them in an optical bench that agrees with the ISO119679-2 1999 standard (Ophthalmic implants. Intraocular lenses. Part 2. Optical Properties and Test Methods). In addition to analyze the IOLs according to the ISO standard, we have designed an optical bench that allows us to simulate the conditions of a real human eye. To do that, we will use artificial corneas with different amounts of optical aberrations and several illumination sources with different spectral distributions. Moreover, the design of the test bench includes the possibility of testing the IOLs under off-axis conditions as well as in the presence of decentration and/or tilt. Finally, the optical imaging quality of the IOLs is assessed by using common metrics like the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the Point Spread Function (PSF) and/or the Strehl ratio (SR), or via registration of the IOL's wavefront with a Hartmann-Shack sensor and its

  8. ESA's CCD test bench for the PLATO mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaufort, Thierry; Duvet, Ludovic; Bloemmaert, Sander; Lemmel, Frederic; Prod'homme, Thibaut; Verhoeve, Peter; Smit, Hans; Butler, Bart; van der Luijt, Cornelis; Heijnen, Jerko; Visser, Ivo

    2016-08-01

    PLATO { PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars { is the third medium-class mission to be selected in the European Space Agency (ESA) Science and Robotic Exploration Cosmic Vision programme. Due for launch in 2025, the payload makes use of a large format (8 cm x 8 cm) Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs), the e2v CCD270 operated at 4 MHz and at -70 C. To de-risk the PLATO CCD qualification programme initiated in 2014 and support the mission definition process, ESA's Payload Technology Validation section from the Future Missions Office has developed a dedicated test bench.

  9. Spacecraft signal sources portable test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Albert; Kuhnle, Paul; Sydnor, Richard; Diener, William; Stowers, David

    1993-01-01

    There is a frequent need to measure the frequency stability and phase noise levels of very high performance signal sources that are required for certain spacecraft missions. These measurements need to be done at different locations as the spacecraft subsystems progress through the various stages of development, assembly, test, and integration. Allan Deviation and Phase Noise of high performance sources are generally measured by comparing the unit under test to a reference standard. Five basic requirements are associated with making these kind of measurements: (1) the reference standard performance needs to be equal or better than the unit under test; (2) the measurement system needs to accommodate odd, nonstandard measurement frequencies that can range from 4 MHz to 35 GHz; (3) warm-up frequency drift and aging can corrupt a measurement and must be dealt with; (4) test equipment generated noise must be understood and prevented from limiting the measurements; (5) test equipment noise performance must be verifiable in the field as needed. A portable measurement system that was built by JPL and used in the field is described. The methods of addressing the above requirements are outlined and some measurement noise floor values are given. This test set was recently used to measure state of the art crystal oscillator frequency standards on the TOPEX and MARS OBSERVER spacecraft during several stages of acceptance tests.

  10. Feasibility of a Single Common Powertrain Lubricant-Transmission Bench Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    mechanical applications including engine crankcase lubrication, powershift transmission operation, and some hydraulic system operation. Several diesel ...performance in SCPL. Overall, the performance of various diesel engine oils tested in a variety of friction bench tests was determined. The results indicate...friction bench test results with the slate of engine oils tested. This will enable the marriage of diesel engine oil performance with military

  11. Pattern Generator for Bench Test of Digital Boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkun, Andrew C.; Chu, Anhua J.

    2012-01-01

    All efforts to develop electronic equipment reach a stage where they need a board test station for each board. The SMAP digital system consists of three board types that interact with each other using interfaces with critical timing. Each board needs to be tested individually before combining into the integrated digital electronics system. Each board needs critical timing signals from the others to be able to operate. A bench test system was developed to support test of each board. The test system produces all the outputs of the control and timing unit, and is delivered much earlier than the timing unit. Timing signals are treated as data. A large file is generated containing the state of every timing signal at any instant. This file is streamed out to an IO card, which is wired directly to the device-under-test (DUT) input pins. This provides a flexible test environment that can be adapted to any of the boards required to test in a standalone configuration. The problem of generating the critical timing signals is then transferred from a hardware problem to a software problem where it is more easily dealt with.

  12. Design, fabrication, and bench testing of a solar chemical receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, W. A.; Pierre, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Solar thermal energy can be effectively collected, transported, stored, and utilized by means of a chemical storage and transport system employing the reversible SO2 oxidation reaction. A solar chemical receiver for SO3 thermal decomposition to SO2 and oxygen was analyzed. Bench tests of a ten foot section of a receiver module were conducted with dissociated sulfuric acid (SO3 and H2O) in an electrical furnace. Measured percent conversion of SO3 was 85% of the equilibrium value. Methods were developed to fabricate and assemble a complete receiver module. These methods included applying an aluminide coating to certain exposed surfaces, assembling concentric tubes with a wire spacer, applying a platinum catalyst to the tubing wall, and coiling the entire assembly into the desired configuration.

  13. High order test bench for extreme adaptive optics system optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller-Carpentier, Emmanuel; Kasper, Markus; Martinez, Patrice; Vernet, Elise; Fedrigo, Enrico; Soenke, Christian; Tordo, Sébastien; Hubin, Norbert; Verinaud, Christophe; Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Tozzi, Andrea; Quiros, Fernando; Basden, Alastair G.; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Love, Gordon D.; Myers, Richard M.

    2008-07-01

    High-contrast imagers dedicated to the search for extrasolar planets are currently being developed for the VLT (SPHERE) and Gemini (GPI) observatories. A vital part of such a high-contrast imager is the extreme adaptive optics (XAO) system that very efficiently removes effects of atmospheric turbulence and instrument aberrations. The high order test bench (HOT) implements an XAO system under realistic telescope conditions reproduced by star and turbulence generators. New technological developments (32x32 actuator micro deformable mirror, read-noise free electron multiplying CCD60, SPARTA real time computer) are used to study and compare two potential XAO wave front sensors: The Pyramid- and the Shack-Hartmann wave front sensors. We will describe the overall design of HOT including the sub-systems. We will present the closed loop study results of the behavior of the Shack-Hartmann wave front sensor in terms of linearity, sensitivity to calibration errors, performance and other specific issues.

  14. Development of a real time MTF test bench for visible optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinhua; Chen, Yuheng; Fan, Jiming; Xiang, Chunchang; Shen, Weimin

    2010-11-01

    A real-time MTF test bench for visible optical systems is presented in this paper. This test bench can perform quick on-axis and off-axis MTF measurement of optical systems whose aperture are less than 200mm in visible wavelength. A high quality off-axis parabolic collimator is used as object generator of this test bench. The image analyzer is a microscopy with CCD camera installed on a multi-axis motion stage. The software of this MTF test bench provides a good interface for the operators to set measurement parameters and control this bench. Validation of this test bench, performed with a 50mm plano-convex audit lens, shows that MTF measurement error of this bench is within 0.04. Besides MTF measurement, this bench can also perform effective focal length (EFL) and back focal length (BFL) without any hardware modification. Transmittance of optical system can also be performed on this bench with an integrating sphere.

  15. Endosafe(R)-Portable Test System (PTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maule, Jake; Wainwright, Norm; Burbank, Dan

    2005-01-01

    The Portable Test System (PTS) is a hand-held device for monitoring the presence of potentially hazardous bacteria in the environment. It uses an immunological method derived from the horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) to detect bacterial cell membranes and other molecular components of a cell. Further modifications of the PTS will allow detection of individual hazardous species of bacteria. This study was a follow-up of previous PTS and other immunological tests performed on the KC-135 during 2002-2003 (Maule et al., 2003, J. Gravit. Physiol.) and in the underwater habitat Aquarius during NEEMO 5 (Maule et al., 2005, Appl. Environ. Microbiol in prep.). The experiments described here were part of a final testing phase prior to use of the PTS on the International Space Station (ISS), scheduled for launch on 12A.1 on February 9th 2006. The specific aspects of PTS operation studied were those involving a fluid component: pumping, mixing, incubations and pipetting into the instrument. The PTS uses a stepper motor to move fluid along small channels, which may be affected by reduced gravity.

  16. Virtual Turbine Engine Test Bench Using MGET Test Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kho, Seonghee; Kong, Changduk; Ki, Jayoung

    2015-05-01

    Test device using virtual engine simulator can help reduce the number of engine tests through tests similar to the actual engine tests and repeat the test under the same condition, and thus reduce the engine maintenance and operating costs [1]. Also, as it is possible to easily implement extreme conditions in which it is hard to conduct actual tests, it can prevent engine damages that may happen during the actual engine test under such conditions. In this study, an upgraded MGET test device was developed that can conduct both real and virtual engine test by applying real-time engine model to the existing MGET test device that was developed and has been sold by the Company. This newly developed multi-purpose MGET test device is expected to be used for various educational and research purposes.

  17. Shunt assistant valve: bench test investigations and clinical performance.

    PubMed

    Tokoro, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Shin-Ichi; Chiba, Yasuhiro; Tsuda, Masako

    2002-10-01

    We tested the flow characteristics of a new siphon-reducing device, the Shunt Assistant Valve trade mark (SAV) combined with a Codman-Hakim trade mark (CH) programmable valve and studied 4 clinical cases. We discussed the efficacy of the SAV at preventing low pressure syndrome secondary to overdrainage. In the horizontal position the closing pressure (CP) of the SAV was 0. The SAV was available in five different pressure ranges for the vertical position: 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 cmH(2)O. A bench test was performed in order to obtain pressure-flow curves for the SAV under various conditions. We investigated the simulation of the postural change of the flow performance of the new device. We implanted an SAV in 4 patients who already had an implanted CH valve. Postural changes of the shunt flow and intracranial pressure (ICP) were measured before and after the addition of the SAV. Bench test: in the horizontal position the flow increased in proportion to the pressure difference. For all SAVs it reached 14 to 16 mL/min when the pressure difference was 50 cmH(2)O. A tantalum sphere determined the CP of the SAV with a maximum in the vertical position. The flow in the vertical position was significantly decreased in comparison with the horizontal position. The external pressures did not influence the flow. Simulation: in adults shunt flow in the supine position was sufficient at both the low and the high ICP stages. When the SAV 20 and the CH valve (CP=8 cmH(2)O) was used in the sitting position we found a reduction of the flow 70-80% compared with the flow-rate found for the CH valve alone. When the CP of the CH valve was adjusted up to 20 cmH(2)O, we found a further reduction of the flow of 27-50% in the sitting position and overdrainage was effectively prevented. With this combination the flow in the sitting position significantly decreased in paediatric hydrocephalus and became zero, indicating the possibility of underdrainage in children. in 4 patients with

  18. Test Bench for Coupling and Shielding Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, J.; Esteve, V.; Dede, E.; Sanchis, E.; Maset, E.; Ferreres, A.; Ejea, J. B.; Cases, C.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a test bench for training purposes, which uses a magnetic field generator to couple this magnetic field to a victim circuit. It can be very useful to test for magnetic susceptibility as well. The magnetic field generator consists of a board, which generates a variable current that flows into a printed circuit board with spiral tracks (noise generator). The victim circuit consists of a coaxial cable concentric with the spiral tracks and its generated magnetic field. The coaxial cable is part of a circuit which conducts a signal produced by a signal generator and a resistive load. In the paper three cases are studied. First, the transmitted signal from the signal generator uses the central conductor of the coaxial cable and the shield is floating. Second, the shield is short circuited at its ends (and thus forming a loop). Third, when connecting the shield in series with the inner conductor and therefore having the current flowing into the coax via the inner conductor and returning via the shield.

  19. Measure Twice, Build Once: Bench-Scale Testing to Evaluate Bioretention Media Design

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the utility of conducting bench-scale testing on selected bioretention media and media amendments to validate hydrologic properties before installing media and amendments in larger pilot- or full-scale rain garden installations. The bench-scale study conclude...

  20. Measure Twice, Build Once: Bench-Scale Testing to Evaluate Bioretention Media Design

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the utility of conducting bench-scale testing on selected bioretention media and media amendments to validate hydrologic properties before installing media and amendments in larger pilot- or full-scale rain garden installations. The bench-scale study conclude...

  1. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench..., fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. (a) Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against dusts, fumes, mists, and smokes...

  2. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench..., fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. (a) Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against dusts, fumes, mists, and...

  3. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench..., fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. (a) Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against dusts, fumes, mists, and...

  4. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench..., fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. (a) Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against dusts, fumes, mists, and...

  5. Tests of the Daimler D-IVa Engine at a High Altitude Test Bench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noack, W G

    1920-01-01

    Reports of tests of a Daimler IVa engine at the test-bench at Friedrichshafen, show that the decrease of power of that engine, at high altitudes, was established, and that the manner of its working when air is supplied at a certain pressure was explained. These tests were preparatory to the installation of compressors in giant aircraft for the purpose of maintaining constant power at high altitudes.

  6. The E-lens test bench for RHIC beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Gu X.; Altinbas, F.Z.; Aronson, J.; Beebe, E. et al

    2012-05-20

    To compensate for the beam-beam effects from the proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are fabricating two electron lenses that we plan to install at RHIC IR10. Before installing the e-lenses, we are setting-up the e-lens test bench to test the electron gun, collector, GS1 coil, modulator, partial control system, some instrumentation, and the application software. Some e-lens power supplies, the electronics for current measurement will also be qualified on test bench. The test bench also was designed for measuring the properties of the cathode and the profile of the beam. In this paper, we introduce the layout and elements of the e-lens test bench; and we discuss its present status towards the end of this paper.

  7. Bench-Scale Testing of the Micronized Magnetite Process

    SciTech Connect

    Edward R. Torak; Peter J. Suardini

    1997-11-01

    A recent emphasis of the Department of Energy's (DOE's), Coal Preparation Program has been the development of high-efficiency technologies that offer near-term, low-cost improvements in the ability of coal preparation plants to address problems associated with coal fines. In 1992, three cost-shared contracts were awarded to industry, under the first High-Efficiency Preparation (HEP I) solicitation. All three projects involved bench-scale testing of various emerging technologies, at the Federal Energy Technology Center*s (FETC*s), Process Research Facility (PRF). The first HEP I project, completed in mid-1993, was conducted by Process Technology, Inc., with the objective of developing a computerized, on-line system for monitoring and controlling the operation of a column flotation circuit. The second HEP I project, completed in mid-1994, was conducted by a team led by Virginia Polytechnic Institute to test the Mozely Multi-Gravity Separator in combination with the Microcel Flotation Column, for improved removal of mineral matter and pyritic sulfur from fine coal. The last HEP I project, of which the findings are contained in this report, was conducted by Custom Coals Corporation to evaluate and advance a micronized-magnetite-based, fine-coal cycloning technology. The micronized-magnetite coal cleaning technology, also know as the Micro-Mag process, is based on widely used conventional dense-medium cyclone applications, in that it utilizes a finely ground magnetite/water suspension as a separating medium for cleaning fine coal, by density, in a cyclone. However, the micronized-magnetite cleaning technology differs from conventional systems in several ways: ! It utilizes significantly finer magnetite (about 5 to 10 micron mean particle size), as compared to normal mean particle sizes of 20 microns. ! It can effectively beneficiate coal particles down to 500M in size, as compared to the most advanced, existing conventional systems that are limited to a particle bottom

  8. On determining the acoustic properties of main helicopter rotor models on an open test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kop'ev, V. F.; Zaitsev, M. Yu.; Ostrikov, N. N.; Denisov, S. L.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Anikin, V. A.; Gromov, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies on developing a technique to determine the acoustic properties of models of main helicopter rotors on an open test bench. The method of maximum length sequences is used to choose the optimum arrangement of microphones for an open test bench that would minimize the influence of parasitic echo. The results of processing the data of an acoustic experiment with a model rotor are detailed.

  9. Design of a new front-end electronics test-bench for the upgraded ATLAS detector's Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kureba, C. O.; Govender, M.; Hofsajer, I.; Ruan, X.; Sandrock, C.; Spoor, M.

    2015-10-01

    The year 2022 has been scheduled to see an upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in order to increase its instantaneous luminosity. The High Luminosity LHC, also referred to as the upgrade Phase-II, means an inevitable complete re-design of the read-out electronics in the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the A Toroidal LHC Apparatus (ATLAS) detector. Here, the new read-out architecture is expected to have the front-end electronics transmit fully digitized information of the detector to the back-end electronics system. Fully digitized signals will allow more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms which will contribute to the required improved triggers at high pile-up. In Phase II, the current Mobile Drawer Integrity ChecKing (MobiDICK) test-bench will be replaced by the next generation test-bench for the TileCal superdrawers, the new Prometeo (A Portable ReadOut ModulE for Tilecal ElectrOnics). Prometeo is a portable, high-throughput electronic system for full certification of the front-end electronics of the ATLAS TileCal. It is designed to interface to the fast links and perform a series of tests on the data to assess the certification of the electronics. The Prometeo's prototype is being assembled by the University of the Witwatersrand and installed at CERN for further developing, tuning and tests. This article describes the overall design of the new Prometeo, and how it fits into the TileCal electronics upgrade.

  10. Full-scale and bench-scale testing of a coal-fueled gas turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, P.B.; LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1992-01-01

    Components for a coal-fueled industrial gas turbine were developed and tested at both benchscale and full-scale. The components included a two stage slagging combustor, a particulate rejection impact separator (PRIS), and a secondary particulate filter. The Integrated Bench Scale Test Facility (IBSTF) was used for the filter tests ana some of the PRIS testing. Full-scale combustor testing has been carried-out both with and without the PRIS. Bench-scale testing has included evaluating the feasibility of on-site CWM preparation, developing a water-cooled impactor and an extended run with new secondary candle filters.

  11. Full-scale and bench-scale testing of a coal-fueled gas turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, P.B.; LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1992-12-31

    Components for a coal-fueled industrial gas turbine were developed and tested at both benchscale and full-scale. The components included a two stage slagging combustor, a particulate rejection impact separator (PRIS), and a secondary particulate filter. The Integrated Bench Scale Test Facility (IBSTF) was used for the filter tests ana some of the PRIS testing. Full-scale combustor testing has been carried-out both with and without the PRIS. Bench-scale testing has included evaluating the feasibility of on-site CWM preparation, developing a water-cooled impactor and an extended run with new secondary candle filters.

  12. An ion-optical bench for testing ion source lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, J. J.; Ells, D. R.

    1988-06-01

    An ion-optical bench has been designed and constructed to obtain experimental data on the focusing properties of ion lenses in three dimensions. The heart of the apparatus is a position-sensitive detector (PSD) that gives output signals proportional to the x and y positions of each ion impact. The position signals can be displayed on an oscilloscope screen and analyzed by a two-parameter pulse-height analyzer, thereby giving a visual picture of the ion beam cross section and intensity distribution. The PSD itself is mounted on a track and is movable during operation from a position immediately following the ion lens to 30 cm away. This enables the rapid collection of accurate data on the intensity distribution and divergence angles of ions leaving the source lens. Examples of ion lens measurements are given.

  13. Preliminary optical design of an Active Optics test bench for space applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcines, A.; Bitenc, U.; Rolt, S.; Reeves, S.; Doelman, N.; Human, J.; Morris, T.; Myers, R.; Talbot, G.

    2017-03-01

    This communication presents a preliminary optical design for a test bench conceived within the European Space Agency's TRP project (Active Optics Correction Chain (AOCC) for large monolithic mirrors) with the goal of designing and developing an Active Optics system able to correct in space on telescopes apertures larger than 3 meters. The test bench design uses two deformable mirrors of 37.5 mm and 116 mm, the smallest mirror to generate aberrations and the largest one to correct them. The system is configured as a multi-functional test bench capable of verifying the performance of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor as well as of a Phase Diversity based wavefront sensor. A third optical path leads to a high-order Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor to monitor the entire system performance.

  14. Development and Testing of a Portable Vocal Accumulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheyne, Harold A.; Hanson, Helen M.; Genereux, Ronald P.; Stevens, Kenneth N.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    This research note describes the design and testing of a device for unobtrusive, long-term ambulatory monitoring of voice use, named the Portable Vocal Accumulator (PVA). The PVA contains a digital signal processor for analyzing input from a neck-placed miniature accelerometer. During its development, accelerometer recordings were obtained from 99…

  15. Development and Testing of a Portable Vocal Accumulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheyne, Harold A.; Hanson, Helen M.; Genereux, Ronald P.; Stevens, Kenneth N.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    This research note describes the design and testing of a device for unobtrusive, long-term ambulatory monitoring of voice use, named the Portable Vocal Accumulator (PVA). The PVA contains a digital signal processor for analyzing input from a neck-placed miniature accelerometer. During its development, accelerometer recordings were obtained from 99…

  16. The Portable Usability Testing Lab: A Flexible Research Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Michael E.; And Others

    A group of faculty at the University of Georgia obtained funding for a research and development facility called the Learning and Performance Support Laboratory (LPSL). One of the LPSL's primary needs was obtaining a portable usability lab for software testing, so the facility obtained the "Luggage Lab 2000." The lab is transportable to…

  17. Test bench HEATREC for heat loss measurement on solar receiver tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, José M.; López-Martín, Rafael; Valenzuela, Loreto; Zarza, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    In Solar Thermal Electricity (STE) plants the thermal energy of solar radiation is absorbed by solar receiver tubes (HCEs) and it is transferred to a heat transfer fluid. Therefore, heat losses of receiver tubes have a direct influence on STE plants efficiency. A new test bench called HEATREC has been developed by Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) in order to determinate the heat losses of receiver tubes under laboratory conditions. The innovation of this test bench consists in the possibility to determine heat losses under controlled vacuum.

  18. A computer test bench for checking and adjusting the automatic regulators of generator excitation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dovganyuk, I. Ya.; Labunets, I. A.; Plotnikova, T. V.; Sokur, P. V.

    2008-05-15

    A computer test bench for testing and debugging natural samples of the automatic excitation regulation systems of generators, the protection units and the power part of the excitation system is described. The bench includes a personal computer with specialized input-output circuit boards for analog and digital signals, and enables the time and cost involved in developing and checking control systems to be reduced considerably. The program employed operates in real time and enables the automatic excitation regulators of synchronous generators and generators with longitudinal-transverse excitation in a specific power system to be adjusted.

  19. Development of remote data acquisition system based on OPC for brake test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiwei; Wu, Mengling; Tian, Chun; Ma, Tianhe

    2017-08-01

    The 1:1 train brake system test bench can be used to carry out brake-related adhesion-slid control, stability test, noise test and dynamic test. To collect data of the test bench, a data acquisition method is needed. In this paper, the remote data acquisition system of test bench is built by LabVIEW based on OPC technology. Unlike the traditional hardwire way connecting PLC acquisition module with sensors, the novel method is used to collect data and share them through the internal LAN built by Ethernet switches, which avoids the complex wiring interference in an easy, efficient and flexible way. The system has been successfully applied to the data acquisition activities of the comprehensive brake system test bench of CRRC Nanjing Puzhen Haitai Brake Equipment Co., Ltd., and the relationship test between the adhesion coefficient and the slip-ratio is realized. The speed signal, torque signal and brake disc temperature can be collected and displayed. The results show that the system is reliable, convenient, and efficient, and can meet the requirements of data acquisition.

  20. A portable cell-based impedance sensor for toxicity testing of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Theresa M; Widder, Mark W; Brennan, Linda M; Schwager, Steven J; van der Schalie, William H; Fey, Julien; Salazar, Noe

    2009-08-07

    A major limitation to using mammalian cell-based biosensors for field testing of drinking water samples is the difficulty of maintaining cell viability and sterility without an on-site cell culture facility. This paper describes a portable automated bench-top mammalian cell-based toxicity sensor that incorporates enclosed fluidic biochips containing endothelial cells monitored by Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) technology. Long-term maintenance of cells on the biochips is made possible by using a compact, self-contained disposable media delivery system. The toxicity sensor monitors changes in impedance of cell monolayers on the biochips after the introduction of water samples. The fluidic biochip includes an ECIS electronic layer and a polycarbonate channel layer, which together reduce initial impedance disturbances seen in commercially available open well ECIS chips caused by the mechanics of pipetting while maintaining the ability of the cells to respond to toxicants. A curve discrimination program was developed that compares impedance values over time between the control and treatment channels on the fluidic biochip and determines if they are significantly different. Toxicant responses of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells grown on fluidic biochips are similar to cells on commercially-available open well chips, and these cells can be maintained in the toxicity sensor device for at least nine days using an automated media delivery system. Longer-term cell storage is possible; bovine lung microvessel endothelial cells survive for up to four months on the fluidic biochips and remain responsive to a model toxicant. This is the first demonstration of a portable bench top system capable of both supporting cell health over extended periods of time and obtaining impedance measurements from endothelial cell monolayers after toxicant exposure.

  1. Weight/balance portable test equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Whitlock, R.W.

    1994-11-03

    This document shows the general layout, and gives a part description for the weight/balance test equipment. This equipment will aid in the regulation of the leachate loading of tanker trucks. The report contains four drawings with part specifications. The leachate originates from lined trenches.

  2. ANOLE Portable Radiation Detection System Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris A. Hodge

    2007-07-12

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named “Anole,” it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  3. Test-bench system for a borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianping; Ju, Xiaodong; Qiao, Wenxiao; Lu, Junqiang; Men, Baiyong; Liu, Dong

    2016-06-01

    The borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool (BAAR) is a new generation of imaging logging tool, which is able to investigate stratums in a relatively larger range of space around the borehole. The BAAR is designed based on the idea of modularization with a very complex structure, so it has become urgent for us to develop a dedicated test-bench system to debug each module of the BAAR. With the help of a test-bench system introduced in this paper, test and calibration of BAAR can be easily achieved. The test-bench system is designed based on the client/server model. The hardware system mainly consists of a host computer, an embedded controlling board, a bus interface board, a data acquisition board and a telemetry communication board. The host computer serves as the human machine interface and processes the uploaded data. The software running on the host computer is designed based on VC++. The embedded controlling board uses Advanced Reduced Instruction Set Machines 7 (ARM7) as the micro controller and communicates with the host computer via Ethernet. The software for the embedded controlling board is developed based on the operating system uClinux. The bus interface board, data acquisition board and telemetry communication board are designed based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and provide test interfaces for the logging tool. To examine the feasibility of the test-bench system, it was set up to perform a test on BAAR. By analyzing the test results, an unqualified channel of the electronic receiving cabin was discovered. It is suggested that the test-bench system can be used to quickly determine the working condition of sub modules of BAAR and it is of great significance in improving production efficiency and accelerating industrial production of the logging tool.

  4. Automated Portable Test System (APTS) - A performance envelope assessment tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, R. S.; Dunlap, W. P.; Jones, M. B.; Wilkes, R. L.; Bittner, A. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The reliability and stability of microcomputer-based psychological tests are evaluated. The hardware, test programs, and system control of the Automated Portable Test System, which assesses human performance and subjective status, are described. Subjects were administered 11 pen-and-pencil and microcomputer-based tests for 10 sessions. The data reveal that nine of the 10 tests stabilized by the third administration; inertial correlations were high and consistent. It is noted that the microcomputer-based tests display good psychometric properties in terms of differential stability and reliability.

  5. Optimization of an Optical Test Bench for Tire Properties Measurement and Tread Defects Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Castillo Aguilar, Juan Jesús; Cabrera Carrillo, Juan Antonio; Guerra Fernández, Antonio Jesús; Postigo Pozo, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Tire characteristics and behavior are of great importance in vehicle dynamics since the forces transmitted in the tire-road contact are the main contributors to global vehicle performance. Several research groups have focused on the study and modeling of tires. Some of the most important factors that need to be known are tread characteristics and pressure distribution in the tire-ground contact patch. In this work, a test bench has been used to adequately determine the aforementioned factors. The measurement principle of the test bench is the frustration of total internal reflection (FTIR) of light. It makes use of a laterally illuminated glass on which the tire leans. An interposed plastic interface between them causes the reflection of light. Finally, a video camera captures the bright image formed through the glass. The brightness level in each pixel of the image is related to existing normal pressure. A study of the parameters that affect the test bench calibration such as type of interface material used, diffuse light, hysteresis, creep and transverse light absorption is performed. Experimental tests are conducted to relate tire inflation pressure and camber angle to the pressure distribution. Furthermore, the test bench is used to detect and evaluate the influence of defects in the tire on the contact pressures. PMID:28353674

  6. Measurement of wheelchair contact force with a low cost bench test.

    PubMed

    Silva, L C A; Dedini, F G; Corrêa, F C; Eckert, J J; Becker, M

    2016-02-01

    In mechanical engineering, it is well established that contact between the tire and the ground is a key parameter in characterizing the dynamic behavior of vehicles and an important factor in design control. Therefore, it is an important part of dynamic simulation models for vehicles, including wheelchairs. This work presents a bench test designed to experimentally monitor and measure the forces transmitted to the ground by a moving wheel. The test bench is composed of a table and a track with a fixed wheel structure and powertrain system. The table is an integrated structure that measures the longitudinal and lateral forces produced by tire contact. This table allows characterization of the tire and tests the tire under varying loads at different slip and camber angles. Additionally, the test bench can also be used to evaluate other tires, such as caster tires. The performances of the new device are illustrated, and the results show the differences between tires, which are related to the dynamic behaviors of wheelchair model. Finally, preliminary experiments performed using the test bench have shown that it is able to monitor and measure the forces generated by the contact between the tire and the ground. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization of an Optical Test Bench for Tire Properties Measurement and Tread Defects Characterization.

    PubMed

    Castillo Aguilar, Juan Jesús; Cabrera Carrillo, Juan Antonio; Guerra Fernández, Antonio Jesús; Postigo Pozo, Sergio

    2017-03-29

    Tire characteristics and behavior are of great importance in vehicle dynamics since the forces transmitted in the tire-road contact are the main contributors to global vehicle performance. Several research groups have focused on the study and modeling of tires. Some of the most important factors that need to be known are tread characteristics and pressure distribution in the tire-ground contact patch. In this work, a test bench has been used to adequately determine the aforementioned factors. The measurement principle of the test bench is the frustration of total internal reflection (FTIR) of light. It makes use of a laterally illuminated glass on which the tire leans. An interposed plastic interface between them causes the reflection of light. Finally, a video camera captures the bright image formed through the glass. The brightness level in each pixel of the image is related to existing normal pressure. A study of the parameters that affect the test bench calibration such as type of interface material used, diffuse light, hysteresis, creep and transverse light absorption is performed. Experimental tests are conducted to relate tire inflation pressure and camber angle to the pressure distribution. Furthermore, the test bench is used to detect and evaluate the influence of defects in the tire on the contact pressures.

  8. An interferometric imaging test bench: The densified pupil concept applied to the VLTI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Mourard, Denis; Lardière, Olivier; Spang, Alain; Clausse, Jean-Michel; Bresson, Yves; Lagarde, Stéphane

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this poster is to present a test bench that we are developing at Observatoire de la Cote d'Azut to study the performances of interferometric imaging systems. The goal is to study the densified pupil concept in different configurations of the VLTI. This work is linked to the next generation instrument VIDA (VLTI Imaging with a Densified Array). This bench is used to specify the technical requirements like tip-tilt correction and cophasing. We will compare the imaging performances of the aperture synthesis, Fizeau and densified pupils configuration.

  9. Testing of a portable ultrahigh pressure water decontamination system (UHPWDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Lovell, A.; Dahlby, J.

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the tests done with a portable ultrahigh pressure water decontamination system (UHPWDS) on highly radioactively contaminated surfaces. A small unit was purchased, modified, and used for in-situ decontamination to change the waste level of the contaminated box from transuranic (TRU) waste to low- level waste (LLW). Low-level waste is less costly by as much as a factor of five or more if compared with TRU waste when handling, storage, and disposal are considered. The portable unit we tested is commercially available and requires minimal utilities for operation. We describe the UHPWDS unit itself, a procedure for its use, the results of the testing we did, and conclusions including positive and negative aspects of the UHPWDS.

  10. Hybrid test bench for evaluation of any device related to mechanical cardiac assistance.

    PubMed

    Colacino, F M; Arabia, M; Danieli, G A; Moscato, F; Nicosia, S; Piedimonte, F; Valigi, P; Pagnottelli, S

    2005-08-01

    Hydraulic mock circulatory systems have low flexibility to allow tests of different cardiovascular devices and low precision when a reference model must be reproduced. In this paper a new bench is described. It combines the computer model of the environment in which the device will operate and the electro-hydraulic interfaces by which device and computer are connected. A models library provided with basic functions allows implementing many layouts of the bench, which in turn depend both on the device properties and the desired experiment. In case of an apical LVAD evaluation, the bench can reproduce right and left ventricles, pulmonary and systemic circulations, inlet and outlet LVAD cannulas. An interface forces the instantaneous calculated flow at the VAD input and feeds back the measured pressure to the computer; another interface works in a similar -but complementary- way at the VAD output. The paper focuses on the operating principle of the electro hydraulic interfaces which represent a relevant component of the bench, on the RT-Linux-based software architecture, on the models of the basic elements of the bench. A patent is under preparation. At the moment, only a portion of the bench has been developed. It consists of a piston-cylinder mechanism, which mimics the elastance-based mechanism of a natural ventricle, and a hydraulic circuit representing the arterial load according to a modified windkessel model and the venous return according to the Guyton's model. The pump is driven by a real-time simulation of the cardiovascular system. This preliminary layout allowed testing the piston-cylinder mechanism, its control, and the software. This electro-hydraulic interface has been used to reproduce a pulsatile pump working in different modes. The hybrid model approach can support the development of new cardiac assist devices from their computer model to their manufacture.

  11. 49 CFR 180.605 - Requirements for periodic testing, inspection and repair of portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for periodic testing, inspection and... of Portable Tanks § 180.605 Requirements for periodic testing, inspection and repair of portable... periodic inspections and tests. Each Specification portable tank must be tested and inspected in accordance...

  12. REVIEW OF BENCH-, PILOT-, AND FULL-SCALE ORIMULSION (R) COMBUSTION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a review of bench-, pilot-, and full-scale Orimulsion combustion tests. A fossil fuel marketed by its producer, Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PdVSA), since the late 1980s as an alternative to coal and heavy fuel oil, Orimulsion is a bitumen-in-water em...

  13. REVIEW OF BENCH-, PILOT-, AND FULL-SCALE ORIMULSION (R) COMBUSTION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a review of bench-, pilot-, and full-scale Orimulsion combustion tests. A fossil fuel marketed by its producer, Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PdVSA), since the late 1980s as an alternative to coal and heavy fuel oil, Orimulsion is a bitumen-in-water em...

  14. Measure Twice, Build Once: Bench-Scale Testing to Evaluate Bioretention Media Design - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oral presentation will be at the EWRI International LID Conference in San Francisco, on April 11-14, 2010. The slides discuss the utility of conducting bench-scale testing on selected bioretention media and media amendments to validate hydrologic properties before installing...

  15. Measure Twice, Build Once: Bench-Scale Testing to Evaluate Bioretention Media Design - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oral presentation will be at the EWRI International LID Conference in San Francisco, on April 11-14, 2010. The slides discuss the utility of conducting bench-scale testing on selected bioretention media and media amendments to validate hydrologic properties before installing...

  16. Calibrating/testing meters in hot water test bench VM7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, E.; Stolt, K.; Lau, P.; Mattiasson, K.

    A Hot Water Test Bench, VM7, has been developed and constructed for the calibration and testing of volume and flowmeters, in a project at the National Volume Measurement Laboratory at the Swedish National Testing and Research Institute. The intended area of use includes use as a reference at audit measurements, e.g. for accredited laboratories, calibration of meters for the industry and for the testing of hot water meters. The objective of the project, which was initiated in 1989, was to design equipment with stable flow and with a minimal temperature drop even at very low flow rates. The principle of the design is a closed system with two pressure tanks at different pressures. The water is led from the high pressure tank through the test object and the volume standard, in the form of master meters or a piston prover alternatively, to the low pressure tank. Calibrations/tests are made comparing the indication of the test object to that of master meters covering the current flow rate. These are, in the same test cycle, calibrated to the piston prover. Alternatively, the test object can be calibrated directly to the piston prover.

  17. Bench Test Evaluation of Adaptive Servoventilation Devices for Sleep Apnea Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kaixian; Kharboutly, Haissam; Ma, Jianting; Bouzit, Mourad; Escourrou, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Adaptive servoventilation devices are marketed to overcome sleep disordered breathing with apneas and hypopneas of both central and obstructive mechanisms often experienced by patients with chronic heart failure. The clinical efficacy of these devices is still questioned. Study Objectives: This study challenged the detection and treatment capabilities of the three commercially available adaptive servoventilation devices in response to sleep disordered breathing events reproduced on an innovative bench test. Methods: The bench test consisted of a computer-controlled piston and a Starling resistor. The three devices were subjected to a flow sequence composed of central and obstructive apneas and hypopneas including Cheyne-Stokes respiration derived from a patient. The responses of the devices were separately evaluated with the maximum and the clinical settings (titrated expiratory positive airway pressure), and the detected events were compared to the bench-scored values. Results: The three devices responded similarly to central events, by increasing pressure support to raise airflow. All central apneas were eliminated, whereas hypopneas remained. The three devices responded differently to the obstructive events with the maximum settings. These obstructive events could be normalized with clinical settings. The residual events of all the devices were scored lower than bench test values with the maximum settings, but were in agreement with the clinical settings. However, their mechanisms were misclassified. Conclusion: The tested devices reacted as expected to the disordered breathing events, but not sufficiently to normalize the breathing flow. The device-scored results should be used with caution to judge efficacy, as their validity depends upon the initial settings. Citation: Zhu K; Kharboutly H; Ma J; Bouzit M; Escourrou P. Bench test evaluation of adaptive servoventilation devices for sleep apnea treatment. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(9):861-871. PMID

  18. Automated Portable Test (APT) System: overview and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittner, A. C.; Smith, M. G.; Kennedy, R. S.; Staley, C. F.; Harbeson, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    The Automated Portable Test (APT) System is a notebook-sized, computer-based, human-performance and subjective-status assessment system. It is now being used in a wide range of environmental studies (e.g., simulator aftereffects, flight tests, drug effects, and hypoxia). Three questionnaires and 15 performance tests have been implemented, and the adaptation of 30 more tests is underway or is planned. The APT System is easily transportable, is inexpensive, and has the breadth of expansion options required for field and laboratory applications. The APT System is a powerful and expandable tool for human assessment in remote and unusual environments.

  19. Automated Portable Test (APT) System: overview and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittner, A. C.; Smith, M. G.; Kennedy, R. S.; Staley, C. F.; Harbeson, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    The Automated Portable Test (APT) System is a notebook-sized, computer-based, human-performance and subjective-status assessment system. It is now being used in a wide range of environmental studies (e.g., simulator aftereffects, flight tests, drug effects, and hypoxia). Three questionnaires and 15 performance tests have been implemented, and the adaptation of 30 more tests is underway or is planned. The APT System is easily transportable, is inexpensive, and has the breadth of expansion options required for field and laboratory applications. The APT System is a powerful and expandable tool for human assessment in remote and unusual environments.

  20. Portable oxygen subsystem. [design analysis and performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The concept and design of a portable oxygen device for use in the space shuttle orbiter is presented. Hardware fabrication and acceptance tests (i.e., breadboard models) are outlined and discussed. Optimization of the system (for weight, volume, safety, costs) is discussed. The device is of the rebreather type, and provides a revitalized breathing gas supply to a crewman for denitrogenization and emergency activities. Engineering drawings and photographs of the device are shown.

  1. 49 CFR 180.605 - Requirements for periodic testing, inspection and repair of portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... portable tank must be leak tested by a minimum sustained air pressure of at least 3 psig applied to the entire tank. Each Specification 51 or 56 portable tank must be tested by a minimum pressure (air or... portable tanks must be at a pressure of at least 25% of MAWP. During each air pressure test, the entire...

  2. 49 CFR 180.605 - Requirements for periodic testing, inspection and repair of portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... portable tank must be leak tested by a minimum sustained air pressure of at least 3 psig applied to the entire tank. Each Specification 51 or 56 portable tank must be tested by a minimum pressure (air or... portable tanks must be at a pressure of at least 25% of MAWP. During each air pressure test, the entire...

  3. 49 CFR 180.605 - Requirements for periodic testing, inspection and repair of portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... portable tank must be leak tested by a minimum sustained air pressure of at least 3 psig applied to the entire tank. Each Specification 51 or 56 portable tank must be tested by a minimum pressure (air or... portable tanks must be at a pressure of at least 25% of MAWP. During each air pressure test, the entire...

  4. MEGARA Detector Test Bench at LICA-UCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulloch, S. M.; García-Vargas, M. L.; Maldonado, M.; Zamorano, J.; Gil de Paz, A.; Gallego, J.; Carrasco, E.; Vílchez, J. M.; Sánchez-Moreno, F. M.

    2013-05-01

    LICA (Laboratorio de Instrumentación Científica Avanzada) is an initiative of the Campus de Excelencia Internacional of UCM. Among the facilities within LICA, a new laboratory has been assigned to MEGARA project for subsystem tests and AIV. This paper presents the current facilities installed at LICA for detector characterization, which will be used to test and characterize MEGARA detectors.

  5. 100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

  6. The test bench for testing torsional stiffness of active anti-roll bar made of extended profiles with rectangular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macikowski, K. R.; Kaszuba, S.

    2016-09-01

    The article describes the test bench constructed to determine the characteristics of torsional stiffness of extended rod elements, which can be used, for example, in cars as anti-roll bars. The bench has been designed so as to allow an examination of the samples with variable length and variable cross-sectional dimensions. It is possible to perform tests for different materials. The article contains a detailed description of the mentioned test bench and presentation of the results obtained from preliminary tests.

  7. A vibration monitoring acquisition and diagnostic system for helicopter drive train bench tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dousis, Dimitri A.

    An automated drive train test stand vibration monitoring system called VMADS has been developed by Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., and has been installed at Bell's transmission bench test facility. VMADS provides the operator with warning and alarm indications for preselected degraded conditions, and acquires vibration data to be used by engineers to improve the diagnostics for better fault detection and fault isolation. VMADS is used as a test bed for new monitoring and diagnostic algorithm evaluation and validation, a necessary step to ensure development of accurate, reliable integrated health usage monitoring systems for the Bell rotorcraft fleet. This paper highlights the VMADS features for helicopter and tiltrotor aircraft drive train bench test monitoring and diagnostics and discusses supportive ongoing health and usage monitoring activities at BHTI, both military and commercial for enhanced safety and reduced maintenance costs. Bell is translating VMADS developed capability to airborne applications, while simultaneously enhancing the original VMADS capabilities.

  8. Unbalanced rock mass vibration generator and its bench testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybalkin, LA; Azarov, AV; Serdyukov, AS

    2017-02-01

    This work presents an unbalanced borehole vibration source with the pneumatic actuator to affect the rock mass bottomhole zone in the seismic frequency range. The modulus-type source consists of the vibration generator with automatic step regulation of static moment, clamping node and built-in pneumatic device to transfer equipment in uncased boreholes. There are test results on the source prototype, amplitude and frequency characteristics and spectral content of the source signal.

  9. Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-10-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous

  10. Optimization of limestone sizing for CFB combustors: Results of pilot plant and bench-scale testing

    SciTech Connect

    Alliston, M.; Edvardsson, C.; Wu, S.; Probst, S.

    1994-12-31

    A grant to study the performance of limestones in a Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor was obtained in 1991 from the Pennsylvania Energy Development Authority (PEDA) by Tampella Power Corporation (TPC). The overall objective of this PEDA project was to carry out a systematic pilot plant tests at TPC`s pilot plant in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, in systematic order to identify ways of improving sulfur capture and limestone utilization through better control of the size distribution and residence time of the limestone particles in the furnace. It was also an objective to determine if bench scale testing could be of value in predicting CFB sorbent behavior. The pilot plant and bench test results were incorporated into an empirical Correlation which accounts for the size distribution and residence time of solids in CFB boiler.

  11. Acceptance test report for portable exhauster POR-007/Skid E

    SciTech Connect

    Kriskovich, J.R.

    1998-07-24

    This document describes Acceptance Testing performed on Portable Exhauster POR-007/Skid E. It includes measurements of bearing vibration levels, pressure decay testing, programmable logic controller interlocks, high vacuum, flow and pressure control functional testing. The purpose of Acceptance testing documented by this report was to demonstrate compliance of the exhausters with the performance criteria established within HNF-0490, Rev. 1 following a repair and upgrade effort at Hanford. In addition, data obtained during this testing is required for the resolution of outstanding Non-conformance Reports (NCR), and finally, to demonstrate the functionality of the associated software for the pressure control and high vacuum exhauster operating modes provided for by W-320. Additional testing not required by the ATP was also performed to assist in the disposition and close out of receiving inspection report and for application design information (system curve). Results of this testing are also captured within this document.

  12. Acceptance test report for portable exhauster POR-008/Skid F

    SciTech Connect

    Kriskovich, J.R.

    1998-07-24

    Portable Exhauster POR-008 was procured via HNF-0490, Specification for a Portable Exhausted System for Waste Tank Ventilation. Prior to taking ownership, acceptance testing was performed at the vendors. However at the conclusion of testing a number of issues remained that required resolution before the exhausters could be used by Project W-320. The purpose of acceptance testing documented by this report was to demonstrate compliance of the exhausters with the performance criteria established within HNF-O49O, Rev. 1 following a repair and upgrade effort at Hanford. In addition, data obtained during this testing is required for the resolution of outstanding Non-conformance Reports (NCR), and finally, to demonstrate the functionality of the associated software for the pressure control and high vacuum exhauster operating modes provided for by W-320. Additional testing not required by the ATP was also performed to assist in the disposition and close out of receiving inspection report and for application design information (system curve). Results of this testing are also captured within this document.

  13. Bench-scale testing of a heat-pipe receiver for solar thermal electric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Dudley, Vernon

    Electric power generating systems that couple parabolic-dish solar-concentrators with Stirling engines and generators are currently being developed under the Department of Energy's solar thermal electric program. These systems will use liquid metal heat pipes to transfer energy from the focal point of a solar concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. The heat-pipe solar-receivers are required to operate in adverse orientations and accept flux levels on the order of 100 W/sq. cm. To explore the operating limits of heat-pipe solar-receivers, a series of bench-scale heat pipe receivers are being designed and tested. Results from the bench-scale tests and their implications on a full-scale heat-pipe solar receiver are presented in this paper.

  14. Comparison between simulations and lab results on the ASSIST test-bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Louarn, Miska; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Kolb, Johann; Paufique, Jerome; Oberti, Sylvain; La Penna, Paolo; Arsenault, Robin

    2016-07-01

    We present the latest comparison results between laboratory tests carried out on the ASSIST test bench and Octopus end-to end simulations. We simulated, as closely to the lab conditions as possible, the different AOF modes (Maintenance and commissioning mode (SCAO), GRAAL (GLAO in the near IR), Galacsi Wide Field mode (GLAO in the visible) and Galacsi narrow field mode (LTAO in the visible)). We then compared the simulation results to the ones obtained on the lab bench. Several aspects were investigated, like number of corrected modes, turbulence wind speeds, LGS photon flux etc. The agreement between simulations and lab is remarkably good for all investigated parameters, giving great confidence in both simulation tool and performance of the AO system in the lab.

  15. A test bench for ARGOS: integration of sub-systems and validation of the wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orban de Xivry, Gilles; Rabien, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    ARGOS, the wide eld Laser Guide Stars adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope, is now entering its installation phase. In the meanwhile, we have started a test bench in order to integrate various Argos sub-systems and demonstrate its wavefront measurements. To this objective, we rst validate three key components of the Argos wavefront sensor which we then integrate together. The test bench therefore comprises the Argos wavefront camera system - including a large frame, fast framerate, high quantum eciency and low readout noise pnCCD -, the slope computer, and a optical gating unit. While we present here the demonstration of those three key components, it is also a step to their system level integration that enables us to validate the wavefront measurements in term of noises, timing and computation. In the near future, those system will be integrated to the wavefront sensor system of ARGOS.

  16. Test-retest reliability of barbell velocity during the free-weight bench-press exercise.

    PubMed

    Stock, Matt S; Beck, Travis W; DeFreitas, Jason M; Dillon, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to calculate test-retest reliability statistics for peak barbell velocity during the free-weight bench-press exercise for loads corresponding to 10-90% of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM). Twenty-one healthy, resistance-trained men (mean ± SD age = 23.5 ± 2.7 years; body mass = 90.5 ± 14.6 kg; 1RM bench press = 125.4 ± 18.4 kg) volunteered for this study. A minimum of 48 hours after a maximal strength testing and familiarization session, the subjects performed single repetitions of the free-weight bench-press exercise at each tenth percentile (10-90%) of the 1RM on 2 separate occasions. For each repetition, the subjects were instructed to press the barbell as rapidly as possible, and peak barbell velocity was measured with a Tendo Weightlifting Analyzer. The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients (model 2,1) and corresponding standard errors of measurement (expressed as percentages of the mean barbell velocity values) were 0.717 (4.2%), 0.572 (5.0%), 0.805 (3.1%), 0.669 (4.7%), 0.790 (4.6%), 0.785 (4.8%), 0.811 (5.8%), 0.714 (10.3%), and 0.594 (12.6%) for the weights corresponding to 10-90% 1RM. There were no mean differences between the barbell velocity values from trials 1 and 2. These results indicated moderate to high test-retest reliability for barbell velocity from 10 to 70% 1RM but decreased consistency at 80 and 90% 1RM. When examining barbell velocity during the free-weight bench-press exercise, greater measurement error must be overcome at 80 and 90% 1RM to be confident that an observed change is meaningful.

  17. 15 kA energy-evacuation switch for test bench of superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudashkin, A. V.; Sidorin, A. O.; Karpinskiy, V. N.; Savelev, A. A.; Osipenkov, A. L.; Makarov, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    A new 15-kA energy-evacuation switch based on the operational experience of the protection system of Nuclotron superconducting magnets has been developed. It is used at the test bench of superconducting magnets being produced for NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility, which is implemented at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR)) [1] and FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, Darmstadt, Germany) accelerator facilities.

  18. Design of a pseudo-physiological test bench specific to the development of biodegradable metallic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Julie; Hermawan, Hendra; Dubé, Dominique; Mantovani, Diego

    2008-03-01

    Endovascular stents have proven effective in treating coronary and peripheral arterial occlusions. Since the first attempts, metals used to make these devices have been generally selected, and designed to be highly resistant to corrosion. Therefore, as almost the totality of metallic biomaterials, they are implanted on a long-term basis. However, complications associated with permanent stents, such as in-stent restenosis and thrombosis, have often been reported. In order to reduce those complications, it would be clinically useful to develop a new family of degradable stents. An interesting material for fabrication of degradable stents is based on magnesium, an essential element involved in human metabolism. Success in using magnesium alloys for the fabrication of endovascular devices is closely related to the properties of the selected alloy. In this context, a test bench was specifically designed to reproduce the physiological conditions to which stents are submitted when implanted in the coronary arteries. Then the test bench was validated using a magnesium-based alloy. Results showed that the corrosion rate and the corrosion mechanisms vary with the applied shear stress and that corrosion products strongly depend on the composition of the corrosive solution. This test bench will thus be useful in further investigations for the development of metallic alloys as degradable biomaterials.

  19. Extreme adaptive optics system optimization with the high order test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernet, Elise; Kasper, Markus; Vérinaud, Christophe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Tordo, Sébastien; Hubin, Norbert; Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Tozzi, Andrea; Basden, Alastair G.; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Love, Gordon D.; Myers, Richard M.

    2006-06-01

    Extreme adaptive optics systems dedicated to the search for extrasolar planets are currently being developed for most 8-10 meter telescopes. Extensive computer simulations have shown the ability of both Shack-Hartmann and pyramid wave front sensors to deliver high Strehl ratio correction expected from extreme adaptive optics but few experiments have been realized so far. The high order test bench implements extreme adaptive optics on the MACAO test bench with realistic telescope conditions reproduced by star and turbulence generators. A 32×32 actuator micro deformable mirror, one pyramid wave front sensor, one Shack-Hartmann wave front sensor, the ESO SPARTA real time computer and an essentially read-noise free electron multiplying CCD60 (E2V CCD60) provide an ideal cocoon to study the different behavior of the two types of wave front sensors in terms of linearity, sensitivity to calibration errors, noise propagation, specific issues to pyramid or Shack-Hartmann wave front sensors, etc. We will describe the overall design of this test bench and will focus on the characterization of two essential sub-systems: the micro deformable mirror and the phase screens.

  20. BETSI, a new test bench for ion sources optimization at CEA SACLAY.

    PubMed

    Tuske, O; Adroit, G; Delferrière, O; De Menezes, D; Gauthier, Y; Gobin, R; Harrault, F

    2008-02-01

    In the framework of several International HPPA projects (such as IFMIF, IPHI, and Spiral2) the CEA handles the design and the developments of several electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. For the IFMIF EVEDA demonstrator, a 140 mA cw extracted deuteron beam will be required for high yield of neutron production. For radioactive ion production in the Spiral2 project, several milliamperes of deuterons will be delivered with a permanent magnet source. The optimization of the beam quality at the entrance of the radio frequency quadropole (RFQ) accelerator system triggered the need of a new test bench for ion source optimization and beam qualification. The BETSI ion source test bench will operate up to 50 kV and ignite cw or pulsed hydrogen plasma with a 2.45 GHz magnetron. Great care has already been taken to design electrostatic optics of the extraction system to minimize the emittance growth. Plasma diagnostics will be inserted in the source chamber and several beam diagnostics (emittance and current measurements, beam species analysis) will also be implemented on the low energy beam line transport (LEBT). These diagnostics allow the simultaneous analysis of the beam quality with the plasma parameters of the source. Regional funding request will also be needed to improve the LEBT for space charge compensation measurements. The design of the present and upgraded test bench will be reported as well as the first extracted beam analysis.

  1. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench... Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist;...

  2. Automated test bench for simulation of radiation electrification of spacecraft structural dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, A. M.; Bezhayev, A. Yu; Zykov, V. M.; Isaychenko, V. I.; Lukashchuk, A. A.; Lukonin, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes the test bench “Prognoz-2” designed in Testing Center, Institute of Non-Destructive Testing, Tomsk Polytechnic University, which can be used: for ground testing of individual samples of spacecraft structural materials (e.g. thermal control coatings or cover glasses for solar batteries) or ceramics of the plasma thruster discharge channel), and whole spacecraft units or instruments (e.g. instruments of solar and stellar orientation or correcting plasma thrusters) exposed to radiation electrification factors; to verify the calculation mathematical models of radiation electrification of structural dielectrics under the impact of space factors in different orbits.

  3. An interferometric imaging test bench: the densified pupil concept applied to the VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Mourard, Denis; Lardiere, Olivier; Spang, Alain; Clausse, Jean-Michel; Antonelli, Pierre; Bresson, Yves; Lagarde, Stephane

    2004-10-01

    We describe a test bench designed to study the performances of interferometric imaging systems. The main goal is to study the densified pupil concept in the framework of the VLTI. This work is linked to the proposition of a second generation instrument called VIDA (VLTI Imaging with a Densified Array). This bench aims at comparing the imaging performances of the aperture synthesis, Fizeau and densified pupils beam combination schemes and at specifying the technical requirements like cophasing and tip-tilt correction. A Fizeau assembly, using a multi-apertures mask and associated with a wavefront sensor, has been designed. It allows to measure the differential piston between sub-apertures and to link them to the characteristics of the image recovered. A densified assembly is under study by using reflective surfaces or optical fibers to carry the beams and to densify the pupils before the combination.

  4. [Portable lung function parameters testing system based on DSP].

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhanshe; Yuan, Minzhong; Zhou, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Lung function monitoring is a critical technique for clinical medicine. Currently, the lung function testing devices used in our domestic hospitals are both expensive and bulky. A portable and accurate lung function parameters testing system is highly desired and is proposed in this paper. The hardware of the system is based on DSP technology. The breathing passage is designed with an aim suitable for the breathe and signal detection. We use the direct detection method to detect the gas flow, the breathing passage pressure and the breathing time. Thanks to the powerful data processing ability and the high operation speed of the DSP, breathing signals can be easily analyzed. Thus, several lung function parameters of clinical significance can be obtained. Experiments show that the accuracy of the system is better than 3%, and could meet the demand of the lung function testing.

  5. Ultra-portable, wireless smartphone spectrometer for rapid, non-destructive testing of fruit ripeness

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anshuman J.; Wahi, Akshat; Kothari, Ishan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a smartphone based spectrometer design that is standalone and supported on a wireless platform. The device is inherently low-cost and the power consumption is minimal making it portable to carry out a range of studies in the field. All essential components of the device like the light source, spectrometer, filters, microcontroller and wireless circuits have been assembled in a housing of dimensions 88 mm × 37 mm × 22 mm and the entire device weighs 48 g. The resolution of the spectrometer is 15 nm, delivering accurate and repeatable measurements. The device has a dedicated app interface on the smartphone to communicate, receive, plot and analyze spectral data. The performance of the smartphone spectrometer is comparable to existing bench-top spectrometers in terms of stability and wavelength resolution. Validations of the device were carried out by demonstrating non-destructive ripeness testing in fruit samples. Ultra-Violet (UV) fluorescence from Chlorophyll present in the skin was measured across various apple varieties during the ripening process and correlated with destructive firmness tests. A satisfactory agreement was observed between ripeness and fluorescence signals. This demonstration is a step towards possible consumer, bio-sensing and diagnostic applications that can be carried out in a rapid manner. PMID:27606927

  6. Ultra-portable, wireless smartphone spectrometer for rapid, non-destructive testing of fruit ripeness.

    PubMed

    Das, Anshuman J; Wahi, Akshat; Kothari, Ishan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-09-08

    We demonstrate a smartphone based spectrometer design that is standalone and supported on a wireless platform. The device is inherently low-cost and the power consumption is minimal making it portable to carry out a range of studies in the field. All essential components of the device like the light source, spectrometer, filters, microcontroller and wireless circuits have been assembled in a housing of dimensions 88 mm × 37 mm × 22 mm and the entire device weighs 48 g. The resolution of the spectrometer is 15 nm, delivering accurate and repeatable measurements. The device has a dedicated app interface on the smartphone to communicate, receive, plot and analyze spectral data. The performance of the smartphone spectrometer is comparable to existing bench-top spectrometers in terms of stability and wavelength resolution. Validations of the device were carried out by demonstrating non-destructive ripeness testing in fruit samples. Ultra-Violet (UV) fluorescence from Chlorophyll present in the skin was measured across various apple varieties during the ripening process and correlated with destructive firmness tests. A satisfactory agreement was observed between ripeness and fluorescence signals. This demonstration is a step towards possible consumer, bio-sensing and diagnostic applications that can be carried out in a rapid manner.

  7. Ultra-portable, wireless smartphone spectrometer for rapid, non-destructive testing of fruit ripeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anshuman J.; Wahi, Akshat; Kothari, Ishan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a smartphone based spectrometer design that is standalone and supported on a wireless platform. The device is inherently low-cost and the power consumption is minimal making it portable to carry out a range of studies in the field. All essential components of the device like the light source, spectrometer, filters, microcontroller and wireless circuits have been assembled in a housing of dimensions 88 mm × 37 mm × 22 mm and the entire device weighs 48 g. The resolution of the spectrometer is 15 nm, delivering accurate and repeatable measurements. The device has a dedicated app interface on the smartphone to communicate, receive, plot and analyze spectral data. The performance of the smartphone spectrometer is comparable to existing bench-top spectrometers in terms of stability and wavelength resolution. Validations of the device were carried out by demonstrating non-destructive ripeness testing in fruit samples. Ultra-Violet (UV) fluorescence from Chlorophyll present in the skin was measured across various apple varieties during the ripening process and correlated with destructive firmness tests. A satisfactory agreement was observed between ripeness and fluorescence signals. This demonstration is a step towards possible consumer, bio-sensing and diagnostic applications that can be carried out in a rapid manner.

  8. Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

    1998-03-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

  9. Modification of a compressor performance test bench for liquid slugging observation in refrigeration compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ola, Max; Thomas, Christiane; Hesse, Ullrich

    2017-08-01

    Compressor performance test procedures are defined by the standard DIN EN 13771, wherein a variety of possible calorimeter and flow rate measurement methods are suggested. One option is the selection of two independent measurement methods. The accuracies of both selected measurement methods are essential. The second option requires only one method. However the measurement accuracy of the used device has to be verified and recalibrated on a regular basis. The compressor performance test facility at the Technische Universitaet Dresden uses a calibrated flow measurement sensor, a hot gas bypass and a mixed flow heat exchanger. The test bench can easily be modified for tests of various compressor types at different operating ranges and with various refrigerants. In addition, the modified test setup enables the investigation of long term liquid slug and its effects on the compressor. The modification comprises observational components, adjustments of the control system, safety measures and a customized oil recirculation system for compressors which do not contain an integrated oil sump or oil level regulation system. This paper describes the setup of the test bench, its functional principle, the key modifications, first test results and an evaluation of the energy balance.

  10. Fabrication, assembly, bench and drilling tests of two prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bookwalter, R.; Duettra, P.D.; Johnson, P.; Lyons, W.C.; Miska, S.

    1987-04-01

    The first and second prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors have been fabricated, assembled and tested. All bench tests showed that the motor will produce horsepower and bit speeds approximating the predicted values. Specifically, the downhole pneumatic turbine motor produced approximately 50 horsepower at 100 rpm, while being supplied with about 3600 SCFM of compressed air. The first prototype was used in a drilling test from a depth of 389 feet to a depth of 789 feet in the Kirtland formation. This first prototype motor drilled at a rate exceeding 180 ft/hr, utilizing only 3000 SCFM of compressed air. High temperature tests (at approximately 460/sup 0/F) were carried out on the thrust assembly and the gearboxes for the two prototypes. These components operated successfully at these temperatures. Although the bench and drilling tests were successful, the tests revealed design changes that should be made before drilling tests are carried out in geothermal boreholes at the Geysers area, near Santa Rosa, California.

  11. Theoretical Rationale of Heating Block for Testing Bench of Aerospace Crafts Thermal Protection Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Anna A.; Reznik, Sergey V.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical rationale for the structural layout of a testing bench with zirconium dioxide heating elements on the basis of modelling radiative-conductive heat transfer are presented. The numerical simulation of radiative-conductive heat transfer for the two-dimensional scaled model of the testing segment with the finite-element analysis software package Ansys 15.0 are performed. The simulation results showed that for the selected layout of the heaters the temperature non-uniformity along the length of the sample over time will not exceed 3 % even at a temperature of 2000 K.

  12. Development of a pyramidal wavefront sensor test-bench at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min; Gauvin, Jonny; Martin, Olivier; Savard, Maxime; Bourqui, Pascal; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Deschenes, William; Anctil, Genevieve; Chateauneuf, François

    2013-12-01

    The key technical element of the adaptive optics in astronomy is the wavefront sensing (WFS). One of the advantages of the pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS) over the widely used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor seems to be the increased sensitivity in closed-loop applications. A high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range WFS, such as P-WFS technology, still needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes application. At INO, we have recently carried out the optical design, testing and performance evaluation of a P-WFS bench setup. The optical design of the bench setup mainly consists of the super-LED fiber source, source collimator, spatial light modulator (SLM), relay lenses, tip-tilt mirror, Fourier-transforming lens, and a four-faceted glass pyramid with a large vertex angle as well as pupil re-imaged optics. The phase-only SLM has been introduced in the bench setup to generate atmospheric turbulence with a maximum phase shift of more than 2π at each pixel (256 grey levels). Like a modified Foucault knife-edge test, the refractive pyramid element is used to produce four images of the entrance pupil on a CCD camera. The Fourier-transforming lens, which is used before the pyramid prism, is designed for telecentric output to allow dynamic modulation (rotation of the beam around the pyramid-prism center) from a tip-tilt mirror. Furthermore, a P-WFS diffraction-based model has been developed. This model includes most of the system limitations such as the SLM discrete voltage steps and the CCD pixel pitch. The pyramid effects (edges and tip) are considered as well. The modal wavefront reconstruction algorithm relies on the construction of an interaction matrix (one for each modulation's amplitude). Each column of the interaction matrix represents the combination of the four pupil images for a given wavefront aberration. The nice agreement between the data and the model suggest that the limitation of the system is not the P

  13. Sensory feedback in prosthetics: a standardized test bench for closed-loop control.

    PubMed

    Dosen, Strahinja; Markovic, Marko; Hartmann, Cornelia; Farina, Dario

    2015-03-01

    Closing the control loop by providing sensory feedback to the user of a prosthesis is an important challenge, with major impact on the future of prosthetics. Developing and comparing closed-loop systems is a difficult task, since there are many different methods and technologies that can be used to implement each component of the system. Here, we present a test bench developed in Matlab Simulink for configuring and testing the closed-loop human control system in standardized settings. The framework comprises a set of connected generic blocks with normalized inputs and outputs, which can be customized by selecting specific implementations from a library of predefined components. The framework is modular and extensible and it can be used to configure, compare and test different closed-loop system prototypes, thereby guiding the development towards an optimal system configuration. The use of the test bench was demonstrated by investigating two important aspects of closed-loop control: performance of different electrotactile feedback interfaces (spatial versus intensity coding) during a pendulum stabilization task and feedforward methods (joystick versus myocontrol) for force control. The first experiment demonstrated that in the case of trained subjects the intensity coding might be superior to spatial coding. In the second experiment, the control of force was rather poor even with a stable and precise control interface (joystick), demonstrating that inherent characteristics of the prosthesis can be an important limiting factor when considering the overall effectiveness of the closed-loop control. The presented test bench is an important instrument for investigating different aspects of human manual control with sensory feedback.

  14. Performance study of protective clothing against hot water splashes: from bench scale test to instrumented manikin test.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Song, Guowen; Wang, Faming

    2015-03-01

    Hot liquid hazards existing in work environments are shown to be a considerable risk for industrial workers. In this study, the predicted protection from fabric was assessed by a modified hot liquid splash tester. In these tests, conditions with and without an air spacer were applied. The protective performance of a garment exposed to hot water spray was investigated by a spray manikin evaluation system. Three-dimensional body scanning technique was used to characterize the air gap size between the protective clothing and the manikin skin. The relationship between bench scale test and manikin test was discussed and the regression model was established to predict the overall percentage of skin burn while wearing protective clothing. The results demonstrated strong correlations between bench scale test and manikin test. Based on these studies, the overall performance of protective clothing against hot water spray can be estimated on the basis of the results of the bench scale hot water splashes test and the information of air gap size entrapped in clothing. The findings provide effective guides for the design and material selection while developing high performance protective clothing. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society 2014.

  15. 49 CFR 180.605 - Requirements for periodic testing, inspection and repair of portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for periodic testing, inspection and... Tanks § 180.605 Requirements for periodic testing, inspection and repair of portable tanks. (a) A... periodic inspections and tests. Each Specification portable tank must be tested and inspected in accordance...

  16. Construction and Bench Testing of a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the 30 high robust Phase I graphite secondary collimators with 30 high Z Phase II collimators. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. This paper reports on the final construction and testing of the prototype collimator to be installed in the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN. Bench-top measurements will demonstrate that the device is fully operational and has the mechanical and vacuum characteristics acceptable for installation in the SPS.

  17. Testing of a work bench for handling of explosives in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hank, R.; Johansson, K.; Lagman, L.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype work station was developed at which jobs can be carried out with explosives up to 10 gr and deflagrating products up to 50 gr. Tests were made to investigate the consequences of a spontaneous accident during work. Conclusions are: the workbench offers good protection against splinters provided the inside walls are coated with a shock absorber; the carbonate glass should be a minimum of eight mm thick; the risk of burns, except on arms and hands, is very low; the bench withstands the explosion with the given weight of explosives (10 gr); the risk of lesions on the lung are very low, for the operator as well as for somebody nearby.

  18. Titan IIIC Transtage/Stage 2 Separation-Shock Bench Test. Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    2 6 15o I Frequency, HzJ Bench Shock Test - Stage II/III Separation, Run 10Measurement No. 4 - Longitudinal axis longeron nearstation 117 !• , 149 A...6I 5 5 4 33 3 10CC- O-10 I--L 87 8 i5 5 : -- 6 1ench Sh c- es -t ge I / I Se a a i n Ru02 1 2~w Me srm n No L N Lo g td n l0xsIn eo

  19. Method, apparatus and system for managing queue operations of a test bench environment

    DOEpatents

    Ostler, Farrell Lynn

    2016-07-19

    Techniques and mechanisms for performing dequeue operations for agents of a test bench environment. In an embodiment, a first group of agents are each allocated a respective ripe reservation and a second set of agents are each allocated a respective unripe reservation. Over time, queue management logic allocates respective reservations to agents and variously changes one or more such reservations from unripe to ripe. In another embodiment, an order of servicing agents allocated unripe reservations is based on relative priorities of the unripe reservations with respect to one another. An order of servicing agents allocated ripe reservations is on a first come, first served basis.

  20. Novel Electrochemical Test Bench for Evaluating the Functional Fatigue Life of Biomedical Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijaz, M. F.; Dubinskiy, S.; Zhukova, Y.; Korobkova, A.; Pustov, Y.; Brailovski, V.; Prokoshkin, S.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present work was first to develop and validate a test bench that simulates the in vitro conditions to which the biomedical implants will be actually subjected in vivo. For the preliminary application assessments, the strain-controlled fatigue tests of biomedically pure Ti and Ti-Nb-Zr alloy in simulated body fluid were undertaken. The in situ open-circuit potential measurements from the test bench demonstrated a strong dependence on the dynamic cycling and kind of material under testing. The results showed that during fatigue cycling, the passive oxide film formed on the surface of Ti-Nb-Zr alloy was more resistant to fatigue degradation when compared with pure Ti. The Ti-Nb-Zr alloy exhibited prolonged fatigue life when compared with pure Ti. The fractographic features of both materials were also characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical results and the fractographic evidence confirmed that the prolonged functional fatigue life of the Ti-Nb-Zr alloy is apparently ascribable to the reversible martensitic phase transformation.

  1. Development and Application of a Portable Health Algorithms Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Fulton, Christopher E.; Maul, William A.; Sowers, T. Shane

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the development and initial demonstration of a Portable Health Algorithms Test (PHALT) System that is being developed by researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The PHALT System was conceived as a means of evolving the maturity and credibility of algorithms developed to assess the health of aerospace systems. Comprising an integrated hardware-software environment, the PHALT System allows systems health management algorithms to be developed in a graphical programming environment; to be tested and refined using system simulation or test data playback; and finally, to be evaluated in a real-time hardware-in-the-loop mode with a live test article. In this paper, PHALT System development is described through the presentation of a functional architecture, followed by the selection and integration of hardware and software. Also described is an initial real-time hardware-in-the-loop demonstration that used sensor data qualification algorithms to diagnose and isolate simulated sensor failures in a prototype Power Distribution Unit test-bed. Success of the initial demonstration is highlighted by the correct detection of all sensor failures and the absence of any real-time constraint violations.

  2. Project of electro-cyclotron resonance ion source test-bench for material investigation.

    PubMed

    Kulevoy, T V; Chalykh, B B; Kuibeda, R P; Kropachev, G N; Ziiatdinova, A V

    2014-02-01

    Development of new materials for future energy facilities with higher operating efficiency is a challenging and crucial task. However, full-scale testing of radiation hardness for reactor materials is quite sophisticated and difficult as it requires long session of reactor irradiation; moreover, induced radioactivity considerably complicates further investigation. Ion beam irradiation does not have such a drawback; on the contrary, it has certain advantages. One of them is high speed of defect formation. Therefore, it provides a useful tool for modeling of different radiation damages. Improved understanding of material behavior under high dose irradiation will probably allow to simulate reactor irradiation close to real conditions and to make an adequate estimation of material radiation hardness. Since 2008 in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, the ion beam irradiation experiments are under development at the heavy ion radio frequency quadrupole linac and very important results are obtained already [T. V. Kulevoy et al., in Proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Research Applications and Utilization of Accelerators, IAEA Vienna, Austria, 2009, http://www.pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/P1433_CD/darasets/papers/ap_p5_07.pdf]. Nevertheless, the new test bench based on electro-cyclotron resonance ion source and high voltage platform is developed. The project of the test bench is presented and discussed.

  3. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM0 Flight Hardware in Bench Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Engineering bench system hardware for the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested on a lab bench at the University of Colorado in Boulder. This is done in a horizontal arrangement to reduce pressure differences so the tests more closely resemble behavior in the microgravity of space. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  4. Evaluation of malodor for automobile air conditioner evaporator by using laboratory-scale test cooling bench.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Sun Hwa; Jung, Young Rim; Kim, Man Goo

    2008-09-12

    As one of the measures to improve the environment in an automobile, malodor caused by the automobile air-conditioning system evaporator was evaluated and analyzed using laboratory-scale test cooling bench. The odor was simulated with an evaporator test cooling bench equipped with an airflow controller, air temperature and relative humidity controller. To simulate the same odor characteristics that occur from automobiles, one previously used automobile air conditioner evaporator associated with unpleasant odors was selected. The odor was evaluated by trained panels and collected with aluminum polyester bags. Collected samples were analyzed by thermal desorption into a cryotrap and subsequent gas chromatographic separation, followed by simultaneous olfactometry, flame ionization detector and identified by atomic emission detection and mass spectrometry. Compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, and organic acids were identified as responsible odor-active compounds. Gas chromatography/flame ionization detection/olfactometry combined sensory method with instrumental analysis was very effective as an odor evaluation method in an automobile air-conditioning system evaporator.

  5. Ultrafine particle emission characteristics of diesel engine by on-board and test bench measurement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Lou, Diming; Hu, Zhiyuan; Tan, Piqiang; Yao, Di; Hu, Wei; Li, Peng; Ren, Jin; Chen, Changhong

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the emission characteristics of ultrafine particles based on test bench and on-board measurements. The bench test results showed the ultrafine particle number concentration of the diesel engine to be in the range of (0.56-8.35) x 10(8) cm(-3). The on-board measurement results illustrated that the ultrafine particles were strongly correlated with changes in real-world driving cycles. The particle number concentration was down to 2.0 x 10(6) cm(-3) and 2.7 x 10(7) cm(-3) under decelerating and idling operations and as high as 5.0 x 10(8) cm(-3) under accelerating operation. It was also indicated that the particle number measured by the two methods increased with the growth of engine load at each engine speed in both cases. The particle number presented a "U" shaped distribution with changing speed at high engine load conditions, which implies that the particle number will reach its lowest level at medium engine speeds. The particle sizes of both measurements showed single mode distributions. The peak of particle size was located at about 50-80 nm in the accumulation mode particle range. Nucleation mode particles will significantly increase at low engine load operations like idling and decelerating caused by the high concentration of unburned organic compounds.

  6. Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-22

    This document contains the first quarterly technical progress report for PTI's Bench-Scale Testing Project of a circuit integrating PTI's KEN-FLOTETM Column Flotation Technology and PTI's On-Line Quality Monitor Control System. The twelve-month project will involve installation of a 300 lb/hr. bench-scale testing circuit at PETC's Coal Preparation Process Research Facility (CPPRF) and testing of two bituminous coals (Upper Freeport and Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Raw Coals). Figure 1 contains the project plan as well as the approach to completing the major tasks within the twelvemonth project. The project is broken down into three phases, which include: Phase I - Preparation: The preparation phase was performed principally at PTI's Calumet offices from October through December, 1992. It involved building of the equipment and circuitry, as well as some preliminary design and equipment testing. Phase II - ET Circuit Installation and Testing: This installation and testing phase of the project will be performed at PETC's CPPRF from January through May, 1993, and will be the major focus of the project. It will involve testing of the continuous 300 lb/hr. circuit. Phase II - Project Finalization: The project finalization phase will occur from June through September, 1993, at PTI's Calumet offices and will involve finalizing analytical work and data evaluation, as well as final project reporting. This quarterly progress report principally summarizes the results from the Phase I preparation work and the plan for the early portions of the Phase 11 installation and commissioning, which will occur in January and the first week of February, 1993.

  7. Development of circumferential seal for helicopter transmissions: Results of bench and flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, T. N.; Ludwig, L. P.

    1975-01-01

    A modified circumferential segmented ring seal was designed for direct replacement of a helicopter transmission elastomeric lip seal operating on a shaft diameter of 13.91 centimeters (5.481 in.) at sliding velocities to 52.48 m/sec (10 330 ft/min). The modifications involved the garter spring tension, shaft roundness, seal housing flatness, and pumping grooves to inhibit leakage. Operation of the seals in bench tests under simulated helicopter transmission conditions revealed that the seal leakage rate was within acceptable limits and that the wear rate was negligible. The low leakage and wear rates were confirmed in flight tests of 600 and 175 hours (sliding speed, 48.11 m/sec (9470 ft/min)). An additional 200 hours of air worthiness qualification testing (aircraft tie down) demonstrated that the seal can operate at the advanced sliding conditions of 52.48 m/sec (10 330 ft/min).

  8. Bench-Scale Filtration Testing in Support of the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Billing, Justin M.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2009-09-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP testing program specifies that bench-scale testing is to be performed in support of specific operations, including filtration, caustic leaching, and oxidative leaching.

  9. Bench-scale testing of a micronized magnetite, fine-coal cleaning process

    SciTech Connect

    Suardini, P.J.

    1995-11-01

    Custom Coals, International has installed and is presently testing a 500 lb/hr. micronized-magnetite, fine-coal cleaning circuit at PETC`s Process Research Facility (PRF). The cost-shared project was awarded as part of the Coal Preparation Program`s, High Efficiency Preparation Subprogram. The project includes design, construction, testing, and decommissioning of a fully-integrated, bench-scale circuit, complete with feed coal classification to remove the minus 30 micron slimes, dense medium cycloning of the 300 by 30 micron feed coal using a nominal minus 10 micron size magnetite medium, and medium recovery using drain and rinse screens and various stages and types of magnetic separators. This paper describes the project circuit and goals, including a description of the current project status and the sources of coal and magnetite which are being tested.

  10. FIRST ARTICLE ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING OF PORTABLE ALPHA SCINTILLATION COUNTER EQUIPMENT SET. SUPPLEMENT 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Three revised Portable Alpha Scintillation Counter Equipment Sets were subjected to tests in accordance with project documentation. Failures incurred by the test items prohibited completion of the test series. (Author)

  11. Portable narcotics detector and the results obtained in field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumer, Tumay O.; Su, Chih-Wu; Kaplan, Christopher R.; Rigdon, Stephen W.

    1997-02-01

    A compact integrated narcotics detection instrument (CINDI) has been developed at NOVA R&D, Inc. with funding provided by the U.S. Coast Guard. CINDI is designed as a portable sensitive neutron backscatter detector which has excellent penetration for thick and high Z compartment barriers. It also has a highly sensitive detection system for backscattered neutrons and, therefore, uses a very weak californium-252 neutron source. Neutrons backscatter profusely from materials that have a large hydrogen content, such as narcotics. The rate of backscattered neutrons detected is analyzed by a microprocessor and displayed on the control panel. The operator guides the detector along a suspected area and displays in real time the backscattered neutron rate. CINDI is capable of detecting narcotics effectively behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls or small sealed containers. The strong response of CINDI to hydrogen-rich materials such as narcotics makes it an effective tool for detecting concealed drugs. Its response has been field tested by NOVA, the U.S. Coast Guard and Brewt Power Systems. The results of the tests show excellent response and specificity to narcotic drugs. Several large shipments of concealed drugs have been discovered during these trials and the results are presented and discussed.

  12. Electrolytic Reduction of Spent Oxide Fuel – Bench-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    S. D. Herrmann; S. X. Li; M. F. Simpson

    2005-10-01

    A series of tests were performed to demonstrate the electrolytic reduction of spent light water reactor fuel at bench-scale in a hot cell at the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex (formerly Argonne National Laboratory - West). The process involves the conversion of oxide fuel to metal by electrolytic means, which would then enable subsequent separation and recovery of actinides via existing electrometallurgical technologies, i.e., electrorefining. Four electrolytic reduction runs were performed at bench scale using ~500 ml of molten LiCl -- 1 wt% Li2O electrolyte at 650 ºC. In each run, ~50 g of crushed spent oxide fuel was loaded into a permeable stainless steel basket and immersed into the electrolyte as the cathode. A spiral wound platinum wire was immersed into the electrolyte as the anode. When a controlled electric current was conducted through the anode and cathode, the oxide fuel was reduced to metal in the basket and oxygen gas was evolved at the anode. Salt samples were extracted before and after each electrolytic reduction run and analyzed for fuel and fission product constituents. The fuel baskets following each run were sectioned and sampled, revealing an extent of uranium oxide reduction in excess of 98%.

  13. NFL-225 test to predict 1RM bench press in NCAA Division I football players.

    PubMed

    Mann, J Bryan; Stoner, Josh D; Mayhew, Jerry L

    2012-10-01

    The National Football League (NFL)-225 test has gained popularity for assessing muscular performance among college football programs. Although the test is a measure of absolute muscular endurance, it was reputed to be highly correlated with maximum muscular strength. The purposes of this study were to assess the predictive potential of the NFL-225 test for estimating 1 repetition maximum (1RM) bench press performance in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I college football players and to evaluate the accuracy of previous NFL-225 prediction equations. Players (n = 289) in a successful Division I program were assessed over a period of 5 years for 1RM bench press and repetitions completed with 102.3 kg (225 lb). Test sessions occurred within 1 week of each other during the off-season training period. In a validation group (n = 202), repetitions were significantly correlated with 1RM (r = 0.95), producing a prediction equation (1RM [kg] = 103.5 + 3.08 Reps) with a standard error of estimate = 6.4 kg (coefficient of variation = 4.3%). In a randomly selected cross-validation group (n = 87), the new equation nonsignificantly underpredicted by 0.9 ± 7.2 kg produced a high correlation with actual 1RM (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.967), had a limit of agreement of -15.0 to 13.2 kg, and predicted 69% of the group within ±4.5 kg of their actual 1RM. The best previous equation was that of Slovak et al., which was nonsignificantly underpredicted by -0.5 ± 6.7 kg, produced a high correlation with actual 1RM (ICC = 0.975), and predicted 68% of the group within ±4.5 kg of their actual 1RM. The new NFL-225 test seems to be a reasonable predictor of 1RM bench press in Division I players but should be further assessed on players from other high-level programs.

  14. Bench-scale screening tests for a boiling sodium-potassium alloy solar receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

    1993-06-01

    Bench-scale tests were carried out in support of the design of a second-generation 75-kW{sub t} reflux pool-boiler solar receiver. The receiver will be made from Haynes Alloy 230 and will contain the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78. The bench-scale tests used quartz-lamp-heated boilers to screen candidate boiling-stabilization materials and methods at temperatures up to 750{degree}C. Candidates that provided stable boiling were tested for hot-restart behavior. Poor stability was obtained with single 1/4-inch diameter patches of powdered metal hot-press-sintered onto the wetted side of the heat-input area. Laser-drilled and electric-discharge-machined cavities in the heated surface also performed poorly. Small additions of xenon, and heated-surface tilt out of the vertical dramatically improved poor boiling stability; additions of helium or oxygen did not. The most stable boiling was obtained when the entire heat-input area was covered by a powdered-metal coating. The effect of heated-area size was assessed for one coating: at low incident fluxes, when even this coating performed poorly, increasing the heated-area size markedly improved boiling stability. Good hot-restart behavior was not observed with any candidate, although results were significantly better with added xenon in a boiler shortened from 3 to 2 feet. In addition to the screening tests, flash-radiography imaging of metal-vapor bubbles during boiling was attempted. Contrary to the Cole-Rohsenow correlation, these bubble-size estimates did not vary with pressure; instead they were constant, consistent with the only other alkali metal measurements, but about 1/2 their size.

  15. Design of a Compact, Portable Test System for Thermoelectric Power Generator Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Amir Yadollah; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar

    2013-07-01

    Measurement of fundamental parameters of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) module, including efficiency, internal electrical resistance, thermal resistance, power output, Seebeck coefficient, and figure of merit ( Z), is necessary in order to design a thermoelectric-based power generation system. This paper presents a new design for a compact, standalone, portable test system that enables measurement of the main parameters of a TEG over a wide range of temperature differences and compression pressures for a 40 mm × 40 mm specimen. The Seebeck coefficient and figure of merit can also be calculated from the information obtained. In the proposed system, the temperature of each side of the TEG can be set at the desired temperature—the hot side as high as 380°C and the cold side as low as 5°C, with 0.5°C accuracy—utilizing an electrical heating system and a thermoelectric-based compact chilling system. Heating and cooling procedures are under control of two proportional-integral-derivative (PID) temperature controllers. Using a monitored pressure mechanism, the TEG specimen is compressed between a pair of hot and cold aluminum cubes, which maintain the temperature difference across the two sides of the TEG. The compressive load can be varied from 0 kPa to 800 kPa. External electrical loading is applied in the form of a direct-current (DC) electronic load. Data collection and processing are through an Agilent 34972A data logger, a computer, and BenchLink software, with results available as computer output. The input power comes from a 240-V general-purpose power point, and the only sound-generating component is a 4-W cooling fan. Total calculated uncertainty in results is approximately 7%. Comparison between experimental data and the manufacturer's published datasheet for a commercially available specimen shows good agreement. These results obtained from a preliminary experimental setup serve as a good guide for the design of a fully automatic portable test system

  16. Optical Testing Using Portable Laser Coordinate Measuring Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khreishi, Manal; Ohl, Raymond G.; Mclean, Kyle F.; Hadjimichael, Theodore J.; Hayden, Joseph E.

    2017-01-01

    High precision, portable coordinate measuring instruments (CMI) such as laser radars (LR) and laser trackers (LT) have been used for optical system alignment and integration. The LR's ability to perform a non-contact scan of surfaces was previously utilized to characterize large spherical and aspheric mirrors. In this paper, we explore the use of a CMI as an accurate, fast, robust, and non-contact tool for prescription characterization of powered optical surfaces. Using Nikon's MV-224/350 LR and Leica's Absolute Tracker AT401/402 instruments, proof of concept measurements were performed to characterize a variety of optical components by measuring the actual and apparent, or equivalently the "direct and through" (D&T), coordinates of calibrated metrology targets. Custom macros in metrology software and other data reduction code were developed to compute surface-ray intercepts and surface slopes from the D&T shots. The calculated data is fit to an aspheric surface formula to obtain the optimum prescription. The results were compared to the nominal parameters and were crosschecked using LR scans or other approaches. We discuss potential applications across the fields of optical component fabrication and system alignment and testing.

  17. Optical Testing Using Portable Laser Coordinate Measuring Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khreishi, M.; Ohl, R.; Mclean, K.; Hadjimichael, T.; Hayden, J.

    2017-01-01

    High precision, portable coordinate measuring instruments (CMI) such as laser radars (LR) and laser trackers (LT) have been used for optical system alignment and integration. The LRs ability to perform a non-contact scan of surfaces was previously utilized to characterize large spherical and aspheric mirrors. In this paper, we explore the use of a CMI as an accurate, fast, robust, and non-contact tool for prescription characterization of powered optical surfaces. Using Nikons MV-224350 LR and Leicas Absolute Tracker AT401402 instruments, proof of concept measurements were performed to characterize a variety of optical components by measuring the actual and apparent, or equivalently the direct and through (DT), coordinates of calibrated metrology targets. Custom macros in metrology software and other data reduction code were developed to compute surface-ray intercepts and surface slopes from the DT shots. The calculated data is fit to an aspheric surface formula to obtain the optimum prescription. The results were compared to the nominal parameters and were crosschecked using LR scans or other approaches. We discuss potential applications across the fields of optical component fabrication and system alignment and testing.

  18. Evaluation of induced seismicity forecast models in the Induced Seismicity Test Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Eszter; Gischig, Valentin; Zechar, Jeremy; Doetsch, Joseph; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Wiemer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Induced earthquakes often accompany fluid injection, and the seismic hazard they pose threatens various underground engineering projects. Models to monitor and control induced seismic hazard with traffic light systems should be probabilistic, forward-looking, and updated as new data arrive. Here, we propose an Induced Seismicity Test Bench to test and rank such models. We apply the test bench to data from the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-Forêts 2004 geothermal stimulation projects, and we assess forecasts from two models that incorporate a different mix of physical understanding and stochastic representation of the induced sequences: Shapiro in Space (SiS) and Hydraulics and Seismics (HySei). SiS is based on three pillars: the seismicity rate is computed with help of the seismogenic index and a simple exponential decay of the seismicity; the magnitude distribution follows the Gutenberg-Richter relation; and seismicity is distributed in space based on smoothing seismicity during the learning period with 3D Gaussian kernels. The HySei model describes seismicity triggered by pressure diffusion with irreversible permeability enhancement. Our results show that neither model is fully superior to the other. HySei forecasts the seismicity rate well, but is only mediocre at forecasting the spatial distribution. On the other hand, SiS forecasts the spatial distribution well but not the seismicity rate. The shut-in phase is a difficult moment for both models in both reservoirs: the models tend to underpredict the seismicity rate around, and shortly after, shut-in. Ensemble models that combine HySei's rate forecast with SiS's spatial forecast outperform each individual model.

  19. [Risk of barotrauma when using non-reinhalation Waters valves: a comparative study on bench test].

    PubMed

    Coisel, Y; Galia, F; Conseil, M; Jung, B; Chanques, G; Jaber, S

    2013-11-01

    Manual ventilation is delivered in the operating room or the intensive care unit to intubated or non-intubated patients, using non-rebreathing systems such as the Waters valve. New generation Waters valves are progressively replacing the historic Waters valve. The aim of this study was to evaluate maximal pressure delivered by these 2 valves. Bench test. Thirty-two different conditions were tested, according to 2 oxygen flow rates (10 and 20L/min), without (static condition) or with manual insufflations (dynamic condition) and 4 valve expiratory opening pressures. The primary endpoint was maximal pressure measured at the exit of the valve, connected to a model lung and a bench test. Measured pressures were different for most evaluated conditions. Increasing oxygen flow from 10 to 20L/min increased maximal pressure for both valves. Increasing valve expiratory opening pressure induced a significant increase in maximal pressure for the new generation valve (from 4 to 61cmH2O in static conditions and from 18 to 68cmH2O in dynamic conditions). For the historic valve, maximal pressure increased significantly but remained below 15cmH2O in both static and dynamic conditions. Use of new generation Waters valves should be different from historic Waters valves. Indeed, barotrauma could be caused by badly adapted valve expiratory opening pressure settings. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of roll designs on a roll-crusher/ crusher/splitter biomass harvester: test bench results

    Treesearch

    Colin Ashmore; Donald L. Sirois; Bryce J. Stokes

    1987-01-01

    Four different roll designs were evaluated on a test bench roll crusher/splitter to determine feeding and crushing efficiencies. For each design, different gap settings for the primary and secondary rolls were tested at two hydraulic cylinder pressures on the primary crush roll to determine their ability to crush and/or feed tree bolts. Seven different diameter classes...

  1. Investigation of Subglacial and Englacial Hydrology Using Borehole Slug Tests; Bench Glacier, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaha, J. M.; Harper, J. T.; Humphrey, N. F.; Pfeffer, W. T.

    2003-12-01

    Slug tests have long been used to determine the hydraulic conductivity of aquifer formations in the immediate vicinity of monitoring wells. However, slug tests have rarely been used to help determine englacial and subglacial hydrological characteristics. A series of slug tests were performed on Bench Glacier, Alaska in order to characterize the subglacial and englacial hydrology. A total of 16 slug tests were performed over a period of one week in early June 2002, with an additional 20 slug tests performed over a period of 10 days in June 2003. The slug tests were performed at various times of the day in boreholes drilled to the bed of the glacier. During the 2002 field season, water levels were recorded in the slug hole and an adjacent hole approximately 10 meters away. In 2003, water levels were recorded in the slug hole and 5 adjacent holes (within a grid of 16 boreholes) located between 20 and 60 meters away. Responses to the slug of water varied from an overdamped, slow drain to an underdamped, oscillation of the borehole water level. Modeling of the amplitude and frequency for the underdamped response reveals information on the structure of the subglacial and englacial drainage systems, as well as provides constraints on the amount of water in the system. Analysis of the slug tests within the grid shows both temporal and spatial changes in the response and thus the system, providing insight into the development of the subglacial and englacial hydrologic systems.

  2. Bench-Scale Trace Contaminant Testing of SA9T at Ambient and Reduced Pressure Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broerman, Craig; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    A principal concern for air revitalization technology in a closed loop system is the capability to control carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity (H2O). An amine based sorbent technology, SA9T, has been evaluated for use in this application and several programs are evaluating it for use in both cabin and space suit applications. While the CO2 and H2O performance of the sorbent has been tested extensively, the question of how trace contaminants impact performance requires further evaluation. This paper presents experimental results of bench-scale SA9T testing that was performed under a variety of test conditions and with several different trace contaminants. Tests were conducted to determine if the capacity of the SA9T media to sufficiently remove CO2 and H2O is compromised after exposure to a fully saturated trace contaminant at ambient conditions. Tests also were conducted to evaluate the performance of SA9T at ambient conditions in a continuous 30-day test with a mixed trace contaminant stream. In addition, testing also evaluated the impact of CO2 and H2O removal performance at suit loop pressures (29.6 KPa/4.3 psia) during cyclic operation with a constant inlet contaminant load.

  3. Detailed modal testing of a solid rocket motor using a portable test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glozman, Vladimir; Brillhart, Ralph D.

    1990-01-01

    Modern analytical techniques have expended the ability to evaluate solid rocket motors used in launch vehicles. As more detailed models of solid rocket motors were developed, testing methods were required to verify the models. Experimental modal analysis (modal testing) of space structures and launch vehicles has been a requirement for model validation for many years. However, previous testing of solid rocket motors has not typically involved dynamic modal testing of full scale motors for verification of solid propellant or system assembly properties. Innovative approaches to the testing of solid rocket motors were developed and modal testing of a full scale, two segment Titan 34D Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) was performed to validate detailed computer modeling. Special modifications were made to convert an existing facility into a temporary modal test facility which would accommodate the test article. The assembly of conventional data acquisition equipment into a multiple channel count portable system has made modal testing in the field feasible. Special purpose hydraulic exciters were configured to apply the dynamic driving forces required. All instrumentation and data collection equipment were installed at the test site for the duration of the test program and removed upon completion. Conversion of an existing test facility into a temporary modal test facility, and use of a multiple channel count portable test data acquisition system allowed all test objectives to be met and resulted in validation of the computer model in a minimum time.

  4. Optical test bench for high precision metrology and alignment of zoom sub-assembly components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leprêtre, F.; Levillain, E.; Wattellier, B.; Delage, P.; Brahmi, D.; Gascon, A.

    2013-09-01

    Thales Angénieux (TAGX) designs and manufactures zoom lens assemblies for cinema applications. These objectives are made of mobile lens assemblies. These need to be precisely characterized to detect alignment, polishing or glass index homogeneity errors, which amplitude may range to a few hundreds of nanometers. However these assemblies are highly aberrated with mainly spherical aberration (>30 μm PV). PHASICS and TAGX developed a solution based on the use of a PHASICS SID4HR wave front sensor. This is based on quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometry, a technology known for its high dynamic range. A 100-mm diameter He:Ne source illuminates the lens assembly entrance pupil. The transmitted wave front is then directly measured by the SID4- HR. The measured wave front (WFmeas) is then compared to a simulation from the lens sub-assembly optical design (WFdesign). We obtain a residual wave front error (WFmanufactured), which reveals lens imperfections due to its manufacturing. WFmeas=WFdesign+(WFEradius+WFEglass+WFEpolish)=WF design + WFmanufactured The optical test bench was designed so that this residual wave front is measured with a precision below 100 nm PV. The measurement of fast F-Number lenses (F/2) with aberrations up to 30 μm, with a precision of 100 nm PV was demonstrated. This bench detects mismatches in sub-assemblies before the final integration step in the zoom. Pre-alignment is also performed in order to overpass the mechanical tolerances. This facilitates the completed zoom alignment. In final, productivity gains are expected due to alignment and mounting time savings.

  5. Synthetic lightweight aggregate from cool water slag: Bench-scale confirmation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhry, V.; Hadley, S.R. )

    1990-05-01

    This report analyzes the potential for production of synthetic lightweight aggregate (SLA) from a Texaco coal gasification solid residue. The objective of the project was to develop a replacement for conventional lightweight aggregates typically derived from expanded clays and shales or natural lightweight aggregates. The sequence of tests performed to develop SLA from slag began with the crushing of samples of slag, followed by either extrusion or pelletization. The level of clay binder required for sufficient aggregate strength was evaluated. Using a tube furnace, expansion characteristics were studied as a function of temperature and residence time. Next, a large batch of SLA was produced in a muffle furnace and used to form concrete test cylinders. The unit weight of the resultant concrete was 105 lb/ft{sup 3}, with a compressive strength of 3100 psi, which meets the requirements specified in ASTM C 330 for lightweight aggregate of a comparable density. When the same sequence of tests was performed using a slag from which the bulk of the char had been removed, the concrete test cylinders showed an improved relationship between strength and density. Based on the results of bench-scale tests and the similarity to conventional LWA production, the conceptual design of an SLA processing plant was formulated. A comparative estimate of operating costs was prepared by analyzing data from plants using clays and shales to produce lightweight aggregates. 24 refs., 15 figs., 17 tabs.

  6. Plate coil thermal test bench for the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) carousel cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, LeEllen; Murga, Gaizka; Montijo, Guillermo; Hauth, David

    2014-08-01

    Analyses have shown that even a white-painted enclosure requires active exterior skin-cooling systems to mitigate dome seeing which is driven by thermal nonuniformities that change the refractive index of the air. For the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) Enclosure, this active surface temperature control will take the form of a system of water cooled plate coils integrated into the enclosure cladding system. The main objective of this system is to maintain the surface temperature of the enclosure as close as possible to, but always below, local ambient temperature in order to mitigate this effect. The results of analyses using a multi-layer cladding temperature model were applied to predict the behavior of the plate coil cladding system and ultimately, with safety margins incorporated into the resulting design thermal loads, the detailed designs. Construction drawings and specifications have been produced. Based on these designs and prior to procurement of the system components, a test system was constructed in order to measure actual system behavior. The data collected during seasonal test runs at the DKIST construction site on Haleakalā are used to validate and/or refine the design models and construction documents as appropriate. The test fixture was also used to compare competing hardware, software, components, control strategies, and configurations. This paper outlines the design, construction, test protocols, and results obtained of the plate coil thermal test bench for the DKIST carousel cooling system.

  7. Bench Testing Results for the Electrical PCM-Assisted Thermal Heating System (ePATHS)

    SciTech Connect

    LaClair, Tim J.; Gao, Zhiming; Abdelaziz, Omar

    2016-04-20

    Bench testing of the Electrical PCM-Assisted Thermal Heating System (ePATHS) was completed at the Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The ePATHS is a thermal energy storage device designed to reduce the energy required from the battery for cabin heating of electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). ORNL s testing of the ePATHS assessed three main aspects of operation of the device: 1.ePATHS charging evaluation: measure the time to charge and the energy input needed to fully charge the PCM for a range of different ambient conditions. 2.ePATHS Discharge Evaluations: measure the energy provided by the PCM HX, both during mode 1 and mode 2 operation, and confirm the cabin heating duration that can be provided by the ePATHS. This is the primary evaluation to validate the system performance, and an array of multiple ambient conditions and operating scenarios were tested. 3.Evaluation of Thermal Losses from the ePATHS during Cold Soak: this test will evaluate the performance of the insulation system for the ePATHS. The charged ePATHS undergoes a long-term soak in cold ambient temperature conditions, and the heat losses will be evaluated to validate that the performance meets the maximum energy loss requirement.

  8. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY REPORT: BENCH-SCALE TESTING OF PHOTOLYSIS, CHEMICAL OXIDATION AND BIODEGRADATION OF PCB CONTAMINATED SOILS AND PHOTOLYSIS OF TCDD CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of bench-scale testing on degradation of 2,3,7,8-TCDD using W photolysis, and PCB degradation using UV photolysis, chemical oxidation and biological treatment. Bench-scale tests were conducted to investigate the feasibility of a two-phase detoxifi...

  9. 78 FR 70324 - Thy Hydrostatic Testing Provision of the Portable Fire Extinguishers Standard; Extension of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Thy Hydrostatic Testing Provision of the Portable Fire... Collection (Paperwork) Requirements AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor... Safety and Health Administration, Room N-2625, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20210...

  10. Bench testing of a new hyperbaric chamber ventilator at different atmospheric pressures.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Jean-Claude; Lyazidi, Aissam; Parceiro, Miguel; Sferrazza Papa, Giuseppe F; Akoumianaki, Evangelia; Pugin, Deborah; Tassaux, Didier; Brochard, Laurent; Richard, Jean-Christophe M

    2012-08-01

    Providing mechanical ventilation is challenging at supra-atmospheric pressure. The higher gas density increases resistance, reducing the flow delivered by the ventilator. A new hyperbaric ventilator (Siaretron IPER 1000) is said to compensate for these effects automatically. The aim of this bench test study was to validate the compensation, define its limits and provide details on the ventilator's output at varied atmospheric pressures. Experiments were conducted inside a multiplace hyperbaric chamber at 1, 2.2, 2.8 and 4 atmospheres absolute (ATA), with the ventilator connected to a test lung. Transducers were recalibrated at each ATA level. Various ventilator settings were tested in volume and pressure control modes. Measured tidal volumes were compared with theoretical predictions based on gas laws. Results confirmed the ventilator's ability to provide compensation, but also identified its limits. The compensation range could be predicted and depended on the maximal flow attainable, decreasing linearly with increasing atmospheric pressure. With settings inside the range, tidal volumes approximated set values (mean error 10 ± 5 %). With settings outside the range, the volume was limited to the predicted maximal value calculated from maximal flow. A practical guide for clinicians is provided. The IPER 1000 ventilator attempted to deliver stable tidal volume by adjusting the opening of the inspiratory valve in proportion to atmospheric pressure. Adequate compensation was observed, albeit only within a predictable range, which can be reliably predicted for each setting and ATA level combination. Setting a tidal volume outside this range can result in an unwanted decrease in minute ventilation.

  11. 100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil

    SciTech Connect

    Field, J.G.

    1994-06-10

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

  12. Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing direct coal liquefaction rawhide sub-bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, R.F.; Coless, L.A.; Davis, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    In 1992, the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research to demonstrate a dispersed catalyst system using a combination of molybdenum and iron precursors for direct coal liquefaction. This dispersed catalyst system was successfully demonstrated using Black Thunder sub-bituminous coal at Wilsonville, Alabama by Southern Electric International, Inc. The DOE sponsored research continues at Exxon Research and Development Laboratories (ERDL). A six month continuous bench-scale program using ERDL`s Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) is planned, three months in 1994 and three months in 1995. The initial conditions in RCLU reflect experience gained from the Wilsonville facility in their Test Run 263. Rawhide sub-bituminous coal which is similar to the Black Thunder coal tested at Wilsonville was used as the feed coal. A slate of five dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal has been tested. Throughout the experiments, the molybdenum addition rate was held constant at 100 wppm while the iron oxide addition rate was varied from 0.25 to 1.0 weight percent (dry coal basis). This report covers the 1994 operations and accomplishments.

  13. The electron lens test bench for the relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, F. Z.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Frak, B. M.; Gassner, D. M.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Hoff, L.; Kankiya, P.; Lambiase, R.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Mi, J.; Miller, T.; Montag, C.; Nemesure, S.; Okamura, M.; Olsen, R. H.; Pikin, A. I.; Raparia, D.; Rosas, P. J.; Sandberg, J.; Tan, Y.; Theisen, C.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, W.

    2014-04-01

    To compensate for the beam-beam effects from the proton-proton interactions at the two interaction points IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are constructing two electron lenses (e-lenses) that we plan to install in the interaction region IR10. Before installing them, the electron gun, collector, instrumentation were tested and the electron beam properties were qualified on an electron lens test bench. We will present the test results and discuss our measurement of the electron beam current and of the electron gun perveance. We achieved a maximum current of 1 A with 5 kV energy for both the pulsed- and the DC-beam (which is a long turn-by-turn pulse beam). We measured beam transverse profiles with an yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) screen and pinhole detector, and compared those to simulated beam profiles. Measurements of the pulsed electron beam stability were obtained by measuring the modulator voltage.

  14. 'Enzyme Test Bench': A biochemical application of the multi-rate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachinskiy, K.; Schultze, H.; Boy, M.; Büchs, J.

    2008-11-01

    In the expanding field of 'white biotechnology' enzymes are frequently applied to catalyze the biochemical reaction from a resource material to a valuable product. Evolutionary designed to catalyze the metabolism in any life form, they selectively accelerate complex reactions under physiological conditions. Modern techniques, such as directed evolution, have been developed to satisfy the increasing demand on enzymes. Applying these techniques together with rational protein design, we aim at improving of enzymes' activity, selectivity and stability. To tap the full potential of these techniques, it is essential to combine them with adequate screening methods. Nowadays a great number of high throughput colorimetric and fluorescent enzyme assays are applied to measure the initial enzyme activity with high throughput. However, the prediction of enzyme long term stability within short experiments is still a challenge. A new high throughput technique for enzyme characterization with specific attention to the long term stability, called 'Enzyme Test Bench', is presented. The concept of the Enzyme Test Bench consists of short term enzyme tests conducted under partly extreme conditions to predict the enzyme long term stability under moderate conditions. The technique is based on the mathematical modeling of temperature dependent enzyme activation and deactivation. Adapting the temperature profiles in sequential experiments by optimum non-linear experimental design, the long term deactivation effects can be purposefully accelerated and detected within hours. During the experiment the enzyme activity is measured online to estimate the model parameters from the obtained data. Thus, the enzyme activity and long term stability can be calculated as a function of temperature. The results of the characterization, based on micro liter format experiments of hours, are in good agreement with the results of long term experiments in 1L format. Thus, the new technique allows for both

  15. Accuracy improvement in a calibration test bench for accelerometers by a vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Emilia, Giulio; Di Gasbarro, David; Gaspari, Antonella; Natale, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    A procedure is described in this paper for the accuracy improvement of calibration of low-cost accelerometers in a prototype rotary test bench, driven by a brushless servo-motor and operating in a low frequency range of vibrations (0 to 5 Hz). Vibration measurements by a vision system based on a low frequency camera have been carried out, in order to reduce the uncertainty of the real acceleration evaluation at the installation point of the sensor to be calibrated. A preliminary test device has been realized and operated in order to evaluate the metrological performances of the vision system, showing a satisfactory behavior if the uncertainty measurement is taken into account. A combination of suitable settings of the control parameters of the motion control system and of the information gained by the vision system allowed to fit the information about the reference acceleration at the installation point to the needs of the procedure for static and dynamic calibration of three-axis accelerometers.

  16. Accuracy improvement in a calibration test bench for accelerometers by a vision system

    SciTech Connect

    D’Emilia, Giulio Di Gasbarro, David Gaspari, Antonella Natale, Emanuela

    2016-06-28

    A procedure is described in this paper for the accuracy improvement of calibration of low-cost accelerometers in a prototype rotary test bench, driven by a brushless servo-motor and operating in a low frequency range of vibrations (0 to 5 Hz). Vibration measurements by a vision system based on a low frequency camera have been carried out, in order to reduce the uncertainty of the real acceleration evaluation at the installation point of the sensor to be calibrated. A preliminary test device has been realized and operated in order to evaluate the metrological performances of the vision system, showing a satisfactory behavior if the uncertainty measurement is taken into account. A combination of suitable settings of the control parameters of the motion control system and of the information gained by the vision system allowed to fit the information about the reference acceleration at the installation point to the needs of the procedure for static and dynamic calibration of three-axis accelerometers.

  17. Bench-scale testing of the multi-gravity separator in combination with microcel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Venkatraman, P.; Phillips, D.I.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    1995-03-01

    It was the purpose of this investigation to test a new fine coal cleaning system, in which a coal is cleaned first by column flotation to remove primarily ash-forming minerals and then by an enhanced gravity separation technique to remove the pyrite remaining in the flotation product. Of the various column flotation technologies developed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy, the Microcel{sup TM} flotation column was chosen because it is being used commercially in the US coal industry, particularly by low-sulfur coal producers. Of the various enhanced gravity separation technologies used in minerals industry, Multi-Gravity Separator (MGS) was chosen because it shows promise for pyrite rejection from fine coal streams containing a wide range of particle sizes. The bench-scale tests were conducted using three different circuit configurations, i.e.; Microcel{sup TM} column alone; MGS alone; and Microcel{sup Tm} and MGS in series. In general, high ash-rejections were achieved using Microcel{sup TM} column and an MGS unit in series, both the ash and pyritic sulfur rejections exceeded what can be achieved using either the Microcel{sup TM} column or the MGS unit alone, demonstrating a synergistic effect.

  18. Handheld and portable test systems for decentralized testing: from lab to marketplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulstich, Konrad; Haberstroh, Klaus

    2009-05-01

    Emergency Diagnostics, Homeland Security, Epidemiological Preparedness and the high cost of the Health Care Systems have increased demand for affordable and mobile point of care (POC) devices with highest sensitivity, specificity and rapid time to result. We have developed pocket and brief case sized systems for point of care and field based tests based on fluorescence read-out. The core consists of battery operated, 90 gram electro-optical units with optional wireless data transfer, which have been optimized to achieve highest accuracy and sensitivity combined with simplicity of use. The robust systems have been applied to molecular diagnostics such as DNA based testing, immunodiagnostics as well as environmental monitoring and agricultural testing. Starting with the current bottlenecks of in-vitro diagnostics testing and a brief market overview, we will show commercially available portable test systems for molecular diagnostics and how we solve the current bottlenecks. We will further show battery operated handheld prototypes for DNA testing. ESE's handheld and portable testing platforms have been shown to provide sensitive, accurate, and specific results, as well as rapid turnaround. The stand-alone devices demonstrate operational and physical robustness, and they can be manufactured to be affordable.

  19. Design and optimization of an experimental test bench for the study of impulsive fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, S.; Krastev, V. K.; Jannelli, E.; Falcucci, G.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the design and the optimization of an experimental test bench for the experimental characterization of impulsive water-entry problems are presented. Currently, the majority of the experimental apparatus allow impact test only in specific conditions. Our test bench allows for testing of rigid and compliant bodies and allows performing experiments on floating or sinking structures, in free-fall, or under dynamic motion control. The experimental apparatus is characterized by the adoption of accelerometers, encoders, position sensors and, above all, FBG (fiber Bragg grating) sensors that, together with a high speed camera, provide accurate and fast data acquisitions for the dissection of structural deformations and hydrodynamic loadings under a broad set of experimental conditions.

  20. Characterization of the dimensional stability of advanced metallic materials using an optical test bench structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Cheng; O'Donnell, Timothy P.

    1991-01-01

    The dimensional stability of low-density high specific-strength metal-matrix composites (including 30 vol pct SiC(p)/SXA 24-T6 Al, 25 vol pct SiC(p)/6061-T6 Al, 40 vol pct graphite P100 fiber/6061 Al, 50 vol pct graphite P100 fiber/6061 Al, and 40 vol pct P100 graphite fiber/AZ91D Mg composites) and an Al-Li-Mg metal alloy was evaluated using a specially designed five-strut optical test bench structure. The structure had 30 thermocouple locations, one retroreflector, one linear interferometer multilayer insulation, and various strip heaters. It was placed in a 10 exp -7 torr capability vacuum chamber with a laser head positioned at a window port, and a laser interferometer system for collecting dimensional change data. It was found that composite materials have greater 40-C temporal dimensional stability than the AL-Li-Mg alloy. Aluminum-based composites demonstrated better 40-C temporal stability than Mg-based composites.

  1. Comparing coronary stent material performance on a common geometric platform through simulated bench testing.

    PubMed

    Grogan, J A; Leen, S B; McHugh, P E

    2012-08-01

    Absorbable metallic stents (AMSs) are a newly emerging cardiovascular technology which has the potential to eliminate long-term patient health risks associated with conventional permanent stents. AMSs developed to date have consisted of magnesium alloys or iron, materials with inferior mechanical properties to those used in permanent stents, such as stainless steel and cobalt-chromium alloys. However, for AMSs to be feasible for widespread clinical use it is important that their performance is comparable to modern permanent stents. To date, the performances of magnesium, iron, and permanent stent materials have not been compared on a common stent platform for a range of stent performance metrics, such as flexibility, radial strength, and recoil. In this study, this comparison is made through simulated bench testing, based on finite-element modelling. The significance of this study is that it allows potential limitations in current AMS performance to be identified, which will aid in focusing future AMS design. This study also allows the identification of limitations in current AMS materials, thereby informing the on-going development of candidate biodegradable alloys. The results indicate that the AMSs studied here can match the recoil characteristics and radial strength of modern permanent stents; however, to achieve this, larger strut dimensions are required. It is also predicted that the AMSs studied are inferior to permanent stents in terms of maximum absolute curvature and longitudinal stiffness.

  2. Impact of air distribution on efficiency of dust capture from metal grinding--bench test method.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    According to the Machinery Directive 2006/42/EC, one of the essential requirements relating to occupational safety and health hazards is to prevent dust pollution emitted by machinery during the implementation processes. Research on evaluation of emissions from machinery, according to the method of test bench using tracer gases, are currently being conducted in CIOP-PIB. This article presents some aspects of dust emission and efficiency of local exhaust ventilation (LEV) during metal grinding. Studies were performed with 10 sources of dust emissions during grinding. To evaluate the pollutants emission in the process of grinding metal products sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) was selected as a tracer gas. The results show that wherever dust is emitted, the LEV should be supported by the general ventilation. Ensure good interaction between all elements of modifying the air flow and the spread of pollutants in the surroundings of the LEV is essential to effective protection of human working zone against pollutants. We used five variants of ventilation: ventilation turned off, the LEV, one-way general ventilation, mixed general ventilation and displacement general ventilation. An increase in the efficiency of dust capture depending on the source of emission by 2.5-14% was observed. This confirms that characteristics of flow resulting from the operation of ventilation is important in the spread of pollutants in the room.

  3. Bench-top testing of suction forces generated through endoscopic ultrasound-guided aspiration needles.

    PubMed

    Katanuma, Akio; Itoi, Takao; Baron, Todd H; Yasuda, Ichiro; Kin, Toshifumi; Yane, Kei; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Hajime; Sano, Itsuki; Minami, Ryuki; Manabu, Sen-yo; Ikarashi, Satoshi; Osanai, Manabu; Takahashi, Kuniyuki

    2015-05-01

    Adequate needle size and tissue acquisition techniques for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) need further elucidation. Moreover, the actual negative pressure and suction forces of FNA needles remain unknown. We evaluated the suction forces of 19-gauge, 22-gauge, and 25-gauge conventional FNA needles and side hole aspiration needles using conventional negative pressure and the slow pull technique. Using a manometer, we determined the mean (SD) negative pressure and suction force for needle gauge, aspiration volume, and aspiration technique. We also evaluated the time to reach the maximum negative pressure. Suction force was comparatively higher in the 19-gauge needle when 50 ml of negative pressure was applied. Suction force using the slow pull method was very weak at 5% of pressure found with conventional methods. With the use of a 20-ml syringe, the time to reach the maximum negative pressure was 4 s in the 19-gauge needle, 11 s in the 22-gauge needle, and 80 s in the 25-gauge needle. Bench-top testing showed that suction force increases with a larger gauge needle and larger aspiration volume. The slow pull method produces a very weak suction force. The time to reach the maximum negative pressure was longest in the 25-gauge needle. © 2015 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  4. Ultimate test bench for pediatric biventricular assist device based on artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Muradbegovic, Mirza; Taub, Steven; Rizzo, Elena; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Tozzi, Piergiorgio

    2011-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are used in treatment for terminal heart failure or as a bridge to transplantation. We created biVAD using the artificial muscles (AMs) that supports both ventricles at the same time. We developed the test bench (TB) as the in vitro evaluating system to enable the measurement of performance. The biVAD exerts different pressure between left and right ventricle like the heart physiologically does. The heart model based on child's heart was constructed in silicone. This model was fitted with the biVAD. Two pipettes containing water with an ultrasonic sensor placed on top of each and attached to ventricles reproduced the preload and the after load of each ventricle by the real-time measurement of the fluid height variation proportionally to the exerted pressure. The LabVIEW software extrapolated the displaced volume and the pressure generated by each side of our biVAD. The development of a standardized protocol permitted the validation of the TB for in vitro evaluation, measurement of the performances of the AM biVAD herein, and reproducibility of data.

  5. DRAGON, the Durham real-time, tomographic adaptive optics test bench: progress and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Andrew P.; Myers, Richard M.; Morris, Timothy J.; Basden, Alastair G.; Bharmal, Nazim A.; Rolt, Stephen; Bramall, David G.; Dipper, Nigel A.; Younger, Edward J.

    2014-08-01

    DRAGON is a real-time, tomographic Adaptive Optics test bench currently under development at Durham University. Optical and mechanical design work for DRAGON is now complete, and the system is close to becoming fully operational. DRAGON emulates current 4.2 m and 8 m telescopes, and can also be used to investigate ELT scale issues. The full system features 4 Laser Guide Star (LGS) Wavefront Sensors (WFS), 3 Natural Guide Star (NGS) WFSs and one Truth Sensor, all of which are 31 × 31 sub-aperture Shack-Hartmann WFS. Two Deformable Mirrors (DMs), a Boston MEMS Kilo DM and a Xinetics 97 actuator DM, correct for turbulence induced aberrations and these can be configured to be either open or closed loop of the WFS. A novel method of LGS emulation is implemented which includes the effects of uplink turbulence and elongation in real-time. The atmosphere is emulated by 4 rotating phase screens which can be translated in real-time to replicate altitude evolution of turbulent layers. DRAGON will be used to extensively study tomographic AO algorithms, such as those required for Multi-Object AO. As DRAGON has been designed to be compatible with CANARY, the MOAO demonstrator, results can be compared to those from the CANARY MOAO demonstrator on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. We present here an overview of the current status of DRAGON and some early results, including investigations into the validity of the LGS emulation method.

  6. Bench-scale reactor tests of low-temperature, catalytic gasification of wet, industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J.

    1990-04-01

    Bench-scale reactor tests are under way at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for to a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. The current research program is focused on the use of a continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The catalyst is nickel metal on an inert support. Typical results show that feedstocks such as solutions of 2% para-cresol or 5% and 10% lactose in water or cheese whey can be processed to >99% reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) at a rate of up to 2 L/hr. The estimated residence time is less than 5 min at 360{degree}C and 3000 psig, not including 1 to 2 min required in the preheating zone of the reactor. The liquid hourly space velocity has been varied from 1.8 to 2.9 L feedstock/L catalyst/hr depending on the feedstock. The product fuel gas contains 40% to 55% methane, 35% to 50% carbon dioxide, and 5% to 10% hydrogen with as much as 2% ethane, but less than 0.1% ethylene or carbon monoxide, and small amounts of higher hydrocarbons. The byproduct water stream carries residual organics amounting to less than 500 mg/L COD. 9 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. DRAGON-NG: a configurable and capable AO test-bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharmal, Nazim A.; Bitenc, Urban; Bramall, David G.; Dipper, Nigel A.; Dubbeldam, Cornelis M.; Reeves, Andrew P.; Dunlop, Colin; Rolt, Stephen; Younger, Eddy J.; Myers, Richard M.

    2016-07-01

    An astronomical adaptive optics test-bench, designed to replicate the conditions of a 4 m-class telescope, is presented. Named DRAGON-Next Generation, it is constructed primarily from commercial off-the-shelf components with minimal customization (approximately a 90:10 ratio). This permits an optical design which is modular and this leads to a reconfigurability. DRAGON-NG has been designed for operation for the following modes: (high-order) SCAO, (twin-DM) MOAO, and (twin-DM) MCAO. It is capable of open-loop or closed-loop operation, with (3) natural and (3) laser guide-star emulation at loop rates of up to 200Hz. Field angles of up-to 2.4 arcmin (4m pupil emulation) can pass through the system. The design is dioptric and permits long cable runs to a compact real-time control system which is on-sky compatible. Therefore experimental validation can be carried out on DRAGON-NG before transferring to an on-sky system, which is a significant risk mitigation.

  8. Portable disposable ultrathin endoscopy tested through percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Baeg, Myong Ki; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jin Su; Cho, Yu Kyung; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, Bo-In; Lee, In-Seok; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A portable disposable ultrathin endoscope (DUE) with high visual quality and maneuverability would reduce the need for expensive facilities and emergency endoscopy could be available anywhere. It would increase patient satisfaction, prevent unnecessary sedation, and reduce infection. Our aim was to evaluate the usefulness of portable DUE in performing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Methods: We prospectively enrolled patients who underwent PEG under DUE guidance and compared them with historical controls who underwent PEG under conventional ultrathin endoscopy (CUE) guidance. The primary outcomes were successful stomach visualization and PEG tube insertion. Results: Twenty-five patients (19 male) were enrolled and compared with 25 gender and indication-matched controls. The most common indications for PEG were aspiration due to stroke or brain injury, dementia, and head and neck cancer. Entrance into the stomach was achieved in 92.0% (23/25) and 96% (24/25) in the DUE and CUE groups, and PEG was performed in 91.3% (21/23) and 95.8% (23/24), respectively. The mean insertion time for the DUE and CUE groups were 22.7 ± 9.3 minutes and 17.1 ± 5.7 minutes (P = 0.044). The 3 cases of failure to reach the stomach in both groups were caused by esophageal blockage. The 3 cases of failed PEG tube insertion were caused by poor visualization of the insertion site. Bleeding and pneumoperitoneum occurred in 1 and 2 patients in the DUE group. One case of fever was noted in the CUE group. All adverse events were conservatively managed. Conclusions: Our study shows that portable DUE in facilities without endoscopy equipment may be clinically feasible. PMID:27902596

  9. MSAP Hardware Verification: Testing Multi-Mission System Architecture Platform Hardware Using Simulation and Bench Test Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossin, Kent R.

    2005-01-01

    The Multi-Mission System Architecture Platform (MSAP) project aims to develop a system of hardware and software that will provide the core functionality necessary in many JPL missions and can be tailored to accommodate mission-specific requirements. The MSAP flight hardware is being developed in the Verilog hardware description language, allowing developers to simulate their design before releasing it to a field programmable gate array (FPGA). FPGAs can be updated in a matter of minutes, drastically reducing the time and expense required to produce traditional application-specific integrated circuits. Bench test equipment connected to the FPGAs can then probe and run Tcl scripts on the hardware. The Verilog and Tcl code can be reused or modified with each design. These steps are effective in confirming that the design operates according specifications.

  10. MSAP Hardware Verification: Testing Multi-Mission System Architecture Platform Hardware Using Simulation and Bench Test Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossin, Kent R.

    2005-01-01

    The Multi-Mission System Architecture Platform (MSAP) project aims to develop a system of hardware and software that will provide the core functionality necessary in many JPL missions and can be tailored to accommodate mission-specific requirements. The MSAP flight hardware is being developed in the Verilog hardware description language, allowing developers to simulate their design before releasing it to a field programmable gate array (FPGA). FPGAs can be updated in a matter of minutes, drastically reducing the time and expense required to produce traditional application-specific integrated circuits. Bench test equipment connected to the FPGAs can then probe and run Tcl scripts on the hardware. The Verilog and Tcl code can be reused or modified with each design. These steps are effective in confirming that the design operates according specifications.

  11. Bench-scale testing of fluidized-bed sorbents -- ZT-4

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Gupta, R.P.

    1995-12-01

    The objectives of this project are to identify and demonstrate methods for enhancing long-term chemical reactivity and attrition resistance of zinc oxide-based mixed metal-oxide sorbents for desulfurization of hot coal-derived gases in a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) fluidized-bed reactor. Specific objectives of this study are the following: {sm_bullet} Investigating various manufacturing methods to produce fluidizable zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents in a particle size range of 50 to 400 {mu}m; Characterizating and screening the formulations for chemical reactivity, attrition resistance, and structural properties; Testing selected formulations in an HTHP bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor to obtain an unbiased ranking of the promising sorbents; Investigating the effect of various process variables, such as temperature, nature of coal gas, gas velocity, and chemical composition of the sorbent, on the performance of the sorbent; Life-cycle testing of the superior zinc ferrite and zinc titanate formulations under HTHP conditions to determine their long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical strength; Addressing various reactor design issues; Generating a database on sorbent properties and performance (e.g., rates of reaction, attrition rate) to be used in the design and scaleup of future commercial hot-gas desulfurization systems; Transferring sorbent manufacturing technology to the private sector; Producing large batches (in tonnage quantities) of the sorbent to demonstrate commercial feasibility of the preparation method; and Coordinate testing of superior formulations in pilot plants with real and/or simulated coal gas.

  12. Real-time control for the high order, wide field DRAGON AO test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, Alastair; Bharmal, Nazim A.; Bitenc, Urban; Dipper, Nigel; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard; Reeves, Andrew; Younger, Eddy

    2014-07-01

    DRAGON is a high order, wide field AO test-bench at Durham. A key feature of DRAGON is the ability to be operated at real-time rates, i.e. frame rates of up to 1kHz, with low latency to maintain AO performance. Here, we will present the real-time control architecture for DRAGON, which includes two deformable mirrors, eight wavefront sensors and thousands of Shack-Hartmann sub-apertures. A novel approach has been taken to allow access to the wavefront sensor pixel stream, reducing latency and peak computational load, and this technique can be implemented for other similar wavefront sensor cameras with no hardware costs. We report on experience with an ELT-suitable wavefront sensor camera. DRAGON will form the basis for investigations into hardware acceleration architectures for AO real-time control, and recent work on GPU and many-core systems (including the Xeon Phi) will be reported. Additionally, the modular structure of DRAGON, its remote control capabilities, distribution of AO telemetry data, and the software concepts and architecture will be reported. Techniques used in DRAGON for pixel processing, slope calculation and wavefront reconstruction will be presented. This will include methods to handle changes in CN2 profile and sodium layer profile, both of which can be modelled in DRAGON. DRAGON software simulation techniques linking hardware-in-the-loop computer models to the DRAGON real-time system and control software will also be discussed. This tool allows testing of the DRAGON system without requiring physical hardware and serves as a test-bed for ELT integration and verification techniques.

  13. ExoGeoLab Test Bench for Landers, Rovers and Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.

    2009-04-01

    In the frame of ESTEC technology and research pilot project, we have started a small pilot facility with a ExoGeoLab and a mini-Habitat, supported by two design and control offices in the European Space Incubator (ESI), as well as infrastructure support and manpower. We have in addition to contribution on external instruments and manpower from partner institutes. From this test bench and kit of ExoGeoLab instruments, we plan to operate comprehensive instruments packages that could help in the technical research and science preparation of lander/rover missions studied in the frame of Cosmic Vision or the Exploration programme. The ExoGeoLab research incubator project includes a sequence of activities: - Data analysis and interpretation of remote sensing data (MEX, SMART-1, VEX, Cassini-Huygens) and in-situ (Huygens, MER) , and merging of multi-scale data sets - Procurement and integration of geophysical, geochemical and astrobiological breadboard instruments in an surface station and rover (ExoGeoLab) - Research operations and exploitation of ExoGeoLab test bench for various conceptual configurations (Moon, Mars, NEO, Titan) - Contribution to the exploitation of surface lander results (MER, Phenix, MSL, preparation Exomars) - Scientific simulation of planetary surfaces using laboratory and modelling tools - Support research for definition and design of science surface packages on the Moon, Mars, NEO, Titan - Research support to community preparation of payload for surface lander opportunities Specific goals and methods of ESTEC ExoGeoLab: we have started to integrate instruments in an ExoGeoLab crossing various techniques. The methodic steps for this hands-on research are: 1) We have procured and adapted instruments to equip a mid-size ExoGeoRover (made available in collaboration with ESTEC robotics section), and a small surface station. 2) This terrestrial payload (instruments, sensors, data handling) will be deployed, operated and used as collaborative research

  14. Development and bench testing of a multi-spectral imaging technology built on a smartphone platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Frank J.; Weiser, Reuven; Kass, Alex J.; Rose, Donny; Safir, Amit; Levitz, David

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer screening presents a great challenge for clinicians across the developing world. In many countries, cervical cancer screening is done by visualization with the naked eye. Simple brightfield white light imaging with photo documentation has been shown to make a significant impact on cervical cancer care. Adoption of smartphone based cervical imaging devices is increasing across Africa. However, advanced imaging technologies such as multispectral imaging systems, are seldom deployed in low resource settings, where they are needed most. To address this challenge, the optical system of a smartphone-based mobile colposcopy imaging system was refined, integrating components required for low cost, portable multi-spectral imaging of the cervix. This paper describes the refinement of the mobile colposcope to enable it to acquire images of the cervix at multiple illumination wavelengths, including modeling and laboratory testing. Wavelengths were selected to enable quantifying the main absorbers in tissue (oxyand deoxy-hemoglobin, and water), as well as scattering parameters that describe the size distribution of scatterers. The necessary hardware and software modifications are reviewed. Initial testing suggests the multi-spectral mobile device holds promise for use in low-resource settings.

  15. Theoretical Analysis and Bench Tests of a Control-Surface Booster Employing a Variable Displacement Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, Charles W.; Kleckner, Harold F.

    1947-01-01

    The NACA is conducting a general investigation of servo-mechanisms for use in powering aircraft control surfaces. This paper presents a theoretical analysis and the results of bench tests of a control-booster system which employs a variable displacement hydraulic pump. The booster is intended for use in a flight investigation to determine the effects of various booster parameters on the handling qualities of airplanes. Such a flight investigation would aid in formulating specific requirements concerning the design of control boosters in general. Results of the theoretical analysis and the bench tests indicate that the subject booster is representative of types which show promise of satisfactory performance. The bench tests showed that the following desirable features were inherent in this booster system: (1) No lost motion or play in any part of the system; (2) no detectable lag between motion of the contra1 stick and control surface; and (3) Good agreement between control displacements and stick-force variations with no hysteresis in the stick-force characteristics. The final design configuration of this booster system showed no tendency to oscillate, overshoot, or have other undesirable transient characteristics common to boosters.

  16. A Lego Mindstorms NXT based test bench for multiagent exploratory systems and distributed network partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Riya Raghuvir

    Networks of communicating agents require distributed algorithms for a variety of tasks in the field of network analysis and control. For applications such as swarms of autonomous vehicles, ad hoc and wireless sensor networks, and such military and civilian applications as exploring and patrolling a robust autonomous system that uses a distributed algorithm for selfpartitioning can be significantly helpful. A single team of autonomous vehicles in a field may need to self-dissemble into multiple teams, conducive to completing multiple control tasks. Moreover, because communicating agents are subject to changes, namely, addition or failure of an agent or link, a distributed or decentralized algorithm is favorable over having a central agent. A framework to help with the study of self-partitioning of such multi agent systems that have most basic mobility model not only saves our time in conception but also gives us a cost effective prototype without negotiating the physical realization of the proposed idea. In this thesis I present my work on the implementation of a flexible and distributed stochastic partitioning algorithm on the LegoRTM Mindstorms' NXT on a graphical programming platform using National Instruments' LabVIEW(TM) forming a team of communicating agents via NXT-Bee radio module. We single out mobility, communication and self-partition as the core elements of the work. The goal is to randomly explore a precinct for reference sites. Agents who have discovered the reference sites announce their target acquisition to form a network formed based upon the distance of each agent with the other wherein the self-partitioning begins to find an optimal partition. Further, to illustrate the work, an experimental test-bench of five Lego NXT robots is presented.

  17. Validation of a New Portable Metabolic System During an Incremental Running Test

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Víctor; Benito, Pedro José; Peinado, Ana Belén; Álvarez, María; Martín, Carlos; Salvo, Valter Di; Pigozzi, Fabio; Maffulli, Nicola; Calderón, Fracisco Javier

    2008-01-01

    We tested a new portable metabolic system, the Jaeger Oxycon Mobile (OM) at a range of running speeds. Six subjects carried out, in random order, two incremental tests on a treadmill, one of them using the OM, and the other using the Jaeger Oxycon Pro (OP). There are systematic errors in the measurements of oxygen consumption (VO2) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) with the OM. Production of CO2 (VCO2) tends to be overestimated by the OM, although the differences are not significant. Ventilation (VE) showed very similar values in both analyzers. Data of VO2 and RER were corrected with a regression equation which minimised the differences among the devices. The portable metabolic system OM makes systematic errors in measurements of VO2 and RER which can be adjusted with a regression analysis to obtain data comparable to those obtained by fixed systems. Key pointsPortable metabolic systems are frequently used to explore various physiological ventilatory variables in field tests.There are systematic errors in the measurements of oxygen consumption (VO2) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) with the Jaeger Oxycon Mobile (OM) portable metabolic systemProduction of CO2 (VCO2) tends to be overestimated by the OMData of VO2 and RER can be corrected with a regression equationThe portable metabolic system OM makes systematic errors in measurements of VO2 and RER which can be adjusted with a regression analysis to obtain data comparable to those obtained by fixed systems PMID:24149962

  18. Portable nondestructive testing and dynamic test diagnostics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.A.; Brooks, G.H.; Bryant, L.E.; Guerrero, A.; Valdez, J.E.

    1994-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory maintains one of the most complete NDT facilities worldwide. In addition to many fixed pieces of equipment, the Laboratory has a very wide range of NDT and dynamic test diagnostic equipment that can be taken to the job site. Most of the equipment described here was procured for a specific purpose to support a program consistent with the nuclear weapons mission of Los Alamos. However, through the years, the equipment has found use in many other applications both within and external to weapons research, development, and testing. Various combinations of these equipments form unique capabilities, as demonstrated by the applications. The portable equipment is mainly applied to problems where the process or object under study cannot be brought into an NDT laboratory.

  19. Accuracy and Linearity of Positive Airway Pressure Devices: A Technical Bench Testing Study

    PubMed Central

    Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; López-Escárcega, Elodia; Carrillo-Alduenda, José Luis; Arredondo-del-Bosque, Fernando; Reyes-Zúñiga, Margarita; Castorena-Maldonado, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To analyze the accuracy and linearity of different CPAP devices outside of the manufacturers' own quality control environment. Methods: Accuracy (how well readings agree with the gold standard) and linearity were evaluated by comparing programmed pressure to measured CPAP pressure using an instrument established as the gold standard. Comparisons were made centimeter-by-centimeter (linearity) throughout the entire programming spectrum of each device (from 4 to 20 cm H2O). Results: A total of 108 CPAP devices were tested (1836 measurements); mean use of the devices was 956 hours. Twenty-two of them were new. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) decreased from 0.97 at pressures programmed between 4 and 10 cm H2O, to 0.84 at pressures of 16 to 20 cm H2O. Despite this high ICC, the 95% agreement limit oscillated between −1 and 1 cm H2O. This same behavior was observed in relation to hours of use: the ICC for readings taken on devices with < 2,000 hours of use was 0.99, while that of the 50 measurements made on devices with > 6,000 hours was 0.97 (the agreement limit oscillated between −1.3 and 2.5 cm H2O). “Adequate adjustments” were documented in 97% of measurements when the definition was ± 1 cm H2O of the programmed pressure, but this index of adequate adjustment readings decreased to 85% when the ± 0.5 cm H2O criterion was applied. Conclusions: In general, the CPAP devices were accurate and linear throughout the spectrum of programmable pressures; however, strategies to assure short- and long-term equipment reliability are required in conditions of routine use. Citation: Torre-Bouscoulet L; López-Escárcega E; Carrillo-Alduenda JL; Arredondo-del-Bosque F; Reyes-Zúñiga M; Castorena-Maldonado A. Accuracy and linearity of positive airway pressure devices: a technical bench testing study. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(4):369-373. PMID:20726286

  20. Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description

    SciTech Connect

    Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

    2002-08-01

    Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

  1. Design and test of the benches for the magnetic measurement of the LHC dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billan, J.; Buckley, J.; Saban, R.; Sievers, P.; Walckiers, L.

    1994-07-01

    The magnetic measurement of more than 1300 LHC dipoles comprises the content of higher harmonic field components, field direction and field integrals. The measurements will be carried out along a warm bore installed inside the magnet cold bore, thus allowing the use of rotating coils at room temperature. This coil, together with Hall and NMR detectors is mounted at one end of a 12.5 m long shaft which is specially designed for very high rotational stiffness and which is controlled from its far end by a motor, an angular encoder and a level meter, all standard components placed outside the magnetic field without space restrictions. Particular emphasis has been put on the user-friendliness of the bench and its automated, computer-controlled operation requiring a minimum of staff, an important issue during production measurements of large series of magnets. The bench and its performance and precision achieved during its commissioning are described.

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA): Development of a Flow Model for Bovine Livers for Extensive Bench Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lubienski, Andreas Bitsch, Rudi G.; Lubienski, Katrin; Kauffmann, Guenter; Duex, Markus

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To develop a flow model for bovine livers for extensive bench testing of technical improvements or procedure-related developments of radiofrequency ablation excluding animal experiments. Methods. The perfusion of bovine livers directly from the slaughterhouse was simulated in a liver perfusion tank developed for the experimental work. The liver perfusion medium used was a Tyrode solution prepared in accordance with physiologic criteria (as for liver transplants) which was oxygenated by an oxygenator and heated to 36.5 deg. C. Portal vein circulation was regulated via a flow- and pressure-controlled pump and arterial circulation using a dialysis machine. Flow rate and pressure were adjusted as for the physiology of a human liver converted to bovine liver conditions. The fluid discharged from the liver was returned into the perfusion system through the vena cava. Extendable precision swivel arms with the radiofrequency probe attached were mounted on the liver perfusion tank. RFA was conducted with the RF3000 generator and a 2 cm LeVeen needle (Boston Scientific, Ratingen, Germany) in a three-dimensional grid for precise localization of the generated thermolesions. Results. Four bovine livers weighing 8.4 {+-} 0.4 kg each were prepared, connected to the perfusion system, and consecutively perfused for the experiments. Mean arterial flow was 569 {+-} 43 ml/min, arterial pressure 120 mmHg, portovenous flow 1440 {+-} 305 ml/min, and portal pressure 10 mmHg. Macroscopic evaluation after the experiments revealed no thrombi within the hepatic vessels. A total of 136 RF thermolesions were generated with an average number of 34 per liver. Mean RF duration was 2:59 {+-} 2:01 min:sec with an average baseline impedance of 28.2 {+-} 3.4 ohms. The mean diameter of the thermolesions along the puncture channel was 22.98 {+-} 4.34 mm and perpendicular to the channel was 23.27 {+-} 4.82 mm. Conclusion. Extracorporeal perfusion of bovine livers with consecutive standardized RF

  3. SUMMARY PLAN FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER AND PRODUCT TESTING TREATABILITY STUDIES USING HANFORD TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB

    2010-08-19

    ) was found to be comparable to immobilized low-activity waste glass waste form in the initial supplemental LAW treatment technology risk assessment (Mann 2003). To confirm this hypothesis, DOE is funding a treatability study where three actual Hanford tank waste samples (containing both {sup 99}Tc and {sup 125}I) will be processed in Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) to form the mineral product, similar to the granular NAS waste form, that will then be subject to a number of waste form qualification tests. In previous tests, SRNL have demonstrated that the BSR product is chemically and physically equivalent to the FBSR product (Janzen 2005). The objective of this paper is to describe the sample selection, sample preparation, and environmental and regulatory considerations for treatability studies of the FBSR process using Hanford tank waste samples at the SNRL. The SNRL will process samples in its BSR. These samples will be decontaminated in the 222-S Laboratory to remove undissolved solids and selected radioisotopes to comply with Department of Transportation (DOT) shipping regulations and to ensure worker safety by limiting radiation exposure to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). These decontamination levels will also meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) definition of low activity waste (LAW). After the SNRL has processed the tank samples to a granular mineral form, SRNL and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will conduct waste form testing on both the granular material and monoliths prepared from the granular material. The tests being performed are outlined in Appendix A.

  4. Study on Dynamical Simulation of Railway Vehicle Bogie Parameters Test-bench Electro-hydraulic Servo System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zhikun; Su, Jian; Xu, Guan; Cao, Xiaoning

    Dynamical mathematical model was established for accurately positioning, fast response and real-time tracing of electro-hydraulic servo control system in railway vehicle bog ie parameters test system with elastic load. The model could precisely control the output of position and force of the hydraulic cylinders. Induction method was proposed in the paper. Dynamical simulation verified the mathematical model by SIMULINK software. Meanwhile the key factors affecting the dynamical characteristics of the system were discussed in detail. Through the simulation results, high precision is obtained in application and the need of real-time control on the railway vehicle bogie parameters test-bench is realized.

  5. Development of an experimental test bench for the measurement of fluid dynamic behavior of mechanical heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, Paolo; Pinotti, Marcos; Scalise, Lorenzo

    2001-06-01

    In this paper an experimental test bench for mechanical heart valve and the procedure for non-invasive optical measurement are reported. Fluidynamic behaviour of a bileafleat mechanical valve in steady state and pulsed flow conditions has been studied. Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) is used to access velocity and turbulence values at different distances before and after the mechanical valve. Data obtained can be related, according to the literature, to typical pathologies affecting patients who underwent surgical procedures to implant mechanical heart valves. In particular thrombosis and hemolysis can be related to high levels of shear stress affecting blood cells. Measurements of velocity, turbulence and shear stresses have been performed.

  6. Design of the ANTARES LCM-DAQ board test bench using a FPGA-based system-on-chip approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anvar, S.; Kestener, P.; Le Provost, H.

    2006-11-01

    The System-on-Chip (SoC) approach consists in using state-of-the-art FPGA devices with embedded RISC processor cores, high-speed differential LVDS links and ready-to-use multi-gigabit transceivers allowing development of compact systems with substantial number of IO channels. Required performances are obtained through a subtle separation of tasks between closely cooperating programmable hardware logic and user-friendly software environment. We report about our experience in using the SoC approach for designing the production test bench of the off-shore readout system for the ANTARES neutrino experiment.

  7. Measurement of the temperature of a stator winding with fiber-optic sensors in bench tests of a turbogenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, E. I.; Lyamin, A. A.; Shelemba, I. S.

    2010-09-15

    The temperature of the elementary conductors of the stator winding of a 225 MW turbogenerator has been measured using miniature fiber-optic sensors, built in to the winding during manufacture. This is the first time that practical bench tests have been made in Russian electrical machine construction practice. The results of the experiment are used as the initial data for determining important parameters of the construction of turbogenerators with air cooling, namely, the thermal conductivity of the body insulation in the slot, and the heat-transfer coefficient in the front parts of the stator winding.

  8. Far infrared emission and portable testing device of fine powders.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinsheng; Meng, Junping; Ding, Yan; Wang, Peipeng; Gan, Kun

    2011-11-01

    In order for industrial and mining enterprises to fast detect the quality of fine mineral powders with far infrared emission, a simple testing model was set up according to the relationship between the emission intensity of powders and their surface temperature. The corresponding testing device was designed and assembled into three parts containing Constant Temperature Heating Part, Temperature Measuring Part and Sample Loading Part. By using the tourmaline mineral powders with far infrared emission as the research object and combining Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the calibration for the testing device was carried out. The results showed that the far infrared emission intensity of the tourmaline powders with different mining area and particle size could be judged. The testing results exhibited correct values when compared with those from FTIR measurements.

  9. The development of a portable, automatic, microwave transmission line test set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Fuente, Val; Karuschkat, Glenn; Simone, Frederick

    Existing test sets for flightline testing of microwave transmission lines are complex, semiportable systems requiring the piece-part testing of waveguides, antennas, and transmission line components in the aircraft. Moreover, these systems are not fully automated and require a large degree of manual intervention. Therefore, advances in test-set miniaturization and automatic control techniques can now be utilized to develop a fully portable, automatic test set for the flightline functional and diagnostic fault isolation testing of RF avionics and microwave transmission lines. A description is given of the proposed capabilities of such a tester, and the benefits expected to be derived from its use.

  10. DESIGN, FABRICATION, ASSEMBLY AND BENCH TESTING OF A TEXACO INFRARED RATIO PYROMETER SYSTEM FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF REACTION CHAMBER TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Leininger

    2001-03-31

    Reliable measurement of gasifier reaction chamber temperature is important for the proper operation of slagging, entrained-flow gasification processes. Historically, thermocouples have been used as the main measurement technique, with the temperature inferred from syngas methane concentration being used as a backup measurement. While these have been sufficient for plant operation in many cases, both techniques suffer from limitations. The response time of methane measurements is too slow to detect rapid upset conditions, and thermocouples are subject to long-term drift, as well as slag attack, which eventually leads to failure of the thermocouple. Texaco's Montebello Technology Center (MTC) has developed an infrared ratio pyrometer system for measuring gasifier reaction chamber temperature. This system has a faster response time than both methane and thermocouples, and has been demonstrated to provide reliable temperature measurements for longer periods of time when compared to thermocouples installed in the same MTC gasifier. In addition, the system can be applied to commercial gasifiers without any significant scale-up issues. The major equipment items, the purge system, and the safety shutdown system in a commercial plant are essentially identical to the prototypes at MTC. The desired result of this DOE program is ''a bench-scale prototype, either assembled or with critical components (laboratory) tested in a convincing manner.'' The prototype of the pyrometer system (including gasifier optical access port) that was designed, assembled and tested for this program, has had previous prototypes that have been built and successfully tested under actual coal and coke gasification conditions in three pilot units at MTC. It was the intent of the work performed under the auspices of this program to review and update the existing design, and to fabricate and bench test an updated system that can be field tested in one or more commercial gasifiers during a follow on phase

  11. Space Suit Portable Life Support System Test Bed (PLSS 1.0) Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matthew; Conger, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at NASA-JSC to develop an advanced extra-vehicular activity Portable Life Support System (PLSS) design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. Previous efforts have focused on modeling and analyzing the advanced PLSS architecture, as well as developing key enabling technologies. Like the current International Space Station Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit PLSS, the advanced PLSS comprises three subsystems required to sustain the crew during extra-vehicular activity including the Thermal, Ventilation, and Oxygen Subsystems. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test bed that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off the shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, Ventilation Subsystem fan, Rapid Cycle Amine swingbed carbon dioxide and water vapor removal device, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator heat rejection device. The overall PLSS 1.0 test objective was to demonstrate the capability of the Advanced PLSS to provide key life support functions including suit pressure regulation, carbon dioxide and water vapor removal, thermal control and contingency purge operations. Supplying oxygen was not one of the specific life support functions because the PLSS 1.0 test was not oxygen rated. Nitrogen was used for the working gas. Additional test objectives were to confirm PLSS technology development components performance within an integrated test bed, identify unexpected system level interactions, and map the PLSS 1.0 performance with respect to key variables such as crewmember metabolic rate and suit pressure. Successful PLSS 1.0 testing completed 168 test points over 44 days of testing and produced a large database of test results that characterize system level

  12. Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

  13. Railway testing using a portable ride quality and vibration measurement system with GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mee, Brian; Whitten, Brian; Neijikovsky, Boris

    1995-06-01

    To conduct the testing and evaluation of railway and railway vehicles, the Federal Railroad Administration developed a protable system that consists of accelerometers oriented in the vertical and horizontal directions, a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, data collection and power systems, and a portable computer. Commercial software was used to collect and display the data, while software, developed by ENSCO, was used to analyze and display results. The GPS provided dynamic location to an accuracy of 30 meters or better, and vehicle speed to within one mile per hour. The system was used in the demonstration tests of several advanced high-speed trains on Amtrak's Northeast Corrider and on other tracks in the US. The portable measurement system proved to be a simple and effective device to characterize the vibration environment of any transportation system. It is ideal for use in the assessment of the safe performance of high-speed trains operating at high cant deficiency. The system has also been used for other field tests, including braking performance and bridge monitoring. This report discusses the portable measurement system, the test applications that the system has been used for, the results of thoses tests, and the potential for improvements.

  14. A Portable Fluorescence Camera for Testing Surgical Specimens in the Operating Room: Description and Early Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kakareka, John W.; McCann, Thomas E.; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Clinical translation of novel optical probes requires testing of human specimens ex vivo to ensure efficacy. However, it may be difficult to remove human tissue from the operating room due to regulatory/privacy issues. Therefore, we designed a portable fluorescence camera to test targeted optical imaging probes on human specimens in the operating room. Procedures A compact benchtop fluorescence camera was designed and built in-house. A mouse xenograft model of ovarian cancer with an activatable imaging probe based on rhodamine green was used to test the device. Comparison was made to commercially available imaging systems. Results The prototype camera produced images comparable to images acquired with commercially available, non-portable imaging systems. Conclusion We demonstrate the feasibility of a specimen-based portable fluorescence camera for use in the operating room. Its small size ensures that tissue excised from patients can be tested promptly for fluorescence within the operating room environment, thus expediting the testing of novel imaging probes. PMID:20960235

  15. Research: Testing of a Novel Portable Body Temperature Conditioner Using a Thermal Manikin.

    PubMed

    Heller, Daniel; Heller, Alex; Moujaes, Samir; Williams, Shelley J; Hoffmann, Ryan; Sarkisian, Paul; Khalili, Kaveh; Rockenfeller, Uwe; Browder, Timothy D; Kuhls, Deborah A; Fildes, John J

    2016-01-01

    A battery-operated active cooling/heating device was developed to maintain thermoregulation of trauma victims in austere environments while awaiting evacuation to a hospital for further treatment. The use of a thermal manikin was adopted for this study in order to simulate load testing and evaluate the performance of this novel portable active cooling/heating device for both continuous (external power source) and battery power. The performance of the portable body temperature conditioner (PBTC) was evaluated through cooling/heating fraction tests to analyze the heat transfer between a thermal manikin and circulating water blanket to show consistent performance while operating under battery power. For the cooling/heating fraction tests, the ambient temperature was set to 15°C ± 1°C (heating) and 30°C ± 1°C (cooling). The PBTC water temperature was set to 37°C for the heating mode tests and 15°C for the cooling mode tests. The results showed consistent performance of the PBTC in terms of cooling/heating capacity while operating under both continuous and battery power. The PBTC functioned as intended and shows promise as a portable warming/cooling device for operation in the field.

  16. W5″ Test: A simple method for measuring mean power output in the bench press exercise.

    PubMed

    Tous-Fajardo, Julio; Moras, Gerard; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Sergio; Gonzalo-Skok, Oliver; Busquets, Albert; Mujika, Iñigo

    2016-11-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the validity and reliability of a novel simple test [Five Seconds Power Test (W5″ Test)] for estimating the mean power output during the bench press exercise at different loads, and its sensitivity to detect training-induced changes. Thirty trained young men completed as many repetitions as possible in a time of ≈5 s at 25%, 45%, 65% and 85% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) in two test sessions separated by four days. The number of repetitions, linear displacement of the bar and time needed to complete the test were recorded by two independent testers, and a linear encoder was used as the criterion measure. For each load, the mean power output was calculated in the W5″ Test as mechanical work per time unit and compared with that obtained from the linear encoder. Subsequently, 20 additional subjects (10 training group vs. 10 control group) were assessed before and after completing a seven-week training programme designed to improve maximal power. Results showed that both assessment methods correlated highly in estimating mean power output at different loads (r range: 0.86-0.94; p < .01) and detecting training-induced changes (R(2): 0.78). Good to excellent intra-tester (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) range: 0.81-0.97) and excellent inter-tester (ICC range: 0.96-0.99; coefficient of variation range: 2.4-4.1%) reliability was found for all loads. The W5″ Test was shown to be a valid, reliable and sensitive method for measuring mean power output during the bench press exercise in subjects who have previous resistance training experience.

  17. Acceptance test procedure for a portable, self-contained nitrogen supply

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1994-10-04

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of WHC-S-0249 Rev. 1 and ECN 606112. The equipment being tested is a Portable, Self-Contained Nitrogen Supply. The unit was purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity. The Functional Test was written by the Seller and is contained in Appendix A. The Functional test will be performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company performing inspection and witnessing the functional test at the Seller`s location.

  18. Bench scale testing of micronized magnetite beneficiation. Quarterly technical progress report 4, October--December, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Anast, K.

    1994-01-25

    This project is aimed at development of a process that, by using ultra fine magnetite suspension, would expand the application of heavy media separation technology to processing fine, {minus}28 mesh coals. These coal fines, produced during coal mining and crushing, are separated in the conventional coal preparation plant and generally impounded in a tailings pond. Development of an economic process for processing these fines into marketable product will expand the utilization of coal for power production in an environmentally acceptable and economically viable way. This process has been successfully researched at PETC but has not been studied on a continuous bench-scale unit, which is a necessary step towards commercial development of this promising technology. The goal of the program is to investigate the technology in a continuous circuit at a reasonable scale to provide a design basis for larger plants and a commercial feasibility data.

  19. A portable and affordable extensional rheometer for field testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallmark, Bart; Bryan, Matthew; Bosson, Ed; Butler, Simon; Hoier, Tom; Magens, Ole; Pistre, Nicolas; Pratt, Lee; Ward, Betsy-Ann; Wibberley, Sam; Wilson, D. Ian

    2016-12-01

    Extensional shear testing is often needed to characterise the behaviour of complex fluids found in industry and nature. Traditional extensional rheometers are typically expensive, fragile and heavy and are only suited to making measurements in a laboratory environment. For some applications, it is necessary to make in situ rheological measurements where, for example, fluid properties change rapidly over time or where laboratory facilities are unavailable. This paper reports the development and validation of an inexpensive, lightweight and robust ‘open source’ extensional rheometer, Seymour II. Validation was carried out experimentally and computationally. Measurements on a Newtonian fluid (492 mPa s Brookfield silicone oil) yielded results of 510  ±  51 mPa s; these are comfortably within the range of  ±10% which other authors have quoted for extensional techniques using laboratory rheometers. Comparison of the observed filament thinning dynamics to those obtained using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) gave good qualitative agreement. Use of Seymour II at the University of Cambridge Botanic Gardens revealed that the mucilage of the ‘crane flower’, Strelitzia reginae, was a viscoelastic fluid whose extensional response could be described by a two-mode Giesekus equation. Engineering drawings and image analysis code for Seymour II are available for download at the project website, www.seymourII.org/.

  20. Bench-scale testing and evaluation of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; McMichael, W.J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Chen, D.H.; Hopper, J.R.

    1992-11-01

    The present work seeks to (1) demonstrate the DSRP in an integrated two-stage bench-scale unit scaled up by a factor of up to 40, for up to 99 percent or higher recovery of sulfur, (2) explain the high sulfur yield and mechanism of DSRP reactions by conducting kinetic experiments and advanced thermodynamic calculations, and (3) continue technology transfer to the point where industry is willing to support further DSRP development. The DSRP Bench-Scale Unit hardware has been described in detail previously (Gangwal and McMichael, 1990; Gangwal and McMichael, 1991). The unit consists of a simulated off-gas and coal-gas delivery system connected to two high-pressure reactors and condensers in the configuration shown conceptually in Figure 1. The system is rated to 400 psig and the reactors, capable of operation at up to 400 psig at 750{degree}C, hold up to 1 L of catalyst each. The inlet and outlet gases are analyzed using two gas chromatographs (GCs) and a continuous SO{sub 2} analyzer. One major change recently made to the unit consists of installing advanced condensers suggested by experts in the field to facilitate more efficient separation of the sulfur after each reactor. A schematic diagram of the advanced condenser is shown in Figure 2. The sulfur-laden gas is cooled by surrounding steam at 250{degree}F in a coil and then flashed into the sulfur collection pot for separation of gas and sulfur. A sulfur drain is included so that it is not necessary to dismantle the condenser after every run. The ability to drain the sulfur during a run allows extended runs to be carried out. Also fittings are provided in strategic locations to allow dismantling when cleanup becomes necessary.

  1. Bench-scale testing and evaluation of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; McMichael, W.J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Chen, D.H.; Hopper, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The present work seeks to (1) demonstrate the DSRP in an integrated two-stage bench-scale unit scaled up by a factor of up to 40, for up to 99 percent or higher recovery of sulfur, (2) explain the high sulfur yield and mechanism of DSRP reactions by conducting kinetic experiments and advanced thermodynamic calculations, and (3) continue technology transfer to the point where industry is willing to support further DSRP development. The DSRP Bench-Scale Unit hardware has been described in detail previously (Gangwal and McMichael, 1990; Gangwal and McMichael, 1991). The unit consists of a simulated off-gas and coal-gas delivery system connected to two high-pressure reactors and condensers in the configuration shown conceptually in Figure 1. The system is rated to 400 psig and the reactors, capable of operation at up to 400 psig at 750[degree]C, hold up to 1 L of catalyst each. The inlet and outlet gases are analyzed using two gas chromatographs (GCs) and a continuous SO[sub 2] analyzer. One major change recently made to the unit consists of installing advanced condensers suggested by experts in the field to facilitate more efficient separation of the sulfur after each reactor. A schematic diagram of the advanced condenser is shown in Figure 2. The sulfur-laden gas is cooled by surrounding steam at 250[degree]F in a coil and then flashed into the sulfur collection pot for separation of gas and sulfur. A sulfur drain is included so that it is not necessary to dismantle the condenser after every run. The ability to drain the sulfur during a run allows extended runs to be carried out. Also fittings are provided in strategic locations to allow dismantling when cleanup becomes necessary.

  2. System for portable nucleic acid testing in low resource settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hsiang-Wei; Roskos, Kristina; Hickerson, Anna I.; Carey, Thomas; Niemz, Angelika

    2013-03-01

    Our overall goal is to enable timely diagnosis of infectious diseases through nucleic acid testing at the point-of-care and in low resource settings, via a compact system that integrates nucleic acid sample preparation, isothermal DNA amplification, and nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF) detection. We herein present an interim milestone, the design of the amplification and detection subsystem, and the characterization of thermal and fluidic control and assay execution within this system. Using an earlier prototype of the amplification and detection unit, comprised of a disposable cartridge containing flexible pouches, passive valves, and electrolysis-driven pumps, in conjunction with a small heater, we have demonstrated successful execution of an established and clinically validated isothermal loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) reaction targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) DNA, coupled to NALF detection. The refined design presented herein incorporates miniaturized and integrated electrolytic pumps, novel passive valves, overall design changes to facilitate integration with an upstream sample preparation unit, and a refined instrument design that automates pumping, heating, and timing. Nucleic acid amplification occurs in a two-layer pouch that facilitates fluid handling and appropriate thermal control. The disposable cartridge is manufactured using low-cost and scalable techniques and forms a closed system to prevent workplace contamination by amplicons. In a parallel effort, we are developing a sample preparation unit based on similar design principles, which performs mechanical lysis of mycobacteria and DNA extraction from liquefied and disinfected sputum. Our next step is to combine sample preparation, amplification, and detection in a final integrated cartridge and device, to enable fully automated sample-in to answer-out diagnosis of active tuberculosis in primary care facilities of low-resource and high-burden countries.

  3. Portable Lifting Seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Portable lifting machine assists user in rising from seated position to standing position, or in sitting down. Small and light enough to be carried like briefcase. Used on variety of chairs and benches. Upholstered aluminum box houses mechanism of lifting seat. Springs on outer shaft-and-arm subassembly counterbalance part of user's weight to assist motor.

  4. Portable Lifting Seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Portable lifting machine assists user in rising from seated position to standing position, or in sitting down. Small and light enough to be carried like briefcase. Used on variety of chairs and benches. Upholstered aluminum box houses mechanism of lifting seat. Springs on outer shaft-and-arm subassembly counterbalance part of user's weight to assist motor.

  5. Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System (LOCAD) Phase 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-21

    ISS018-E-041370 (21 March 2009) --- Astronaut Sandra Magnus, STS-119 mission specialist, prepares to work with the Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) experiment in the Destiny laboratory while Space Shuttle Discovery remains docked with the International Space Station. LOCAD-PTS is a handheld device for rapid detection of biological and chemical substances onboard the station.

  6. Development of the Portable Synchrotron MIRRORCLE-CV for High Precision Non-Destructive Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Toyosugi, Norio; Noh, Young Deok; Yamada, Takanori; Morita, Masaki; Mantey, Edward; Masaoka, Sei; Yamada, Hironari

    2007-01-19

    We started the development of the portable synchrotron MIRRORCLE-CV series, which provides a high quality x-ray beam for high precision non-destructive testing (NDT). Computer simulations for the magnetic field design and electron dynamics reveal that the outer diameter of the synchrotron magnet can be as small as 30 cm. This synchrotron size approaches that of a conventional x-ray tube.

  7. MIRRORCLE-CV The Portable Synchrotron For Precise Non-Destructive Testing And Medical Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Yamada, Hironari

    2007-03-30

    We are developing the portable synchrotron MIRRORCLE-CV series, which provides a high quality x-ray beam for high precision non-destructive testing (NDT). Computer simulations for the magnetic field design and electron dynamics reveal that the outer diameter of the synchrotron magnet can be as small as 30 cm. This synchrotron size approaches that of a conventional x-ray tube.

  8. Testing and Oxygen Assessment Results for a Next Generation Extravehicular Activity Portable Life Support System Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Rivera, Fatonia L.; Martin, Devin

    2011-01-01

    NASA is designing a next generation Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for use in future surface exploration endeavors. To meet the new requirements for ventilation flow at nominal and buddy modes, a fan has been developed and tested. This paper summarizes the results of the performance and life cycle testing efforts conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center. Additionally, oxygen compatibility assessment results from an evaluation conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) are provided, and lessons learned and future recommendations are outlined.

  9. Development and testing of a portable wind sensitive directional air sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyo, J.; Toma, J.; King, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A portable wind-sensitive directional air sampler has been developed as part of an air pollution source identification system. The system is designed to identify sources of air pollution based on the directional collection of field air samples and their analysis for TSP and trace element characteristics. Sources can be identified by analyzing the data on the basis of pattern recognition concepts. Functional testing of a prototype sampler is described; all items exhibited performance and life sufficient to carry out field performance test operations. Life testing of the wind direction sensor and the directional porting valves, which are critical to reliable operation, was emphasized with successful results.

  10. Portable microwave test packages for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, Tom Y.; Stewart, Scott R.; Franco, Manuel M.

    1992-01-01

    Portable microwave test packages used to evaluate a new 34-m-diameter beam-waveguide (BWG) antenna are described. The experimental methodology involved transporting test packages to different focal points of the BWG system and making noise temperature, antenna efficiency, and holography measurements. Comparisons of data measured at the different focal points enabled determinations of performance degradations caused by various mirrors in the BWG system. It is shown that, due to remarkable stabilities and accuracies of radiometric data obtained through the use of the microwave test packages, degradations caused by the BWG system were successfully determined.

  11. Crucible melts and bench-scale ISV (in situ vitrification) tests on simulated wastes in INEL (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) soils

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Oma, K.H.; Reimus, M.A.H.

    1990-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of eight crucible melt tests and three bench-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) test that were performed on simulated metals/soils mixtures containing actual site soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The crucible melt and bench-scale ISV tests are a part of efforts by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to assist the INEL in conducting a treatability study on ISV for application to the mixed waste buried at the INEL subsurface disposal area (SDA). The crucible melt tests were performed to evaluate the effect of various chemical additives and metal oxidation techniques on soil melting temperatures, melt viscosities, metals versus electrode oxidation potentials, and metals incorporation in the glass. The bench-scale ISV tests were performed to supplement the existing ISV data base with information on certain hazardous materials that have not been adequately evaluated in previous ISV tests. These materials included five EP toxicity metals, various volatile organic materials fixed in a cementitious matrix (including carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE)), and asbestos. In addition, the bench-scale test were used to evaluated the effect of the proposed chemical additive on ISV processing performance and product quality. 8 refs., 24 figs., 19 tabs.

  12. Preliminary testing of a prototype portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, L. L.; Anderson, N. B.; Stevenson, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    A portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for use as an analyzer in mineral resource investigative work was built and tested. The prototype battery powered spectrometer, measuring 11 by 12 by 5 inches and weighing only about 15 pounds, was designed specifically for field use. The spectrometer has two gas proportional counters and two radioactive sources, Cd (10a) and Fe (55). Preliminary field and laboratory tests on rock specimens and rock pulps have demonstrated the capability of the spectrometer to detect 33 elements to date. Characteristics of the system present some limitations, however, and further improvements are recommended.

  13. Evaluation of the 8310-N-S manufactured by Sutron–Results of bench, temperature, and field deployment testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunkle, Gerald A.

    2016-01-07

    The Sutron 8310-N-S (8310) data collection platform (DCP) manufactured by Sutron Corporation was evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) for conformance to the manufacturer’s specifications for recording and transmitting data. The 8310-N-S is a National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA)-enclosed DCP with a built-in Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite transmitter that operates over a temperature range of −40 to 60 degrees Celsius (°C). The evaluation procedures followed and the results obtained are described in this report for bench, temperature chamber, and outdoor deployment testing. The three units tested met the manufacturer’s stated specifications for the tested conditions, but two of the units had transmission errors either during temperature chamber or deployment testing. During outdoor deployment testing, 6.72 percent of transmissions by serial number 1206109 contained errors, resulting in missing data. Transmission errors were also observed during temperature chamber testing with serial number 1208283, at an error rate of 3.22 percent. Overall, the 8310 has good logging capabilities, but the transmission errors are a concern for users who require reliable telemetered data.

  14. A portable chemical protective clothing test method: application at a chemical plant.

    PubMed

    Berardinelli, S P; Rusczek, R A; Mickelsen, R L

    1987-09-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), in cooperation with Monsanto Chemical Company, conducted an on-site evaluation of chemical protective clothing at Monsanto's Nitro, West Virginia plant. The Monsanto plant manufactures additives for the rubber industry including antioxidants, pre-vulcanization inhibitors, accelerators, etc. This survey evaluated six raw materials that have a potential for skin absorption: aniline, cyclohexylamine, diisopropylamine, tertiary butylamine, morpholine and carbon disulfide. Five generic glove materials were tested against these chemicals: nitrile, neoprene, polyvinylchloride, natural latex and natural rubber. The NIOSH chemical permeation portable test system was used to generate breakthrough time data. The results were compared to permeation data reported in the literature that were obtained by using the ASTM F739-85 test method. The test data demonstrated that aniline has too low a vapor pressure for reliable analysis on the portable direct reading detectors used. The chemical permeation test system, however, provided comparable, reliable permeation data for the other tested chemicals. Monsanto has used this data to better select chemical protection clothing for its intended use.

  15. Portable chemical protective clothing test method: application at a chemical plant

    SciTech Connect

    Berardinelli, S.P.; Rusczek, R.A.; Mickelsen, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), in cooperation with Monsanto Chemical Company, conducted an on-site evaluation of chemical protective clothing at Monsanto's Nitro, West Virginia plant. The Monsanto plant manufactures additives for the rubber industry including antioxidants, pre-vulcanization inhibitors, accelerators, etc. This survey evaluated six raw materials that have a potential for skin absorption: aniline, cyclohexylamine, diisorpropylamine, tertiary butylamine, morpholine and carbon disulfide. Five generic glove materials were tested against these chemicals; nitrile, neoprene, polyvinylchloride, natural latex and natural rubber. The NIOSH chemical permeation portable test system was used to generate breakthrough time data. The results were compared to permeation data reported in the literature that were obtained by using the ASTM F739-85 test method. The test data demonstrated that aniline has too low a vapor pressure for reliable analysis on the portable direct reading detectors used. The chemical permeation test system, however provided comparable, reliable permeation data for the other tested chemicals. Monsanto has used this data to better select chemical protective clothing for its intended use.

  16. Design of a right ventricular mock circulation loop as a test bench for right ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Indra; Jansen-Park, So-Hyun; Neidlin, Michael; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Abel, Dirk; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Rossaint, Rolf; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Sonntag, Simon Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Right heart failure (RHF), e.g. due to pulmonary hypertension (PH), is a serious health issue with growing occurrence and high mortality rate. Limited efficacy of medication in advanced stages of the disease constitutes the need for mechanical circulatory support of the right ventricle (RV). An essential contribution to the process of developing right ventricular assist devices (RVADs) is the in vitro test bench, which simulates the hemodynamic behavior of the native circulatory system. To model healthy and diseased arterial-pulmonary hemodynamics in adults (mild and severe PH and RHF), a right heart mock circulation loop (MCL) was developed. Incorporating an anatomically shaped silicone RV and a silicone atrium, it not only enables investigations of hemodynamic values but also suction events or the handling of minimal invasive RVADs in an anatomical test environment. Ventricular pressure-volume loops of all simulated conditions as well as pressure and volume waveforms were recorded and compared to literature data. In an exemplary test, an RVAD was connected to the apex to further test the feasibility of studying such devices with the developed MCL. In conclusion, the hemodynamic behavior of the native system was well reproduced by the developed MCL, which is a useful basis for future RVAD tests.

  17. Childhood lead poisoning investigations: evaluating a portable instrument for testing soil lead.

    PubMed

    Reames, Ginger; Lance, Larrie L

    2002-04-01

    The Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch of the California Department of Health Services evaluated a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument for use as a soil lead-testing tool during environmental investigations of lead-poisoned children's homes. A Niton XRF was used to test soil at 119 sampling locations in the yards of 11 San Francisco Bay Area houses. Niton XRF readings were highly correlated with laboratory results and met the study criteria for an acceptable screening method. The data suggest that the most health-protective and time-efficient approach to testing for soil lead above regulatory levels is to take either surface readings or readings of a test cup of soil prepared by grinding with a mortar and pestle. The advantage of the test cup method is that the test cup with soil may be submitted to a laboratory for confirmatory analysis.

  18. Design and Testing of the Variable Electronic Regulator (VER) for Portable Life Support System (PLSS) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Colin; Pryzbyla, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The next generation space suit requires additional capabilities for controlling and adjusting internal pressure compared to that of historical designs. Next generation suit pressures will range from slight pressure, for astronaut prebreathe comfort, to hyperbaric pressure levels for emergency medical treatment of decompression sickness. Historical regulator designs for space suits have been purely mechanical in nature with the performance aspects typical of such designs such as droop. This paper discusses a new approach to providing the tighter regulation band possible with electronic regulation while mitigating the typical short-comings of electronic control: power consumption, loss of power failure modes, start-up time, and reliability. The paper will also address the bench top prototype development and subsequent performance testing with comparison back to mechanical regulators as a baseline.

  19. An optical test bench for the precision characterization of absolute quantum efficiency for the TESS CCD detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, A.; Villasenor, J.; Kissel, S.; Ricker, G.; Vanderspek, R.

    2017-05-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will search for planets transiting bright stars with Ic lesssim 13. TESS has been selected by NASA for launch in 2018 as an Astrophysics Explorer mission, and is expected to discover a thousand or more planets that are smaller in size than Neptune. TESS will employ four wide-field optical charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras with a band-pass of 650 nm-1050 nm to detect temporary drops in brightness of stars due to planetary transits. The 1050 nm limit is set by the quantum efficiency (QE) of the CCDs. The detector assembly consists of four back-illuminated MIT Lincoln Laboratory CCID-80 devices. Each CCID-80 device consists of 2048×2048 imaging array and 2048×2048 frame store regions. Very precise on-ground calibration and characterization of CCD detectors will significantly assist in the analysis of the science data obtained in space. The characterization of the absolute QE of the CCD detectors is a crucial part of the characterization process because QE affects the performance of the CCD significantly over the redder wavelengths at which TESS will be operating. An optical test bench with significantly high photometric stability has been developed to perform precise QE measurements. The design of the test setup along with key hardware, methodology, and results from the test campaign are presented.

  20. Use of Strain Measurements from Acoustic Bench Tests of the Battleship Flowliner Test Articles To Link Analytical Model Results to In-Service Resonant Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Greg; Smaolloey, Kurt; LaVerde, Bruce; Bishop, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The paper will discuss practical and analytical findings of a test program conducted to assist engineers in determining which analytical strain fields are most appropriate to describe the crack initiating and crack propagating stresses in thin walled cylindrical hardware that serves as part of the Space Shuttle Main Engine's fuel system. In service the hardware is excited by fluctuating dynamic pressures in a cryogenic fuel that arise from turbulent flow/pump cavitation. A bench test using a simplified system was conducted using acoustic energy in air to excite the test articles. Strain measurements were used to reveal response characteristics of two Flowliner test articles that are assembled as a pair when installed in the engine feed system.

  1. Use of Strain Measurements from Acoustic Bench Tests of the Battleship Flowliner Test Articles To Link Analytical Model Results to In-Service Resonant Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Greg; Smaolloey, Kurt; LaVerde, Bruce; Bishop, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The paper will discuss practical and analytical findings of a test program conducted to assist engineers in determining which analytical strain fields are most appropriate to describe the crack initiating and crack propagating stresses in thin walled cylindrical hardware that serves as part of the Space Shuttle Main Engine's fuel system. In service the hardware is excited by fluctuating dynamic pressures in a cryogenic fuel that arise from turbulent flow/pump cavitation. A bench test using a simplified system was conducted using acoustic energy in air to excite the test articles. Strain measurements were used to reveal response characteristics of two Flowliner test articles that are assembled as a pair when installed in the engine feed system.

  2. Ecotoxicity test methods for engineered nanomaterials: practical experiences and recommendations from the bench.

    PubMed

    Handy, Richard D; Cornelis, Geert; Fernandes, Teresa; Tsyusko, Olga; Decho, Alan; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Metcalfe, Chris; Steevens, Jeffery A; Klaine, Stephen J; Koelmans, Albert A; Horne, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Ecotoxicology research is using many methods for engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), but the collective experience from researchers has not been documented. This paper reports the practical issues for working with ENMs and suggests nano-specific modifications to protocols. The review considers generic practical issues, as well as specific issues for aquatic tests, marine grazers, soil organisms, and bioaccumulation studies. Current procedures for cleaning glassware are adequate, but electrodes are problematic. The maintenance of exposure concentration is challenging, but can be achieved with some ENMs. The need to characterize the media during experiments is identified, but rapid analytical methods are not available to do this. The use of sonication and natural/synthetic dispersants are discussed. Nano-specific biological endpoints may be developed for a tiered monitoring scheme to diagnose ENM exposure or effect. A case study of the algal growth test highlights many small deviations in current regulatory test protocols that are allowed (shaking, lighting, mixing methods), but these should be standardized for ENMs. Invertebrate (Daphnia) tests should account for mechanical toxicity of ENMs. Fish tests should consider semistatic exposure to minimize wastewater and animal husbandry. The inclusion of a benthic test is recommended for the base set of ecotoxicity tests with ENMs. The sensitivity of soil tests needs to be increased for ENMs and shortened for logistics reasons; improvements include using Caenorhabditis elegans, aquatic media, and metabolism endpoints in the plant growth tests. The existing bioaccumulation tests are conceptually flawed and require considerable modification, or a new test, to work for ENMs. Overall, most methodologies need some amendments, and recommendations are made to assist researchers. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  3. Pilot- and bench-scale testing of faecal indicator bacteria survival in marine beach sand near point sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mika, K.B.; Imamura, G.; Chang, C.; Conway, V.; Fernandez, G.; Griffith, J.F.; Kampalath, R.A.; Lee, C.M.; Lin, C.-C.; Moreno, R.; Thompson, S.; Whitman, R.L.; Jay, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Factors affecting faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and pathogen survival/persistence in sand remain largely unstudied. This work elucidates how biological and physical factors affect die-off in beach sand following sewage spills. Methods and Results: Solar disinfection with mechanical mixing was pilot-tested as a disinfection procedure after a large sewage spill in Los Angeles. Effects of solar exposure, mechanical mixing, predation and/or competition, season, and moisture were tested at bench scale. First-order decay constants for Escherichia coli ranged between -0??23 and -1??02 per day, and for enterococci between -0??5 and -1??0 per day. Desiccation was a dominant factor for E. coli but not enterococci inactivation. Effects of season were investigated through a comparison of experimental results from winter, spring, and fall. Conclusions: Moisture was the dominant factor controlling E. coli inactivation kinetics. Initial microbial community and sand temperature were also important factors. Mechanical mixing, common in beach grooming, did not consistently reduce bacterial levels. Significance and Impact of the Study: Inactivation rates are mainly dependent on moisture and high sand temperature. Chlorination was an effective disinfection treatment in sand microcosms inoculated with raw influent. ?? 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Pilot- and bench-scale testing of faecal indicator bacteria survival in marine beach sand near point sources

    PubMed Central

    Mika, K.B.; Imamura, G.; Chang, C.; Conway, V.; Fernandez, G.; Griffith, J.F.; Kampalath, R.A.; Lee, C.M.; Lin, C.-C.; Moreno, R.; Thompson, S.; Whitman, R.L.; Jay, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Factors affecting faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and pathogen survival/persistence in sand remain largely unstudied. This work elucidates how biological and physical factors affect die-off in beach sand following sewage spills. Methods and Results Solar disinfection with mechanical mixing was pilot-tested as a disinfection procedure after a large sewage spill in Los Angeles. Effects of solar exposure, mechanical mixing, predation and/or competition, season, and moisture were tested at bench scale. First-order decay constants for Escherichia coli ranged between −0·23 and −·102 per day, and for enterococci between −0·5 and −1·0 per day. Desiccation was a dominant factor for E. coli but not enterococci inactivation. Effects of season were investigated through a comparison of experimental results from winter, spring, and fall. Conclusions Moisture was the dominant factor controlling E. coli inactivation kinetics. Initial microbial community and sand temperature were also important factors. Mechanical mixing, common in beach grooming, did not consistently reduce bacterial levels. Significance and Impact of the Study Inactivation rates are mainly dependent on moisture and high sand temperature. Chlorination was an effective disinfection treatment in sand microcosms inoculated with raw influent. PMID:19302327

  5. The Development and Field Testing of the Portable Acousto-optic Spectrometer for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, Nancy J.; Uckert, Kyle; Voelz, David; Boston, Penelope

    2014-11-01

    The development of in situ instrumentation for the detection of biomarkers on planetary surfaces is critical for the search for evidence of present or past life in our solar system. In our earlier instrument development efforts we addressed this need through the development of a near-infrared point spectrometer intended for quick-look examinations of samples that could be subsequently analyzed with a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The point spectrometer utilized an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) crystal as the wavelength selecting element. In parallel with the aforementioned development efforts we identified the need for a portable version of the AOTF spectrometer that we could test and demonstrate in a range of field locations on Earth chosen to serve as terrestrial analogs for extreme environments elsewhere in the solar system. Here we describe the development and field testing of the Portable Acousto-optic Spectrometer for Astrobiology (PASA). We demonstrated this instrument in two very different cave environments, a predominantly gypsum and calcite cave in New Mexico and an actively forming cave rich in hydrated sulfates in Tabasco, Mexico. Both of these microbially active environments contain evidence of biologic alteration of minerals, which can be detected using IR spectroscopy. We will describe the instrument operations and present some data acquired with PASA to demonstrate its efficacy as a tool for biomarker detection on planetary surfaces. This work was supported by NASA's EPSCoR program through grant number NNX12AK77A.

  6. Zero Gravity Aircraft Testing of a Prototype Portable Fire Extinguisher for Use in Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, J.; Carriere, T.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Easton, J.

    2012-01-01

    For the past five years ADA Technologies has been developing a portable fire extinguisher (PFE) for use in microgravity environments. This technology uses fine water mist (FWM) to effectively and efficiently extinguish fires representative of spacecraft hazards. Recently the FWM PFE was flown on a Zero-G (reduced gravity) aircraft to validate the performance of the technology in a microgravity environment. Test results demonstrated that droplet size distributions generated in the reduced gravity environment were in the same size range as data collected during normal gravity (1-g) discharges from the prototype PFE. Data taken in an obscured test configuration showed that the mist behind the obstacle was more dense in the low-g environment when compared to 1-g discharges. The mist behind the obstacle tended to smaller droplet sizes in both the low-g and 1-g test conditions.

  7. Development and flight test of a helicopter compact, portable, precision landing system concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.; Clary, G. R.; Davis, T. J.; Chisholm, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    An airborne, radar based, precision approach concept is being developed and flight tested as a part of NASA's Rotorcraft All-Weather Operations Research Program. A transponder based beacon landing system (BLS) applying state of the art X band radar technology and digital processing techniques, has been built and is being flight tested to demonstrate the concept feasibility. The BLS airborne hardware consists of an add on microprocessor, installed in conjunction with the aircraft weather/mapping radar, which analyzes the radar beacon receiver returns and determines range, localizer deviation, and glide slope derivation. The ground station is an inexpensive, portable unit which can be quickly deployed at a landing site. Results from the flight test program show that the BLS concept has a significant potential for providing rotorcraft with low cost, precision instrument approach capability in remote areas.

  8. Development and flight test of a helicopter compact, portable, precision landing system concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clary, G. R.; Bull, J. S.; Davis, T. J.; Chisholm, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    An airborne, radar-based, precision approach concept is being developed and flight tested as a part of NASA's Rotorcraft All-Weather Operations Research Program. A transponder-based beacon landing system (BLS) applying state-of-the-art X-band radar technology and digital processing techniques, was built and is being flight tested to demonstrate the concept feasibility. The BLS airborne hardware consists of an add-on microprocessor, installed in conjunction with the aircraft weather/mapping radar, which analyzes the radar beacon receiver returns and determines range, localizer deviation, and glide-slope deviation. The ground station is an inexpensive, portable unit which can be quickly deployed at a landing site. Results from the flight test program show that the BLS concept has a significant potential for providing rotorcraft with low-cost, precision instrument approach capability in remote areas.

  9. Miravalles Geothermal Project: Portable Well Flow Test Equipment and Procedures Manual

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    The well flow test program has been designed to facilitate the gathering of information, with portable test equipment, from various wells with regard to their capability of flow, the quality of steam produced at various back pressures, the composition and quantity of noncondensable gases flashed from the wells and the composition and quantity of solids in the well's liquid streams (brine). The test program includes procedures for obtaining the following basic flow data pertinent to the plant power cycle design: (1) Effluent steam and brine flows, pressures and temperatures; (2) Noncondensable and dissolved gas contents in steam and brine; (3) H{sub s}S content in gases formed; and (4) Solids content and chemical analysis of steam and brine.

  10. Advanced Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Oxygen Regulator Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matt R.; Watts, Carly

    2011-01-01

    The advanced spacesuit portable life support system (PLSS) oxygen regulators represent an evolutionary approach to regulator development. Several technology development prototypes have been produced that borrow much of the mechanical regulator design from the well proven Shuttle/ISS Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Secondary Oxygen Regulator, but incorporate a motor-settable pressure set-point feature that facilitates significantly greater operational flexibility. For example, this technology would enable EVA to begin at a higher suit pressure, which would reduce pre-breathe time, and then slowly step down to a lower pressure to increase suit mobility for the duration of the EVA. Comprehensive testing of the prototypes was performed on the component level as well as part of the PLSS 1.0 system level testing. Results from these tests characterize individual prototype performance and demonstrate successful operation during multiple nominal and contingency EVA modes

  11. DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR THE BENCH STEAM REFORMER TEST

    SciTech Connect

    BANNING DL

    2010-08-03

    This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing. The type, quantity and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluid bed steam reformer (FBSR). A determination of the adequacy of the FBSR process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the FBSR process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used to test the FBSR process. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the testing criteria.

  12. Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer. Second quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-16

    This document contains the second quarterly technical progress report for PTI`s Bench-Scale Testing Project of a circuit integrating PTI`s KEN-FLOTE{trademark} Column Flotation Technology and PTI`s On-Line Quality Monitor and Control System. The twelve-month project involves installation and testing of a 200--300 lb/hr. bench-scale testing circuit at PETC`s Coal Preparation Process Research Facility (CPPRF) for two bituminous coals (Upper Freeport and Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Raw Coals). The project schedule timeline by task series for the twelve month project, as it was laid out in the initial Project Work Plan. At the present time, all tasks are progressing according to schedule with the exception of the Task 800 Circuit Testing and Sample Prep and Task 1000 Circuit Decommissioning, which have slipped approximately five weeks due to delays incurred within in the project.

  13. Concept Through Preliminary Bench Testing of a Powered Lower Limb Prosthetic Device

    PubMed Central

    Bergelin, Bryan J.; Mattos, Javier O.; Wells, Joseph G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines the design and testing of a powered ankle prosthesis, which utilizes a four-bar mechanism in conjunction with a spring and motor that mimics nonamputee (normal) ankle moments. This approach would enable transtibial (below the knee) amputees to walk at a normal speed with minimal energy input. The design takes into account the energy supplied by the wearer required to achieve many of the desired characteristics of a normal gait. A proof-of-concept prototype prosthesis was designed, optimized, fabricated, and tested with the purpose of demonstrating its ability to match crucial ankle moments during the stance phase of gait. Testing of this prosthesis proved crucial in determining the prosthesis’ capabilities and in evaluating this approach. PMID:21760965

  14. The thermometry system of superconducting magnets test bench for the Nica accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, E. V.; Kirichenko, A. E.; Sedykh, G. S.; Volkov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    Precise temperature control in various parts of the magnet and thermostat is one of the vital problems during cryogenic tests. The report describes design of the thermometry system, developed at LHEP JINR. This system is the operational prototype for the NICA thermometry system. Besides, the report describes generic software tools, developed for the TANGO-based control system web client software design.

  15. Bench-scale testing and evaluation of the direct sulfur recovery process. Final report, February 1990--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Chen, D.H.

    1994-05-01

    The Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a two-stage catalytic reduction process for efficiently recovering up to 99% or higher amounts of elemental sulfur from SO{sub 2}-containing regeneration tail-gas produced in advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems by reacting the tail-gas with a small slipstream of coal gas. In this project, the DSRP was demonstrated with simulated gases at bench-scale with 3-in. diameter, 1-L size catalytic reactors. Fundamental kinetic and modeling studies were conducted to explain the significantly higher than thermodynamically expected sulfur recoveries in DSRP and to enable prediction of sulfur recovery in larger reactors. Technology transfer activities to promote the DSRP consisted of publications and discussions with architectural engineering firms and industrial parties especially IGCC system developers. Toward the end of the project, an agreement was signed with an IGCC system developer to scale up the DSRP and test it with actual gases in their 10-MW (thermal) coal gasification pilot-plant under a cooperative R&D agreement with the US Department of Energy.

  16. An approach to model-based fault detection in industrial measurement systems with application to engine test benches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, P.; Giglio, V.; Guardiola, C.; Lughofer, E.; Luján, J. M.

    2006-07-01

    An approach to fault detection (FD) in industrial measurement systems is proposed in this paper which includes an identification strategy for early detection of the appearance of a fault. This approach is model based, i.e. nominal models are used which represent the fault-free state of the on-line measured process. This approach is also suitable for off-line FD. The framework that combines FD with isolation and correction (FDIC) is outlined in this paper. The proposed approach is characterized by automatic threshold determination, ability to analyse local properties of the models, and aggregation of different fault detection statements. The nominal models are built using data-driven and hybrid approaches, combining first principle models with on-line data-driven techniques. At the same time the models are transparent and interpretable. This novel approach is then verified on a number of real and simulated data sets of car engine test benches (both gasoline—Alfa Romeo JTS, and diesel—Caterpillar). It is demonstrated that the approach can work effectively in real industrial measurement systems with data of large dimensions in both on-line and off-line modes.

  17. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for coal fueled turbines Phase III bench-scale testing and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1995-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technologies such as Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), coal Gasification Combined Cycles (GCC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines (DCFT). A major technical development challenge remaining for coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental emissions standards, as well as to ensure acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, has evaluated an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic hot gas filter (HGF), ILEC concept controls particulate emissions, while simultaneously contributing to the control of sulfur and alkali vapor contaminants in high-temperature, high-pressure, fuel gases or combustion gases. This document reports on the results of Phase III of the ILEC evaluation program, the final phase of the program. In Phase III, a bench-scale ILEC facility has been tested to (1) confirm the feasibility of the ILEC concept, and (2) to resolve some major filter cake behavior issues identified in PFBC, HGF applications.

  18. Modified ACES Portable Life Support Integration, Design, and Testing for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Cody

    2014-01-01

    NASA's next generation of exploration missions provide a unique challenge to designers of EVA life support equipment, especially in a fiscally-constrained environment. In order to take the next steps of manned space exploration, NASA is currently evaluating the use of the Modified ACES (MACES) suit in conjunction with the Advanced Portable Life Support System (PLSS) currently under development. This paper will detail the analysis and integration of the PLSS thermal and ventilation subsystems into the MACES pressure garment, design of prototype hardware, and hardware-in-the-loop testing during the spring 2014 timeframe. Prototype hardware was designed with a minimal impact philosophy in order to mitigate design constraints becoming levied on either the advanced PLSS or MACES subsystems. Among challenges faced by engineers were incorporation of life support thermal water systems into the pressure garment cavity, operational concept definition between vehicle/portable life support system hardware, and structural attachment mechanisms while still enabling maximum EVA efficiency from a crew member's perspective. Analysis was completed in late summer 2013 to 'bound' hardware development, with iterative analysis cycles throughout the hardware development process. The design effort will cumulate in the first ever manned integration of NASA's advanced PLSS system with a pressure garment originally intended primarily for use in a contingency survival scenario.

  19. Testing a portable Raman instrument: the detection of biomarkers in gypsum powdered matrix under gypsum crystals.

    PubMed

    Culka, A; Jehlička, J; Strnad, L

    2012-02-01

    In this study the possibility to detect biomarkers in experimentally prepared evaporitic matrices using a portable Raman instrument was estimated. Testing of the instrument was carried-out under the Alpine conditions outdoors at a low ambient temperature of -10 °C and at an altitude of 2860 m (Pitztal, Austria). Amino acids glycine and l-alanine, nucleo bases thymine and adenine, and metabolite urea were the organics mixed with gypsum powder. In this step it was shown that portable Raman spectroscopic instrumentation is capable of detecting biomarkers in complex samples in a host geological matrix. Such detection is possible even when the laser beam was focussed through the gypsum crystals 3-9 mm thick. For exobiology areas, this is an important fact, because life and/or related biomolecules are likely to be found in cavities under the surface of partially transparent evaporitic minerals that provide them a shelter from the hostile surrounding environment. For influencing the intensity of Raman bands the thickness of covering crystals is not as important as is the actual concentration of the biomarkers. This work and similar experiments serve for better evaluation of Raman spectroscopy as a method for future planetary exploration mission adoption.

  20. Portable simultaneous multiple analyte whole-blood analyzer for point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Schembri, C T; Ostoich, V; Lingane, P J; Burd, T L; Buhl, S N

    1992-09-01

    We describe a portable clinical chemistry analyzer for point-of-care measurements of multiple analytes in less than 10 min from approximately 40 microL of whole blood (fingerstick or venous). Whole blood is applied directly to a 7.9-cm-diameter, single-use plastic rotor containing liquid diluent and greater than or equal to 4-12 tests in the form of 1- to 2-mm-diameter dry reagent beads. The reagent/rotor is immediately placed in a portable instrument along with a ticket/label results card. As the instrument spins the rotor, capillary and rotational forces process the blood into diluted plasma, distribute the patient's diluted sample to cuvettes containing the reagent beads, and mix the diluted sample with the reagents. The instrument monitors the chemical reactions optically at nine wavelengths; sample volume and temperature are also measured optically. The calibration data for each reagent are read from a bar code on the periphery of each rotor. The instrument processes all the measurements to calculate, store, print, and communicate the results. Each reagent/rotor contains an enzymatic control that must be within a defined range before the results from that analysis are reported.

  1. Testing a portable Raman instrument: The detection of biomarkers in gypsum powdered matrix under gypsum crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culka, A.; Jehlička, J.; Strnad, L.

    2012-02-01

    In this study the possibility to detect biomarkers in experimentally prepared evaporitic matrices using a portable Raman instrument was estimated. Testing of the instrument was carried-out under the Alpine conditions outdoors at a low ambient temperature of -10 °C and at an altitude of 2860 m (Pitztal, Austria). Amino acids glycine and L-alanine, nucleo bases thymine and adenine, and metabolite urea were the organics mixed with gypsum powder. In this step it was shown that portable Raman spectroscopic instrumentation is capable of detecting biomarkers in complex samples in a host geological matrix. Such detection is possible even when the laser beam was focussed through the gypsum crystals 3-9 mm thick. For exobiology areas, this is an important fact, because life and/or related biomolecules are likely to be found in cavities under the surface of partially transparent evaporitic minerals that provide them a shelter from the hostile surrounding environment. For influencing the intensity of Raman bands the thickness of covering crystals is not as important as is the actual concentration of the biomarkers. This work and similar experiments serve for better evaluation of Raman spectroscopy as a method for future planetary exploration mission adoption.

  2. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design which is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data to define set-points for control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out from 3/20/13 - 3/15/14 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the completion of PIA

  3. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anchondo, Ian; Cox, Marlon; Meginnis, Carly; Westheimer, David; Vogel, Matt R.

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design. This advanced PLSS is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data, define set-points, evaluate control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out in 2013 and 2014 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the

  4. Preliminary testing of a prototype portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Information circular

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, L.L.; Anderson, N.B.; Stevenson, J.J.

    1982-08-01

    The Federal Bureau of Mines participated with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Martin Marietta Aerospace in developing, building, and testing a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for use as an analyzer in mineral-resource investigative work. The prototype battery-powered spectrometer, measuring 11 by 12 by 5 inches and weighing only about 15 pounds, was designed specifically for field use. The spectrometer has two gas-proportional counters and two radioactive sources, (109)Cd and (55)Fe. Preliminary field and laboratory tests on rock specimens and rock pulps have demonstrated the capability of the spectrometer to detect 33 elements, to date. Characteristics of the system present some limitations, however, and further improvements are recommended.

  5. Development and flight test of a helicopter, X-band, portable precision landing system concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. J.; Clary, G. R.; Chisholm, J. P.; Macdonald, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    A beacon landing system (BLS) is being developed and flight tested as a part of NASA's Rotorcraft All-Weather Operations Research Program. The system is based on state-of-of-the-art X-band radar technology and digital processing techniques. The bLS airborne hardware consists of an X-band receiver and a small micropreocessor, installed in conjunction wht the aircraft instrument landing system (ILS) receiver. The microprocessor analyzes the X-band, BLS pulses and outputs ILS-compatible localizer and glide slope signals. Range information is obtained using an on-board weather/mapping radar in conjunction with the BLS. The ground station is an inexpensive, portable unit; it weighs less than 70 lb and can be quickly deployed at a landing site. Results from the flight-test program show that the BLS has a significant potential for providing rotorcaraft with low-cost, precision instrument approach capability in remote areas.

  6. Development and flight test of a helicopter, X-band, portable precision landing system concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. J.; Clary, G. R.; Chisholm, J. P.; Macdonald, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    A beacon landing system (BLS) is being developed and flight tested as a part of NASA's Rotorcraft All-Weather Operations Research Program. The system is based on state-of-the-art X-band radar technology and digital processing techniques. The BLS airborne hardware consists of an X-band receiver and a small microprocessor, installed in conjunction with the aircraft instrument landing system (ILS) receiver. The microprocessor analyzes the X-band, BLS pulses and outputs ILS-compatible localizer and glide slope signals. Range information is obtained using an on-board weather/mapping radar in conjunction with the BLS. The ground station is an inexpensive, portable unit; it weighs less than 70 lb and can be quickly deployed at a landing site. Results from the flight-test program show that the BLS has a significant potential for providing rotorcraft with low-cost, precision instrument approach capability in remote areas.

  7. University of Tokyo DIMM: a portable DIMM for site testing at Atacama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohara, Kentaro; Doi, Mamoru; Soyano, Takao; Tanaka, Masuo; Kohno, Kotaro; Miyata, Takashi; Takato, Naruhisa; Uraguchi, Fumihiro

    2004-07-01

    University of Tokyo is now planning to construct a new 6.5m telescope on a peak at Chajnantor region of Atacama, Chile. This project is called "Tokyo Atacama Observatory" (TAO), and site testing is now under progress. As a part of this site testing, we have developed a portable DIMM system which is called a "University of Tokyo DIMM" (UT-DIMM) to measure seeing. The system mostly consists of inexpensive commercial products, which are a MEADE 12 inch telescope, a video-rate CCD camera with an electronic shutter, a Linux based PC, and so on. It has thrifty power consumption and can be operated for one whole night only with a single DC-12V battery for an automobile. In this paper, we describe the instrument, report the current status, and explain its future plans.

  8. Structural evaluation of pavement using surface wave and portable FWD tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Q.; Kubodera, T.; Himeno, K.; Matsui, K.

    2006-03-01

    SASW has been well known as one of nondestructive testing methods for pavements. This method makes use of the dispersion characteristics to estimate the thickness and modulus of pavement layers. It is difficult to obtain accurate dispersion curves even if the analytical surface wave fields are used, where only the stiffness proportional damping is considered. However, the good agreement of dispersion curves has been found for the analytical surface wave fields if Rayleigh damping is adopted in the numerical simulation. In this paper, a dynamic general FEM software was developed to inverse the layer moduli and Rayleigh damping coefficient of the tested pavement structure using the portable FWD data. It shows that the predicted dispersion curves are well approximately to ones obtained from experimental SASW.

  9. SIMPLIFIED PRACTICAL TEST METHOD FOR PORTABLE DOSE METERS USING SEVERAL SEALED RADIOACTIVE SOURCES.

    PubMed

    Mikamoto, Takahiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Kurosawa, Tadahiro

    2016-09-01

    Sealed radioactive sources which have small activity were employed for the determination of response and tests for non-linearity and energy dependence of detector responses. Close source-to-detector geometry (at 0.3 m or less) was employed to practical tests for portable dose meters to accumulate statistically sufficient ionizing currents. Difference between response in the present experimentally studied field and in the reference field complied with ISO 4037 due to non-uniformity of radiation fluence at close geometry was corrected by use of Monte Carlo simulation. As a consequence, corrected results were consistent with the results obtained in the ISO 4037 reference field within their uncertainties. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Design of the 15 GHz BPM test bench for the CLIC test facility to perform precise stretched-wire RF measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorzetti, Silvia; Fanucci, Luca; Galindo Muñoz, Natalia; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a low emittance beam transport and preservation, thus a precise control of the beam orbit along up to 50 km of the accelerator components in the sub-μm regime is required. Within the PACMAN3 (Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometer Scale) PhD training action a study with the objective of pre-aligning the electrical centre of a 15 GHz cavity beam position monitor (BPM) to the magnetic centre of the main beam quadrupole is initiated. Of particular importance is the design of a specific test bench to study the stretched-wire setup for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) BPM, focusing on the aspects of microwave signal excitation, transmission and impedance-matching, as well as the mechanical setup and reproducibility of the measurement method.

  11. UE Bench Test Plans and Requirements. Volume 2. Rockwell-Collins UE Set.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    Power Supply Test Objective: Verify Input Power Fault operational. Inputs Input Name Input Level Equipment Used 1. AC or DC input 115V, 400~ z (AC) or...1/100 Fo (HP-8018A) (HP-S10A) MICROWAVE GENERATOR COUNTER Z (HP.5342A). ELECTRONIC SETU COUNTER ANALYZER IMP-5383) (HP-S66A) NOISE FIGURE SWITCH...DRIVE METER (HP-970A) (HP-11713A) z Z zo LOGIC PATTERN - O GENERATOR r-" (HP-8170A) R.F. SYNTHESIZER GENERATOR RELAY (HP-8116A) ACTUATOR-.’ (HP-59306A

  12. New method in medical tomography based on vibrating wire: bench-test experiment on laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aginian, M. A.; Alonso, J.; Arutunian, S. G.; Chung, M.; Margaryan, A. V.; Lazareva, E. G.; Lazarev, L. M.; Shahinyan, L. A.

    2017-04-01

    A new method for fast transverse beam profiling, where a vibrating wire is served as a resonant target, has been developed. The speed of scan up to a few hundred mm/s provides opportunity to make a set of beam profiles at different directions of the scan within a reasonable measurement time. This profile set allows us to reconstruct 2D beam profile by filtered back-projection algorithm. The new method may be applied for proton, X-ray, gamma, and neutron beams, and can also be of interest in tomography including medical applications. The method has been tested experimentally by means of laser beams.

  13. Integration and bench testing for the GRAVITY Coudé IR adaptive optics (CIAO) wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deen, C.; Yang, P.; Huber, A.; Suarez-Valles, M.; Hippler, S.; Brandner, W.; Gendron, E.; Clénet, Y.; Kendrew, S.; Glauser, A.; Klein, R.; Laun, W.; Lenzen, R.; Neumann, U.; Panduro, J.; Ramos, J.; Rohloff, R.-R.; Salzinger, A.; Zimmerman, N.; Henning, T.; Perraut, K.; Perrin, G.; Straubmeier, C.; Amorim, A.; Eisenhauer, F.

    2014-08-01

    GRAVITY, a second generation instrument for the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), will provide an astrometric precision of order 10 micro-arcseconds, an imaging resolution of 4 milli-arcseconds, and low/medium resolution spectro-interferometry. These improvements to the VLTI represent a major upgrade to its current infrared interferometric capabilities, allowing detailed study of obscured environments (e.g. the Galactic Center, young dusty planet-forming disks, dense stellar cores, AGN, etc...). Crucial to the final performance of GRAVITY, the Coudé IR Adaptive Optics (CIAO) system will correct for the effects of the atmosphere at each of the VLT Unit Telescopes. CIAO consists of four new infrared Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFS) and associated real-time computers/software which will provide infrared wavefront sensing from 1.45-2.45 microns, allowing AO corrections even in regions where optically bright reference sources are scarce. We present here the latest progress on the GRAVITY wavefront sensors. We describe the adaptation and testing of a light-weight version of the ESO Standard Platform for Adaptive optics Real Time Applications (SPARTA-Light) software architecture to the needs of GRAVITY. We also describe the latest integration and test milestones for construction of the initial wave front sensor.

  14. Bench Scale Development and Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process for Post-Combustion CO₂ Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ravi

    2015-09-01

    A physical sorption process to produce dry CO₂ at high purity (>98%) and high recovery (>90%) from the flue gas taken before or after the FGD was demonstrated both in the lab and in the field (one ton per day scale). A CO₂ recovery of over 94% and a CO₂ purity of over 99% were obtained in the field tests. The process has a moisture, SOX, and Hg removal stage followed by a CO₂ adsorption stage. Evaluations based on field testing, process simulation and detailed engineering studies indicate that the process has the potential for more than 40% reduction in the capital and more than 40% reduction in parasitic power for CO₂ capture compared to MEA. The process has the potential to provide CO₂ at a cost (<$40/tonne) and quality (<1 ppm H₂O, <1 ppm SOX, <10 ppm O₂) suitable for EOR applications which can make CO₂ capture profitable even in the absence of climate legislation. The process is applicable to power plants without SOX, Hg and NOX removal equipment.

  15. Application of Goubau Surface Wave Transmission Line for Improved Bench Testing of Diagnostic Beamline Elements

    SciTech Connect

    John Musson, Keith Cole, Sheldon Rubin

    2009-05-01

    In-air test fixtures for beamline elements typically utilize an X-Y positioning stage, and a wire antenna excited by an RF source. In most cases, the antenna contains a standing wave, and is useful only for coarse alignment measurements in CW mode. A surface-wave (SW) based transmission line permits RF energy to be launched on the wire, travel through the beamline component, and then be absorbed in a load. Since SW transmission lines employ travelling waves, the RF energy can be made to resemble the electron beam, limited only by ohmic losses and dispersion. Although lossy coaxial systems are also a consideration, the diameter of the coax introduces large uncertainties in centroid location. A SW wire is easily constructed out of 200 micron magnet wire, which more accurately approximates the physical profile of the electron beam. Benefits of this test fixture include accurate field mapping, absolute calibration for given beam currents, Z-axis independence, and temporal response measurements of sub-nanosecond pulse structures. Descriptions of the surface wave launching technique, transmission line, and instrumentation are presented, along with measurement data.

  16. EXOMARS Composite Avionics Description and its Validation on the Test Benches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagna, M.; Capuano, M.; Cassi, C.

    2008-08-01

    The paper describes the Exomars avionics concept with emphasis on the proposed approach for its validation during various project phases. After a brief description of the three modules composing Exomars, the Carrier Module (CM), the Descent Module (DM) and the Rover Module (RM), the current status of the design of the composite avionics based on the presence of a single computer shared between the Carrier and the Descent modules is presented. Details will be given in particular on development testing of the GNC SW to be used in the Entry Descent and Landing phase handled by the Descent Module. The description of the End to End Entry simulator and its usage in the validation phase is also provided.

  17. Baseline and optional bench-scale testing of a chemical candle filter safeguard device

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.; Swanson, M.L.

    2000-11-01

    This project was undertaken by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to design, construct, and test the feasibility of a hot-gas filter safeguard device (SGD) to prevent the release of dust in the event of candle filter failure under both pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) (oxidizing) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) (reducing) operating conditions. The SGD must use existing filter system seals, gaskets, fixtures, and assemblies as much as possible. It must also activate quickly when a candle filter has failed, preferably preventing dust concentrations downstream of the SGD from exceeding 1 ppmw. In addition, the SGD must be able to operate in an inactive mode with minimal pressure drop, and its operation cannot be affected by repeated backpulse cleaning events of up to 3 psia and 1/2 second in duration.

  18. Rapid maxillary expansion screws on the test bench--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Muchitsch, Alfred Peter; Wendl, B; Winsauer, H; Pichelmayer, M; Payer, M

    2011-06-01

    In order to apply high, short-term forces during rapid maxillary expansion (RME) to the sutures of the maxilla with minimum loss of force and without causing unwanted side-effects (dentoalveolar tipping, etc.), the appliance should be as rigid as possible. The retention arms of the RME screws, representing a particularly vulnerable and stressed weak point of RME appliances, were the focus of this laboratory technical study. Retention arms of 16 types of RME screws comprising four arms and one with eight arms were examined using a three-point bending test. According to their ability to absorb the applied bending loads, the screws were classified in product groups from 1 (highest) to 6 (lowest). Fifteen of the tested retention arms (stainless steel), despite having the same diameter (1.48-1.49 mm), differed up to 69.81 per cent between the highest (288.0 N) and lowest (169.6 N) maximum force parameters and up to 66.40 per cent between the highest (3325.9 N/mm(2)) and lowest (1998.7 N/mm(2)) maximum bending stress parameters. Due to optimum formability, though reduced rigidity, a titanium screw for nickel-sensitive patients (group 6) displayed the lowest force and bending tension values. The stainless steel double arms of the eight-arm screw device welded on both ends displayed the highest force data. The mean ductilities of the groups with the most and least rigid single steel arms differed by 22.77 per cent. Statistical analysis using the Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a significant indirect correlation between ductility and both maximum force (r = -0.780, P < 0.001) and maximum bending stress (r = -0.778, P < 0.001). The SUPERscrews, the Tiger Dental four-arm screw (group 1), and the eight-arm screw displayed the highest capacity to absorb an applied bending load. The screws in groups 3-6 appear acceptable for RME during the pre-pubertal period, whereas in the pubertal and post-pubertal period, groups 1 and 2 are sufficient. In early adulthood only the

  19. Bench-scale testing of novel high-temperature desulfurization sorbents: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Harkins, S.M.; Stogner, J.M.; Woods, M.C.; Rogers, T.N.

    1988-12-01

    Extrudates of regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents including zinc ferrite, copper-modified zinc ferrite, zinc titanate, copper aluminate, copper-iron aluminate, and copper manganate were prepared and tested for their potential to remove hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) from coal gasifier gas in a high-temperature high-pressure (HTHP) fixed-bed reactor. The zinc containing sorbents were found to be more promising than those containing combinations of copper, aluminum, iron, and manganese. Reductions in H/sub 2/S concentration were achieved depending on sorbent, reactor temperature, and steam concentration. The copper-modified zinc ferrite sorbent reduced the H/sub 2/S concentration to less than 1 ppmv at up to 1100/degree/F with 20 volume % steam in the gas. The zinc ferrite sorbent showed no apparent loss in capacity over 15 sulfidation-regeneration cycles but underwent significant strength reduction in a coal-derived gas with 15% or less steam due to soot formation. Zinc titanate exhibited excellent strength and capacity retention at steam levels as low as 5% and temperatures as high as 1350/degree/F. 13 refs., 64 figs., 75 tabs.

  20. Effect of Shoes on Stiffness and Energy Efficiency of Ankle-Foot Orthosis: Bench Testing Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Gao, Fan; LeCursi, Nicholas; Foreman, K Bo; Orendurff, Michael S

    2017-06-12

    Understanding the mechanical properties of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) is important to maximize their benefit for those with movement disorders during gait. Though mechanical properties such as stiffness and/or energy efficiency of AFOs have been extensively studied, it remains unknown how and to what extent shoes influence their properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of shoes on stiffness and energy efficiency of an AFO using a custom mechanical testing device. Stiffness and energy efficiency of the AFO were measured in the plantarflexion and dorsiflexion range, respectively, under AFO-alone and AFO-Shoe combination conditions. The results of this study demonstrated that the stiffness of the AFO-Shoe combination was significantly decreased compared to the AFO-alone condition, but no significant differences were found in energy efficiency. From the results, we recommend that shoes used with AFOs should be carefully selected not only based on their effect on alignment of the lower-limb, but also their effects on overall mechanical properties of the AFO-Shoe combination. Further study is needed to clarify the effects of differences in shoe designs on AFO-Shoe combination mechanical properties.

  1. Simulated Bench Testing to Evaluate the Mechanical Performance of New Carotid Stents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gideon Praveen; Kabinejadian, Foad; Liu, Jianfei; Ho, Pei; Leo, Hwa Liang; Cui, Fangsen

    2017-03-01

    Our group recently developed a novel covered carotid stent that can prevent emboli while preserving the external carotid artery (ECA) branch blood flow. However, our recent in vitro side-branch ECA flow preservation tests on the covered stents revealed the need for further stent frame design improvements, including the consideration to crimp the stent to a low profile for the delivery of the stent system and having bigger cells. Hence, the current work aims to design new bare metal stents with bigger cell size to improve the crimpability and to accommodate more slits so that the side-branch flow could be further increased. Three new stent designs were analyzed using finite element analysis and benchmarked against two commercially available carotid stents in terms of their mechanical performances such as crimpability, radial strength, and flexibility. Results indicated that the new bare metal stent designs matched well against the commercial stents. Hence our new generation covered stents based on these designs can be expected to perform better in side-branch flow preservation without compromising on their mechanical performances.

  2. Utility of a scoring balloon for a severely calcified lesion: bench test and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Yoshiaki; Saito, Naritatsu; Watanabe, Shin; Bao, Bingyuan; Yamamoto, Erika; Watanabe, Hiroki; Higami, Hirooki; Matsuo, Hitoshi; Ueno, Katsumi; Kimura, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a scoring balloon catheter in expanding a circumferentially calcified lesion compared to a conventional balloon catheter using an in vitro experiment setting and elucidate the underlying mechanisms of this ability using a finite element analysis. True efficacy of the scoring device and the underlying mechanisms for heavily calcified coronary lesions are unclear. We employed a Scoreflex scoring balloon catheter (OrbusNeich, Hong Kong, China). The ability of Scoreflex to dilate a calcified lesion was compared with a conventional balloon catheter using 3 different sized calcium tubes. The thickness of the calcium tubes were 2.0, 2.25, and 2.5 mm. The primary endpoints were the successful induction of cracks in the calcium tubes and the inflation pressures required for inducing cracks. The inflation pressure required for cracking the calcium tubes were consistently lower with Scoreflex (p < 0.05, Student t test). The finite element analysis revealed that the first principal stress applied to the calcified plaque was higher by at least threefold when applying the balloon catheter with scoring elements. A scoring balloon catheter can expand a calcified lesion with lower pressure than that of a conventional balloon. The finite element analysis revealed that the concentration of the stress observed in the outside of the calcified plaque just opposite to the scoring element is the underlying mechanism of the increased ability of Scoreflex to dilate the calcified lesion.

  3. Characterization of InGaAs-based cameras for astronomical applications using a new VIS-NIR-SWIR detector test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Karsten; Wolf, Jürgen; Krabbe, Alfred

    2014-07-01

    A new test bench for detector and camera characterization in the visible and near-infrared spectral range between 350 -2500 nm has been setup at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS). The detector under study is illuminated by an integrating sphere that is fed by a Czerny-Turner monochromator with quasi-monochromatic light. A quartz tungsten halogen lamp is used as a light source for the monochromator. Si- and InGaAs-based photodiodes have been calibrated against secondary reference standards at PTB (Germany), NPL (UK) and NRC (Canada) for precise spectral flux measurements. The test bench allows measurements of fundamental detector properties such as linearity of response, conversion gain, full well capacity, quantum efficiency (QE), fixed pattern noise and pixel response non-uniformity. The article will focus on the commissioning of the test bench and subsequent performance evaluation and characterization of a commercial camera system with a 640 x 480 InGaAs-detector, sensitive between 900 to 1650 nm. The study aimed at the potential use of InGaAs cameras in ground-based and airborne astronomical observations or as target acquisition and tracking cameras in the NIR supporting infrared observations at longer wavelengths, e.g. on SOFIA. An intended future application of the test bench in combination with an appropriate test dewar is the characterization of focal plane assemblies for imaging spectrometers on spacecraft missions, such as the VIS-SWIR channel of MAJIS, the Moons and Jupiter Imaging Spectrometer aboard JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer).

  4. Efficacy of the National Football League-225 Test to Track Changes in One Repetition Maximum Bench Press After Training in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division IA Football Players.

    PubMed

    Mann, J Bryan; Ivey, Pat A; Stoner, Josh D; Mayhew, Jerry L; Brechue, William F

    2015-11-01

    Numerous investigations have attested to the efficacy of the National Football League (NFL)-225 test to estimate one repetition maximum (1RM) bench press. However, no studies have assessed the efficacy of the test to track changes in strength across a training program. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of the NFL-225 test for determining the change in 1RM bench press in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division IA college football players after training. Over a 4-year period, players (n = 203) were assessed before and after a 6-week off-season resistance program for 1RM bench press and repetitions completed with 102.3 kg (225 lbs). Test sessions typically occurred within 1 week of each other. Players significantly increased 1RM by 4.2 ± 8.6 kg and NFL-225 repetitions by 0.9 ± 2.3, although the effect size (ES) for each was trivial (ES = 0.03 and 0.07, respectively). National Football League 225 prediction equations had higher correlations with 1RM before training (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.95) than after training (ICC = 0.75). The correlation between the change in NFL-225 repetitions and change in 1RM was low and negative (r = -0.22, p < 0.02). Short-term heavy resistance training may alter the association between muscular strength and muscular endurance in college football players and render the NFL-225 test less effective in predicting the change in 1RM bench press strength after short-term training.

  5. Kickback risk of portable chainsaws while cutting wood of different properties: laboratory tests and deductions

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Portable chainsaws are associated with substantial risk and can cause serious injury to operators, especially during kickback. This paper presents new results from research and analyses conducted regarding the impact between the different properties of wood on this occurrence. In an open area, such differences may include: wood species, humidity, temperature and the facing angle of the wood fibres in relation to the kerf and shape of the wood surface that comes in contact with the tip of the guide bar. This paper investigates chainsaw kickback including the research results on kickback and wood-cutting energy, saw chain speed and the efficiency of the chainsaw engine. It also presents conclusions drawn from the tests that can be useful for chainsaw users, showing the dependencies between the different properties of wood and the risk of injury. PMID:26694003

  6. Kickback risk of portable chainsaws while cutting wood of different properties: laboratory tests and deductions.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Portable chainsaws are associated with substantial risk and can cause serious injury to operators, especially during kickback. This paper presents new results from research and analyses conducted regarding the impact between the different properties of wood on this occurrence. In an open area, such differences may include: wood species, humidity, temperature and the facing angle of the wood fibres in relation to the kerf and shape of the wood surface that comes in contact with the tip of the guide bar. This paper investigates chainsaw kickback including the research results on kickback and wood-cutting energy, saw chain speed and the efficiency of the chainsaw engine. It also presents conclusions drawn from the tests that can be useful for chainsaw users, showing the dependencies between the different properties of wood and the risk of injury.

  7. Study of ignition, combustion, and production of harmful substances upon burning solid organic fuel at a test bench with a vortex chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdukov, A. P.; Chernetskiy, M. Yu.; Dekterev, A. A.; Anufriev, I. S.; Strizhak, P. A.; Greben'kov, P. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Results of investigation of furnace processes upon burning of pulverized fuel at a test bench with a power of 5 MW are presented. The test bench consists of two stages with tangential air and pulverized coal feed, and it is equipped by a vibrocentrifugal mill and a disintegrator. Such milling devices have an intensive mechanical impact on solid organic fuel, which, in a number of cases, increases the reactivity of ground material. The processes of ignition and stable combustion of a mixture of gas coal and sludge (wastes of concentration plant), as well as Ekibastus coal, ground in the disintegrator, were studied at the test bench. The results of experimental burning demonstrated that preliminary fuel grinding in the disintegrator provides autothermal combustion mode even for hardly inflammable organic fuels. Experimental combustion of biomass, wheat straw with different lignin content (18, 30, 60%) after grinding in the disintegrator, was performed at the test bench in order to determine the possibility of supporting stable autothermal burning. Stable biofuel combustion mode without lighting by highly reactive fuel was achieved in the experiments. The influence of the additive GTS-Powder (L.O.M. Leaders Co., Ltd., Republic of Korea) in the solid and liquid state on reducing sulfur oxide production upon burning Mugun coal was studied. The results of experimental combustion testify that, for an additive concentration from 1 to 15% of the total mass of the burned mixture, the maximum SO2 concentration reduction in ejected gases was not more than 18% with respect to the amount for the case of burning pure coal.

  8. A method based on near-infrared spectroscopy for the in-situ determination of the ammonia concentration in ammonia/water mixtures in an absorber test bench.

    PubMed

    Barba, M Isabel; Berdasco, Miguel; Salavera, Daniel; Larrechi, M Soledad; Coronas, Alberto

    2017-12-01

    This paper discusses the development and implementation of a method based on NIR spectroscopy for the in-situ determination of the ammonia mass fraction of ammonia/water mixtures in an absorber test bench. The calibration model was established using a static measuring system. A cell was designed and constructed to prepare and measure samples at the ammonia mass fractions (0.332-0.482), pressures (3.4-4.6), bar and temperatures (25.0-35.5) °C typical in absorption refrigeration systems. A quadratic model for absorbance at 1041nm was established and validated. The root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of the results was 2.1%. To implement NIR spectroscopy in the absorber test bench, a new flow cell was designed. The calibration model was transferred and used in the conditions of the absorber test bench. In these experimental conditions, the model was statistically validated using density measurements as a reference method for measuring the ammonia mass fraction. The root-mean-square deviation between the ammonia mass fractions obtained using the two methods was 1.1%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel biodegradable stent applicable for use in congenital heart disease: bench testing and feasibility results in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Veeram Reddy, Surendranath R; Welch, Tre R; Wang, Jian; Bernstein, Frederic; Richardson, James A; Forbess, Joseph M; Nugent, Alan W

    2014-02-15

    A novel double opposed helical (DH) biodegradable stent was designed and fabricated for CHD applications. The primary objective was to evaluate the feasibility of DH stent delivery and deployment in rabbit external iliac arteries (EIA). Secondary objectives were to assess stent patency, thrombosis and inflammation at 1-week and 1-month follow-up. Biodegradable stents have largely been designed for adult cardiovascular indications, to avoid long term complications of permanent implants. A growing child with congenital heart disease (CHD) would especially derive substantial benefit from this technology. DH stents were manufactured to 3, 4, 5, and 6-mm diameter with poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) fibers. Bench test analysis was performed. Six DH stents were implanted in rabbit EIA. Vessel patency was assessed at 1-week and 1-month follow-up with repeat angiography, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Histopathological evaluation was performed. The elastic recoil and collapse pressure of DH stents were comparable to conventional metal stents. All DH stents were successfully delivered and implanted with good apposition to the vessel wall and no collapse of the proximal, mid or distal ends. All stented vessels remained patent. No acute or early stent thrombosis was noted. Histopathology showed minimal inflammatory response and mild neointimal proliferation at 1 month follow-up. In vitro results of DH PLLA biodegradable stents are comparable to conventional metal stents. The pilot animal study confirms the delivery and deployment of the DH stents to the desired location. The DH design can be used to fabricate larger diameter stents needed for CHD. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Shock Bench Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvet, B.; Dilhan, D.; Palladino, M.

    2014-06-01

    In 2008 a contract placed by CNES in partnership with ESA has led MECANO ID to develop a shock bench to qualify spacecraft equipment. A spacecraft shall withstand several shocks without degradation: launcher fairing or stages separation, spacecraft separation, the release of appendage (solar arrays, antenna reflectors, booms) and shocks generated when the pyrovalves of the propulsion system are fired.The Shock Response Spectrum (SRS) requirement, to be applied to the equipment, depends on its mass, its size and its location in the satellite. CNES has performed a survey of the pyroshock qualification requirements on CNES and ESA satellites. The outcome of the activity was the input for the bench development (Fig. 1). The design and sizing of the pyroshock bench started with non linear shock analysis with the help of the Dytran software.A lot of solutions have been compared: mono-plate, bi- plate, Hopkinson bar. The bi-plate was chosen thanks to its very rich frequency content. Also, the shock can be generated on one plate with the equipment mounted on the other, to avoid the direct transmission of the shock to the equipment basis.This study led to a 1000 mm x 650 mm steel bi-plate with a 300 mm aluminum cube fitted on one side. The equipment to test is mounted on the cube (Fig. 2 & 3).

  11. Development, testing, and demonstration of an optimal fine coal cleaning circuit. Task 5: Evaluation of bench-scale test results and equipment selection for in-plant pilot tests

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-14

    The overall objective of this research effort is to improve the efficiency of fine coal flotation in preparation plants above that of currently used conventional cells. In addition to evaluating single-stage operation of four selected advanced flotation devices, the project will also evaluate them in two-stage configurations. The project is being implemented in two phases. Phase 1 comprises bench-scale testing of the flotation units, and Phase 2 comprises in-plant, proof-of-concept (POC), pilot-scale testing of selected configurations at the Cyprus Emerald preparation plant. The Task 5 report presents the findings of the Phase 1 bench-scale test results and provides the basis for equipment selection for Phase 2. Four advanced flotation technologies selected for bench-scale testing are: Jameson cell; Outokumpu HG tank cell; packed column; and open column. In addition to testing all four of the cells in single-stage operation, the Jameson and Outokumpu cells were tested as candidate first-stage cells because of their propensity for rapid attachment of coal particles with air bubbles and low capital and operating costs. The column cells were selected as candidate second-stage cells because of their high-efficiency separation of low-ash products from high-ash feed coals. 32 figs., 72 tabs.

  12. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal Derived Liquids. Volume 9. Results of Bench-Scale and Pilot Plant Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    Amoco Oil Company has conducted bench- and pilot plant-scale experiments to produce jet fuels from the tar oil from the Great Plains Coal ... Gasification Plant in Beulah, North Dakota. Experiments show that the hydroprocessing conditions recommended in Task I are not severe enough to saturate the

  13. LISA Optical Bench Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieser, M.; d'Arcio, L.; Barke, S.; Bogenstahl, J.; Diekmann, C.; Diepholz, I.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Gerberding, O.; Henning, J.-S.; Hewitson, M.; Hey, F. G.; Hogenhuis, H.; Killow, C. J.; Lucarelli, S.; Nikolov, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Pijnenburg, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Sohmer, A.; Taylor, A.; Tröbs, M.; Ward, H.; Weise, D.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2013-01-01

    The optical bench (OB) is a part of the LISA spacecraft, situated between the telescope and the testmass. For measuring the inter-spacecraft distances there are several interferometers on the OB. The elegant breadboard of the OB for LISA is developed for the European Space Agency (ESA) by EADS Astrium, TNO Science & Industry, University of Glasgow and the Albert Einstein Intitute (AEI), the performance tests then will be done at the AEI. Here we present the testbed that will be used for the performance tests with the focus on the thermal environment and the laser infrastructure.

  14. Portable life support system regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal by metal oxide absorbents preprototype hardware development and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Joan M.; Borghese, Joseph B.; Chang, Craig H.; Cusick, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Johnson has acquired a preprototype/full-scale metal oxide CO2 and humidity remover (MOCHR), together with its regeneration module. Tests conducted prior to delivery by the MOCHR's manufacturer have demonstrated the concurrent removal of H2O and CO2 at rates, and under conditions, that are applicable to EVA Portable Life Support Systems.

  15. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: FINAL REPORT: ON-SITE INCINERATION OF SHIRCO INFRARED SYSTEMS PORTABLE PILOT TEST UNIT, TIMES BEACH, MISSOURI

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the period of July 8 - July 12, 1985, the Shirco Infrared Systems Portable Pilot Test Unit was in operation at the Times Beach Dioxin Research Facility to demonstrate the capability of Shirco's infrared technology to decontaminate silty soil laden with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorod...

  16. Portable life support system regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal by metal oxide absorbents preprototype hardware development and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Joan M.; Borghese, Joseph B.; Chang, Craig H.; Cusick, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Johnson has acquired a preprototype/full-scale metal oxide CO2 and humidity remover (MOCHR), together with its regeneration module. Tests conducted prior to delivery by the MOCHR's manufacturer have demonstrated the concurrent removal of H2O and CO2 at rates, and under conditions, that are applicable to EVA Portable Life Support Systems.

  17. Evaluation of a portable test system for assessing endotoxin activity in raw milk

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Yohko; SUZUKI, Kazuyuki; SHIMAMORI, Toshio; TSUCHIYA, Masakazu; NIEHAUS, Andrew; LAKRITZ, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare endotoxin activities detected in raw milk samples obtained from cattle by a commercially available portable test system (PTS) and traditional microplate limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)-based assay, which determined activities using a kinetic turbidimetric (KT) assay. Raw milk samples were obtained from 53 and 12 dairy cattle without and with clinical mastitis, respectively. Comparison between the KT and PTS was performed by the Friedman test. The Pearson product moment correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate associations between any two continuous variables. Linear regression model analysis was also performed to obtain the equation describing the relationship between PTS and KT assay. The endotoxin activities detected in 200- or 400-fold diluted milk samples were similar between PTS and KT assay, whereas a significant difference was observed in 100-fold diluted milk (P<0.001). The results obtained from 200- (r2=0.778, P<0.001) and 400-fold diluted milk samples (r2=0.945, P<0.001) using PTS correlated with those using KT assay. The median milk endotoxin activities in Gram-positive and Gram-negative clinical mastitis cows were 0.655 and 11,523.5 EU/ml, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that PTS as a simple and easy test to assess endotoxin activity in raw milk is efficient, simple and reproducible. PMID:26279135

  18. Performance on the portable rod and frame test predicts variation in learning the kayak roll.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Christopher I; Christian, Edward; McMorris, Terry

    2010-04-01

    Expert performers in sports that include a high proportion of closed skills have often been found to score relatively high in field independence tests; a field-independent cognitive style may be advantageous for learning and performance of closed skills. The relationship between field dependence-independence (measured on a Portable Rod and Frame Test) and the acquisition of a kayak skill was examined. Undergraduates (6 men, 11 women; M age=21.6 yr., SD=3.2) who had no previous kayaking experience participated. Participants completed a structured teaching session (2 hr.) designed to develop three key subskills necessary for the kayak roll. Number of trials taken to consistently perform the underwater orientation and paddle movement subskills and duration of practice taken to develop the upper/lower body separation subskill as well as participants' ability to complete the roll were assessed. Field independence was associated with better performance of subskills and skill acquisition tests. Learners with greater field independence may have an advantage when acquiring sport skills that require cognitive restructuring and a strong reliance on kinesthetic and proprioceptive feedback.

  19. Prediction of VO2max from a new field test based on portable indirect calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Flouris, Andreas D; Metsios, Giorgos S; Famisis, Konstantinos; Geladas, Nikos; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the validity and reliability of the new 15m square shuttle run test (SST) for predicting laboratory treadmill test (TT) maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2 max)) compared to the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MST) in 45 adult males. Thirty participants performed a TT and a SST once to develop a VO( 2max) prediction model. The remaining 15 participants performed the TT and MST once and the SST twice for cross-validation purposes. Throughout testing V O(2max) was determined via portable indirect calorimetry while blood lactate concentration was assessed at the fifth recovery minute. Comparisons of TT V O(2 max) (51.3+/-3.1 ml kg(-1)min(-1)) with SST measured (51.2+/-3.2 ml kg(-1)min(-1)) and predicted (50.9+/-3.3 ml kg(-1)min(-1)) V O(2 max) showed no differences while TT blood lactate was higher compared to SST (10.3+/-1.7 mmol vs. 9.7+/-1.7 mmol, respectively). In contrast, MST measured (53.4+/-3.5 ml kg(-1)min(-1)) and predicted (57.0+/-4.5 ml kg(-1)min(-1)) V O(2 max) and blood lactate (11.2+/-2.0 mmol) were significantly higher compared to TT. No test-retest differences were detected for SST measured and predicted V O(2 max) and blood lactate. It is concluded that the SST is a highly valid and reliable predictive test for V O(2 max). Copyright (c) 2009 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of the Endosafe(R) Portable Testing SystemTM for the Rapid Analysis of Biopharmaceutical Samples.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Luis; Rana, Narendra; Travers, Kasey; Tolomanoska, Verce; Walker, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    The Endosafe® Portable Testing System™ (PTS™) portable system for endotoxin testing was evaluated to analyze biopharmaceutical samples such as raw materials and finished products. The installation, operational, and performance qualification procedures were successfully implemented and verified to determine the system functionality under good manufacturing practices. During the validation stages the PTS™ was compared to the gel-clot test method in terms of presence or absence of endotoxin substances, ease of use, completion time, resource optimization, and sample volume. Water for injection and product samples were analyzed with both methods. All water for injection and product samples were negative for the presence of endotoxin by both methods. However, PTS™ results were obtained after 15 min while the gel-clot completion time was 1 h. Miniaturization of endotoxin testing by the PTS™ allowed optimization of testing procedures by reducing sample volume, analyst manipulations, accessory materials, and turnover time, and by minimizing the risk of exogenous contamination of the reaction.

  1. NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test results and materials analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C.E.; Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Jones, S.A.

    1994-06-01

    Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Pool boilers offer simplicity in design and fabrication. The operation of a full-scale pool-boiler receiver has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate Without significant maintenance for the entire system life, as much as 20 to 30 years. Long-term liquid-metal boiling stability and materials compatibility with refluxing NaK-78 is not known and must be determined for the pool boiler receiver. No boiling system has been demonstrated for a significant duration with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale pool boiler design as much as possible, including flux levels, materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical because of the limited test time available. A test vessel was constructed with a porous boiling enhancement surface. The boiling surface consisted of a brazed stainless steel powder with about 50% porosity. The vessel was heated with a quartz lamp array providing about go W/CM2 peak incident thermal flux. The vessel was charged with NaK-78. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on fullscale receivers. The vessel was fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy. The vessel operated at 750{degrees}C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. The test completed 7500 hours of lamp-on operation time, and over 1000 startups from ambient. The test was terminated when a small leak in an Inconel 600 thermowell was detected. The test design and data are presented here. Metallurgical analysis of virgin and tested materials has begun, and initial results are also presented.

  2. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Unmanned Vacuum Environment Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in more than 30 years, an advanced space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) design was operated inside a vacuum chamber representative of the flight operating environment. The test article, PLSS 2.0, was the second system-level integrated prototype of the advanced PLSS design, following the PLSS 1.0 Breadboard that was developed and tested throughout 2011. Whereas PLSS 1.0 included five technology development components with the balance the system simulated using commercial-off-the-shelf items, PLSS 2.0 featured first generation or later prototypes for all components less instrumentation, tubing and fittings. Developed throughout 2012, PLSS 2.0 was the first attempt to package the system into a flight-like representative volume. PLSS 2.0 testing included an extensive functional evaluation known as Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) testing, Human-in-the-Loop testing in which the PLSS 2.0 prototype was integrated via umbilicals to a manned prototype space suit for 19 two-hour simulated EVAs, and unmanned vacuum environment testing. Unmanned vacuum environment testing took place from 1/9/15-7/9/15 with PLSS 2.0 located inside a vacuum chamber. Test sequences included performance mapping of several components, carbon dioxide removal evaluations at simulated intravehicular activity (IVA) conditions, a regulator pressure schedule assessment, and culminated with 25 simulated extravehicular activities (EVAs). During the unmanned vacuum environment test series, PLSS 2.0 accumulated 378 hours of integrated testing including 291 hours of operation in a vacuum environment and 199 hours of simulated EVA time. The PLSS prototype performed nominally throughout the test series, with two notable exceptions including a pump failure and a Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) leak, for which post-test failure investigations were performed. In addition to generating an extensive database of PLSS 2.0 performance data, achievements included requirements and

  3. NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test design and initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C.E.; Jones, S.A.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Fool boilers offer simplicity in desip and fabrication. Pool-boiler solar receiver operation has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, in order to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate without significant maintenance for the entire system life. At least one theory explaining incipient-boiling behavior of alkali metals indicates that favorable start-up behavior should deteriorate over time. Many factors affect the stability and startup behavior of the boiling system. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale design in every detail as much as possible, including flux levels materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical due to the limited test time available. No boiling system has been demonstrated with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials for a significant period of time. A test vessel was constructed with a Friction Coatings Inc. porous boiling enhancement surface. The vessel is heated with a quartz lamp array providing about 92 W/Cm[sup 2] peak incident thermal flux. The vessel is charged with NaK-78, which is liquid at room temperature. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on full-scale receivers. The vessel is fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy, selected for its high temperature strength and oxidation resistance. The vessel operates at 750[degrees]C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. Temperature data is continually collected. The test design and initial (first 2500 hours and 300 start-ups) test data are presented here. The test is designed to operate for 10,000 hours, and will be complete in the spring of 1994.

  4. NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test design and initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C.E.; Jones, S.A.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

    1993-06-01

    Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Fool boilers offer simplicity in desip and fabrication. Pool-boiler solar receiver operation has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, in order to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate without significant maintenance for the entire system life. At least one theory explaining incipient-boiling behavior of alkali metals indicates that favorable start-up behavior should deteriorate over time. Many factors affect the stability and startup behavior of the boiling system. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale design in every detail as much as possible, including flux levels materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical due to the limited test time available. No boiling system has been demonstrated with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials for a significant period of time. A test vessel was constructed with a Friction Coatings Inc. porous boiling enhancement surface. The vessel is heated with a quartz lamp array providing about 92 W/Cm{sup 2} peak incident thermal flux. The vessel is charged with NaK-78, which is liquid at room temperature. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on full-scale receivers. The vessel is fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy, selected for its high temperature strength and oxidation resistance. The vessel operates at 750{degrees}C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. Temperature data is continually collected. The test design and initial (first 2500 hours and 300 start-ups) test data are presented here. The test is designed to operate for 10,000 hours, and will be complete in the spring of 1994.

  5. Permeable reactive biobarriers for in situ Cr(VI) reduction: bench scale tests using Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6.

    PubMed

    Viamajala, Sridhar; Peyton, Brent M; Gerlach, Robin; Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Apel, William A; Petersen, James N

    2008-12-15

    Chromate (Cr(VI)) reduction studies were performed in bench scale flow columns using the fermentative subsurface isolate Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. In these tests, columns packed with either quartz sand or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-coated quartz sand, were inoculated with strain ES6 and fed nutrients to stimulate growth before nutrient-free Cr(VI) solutions were injected. Results show that in columns containing quartz sand, a continuous inflow of 2 mg/L Cr(VI) was reduced to below detection limits in the effluent for durations of up to 5.7 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued proving the ability of strain ES6 to reduce chromate in the absence of an external electron donor. In the HFO-containing columns, Cr(VI) reduction was significantly prolonged and effluent Cr(VI) concentrations remained below detectable levels for periods of up to 66 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued. Fe was detected in the effluent of the HFO-containing columns throughout the period of Cr(VI) removal indicating that the insoluble Fe(III) bearing solids were being continuously reduced to form soluble Fe(II) resulting in prolonged abiotic Cr(VI) reduction. Thus, growth of Cellulomonas within the soil columns resulted in formation of permeable reactive barriers that could reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) for extended periods even in the absence of external electron donors. Other bioremediation systems employing Fe(II)-mediated reactions require a continuous presence of external nutrients to regenerate Fe(II). After depletion of nutrients, contaminant removal within these systems occurs by reaction with surface-associated Fe(II) that can rapidly become inaccessible due to formation of crystalline Fe-minerals or other precipitates. The ability of fermentative organisms like Cellulomonas to reduce metals without continuous nutrient supply in the subsurface offers a viable and economical alternative technology for in situ remediation of Cr

  6. Portable Automated Test Station: Using Engineering-Design Partnerships to Replace Obsolete Test Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    war fighter’s needs. Moreover, the PATS-70 hardware has spare capacity to add additional COTS PXI components to sup- port future TPS development... TPS test programs, PATS-70 Self- Test, and System Calibration all run under the Windows 7 OS. The A-10 Operational Test Program (OTP) runs under...Identification Number (CPIN), and calibration procedures. Applications The PATS-70 attaches to the A-10C aircraft through a variety of TPS connections in

  7. Remote Advanced Payload Test Rig (RAPTR) Portable Payload Test System for the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, John; Freas, George, II

    2017-01-01

    The RAPTR was developed to test ISS payloads for NASA. RAPTR is a simulation of the Command and Data Handling (C&DH) interfaces of the ISS (MIL-STD 1553B, Ethernet and TAXI) and is designed to facilitate rapid testing and deployment of payload experiments to the ISS. The ISS Program's goal is to reduce the amount of time it takes a payload developer to build, test and fly a payload, including payload software. The RAPTR meets this need with its user oriented, visually rich interface. Additionally, the Analog and Discrete (A&D) signals of the following payload types may be tested with RAPTR: (1) EXPRESS Sub Rack Payloads; (2) ELC payloads; (3) External Columbus payloads; (4) External Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) payloads. The automated payload configuration setup and payload data inspection infrastructure is found nowhere else in ISS payload test systems. Testing can be done with minimal human intervention and setup, as the RAPTR automatically monitors parameters in the data headers that are sent to, and come from the experiment under test.

  8. Remote Advanced Payload Test Rig (RAPTR) Portable Payload Test System for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De La Cruz, Melinda; Henderson, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The RAPTR was developed to test ISS payloads for NASA. RAPTR is a simulation of the Command and Data Handling (C&DH) interfaces of the ISS (MIL-STD1553B, Ethernet and TAXI) and is designed for rapid testing and deployment of payload experiments to the ISS. The ISS's goal is to reduce the amount of time it takes for a payload developer to build, test and fly a payload, including payload software. The RAPTR meets this need with its user oriented, visually rich interface.

  9. A portable microfluidic platform for rapid molecular diagnostic testing of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Zhang, Xinju; Xu, Xiao; Zhang, Qunfeng; Wang, Hengliang; Li, Dong; Kang, Zhihua; Wu, Zhiyuan; Tang, Yigui; An, Zhenhua; Guan, Ming

    2017-08-17

    The ability to simultaneously detect JAK2 V617F and MPL W515K/L mutations would substantially improve the early diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and decrease the risk of arterial thrombosis. The goal of this study is to achieve a point of care testing platform for simultaneous analysis of major genetic alterations in MPN. Here, we report a microfluidic platform including a glass capillary containing polypropylene matrix that extracts genomic DNA from a drop of whole blood, a microchip for simultaneous multi-gene mutation screening, and a handheld battery-powered heating device. The µmLchip system was successfully used for point-of-care identification of the JAK2 V617F and MPL W515K/L mutations. The µmLchip assays were then validated by mutation analysis with samples from 100 MPN patients who had previously been analyzed via unlabeled probe melting curve analysis or real-time PCR. The results from the µmLchip were in perfect agreement with those from the other methods, except for one discrepant result that was negative in the unlabeled probe melting curve analysis but positive in the µmLchip. After T-A cloning, sequences of cloned PCR products revealed JAK2 V617F mutation in the sample. The portable microfluidic platform may be very attractive in developing point-of-care diagnostics for MPL W515K/L and JAK2 V617F mutations.

  10. SU-E-P-46: Clinical Acceptance Testing and Implementation of a Portable CT Unit

    SciTech Connect

    LaFrance, M; Marsh, S; Hicks, R; O’Donnell-Moran, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Planning for the first installation in New England of a new portable CT unit to be used in the Operating Room required the integration of many departments including Surgery, Neurosurgery, Information Services, Clinical Engineering, Radiology and Medical Physics/Radiation Safety. Acceptance testing and the quality assurance procedures were designed to optimize image quality and patient and personnel radiation exposure. Methods: The vendor’s protocols were tested using the CT Dosimetry phantoms. The system displayed the CTDIw instead of the CTDIvol while testing the unit. Radiation exposure was compared to existing CT scanners from installed CT units throughout the facility. Brainlab measures all 4 periphery slots on the CT Dosimetry phantom. The ACR measures only the superior slot for the periphery measurement. A comprehensive radiation survey was also performed for several locations. Results: The CTDIvol measurements were comparable for the following studies: brain, C-Spine, and sinuses. However, the mobile CT measurements were slightly higher than other CT units but within acceptable tolerance if measured using the ACR method.Based on scatter measurements, it was determined if any personnel were to stay in the OR Suite during image acquisition that the appropriate lead apron and thyroid shields had to be worn.In addition, to reduce unnecessary scatter, there were two mobile 6 foot wide shields (1/16″ lead equivalent) available to protect personnel in the room and adjacent areas. Conclusion: Intraoperative CT provides the physician new opportunities for evaluation of the progression of surgical resections and device placement at the cost of increasing the amount of trained personnel required to perform this procedure. It also brings with it challenges to keep the radiation exposure to the patients and staff within reasonable limits.

  11. Development of the virtual experimental bench on the basis of modernized research centrifugal compressor stage test unit with the 3D impeller.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, A. A.; Danilishin, A. M.; Dubenko, A. M.; Kozhukov, Y. V.

    2017-08-01

    Design modernization of the centrifugal compressor stage test bench with three dimensional impeller blades was carried out for the possibility of holding a series of experimental studies of different 3D impeller models. The studies relates to the problem of joint work of the impeller and the stationary channels of the housing when carrying out works on modernization with the aim of improving the parameters of the volumetric capacity or pressure in the presence of design constraints. The object of study is the experimental single end centrifugal compressor stage with the 3D impeller. Compressor stage consists of the 3D impeller, vaneless diffuser (VLD), outlet collector - folded side scroll and downstream pipe. The drive is a DC motor 75 kW. The increase gear (multiplier) was set between the compressor and DC motor, gear ratio is i = 9.8. To obtain the characteristics of the compressor and the flow area the following values were measured: total pressure, static pressure, direction (angles) of the stream in different cross sections. Additional pneumometric probes on the front wall of the VLD of the test bench have been installed. Total pressure probes and foster holes for the measurement of total and static pressure by the new drainage scheme. This allowed carrying out full experimental studies for two elements of centrifugal compressor stage. After the experimental tests the comprehensive information about the performance of model stage were obtained. Was measured geometric parameters and the constructed virtual model of the experimental bench flow part with the help of Creo Parametric 3.0 and ANSYS v. 16.2. Conducted CFD calculations and verification with experimental data. Identifies the steps for further experimental and virtual works.

  12. High resolution optical surface metrology with the slope measuring portable optical test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Alejandro V.

    New optical designs strive to achieve extreme performance, and continually increase the complexity of prescribed optical shapes, which often require wide dynamic range and high resolution. SCOTS, or the Software Configurable Optical Test System, can measure a wide range of optical surfaces with high sensitivity using surface slope. This dissertation introduces a high resolution version of SCOTS called SPOTS, or the Slope measuring Portable Optical Test System. SPOTS improves the metrology of surface features on the order of sub-millimeter to decimeter spatial scales and nanometer to micrometer level height scales. Currently there is no optical surface metrology instrument with the same utility. SCOTS uses a computer controlled display (such as an LCD monitor) and camera to measure surface slopes over the entire surface of a mirror. SPOTS differs in that an additional lens is placed near the surface under test. A small prototype system is discussed in general, providing the support for the design of future SPOTS devices. Then the SCOTS instrument transfer function is addressed, which defines the way the system filters surface heights. Lastly, the calibration and performance of larger SPOTS device is analyzed with example measurements of the 8.4-m diameter aspheric Large Synoptic Survey Telescope's (LSST) primary mirror. In general optical systems have a transfer function, which filters data. In the case of optical imaging systems the instrument transfer function (ITF) follows the modulation transfer function (MTF), which causes a reduction of contrast as a function of increasing spatial frequency due to diffraction. In SCOTS, ITF is shown to decrease the measured height of surface features as their spatial frequency increases, and thus the SCOTS and SPOTS ITF is proportional to their camera system's MTF. Theory and simulations are supported by a SCOTS measurement of a test piece with a set of lithographically written sinusoidal surface topographies. In addition, an

  13. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Volume 1, Bench-scale testing and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research & Development Center (AMAX R&D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  14. A programmable and portable NMES device for drop foot correction and blood flow assist applications.

    PubMed

    Breen, Paul P; Corley, Gavin J; O'Keeffe, Derek T; Conway, Richard; Olaighin, Gearóid

    2009-04-01

    The Duo-STIM, a new, programmable and portable neuromuscular stimulation system for drop foot correction and blood flow assist applications is presented. The system consists of a programmer unit and a portable, programmable stimulator unit. The portable stimulator features fully programmable, sensor-controlled, constant-voltage, dual-channel stimulation and accommodates a range of customized stimulation profiles. Trapezoidal and free-form adaptive stimulation intensity envelope algorithms are provided for drop foot correction applications, while time dependent and activity dependent algorithms are provided for blood flow assist applications. A variety of sensor types can be used with the portable unit, including force sensitive resistor-based foot switches and MEMS-based accelerometer and gyroscope devices. The paper provides a detailed description of the hardware and block-level system design for both units. The programming and operating procedures for the system are also presented. Finally, functional bench test results for the system are presented.

  15. Need for population specific validation of a portable metabolic testing system: a case of sedentary pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Yeo, SeonAe; Ronis, David L; Antonakos, Cathy L; Roberts, Katherine; Hayashi, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Commercially available portable metabolic systems have been validated with samples of young, healthy, and well-fit subjects, but use of these systems with a special population, such as healthy but sedentary pregnant women, requires a unique set of considerations. These include a woman's limited testing time necessary for fetal safety, relatively low oxygen consumption, and the unique physiology of pregnancy (woman, the placenta, and the fetus). The purpose of this study was to validate a portable metabolic testing system (VO2000) with healthy sedentary pregnant women. A total of 9 sedentary pregnant women who averaged 30 years of age (SD=3), 93 kg (SD=19) weight, 163 cm (SD=7) height, and at 19 weeks' gestation (SD=5) volunteered to participate. Submaximum fitness tests using the Cornell protocol were conducted once with two systems (VO2000 and CPX/D, a reference) simultaneously, and then subsequently twice with one system (VO2000). The VO2000 consistently overestimated VO2 measurement, compared to the same manufacturer's reference system, by 4.4 +/- 3.6 (SD) ml/kg/min, and when VO2000 was used twice, the mean difference was statistically significant (1.0 +/- 1.8 [SD] ml/kg/min; t(45) = 3.9, p < .001). The results of the study show that although VO2000 is an established and validated portable metabolic system for measurement on adult males and females who are relatively well fit, this portable system consistently overestimates VO2 readings for pregnant women compared to standard full-size system. Measurements, when repeated, were not consistent.

  16. Astronaut Carl Walz test portable foot restraint in aft cargo bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In Discovery's aft cargo bay, astronaut Carl E. Walz gets his turn on the portable foot restraint (PFR). Astronaut Walz waving to his crewmates inside Discovery's cabin put in time evaluating the PFR and other equipment to be used on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission. Notice the reflection of the empty payload bay in Walz's visor.

  17. Validation testing of a portable kit for measuring an active soil carbon fraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasing demands exist for information about properties related to soil quality and human-induced soil change, particularly soil C. To help address this need, the USDA-NRCS Soil Survey Laboratory (SSL) developed a portable kit for rapid and relatively accurate assessment of soi...

  18. Portable guided-mode resonance biosensor platform for point-of-care testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Gun Yong; Kim, Wan-Joong; Ko, Hyunsung; Kim, Bong K.; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Huh, Chul; Hong, Jongcheol

    2012-10-01

    It represents a viable solution for the realization of a portable biosensor platform that could screen/diagnose acute myocardial infarction by measuring cardiac marker concentrations such as cardiac troponin I (cTnI), creatine kinase MB (CK-MB), and myoglobin (MYO) for application to u-health monitoring system. The portable biosensor platform introduced in this presentation has a more compact structure and a much higher measuring resolution than a conventional spectrometer system. Portable guided-mode resonance (GMR) biosensor platform was composed of a biosensor chip stage, an optical pick-up module, and a data display panel. Disposable plastic GMR biosensor chips with nano-grating patterns were fabricated by injection-molding. Whole blood filtration and label-free immunoassay were performed on these single chips, automatically. Optical pick-up module was fabricated by using the miniaturized bulk optics and the interconnecting optical fibers and a tunable VCSEL (vertical cavity surface emitting laser). The reflectance spectrum from the GMR biosensor was measured by the optical pick-up module. Cardiac markers in human serum with concentrations less than 0.1ng/mL were analyzed using a GMR biosensor. Analysis time was 30min, which is short enough to meet clinical requirements. Our results show that the GMR biosensor will be very useful in developing lowcost portable biosensors that can screen for cardiac diseases.

  19. Validation testing of a portable kit for measuring an active soil carbon fraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasing demands exist for information about properties related to soil quality and human-induced soil change, particularly soil C. To help address this need, the USDA-NRCS Soil Survey Laboratory (SSL) developed a portable kit for rapid and relatively accurate assessment of soi...

  20. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing responses to different external portable drivers in a patient with a CardioWest Total Artificial Heart.

    PubMed

    Tarzia, Vincenzo; Braccioni, Fausto; Bortolussi, Giacomo; Buratto, Edward; Gallo, Michele; Bottio, Tomaso; Vianello, Andrea; Gerosa, Gino

    2016-06-01

    Management of patients treated with CardioWest Total Artificial Heart (CW-TAH) as a bridge to heart transplantation (HTx) is complicated by difficulties in determining the optimal timing of transplantation. We present a case of a 53-year-old man supported as an outpatient with a CW-TAH, whose condition deteriorated following exchange of the portable driver. The patient was followed-up with serial cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) which demonstrated a fall of peak VO2 to below 12 ml/kg/min following driver substitution, and the patient was subsequently treated with urgent orthotopic HTx. This case highlights the potential utility of CPET as a means for monitoring and indicating timing of HTx in patients with CW-TAH, as well as the potential for clinical deterioration following portable driver substitution.

  1. Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer. Quarterly technical progress report, September 21, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-22

    This document contains the first quarterly technical progress report for PTI`s Bench-Scale Testing Project of a circuit integrating PTI`s KEN-FLOTETM Column Flotation Technology and PTI`s On-Line Quality Monitor Control System. The twelve-month project will involve installation of a 300 lb/hr. bench-scale testing circuit at PETC`s Coal Preparation Process Research Facility (CPPRF) and testing of two bituminous coals (Upper Freeport and Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Raw Coals). Figure 1 contains the project plan as well as the approach to completing the major tasks within the twelvemonth project. The project is broken down into three phases, which include: Phase I - Preparation: The preparation phase was performed principally at PTI`s Calumet offices from October through December, 1992. It involved building of the equipment and circuitry, as well as some preliminary design and equipment testing. Phase II - ET Circuit Installation and Testing: This installation and testing phase of the project will be performed at PETC`s CPPRF from January through May, 1993, and will be the major focus of the project. It will involve testing of the continuous 300 lb/hr. circuit. Phase II - Project Finalization: The project finalization phase will occur from June through September, 1993, at PTI`s Calumet offices and will involve finalizing analytical work and data evaluation, as well as final project reporting. This quarterly progress report principally summarizes the results from the Phase I preparation work and the plan for the early portions of the Phase 11 installation and commissioning, which will occur in January and the first week of February, 1993.

  2. Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-24

    This document contains the third quarterly technical progress report for PTI`s Bench-Scale Testing Project of a circuit integrating PTI`s KEN-FLOTETM Column Flotation Technology and PTI`s On-Line Quality Monitor and Control System. The twelve-month project involves installation and testing of a 200--300 lb/hr. bench-scale flotation circuit at PETC`s Coal Preparation Process Research Facility (CPPRF) for two bituminous coals (Upper Freeport and Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Raw Coals). Figure 1 contains the project plan, as well as the approach to completing the major tasks within the twelve-month project schedule. The project is broken down into three phases, which include: Phase I -- Preparation: The preparation phase was performed principally at PTI`s Calumet offices from October through December, 1992. It involved building of the equipment and circuitry, as well as some preliminary design and equipment testing; Phase II -- ET Circuit Installation and Testing: This installation and testing phase of the project was performed at PETC`s CPPRF from January through June, 1993, and was the major focus of the project. It involved testing of the continuous 200--300 lb/hr. circuit; and Phase III -- Project Finalization: The project finalization phase is occurring from July through September, 1993, at PTI`s Calumet offices and involves finalizing analytical work and data evaluation, as well as final project reporting. This Third Quarterly Technical Progress Report principally summarizes the results from the benchscale testing with the second coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Coal), which occurred in April through June, 1993. It also contains preliminary economic evaluations that will go into the Final Report, as well as the plan for the final reporting task.

  3. Requirement for the LCLS Undulator Magnetic Measurement Bench

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Z.

    2005-01-31

    The magnetic measurements for the LCLS undulators will be done using a measurement bench which transports probes through the undulator under test. Errors in the bench construction cause errors in the probe motion through the undulator. This in turn causes measurement errors. In this note, limits are placed on the bench construction errors such that the measurements remain within tolerance. Secondary requirements for the bench are also discussed.

  4. A Portable Cell-Based Impedance Sensor for Toxicity Testing of Drinking Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-07

    monolayer formation. Sterilized fluidic biochips, ready for cell seeding or pre-seeded with cells, are commercially available ( Agave BioSystems, Ithaca...were exposed to chemicals in serum-free MCDB-131 medium (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO). Fig. 1 (A) Custom ECIS fluidic biochip available from Agave Bio...both the portable instrument and disposable fluidic biochips are commercially available through Agave BioSystems (www.aga- vebio.com). Some of the basic

  5. Astronaut Carl Walz test portable foot restraint in aft cargo bay

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-09-16

    STS051-98-021 (16 Sept. 1993) --- In the Space Shuttle Discovery's aft cargo bay, astronaut Carl E. Walz gets his turn on the Portable Foot Restraint (PFR). Astronauts Walz, waving to his crew mates inside Discovery's cabin, and James H. Newman each put in some time evaluating the PFR, one of the pieces of gear to be used on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) STS-61 servicing mission (scheduled later this year) and other Shuttle missions.

  6. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a

  7. Field Test Report: NETL Portable Raman Gas Composition Monitor - Initial Industrial tests at NETL and General Electric (GE)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Buric; Jessica, Mullen; Steven, Woodruff; Ben, Chorpening

    2012-02-24

    NETL has developed new technology which enables the use of Raman spectroscopy in the real-time measurement of gas mixtures. This technology uses a hollow reflective metal-lined capillary waveguide as a gas sampling cell which contains the sample gas, and efficiently collects optical Raman scattering from the gas sample, for measurement with a miniature spectrometer. The result is an optical Raman “fingerprint” for each gas which is tens or hundreds of times larger than that which can be collected with conventional free-space optics. In this manner, the new technology exhibits a combination of measurement speed and accuracy which is unprecedented for spontaneous Raman measurements of gases. This makes the system especially well-suited to gas turbine engine control based on a-priori measurement of incoming fuel composition. The system has been developed to produce a measurement of all of the common components of natural gas, including the lesser nitrogen, oxygen, carbon-dioxide, and carbon monoxide diluents to better than 1% concentration accuracy each second. The objective of this task under CRADA 10-N100 was to evaluate the capability of a laser Raman capillary gas sensor for combustion fuels. A portable version of the Raman gas sensor, constructed at NETL, was used for field-trials conducted in a cooperative research effort at a GE facility. Testing under the CRADA was performed in 5 parts. Parts 1-4 were successful in testing of the Raman Gas Composition Monitor with bottled calibration gases, and in continuous monitoring of several gas streams at low pressure, in comparison with an online mass spectrometer. In part 5, the Raman Gas Composition Monitor was moved outdoors for testing with high pressure gas supplies. Some difficulties were encountered during industrial testing including the condensation of heavy hydrocarbons inside the sample cell (in part 5), communication with the GE data collection system, as well as some drift in the optical noise

  8. Space Suit Portable Life Support System Rapid Cycle Amine Repackaging and Sub-Scale Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Rivera, Fatonia L.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing technologies to meet requirements for an extravehicular activity (EVA) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for exploration. The PLSS Ventilation Subsystem transports clean, conditioned oxygen to the pressure garment for space suit pressurization and human consumption, and recycles the ventilation gas, removing carbon dioxide, humidity, and trace contaminants. This paper provides an overview of the development efforts conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center to redesign the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) canister and valve assembly into a radial flow, cylindrical package for carbon dioxide and humidity control of the PLSS ventilation loop. Future work is also discussed.

  9. A PORTABLE MICROWAVE INTERFERENCE SCANNING SYSTEM FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF MULTI-LAYERED DIELECTRIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, K. F.; Little, J. R.; Ellingson, W. A.; Green, W.

    2009-03-03

    A portable, microwave interference scanning system, that can be used in situ, with one-sided, non-contact access, has been developed. It has demonstrated capability of damage detection on composite ceramic armor. Specimens used for validation included specially fabricated surrogates, and non-ballistic impact-damaged specimens. Microwave data results were corroborated with high resolution direct-digital x-ray imaging. Microwave interference scanning detects cracks, laminar features and material properties variations. This paper will present details of the system and discuss results obtained.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Sequential Proximal Optimizing Technique Versus Kissing Balloon Inflation Technique in Provisional Bifurcation Stenting: Fractal Coronary Bifurcation Bench Test.

    PubMed

    Finet, Gérard; Derimay, François; Motreff, Pascal; Guerin, Patrice; Pilet, Paul; Ohayon, Jacques; Darremont, Olivier; Rioufol, Gilles

    2015-08-24

    This study used a fractal bifurcation bench model to compare 6 optimization sequences for coronary bifurcation provisional stenting, including 1 novel sequence without kissing balloon inflation (KBI), comprising initial proximal optimizing technique (POT) + side-branch inflation (SBI) + final POT, called "re-POT." In provisional bifurcation stenting, KBI fails to improve the rate of major adverse cardiac events. Proximal geometric deformation increases the rate of in-stent restenosis and target lesion revascularization. A bifurcation bench model was used to compare KBI alone, KBI after POT, KBI with asymmetric inflation pressure after POT, and 2 sequences without KBI: initial POT plus SBI, and initial POT plus SBI with final POT (called "re-POT"). For each protocol, 5 stents were tested using 2 different drug-eluting stent designs: that is, a total of 60 tests. Compared with the classic KBI-only sequence and those associating POT with modified KBI, the re-POT sequence gave significantly (p < 0.05) better geometric results: it reduced SB ostium stent-strut obstruction from 23.2 ± 6.0% to 5.6 ± 8.3%, provided perfect proximal stent apposition with almost perfect circularity (ellipticity index reduced from 1.23 ± 0.02 to 1.04 ± 0.01), reduced proximal area overstretch from 24.2 ± 7.6% to 8.0 ± 0.4%, and reduced global strut malapposition from 40 ± 6.2% to 2.6 ± 1.4%. In comparison with 5 other techniques, the re-POT sequence significantly optimized the final result of provisional coronary bifurcation stenting, maintaining circular geometry while significantly reducing SB ostium strut obstruction and global strut malapposition. These experimental findings confirm that provisional stenting may be optimized more effectively without KBI using re-POT. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Design and Testing of the Primary and Secondary Oxygen Regulators for the Flexible Portable Life Support System (FlexPLSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Colin; Hepworth, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The next generation space suit requires additional capabilities for controlling and adjusting internal pressure compared to that of historical designs. Although the general configuration of the oxygen systems for the next generation space suit is similar or derived from the Apollo and Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) with Primary closed loop life support operation and Secondary sourced open loop life support operations, nearly everything else has evolved with new available technologies. For the case of the primary and secondary regulators, the design has gone away from purely mechanical systems actuated with pull-cords or "bicycle cables" to electro-mechanical hybrids that provide the best of both worlds with respect to power draw, reliability, and versatility. This paper discusses the development and testing of a Secondary Oxygen Regulator bench-top prototype along with comparisons of operation with the various prototypes for the Primary Oxygen Regulator.

  12. [Characteristics and limitation of portable bedside swallowing test in elderly with dementia: comparison between the repetitive saliva swallowing test and the simple swallowing provocation test].

    PubMed

    Baba, Yuki; Teramoto, Shinji; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Machida, Ayako; Akishita, Masahiro; Toba, Kenji

    2005-05-01

    Several bedside portable swallowing tests have been advocated for screening for dysphagia. However, the clinical usefulness and limitation of these tests have not been examined in elderly patients with dementia. We performed the repetitive saliva swallowing test (RSST) and the simple swallowing provocation test (SSPT) in 37 elderly inpatients (81.8 +/- 1.2 years old). Simultaneously, cognitive and verbal communication ability were assessed by the Hasegawa Dementia Scale revised version (HDSR) and the Mini-Communication Test (MCT). RSST was completed only in 22 patients (59%), whereas SSPT was successfully completed in all cases. Scores of HDSR and MCT were significantly lower in patients who were unable to cooperate with RSST compared to successful examinees (HDSR: 7 +/- 1 vs 15 +/- 3, p < 0.0; MCT: 47 +/- 8 vs 81 +/- 5, p < 0.01). Dysphagia was detected in 14 patients (64%) by RSST and 5 (14%) by SSPT. Patients with dysphagia showed significantly lower cognitive function (p < 0.05) and verbal communication ability (p < 0.05). In conclusion, RSST is more sensitive to detect dysphagia in elderly patients; however, compliance with RSST is strongly influenced by the patient's cognitive function and verbal communication ability. Comprehensive geriatric assessment will help to choose an alternative test for dysphagia such as SSPT which is more specific test for aspiration pneumonia.

  13. Portable Welder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A low cost, low power, self-contained portable welding gun designed for joining thermoplastics which become soft when heated and harden when cooled was developed originally by NASA's Langley Research Center for repairing helicopter windshields. Welder has a broad range of applications for joining both thermoplastic materials in the aerospace, automotive, appliance, and construction industries. Welders portability and low power requirement allow its use on-site in any type of climate, with power supplied by a variety of portable sources.

  14. Inexpensive portable drug detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Heimbuch, A. H.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Inexpensive, easy-to-use, self-scanning, self-calibrating, portable unit automatically graphs fluorescence spectrum of drug sample. Device also measures rate of movement through chromatographic column for forensic and medical testing.

  15. Inexpensive portable drug detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Heimbuch, A. H.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Inexpensive, easy-to-use, self-scanning, self-calibrating, portable unit automatically graphs fluorescence spectrum of drug sample. Device also measures rate of movement through chromatographic column for forensic and medical testing.

  16. CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101/102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

    2011-06-08

    This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-10-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FB SR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-S.2.1-20 1 0-00 1, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, 'Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using

  17. CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101 & 241AZ-102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

    2011-04-21

    This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-l0-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FBSR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-5.2.1-2010-001, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using

  18. GraphBench

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Hong, Seokyong; Lee, Sangkeun; Lim, Seung-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    GraphBench is a benchmark suite for graph pattern mining and graph analysis systems. The benchmark suite is a significant addition to conducting apples-apples comparison of graph analysis software (databases, in-memory tools, triple stores, etc.)

  19. Adapting and testing a portable Raman spectrometer for SERS analysis of amino acids and small peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, A.; Philippidis, A.; Nevin, A.; Comelli, D.; Valentini, G.; Anglos, D.

    2013-07-01

    Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS), a powerful spectrochemical technique enabling highly sensitive analysis of organic and biological materials, is investigated for applications in the analysis of archaeological materials including in situ screening. In this work, a compact mobile Raman spectrometer is employed for acquiring Surface-Enhanced Raman spectra from natural amino acids (L-Arg, L-Phe, L-Met) and a tripeptide (Glutathione), adsorbed on silver colloids. The detection limits of the portable Raman spectrometer, together with an optimization of sample preparation and experimental parameters, are reported. The collection and interpretation of SER spectra of amino acids and peptides is a starting point for the optimization of the instrumentation and its application in the study of more complex biological molecules in the context of detection and analysis of archaeological materials and residues.

  20. OPTIMIZING A PORTABLE MICROWAVE INTERFERENCE SCANNING SYSTEM FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF MULTI-LAYERED DIELECTRIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, K. F. Jr.; Little, J. R. Jr.; Ellingson, W. A.; Green, W.

    2010-02-22

    The projected microwave energy pattern, wave guide geometry, positioning methods and process variables have been optimized for use of a portable, non-contact, lap-top computer-controlled microwave interference scanning system on multi-layered dielectric materials. The system can be used in situ with one-sided access and has demonstrated capability of damage detection on composite ceramic armor. Specimens used for validation included specially fabricated surrogates, and ballistic impact-damaged specimens. Microwave data results were corroborated with high resolution direct-digital x-ray imaging. Microwave interference scanning detects cracks, laminar features and material properties variations. This paper presents the details of the system, the optimization steps and discusses results obtained.

  1. Can latent heat safely warm blood? - in vitro testing of a portable prototype blood warmer.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Mark P; Roxby, David

    2007-08-01

    Trauma/retrieval patients are often in shock and hypothermic. Treatment of such patients usually involves restoring their blood volume with transfusion of blood (stored at 2 degrees C - 6 degrees C) and/or crystalloids or colloids (stored at ambient temperature). Rapid infusion of these cold fluids can worsen or even induce hypothermia in these patients. Warming of intravenous fluids at accident sites has traditionally been difficult due to a lack of suitable portable fluid warmers that are not dependent on mains electrical or battery power. If latent heat, the heat released when a liquid solidifies (an inherently temperature limiting process) can warm intravenous fluids, portable devices without a reliance on electrical energy could be used to reduce the incidence of hypothermia in trauma patients. Rapid infusion of red cells into patients was timed to sample typical clinical flow rates. An approved dry heat blood warmer was compared with a prototype blood warmer using a supercooled liquid latent heat storage material, to warm red cells whilst monitoring inlet and outlet temperatures. To determine the effect of warming on red cell integrity compared to the normal storage lesion of blood, extracellular concentrations of potassium, lactate dehydrogenase and haemoglobin were measured in blood which had been warmed after storage at 2 degrees C - 6 degrees C for 1 to 42 days. A prototype latent heat fluid warmer consistently warmed red cells from approximately 4 degrees C to approximately 35 degrees C at typical clinical flow rates. Warming of stored blood with latent heat did not affect red cell integrity more than the approved dry heat blood warmer. Using latent heat as an energy source can satisfactorily warm cold blood or other intravenous fluids to near body temperature, without any adverse affects.

  2. Courseware Portability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, J. D.

    Portability enables interactive courseware (ICW) and associated application programs to operate on computer-based systems other than the ones on which they are developed. Courseware portability will increase sharing of ICW across a range of instructional settings within military services and across internationally allied military services. The…

  3. A Portable, High Resolution, Surface Measurement Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Burns, Bradley M.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution, portable, surface measurement device has been demonstrated to provide micron-resolution topographical plots. This device was specifically developed to allow in-situ measurements of defects on the Space Shuttle Orbiter windows, but is versatile enough to be used on a wide variety of surfaces. This paper discusses the choice of an optical sensor and then the decisions required to convert a lab bench optical measurement device into an ergonomic portable system. The necessary trade-offs between performance and portability are presented along with a description of the device developed to measure Orbiter window defects.

  4. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Human-in-the-Loop (HITL) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 represents the second integrated prototype developed and tested to mature a design that uses advanced technologies to reduce consumables, improve robustness, and provide additional capabilities over the current state of the art. PLSS 2.0 was developed in 2012, with extensive functional evaluations and system performance testing through mid-2014. In late 2014, PLSS 2.0 was integrated with the Mark III space suit in an ambient laboratory environment to facilitate manned testing, designated PLSS 2.0 Human-in-the-Loop (HITL) testing, in which the PLSS prototype performed the primary life support functions, including suit pressure regulation, ventilation, carbon dioxide control, and cooling of the test subject and PLSS avionics. The intent of this testing was to obtain subjective test subject feedback regarding qualitative aspects of PLSS 2.0 performance such as thermal comfort, sounds, smells, and suit pressure fluctuations due to the cycling carbon dioxide removal system, as well as to collect PLSS performance data over a range of human metabolic rates from 500-3000 Btu/hr. Between October 27 and December 18, 2014, nineteen two-hour simulated EVA test points were conducted in which suited test subjects walked on a treadmill to achieve a target metabolic rate. Six test subjects simulated nominal and emergency EVA conditions with varied test parameters including metabolic rate profile, carbon dioxide removal control mode, cooling water temperature, and Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment (state of the art or prototype). The nineteen test points achieved more than 60 hours of test time, with 36 hours accounting for simulated EVA time. The PLSS 2.0 test article performed nominally throughout the test series, confirming design intentions for the advanced PLSS. Test subjects' subjective feedback provided valuable insight into thermal comfort and perceptions of suit pressure fluctuations that will influence future

  5. D Imaging for Museum Artefacts: a Portable Test Object for Heritage and Museum Documentation of Small Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, M.; Robson, S.

    2012-07-01

    3D colour image data generated for the recording of small museum objects and archaeological finds are highly variable in quality and fitness for purpose. Whilst current technology is capable of extremely high quality outputs, there are currently no common standards or applicable guidelines in either the museum or engineering domain suited to scientific evaluation, understanding and tendering for 3D colour digital data. This paper firstly explains the rationale towards and requirements for 3D digital documentation in museums. Secondly it describes the design process, development and use of a new portable test object suited to sensor evaluation and the provision of user acceptance metrics. The test object is specifically designed for museums and heritage institutions and includes known surface and geometric properties which support quantitative and comparative imaging on different systems. The development for a supporting protocol will allow object reference data to be included in the data processing workflow with specific reference to conservation and curation.

  6. Optical Bench for LISA-like missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Guido

    The detection of B-modes in the μ-Wave background has rattled the scientific community and further enhanced the large scientific interest in gravitational waves and gravitational wave astronomy. The first direct detection of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and maybe also by pulsar timing arrays in the second half of this decade will be another watershed event which will start a new era in astronomy and astrophysics. However, the holy grail of gravitational wave astronomy will be opened by a LISA-like mission. Only space provides the environment that allows to cover the signal-rich mHz frequency range where we expect to see gravitational waves from massive black hole mergers, compact galactic binaries, and many other sources. All mature concepts use laser interferometry between free falling test masses separated by millions of km. The central piece in all these concepts is a stable optical bench which is used to prepare and exchange the laser beams between the different arms. It has always been assumed that the base material for the optical bench has to be one of the ultra-low expansion glasses such as Zerodur or ULE to meet the pm/#Hz stability requirements. This very conservative approach was a reflection of the state-of-the-art in frequency stabilization experiments which used optical reference cavities in the early ‘90s. It is not surprising that the LISA pathfinder (LPF) uses also an all Zerodur bench where each optical component is precision bonded to the bench using hydroxide bonding, a nonreversible bonding technique. The manufacturing of this bench was a very time consuming one-mirror-a-day effort and was one of the highest risk items in terms of schedule and cost. The original LISA design uses the same approach except that the LISA bench is far more complex than the LPF bench and manufacturing of the required 10+ benches, six flight units and at least four pre-flight models and spares, will be even more time consuming and expensive. We question the

  7. A portable Ka-band front-end test package for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluation. Part 1: Design and ground tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Stewart, S. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    A unique experimental method was used to test the beam waveguide (BWG) antenna at Deep Space Station (DDS) 13 in the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex near Barstow, California. The methodology involved the use of portable test packages to make measurements of operating noise temperatures and antenna efficiencies (as functions of antenna pointing angles) at the Cassegrain focal point and the final focal point located in a subterranean pedestal room. Degradations caused by the BWG mirror systems were determined by making comparisons of the measured parameters at the two focal points of the antenna. Previous articles were concerned with the design, performance characteristics, and test results obtained with an X-band test package operating at 32 GHz. Noise temperature measurement results are presented for the Ka-band test package in an on-the-ground test configuration.

  8. A portable Ka-band front-end test package for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluation. Part 1: Design and ground tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Stewart, S. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    A unique experimental method was used to test the beam waveguide (BWG) antenna at Deep Space Station (DDS) 13 in the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex near Barstow, California. The methodology involved the use of portable test packages to make measurements of operating noise temperatures and antenna efficiencies (as functions of antenna pointing angles) at the Cassegrain focal point and the final focal point located in a subterranean pedestal room. Degradations caused by the BWG mirror systems were determined by making comparisons of the measured parameters at the two focal points of the antenna. Previous articles were concerned with the design, performance characteristics, and test results obtained with an X-band test package operating at 32 GHz. Noise temperature measurement results are presented for the Ka-band test package in an on-the-ground test configuration.

  9. Field dependence and verbalized strategies on the portable rod-and-frame test by depressed outpatients and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Calamari, E; Pini, M; Puleggio, A

    2000-12-01

    This study examined the relationships between scores on the cognitive style of field dependence-independence and verbalized strategies on the Portable Rod-and-Frame Test for normal and psychopathological outpatients. We attempted to verify (a) Manning's hypothesis (1991) of a correspondence between scores on field dependence and external strategies (reference to the visual field) and scores on field independence and internal strategies (reference to the body) on perceptual tasks, and (b) a tendency of depressed persons to score as field dependent, and (c) use of external verbalized strategies. A total of 50 depressed outpatients and 50 normal controls were administered the test and requested to report the strategy they had employed to solve the problem. Contrary to Manning's findings, no significant relationship was found between cognitive style and verbalized strategies in the total sample. Depressed outpatients classified as internal scored significantly higher on the Group Embedded Figures Test but appeared more field dependent on the Rod-and-Frame Test. Moreover, only for the former test did depressed outpatients score more field-dependent than controls. Finally, no significant relationship was found between the diagnosis of depression and use of external strategies; however, field dependence and the use of external strategies on the Rod-and-Frame Test were associated with more severe depressive symptoms measured by the D scale of the MMPI-2. Further research is needed to assess the role of premorbid personality structures of depression in subjective and objective aspects of Rod-and-Frame Test performance.

  10. Development and testing of a portable wind sensitive directional air sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyo, J.; Toma, J.; King, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A portable wind sensitive directional air sampler was developed as part of an air pollution source identification system. The system is designed to identify sources of air pollution based on the directional collection of field air samples and their analysis for TSP and trace element characteristics. Sources can be identified by analyzing the data on the basis of pattern recognition concepts. The unit, designated Air Scout, receives wind direction signals from an associated wind vane. Air samples are collected on filter slides using a standard high volume air sampler drawing air through a porting arrangement which tracks the wind direction and permits collection of discrete samples. A preset timer controls the length of time each filter is in the sampling position. At the conclusion of the sampling period a new filter is automatically moved into sampling position displacing the previous filter to a storage compartment. Thus the Air Scout may be set up at a field location, loaded with up to 12 filter slides, and left to acquire air samples automatically, according to the wind, at any timer interval desired from 1 to 30 hours.

  11. Performance specifications for health physics instrumentation: portable instrumentation for use in normal work environments. Part 2. Test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kenoyer, J.L.; Swinth, K.L.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Selby, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated a draft American National Standards Institute Standard N42.17 (ANSI N42.17) on performance specifications for health physics instrumentation through a project jointly funded by the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The evaluation involved testing a representative cross section of instruments against criteria in the standard. This report presents results of the testing program. A brief history of the project is included in the introduction. The instrumentation tested is described in general terms (i.e., types, ranges); however, no direct relationship between the results and a specific instrument model is made in this report. Testing requirements in ANSI N42.17D4, Revision 1 (May 1985) are summarized and the methods by which the tests are performed are discussed. Brief descriptions of the testing equipment are included in the methods section of the report. More detailed information about the draft standard, testing requirements and procedures, and the test equipment is included in ''Performance Specifications for Health Physics Instrumentation - Portable Instrumentation for Use in Normal Work Environments, Part 1: Manual of Testing Procedures.'' Results of testing are given in two formats: test-by-test and instrument-by-instrument. Discussion is included on significant and interesting findings, on comparisons of results from the same type of instruments from same and different manufacturers, and on data grouped by manufacturer. Conclusions are made on the applicability and practicality of the proposed standard and on instrument performance. Changes that have been made to the proposed standard based on findings of the testing program are listed and discussed. 22 refs., 11 figs., 77 tabs.

  12. Design and test of a PC-based portable three-dimensional ultrasound software system Ultra3D.

    PubMed

    Xu, X George; Hum Na, Yong; Zhang, Tiantian

    2008-02-01

    Currently, portable ultrasound units lack three-dimensional (3D) image display, limiting their potential usefulness especially under remote and hostile operating environments where information must be intuitive and objective. A freehand 3D image processing and visualization software package, Ultra3D, has been developed and tested, especially to work with a miniaturized linear-array transducer probe that is connected to a laptop PC. This paper presents the software design and method to integrate Ultra3D into Terason's miniaturized SmartProbe for freehand 3D ultrasound imaging. Since images generated by Ultra3D are in a digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format, data sharing with others is easy.

  13. A laboratory and field evaluation of a portable immunoassay test for triazine herbicides in environmental water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulze, P.A.; Capel, P.D.; Squillace, P.J.; Helsel, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness and sensitivity, of a portable immunoassay test for the semiquantitative field screening of water samples was evaluated by means of laboratory and field studies. Laboratory results indicated that the tests were useful for the determination of atrazine concentrations of 0.1 to 1.5 μg/L. At a concentration of 1 μg/L, the relative standard deviation in the difference between the regression line and the actual result was about 40 percent. The immunoassay was less sensitive and produced similar errors for other triazine herbicides. After standardization, the test results were relatively insensitive to ionic content and variations in pH (range, 4 to 10), mildly sensitive to temperature changes, and quite sensitive to the timing of the final incubation step, variances in timing can be a significant source of error. Almost all of the immunoassays predicted a higher atrazine concentration in water samples when compared to results of gas chromatography. If these tests are used as a semiquantitative screening tool, this tendency for overprediction does not diminish the tests' usefulness. Generally, the tests seem to be a valuable method for screening water samples for triazine herbicides.

  14. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Eighth quarterly technical progress report, April--June, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-13

    The major focus of the project is to install and test a 500 lbs./hr. fine-coal cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The circuit consists of three subcircuits: Classification Circuit; Dense-Medium Cycloning Circuit; and Magnetite Recovery Circuit. The testing scope involves initial closed-loop testing of each subcircuit to optimize the performance of the equipment in each subcircuit (i.e., Component Testing), followed by open-circuit testing of the entire integrated circuit to optimize the process and quantify the process efficiency (i.e., Integrated Testing). This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. It also includes a detailed discussion of the above mentioned project accomplishments and plans, organized by the various task series within the project work plan. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

  15. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Seventh quarterly technical progress report, January--March, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-13

    The major focus of the project is to install and test a 500 lbs./hr. fine-coal cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The circuit consists of three subcircuits: Classification Circuit; Dense-Medium Cycloning Circuit; and Magnetite Recovery Circuit. The testing scope involves initial closed-loop testing of each subcircuit to optimize the performance of the equipment in each subcircuit (i.e., Component Testing), followed by open-circuit testing of the entire integrated circuit to optimize the process and quantify the process efficiency (i.e., Integrated Testing). This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. It also includes a detailed discussion of the above mentioned project accomplishments and plans, organized by the various task series within the project work plan. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

  16. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, October--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-13

    The major focus of the project is to install and test a 500 lbs./hr. fine-coal cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The circuit consists of three subcircuits: Classification Circuit; Dense-Medium Cycloning Circuit; and Magnetite Recovery Circuit. The testing scope involves initial closed-loop testing of each subcircuit to optimize the performance of the equipment in each subcircuit (i.e., Component Testing), followed by open-circuit testing of the entire integrated circuit to optimize the process and quantify the process efficiency (i.e., Integrated Testing). This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. It also includes a detailed discussion of the above mentioned project accomplishments and plans, organized by the various task series within the project work plan. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

  17. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-10

    The main accomplishments of Custom Coals and the project subcontractors, during this period, included: continued purchase of small equipment and supplies for the circuit; completed the circuit commissioning task; procured one lot of PennMag Grade-K and one lot Grade-L magnetite; completed work on analytical investigations; completed Classifying Circuit Component Testing on Pittsburgh No. 8 coal; completed the final Heavy-Media cyclone component testing on the Pittsburgh No. 8 seam using Grade-K and Grade-L magnetites; continued QA/QC tests on wet screening, wet splitting, Marcy Balance, and reproducibility checks on component tests and component test samples; and completed the magnetite recovery circuit component testing with and without screens using the Grade-K magnetite and the Pittsburgh No. 8 coal seam. This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. It also includes a detailed discussion of the above mentioned project accomplishments and plans, organized by the various task series within the project work plan. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

  18. Portable Planetarium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis L.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method that students can use to build portable planetariums. After building the models, students are familiar with the names of constellations and major stars and are able to share their projects with other students. (DDR)

  19. Use of a portable system with ultrasound and blood tests to improve prenatal controls in rural Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Crispín Milart, Patricia Hanna; Diaz Molina, César Augusto; Prieto-Egido, Ignacio; Martínez-Fernández, Andrés

    2016-09-13

    Maternal and neonatal mortality figures remain unacceptably high worldwide and new approaches are required to address this problem. This paper evaluates the impact on maternal and neonatal mortality of a pregnancy care package for rural areas of developing countries with portable ultrasound and blood/urine tests. An observational study was conducted, with intervention and control groups not randomly assigned. Rural areas of the districts of Senahu, Campur and Carcha, in Alta Verapaz Department (Guatemala). The control group is composed by 747 pregnant women attended by the community facilitator, which is the common practice in rural Guatemala. The intervention group is composed by 762 pregnant women attended under the innovative Healthy Pregnancy project. That project strengthens the local prenatal care program, providing local nurses training, portable ultrasound equipment and blood and urine tests. The information of each pregnancy is registered in a medical exchange tool, and is later reviewed by a gynecology specialist to ensure a correct diagnosis and improve nurses training. No maternal deaths were reported within the intervention group, versus five cases in the control group. Regarding neonatal deaths, official data revealed a 64 % reduction for neonatal mortality. A 37 % prevalence of anemia was detected. Non-urgent referral was recommended to 70 pregnancies, being fetal malpresentation the main reported cause. Impact data on maternal mortality (reduction to zero) and neonatal mortality (NMR was reduced to 36 %) are encouraging, although we are aware of the limitations of the study related to possible biasing and the small sample size. The major reduction of maternal and neonatal mortality provides promising prospects for these low-cost diagnostic procedures, which allow to provide high quality prenatal care in isolated rural communities of developing countries. This research was not registered because it is an observational study where the assignment of

  20. Continuous bench-scale tests to assess METHOXYCOAL process performance. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.; Carty, R.H.

    1992-08-01

    Laboratory-scale research conducted at Southern Illinois University of Carbondale (SIUC) has shown that coal pyrolysis in the presence of CH{sub 4} and small quantities of O{sub 2} (the METHOXYCOAL process) can produce high yields of liquids and valuable chemicals compared to conventional pyrolysis. The addition of MgO, coal ash, and clays have been shown to further enhance coal conversion. The goal of this two-year project is to build upon that laboratory research by conducting continuous benchscale tests at IGT. Tests are being conducted with IBC-101 coal under CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} blends with and without added coal ash, MgO, and/or clays, at temperatures and pressures up to 1000{degrees}F and 200 psig. These tests will provide data to select preferred operating conditions for production of targeted chemicals (phenol, cresols, naphthalene, C{sub 1}-naphthalenes) from high-sulfur Illinois coals.

  1. Development and Validation of a Portable Hearing Self-Testing System Based on a Notebook Personal Computer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Dong; Xiong, Fen; Yu, Lan; Ji, Fei; Wang, Qiu-Ju

    2015-09-01

    Hearing loss affects more than 27 million people in mainland China. It would be helpful to develop a portable and self-testing audiometer for the timely detection of hearing loss so that the optimal clinical therapeutic schedule can be determined. The objective of this study was to develop a software-based hearing self-testing system. The software-based self-testing system consisted of a notebook computer, an external sound card, and a pair of 10-Ω insert earphones. The system could be used to test the hearing thresholds by individuals themselves in an interactive manner using software. The reliability and validity of the system at octave frequencies of 0.25 Hz to 8.0 kHz were analyzed in three series of experiments. Thirty-seven normal-hearing particpants (74 ears) were enrolled in experiment 1. Forty individuals (80 ears) with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) participated in experiment 2. Thirteen normal-hearing participants (26 ears) and 37 participants (74 ears) with SNHL were enrolled in experiment 3. Each participant was enrolled in only one of the three experiments. In all experiments, pure-tone audiometry in a sound insulation room (standard test) was regarded as the gold standard. SPSS for Windows, version 17.0, was used for statistical analysis. The paired t-test was used to compare the hearing thresholds between the standard test and software-based self-testing (self-test) in experiments 1 and 2. In experiment 3 (main study), one-way analysis of variance and post hoc comparisons were used to compare the hearing thresholds among the standard test and two rounds of the self-test. Linear correlation analysis was carried out for the self-tests performed twice. The concordance was analyzed between the standard test and the self-test using the kappa method. p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Experiments 1 and 2: The hearing thresholds determined by the two methods were not significantly different at frequencies of 250, 500, or 8000 Hz (p > 0

  2. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-11

    The major focus of the project, which is scheduled to occur through January 1996, will be to install and test a 500{number_sign}/hr. fine coal-cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The main accomplishments of Custom Coals and the project subcontractors, during this period, included: continued purchasing small equipment and supplies for the circuit; procured a 46-ton sample of Lower Kittanning ``B`` Seam coal; completed eight primary integrated tests (PIT {number_sign}1--{number_sign}8) using the Pittsburgh No. 8 seam and the Grade-K and Grade-L magnetites; completed classifying cyclone tests using the Pittsburgh No. 8 and Lower Kittanning seams using a larger (0.5 inch) apex; completed data analysis on the four Grade-K magnetite ``closed-loop`` heavy-media cyclone tests; obtained a finer third grade of magnetite (Grade-M) with a MVD of approximately 3 microns; presented paper on the Micro- Mag project at the Coal Preparation, Utilization and Environmental Control Contractors Conference and a Poster Board Paper on the Micro- Mag Project at the Pittsburgh Coal Conference; and developed a method to modify all 5 Micro-Mag magnetic separators to approximately one third of their present size to better approximate commercial operation.

  3. Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Soli, G. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is described for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 micron was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 MeV sq cm/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV sq cm/mg was determined.

  4. Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Soli, G. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is described for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 micron was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 MeV sq cm/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV sq cm/mg was determined.

  5. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Applegate, L.J.; Murray, A.L.; Purcell, M.K.; McKibben, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  6. The use of portable NIRS to measure muscle oxygenation and haemodynamics during a repeated sprint running test.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ben; Hesford, Catherine M; Cooper, Chris E

    2013-01-01

    Portable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) devices were originally developed for use in exercise and sports science by Britton Chance in the 1990s (the RunMan and microRunman series). However, only recently with the development of more robust, and wireless systems, has the routine use in elite sport become possible. As with the medical use of NIRS, finding applications of the technology that are relevant to practitioners is the key issue. One option is to use NIRS to track exercise training-induced adaptations in muscle. Portable NIRS devices enable monitoring during the normal 'field' routine uses to assess fitness, such as repeat sprint shuttle tests. Knowledge about the acute physiological responses to these specific tests has practical applications within team sport training prescription, where development of both central and peripheral determinants of high-intensity intermittent exercise needs to be considered. The purpose of this study was to observe NIRS-detected parameters during a repeat sprint test. We used the PortaMon, a two wavelength spatially resolved NIR spectrometer manufactured by Artinis Inc., to assess NIR changes in the gastrocnemius muscle of both the left and right leg during high-intensity running. Six university standard rugby players were assessed (age 20 ± 1.5 years; height 183 ± 1.0 cm; weight 89.4 ± 5.8 kg; body fat 12.2 ± 3.0 %); the subjects completed nine repeated shuttle runs, which incorporated forward, backward and change of direction movements. Individual sprint time, total time to complete test, blood lactate response (BL), heart rate values (HR) and haemoglobin variables (ΔHHb, ΔtHb, ΔHbO2 and ΔTSI%) were measured. Total time to complete the test was 260 ± 20 s, final blood lactate was 14.3 ± 2.8 mM, and maximal HR 182 ± 5 bpm. NIRS variables displayed no differences between right and left legs. During the test, the group-averaged data showed a clear decrease in HbO2 (max. decrease 11.41 ± 4.95 μM), increase in HHb

  7. THE MECHANICAL AND SHIELDING DESIGN OF A PORTABLE SPECTROMETER AND BEAM DUMP ASSEMBLY AT BNLS ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    HU,J.P.; CASEY,W.R.; HARDER,D.A.; PJEROV,S.; RAKOWSKY,G.; SKARITKA,J.R.

    2002-09-05

    A portable assembly containing a vertical-bend dipole magnet has been designed and installed immediately down-beam of the Compton electron-laser interaction chamber on beamline 1 of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The water-cooled magnet designed with field strength of up to 0.7 Tesla will be used as a spectrometer in the Thompson scattering and vacuum acceleration experiments, where field-dependent electron scattering, beam focusing and energy spread will be analyzed. This magnet will deflect the ATF's 60 MeV electron-beam 90{sup o} downward, as a vertical beam dump for the Compton scattering experiment. The dipole magnet assembly is portable, and can be relocated to other beamlines at the ATF or other accelerator facilities to be used as a spectrometer or a beam dump. The mechanical and shielding calculations are presented in this paper. The structural rigidity and stability of the assembly were studied. A square lead shield surrounding the assembly's Faraday Cup was designed to attenuate the radiation emerging from the 1 inch-copper beam stop. All photons produced were assumed to be sufficiently energetic to generate photoneutrons. A safety evaluation of groundwater tritium contamination due to the thermal neutron capturing by the deuterium in water was performed, using updated Monte Carlo neutron-photon coupled transport code (MCNP). High-energy neutron spallation, which is a potential source to directly generate radioactive tritium and sodium-22 in soil, was conservatively assessed in verifying personal and environmental safety.

  8. Paper strip whole cell biosensors: a portable test for the semiquantitative detection of bacterial quorum signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Struss, Anjali; Pasini, Patrizia; Ensor, C Mark; Raut, Nilesh; Daunert, Sylvia

    2010-06-01

    Herein, we report the development of a novel, inexpensive, and portable filter-paper-based strip biosensor for the detection of bacterial quorum sensing signaling molecules, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). AHLs are generally employed by Gram-negative bacteria for their cell-cell communication to control expression of specialized genes, such as those involved in biofilm formation and production of virulence factors, in a population-density-dependent manner. First, a bacterial cell-based sensing system employing components of AHL-mediated QS regulatory system as recognition elements and beta-galactosidase as the reporter protein was designed and developed. The bacterial-sensing cells were then liquid-dried on strips of filter paper. beta-Galactosidase as the reporter allows for the visual monitoring of the analyte-induced signal when a colorimetric method of detection is applied. The paper strip biosensor was able to detect low AHL concentrations down to 1 x 10(-8) M. Furthermore, it was successfully applied to the detection of AHLs in physiological samples, such as saliva. The filter-paper-based sensing strips could provide reproducible results upon storage at 4 degrees C for at least 3 months. In conclusion, a filter-paper-based strip biosensor was developed that allows for visual, fast, and convenient detection of AHLs in a dose-dependent manner in a test sample. In addition, it does not require expensive equipment or trained personnel and allows ease of transportation and storage. Therefore, we envision that this biosensor will serve as a simple and economical portable field kit for on-site monitoring of AHL in a variety of clinical and environmental samples.

  9. Final Report on NASA Portable Laser Coating Removal Systems Field Demonstrations and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J; McLaughlin, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    Portable Laser Coating Removal System (PLCRS) started as the goal of a Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JG-PP) project, led by the Air Force, where several types of lasers in several configurations were thoroughly evaluated. Following this project, NASA decided to evaluate the best performers on processes and coatings specific to the agency. Laser systems used during this project were all of a similar design, between 40 and 500 Watts, most of which had integrated vacuum systems in order to collect materials removed from substrate surfaces during operation.

  10. High-temperature-staged fluidized-bed combustion (HITS), bench scale experimental test program conducted during 1980. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R E; Jassowski, D M; Newton, R A; Rudnicki, M L

    1981-04-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the process feasibility of the first stage of the HITS two-stage coal combustion system. Tests were run in a small (12-in. ID) fluidized bed facility at the Energy Engineering Laboratory, Aerojet Energy Conversion Company, Sacramento, California. The first stage reactor was run with low (0.70%) and high (4.06%) sulfur coals with ash fusion temperatures of 2450/sup 0/ and 2220/sup 0/F, respectively. Limestone was used to scavenge the sulfur. The produced low-Btu gas was burned in a combustor. Bed temperature and inlet gas percent oxygen were varied in the course of testing. Key results are summarized as follows: the process was stable and readily controllable, and generated a free-flowing char product using coals with low (2220/sup 0/F) and high (2450/sup 0/F) ash fusion temperatures at bed temperatures of at least 1700/sup 0/ and 1800/sup 0/F, respectively; the gaseous product was found to have a total heating value of about 120 Btu/SCF at 1350/sup 0/F, and the practicality of cleaning the hot product gas and delivering it to the combustor was demonstrated; sulfur capture efficiencies above 80% were demonstrated for both low and high sulfur coals with a calcium/sulfur mole ratio of approximately two; gasification rates of about 5,000 SCF/ft/sup 2/-hr were obtained for coal input rates ranging from 40 to 135 lbm/hr, as required to maintain the desired bed temperatures; and the gaseous product yielded combustion temperatures in excess of 3000/sup 0/F when burned with preheated (900/sup 0/F) air. The above test results support the promise of the HITS system to provide a practical means of converting high sulfur coal to a clean gas for industrial applications. Sulfur capture, gas heating value, and gas production rate are all in the range required for an effective system. Planning is underway for additional testing of the system in the 12-in. fluid bed facility, including demonstration of the second stage char burnup

  11. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Second quarterly technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-19

    This document contains the Quarterly Technical Progress Report for the Micronized Magnetite Testing Project being performed at PETC`s Process Research Facility (PRF). This second quarterly report covers the period from October, 1994 through December, 1994. The main accomplishments of Custom Coals and the project subcontractors, during this period, included: (1) Submitted all overdue project documents and kept up with routine reporting requirements; (2) Worked with CLI Corporation, the design subcontractor, and completed the circuit design and finalized all design drawings; (3) Specified and procured all of the process equipment for the circuit, as well as a number of ancillary equipment, instruments, and supplies; (4) Assisted Vangura Iron Inc. in detailing and constructing the structural and platework steel; (5) Subcontracted Rizzo & Sons to perform the circuit mechanical and electrical installation, and prepared for January 23rd installation start date; (6) Organized and prepared for coal and magnetite procurement; (7) Specified and organized an operating personnel plan for the commissioning and testing tasks in the project; (8) Assessed analytical challenges for project, and began to research problem areas. This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. It also includes a detailed discussion of the abovementioned project accomplishments and plans, organized by the various task series within the project work plan. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

  12. Quick, portable toxicity testing of marine or terrigenous fluids, sediments, or chemicals with bioluminescent organism

    SciTech Connect

    Sabate, R.W.; Stiffey, A.V.; Dewailly, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    A hand-held, battery-operated instrument, which measures bioluminescence inhibition of the microscopic marine dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula, is capable of field-testing substances for toxicity. The organism is sensitive to ppb of strong toxicants. It tolerates some solvents in concentrations necessary for testing lipophylic samples. A test consumes only micrograms of sample. This method requires no adjustments for salinity, pH, color, or turbidity. It has been used successfully to test oil-well drilling fluids, brines produced with oil, waters and sediments from streams and lakes and petroleum-plant effluents containing contaminants such as benzene. The test is non-specific; however, if the substance is known, the end-point effects a direct measurement of its concentration. One-hour toxicity screening tests in the field produce results comparable to the standard four-hour laboratory test. Keeping the sample in the dark during incubation and testing, together with shortness of the overall procedure, eliminates anomalies from light-sensitive substances. Day-to-day variation, as well as among test replicates, is less than 10%. This quick method yields results comparable with a quick test that uses Photobacterium phosphoria, and with 96-hour tests that use Mysidopsis bahia, Artemia salina, Gonyaulax polyedra, Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Cyprinodon variegatus.

  13. Relationship of pectoralis major muscle size with bench press and bench throw performances.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Ryota; Tohdoh, Yukihiro; Hirayama, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the relationship of muscle size indices of the pectoralis major muscle with bench press and bench throw performances in 18 male collegiate athletes. The maximal cross-sectional area (MCSAMAx) and volume (MV) of the pectoralis major muscle were determined by magnetic resonance imaging. First, subjects were tested for their one repetition maximum bench press strength (1RMBP) using a Smith machine. At a later date, subjects performed bench throws using the Smith machine with several different loads ranging from 30.0 kg to 90% of 1RMBP. Barbell positions were measured by a linear position transducer, and bench throw power was calculated using a dynamic equation. Three trials were performed for each load. In all the trials, the maximal peak power was adopted as bench throw peak power (PPBT). The 1RMBP was significantly correlated with MCSAMAx. Similarly, the correlation coefficient between MV and PPBT was significant. In contrast to the y-intercept of the MV-PPBT regression line, that of the MCSAMAx-1RMBP regression line was not significantly different from 0. These results suggested that, although the dependence on pectoralis major muscle size is slightly different between bench press strength and bench throw power, the pectoralis major muscle size has a significant impact on bench press and throw performances. Greater muscle size leads to heavier body weight, which can be a negative factor in some sports. We therefore recommend that athletes and their coaches develop training programs for improving sports performance by balancing the advantage of increased muscle size and the potential disadvantage of increased body weight.

  14. Development of a menu of performance tests self-administered on a portable microcomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Robert L.; Kuntz, Lois-Ann; Kennedy, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    Eighteen cognitive, motor, and information processing performance subtests were screened for self-administration over 10 trials by 16 subjects. When altered presentation forms of the same test were collectively considered, the battery composition was reduced to 10 distinctly different measures. A fully automated microbased testing system was employed in presenting the battery of subtests. Successful self-administration of the battery provided for the field testing of the automated system and facilitated convenient data collection. Total test administration time was 47.2 minutes for each session. Results indicated that nine of the tests stabilized, but for a short battery of tests only five are recommended for use in repeated-measures research. The five recommended tests include: the Tapping series, Number Comparison, Short-term Memory, Grammatical Reasoning, and 4-Choice Reaction Time. These tests can be expected to reveal three factors: (1) cognition, (2) processing quickness, and (3) motor. All the tests stabilized in 24 minutes, or approximately two 12-minute sessions.

  15. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Third quarterly technical progress report, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-29

    The major focus of the project, which is scheduled to occur through December 1995, will be to install and test a 500{number_sign}/hr. fine-coal cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The overall objectives of the project are to: Determine the effects of operating time on the characteristics of the recirculating medium in a continuous integrated processing circuit, and subsequently, the sensitivity of cyclone separation performance to the quality of the recirculating medium; and determine the technical and economic feasibility of various unit operations and systems in optimizing the separation and recovery of the micronized magnetite from the coal products. This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

  16. Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Breadboard (PLSS 1.0) Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Matt R.; Watts, Carly

    2011-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at NASA-JSC to develop an advanced Extravehicular Activity (EVA) PLSS design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. Previous efforts have focused on modeling and analyzing the advanced PLSS architecture, as well as developing key enabling technologies. Like the current International Space Station (ISS) Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS, the advanced PLSS comprises of three subsystems required to sustain the crew during EVA including the Thermal, Ventilation, and Oxygen Subsystems. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test rig that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off the shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, ventilation loop fan, Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swingbed, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME). Testing accumulated 239 hours over 45 days, while executing 172 test points. Specific PLSS 1.0 test objectives assessed during this testing include: confirming key individual components perform in a system level test as they have performed during component level testing; identifying unexpected system-level interactions; operating PLSS 1.0 in nominal steady-state EVA modes to baseline subsystem performance with respect to metabolic rate, ventilation loop pressure and flow rate, and environmental conditions; simulating nominal transient EVA operational scenarios; simulating contingency EVA operational scenarios; and further evaluating individual technology development components. Successful testing of the PLSS 1.0 provided a large database of test results that characterize system level and component performance. With the exception of several minor anomalies, the PLSS 1.0 test rig performed as expected; furthermore, many system

  17. Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Breadboard (PLSS 1.0) Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly A.; Vogel, Matt

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at the Johnson Space Center to develop an advanced EVA PLSS design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test rig that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off-the-shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, ventilation loop fan, Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swingbed, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME). PLSS 1.0 was tested from June 17th through September 30th, 2011. Testing accumulated 233 hours over 45 days, while executing 119 test points. An additional 164 hours of operational time were accrued during the test series, bringing the total operational time for PLSS 1.0 testing to 397 hours. Specific PLSS 1.0 test objectives assessed during this testing include: (1) Confirming prototype components perform in a system level test as they have performed during component level testing, (2) Identifying unexpected system-level interactions (3) Operating PLSS 1.0 in nominal steady-state EVA modes to baseline subsystem performance with respect to metabolic rate, ventilation loop pressure and flow rate, and environmental conditions (4) Simulating nominal transient EVA operational scenarios (5) Simulating contingency EVA operational scenarios (6) Further evaluating prototype technology development components Successful testing of the PLSS 1.0 provided a large database of test results that characterize system level and component performance. With the exception of several minor anomalies, the PLSS 1.0 test rig performed as expected. Documented anomalies and observations include: (1) Ventilation loop fan controller issues at high fan speeds (near 70,000 rpm, whereas the fan speed during nominal operations would be closer

  18. Handheld and portable test systems for immunodiagnostics, nucleic acid detection and more

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulstich, Konrad; Haberstroh, Klaus; Gruler, Roman; Eberhard, Michael; Wiest, Thomas; Lentzsch, Dirk

    2008-04-01

    Emergency Diagnostics, Homeland Security, Epidemiological Preparedness and the high cost of the Health Care Systems have increased demand for affordable and mobile point of care (POC) devices with highest sensitivity, specificity and rapid time to result. We have developed pocket sized systems for point of care and field based tests based on fluorescence read-out. The core consists of battery operated, 90 gram electro-optical units with optional wireless data transfer, which have been optimized to achieve highest accuracy and sensitivity paired with simplicity of use. The robust systems have been applied to molecular diagnostics such as DNA based testing, immunodiagnostics as well as environmental monitoring and agricultural testing. We will show examples of DNA testing, testing of drugs and toxins, cell based assays and water monitoring. We will discuss drivers and rationale for mobile testing platforms and address critical points such as sample preparation and sampling problems e.g. target delivery in small volumes. ESE's battery-operated handheld and mobile testing platforms have been shown to provide sensitive, accurate, and specific results, as well as rapid turnaround. The stand-alone devices demonstrate operational and physical robustness, and they can be manufactured to be affordable. Some underlying assays work directly from clinical samples such as urine or blood.

  19. PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION TEST FOR FIELD-PORTABLE MEASUREMENTS OF LEAD IN DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program (www.epa.jzov/etv) conducts performance verification tests of technologies used for the characterization and monitoring of contaminated media. The program exists to provide high-quali...

  20. 40 CFR 59.653 - How do I test portable fuel containers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... other factors (such as vibration or thermal expansion). If your container cannot be tested using the... positive or negative pressure that may have developed during stabilization. (2) Weigh the sealed reference...

  1. 40 CFR 59.653 - How do I test portable fuel containers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... other factors (such as vibration or thermal expansion). If your container cannot be tested using the... positive or negative pressure that may have developed during stabilization. (2) Weigh the sealed reference...

  2. PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION TEST FOR FIELD-PORTABLE MEASUREMENTS OF LEAD IN DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program (www.epa.jzov/etv) conducts performance verification tests of technologies used for the characterization and monitoring of contaminated media. The program exists to provide high-quali...

  3. Portable apparatus with CRT display for nondestructive testing of concrete by the ultrasonic pulse method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manta, G.; Gurau, Y.; Nica, P.; Facacaru, I.

    1974-01-01

    The development of methods for the nondestructive study of concrete structures is discussed. The nondestructive test procedure is based on the method of ultrasonic pulse transmission through the material. The measurements indicate that the elastic properties of concrete or other heterogeneous materials are a function of the rate of ultrasonic propagation. Diagrams of the test equipment are provided. Mathematical models are included to support the theoretical aspects.

  4. Portable apparatus with CRT display for nondestructive testing of concrete by the ultrasonic pulse method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manta, G.; Gurau, Y.; Nica, P.; Facacaru, I.

    1974-01-01

    The development of methods for the nondestructive study of concrete structures is discussed. The nondestructive test procedure is based on the method of ultrasonic pulse transmission through the material. The measurements indicate that the elastic properties of concrete or other heterogeneous materials are a function of the rate of ultrasonic propagation. Diagrams of the test equipment are provided. Mathematical models are included to support the theoretical aspects.

  5. Accuracy, precision, usability, and cost of portable silver test methods for ceramic filter factories.

    PubMed

    Meade, Rhiana D; Murray, Anna L; Mittelman, Anjuliee M; Rayner, Justine; Lantagne, Daniele S

    2017-02-01

    Locally manufactured ceramic water filters are one effective household drinking water treatment technology. During manufacturing, silver nanoparticles or silver nitrate are applied to prevent microbiological growth within the filter and increase bacterial removal efficacy. Currently, there is no recommendation for manufacturers to test silver concentrations of application solutions or filtered water. We identified six commercially available silver test strips, kits, and meters, and evaluated them by: (1) measuring in quintuplicate six samples from 100 to 1,000 mg/L (application range) and six samples from 0.0 to 1.0 mg/L (effluent range) of silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate to determine accuracy and precision; (2) conducting volunteer testing to assess ease-of-use; and (3) comparing costs. We found no method accurately detected silver nanoparticles, and accuracy ranged from 4 to 91% measurement error for silver nitrate samples. Most methods were precise, but only one method could test both application and effluent concentration ranges of silver nitrate. Volunteers considered test strip methods easiest. The cost for 100 tests ranged from 36 to 1,600 USD. We found no currently available method accurately and precisely measured both silver types at reasonable cost and ease-of-use, thus these methods are not recommended to manufacturers. We recommend development of field-appropriate methods that accurately and precisely measure silver nanoparticle and silver nitrate concentrations.

  6. Final Report on Portable Laser Coating Removal Systems Field Demonstrations and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J.; McLaughlin, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    Processes currently used throughout the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to remove corrosion and coatings from structures, ground service equipment and small components results in waste streams consisting of toxic chemicals, spent media blast materials, and waste water. When chemicals are used in these processes they are typically high in volatile organic compounds (VOC) and are considered hazardous air pollutants (HAP). When blast media is used, the volume of hazardous waste generated is increased significantly. Many of the coatings historically used within NASA contain toxic metals such as hexavalent chromium, and lead. These materials are highly regulated and restrictions on worker exposure continue to increase. Most recently the EPA reduced the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for hexavalent chromium. The new standard lowers OSHA's PEL for hexavalent chromium from 52 to 5 micrograms of Cr(V1) per cubic meter of air as an 8-hour time-weighted average. Hexavalent chromium is found in the pretreatment and primer coatings used within the Shuttle Program. In response to the need to continue to protect assets within the agency and the growing concern over these new regulations, NASA is researching different ways to continue the required maintenance of both facility and flight equipment in a safe, efficient and environmentally preferable manner. The use of laser energy to remove prepare surfaces for a variety of processes, such as corrosion and coating removal, weld preparation and non destructive evaluation is a relatively new technology that has shown itself to be environmentally preferable and in many cases less labor intensive than currently used removal methods. The development of a Portable Laser Coating Removal System (PLCRS) started as the goal of a Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JG-PP) project, led by the Air Force, where several types of lasers in several configurations were thoroughly evaluated. Following this project, NASA decided

  7. Development of a Portable Test Kit for Field-Screening Paints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    cracked when the coating was applied on a tinplate panel with a 6-mil Discussion blade and this panel was bent over a 1/8-in, mandrel The agreement...34eeFlexibility test results according to Method 6221 of Federal Test Method Standard 141B, for the coating film on a tinplate panel bent over a 1/8-inch...magnifying lens. *• ever, instead of using coated tinplate panels, the draw. downs are made on plastic and bent over 1/16-in.- Discussion diameter and l/8

  8. An AIE-based fluorescent test strip for the portable detection of gaseous phosgene.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huiting; Wu, Yinglong; Zeng, Fang; Chen, Junjie; Wu, Shuizhu

    2017-08-29

    An AIE-based fluorescent test strip (OPD-TPE-Py-2CN) for rapid and sensitive detection of gaseous phosgene was designed. The fluorescence changes from blue to green upon exposure to phosgene. And the detection limit (1.87 ppm) is lower than the "harmless" level of human response to acute phosgene exposure.

  9. Portable wind tunnels for field testing of soils and natural surfaces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Large stationary wind tunnels have been used to test the erodibility of soils and to study in detail the processes controlling erosion rates. These tunnels require the use of disturbed soil samples which may result in parameter estimations that are not consistent with the natural surface. Several ...

  10. Effects of the bench shirt on sagittal bar path.

    PubMed

    Silver, Tobin; Fortenbaugh, Dave; Williams, Ryan

    2009-07-01

    Powerlifting, like many sports, uses specialized equipment to enhance performance and decrease the chance of injury. The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine whether wearing a bench press shirt would alter the natural mechanics of the bench press, causing a more efficient lift when pressing the same weight as without the bench shirt. Participants (n = 5) completed 2 series of 1-repetition maximum (1RM) bench press tests, with 1 week of rest in between 1 series without the bench shirt (no-shirt), and 1 series with a bench shirt (bench shirt). Results revealed that the vertical bar path ranges were significantly less in the bench shirt condition (35.7 +/- 4.8 cm) compared with the no-shirt condition (40.2 +/- 7.0 cm) (p < 0.05). Significant differences were found between the bar's optimal (81.4 +/- 14.2 cm) and observed (96.7 +/- 19.1 cm) total distances traveled in the no-shirt condition (p < 0.01), but no significant differences were found between the bar's optimal (71.6 +/- 12.7 cm) and observed (86.3 +/- 10.5 cm) total distances traveled in the bench shirt condition. These findings suggest that the bar path in bench shirt trials is more efficient and consistent than in the no-shirt trials. This pattern demonstrates that a bench shirt can improve load capacity. It is also possible that the bench shirt decreases the forces that act on the shoulder for a given weight and, thus, may decrease the risk of injury.

  11. Anesthesia for bench surgery.

    PubMed

    Sachin, S; Rajesh, M C; Ramdas, E K

    2016-01-01

    Surgical removal of the kidney tumor outside the body, (ex vivo renal bench surgery) followed by auto transplantation is an emerging and often done procedure to reconstruct the urinary tract. It possesses immense challenges to both the anesthesiologists and the surgeons. The risks are multiplied if you are performing the surgery on a solitary functioning kidney. Here, we are describing the anesthetic management of 70-year-old male post nephrectomy patient undergoing renal auto transplantation by bench surgery. Our primary goals for perioperative management were to maintain a stable hemodynamics throughout the procedure, to reduce fluid overload during the period of extracorporeal surgery, to maintain perfusion for the transplanted solitary kidney, to control bleeding to a minimum, and to provide adequate analgesia for the patient. We made use of a balanced anesthetic technique and stringent monitoring standards to bring forth a successful outcome for the patient. At the end of his hospital stay, patient went home with a healthy, normally functioning kidney.

  12. Evaluation testing of a portable vapor detector for Part-Per-Billion (PPB) level UDMH and N2H4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Dan; Lueck, Dale E.

    1995-01-01

    Trace level detection of hydrazine (N2H4), monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) has been receiving increased attention over the past several years. In May 1995 the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) lowered their acceptable threshold limit value (TLV) from 100 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 10 ppb. Several types of ppb-level detectors are being developed by the United States Air Force (USAF) Space and Missile Systems Center (SMSC). A breadboard version of a portable, lightweight hydrazine detection sensor was developed and produced by Giner Corp. for the USAF. This sensor was designed for ppb level UDMH and N2H4 vapor detection in near real-time. This instrument employs electrochemical sensing, utilizing a three electrode cell with an anion-exchange polymer electrolyte membrane as the only electrolyte in the system. The sensing, counter and reference electrodes are bonded to the membrane forming a single component. The only liquid required to maintain the sensor is deionized water which hydrates the membrane. At the request of the USAF SMSC, independent testing and evaluation of the breadboard instrument was performed at NASA's Toxic Vapor Detection Laboratory (TVDL) for response to ppb-level N2H4 and UDMH and MMH. The TVDL, located at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the unique ability to generate calibrated sample vapor streams of N2H4, UDMH, and MMH over a range from less than 10 ppb to thousands of parts per million (ppm) with full environmental control of relative humidity (0-90%) and temperature (0-50 C). The TVDL routinely performs these types of tests. Referenced sensors were subjected to extensive testing, including precision, linearity, response/recovery times, zero and span drift, humidity and temperature effects as well as ammonia interference. Results of these tests and general operation characteristics are reported.

  13. Preliminary Results from the Portable Imagery Quality Assessment Test Field (PIQuAT) of Uav Imagery for Imagery Reconnaissance Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, R.; Orych, A.; Jenerowicz, A.; Walczykowski, P.

    2015-08-01

    The article presents a set of initial results of a quality assessment study of 2 different types of sensors mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle, carried out over an especially designed and constructed test field. The PIQuAT (Portable Imagery Quality Assessment Test Field) field had been designed especially for the purposes of determining the quality parameters of UAV sensors, especially in terms of the spatial, spectral and radiometric resolutions and chosen geometric aspects. The sensor used include a multispectral framing camera and a high-resolution RGB sensor. The flights were conducted from a number of altitudes ranging from 10 m to 200 m above the test field. Acquiring data at a number of different altitudes allowed the authors to evaluate the obtained results and check for possible linearity of the calculated quality assessment parameters. The radiometric properties of the sensors were evaluated from images of the grayscale target section of the PIQuAT field. The spectral resolution of the imagery was determined based on a number of test samples with known spectral reflectance curves. These reference spectral reflectance curves were then compared with spectral reflectance coefficients at the wavelengths registered by the miniMCA camera. Before conducting all of these experiments in field conditions, the interior orientation parameters were calculated for the MiniMCA and RGB sensor in laboratory conditions. These parameters include: the actual pixel size on the detector, distortion parameters, calibrated focal length (CFL) and the coordinates of the principal point of autocollimation (miniMCA - for each of the six channels separately.

  14. Development of portable measuring system for testing of electrical vehicle's heat energy recovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvajcz, K.; Váradiné Szarka, A.

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays the consumer society applies a huge amount of energy in many fields including transportation sector. Internal combustion vehicles contribute substantially to the air pollution. An alternative solution for reducing energy consumption is replacing the internal combustion vehicles by electrical or hybrid vehicles. Today one of the biggest disadvantages of the electrical vehicles is the finite capacity of batteries. The research topic presented in this paper is the „Energy Harvesting”, and development of energy recovery system for electrical vehicles which largely contributes in increasing the driving range. At the current phase of the research efficiency analysis of the heat energy recovery devices are investigated in real driving circumstances. Computer based mobile and wireless measurement system for the analysis was developed, tested and installed in a real vehicle. Driving tests were performed and analysed in different circumstances.

  15. Field testing of lake water chemistry with a portable and an AUV-based mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hemond, Harry F; Mueller, Amy V; Hemond, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Two mass spectrometers (MS) are tested for the measurement of volatile substances, such as hydrocarbons and metabolic gases, in natural waters. KOALA is a backpackable MS operated from above the water surface, in which samples are pumped through a flow cell using a syringe. NEREUS is an underwater instrument hosted by an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) that is linked to a communications network to provide chemical data in real time. The mass analyzers of the two MS are nearly identical cycloids, and both use flat-plate membrane inlets. Testing took place in an eutrophic, thermally stratified lake exhibiting steep chemical gradients and significant levels of methane. KOALA provided rapid multispecies analysis of dissolved gases, with a detection limit for methane of 0.1 ppm (readily extendable to 0.01 ppm) and savings of time of at least a factor of 10 compared to that of conventional analysis. The AUV-mounted NEREUS additionally provided rapid spatial coverage and the capability of performing chemical surveys autonomously. Tests demonstrated the need for temperature control of a membrane inlet when steep thermal gradients are present in a water body, as well as the benefits of co-locating all sensors on the AUV to avoid interference from chemically different waters entering and draining from the free-flooding outer hull. The ability to measure dissolved volatiles provided by MS offers potential for complementarity with ionic sensors in the study of natural waters, such as in the case of the carbonate system.

  16. Serial Versus Direct Dilation of Small Diameter Stents Results in a More Predictable and Complete Intentional Transcatheter Stent Fracture: A PICES Bench Testing Study.

    PubMed

    Crystal, Matthew A; Morgan, Gareth J; Danon, Saar; Gray, Robert G; Gruenstein, Daniel H; Gordon, Brent M; Goldstein, Bryan H

    2017-10-04

    Balloon-expandable stents, implanted in infants and children with congenital heart disease (CHD), often require redilation to match somatic growth. Small diameter stents may eventually require longitudinal surgical transection to prevent iatrogenic vascular stenosis. Intentional transcatheter stent fracture (TSF) is an emerging alternative approach to stent transection, but little is known about the optimal stent substrate and best protocol to improve the likelihood of successful TSF. Bench testing was performed with a stent dilation protocol. After recording baseline characteristics, stents were serially or directly dilated using ultra-high-pressure balloons (UHPB) until fracture occurred or further stent dilation was not possible. Stent characteristics recorded were as follows: cell design, metallurgy, mechanism, and uniformity of fracture. Stents tested included bare-metal coronary stents, premounted small diameter stents, and ePTFE-covered small diameter premounted stents. Ninety-four stents representing 9 distinct models were maximally dilated, with 80 (85%) demonstrating evidence of fracture. Comprehensive fracture details were recorded in 64 stents: linear and complete in 34/64 stents (53.1%), linear and incomplete in 9/64 stents (14.1%), transverse/complex and complete in 6/64 stents (9.4%), and transverse/complex and incomplete in 15/64 stents (23.4%). Stent fracture was not accomplished in some stent models secondary to significant shortening, i.e., "napkin-ring" formation. Serial dilation resulted in evidence of fracture in 62/67 (92.5%) stents compared with 18/27 (66.7%) stents in the direct dilation group (p = 0.003). Intentional TSF is feasible in an ex vivo model. Serial dilation more reliably expanded the stent and allowed for ultimate stent fracture, whereas direct large diameter dilation of stents was more likely to generate a "napkin-ring" configuration, which may be more resistant to fracture. In vivo animal and human testing is necessary to

  17. Portable device for use in starting air-start-units for aircraft and having cable lead testing capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosier, W. R.; Volk, G. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A portable device for starting aircraft engines and the like is disclosed. The device includes a lead testing and motor starting circuit characterized by: (1) a direct current voltage source, (2) a pair of terminal plugs connected with the circuit (each being characterized by a first, second, and third terminal) (3) a pair of manually operable switches for connecting the first terminal of each plug of the pair to the positive side of the voltage source, (4) a circuit lead connecting to the second terminal of each plug the negative side of said source, (5) a pair of electrical cables adapted to connect said first and second terminals of each plug to an air-start unit, and means for connecting each cable of the pair of cables between the first terminal of one plug and the third terminal of the other plug of the pair, and (6) a second pair of manually operable switches for selectivity connecting the third terminal of each plug of the pair to the negative side of the voltage source.

  18. Fluoroscopic performance tests using a portable computer/frame grabber: Wiener spectra measurements.

    PubMed

    Goldman, L W

    1992-01-01

    Currently, routine tests of fluoroscopic image quality in common use are highly subjective. As part of an effort to develop more quantitative routine tests of fluoroscopic image quality, a method was developed to quickly and easily measure Wiener spectra (WS) of TV-viewed fluoroscopic systems that considers both spatial and temporal noise correlations. A PC-mounted frame grabber captures images at the TV frame rate to form a three-dimensional (3-D) array of pixels. Scans of a "two-dimensional slit" are then synthesized from which a one-dimensional central section of a 3-D WS is calculated. To avoid errors due to coarse (8-bit) quantization, a video amplifier is used to expand a portion of the signal to the full digitizer range. A reference signal (2 mm of aluminum) is then used to normalize image contrast. Ensemble averages of 250 spectra were obtained in approximately 1 min, including all processing. Results are presented to demonstrate reproducibility, sensitivity, and behavior of the WS. The eventual goal of this work is to use this method in conjunction with measurements of an MTF to calculate fundamental descriptors of image quality, such as SNR and NEQ.

  19. Portable COHB Analyzer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A portable spectrophotometric apparatus and method therefore for measuring the percentage of carboxyhemoglobin ( COHb ) in blood. The apparatus...comprises a spectrophotometer and wavelength selection filters for testing a reference sample having a hemolizing agent and sodium hyposulfite and a treated...blood sample with the hemolizing agent and sodium hyposulfite and providing a two component COHb -Hb system for determining relative absorbance values

  20. Portable Breathing Assembly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-12

    In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Jacobs Test and Operations Support Contract, or TOSC, technicians fill portable breathing apparatuses, or PBAS. The PBAs are to be use on board the International Space Staton to provide astronauts with breathable air in the event of a fire or other emergency situation.

  1. Portable headset microphone checker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, J.; Foster, J. A.; Langley, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    Simple and reliable test system gives go/no-go indication of output level of headset microphones. Portable system has its own internal battery power supply and can be used in field or in laboratory with wide variety of headset types.

  2. Portable Breathing Assembly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-12

    In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Jacobs Test and Operations Support Contract, or TOSC, technician Rod Ostgrard helps fill portable breathing apparatuses, or PBAS. The PBAs are to be use on board the International Space Staton to provide astronauts with breathable air in the event of a fire or other emergency situation.

  3. Portable Breathing Assembly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-12

    In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Jacobs Test and Operations Support Contract, or TOSC, technician John Thompson helps fill portable breathing apparatuses, or PBAS. The PBAs are to be use on board the International Space Staton to provide astronauts with breathable air in the event of a fire or other emergency situation.

  4. Development of a portable odorant test instrument. Final report, October 15, 1981-April 15, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Grain, C.F.; Oberholtzer, J.E.

    1983-04-25

    The report describes the results of a laboratory program in which the feasibility of using solid-state semiconductor detectors to measure odorant levels in natural gas was studied. One type of sensor which employed a catalyst composed of the mixed oxides of lanthanum, strontium and cobalt in a Perovskite crystal structure could detect low-ppm concentration of sulfur-containing odorants at odorant-to-methane ratios typical of those found in odorized natural gas. A second sensor which used a thin film of pure tin oxide could also detect odorants in relatively high concentrations of methane but it was not as selective for odorant vs. methane as was the Perovskite material. Odorants commonly used by the gas industry were prepared as mixtures in cylinders of pressurized methane, certified at 50 ppm. Prepared sensors were placed in a glass test chamber of a dynamic flow system and exposed to concentration levels which varied from 1-50 ppm while operating over a temperature range from 190 C to 340 C.

  5. JV TASK 45-MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR ELECTRIC UTILITIES BURNING LIGNITE COAL, PHASE I BENCH-AND PILOT-SCALE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Pavlish; Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Edwin S. Olson; Kevin C. Galbreath; Ye Zhuang; Brandon M. Pavlish

    2003-10-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed the first phase of a 3-year, two-phase consortium project to develop and demonstrate mercury control technologies for utilities that burn lignite coal. The overall project goal is to maintain the viability of lignite-based energy production by providing utilities with low-cost options for meeting future mercury regulations. Phase I objectives are to develop a better understanding of mercury interactions with flue gas constituents, test a range of sorbent-based technologies targeted at removing elemental mercury (Hg{sup o}) from flue gases, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the most promising technologies at the pilot scale. The Phase II objectives are to demonstrate and quantify sorbent technology effectiveness, performance, and cost at a sponsor-owned and operated power plant. Phase I results are presented in this report along with a brief overview of the Phase II plans. Bench-scale testing provided information on mercury interactions with flue gas constituents and relative performances of the various sorbents. Activated carbons were prepared from relatively high-sodium lignites by carbonization at 400 C (752 F), followed by steam activation at 750 C (1382 F) and 800 C (1472 F). Luscar char was also steam-activated at these conditions. These lignite-based activated carbons, along with commercially available DARCO FGD and an oxidized calcium silicate, were tested in a thin-film, fixed-bed, bench-scale reactor using a simulated lignitic flue gas consisting of 10 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} Hg{sup 0}, 6% O{sub 2}, 12% CO{sub 2}, 15% H{sub 2}O, 580 ppm SO{sub 2}, 120 ppm NO, 6 ppm NO{sub 2}, and 1 ppm HCl in N{sub 2}. All of the lignite-based activated (750 C, 1382 F) carbons required a 30-45-minute conditioning period in the simulated lignite flue gas before they exhibited good mercury sorption capacities. The unactivated Luscar char and oxidized calcium silicate were ineffective in capturing mercury. Lignite

  6. Laboratory/bench scale testing and evaluation of A. P. T. dry plate scrubber. Sixth quarterly progress report, June 1-August 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-17

    The objective of this project is to conduct a bench scale experimental evaluation of the dry plate scrubber (DPS) at high temperature and pressure to determine its potential for controlling particulates and alkali vapor emissions from a pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) process. Progress reports are presented from the following tasks: high temperature and pressure (HTP) experiments; and preliminary alkali experiments on sorbent capacity and efficiency, and sorbent attrition. Some of the highlights are: of the five sorbents (diatomaceous earth MP-94, activated bauxite, dolomite, alumina spheres, and zirconia spheres) evaluated, diatomaceous earth and activated bauxite showed a higher sodium capture efficiency than the other three sorbents; the attrition of diatomaceous earth and activated bauxite is higher at 900/sup 0/C than at ambient temperatures; detailed mechanical design of the HTP DPS system continued; alkali vapor generator and the fly ash particle generator were built; the bench scale DPS was built and installed.

  7. Comparison of automated and manual determination of HER2 status in breast cancer for diagnostic use: a comparative methodological study using the Ventana BenchMark automated staining system and manual tests.

    PubMed

    Bánkfalvi, Agnes; Boecker, Werner; Reiner, Angelika

    2004-10-01

    This study was performed to test the validity of manual and automated HER2 tests in one hundred routinely formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded diagnostic breast carcinoma tissues. Immunohistochemical (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays for HER2 were separately carried out in two institutes of pathology specialised in diagnostics of breast diseases. Manual immunostaining was performed by the Dako-HercepTest. Automated IHC and FISH were carried out in the Ventana BenchMark platform by using the Pathway-CB11 antibody and the INFORM(R) HER2 probe, respectively. Positivity rates varied between HercepTest (26%), automated CB11 IHC (23%) and automated FISH (22%). Overall concordance between positive (2+, 3+) and negative (0; 1+) results of manual and automated IHC was 97%, between automated FISH and IHC 92%, and between automated FISH and HercepTest 89%. The frequency of 2+ IHC scores was 13% using the BenchMark and 14% with the HercepTest; 6/12 and 8/14 of the respective cases were not amplified by FISH. Automated FISH was not interpretable in 11 of 100 specimens. In the 89 informative cases, automated IHC resulted in increased specificity (92% vs. 88%), increased positive predictive value (73% vs. 64%) and increased efficiency (92% vs. 89%). We conclude that automation improves the accuracy of HER2 detection in diagnostic breast carcinoma tissues and provides a new approach for the global standardization of clinical HER2 tests.

  8. Bench surgical training with lyophilized esophageal segments.

    PubMed

    Sotres-Vega, Avelina; Osorio-Necoechea, María Elba; Salas-Galindo, Gabriela; González-Ramón, Soemi Careli; Guadarrama-Sánchez, Isabel; Villalba-Caloca, Jaime; Santibáñez-Salgado, José Alfredo

    2013-08-01

    To present lyophilized esophageal segments that can be used to learn surgical skills. Four esophagus were harvested from four non-esophagus related research dogs at the moment of euthanasia. Each esophagus was trimmed in 3 cm long segments. They were lyophilized and stored during 30 days. The day programmed for surgical skills practice, they were rehydrated. Sixteen segments have been used. After rehydrating, all the segments kept their normal anatomic shape and structural integrity. One incision was made on every esophageal segment and sutured with running stitches of 3-0 polyglactin 910. There were no complications, such as tissue tears, nor esophageal hardening. The lyophilized esophagus is a high fidelity, practical, reproducible, portable, low-cost bench model. It allows general surgery apprentices to learn how to handle an esophagus, as well as to perfect their surgical and suture abilities before applying them on real patient's esophagus.

  9. The Measurement of the Effects of Helmet Form on Sound Source Detection and Localization Using a Portable Four-Loudspeaker Test Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Monaural and Binaural Localization. Hearing Res. 1986, 21, 67–73. Carlile, S.; Leong, P.; Hyams, S. The Nature and Distribution of Errors in Sound ...The Measurement of the Effects of Helmet Form on Sound Source Detection and Localization Using a Portable Four-Loudspeaker Test Array by...Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5425 ARL-TR-6444 May 2013 The Measurement of the Effects of Helmet Form on Sound Source Detection and

  10. Anesthesia for bench surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sachin, S.; Rajesh, M. C.; Ramdas, E. K.

    2016-01-01

    Surgical removal of the kidney tumor outside the body, (ex vivo renal bench surgery) followed by auto transplantation is an emerging and often done procedure to reconstruct the urinary tract. It possesses immense challenges to both the anesthesiologists and the surgeons. The risks are multiplied if you are performing the surgery on a solitary functioning kidney. Here, we are describing the anesthetic management of 70-year-old male post nephrectomy patient undergoing renal auto transplantation by bench surgery. Our primary goals for perioperative management were to maintain a stable hemodynamics throughout the procedure, to reduce fluid overload during the period of extracorporeal surgery, to maintain perfusion for the transplanted solitary kidney, to control bleeding to a minimum, and to provide adequate analgesia for the patient. We made use of a balanced anesthetic technique and stringent monitoring standards to bring forth a successful outcome for the patient. At the end of his hospital stay, patient went home with a healthy, normally functioning kidney. PMID:27746573

  11. 49 CFR 178.276 - Requirements for the design, construction, inspection and testing of portable tanks intended for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) With insulation: 50 °C (122 °F). (3) Filling density means the average mass of liquefied compressed gas... stamped in accordance with the ASME Code, Section VIII. (2) Portable tanks must be postweld heat-treated... constructed in accordance with part UHT of the ASME Code must be postweld heat-treated. Where postweld...

  12. Astrophysics on the Lab Bench

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In this article some basic laboratory bench experiments are described that are useful for teaching high school students some of the basic principles of stellar astrophysics. For example, in one experiment, students slam a plastic water-filled bottle down onto a bench, ejecting water towards the ceiling, illustrating the physics associated with a…

  13. The Apennine Bench Formation revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Hawke, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Apennine Bench Formation consists of pre-mare light plains materials that crop out south of the crater Archimedes, inside the Imbrium basin. This material was ascribed to either impact or volcanic origins. The characteristics of Apollo 15 KREEP basalts and the Apennine Bench Formation are reviewed to determine whether their characteristics are compatible with a volcanic origin.

  14. Astrophysics on the Lab Bench

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In this article some basic laboratory bench experiments are described that are useful for teaching high school students some of the basic principles of stellar astrophysics. For example, in one experiment, students slam a plastic water-filled bottle down onto a bench, ejecting water towards the ceiling, illustrating the physics associated with a…

  15. The Apennine Bench Formation revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Hawke, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Apennine Bench Formation consists of pre-mare light plains materials that crop out south of the crater Archimedes, inside the Imbrium basin. This material was ascribed to either impact or volcanic origins. The characteristics of Apollo 15 KREEP basalts and the Apennine Bench Formation are reviewed to determine whether their characteristics are compatible with a volcanic origin.

  16. Bench-Scale Testing and Process Performance Projections of CO2 Capture by CO2–Binding Organic Liquids (CO2BOLs) With and Without Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Feng; Heldebrant, David J.; Mathias, Paul M.; Koech, Phillip K.; Bhakta, Mukund; Freeman, Charles J.; Bearden, Mark D.; Zwoster, Andy

    2016-01-12

    This manuscript provides a detailed analysis of a continuous flow, bench scale study of the CO2BOL solvent platform with and without its Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). This study encompassed four months of continuous flow testing of a candidate CO2BOL with a thermal regeneration and PSAR regeneration using decane antisolvent. In both regeneration schemes, steady state capture of >90 %CO2 was achieved using simulated flue gas at acceptable L/G ratios. Aspen Plus™ modeling was performed to assess process performance compared to previous equilibrium performance projections. This paper also includes net power projections, and comparisons to DOE’s Case 10 amine baseline.

  17. Pharmacogenomics: bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Weinshilboum, Richard; Wang, Liewei

    2004-09-01

    Pharmacogenetics is the study of the role of inheritance in inter-individual variation in drug response. Since its origins in the mid-twentieth century, a major driving force in pharmacogenetics research has been the promise of individualized drug therapy to maximize drug efficacy and minimize drug toxicity. In recent years, the convergence of advances in pharmacogenetics with rapid developments in human genomics has resulted in the evolution of pharmacogenetics into pharmacogenomics, and led to increasing enthusiasm for the 'translation' of this evolving discipline into clinical practice. Here, we briefly summarize the development of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics, and then discuss the key factors that have had an influence on - and will continue to affect - the translation of pharmacogenomics from the research bench to the bedside, highlighting the challenges that need to be addressed to achieve this goal.

  18. BENCH SCALE SALTSTONE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT MIXING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.; Hansen, E.

    2011-08-03

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop a bench scale test facility, using a mixer, transfer pump, and transfer line to determine the impact of conveying the grout through the transfer lines to the vault on grout properties. Bench scale testing focused on the effect the transfer line has on the rheological property of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Rheological and other physical properties of grout samples were obtained prior to and after pumping through a transfer line. The Bench Scale Mixing Rig (BSMR) consisted of two mixing tanks, grout feed tank, transfer pump and transfer hose. The mixing tanks were used to batch the grout which was then transferred into the grout feed tank. The contents of the feed tank were then pumped through the transfer line (hose) using a progressive cavity pump. The grout flow rate and pump discharge pressure were monitored. Four sampling stations were located along the length of the transfer line at the 5, 105 and 205 feet past the transfer pump and at 305 feet, the discharge of the hose. Scaling between the full scale piping at Saltstone to bench scale testing at SRNL was performed by maintaining the same shear rate and total shear at the wall of the transfer line. The results of scaling down resulted in a shorter transfer line, a lower average velocity, the same transfer time and similar pressure drops. The condition of flow in the bench scale transfer line is laminar. The flow in the full scale pipe is in the transition region, but is more laminar than turbulent. The resulting plug in laminar flow in the bench scale results in a region of no-mixing. Hence mixing, or shearing, at the bench scale should be less than that observed in the full scale, where this plug is non existent due to the turbulent flow. The bench scale tests should be considered to be conservative due to the highly laminar condition of flow that exists. Two BSMR runs were performed. In both cases, wall

  19. Bench evaluation of 7 home-care ventilators.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Thomas C; Rodriquez, Dario; Hanseman, Dennis; Branson, Richard D

    2011-11-01

    Portable ventilators continue to decrease in size while increasing in performance. We bench-tested the triggering, battery duration, and tidal volume (V(T)) of 7 portable ventilators: LTV 1000, LTV 1200, Puritan Bennett 540, Trilogy, Vela, iVent 101, and HT50. We tested triggering with a modified dual-chamber test lung to simulate spontaneous breathing with weak, normal, and strong inspiratory effort. We measured battery duration by fully charging the battery and operating the ventilator with a V(T) of 500 mL, a respiratory rate of 20 breaths/min, and PEEP of 5 cm H(2)O until breath-delivery ceased. We tested V(T) accuracy with pediatric ventilation scenarios (V(T) 50 mL or 100 mL, respiratory rate 50 breaths/min, inspiratory time 0.3 s, and PEEP 5 cm H(2)O) and an adult ventilation scenario (V(T) 400 mL, respiratory rate 30 breaths/min, inspiratory time 0.5 s, and PEEP 5 cm H(2)O). We measured and analyzed airway pressure, volume, and flow signals. At the adult settings the measured V(T) range was 362-426 mL. On the pediatric settings the measured V(T) range was 51-182 mL at the set V(T) of 50 mL, and 90-141 mL at the set V(T) of 100 mL. The V(T) delivered by the Vela at both the 50 mL and 100 mL, and by the HT50 at 100 mL, did not meet the American Society for Testing and Materials standard for V(T) accuracy. Triggering response and battery duration ranged widely among the tested ventilators. There was wide variability in battery duration and triggering sensitivity. Five of the ventilators performed adequately in V(T) delivery across several settings. The combination of high respiratory rate and low V(T) presented problems for 2 of the ventilators.

  20. Construction and Setup of a Bench-scale Algal Photosynthetic Bioreactor with Temperature, Light, and pH Monitoring for Kinetic Growth Tests.

    PubMed

    Karam, Amanda L; McMillan, Catherine C; Lai, Yi-Chun; de Los Reyes, Francis L; Sederoff, Heike W; Grunden, Amy M; Ranjithan, Ranji S; Levis, James W; Ducoste, Joel J

    2017-06-14

    The optimal design and operation of photosynthetic bioreactors (PBRs) for microalgal cultivation is essential for improving the environmental and economic performance of microalgae-based biofuel production. Models that estimate microalgal growth under different conditions can help to optimize PBR design and operation. To be effective, the growth parameters used in these models must be accurately determined. Algal growth experiments are often constrained by the dynamic nature of the culture environment, and control systems are needed to accurately determine the kinetic parameters. The first step in setting up a controlled batch experiment is live data acquisition and monitoring. This protocol outlines a process for the assembly and operation of a bench-scale photosynthetic bioreactor that can be used to conduct microalgal growth experiments. This protocol describes how to size and assemble a flat-plate, bench-scale PBR from acrylic. It also details how to configure a PBR with continuous pH, light, and temperature monitoring using a data acquisition and control unit, analog sensors, and open-source data acquisition software.

  1. Tribological bench and engine dynamometer tests of a low viscosity SAE 0W-16 engine oil using a combination of ionic liquid and ZDDP as anti-wear additives

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, William C.; Gao, Hong; Kheireddin, Bassem; Papke, Brian L.; Luo, Huimin; West, Brian H.; Qu, Jun

    2015-09-29

    We have previously reported an oil-miscible phosphonium-organophosphate ionic liquid (IL) with an effective anti-wear (AW) functionality when added to a base oil by itself or combined with a conventional zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) for a synergistic effect. In this research, we investigated whether this synergy manifests in formulated engine oils. An experimental SAE 0W-16 engine oil was generated containing a combination of IL and ZDDP with equal phosphorus contribution. The prototype engine oil was first evaluated using tribological bench tests: AW performance in boundary lubrication (BL) and friction behavior (Stribeck curves) in elastohydrodynamic, mixed, and BL. In addition, the forthcoming standard Sequence VIE engine dynamometer test was then conducted to demonstrate improved fuel economy. Results were benchmarked against those of another experimental engine oil with almost the same formulation except using ZDDP only without the IL (similar total phosphorus content). The IL-ZDDP formulation consistently outperforms the ZDDP-only formulation in friction reduction and wear protection, and results from the bench and engine tests are well correlated.

  2. Tribological bench and engine dynamometer tests of a low viscosity SAE 0W-16 engine oil using a combination of ionic liquid and ZDDP as anti-wear additives

    DOE PAGES

    Barnhill, William C.; Gao, Hong; Kheireddin, Bassem; ...

    2015-09-29

    We have previously reported an oil-miscible phosphonium-organophosphate ionic liquid (IL) with an effective anti-wear (AW) functionality when added to a base oil by itself or combined with a conventional zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) for a synergistic effect. In this research, we investigated whether this synergy manifests in formulated engine oils. An experimental SAE 0W-16 engine oil was generated containing a combination of IL and ZDDP with equal phosphorus contribution. The prototype engine oil was first evaluated using tribological bench tests: AW performance in boundary lubrication (BL) and friction behavior (Stribeck curves) in elastohydrodynamic, mixed, and BL. In addition, the forthcoming standardmore » Sequence VIE engine dynamometer test was then conducted to demonstrate improved fuel economy. Results were benchmarked against those of another experimental engine oil with almost the same formulation except using ZDDP only without the IL (similar total phosphorus content). The IL-ZDDP formulation consistently outperforms the ZDDP-only formulation in friction reduction and wear protection, and results from the bench and engine tests are well correlated.« less

  3. 49 CFR 178.276 - Requirements for the design, construction, inspection and testing of portable tanks intended for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....): (A) Without insulation or sun shield: 60 °C (140 °F); (B) With sun shield: 55 °C (131 °F); and (C) With insulation: 50 °C (122 °F). (3) Filling density means the average mass of liquefied compressed gas... stamped in accordance with the ASME Code, Section VIII. (2) Portable tanks must be postweld heat-treated...

  4. A handheld computer as part of a portable in vivo knee joint load monitoring system

    PubMed Central

    Szivek, JA; Nandakumar, VS; Geffre, CP; Townsend, CP

    2009-01-01

    In vivo measurement of loads and pressures acting on articular cartilage in the knee joint during various activities and rehabilitative therapies following focal defect repair will provide a means of designing activities that encourage faster and more complete healing of focal defects. It was the goal of this study to develop a totally portable monitoring system that could be used during various activities and allow continuous monitoring of forces acting on the knee. In order to make the monitoring system portable, a handheld computer with custom software, a USB powered miniature wireless receiver and a battery-powered coil were developed to replace a currently used computer, AC powered bench top receiver and power supply. A Dell handheld running Windows Mobile operating system(OS) programmed using Labview was used to collect strain measurements. Measurements collected by the handheld based system connected to the miniature wireless receiver were compared with the measurements collected by a hardwired system and a computer based system during bench top testing and in vivo testing. The newly developed handheld based system had a maximum accuracy of 99% when compared to the computer based system. PMID:19789715

  5. Portable Laser Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, J.T.

    1994-07-01

    A Portable Laser Laboratory (PLL) is being designed and built for the CALIOPE Program tests which will begin in October of 1994. The PLL is designed to give maximum flexibility for evolving laser experiments and can be readily moved by loading it onto a standard truck trailer. The internal configuration for the October experiments will support a two line DIAL system running in the mid-IR. Brief descriptions of the laser and detection systems are included.

  6. Portable laser laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, J. T.

    1994-07-01

    A Portable Laser Laboratory (PLL) is being designed and built for the CALIOPE Program tests which will begin in October of 1994. The PLL is designed to give maximum flexibility for evolving laser experiments and can be readily moved by loading it onto a standard truck trailer. The internal configuration for the October experiments will support a two line DIAL system running in the mid-IR. Brief descriptions of the laser and detection systems are included.

  7. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Protein Biomarker Using a Portable Fluorescence Biosensor based on Quantum Dots and a Lateral Flow Test Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhaohui; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jun; Tang, Zhiwen; Pounds, Joel G.; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-08-15

    A portable fluorescence biosensor with rapid and ultrasensitive response for trace protein has been built up with quantum dots and lateral flow test strip. The superior signal brightness and high photostability of quantum dots are combined with the promising advantages of lateral flow test strip and resulted in high sensitivity, selectivity and speedy for protein detection. Nitrated ceruloplasmin, a significant biomarker for cardiovascular disease, lung cancer and stress response to smoking, was used as model protein to demonstrate the good performances of this proposed Qdot-based lateral flow test strip. Quantitative detection of nitrated ceruloplasmin was realized by recording the fluorescence intensity of quantum dots captured on the test line. Under optimal conditions, this portable fluorescence biosensor displays rapid responses for nitrated ceruloplasmin in wide dynamic range with a detection limit of 0.1ng/mL (S/N=3). Furthermore, the biosensor was successfully utilized for spiked human plasma sample detection with the concentration as low as 1ng/mL. The results demonstrate that the quantum dot-based lateral flow test strip is capable for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative detection of nitrated ceruloplasmin and hold a great promise for point-of-care and in field analysis of other protein biomarkers.

  8. Foaming phenomenon in bench-scale anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Siebels, Amanda M; Long, Sharon C

    2013-04-01

    The Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District (The District) in Madison, Wisconsin has been experiencing seasonal foaming in their anaerobic biosolids digesters, which has occurred from mid-November to late June for the past few years. The exact cause(s) of foaming is unknown. Previous research findings are unclear as to whether applications of advanced anaerobic digestion processes reduce the foaming potential of digesters. The object of this study was to investigate how configurations of thermophilic and acid phase-thermophilic anaerobic digestion would affect foaming at the bench-scale level compared to single stage mesophilic digestion for The District. Bench-scale anaerobic digesters were fed with a 4 to 4.5% by dry weight of solids content blend of waste activated sludge (WAS) and primary sludge from The District. Foaming potential was monitored using Alka-Seltzer and aeration foaming tests. The bench-scale acid phase-thermophilic digester had a higher foaming potential than the bench-scale mesophilic digester. These results indicate that higher temperatures increase the foaming potential of the bench-scale anaerobic digesters. The bench-scale acid phase-thermophilic digesters had a greater percent (approximately 5 to 10%) volatile solids destruction and a greater percent (approximately 5 to 10%) total solids destruction when compared to the bench-scale mesophilic digester. Overall, for the full-scale foaming experienced by The District, it appears that adding an acid phase or switching to thermophilic digestion would not alleviate The District's foaming issues.

  9. Point-of-Care Testing for Anaemia in Children Using Portable Haematocrit Meter: A Pilot Study from Southwest Nigeria and Implications for Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Olatunya, Oladele; Ogundare, Olatunde; Olaleye, Abiola; Agaja, Oyinkansola; Omoniyi, Evelyn; Adeyefa, Babajide; Oluwadiya, Kehinde; Oyelami, Oyeku

    2016-05-01

    Prompt and accurate diagnosis is needed to prevent the untoward effects of anaemia on children. Although haematology analyzers are the gold standard for accurate measurement of haemoglobin or haematocrit for anaemia diagnosis, they are often out of the reach of most health facilities in resource-poor settings thus creating a care gap. We conducted this study to examine the agreement between a point-of-care device and haematology analyzer in determining the haematocrit levels in children and to determine its usefulness in diagnosing anaemia in resource-poor settings. EDTA blood samples collected from participants were processed to estimate their haematocrits using the two devices (Mindray BC-3600 haematology analyzer and Portable Mission Hb/Haemotocrit testing system). A pairwise t-test was used to compare the haematocrit (PCV) results from the automated haematology analyzer and the portable haematocrit meter. The agreement between the two sets of measurements was assessed using the Bland and Altman method where the mean, standard deviation and limit of agreement of paired results were calculated. The intraclass and concordance correlation coefficients were 0.966 and 0.936. Sensitivity and specificity were 97.85% and 94.51% respectively while the positive predictive and negative predictive values were 94.79% and 97.73%. The Bland and Altman`s limit of agreement was -5.5-5.1 with the mean difference being -0.20 and a non-ignificant variability between the two measurements (p = 0.506). Haematocrit determined by the portable testing system is comparable to that determined by the haematology analyzer. We therefore recommend its use as a point-of-care device for determining haematocrit in resource-poor settings where haematology analyzers are not available.

  10. Working Towards the LISA Optical Benches at UF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilton, Andrew; Hillsberry, Daniel; Ciani, Giacomo; Conklin, John; Mueller, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The first space-based gravitational wave observatory will likely be a six-link LISA-like observatory with three million km scale arms. LISA aims at detecting gravitational waves from super-massive black hole mergers, compact galactic binaries, and many other exciting sources which emit gravitational waves in the 10 µHz to 1Hz frequency band. LISA will use laser interferometry to measure changes in the distance between free floating test masses at the pm/Hz level. At the core of the interferometry are the optical benches (two on each spacecraft) which receive, manipulate and redirect the different laser beams. The optical bench has been identified as a critical item in the design, manufacturing, and testing phases of this mission. Our group studies different components of the optical bench with the goal to simplify the design and manufacturing process of the optical bench.

  11. Portable neon purification system

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, R.A.; Schmitt, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes the principle design features of a portable neon purification system and the results of the system performance testing. Neon gas replaces air in the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector without using vacuum, in experiment E781(SELEX) at Fermilab. The portable neon purification system purifies neon gas by, first purging air with CO{sub 2}, freezing the CO{sub 2}, then cryoadsorbing the remaining contaminants. The freezer removes carbon dioxide from a neon gas mixture down to a maximum concentration of 500 parts-per-million (ppm). The charcoal bed adsorber removes nitrogen from neon gas down to a maximum concentration of 100 ppm. The original RICH vessel was designed to hold vacuum but its photomultiplier tube plates were not.

  12. Postural balance in low back pain patients: Intra-session reliability of center of pressure on a portable force platform and of the one leg stand test.

    PubMed

    Maribo, Thomas; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit

    2011-06-01

    Low back pain (LBP) patients have poorer postural control compared to healthy controls, and the importance of assessing and addressing balance is a matter of debate. In the clinic, balance is often tested by means of the one leg stand test (OLST) while research often employs center of pressure (CoP) on a force platform. Portable force platforms might be of clinical relevance, but their reliability for LBP patients in a clinical setting has not been demonstrated. As LBP patients are more dependent on vision compared to healthy controls, the ratio of tests performed with eyes open and eyes closed (Romberg Ratio) might be of clinical interest. This study aimed to assess postural balance in LBP patients by analyzing intra-session reliability of CoP parameters on a portable force platform, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether CoP parameters and OLST measure identical aspects of postural stability. We examined 49 LBP patients and found acceptable reliability of the CoP parameters' trace length and velocity, whereas reliability regarding C90 area, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST was poor. Correlations between the CoP parameters and OLST were insignificant. Reliability of trace length and velocity is acceptable and can be used as parameters when assessing CoP in LBP patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of level 3 portable sleep tests versus level 1 polysomnography for sleep-disordered breathing: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    El Shayeb, Mohamed; Topfer, Leigh-Ann; Stafinski, Tania; Pawluk, Lawrence; Menon, Devidas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Greater awareness of sleep-disordered breathing and rising obesity rates have fueled demand for sleep studies. Sleep testing using level 3 portable devices may expedite diagnosis and reduce the costs associated with level 1 in-laboratory polysomnography. We sought to assess the diagnostic accuracy of level 3 testing compared with level 1 testing and to identify the appropriate patient population for each test. Methods: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative studies of level 3 versus level 1 sleep tests in adults with suspected sleep-disordered breathing. We searched 3 research databases and grey literature sources for studies that reported on diagnostic accuracy parameters or disease management after diagnosis. Two reviewers screened the search results, selected potentially relevant studies and extracted data. We used a bivariate mixed-effects binary regression model to estimate summary diagnostic accuracy parameters. Results: We included 59 studies involving a total of 5026 evaluable patients (mostly patients suspected of having obstructive sleep apnea). Of these, 19 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The estimated area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was high, ranging between 0.85 and 0.99 across different levels of disease severity. Summary sensitivity ranged between 0.79 and 0.97, and summary specificity ranged between 0.60 and 0.93 across different apnea–hypopnea cut-offs. We saw no significant difference in the clinical management parameters between patients who underwent either test to receive their diagnosis. Interpretation: Level 3 portable devices showed good diagnostic performance compared with level 1 sleep tests in adult patients with a high pretest probability of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea and no unstable comorbidities. For patients suspected of having other types of sleep-disordered breathing or sleep disorders not related to breathing, level 1 testing remains the

  14. Algal toxins and reverse osmosis desalination operations: laboratory bench testing and field monitoring of domoic acid, saxitoxin, brevetoxin and okadaic acid.

    PubMed

    Seubert, Erica L; Trussell, Shane; Eagleton, John; Schnetzer, Astrid; Cetinić, Ivona; Lauri, Phil; Jones, Burton H; Caron, David A

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence and intensity of harmful algal blooms (HABs) have been increasing globally during the past few decades. The impact of these events on seawater desalination facilities has become an important topic in recent years due to enhanced societal interest and reliance on this technology for augmenting world water supplies. A variety of harmful bloom-forming species of microalgae occur in southern California, as well as many other locations throughout the world, and several of these species are known to produce potent neurotoxins. These algal toxins can cause a myriad of human health issues, including death, when ingested via contaminated seafood. This study was designed to investigate the impact that algal toxin presence may have on both the intake and reverse osmosis (RO) desalination process; most importantly, whether or not the naturally occurring algal toxins can pass through the RO membrane and into the desalination product. Bench-scale RO experiments were conducted to explore the potential of extracellular algal toxins contaminating the RO product. Concentrations exceeding maximal values previously reported during natural blooms were used in the laboratory experiments, with treatments comprised of 50 μg/L of domoic acid (DA), 2 μg/L of saxitoxin (STX) and 20 μg/L of brevetoxin (PbTx). None of the algal toxins used in the bench-scale experiments were detectable in the desalinated product water. Monitoring for intracellular and extracellular concentrations of DA, STX, PbTx and okadaic acid (OA) within the intake and desalinated water from a pilot RO desalination plant in El Segundo, CA, was conducted from 2005 to 2009. During the five-year monitoring period, DA and STX were detected sporadically in the intake waters but never in the desalinated water. PbTx and OA were not detected in either the intake or desalinated water. The results of this study demonstrate the potential for HAB toxins to be inducted into coastal RO intake facilities, and the

  15. Development and implementation of a portable grating interferometer system as a standard tool for testing optics at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 1-BM

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, Lahsen; Shi, Xianbo; Marathe, Shashidhara; Benda, Erika; Wojcik, Michael J.; Lang, Keenan; Xu, Ruqing; Liu, Wenjun; Macrander, Albert T.; Tischler, Jon Z.

    2016-05-15

    We developed a portable X-ray grating interferometer setup as a standard tool for testing optics at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline 1-BM. The interferometer can be operated in phase-stepping, Moiré, or single-grating harmonic imaging mode with 1-D or 2-D gratings. All of the interferometer motions are motorized; hence, it is much easier and quicker to switch between the different modes of operation. A novel aspect of this new instrument is its designed portability. While the setup is designed to be primarily used as a standard tool for testing optics at 1-BM, it could be potentially deployed at other APS beamlines for beam coherence and wavefront characterization or imaging. The design of the interferometer system is described in detail and coherence measurements obtained at the APS 34-ID-E beamline are presented. The coherence was probed in two directions using a 2-D checkerboard, a linear, and a circular grating at X-ray energies of 8 keV, 11 keV, and 18 keV.

  16. Development and implementation of a portable grating interferometer system as a standard tool for testing optics at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 1-BM.

    PubMed

    Assoufid, Lahsen; Shi, Xianbo; Marathe, Shashidhara; Benda, Erika; Wojcik, Michael J; Lang, Keenan; Xu, Ruqing; Liu, Wenjun; Macrander, Albert T; Tischler, Jon Z

    2016-05-01

    We developed a portable X-ray grating interferometer setup as a standard tool for testing optics at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline 1-BM. The interferometer can be operated in phase-stepping, Moiré, or single-grating harmonic imaging mode with 1-D or 2-D gratings. All of the interferometer motions are motorized; hence, it is much easier and quicker to switch between the different modes of operation. A novel aspect of this new instrument is its designed portability. While the setup is designed to be primarily used as a standard tool for testing optics at 1-BM, it could be potentially deployed at other APS beamlines for beam coherence and wavefront characterization or imaging. The design of the interferometer system is described in detail and coherence measurements obtained at the APS 34-ID-E beamline are presented. The coherence was probed in two directions using a 2-D checkerboard, a linear, and a circular grating at X-ray energies of 8 keV, 11 keV, and 18 keV.

  17. The HIA MCAO laboratory bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Dave; Correia, Carlos; Herriot, Glen; Goodwill, Jeff; Pazder, John; Lardière, Olivier; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present our current design of an MCAO laboratory bench to support the development of NFIRAOS, the first light MCAO facility for the TMT. This MCAO bench will build on the experience of the existing LGS WFS bench at University of Victoria, which uses a focus ramp induced by a deformable mirror (DM) and source modulation during WFS integration to produce Shack-Hartmann spots with the proper radial profile. The bench will implement a closed-loop MCAO system, with two magnetic DMs, four LGS Shack-Hartmann WFSs, two NGS T/T WFS, one NGS T/T/F WFS and one higher order Truth WFS, making up a scaled down version of NFIRAOS. Turbulence on the bench will be induced by the DMs and by two additional synthetic turbulence plates. The bench will be driven by software in Matlab, at a minimum frame-rate of 1Hz, up to 15Hz. The goals of this bench are to anchor the NFIRAOS end-to-end simulation tools; to exercise real-time LGS tomographic AO in a variety of well controlled conditions, such as faint and poorly corrected NGSs, non-uniformities in the sodium layer and field dependant Non-Common-Path Aberrations (NCPAs); develop and demonstrate calibration procedures, such PSF reconstruction and tomographic reconstruction and correction of field dependant NCPAs; and to validate optimization methods that operates at 10+ second time scales, which is not tractable in a numerical simulation, such as matched filter update and Cn2 estimation using a SLODAR method.

  18. Validation of a Portable Low-power Deep Brain Stimulation Device through Anxiolytic Effects in a Laboratory Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Kouzani, Abbas Z; Kale, Rajas P; Zarate-Garza, Pablo Patricio; Berk, Michael; Walder, Ken; Tye, Susannah J

    2016-11-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices deliver electrical pulses to neural tissue through an electrode. To study the mechanisms and therapeutic benefits of deep brain stimulation, murine preclinical research is necessary. However, conducting naturalistic long-term, uninterrupted animal behavioral experiments can be difficult with bench-top systems. The reduction of size, weight, power consumption, portability, and cost of DBS devices can assist the progress of this research in animal studies. A low power, low weight, miniature DBS device is presented in this paper. This device consists of electronic hardware and software components including a low-power microcontroller, an adjustable current source, an n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor, a coin-cell battery, electrode wires and a software program to operate the device. Evaluation of the performance of the device in terms of battery lifetime and device functionality through bench and in vivo tests was conducted. The bench test revealed that this device can deliver continuous stimulation current pulses of strength 200 μA, width 90 μs, and frequency 130 Hz for 22.75 days. The in vivo tests demonstrated that chronic stimulation of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) with this device significantly increased psychomotor activity, together with a dramatic reduction in anxiety-like behavior in the elevated zero-maze test.

  19. Portable Electromyograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Luca, Gianluca; De Luca, Carlo J.; Bergman, Per

    2004-01-01

    A portable electronic apparatus records electromyographic (EMG) signals in as many as 16 channels at a sampling rate of 1,024 Hz in each channel. The apparatus (see figure) includes 16 differential EMG electrodes (each electrode corresponding to one channel) with cables and attachment hardware, reference electrodes, an input/output-and-power-adapter unit, a 16-bit analog-to-digital converter, and a hand-held computer that contains a removable 256-MB flash memory card. When all 16 EMG electrodes are in use, full-bandwidth data can be recorded in each channel for as long as 8 hours. The apparatus is powered by a battery and is small enough that it can be carried in a waist pouch. The computer is equipped with a small screen that can be used to display the incoming signals on each channel. Amplitude and time adjustments of this display can be made easily by use of touch buttons on the screen. The user can also set up a data-acquisition schedule to conform to experimental protocols or to manage battery energy and memory efficiently. Once the EMG data have been recorded, the flash memory card is removed from the EMG apparatus and placed in a flash-memory- card-reading external drive unit connected to a personal computer (PC). The PC can then read the data recorded in the 16 channels. Preferably, before further analysis, the data should be stored in the hard drive of the PC. The data files are opened and viewed on the PC by use of special- purpose software. The software for operation of the apparatus resides in a random-access memory (RAM), with backup power supplied by a small internal lithium cell. A backup copy of this software resides on the flash memory card. In the event of loss of both main and backup battery power and consequent loss of this software, the backup copy can be used to restore the RAM copy after power has been restored. Accessories for this device are also available. These include goniometers, accelerometers, foot switches, and force gauges.

  20. The HIA MCAO laboratory bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véran, Jean-Pierre; McWeigh, Eric; Andersen, David; Correia, Carlos; Herriot, Glen; Pazder, John

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an update on the design and deployment of the HIA MCAO laboratory bench. This bench directly supports the development of NFIRAOS, the first light MCAO facility for the Thirty Meter Telescope. The bench implements a closed-loop MCAO system, with two magnetic DMs, four LGS Shack-Hartmann WFSs, two NGS T/T WFS, one NGS T/T/F WFS and one higher order Truth WFS, making up a scaled down version of NFIRAOS. The bench includes several artificial turbulence screens and reproduces realistic LGS spot elongations. It is driven by software in Matlab, frame-rates ranging from 1Hz to 15Hz. The goals of this bench are to anchor the NFIRAOS end-toend simulation tools; to exercise real-time LGS tomographic AO in a variety of well controlled conditions, such as faint and poorly corrected NGSs, non-uniformities in the sodium layer and field dependant Non-Common-Path Aberrations (NCPAs); develop and demonstrate calibration procedures, such as PSF reconstruction and tomographic reconstruction and correction of field dependant NCPAs; and to validate optimization methods that operate at 10+ second time scales, which is not tractable in a numerical simulation, such as matched filter update and Cn2 estimation using a SLODAR method.

  1. Smart portable rehabilitation devices.

    PubMed

    Mavroidis, Constantinos; Nikitczuk, Jason; Weinberg, Brian; Danaher, Gil; Jensen, Katherine; Pelletier, Philip; Prugnarola, Jennifer; Stuart, Ryan; Arango, Roberto; Leahey, Matt; Pavone, Robert; Provo, Andrew; Yasevac, Dan

    2005-07-12

    The majority of current portable orthotic devices and rehabilitative braces provide stability, apply precise pressure, or help maintain alignment of the joints with out the capability for real time monitoring of the patient's motions and forces and without the ability for real time adjustments of the applied forces and motions. Improved technology has allowed for advancements where these devices can be designed to apply a form of tension to resist motion of the joint. These devices induce quicker recovery and are more effective at restoring proper biomechanics and improving muscle function. However, their shortcoming is in their inability to be adjusted in real-time, which is the most ideal form of a device for rehabilitation. This introduces a second class of devices beyond passive orthotics. It is comprised of "active" or powered devices, and although more complicated in design, they are definitely the most versatile. An active or powered orthotic, usually employs some type of actuator(s). In this paper we present several new advancements in the area of smart rehabilitation devices that have been developed by the Northeastern University Robotics and Mechatronics Laboratory. They are all compact, wearable and portable devices and boast re-programmable, real time computer controlled functions as the central theme behind their operation. The sensory information and computer control of the three described devices make for highly efficient and versatile systems that represent a whole new breed in wearable rehabilitation devices. Their applications range from active-assistive rehabilitation to resistance exercise and even have applications in gait training. The three devices described are: a transportable continuous passive motion elbow device, a wearable electro-rheological fluid based knee resistance device, and a wearable electrical stimulation and biofeedback knee device. Laboratory tests of the devices demonstrated that they were able to meet their design

  2. Smart portable rehabilitation devices

    PubMed Central

    Mavroidis, Constantinos; Nikitczuk, Jason; Weinberg, Brian; Danaher, Gil; Jensen, Katherine; Pelletier, Philip; Prugnarola, Jennifer; Stuart, Ryan; Arango, Roberto; Leahey, Matt; Pavone, Robert; Provo, Andrew; Yasevac, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Background The majority of current portable orthotic devices and rehabilitative braces provide stability, apply precise pressure, or help maintain alignment of the joints with out the capability for real time monitoring of the patient's motions and forces and without the ability for real time adjustments of the applied forces and motions. Improved technology has allowed for advancements where these devices can be designed to apply a form of tension to resist motion of the joint. These devices induce quicker recovery and are more effective at restoring proper biomechanics and improving muscle function. However, their shortcoming is in their inability to be adjusted in real-time, which is the most ideal form of a device for rehabilitation. This introduces a second class of devices beyond passive orthotics. It is comprised of "active" or powered devices, and although more complicated in design, they are definitely the most versatile. An active or powered orthotic, usually employs some type of actuator(s). Methods In this paper we present several new advancements in the area of smart rehabilitation devices that have been developed by the Northeastern University Robotics and Mechatronics Laboratory. They are all compact, wearable and portable devices and boast re-programmable, real time computer controlled functions as the central theme behind their operation. The sensory information and computer control of the three described devices make for highly efficient and versatile systems that represent a whole new breed in wearable rehabilitation devices. Their applications range from active-assistive rehabilitation to resistance exercise and even have applications in gait training. The three devices described are: a transportable continuous passive motion elbow device, a wearable electro-rheological fluid based knee resistance device, and a wearable electrical stimulation and biofeedback knee device. Results Laboratory tests of the devices demonstrated that they were able to

  3. Portable Extensible Viewer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Jay G.

    1997-01-01

    The use of Nonuniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) to represent geometry and data offers a standard way to facilitate the multidisciplinary analysis and design of aeropropulsion products. Using standard geometry defined by NURBS throughout design, analysis, part definition, manufacture, and test processes saves money and time. The Portable Extensible Viewer (PEV) offers engineers of different disciplines a means to view and manipulate NURBS geometry and associated data. Under the guidance of a team of Lewis, Boeing Company, and Navy personnel, PEV was developed by NASA Lewis Research Center's Computer Services Division for Lewis' Interdisciplinary Technology Office. The aeropropulsion industry provided input to the design requirements.

  4. Astrophysics on the lab bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2010-05-01

    In this article some basic laboratory bench experiments are described that are useful for teaching high school students some of the basic principles of stellar astrophysics. For example, in one experiment, students slam a plastic water-filled bottle down onto a bench, ejecting water towards the ceiling, illustrating the physics associated with a type II supernova explosion. In another experiment, students roll marbles up and down a double ramp in an attempt to get a marble to enter a tube halfway up the slope, which illustrates quantum tunnelling in stellar cores. The experiments are reasonably low cost to either purchase or manufacture.

  5. Development of a Standard Test Scenario to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Portable Fire Extinguishers on Lithium-ion Battery Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harper, Susan A.; Hirsch, David B.; Carriere, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Many sources of fuel are present aboard current spacecraft, with one especially hazardous source of stored energy: lithium ion batteries. Lithium ion batteries are a very hazardous form of fuel due to their self-sustaining combustion once ignited, for example, by an external heat source. Batteries can become extremely energetic fire sources due to their high density electrochemical energy content that may, under duress, be violently converted to thermal energy and fire in the form of a thermal runaway. Currently, lithium ion batteries are the preferred types of batteries aboard international spacecraft and therefore are routinely installed, collectively forming a potentially devastating fire threat to a spacecraft and its crew. Currently NASA is developing a fine water mist portable fire extinguisher for future use on international spacecraft. As its development ensues, a need for the standard evaluation of various types of fire extinguishers against this potential threat is required to provide an unbiased means of comparing between fire extinguisher technologies and ranking them based on performance.

  6. Developments and field tests of low-frequency portable acoustic transducers for a mobile exploration and time lapse experiment of a sea-bottom reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruga, K.; Kasahara, J.; Hasada, Y.; Kondo, H.

    2013-12-01

    Depth, scale and resolutions of geophysical explorations for mineral resources are controlled by transmitted seismic energy and wavelength (frequency range). Most explorations in marine have been conducted by survey ship system with arrayed acoustic sources whose dominant frequency range is about 10 to 500 Hz. On the other hand, for shallow parts of sea bottom structure survey, some sub-bottom profilers with frequency range around 3.5kHz are used. To monitor a time lapse of a sea bottom reservoir such as an oil, gas, or methane hydrate reservoir as well as to exploit a mobile survey near a sea bottom by AUVs, it is necessary to use a broadband portable acoustic transducer with a dominant frequency range of 500 Hz to 5 kHz. We have been developing several types of portable acoustic transducers and a transmitting and recording system which is accurately controlled by a GPS clock (Tsuruga et al., 2012). In this pater, we report the new broadband acoustic portable transducers which have larger power than the original cylindrical acoustic transducers in a low frequency range (<5 kHz), partly funded by JOGMEC, and show the preliminary results of field tests at the shallow sea bottom around 32 m deep by means of the transducers and hydrophone receivers array. Each transducer repeatedly transmitted Chirp signals with a unit period of 500 msec in two frequency ranges of 0.5k-4.5kHz and 4k-16kHz . We stacked 500-ms data by 28 times to obtain a transfer function of each source-receiver pair in the time and frequency domains. The preliminary results suggest as the follows: (i) it is successful to broaden the frequency bandwidth (i.e., 2k-10kHz) by extending a geometrical resonance length of a cylindrical acoustic transducers, and (ii) the observation at the sea bottom with accurately controlled timing systems of transmitter and data-logger is very useful to identify the stable and/or unstable seismic phases, that is, waves propagating in a underground and/or in a sea water as

  7. Portable Virtual Training Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Reagan; Johnston, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Mission Operations Lab initiated a project to design, develop, deliver, test, and validate a unique training system for astronaut and ground support personnel. In an effort to keep training costs low, virtual training units (VTUs) have been designed based on images of actual hardware and manipulated by a touch screen style interface for ground support personnel training. This project helped modernized the training system and materials by integrating them with mobile devices for training when operators or crew are unavailable to physically train in the facility. This project also tested the concept of a handheld remote device to control integrated trainers using International Space Station (ISS) training simulators as a platform. The portable VTU can interface with the full-sized VTU, allowing a trainer co-located with a trainee to remotely manipulate a VTU and evaluate a trainee's response. This project helped determine if it is useful, cost effective, and beneficial for the instructor to have a portable handheld device to control the behavior of the models during training. This project has advanced NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) VTU capabilities with modern and relevant technology to support space flight training needs of today and tomorrow.

  8. Testing portable luminescence reader signals against late Pleistocene to modern OSL ages of coastal and desert dunefield sand in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskin, Joel; Sivan, Dorit; Bookman, Revital; Porat, Naomi; López, Gloria I.

    2017-04-01

    Rapid assessment of luminescence signals of poly-mineral samples by a pulsed-photon portable OSL reader (PPSL) is useful for interpreting sedimentary sections during fieldwork, and can assist with targeted field sampling for later full OSL dating and prioritize laboratory work. This study investigates PPSL signal intensities in order to assess its usefulness in obtaining relative OSL ages from linear regressions created by interpolating newly generated PPSL values of samples with existing OSL ages from two extensive Nilotic-sourced dunefields. Eighteen OSL-dated sand samples from two quartz-dominated sand systems in Israel were studied:(1) the Mediterranean littoral-sourced coastal dunefields that formed since the middle Holocene; and (2) the inland north-western Negev desert dunefield that rapidly formed between the Last Glacial Maximum and the Holocene. Samples from three coastal dune profiles were also measured. Results show that the PPSL signals differ by several orders of magnitude between modern and late Pleistocene sediments. The coastal and desert sand have different OSL age - PPSL signal ratios. Coastal sand show better correlations between PPSL values and OSL ages. However, using regression curves for each dunefield to interpolate ages is less useful than expected as samples with different ages exhibit similar PPSL signals. The coastal dune profiles yielded low luminescence signal values depicting a modern profile chronology. This study demonstrates that a rapid assessment of the relative OSL ages across different and extensive dunefields is useful and may be achieved. However, the OSL ages obtained by linear regression are only a very rough age estimate. The reasons for not obtaining more reliable ages need to be better understood, as several variables can affect the PPSL signal such as mineral provenance, intrinsic grain properties, micro-dosimetry and moisture content.

  9. Measurement of Circulating Filarial Antigen Levels in Human Blood with a Point-of-Care Test Strip and a Portable Spectrodensitometer

    PubMed Central

    Chesnais, Cédric B.; Vlaminck, Johnny; Kunyu-Shako, Billy; Pion, Sébastien D.; Awaca-Uvon, Naomi-Pitchouna; Weil, Gary J.; Mumba, Dieudonné; Boussinesq, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) is a qualitative, point-of-care diagnostic tool that detects Wuchereria bancrofti circulating filarial antigen (CFA) in human blood, serum, or plasma. The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis employs the FTS for mapping filariasis-endemic areas and assessing the success of elimination efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between the intensity of positive test lines obtained by FTS with CFA levels as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with blood and plasma samples from 188 individuals who live in a filariasis-endemic area. The intensity of the FTS test line was assessed visually to provide a semiquantitative score (visual Filariasis Test Strip [vFTS]), and line intensity was measured with a portable spectrodensitometer (quantitative Filariasis Test Strip [qFTS]). These results were compared with antigen levels measured by ELISA in plasma from the same subjects. qFTS measurements were highly correlated with vFTS scores (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.001) and with plasma CFA levels (ρ = 0.91; P < 0.001). Thus, qFTS assessment is a convenient method for quantifying W. bancrofti CFA levels in human blood, which are correlated with adult worm burdens. This tool may be useful for assessing the impact of treatment on adult filarial worms in individuals and communities. PMID:27114288

  10. Coping With Spatial Attention in Real Space: A Low-Cost Portable Testing System for the Investigation of Visuo-Spatial Processing in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Benjamin; Rushmore, Richard J.; Valero-Cabré, Antoni

    2010-01-01

    While two-dimensional stimuli may be easily presented with any computer, an apparatus which allows a range of stimuli to be presented in three dimensions is not easily or cheaply available to researchers or clinicians. To fill this gap, we have developed the Realspace Testing System (RTS) which addresses the need for a flexible and multimodal stimulus presentation system capable of displaying stimuli in a three dimensional space with a high degree of temporal accuracy. The RTS is able to control twenty-six channels of visual or audio stimuli, to send trigger pulses during each trial to external devices, such as a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator, and to record subject responses during the testing sessions. The RTS is flexible, portable and can be used in laboratory or clinical settings as required while being built at a low cost using off the shelf components. We have tested the RTS by performing an exploratory experiment on the role of right posterior parietal cortex in visuospatial processing in conjunction with online Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and verified that the system can accurately present stimuli as needed while triggering a TMS pulse during each trial at the required time. The RTS could be appealing and useful to a range of researchers or clinicians who may choose to use it much as we have designed it, or use it in its current state as a starting point to customize their stimulus control systems in real space. PMID:20079374

  11. Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Vince Maio

    2011-08-01

    This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing

  12. A portable Ku-band front-end test package for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Stewart, S. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    A 34-m beam-waveguide (BWG) antenna has been built a Deep Space Station 13 (DDS 13) in the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex. This antenna is designed to be efficient at X-, Ku-, and Ka-bands, and it is the first NASA tracking antenna to use a BWG design. The design of a Ku-band test package for the new BWG antenna at 11.7-12.2 GHz is presented. Results of linear polarization measurements with the test package on the ground are also presented. This report is the fifth in a series of articles concerned with test package design and performance.

  13. [Assessment of a rapid diagnostic test and portable fluorescent microscopy for malaria diagnosis in Cotonou (Bénin)].

    PubMed

    Ogouyèmi-Hounto, A; Kinde-Gazard, D; Keke, C; Gonçalves, E; Alapini, N; Adjovi, F; Adisso, L; Bossou, C; Denon, Y V; Massougbodji, A

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the accuracy of a rapid diagnostic test (SD Bioline Malaria Ag P.f/ Pan®) and fluorescent microscopy (CyScope®) in confirming presumptive malaria diagnosis in Cotonou. Thick blood smear was used as the reference technique for comparison. Testing was conducted on persons between the ages of 6 months and 70 years at two hospitals from June to October 2010. If malaria was suspected in the sample by the nurse based on clinical findings and sent to laboratory for confirmation, one thick smear, one rapid diagnostic test and one slide for the fluorescent microscopy were performed. All tests were read in hospital laboratories involved with the quality control of thick blood smear in the parasitology laboratory of National University Hospital of Cotonou. A total of 354 patients with clinical diagnosis of malaria were included. Malaria prevalence determined by thick smear, rapid diagnostic test and fluorescent microscopy was 22.8%, 25.4%, and 25.1% respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values compared to the thick smears were 96.3, 95.6, 86.7, and 98.9% for rapid diagnostic test; and 97.5, 96.7, 89.8, and 99.27% for fluorescent microscopy. With these performances, these tests meet acceptability standards recommended by WHO for rapid tests (sensitivity > 95%). These two methods have advantages for the confirmation of malaria diagnosis in peripheral health structures that lack the resources to conduct diagnosis confirmation by the thick blood smear.

  14. Performance acceptance test of a portable instrument to detect uranium in water at the DOE Advanced Waste Water Treatment Plant, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.S.; Weeks, S.J.

    1997-03-28

    The Eppendorf-Biotronik Model IC 2001-2, a portable field ruggedized ion chromatography instrument, was rigorously tested at the DOE Advanced Waste Water Treatment Plant, Fernald, Ohio. This instrument rapidly detected the uranium concentration in water, and has a detection limit in the low ppb range without using the sample concentrating feature. The test set of samples analyzed included: ``Real World`` water samples from the AWWT containing uranium concentrations in the 9--110 ppb range, a sample blank, and a performance evaluation sample. The AWWT samples contained sets of both raw water and acid-preserved water samples. Selected samples were analyzed in quadruplicate to asses the instrument`s precision, and these results were compared with the results from an off-site confirmatory laboratory to assess the instrument`s accuracy. Additional comparisons with on-site laboratory instruments, Chemcheck KPA-11 and Scintrex UA-3 are reported. Overall, the Eppendorf-Biotronik IC 2001-2 performed exceptionally well providing a detection limit in the low ppb region (< 10 ppb) and giving rapid (< 5 minutes) accurate and reproducible analytical results for the AWWT, ``real world``, water samples with uranium concentrations in the region of interest (10--40 ppb). The per sample operating cost for this instrument is equivalent to the per sample cost for the currently used KPA. The time required to analyze a sample and provide a result is approximately the same for the CI 2001-2, KPA, and Scintrex instruments.

  15. Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing: Direct coal liquefaction of rawhide sub-bituminous coal. Final topical report, June 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Coless, L.A.; Poole, M.C.; Wen, M.Y.

    1995-11-21

    Supported catalysts, either in fixed bed or ebullating bed reactors, are subject to deactivation with time, especially if the feed contains deactivating species, such as metals and coke precursors. Dispersed catalyst systems avoid significant catalyst deactivation because there are no catalyst pores to plug, hence no pore mouth plugging, and hopefully, no relevant decline of catalyst surface area or pore volume. The tests carried out in 1994, at the Exxon Research and Development Laboratories (ERDL) for DOE covered a slate of 5 dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal, which is similar to the Black Thunder coal tested earlier at Wilsonville. The catalysts included three iron and two molybdenum types. The Bailey iron oxide and the two molybdenum catalysts have previously been tested in DOE-sponsored research. These known catalysts will be used to help provide a base line and tie-in to previous work. The two new catalysts, Bayferrox PK 5210 and Mach-1`s Nanocat are very finely divided iron oxides. The iron oxide addition rate was varied from 1.0 to 0.25 wt % (dry coal basis) but the molybdenum addition rate remained constant at 100 wppm throughout the experiments. The effect of changing recycle rate, sulfur and iron oxide addition rates, first stage reactor temperature, mass velocity and catalyst type were tested in the 1994 operations of ERDL`s recycle coal liquefaction unit (RCLU). DOE will use these results to update economics and plan future work. The test program will resume in mid 1995, with another 2-3 months of pilot plant testing.

  16. Evaluation of the Storm 3 data logger manufactured by WaterLOG/Xylem Incorporated—Results of bench, temperature, and field deployment testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunkle, Gerald A.

    2016-05-04

    The procedures followed and the results obtained from the testing are described in this publication. The device met most of the manufacturer’s stated specifications. An exception was power consumption, which was about 10 percent above the manufacturer’s specifications. It was also observed that enabling WiFi doubles the Storm 3’s power consumption. In addition, several logging errors were made by two units during deployment testing, but it could not be determined whether these errors were the fault of the Storm or of an attached sensor.

  17. Portable Medical System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Portable Medical Status and Treatment System (PMSTS) is designed for use in remote areas where considerable time may elapse before a patient can be transported to a hospital. First units were delivered to the Department of Transportation last year and tested in two types of medical emergency environments: one in a rural Pennsylvania community and another aboard a U.S. Coast Guard rescue helicopter operating along Florida's Gulf Coast. The system has the capability to transmit vital signs to a distantly located physician, who can perform diagnosis and relay treatment instructions to the attendant at the scene. The battery powered PMSTS includes a vital signs monitor and a defibrillator. Narco has also developed a companion system, called Porta-Fib III designed for use in a hospital environment with modifications accordingly. Both systems are offshoots of an earlier NASA project known as the Physician's Black Bag developed by Telecare, Inc., a company now acquired by NARCO.

  18. The evaluation of fabrics in relation to their use as protective garments in nursing and surgery. I. Physical measurements and bench tests.

    PubMed Central

    Lidwell, O. M.; Mackintosh, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    Eleven fabrics selected to provide a representative range of yarns and weaves have been examined microscopically and subjected to a series of tests. The observations were directed towards assessing the potential ability of each fabric to resist penetration by particles, such as skin scales, which might carry micro-organisms. The number, size and shape of pores penetrating through the material were estimated and the penetration of test dusts assessed in several ways. While, generally, the relative merits of the fabrics are similar whatever test or measurement is considered there are a number of significant exceptions which reflect peculiarities of the test system or of a fabric. Comparison with the results of dispersal experiments with volunteers wearing garments made of the fabrics is made in a following paper. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Plate 3 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:731024

  19. Bench-scale testing of the multi-gravity separator in combination with microcel. Fourth quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-06

    Work this quarter included equipment installation, shakedown testing, and the beginning of the detailed testing program. With the exception of ongoing Task 4: Sample Characterization, Tasks 1 through 8 are now complete. Task 10: Detailed Testing and Task 12: Sample Analysis began this quarter and will consume all available time during the 5th quarter. Installation and testing of the process equipment, mechanical systems, as well as the electrical systems were completed. The shakedown process uncovered several necessary modifications to the circuit which were subsequently completed. Most of the changes concerned piping and valving modifications which allowed for better material flow and sampling. The circuit was operated with coal to determine the time for each unit to reach steady state. The primary objective of the proposed work is to design, install, and operate an advanced fine coal processing circuit combining the Microcel{trademark} and Multi-Gravity-Separator (MGS) technologies. Both of these processes have specific advantages as stand-alone units. For example, the Microcel column effectively removes ash-bearing mineral matter, while the MGS efficiently removes coal-pyrite composites.

  20. Thermal motion of the STIS optical bench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Taylor, Mary Jane; Shaw, Richard; Robinson, Richard; Hill, Robert S.

    1997-01-01

    Various tests have been done of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) using internal wavecals to measure thermal motion of the spectral format on the detectors. In most cases, the spectral format moves less than the specification not to exceed 0.2 pixels per hour. Primary causes of the motion are (1) changes to the thermal design dictated by the warmer Aft Shroud environment and (2) on-orbit power cycling of Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMA) electronics to minimize the effects of radiation hits on the MAMA detectors. The rear portion of the STIS optical bench is too warm to be held at a constant temperature by internal heaters. Electronics swing in temperature with an orbital and daily frequency. The thermal drift of the optical formats is not negligible, but is well behaved in most circumstances. The observer is advised to examine the trade-off between the most accurate wavelengths with best spectral/spatial resolutions versus increased overheads that directly affect the observing times. A long term concern is that the Aft Shroud thermal environment is predicted to heat up as much as one Centigrade degree per year. Progressively more of the bench would move out of thermal control. Thus the external cooler for STIS, being considered for the Third Servicing Mission is of major importance to the long term operation of STIS.

  1. Thermal motion of the STIS optical bench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Taylor, Mary Jane; Shaw, Richard; Robinson, Richard; Hill, Robert S.

    1997-01-01

    Various tests have been done of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) using internal wavecals to measure thermal motion of the spectral format on the detectors. In most cases, the spectral format moves less than the specification not to exceed 0.2 pixels per hour. Primary causes of the motion are (1) changes to the thermal design dictated by the warmer Aft Shroud environment and (2) on-orbit power cycling of Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMA) electronics to minimize the effects of radiation hits on the MAMA detectors. The rear portion of the STIS optical bench is too warm to be held at a constant temperature by internal heaters. Electronics swing in temperature with an orbital and daily frequency. The thermal drift of the optical formats is not negligible, but is well behaved in most circumstances. The observer is advised to examine the trade-off between the most accurate wavelengths with best spectral/spatial resolutions versus increased overheads that directly affect the observing times. A long term concern is that the Aft Shroud thermal environment is predicted to heat up as much as one Centigrade degree per year. Progressively more of the bench would move out of thermal control. Thus the external cooler for STIS, being considered for the Third Servicing Mission is of major importance to the long term operation of STIS.

  2. Calibration of the MCAO Canopus Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Rigaut, François; Bec, Matthieu; Boccas, Maxime; Galvez, Ramon; Gausachs, Gaston; Gratadour, Damien; Neichel, Benoit

    The final phase of implementation of all optical components, as well as their integration and tests on the Canopus MCAO bench is currently underway. We present here a detailed description of the LGS and NGS WFS calibration sequences implemented through MYST (MCAO Yorick Smart Tool), a yorick+python+glade software package developed in-house which allows multiple users to control and monitor the bench remotely over the network using EPICS commands. A fine tuning of the optical setup and a better understanding of the flexure/temperature dependencies is being carried out and will allow us to build the many look-up tables to be eventually used by the system (e.g. telescope primary and secondary mirrors). Preliminary work on non-common path aberrations to account for the static aberrations in the central 60 arcsec science field of view (FoV) has been done iteratively using a science focal plane wavefront sensor and has shown good results both in individual directions as well as simultaneously over the entire FoV, the latter using the tomographic approach (presented in another paper in this conference).

  3. 40 CFR 91.323 - Analyzer bench checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 91.323 Analyzer bench checks. (a) Prior to initial use and after major repairs, verify that each analyzer complies... greater than 90 percent. The converter must be at operational temperature while purging. Do not use this...

  4. 40 CFR 89.315 - Analyzer bench checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 89.315 Analyzer bench checks. (a) Prior to initial use and after major repairs verify that each... use this procedure prior to checking converter efficiency on in-use converters. ...

  5. 40 CFR 89.315 - Analyzer bench checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 89.315 Analyzer bench checks. (a) Prior to initial use and after major repairs verify that each... use this procedure prior to checking converter efficiency on in-use converters. ...

  6. 40 CFR 90.323 - Analyzer bench checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.323 Analyzer bench checks. (a) Prior to initial use and after major repairs, verify that each... use this procedure prior to checking converter efficiency on in-use converters. ...

  7. 49 CFR 178.277 - Requirements for the design, construction, inspection and testing of portable tanks intended for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... insulation space. (8) Materials which may react with oxygen or oxygen enriched atmospheres in a dangerous... insulation where there is a risk of contact with oxygen or with oxygen enriched fluid. (9) Insulating... time; or (ii) A closed system test when the rise in pressure in the shell is measured over a period of...

  8. The sevoflurane washout profile of seven recent anesthesia workstations for malignant hyperthermia-susceptible adults and infants: a bench test study.

    PubMed

    Cottron, Nicolas; Larcher, Claire; Sommet, Agnès; Fesseau, Rose; Alacoque, Xavier; Minville, Vincent; Fourcade, Olivier; Kern, Delphine

    2014-07-01

    Preoperative flushing of an anesthesia workstation is an alternative for preparation of the anesthesia workstation before use in malignant hyperthermia-susceptible patients (MHS). We studied in vitro, using a test lung, the washout profile of sevoflurane in 7 recent workstations during adult and, for the first time, pediatric ventilation patterns. Anesthesia workstations were first primed with 3% sevoflurane for 2 hours and then prepared according to the recommendations of the Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States. The flush was done with maximal fresh gas flow (FGF) with a minute ventilation equal to 600 mL × 15, to reach a sevoflurane concentration of <5 parts per million. After flush, 2 clinical situations were simulated in vitro to test the efficiency of preparation: decrease of FGF from max to 10 L/min, or decrease of minute ventilation to 50 mL × 30, to simulate the ventilation of an MHS infant. We report washout delays for MHS patients for previously studied workstations (Primus®, Avance®, and Zeus®) and more interestingly, for machines not previously tested (Felix®, Flow-I®, Perseus®, and Leon®). An increase of sevoflurane concentration was observed when decreasing FGF (except for flow-I® and Leon®) and during simulation of MHS infant ventilation (except for Felix®). This descriptive study strongly suggests that washout profiles may differ for each anesthesia workstation. We advise the use of maximal FGF during preparation and anesthesia. Required flushing times are longer when preparing an anesthesia workstation before providing anesthesia for MHS infants.

  9. Groundwater remediation by an in situ biobarrier: a bench scale feasibility test for methyl tert-butyl ether and other gasoline compounds.

    PubMed

    Saponaro, Sabrina; Negri, Marco; Sezenna, Elena; Bonomo, Luca; Sorlini, Claudia

    2009-08-15

    Most gasoline contains high percentages of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as an additive. The physico-chemical properties of this substance (high water solubility, low sorption in soil) result in high mobility and dissolved concentrations in soil. In situ permeable biological barriers (biobarriers, BBs) can remediate MTBE polluted groundwater by allowing pure cultures or microbial consortia to degrade MTBE when aerobic conditions are present, either by direct metabolism or cometabolism. Lab-scale batch and column tests were carried out to assess a selected microbial consortium in biodegrading MTBE and other gasoline compounds (benzene B, toluene T, ethylbenzene E, xylenes X) and to measure the parameters affecting the efficacy of a BB treatment of polluted groundwater. During the aerobic phase of the batch tests, the simultaneous biodegradation of MTBE, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), B, T, E and o-X was observed. The rapid biodegradation of BTEXs resulted in decreased oxygen availability, but MTBE degradation was nevertheless measured in the presence of BTEXs. Stationary concentrations of MTBE and TBA were measured when anoxic conditions occurred in the systems. Values for a first order kinetic removal process were obtained for MTBE (0.031+/-0.001 d(-1)), B (0.045+/-0.002 d(-1)) and T (0.080+/-0.004 d(-1)) in the inoculated column tests. The estimate of the BB design parameters suggested that inoculation could significantly modify (double) the longitudinal dispersivity value of the biomass support medium. No effect was observed in the retardation factors for MTBE, B and T.

  10. TBI Assessment of Readiness Using a Gait Evaluation Test (TARGET): Development of a Portable mTBI Screening Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    members sustaining some form of traumatic brain injury (TBI) over the past 14 years, the lack of an objective measurement tool for evaluation and...determine the validity and reliability of an Android device-based mTBI (mild traumatic brain injury) screening test app for assessing motor function. The...Institutional Review Board and Human Research Protection Office Application, timeline: 1-2 months o Milestone: IRB and HRPO approval will be

  11. TBI Assessment of Readiness Using a Gait Evaluation Test (TARGET): Development of a Portable mTBI Screening Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    used for neuromotor testing. The last frame in the movement sequence shows the coordinate system of the phone with the AccWalker app in the...Figure 2: Changes in the movement timing parameters by group (neurocognitive decline vs. no neurocognitive decline) as a...on stepping patterns o Incorporated orientation sensor to detect leg movement and angle (Version 2 of app, Figure 4 below

  12. Characterization of metal oxide absorbents for regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal for advanced portable life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kast, Timothy P.; Nacheff-Benedict, Maurena S.; Chang, Craig H.; Cusick, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Characterization of the performance of a silver-oxide-based absorbent in terms of its ability to remove both gaseous CO2 and water vapor in an astronaut portable life support systems (PLSS) is discussed. Attention is focused on regeneration of the absorbent from the carbonite state of the oxide state, preconditioning of the absorbent using a humidified gas stream, and absorption breakthrough testing. Based on the results of bench-scale experiments, a test plan is carried out to further characterize the silver-oxide-based absorbent on a larger scale; it calls for examination of the absorbent in both an adiabatic packed bed and a near-isothermal cooled bed configuration. It is demonstrated that the tested absorbent can be utilized in a way that removes substantial amounts of CO2 and water vapor during an 8-hour extravehicular activity mission, and that applying the absorbent to PLSS applications can simplify the ventilation loop.

  13. Characterization of metal oxide absorbents for regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal for advanced portable life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kast, Timothy P.; Nacheff-Benedict, Maurena S.; Chang, Craig H.; Cusick, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Characterization of the performance of a silver-oxide-based absorbent in terms of its ability to remove both gaseous CO2 and water vapor in an astronaut portable life support systems (PLSS) is discussed. Attention is focused on regeneration of the absorbent from the carbonite state of the oxide state, preconditioning of the absorbent using a humidified gas stream, and absorption breakthrough testing. Based on the results of bench-scale experiments, a test plan is carried out to further characterize the silver-oxide-based absorbent on a larger scale; it calls for examination of the absorbent in both an adiabatic packed bed and a near-isothermal cooled bed configuration. It is demonstrated that the tested absorbent can be utilized in a way that removes substantial amounts of CO2 and water vapor during an 8-hour extravehicular activity mission, and that applying the absorbent to PLSS applications can simplify the ventilation loop.

  14. Bench-scale testing of the Multi-Gravity Separator in combination with Microcel. Fifth quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    During the quarter ending December, 31, 1993, the independent, combined and long duration testing were completed for both the Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and the Illinois No. 6 coal. Overall, the project is on schedule and the bulk of the critical work, from a timing perspective, is complete. Table 1 summarizes the status of major project tasks as of December 31, 1993. Preliminary results provide strong evidence that combining the Microcel flotation column with the Multi-Gravity Separator has a synergistic effect. Overall ash and pyritic sulfur rejections of 75 %, at a 90 % combustible recovery, were consistently achieved on the Pittsburgh No.8 seam coal. On the Illinois No. 6 coal, pyritic sulfur rejections over 75 % and combustible recoveries of over 85 % were achieved. These results are discussed in this report. Although further analysis is taking place, it is very evident from the results presented herein that a well-designed and -operated flotation column performs well for ash rejection but not as well for pyrite rejection. It is equally evident that a good fine gravity separator can reject pyrite from coal but perform more poorly for ash rejection. The concept of combining the best of both units into one circuit has therefore been successfully tested in this project.

  15. Portable modular detection system

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, James S.; Singh, Anup; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Stamps, James F.

    2009-10-13

    Disclosed herein are portable and modular detection devices and systems for detecting electromagnetic radiation, such as fluorescence, from an analyte which comprises at least one optical element removably attached to at least one alignment rail. Also disclosed are modular detection devices and systems having an integrated lock-in amplifier and spatial filter and assay methods using the portable and modular detection devices.

  16. Portable seat lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A portable seat lift that can help individuals either (1) lower themselves to a sitting position or (2) raise themselves to a standing position is presented. The portable seat lift consists of a seat mounted on a base with two levers, which are powered by a drive unit.

  17. Software Engineering for Portability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanchev, Ivan

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of the portability of educational software focuses on the software design and development process. Topics discussed include levels of portability; the user-computer dialog; software engineering principles; design techniques for student performance records; techniques of courseware programing; and suggestions for further research and…

  18. Portable raman explosives detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven; Scharff, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in portable Raman instruments have dramatically increased their application to emergency response and forensics, as well as homeland defense. This paper reviews the relevant attributes and disadvantages of portable Raman spectroscopy, both essentially and instrumentally, to the task of explosives detection in the field.

  19. The development of a custom-built portable impact-testing device for assessing the cushioning properties of athletic socks.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Tim; Jessop, David; Bruce-Low, Stewart; Scurr, Joanna

    2013-12-01

    Despite manufacturer claims that athletic socks attenuate force during exercise, no device exists to assess this. Therefore, this study outlines the development of a custom-built impact-testing device for assessing the cushioning properties of socks. The device used a gravity-driven impact striker (8.5 kg), released from 0.05 m, which impacted a no-sock, sock or a basic shoe/sock condition in the vertical axis. A load cell (10,000 Hz) assessed peak impact force, time to peak impact force and loading rate. Reliability was investigated between day, between trial and within trial. Excellent reliability (coefficient of variation < 5% adjusted for 95% confidence limits) was reported for peak impact force in all conditions, with no evidence of systematic bias. Good reliability (coefficient of variation < 10% adjusted for 68% confidence limits) was reported for time to peak impact force and loading rate with some evidence of systematic bias. It was concluded that the custom-built impact-testing device was reliable and sensitive for the measurement of peak impact force on socks.

  20. A portable Ka-band front-end test package for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluation. Part 2: Tests on the antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Stewart, S. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    In part one of this article, a description was given of a Ka-band test package developed to enable testing of the Deep Space Station (DDS) 13 34-m beam-waveguide (BWG) antenna at 32 GHz. Test results were given for the Ka-band test package in an on-the-ground test configuration. This article is a companion article concerned with Ka-band test results for the test package in an on-the-antenna test configuration. Included are Ka-band zenith noise-temperature values, tipping-curve data, and subreflector test results obtained at the Cassegrain focal point, as well as at the final BWG focal point (located in a subterranean pedestal room). Test results show that, through the use of the Ka-band test package, the BWG antenna performance was successfully evaluated at Ka-band. The Ka-band test package operated well in all of the different antenna test configurations.

  1. Design criteria for portable timber bridge systems : static versus dynamic loads

    Treesearch

    John M. Franklin; S. E. Taylor; Paul A. Morgan; M. A. Ritter

    1999-01-01

    Design criteria are needed specifically for portable bridges to insure that they are safe and cost effective. This paper discusses different portable bridge categories and their general design criteria. Specific emphasis is given to quantifying the effects of dynamic live loads on portable bridge design. Results from static and dynamic load tests of two portable timber...

  2. Reduction of Endotracheal Tube Connector Dead Space Improves Ventilation: A Bench Test on a Model Lung Simulating an Extremely Low Birth Weight Neonate.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Vadim A

    2016-02-01

    The reduction of instrumental dead space is a recognized approach to preventing ventilation-induced lung injury in premature infants. However, there are no published data regarding the effectiveness of instrumental dead-space reduction in endotracheal tube (ETT) connectors. We tested the impact of the Y-piece/ETT connector pairs with reduced instrumental dead space on CO2 elimination in a model of the premature neonate lung. The standard ETT connector was compared with a low-dead-space ETT connector and with a standard connector equipped with an insert. We compared the setups by measuring the CO2 elimination rate in an artificial lung ventilated via the connectors. The lung was connected to a ventilator via a standard circuit, a 2.5-mm ETT, and one of the connectors under investigation. The ventilator was run in volume-controlled continuous mandatory ventilation mode. The low-dead-space ETT connector/Y-piece and insert-equipped standard connector/Y-piece pairs had instrumental dead space reduced by 36 and 67%, respectively. With set tidal volumes (VT) of 2.5, 5, and 10 mL, in comparison with the standard ETT connector, the low-dead-space connector reduced CO2 elimination time by 4.5% (P < .05), 4.4% (P < .01), and 7.1% (not significant), respectively. The insert-equipped standard connector reduced CO2 elimination time by 13.5, 25.1, and 16.1% (all P < .01). The low-dead-space connector increased inspiratory resistance by 17.8% (P < .01), 9.6% (P < .05), and 5.0% (not significant); the insert-equipped standard connector increased inspiratory resistance by 9.1, 8.4, and 5.9% (all not significant). The low-dead-space connector decreased expiratory resistance by 6.8% (P < .01) and 1.8% (not significant) and increased it by 1.4% (not significant); the insert-equipped standard connector decreased expiratory resistance by 1.5 and 1% and increased it by 1% (all not significant). The low-dead-space connector increased work of breathing by 4.7% (P < .01), 3.8% (P < .01), and

  3. Bench Test for the Detection of Bacterial Contamination in Platelet Concentrates Using Rapid and Cultural Detection Methods with a Standardized Proficiency Panel.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Tanja; Knabbe, Cornelius; Geilenkeuser, Wolf-Jochen; Schmidt, Michael; Dreier, Jens

    2015-07-01

    The most frequent infectious complication in transfusion therapy in developed countries is related to the bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs). Rapid and cultural screening methods for bacterial detection in platelets are available, but external performance evaluation, especially of rapid methods, has been difficult to realize so far. Here we summarize the results of three individual collaborative trials using an external quality assessment program (EQAP) for the application of current rapid and cultural screening methods. Three different modules were available for the detection of bacterial contamination: module 1: rapid methods, module 2: culture methods, module 3: bacterial identification methods. The sample set-up included up to six different bacterial strains, 1-2 negative samples and 4-6 positive samples with stabilized bacterial cell counts (approximately 10(3)/10(4)/10(5) CFU/ml). Time schedule for testing was limited (module 1: 6 h, module 2 and 3: 7 days). Samples of module 1 were analyzed with two different rapid methods (BactiFlow, NAT). The results of the three individual collaborative trials showed that all participants detected the negative samples with both assays correctly. Samples spiked with 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/ml of bacteria obtained positive results with both rapid screening methods, whereas samples spiked with only 10(3) CFU/ml disclosed a lower number of correctly identified positive results by NAT (86.6-93.8% sensitivity) compared to BactiFlow (100% sensitivity). The results for modules 2 and 3 revealed a 100% diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in all three collaborative trials. This proficiency panel facilitates the verification of the analytical sensitivity of rapid and cultural bacterial detection systems under controlled routine conditions. The concept of samples provided in this EQAP has three main advantages: i) samples can be examined by both rapid and culture methods, ii) the provided material is matrix

  4. Bench-scale tests on ultrasound-assisted acid washing and thermal desorption of mercury from dredging sludge and other solid matrices.

    PubMed

    Lesa, Barbara; Aneggi, Eleonora; Rossi, Giada; Comuzzi, Clara; Goi, Daniele

    2009-11-15

    A series of ultrasonic assisted acid washing and thermal desorption tests were performed on sludge and other solid matrices with the aim to assay these removal technologies and to determine if the application of low frequency ultrasound was effective to enhance mercury removal. Unpolluted dredging sludge, 820 K calcinated dredging sludge, silica and alumina were characterized, polluted with a known concentration of mercury and treated both by acid washing and thermal desorption with and without low frequency ultrasound application. The acid washing was carried out by a 4% HNO(3) acid solution and the thermal desorption was performed in a 370-620K range. X-ray semi-quantitative analysis of dredging sludge before and after acid washing and granulometric curves of the matrices after the ultrasonic treatment were considered in order to evidence chemical or physical changes during these treatments. Total residual mercury measurements were carried out before and after sonication. Results showed not measurable acid washing extraction from polluted dredging sludge, a little (3%) extraction from 820K heat-treated sludge and a significant (10-20%) extraction from alumina and silica within 120 min of treatment. The ultrasound application gave generally poor improvement of the mercury removal. On the contrary thermal desorption of mercury was somewhat effective for alumina, silica and heat-treated dredging sludge samples in which mercury removal was 30-40% at 370 K and 90-99% at 570 K. Likewise ultrasound application did not improve desorption. Instead, the thermal treatment of dredging sludge had a negligible amount of mercury desorption at 370 K but it reached 95% at 570 K. The application of ultrasound improved the thermal extraction of 25% in the 470-520 K range of temperature.

  5. Influence of the "Slingshot" bench press training aid on bench press kinematics and neuromuscular activity in competitive powerlifters.

    PubMed

    Dugdale, James H; Hunter, Angus; Di Virgilio, Thomas; Macgregor, Lewis J; Hamilton, D Lee

    2017-02-13

    This study examined the acute effects of the 'Slingshot' on bench-press performance, prime-mover surface electromyographic (sEMG) amplitude, and barbell velocity during maximal and submaximal bench-pressing in competitive male powerlifters. Fifteen male powerlifters (mean ± SD age: 27.05 ± 5.94 years; mass: 94.15kg; 1RM bench-press: 139.7 ± 16.79kg) participated in the study. Bench-press strength, average barbell velocity, and sEMG amplitude of the prime mover muscles (triceps brachii, pectoralis major and anterior deltoid) were measured during two conditions; 'Raw' (without use of any assistance) and 'Slingshot' [using the 'Slingshot' to perform both the weight achieved during 'Raw' 1RM testing (Raw max/SS), and absolute 1RM using the 'Slingshot' (SS)]. The results showed that the 'Slingshot' significantly increased bench press 1RM performance by a mean ± SD of 20.67kg ± 3.4kg. Barbell velocity and stick point analysis indicate that this improvement is likely driven by an increase in peak and pre-stick barbell velocity as triceps RMS was lower throughout all rep max phases with the 'Slingshot'. The 'Slingshot' also caused reductions in RMS, specifically of the triceps at all rep ranges but barbell velocity was better maintained in the last reps of all sets. These data indicate that the 'Slingshot' specifically de-loaded the triceps muscle throughout all rep ranges and provide assistance to maintaining barbell velocity under fatigue during later repetitions of multiple-repetition sets. The 'Slingshot' training aid could therefore be used in de-load phases of bench press training or as an over-reaching and velocity training aid.

  6. Portable fiber-optic taper coupled optical microscopy platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiming; Yu, Yan; Huang, Hui; Ou, Jinping

    2017-04-01

    The optical fiber taper coupled with CMOS has advantages of high sensitivity, compact structure and low distortion in the imaging platform. So it is widely used in low light, high speed and X-ray imaging systems. In the meanwhile, the peculiarity of the coupled structure can meet the needs of the demand in microscopy imaging. Toward this end, we developed a microscopic imaging platform based on the coupling of cellphone camera module and fiber optic taper for the measurement of the human blood samples and ascaris lumbricoides. The platform, weighing 70 grams, is based on the existing camera module of the smartphone and a fiber-optic array which providing a magnification factor of 6x.The top facet of the taper, on which samples are placed, serves as an irregular sampling grid for contact imaging. The magnified images of the sample, located on the bottom facet of the fiber, are then projected onto the CMOS sensor. This paper introduces the portable medical imaging system based on the optical fiber coupling with CMOS, and theoretically analyzes the feasibility of the system. The image data and process results either can be stored on the memory or transmitted to the remote medical institutions for the telemedicine. We validate the performance of this cell-phone based microscopy platform using human blood samples and test target, achieving comparable results to a standard bench-top microscope.

  7. The upgraded WIYN bench spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezek, Patricia M.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Willmarth, Daryl; Glaspey, John; Poczulp, Gary; Blanco, Dan; Britanik, Lana; McDougall, Eugene; Corson, Charles; Liang, Ming; Keyes, Joe; Jacoby, George

    2010-07-01

    We present the as-built design overview and post-installation performance of the upgraded WIYN Bench Spectrograph. This Bench is currently fed by either of the general-use multi-fiber instruments at the WIYN 3.5m telescope on Kitt Peak, the Hydra multi-object positioner, and the SparsePak integral field unit (IFU). It is very versatile, and can be configured to accommodate low-order, echelle, and volume phase holographic gratings. The overarching goal of the upgrade was to increase the average spectrograph throughput by ~60% while minimizing resolution loss (< 20%). In order to accomplish these goals, the project has had three major thrusts: (1) a new CCD was provided with a nearly constant 30% increase is throughput over 320-1000 nm; (2) two Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings were delivered; and (3) installed a new all-refractive collimator that properly matches the output fiber irradiance (EE90) and optimizes pupil placement. Initial analysis of commissioning data indicates that the total throughput of the system has increased 50-70% using the 600 l/mm surface ruled grating, indicating that the upgrade has achieved its goal. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that overall image resolution meets the requirement of <20% loss.

  8. Will Euro 6 reduce the NOx emissions of new diesel cars? - Insights from on-road tests with Portable Emissions Measurement Systems (PEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Martin; Bonnel, Pierre; Kühlwein, Jörg; Provenza, Alessio; Lambrecht, Udo; Alessandrini, Stefano; Carriero, Massimo; Colombo, Rinaldo; Forni, Fausto; Lanappe, Gaston; Le Lijour, Philippe; Manfredi, Urbano; Montigny, Francois; Sculati, Mirco

    2012-12-01

    The nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollution in urban areas of Europe can be partially attributed to the increasing market penetration of diesel cars that show higher distance-specific nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions than gasoline cars. The on-road NOx emissions of diesel cars, furthermore, appear to exceed substantially applicable emissions standards. This observation raises concerns that the introduction of more stringent Euro 6 emissions standards in 2014 may not adequately reduce the distance-specific on-road NOx emissions of new diesel cars. We address the existing concerns by analyzing the gaseous emissions of one novel Euro 6 diesel car and six Euro 4-5 diesel cars with Portable Emissions Measurement Systems (PEMS). We find that the average on-road NOx emissions of the Euro 6 car (0.21 ± 0.09 g per kilometer [g km-1]) are considerably lower than those of the Euro 4 cars (0.76 ± 0.12 g km-1) and the Euro 5 cars (0.71 ± 0.30 g km-1). The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system of the Euro 6 diesel car is suitable to limit NOx emissions during real-world on-road driving. Still, all tested cars, including the Euro 6 diesel car, exceed their NOx emissions standards on the road by 260 ± 130%. This finding suggests that the current type-approval procedure does not adequately capture the on-road NOx emissions of diesel cars. By introducing a complementary emissions test procedure that covers a wide range of normal operating conditions, the European legislative authorities can address this problem and ensure that Euro 6 will indeed deliver an adequate reduction in the NOx emissions of new diesel cars.

  9. Human portable preconcentrator system

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Bouchier, Francis A.; Hannum, David W.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    A preconcentrator system and apparatus suited to human portable use wherein sample potentially containing a target chemical substance is drawn into a chamber and through a pervious screen. The screen is adapted to capture target chemicals and then, upon heating, to release those chemicals into the chamber. Chemicals captured and then released in this fashion are then carried to a portable chemical detection device such as a portable ion mobility spectrometer. In the preferred embodiment, the means for drawing sample into the chamber comprises a reversible fan which, when operated in reverse direction, creates a backpressure that facilitates evolution of captured target chemicals into the chamber when the screen is heated.

  10. [Blood pressure goals on the test bench].

    PubMed

    Slany, Jörg

    2011-10-01

    There is little evidence from controlled prospective studies to support the low blood pressure goals stipulated for the treatment of hypertension by present guidelines, especially in high-risk patients with diabetes, renal insufficiency or coronary heart disease. Aim of this review is to scrutinize the potential benefit and risk of low blood pressure on the basis of recent studies and secondary analyses of older studies. In patients with coronary heart disease or equivalent or with diabetes lowering systolic blood pressure to 130 to 135 mmHg reduced primary or secondary cardiovascular endpoints in the majority of studies. Between 120 and 129 mmHg some positive effects could be shown in patients with coronary heart disease but not in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. In patients with diabetic or nondiabetic nephropathy including those with proteinurea no convincing data exist which show a better outcome with systolic blood pressure below 130 versus below 140 mmHg. However, several studies suggest that the risk of stroke may decrease by lowering systolic pressure to 120 mmHg or even lower. Below 120 mmHg an increased risk of cardiac and noncardiac events or death was shown in quite a number of studies. In patients between 70 and 80 years, current evidence suggests lowering systolic blood pressure to 135 to 145 mmHg and in those above 80 years to 145 to 155 mmHg. No evidence was found to justify different diastolic pressure goals for different groups of patients; optimal values fall between 70 and 85 mmHg. Limitations of recent studies are short follow-up, few event rates and small differences in achieved pressure between groups leaving uncertainty about long-term effects. Apart from prevention of stroke there is sparse evidence that lowering systolic blood pressure below 130 mmHg may be beneficial. Current evidence suggests that lowering systolic and diastolic pressure into a range of 130 to 140/70 to 85 may be adequate for all patients with the exception of children, adolescents and patients over 80 years. Further lowering of systolic pressure seems to offer little additional benefit and lowering diastolic pressure below 70 mmHg might increase risk.

  11. Genifuel Hydrothermal Processing Bench Scale Technology ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) and Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification (CHG) proof-of-concept bench-scale tests were performed to assess the potential of the Genifuel hydrothermal process technology for handling municipal wastewater sludge. HTL tests were conducted at 300-350◦C and 2900 psig on three different feeds: primary sludge (11.9 wt% solids), secondary sludge (9.7 wt% solids), and post-digester sludge (also referred to as digested solids) (16.0 wt% solids). Corresponding CHG tests were conducted at 350◦C and 2900 psig on the HTL aqueous phase product using a ruthenium based catalyst. A comprehensive analysis of all feed and effluent phases was also performed. Total mass and carbon balances closed to within ± 15% in all but one case. Biocrude yields from HTL tests were 37%, 25%, and 34% for primary sludge, secondary sludge, and digested solids feeds, respectively. The biocrude yields accounted for 59%, 39%, and 49% of the carbon in the feed for primary sludge, secondary sludge, and digested solids feeds, respectively. It should be noted that HTL test results for secondary sludge may have been affected by equipment problems. Biocrude composition and quality were comparable to that seen with biocrudes generated from algae feeds. CHG product gas consisted primarily of methane, with methane yields (relative to CHG input) on a carbon basis of 47%, 61%, and 64% for aqueous feeds that were the product of HTL tests with primary sludge, secondary sludge, and

  12. A portable X-band front-end test package for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluation. Part 2: Tests on the antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Stewart, S. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Results are given for an X-band (8.45 GHz) test package for testing the new 34-m beam-waveguide antenna at Goldstone in an 'on-the-antenna' configuration. Included are X-band zenith noise temperature values and tipping-curve data obtained at the Cassegrain focal point F1 as well as at the pedestal room focal point F3. Subreflector Z-defocus test results for both F1 and F3 are also presented. The X-band test package operated well in all of the different test configurations and exceeded expected performance.

  13. A pilot study: portable out-of-center sleep testing as an early sleep apnea screening tool in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chernyshev, Oleg Y; McCarty, David E; Moul, Douglas E; Liendo, Cesar; Caldito, Gloria C; Munjampalli, Sai K; Kelley, Roger E; Chesson, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prompt diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) after acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is critical for optimal clinical outcomes, but in-laboratory conventional polysomnograms (PSG) are not routinely practical. Though portable out-of-center type III cardiopulmonary sleep studies (out-of-center cardiopulmonary sleep testing [OCST]) are widely available, these studies have not been validated in patients who have recently suffered from AIS. We hypothesized that OCST in patients with AIS would yield similar results when compared to conventional PSG. Methods Patients with AIS had simultaneous type III OCST and PSG studies performed within 72 hours from symptom onset. The accuracy of OCST was compared to PSG using: chi-square tests, receiver operatory characteristic curves, Bland–Altman plot, paired Student’s t-test/Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and calculation of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Results Twenty-one out of 23 subjects with AIS (age 61±9.4 years; 52% male; 58% African-American) successfully completed both studies (9% technical failure). Nearly all (95%) had Mallampati IV posterior oropharynx; the mean neck circumference was 16.8±1.6 in. and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 30±7 kg/m2. The apnea hypopnea index (AHI) provided by OCST was similar to that provided by PSG (19.8±18.0 vs 22.0±22.7, respectively; P=0.49). On identifying subjects by OCST with an AHI ≥5 on PSG, OCST had the following parameters: sensitivity 100%, specificity 85.7%, PPV 93%, and NPV 100%. On identifying subjects with an AHI ≥15 on PSG, OCST parameters were as follows: sensitivity 100%, specificity 83.3%, PPV 81.8%, and NPV 100%. Bland–Altman plotting showed an overall diagnostic agreement between OCST and PSG modalities for an AHI cutoff >5, despite fine-grained differences in estimated AHIs. Conclusion Compared with PSG, OCST provides similar diagnostic information when run simultaneously in AIS

  14. Comparison of concentric and eccentric bench press repetitions to failure.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Stephen B; Brown, Lee E; Hooker, Steven P; Swan, Pamela D; Buman, Matthew P; Alvar, Brent A; Black, Laurie E

    2015-04-01

    Eccentric muscle actions (ECC) are characterized by muscle lengthening, despite actin-myosin crossbridge formation. Muscles acting eccentrically are capable of producing higher levels of force compared with muscles acting concentrically. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ECC bench press yields greater strength than concentric (CON) as determined by 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Additionally, a comparison was made examining differences in the number of repetitions to failure at different relative intensities of 1RM. Thirty healthy men (age = 24.63 ± 5.6 years) were tested for 1RM in CON and ECC bench press and the number of repetitions completed at 60, 70, 80, and 90% 1RM. For CON repetitions, the weight was mechanically lowered to the chest, and the participant pressed it up until the elbows were fully extended. The ECC bench press consisted of lowering a barbell from a fully extended elbow position to the chest in a continuous controlled manner for 3 seconds as determined by electronic metronome. Paired t-tests showed that ECC 1RM (115.99 ± 31.08 kg) was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) greater than CON 1RM (93.56 ± 26.56 kg), and the number of repetitions completed at 90% 1RM was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) greater in ECC (7.67 ± 3.24) as compared with CON (4.57 ± 2.21). There were no significant differences in number of completed repetitions during CON and ECC bench press at 60, 70, and 80% 1RM. These data indicate that ECC actions yield increased force capabilities (∼120%) as compared with CON in the bench press and may be less prone to fatigue, especially at higher intensities. These differences suggest a need to develop unique strategies for training eccentrically.

  15. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Eckels, Joel D.; Kimmons, James F.; Myers, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  16. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmons, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1996-06-11

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) is described for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units. 4 figs.

  17. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmins, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  18. Exposure histories of Bench Crater rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, D. S.; Drozd, R. J.; Morgan, C. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    A description is presented of the results of mass spectrometric analyses of the noble gases krypton and xenon, in eight Apollo 12 basaltic rocks. The significance of the results is evaluated. It is concluded that the Bench Crater rocks are not what they appear to be in their field relationships. They are not fragments ejected from bedrock by the Bench impact. Most, if not all, have had a previous history of regolith residence prior to the Bench impact. In retrospect, sampling of fresh ejecta from lunar craters during the Apollo missions turned out to be surprisingly difficult. Sampling was successful for Cone and North Ray craters where large boulders were available, but fresh South Ray ejecta was surprisingly elusive. The reported investigation shows that fresh ejecta was not obtained from Bench, and moreover, that the concept of 'radial sampling', in which the rocks sampled from a crater rim are supposed to represent the deepest material excavated, fails very badly for Bench.

  19. BENCH-SCALE RECOVERY OF LEAD USING AND ELECTRO- MEMBRANE/CHELATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of a bench-scale treatability test to investigate key process parameters influencing an innovative chelation electrodeposition process for recovery of lead from contaminated sons. thylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta...

  20. BENCH-SCALE RECOVERY OF LEAD USING AND ELECTRO- MEMBRANE/CHELATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of a bench-scale treatability test to investigate key process parameters influencing an innovative chelation electrodeposition process for recovery of lead from contaminated sons. thylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta...

  1. A comparison of force curve profiles between the bench press and ballistic bench throws.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ross A; Bryant, Adam L; Humphries, Brendan

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the peak force and force curve characteristics during a traditional bench press (BP) and a ballistic bench throw (BT). Eight (age = 21.0 +/- 2.3 years, height = 182.3 +/- 7.4 cm, body mass = 85.9 +/- 5.5 kg) semi-professional rugby league players with resistance and power training experience performed both BP and BT exercises at loads of 55 and 80% of their predicted one-repetition maximum. The force curves for each test were then divided into three intensity levels, set at low to moderate (0-75%), high (75-95%), and near-maximal force (95-100%). These values were obtained by determining the percentage of the range of motion (ROM) in which the force produced during each test was within these thresholds. The BT exercise produced significantly (p < 0.05) higher peak force than BP under both loading conditions. A significantly greater portion of the ROM during the 80% BT was at a high intensity in comparison with the BP. No significant differences were found between force intensity conditions at 55% loads. It can be concluded that performing the BT exercise results in a greater peak force output when compared with the traditional BP movement under both resistance training and maximal power loading conditions. Furthermore, performing the BT exercise with heavy loads results in a more efficient training method for maintaining high force levels throughout the ROM.

  2. Probiotics: from bench to market.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marguerite; Sanders, Mary Ellen; Duong, Tri; Young, Howard A

    2010-11-01

    "Probiotics: From Bench to Market" was a one-day conference convened by the New York Academy of Sciences on June 11, 2010, with the goal of stimulating discussion of the physiological effects of probiotics on the gastrointestinal, nervous, and immune systems. The program included speakers from academia, industry, and government to give conference participants a full understanding of the state of the field of probiotics. The overall goal of the program was to increase communication and collaboration among these groups to advance probiotic research and probiotic contributions to public health. The conference was divided into three sessions and included both oral and visual presentations as well as panel discussions. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. Imaging Neuroinflammation – from Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Pulli, Benjamin; Chen, John W

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a central role in a variety of neurological diseases, including stroke, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and malignant CNS neoplasms, among many other. Different cell types and molecular mediators participate in a cascade of events in the brain that is ultimately aimed at control, regeneration and repair, but leads to damage of brain tissue under pathological conditions. Non-invasive molecular imaging of key players in the inflammation cascade holds promise for identification and quantification of the disease process before it is too late for effective therapeutic intervention. In this review, we focus on molecular imaging techniques that target inflammatory cells and molecules that are of interest in neuroinflammation, especially those with high translational potential. Over the past decade, a plethora of molecular imaging agents have been developed and tested in animal models of (neuro)inflammation, and a few have been translated from bench to bedside. The most promising imaging techniques to visualize neuroinflammation include MRI, positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and optical imaging methods. These techniques enable us to image adhesion molecules to visualize endothelial cell activation, assess leukocyte functions such as oxidative stress, granule release, and phagocytosis, and label a variety of inflammatory cells for cell tracking experiments. In addition, several cell types and their activation can be specifically targeted in vivo, and consequences of neuroinflammation such as neuronal death and demyelination can be quantified. As we continue to make progress in utilizing molecular imaging technology to study and understand neuroinflammation, increasing efforts and investment should be made to bring more of these novel imaging agents from the “bench to bedside.” PMID:25525560

  4. Portable Microfiche Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zybura, Edward L.

    1980-01-01

    Provides an introduction to use of three types of portable microfiche readers: hand-held readers, briefcase readers, and self-contained mobile readers. Features described include image quality, method of operation, product history, and optimal environments for utilization. (SW)

  5. Portable Dental System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Portable dental system provides dental care in isolated communities. System includes a patient's chair and a dentist's stool, an X-ray machine and a power unit, all of which fold into compact packages. A large yellow "pumpkin" is a collapsible compressed air tank. Portable system has been used successfully in South America in out of the way communities with this back-packable system, and in American nursing homes. This product is no longer manufactured.

  6. Portable treatment systems study

    SciTech Connect

    Sherick, M.J.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Bechtold, T.E.; Cole, L.T.

    1997-03-01

    In developing their Site Treatment Plans (STPs), many of the Department of Energy installations identified some form of portable treatment, to facilitate compliant disposition of select mixed low-level wastestreams. The Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology requested that a systems study be performed to better define the potential role of portable treatment with respect to mixed low-level waste, highlight obstacles to implementation, and identify opportunities for future research and development emphasis. The study was performed by first establishing a representative set of mixed waste, then formulating portable treatment system concepts to meet the required processing needs for these wastes. The portable systems that were conceptualized were evaluated and compared to a fixed centralized treatment alternative. The system evaluations include a life-cycle cost analysis and an assessment of regulatory, institutional, and technical issues associated with the potential use of portable systems. The results of this study show that when all costs are included, there are no significant cost differences between portable systems and fixed systems. However, it is also emphasized that many uncertainties exist that could impact the cost of implementing portable treatment systems. Portable treatment could be made more attractive through private sector implementation, although there is little economic incentive for a commercial vendor to develop small, specialized treatment capabilities with limited applicability. Alternatively, there may also be valid reasons why fixed units cannot be used for some problematic wastestreams. In any event, there are some site-specific problems that still need to be addressed, and there may be some opportunity for research and development to make a positive impact in these areas.

  7. Contextual interference effects on the acquisition of skill and strength of the bench press.

    PubMed

    Naimo, Marshall A; Zourdos, Michael C; Wilson, Jacob M; Kim, Jeong-Su; Ward, Emery G; Eccles, David W; Panton, Lynn B

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate contextual interference effects on skill acquisition and strength gains during the learning of the bench press movement. Twenty-four healthy, college-aged males and females were stratified to control, high contextual interference (HCI), and low contextual interference (LCI) groups. Treatment groups were provided with written and visual instruction on proper bench press form and practiced the bench press and dart throwing for four weeks. Within each session, LCI performed all bench press sets before undertaking dart-throws. HCI undertook dart-throws immediately following each set of bench press. Control only did testing. Measurements, including one repetition maximum (1RM), checklist scores based on video recordings of participants' 1RM's, and dart-throw test scores were taken at pre-test, 1 week, 2 week, post-test, and retention test. Results were consistent with the basic premise of the contextual interference effect. LCI had significant improvements in percent 1RM and checklist scores during training, but were mostly absent after training (post-test and retention test). HCI had significant improvements in percent 1RM and checklist scores both during and after training. Thus, HCI may augment strength and movement skill on the bench press since proper technique is an important component of resistance exercise movements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-07-20

    The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor the acoustic signal in natural gas transmission lines. In particular the three acoustic signals associated with a line leak. The system is portable ({approx}30 lbs) and is designed for line pressures up to 1000 psi. It has become apparent that cataloging of the various background acoustic signals in natural gas transmission line is very important if a system to identify leak signals is to be developed. The low-pressure (0-200 psig) laboratory test phase has been completed and a number of field trials have been conducted. Before the cataloging phase could begin, a few problems identified in field trials identified had to be corrected such as: (1) Decreased microphone sensitivity at line pressures above 250 psig. (2) The inability to deal with large data sets collected when cataloging the variety of signals in a transmission line. (3) The lack of an available online acoustic calibration system. These problems have been solved and the WVU PAMP is now fully functional over the entire pressure range found in the Natural Gas transmission lines in this region. Field portability and reliability have been greatly improved. Data collection and storage have also improved to the point were the full acoustic spectrum of acoustic signals can be accurately cataloged, recorded and described.

  9. Portable Ethylene Oxide Sterilization Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Songer, J. R.; Mathis, R. G.

    1969-01-01

    A portable ethylene oxide sterilization chamber was designed, constructed, and tested for use in the sterilization of embolectomy catheters. The unit can accommodate catheters up to 40 inches (101.6 cm) in length and can be operated for less than 4 cents per cycle. A constant concentration of 500 mg of ethylene oxide per liter of space and holding periods of 4 and 6 hr at 43 and 22 C, respectively, were adequate when tested with B. subtilis spores. The estimated cost of construction was $165.00. If temperature control is unnecessary, the cost is approximately $80.00. Images PMID:4977644

  10. Bench scale demonstration and conceptual engineering for DETOX{sup SM} catalyzed wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Moslander, J.; Bell, R.; Robertson, D.; Dhooge, P.; Goldblatt, S.

    1994-06-01

    Laboratory and bench scale studies of the DETOX{sup SM} catalyzed wet oxidation process have been performed with the object of developing the process for treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes. Reaction orders, apparent rates, and activation energies have been determined for a range of organic waste surrogates. Reaction intermediates and products have been analyzed. Metals` fates have been determined. Bench scale units have been designed, fabricated, and tested with solid and liquid organic waste surrogates. Results from the laboratory and bench scale studies have been used to develop conceptual designs for application of the process to hazardous and mixed wastes.

  11. Velocity- and power-load relationships of the bench pull vs. bench press exercises.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Medina, L; González-Badillo, J J; Pérez, C E; Pallarés, J G

    2014-03-01

    This study compared the velocity- and power-load relationships of the antagonistic upper-body exercises of prone bench pull (PBP) and bench press (BP). 75 resistance-trained athletes performed a progressive loading test in each exercise up to the one-repetition maximum (1RM) in random order. Velocity and power output across the 30-100% 1RM were significantly higher for PBP, whereas 1RM strength was greater for BP. A very close relationship was observed between relative load and mean propulsive velocity for both BP (R2=0.97) and PBP (R2=0.94) which enables us to estimate %1RM from velocity using the obtained prediction equations. Important differences in the load that maximizes power output (Pmax) and the power profiles of both exercises were found according to the outcome variable used: mean (MP), peak (PP) or mean propulsive power (MPP). When MP was considered, the Pmax load was higher (56% BP, 70% PBP) than when PP (37% BP, 41% PBP) or MPP (37% BP, 46% PBP) were used. For each variable there was a broad range of loads at which power output was not significantly different. The differing velocity- and power-load relationships between PBP and BP seem attributable to the distinct muscle architecture and moment arm levers involved in these exercises. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Portable infrared reflectometer for evaluating emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Skowronski, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Optical methods are frequently used to evaluate the emittance of candidate spacecraft thermal control materials. One new optical method utilizes a portable infrared reflectometer capable of obtaining spectral reflectance of an opaque surface in the range of 2 to 25 microns using a Michelson-Type FTIR interferometer. This miniature interferometer collects many infrared spectra over a short period of time. It also allows the size of the instrument to be small such that spectra can be collected in the laboratory or in the field. Infrared spectra are averaged and integrated with respect to the room temperature black body spectrum to yield emittance at 300 K. Integrating with respect to other black body spectra yields emittance values at other temperatures. Absorption bands in the spectra may also be used for chemical species identification. The emittance of several samples was evaluated using this portable infrared reflectometer, an old infrared reflectometer equipped with dual rotating black body cavities, and a bench top thermal vacuum chamber. Samples for evaluation were purposely selected such that a range of emittance values and thermal control material types would be represented, including polished aluminum, Kapton®, silvered Teflon®, and the inorganic paint Z-93-P. Results indicate an excellent linear relationship between the room temperature emittance calculated from infrared spectral data and the emittance obtained from the dual rotating black body cavities and thermal vacuum chamber. The prospect of using the infrared spectral data for chemical species identification will also be discussed. .

  13. Investigating portable fluorescent microscopy (CyScope) as an alternative rapid diagnostic test for malaria in children and women of child-bearing age.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Figueiredo, José Carlos; Oguttu, David; Adriko, Moses; Besigye, Fred; Nankasi, Andrina; Arinaitwe, Moses; Namukuta, Annet; Betson, Martha; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Stothard, J Russell

    2010-08-27

    Prompt and correct diagnosis of malaria is crucial for accurate epidemiological assessment and better case management, and while the gold standard of light microscopy is often available, it requires both expertise and time. Portable fluorescent microscopy using the CyScope offers a potentially quicker, easier and more field-applicable alternative. This article reports on the strengths, limitations of this methodology and its diagnostic performance in cross-sectional surveys on young children and women of child-bearing age. 552 adults (99% women of child-bearing age) and 980 children (99% ≤ 5 years of age) from rural and peri-urban regions of Ugandan were examined for malaria using light microscopy (Giemsa-stain), a lateral-flow test (Paracheck-Pf) and the CyScope. Results from the surveys were used to calculate diagnostic performance (sensitivity and specificity) as well as to perform a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses, using light microscopy as the gold-standard. Fluorescent microscopy (qualitative reads) showed reduced specificity (<40%), resulting in higher community prevalence levels than those reported by light microscopy, particularly in adults (+180% in adults and +20% in children). Diagnostic sensitivity was 92.1% in adults and 86.7% in children, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.63. Importantly, optimum performance was achieved for higher parasitaemia (>400 parasites/μL blood): sensitivity of 64.2% and specificity of 86.0%. Overall, the diagnostic performance of the CyScope was found inferior to that of Paracheck-Pf. Fluorescent microscopy using the CyScope is certainly a field-applicable and relatively affordable solution for malaria diagnoses especially in areas where electrical supplies may be lacking. While it is unlikely to miss higher parasitaemia, its application in cross-sectional community-based studies leads to many false positives (i.e. small fluorescent bodies of presently unknown origin mistaken as malaria parasites

  14. Field-testing of a new portable HPGe detector system using the enrichment meter principle for the inspection of uranium oxide and hexafluoride in containers

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, S.J.; Leich, D.A.; Knapp, D.A.; Rowland, M.; Klem, D.; Kefgen, B.; Meyer, D.; Royce, R.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new portable detector system for the measurement of uranium enrichment of Uranium oxide and Uranium hexafluoride samples in containers. In this paper the authors describe such an apparatus that consisted of high purity germanium detector, a collimator, Canberra InSpector{trademark} and a laptop computer. In addition, the portable enrichment measurement system used Canberra Genie-PC{trademark} software for data acquisition and specialized software written for this application for the data analysis. In this paper they briefly discuss the unique features of this system. They also give the results of measurements made on both Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) samples at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

  15. Organic bench model to complement the teaching and learning on basic surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Denadai, Rafael; Souto, Luís Ricardo Martinhão

    2012-01-01

    To propose an organic bench model made with fruits/vegetables as an alternative to complement the arsenal of simulators used in the teaching and learning of basic surgical skills during medical graduation and education. They were described the training strategies, through the use of fruits (or vegetables) to the learning of different techniques of incision, sutures, biopsies and basic principles of reconstruction. The preparation of bench model, the processes of skill acquisition, feedback and evaluation were also delineated. A proposal for teaching based on an organic model with training delivered in multiple sessions, with increasing levels of difficulty, and with feedback and evaluation during all the process was structured. The organic model, being simple, versatile, portable, reproducible, readily available, and having low cost, is another option to complement the existing simulators for teaching and learning of basic surgical skills.

  16. Portable biochip scanner device

    DOEpatents

    Perov, Alexander; Sharonov, Alexei; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2002-01-01

    A portable biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips (biochips) is provided. The portable biochip scanner device employs a laser for emitting an excitation beam. An optical fiber delivers the laser beam to a portable biochip scanner. A lens collimates the laser beam, the collimated laser beam is deflected by a dichroic mirror and focused by an objective lens onto a biochip. The fluorescence light from the biochip is collected and collimated by the objective lens. The fluorescence light is delivered to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) via an emission filter and a focusing lens. The focusing lens focuses the fluorescence light into a pinhole. A signal output of the PMT is processed and displayed.

  17. Deflectometry using portable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butel, Guillaume P.; Smith, Greg A.; Burge, James H.

    2015-02-01

    Deflectometry is a powerful metrology technique that uses off-the-shelf equipment to achieve nanometer-level accuracy surface measurements. However, there is no portable device to quickly measure eyeglasses, lenses, or mirrors. We present an entirely portable new deflectometry technique that runs on any Android™ smartphone with a front-facing camera. Our technique overcomes some specific issues of portable devices like screen nonlinearity and automatic gain control. We demonstrate our application by measuring an amateur telescope mirror and simulating a measurement of the faulty Hubble Space Telescope primary mirror. Our technique can, in less than 1 min, measure surface errors with accuracy up to 50 nm RMS, simply using a smartphone.

  18. Human portable preconcentrator system

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Brusseau, Charles A.; Hannum, David W.; Puissant, James G.; Varley, Nathan R.

    2003-08-12

    A preconcentrator system and apparatus suited to human portable use wherein sample potentially containing a target chemical substance is drawn into a chamber and through a pervious screen. The screen is adapted to capture target chemicals and then, upon heating, to release those chemicals into the chamber. Chemicals captured and then released in this fashion are then carried to a portable chemical detection device such as a portable ion mobility spectrometer. In the preferred embodiment, the means for drawing sample into the chamber comprises a reversible fan which, when operated in reverse direction, creates a backpressure that facilitates evolution of captured target chemicals into the chamber when the screen is heated. The screen can be positioned directly in front of the detector prior to heating to improve detection capability.

  19. Association Between Maximal Bench Press Strength and Isometric Handgrip Strength Among Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Benjamin H; Brown, Justin C; Gater, David R; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2017-02-01

    To characterize the relationship between 1-repetition maximum (1-RM) bench press strength and isometric handgrip strength among breast cancer survivors. Cross-sectional study. Laboratory. Community-dwelling breast cancer survivors (N=295). Not applicable. 1-RM bench press strength was measured with a barbell and exercise bench. Isometric handgrip strength was measured using an isometric dynamometer, with 3 maximal contractions of the left and right hands. All measures were conducted by staff with training in clinical exercise testing. Among 295 breast cancer survivors, 1-RM bench press strength was 18.2±6.1kg (range, 2.2-43.0kg), and isometric handgrip strength was 23.5±5.8kg (range, 9.0-43.0kg). The strongest correlate of 1-RM bench press strength was the average isometric handgrip strength of both hands (r=.399; P<.0001). Mean difference analysis suggested that the average isometric handgrip strength of both hands overestimated 1-RM bench press strength by 4.7kg (95% limits of agreement, -8.2 to 17.6kg). In a multivariable linear regression model, the average isometric handgrip strength of both hands (β=.31; P<.0001) and age (β=-.20; P<.0001) were positively correlated with 1-RM bench press strength (R(2)=.23). Isometric handgrip strength is a poor surrogate for 1-RM bench press strength among breast cancer survivors. 1-RM bench press strength and isometric handgrip strength quantify distinct components of muscular strength. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Passive Thermal Compensation of the Optical Bench of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Virginia; Parks, Rick; Coleman, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer is an orbiting space telescope that will collect information on star formation by observing galaxies and stars in ultraviolet wavelengths. The optical bench supporting detectors and related optical components used an interesting and unusual passive thermal compensation technique to accommodate thermally-induced focal length changes in the optical system. The proposed paper will describe the optical bench thermal compensation design including concept, analysis, assembly and testing results.