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Sample records for portal imager dosimetry

  1. Portal dosimetry for VMAT using integrated images obtained during treatment.

    PubMed

    Bedford, James L; Hanson, Ian M; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark

    2014-02-01

    Portal dosimetry provides an accurate and convenient means of verifying dose delivered to the patient. A simple method for carrying out portal dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is described, together with phantom measurements demonstrating the validity of the approach. Portal images were predicted by projecting dose in the isocentric plane through to the portal image plane, with exponential attenuation and convolution with a double-Gaussian scatter function. Appropriate parameters for the projection were selected by fitting the calculation model to portal images measured on an iViewGT portal imager (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) for a variety of phantom thicknesses and field sizes. This model was then used to predict the portal image resulting from each control point of a VMAT arc. Finally, all these control point images were summed to predict the overall integrated portal image for the whole arc. The calculated and measured integrated portal images were compared for three lung and three esophagus plans delivered to a thorax phantom, and three prostate plans delivered to a homogeneous phantom, using a gamma index for 3% and 3 mm. A 0.6 cm(3) ionization chamber was used to verify the planned isocentric dose. The sensitivity of this method to errors in monitor units, field shaping, gantry angle, and phantom position was also evaluated by means of computer simulations. The calculation model for portal dose prediction was able to accurately compute the portal images due to simple square fields delivered to solid water phantoms. The integrated images of VMAT treatments delivered to phantoms were also correctly predicted by the method. The proportion of the images with a gamma index of less than unity was 93.7% ± 3.0% (1SD) and the difference between isocenter dose calculated by the planning system and measured by the ionization chamber was 0.8% ± 1.0%. The method was highly sensitive to errors in monitor units and field shape, but less sensitive to

  2. Portal dosimetry for VMAT using integrated images obtained during treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, James L. Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Portal dosimetry provides an accurate and convenient means of verifying dose delivered to the patient. A simple method for carrying out portal dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is described, together with phantom measurements demonstrating the validity of the approach. Methods: Portal images were predicted by projecting dose in the isocentric plane through to the portal image plane, with exponential attenuation and convolution with a double-Gaussian scatter function. Appropriate parameters for the projection were selected by fitting the calculation model to portal images measured on an iViewGT portal imager (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) for a variety of phantom thicknesses and field sizes. This model was then used to predict the portal image resulting from each control point of a VMAT arc. Finally, all these control point images were summed to predict the overall integrated portal image for the whole arc. The calculated and measured integrated portal images were compared for three lung and three esophagus plans delivered to a thorax phantom, and three prostate plans delivered to a homogeneous phantom, using a gamma index for 3% and 3 mm. A 0.6 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber was used to verify the planned isocentric dose. The sensitivity of this method to errors in monitor units, field shaping, gantry angle, and phantom position was also evaluated by means of computer simulations. Results: The calculation model for portal dose prediction was able to accurately compute the portal images due to simple square fields delivered to solid water phantoms. The integrated images of VMAT treatments delivered to phantoms were also correctly predicted by the method. The proportion of the images with a gamma index of less than unity was 93.7% ± 3.0% (1SD) and the difference between isocenter dose calculated by the planning system and measured by the ionization chamber was 0.8% ± 1.0%. The method was highly sensitive to errors in monitor units and

  3. Portal dosimetry for VMAT using integrated images obtained during treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, James L. Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Portal dosimetry provides an accurate and convenient means of verifying dose delivered to the patient. A simple method for carrying out portal dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is described, together with phantom measurements demonstrating the validity of the approach. Methods: Portal images were predicted by projecting dose in the isocentric plane through to the portal image plane, with exponential attenuation and convolution with a double-Gaussian scatter function. Appropriate parameters for the projection were selected by fitting the calculation model to portal images measured on an iViewGT portal imager (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) for a variety of phantom thicknesses and field sizes. This model was then used to predict the portal image resulting from each control point of a VMAT arc. Finally, all these control point images were summed to predict the overall integrated portal image for the whole arc. The calculated and measured integrated portal images were compared for three lung and three esophagus plans delivered to a thorax phantom, and three prostate plans delivered to a homogeneous phantom, using a gamma index for 3% and 3 mm. A 0.6 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber was used to verify the planned isocentric dose. The sensitivity of this method to errors in monitor units, field shaping, gantry angle, and phantom position was also evaluated by means of computer simulations. Results: The calculation model for portal dose prediction was able to accurately compute the portal images due to simple square fields delivered to solid water phantoms. The integrated images of VMAT treatments delivered to phantoms were also correctly predicted by the method. The proportion of the images with a gamma index of less than unity was 93.7% ± 3.0% (1SD) and the difference between isocenter dose calculated by the planning system and measured by the ionization chamber was 0.8% ± 1.0%. The method was highly sensitive to errors in monitor units and

  4. The stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber electronic portal imaging devices for dosimetry purposes.

    PubMed

    Louwe, R J W; Tielenburg, R; van Ingen, K M; Mijnheer, B J; van Herk, M B

    2004-04-01

    This study was performed to determine the stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber (LiFi-type) electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) for dosimetric purposes. The short- and long-term stability of the response was investigated, as well as the importance of factors influencing the response (e.g., temperature fluctuations, radiation damage, and the performance of the electronic hardware). It was shown that testing the performance of the electronic hardware as well as the short-term stability of the imagers may reveal the cause of a poor long-term stability of the imager response. In addition, the short-term stability was measured to verify the validity of the fitted dose-response curve immediately after beam startup. The long-term stability of these imagers could be considerably improved by correcting for room temperature fluctuations and gradual changes in response due to radiation damage. As a result, the reproducibility was better than 1% (1 SD) over a period of two years. The results of this study were used to formulate recommendations for a quality control program for portal dosimetry. The effect of such a program was assessed by comparing the results of portal dosimetry and in vivo dosimetry using diodes during the treatment of 31 prostate patients. The improvement of the results for portal dosimetry was consistent with the deviations observed with the reproducibility tests in that particular period. After a correction for the variation in response of the imager, the average difference between the measured and prescribed dose during the treatment of prostate patients was -0.7%+/-1.5% (1 SD), and -0.6%+/-1.1% (1 SD) for EPID and diode in vivo dosimetry, respectively. It can be concluded that a high stability of the response can be achieved for this type of EPID by applying a rigorous quality control program.

  5. A Simple Method for 2-D In Vivo Dosimetry by Portal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Peca, Stefano; Brown, Derek Wilson; Smith, Wendy Lani

    2017-01-01

    To improve patient safety and treatment quality, verification of dose delivery in radiotherapy is desirable. We present a simple, easy-to-implement, open-source method for in vivo planar dosimetry of conformal radiotherapy by electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Correlation ratios, which relate dose in the mid-depth of slab phantoms to transit EPID signal, were determined for multiple phantom thicknesses and field sizes. Off-axis dose is corrected for by means of model-based convolution. We tested efficacy of dose reconstruction through measurements with off-reference values of attenuator thickness, field size, and monitor units. We quantified the dose calculation error in the presence of thickness changes to simulate anatomical or setup variations. An example of dose calculation on patient data is provided. With varying phantom thickness, field size, and monitor units, dose reconstruction was almost always within 3% of planned dose. In the presence of thickness changes from planning CT, the dose discrepancy is exaggerated by up to approximately 1.5% for 1 cm changes upstream of the isocenter plane and 4% for 1 cm changes downstream. Our novel electronic portal imaging device in vivo dosimetry allows clinically accurate 2-dimensional reconstruction of dose inside a phantom/patient at isocenter depth. Due to its simplicity, commissioning can be performed in a few hours per energy and may be modified to the user's needs. It may provide useful dose delivery information to detect harmful errors, guide adaptive radiotherapy, and assure quality of treatment.

  6. Transit Dosimetry for Patient Treatment Verification with an Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Sean L.

    The complex and individualized photon fluence patterns constructed during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning must be verified before they are delivered to the patient. There is a compelling argument for additional verification throughout the course of treatment due to the possibility of data corruption, unintentional modification of the plan parameters, changes in patient anatomy, errors in patient alignment, and even mistakes in identifying the correct patient for treatment. Amorphous silicon (aSi) Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) can be utilized for IMRT verification. The goal of this thesis is to implement EPID transit dosimetry, measurement of the dose at a plane behind the patient during their treatment, within the clinical process. In order to achieve this goal, a number of the EPID's dosimetric shortcomings were studied and subsequently resolved. Portal dose images (PDIs) acquired with an aSi EPID suffer from artifacts related to radiation backscattered asymmetrically from the EPID support structure. This backscatter signal varies as a function of field size (FS) and location on the EPID. Its presence can affect pixel values in the measured PDI by up to 3.6%. Two methods to correct for this artifact are offered: discrete FS specific correction matrices and a single generalized equation. The dosimetric comparison between the measured and predicted through-air dose images for 49 IMRT treatment fields was significantly improved (p << .001) after the application of these FS specific backscatter corrections. The formulation of a transit dosimetry algorithm followed the establishment of the backscatter correction and a confirmation of the EPID's positional stability with linac gantry rotation. A detailed characterization of the attenuation, scatter, and EPID response behind an object in the beam's path is necessary to predict transit PDIs. In order to validate the algorithm's performance, 49 IMRT fields were delivered to a

  7. A generalized calibration procedure for in vivo transit dosimetry using siemens electronic portal imaging devices.

    PubMed

    Fidanzio, Andrea; Greco, Francesca; Gargiulo, Laura; Cilla, Savino; Sabatino, Domenico; Cappiello, Massimo; Di Felice, Cinzia; Di Castro, Elisabetta; Azario, Luigi; Russo, Mariateresa; Pompei, Luciano; D'Onofrio, Guido; Piermattei, Angelo

    2011-03-01

    A practical and accurate generalized in vivo dosimetry procedure has been implemented for Siemens linacs supplying 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beams, equipped with aSi electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). The in vivo dosimetry method makes use of correlation ratios between EPID transit signal, s (t) (0) (TPR,w,L), and phantom mid-plane dose, D (0)(TPR,w,L), as functions of phantom thickness, w, square field dimensions, L, and tissue-phantom ratio TPR(20,10). The s (t) (0) (TPR,w,L) and D (0)(TPR,w,L) values were defined to be independent of the EPID sensitivity and monitor unit calibration, while their dependence on TPR(20,10) was investigated to determine a set of generalized correlation ratios to be used for beams with TPR(20,10) falling in the examined range. This way, other radiotherapy centers can use the method with no need to locally perform the whole set of measurements in solid water phantoms, required to implement it. Tolerance levels for 3D conformal treatments, ranging between ±5 and ±6% according to tumor type and location, were estimated for comparison purposes between reconstructed isocenter dose, D (iso), and treatment planning system (TPS) computed dose D (iso,TPS). Finally a dedicated software, interfaceable with record and verify (R&V) systems used in the centers, was developed to obtain in vivo dosimetry results in less than 2 min after beam delivery.

  8. Calibration of portal imaging devices for radiotherapy in-vivo dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermattei, Angelo; Cilla, Savino; Fidanzio, Andrea; Greco, Francesca; Sabatino, Domenico; Gargiulo, Laura; Azario, Luigi

    2010-11-01

    The complexity of radiotherapy techniques requires an accurate verification of the dose delivered to the patient during treatment. Recently, the present authors have developed an in patient dose reconstruction method with X-ray beams for 3D conformal radiotherapy. The procedure is based on correlation functions defined by the ratios of the transit signal measured by an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to the mid-plane dose measured by calibrated ion chambers in a solid water phantom. The dosimetric characterization of aSi EPIDs in terms of signal stability, linearity and dependence on field dimension pointed out that these detectors are useful for the transit dosimetry of photon beams. However, the aSi EPIDs manufactured by Varian, Elekta and Siemens for their linacs are at present used for the visual inspection of the patient's set-up, and their use as transit dosimeters needs a special calibration that requires an effort for every beam. The aim of this paper has been the determination of a generalized EPID calibration that can be used by linacs of different manufacturers equipped with aSi EPIDs. The transit dosimetry method here proposed could supply for every linac the reconstruction in real time of the isocenter dose in patients with a tolerance level ranging between ±4% and ±6% depending on the treatment type and body district.

  9. Portal dosimetry in wedged beams.

    PubMed

    Spreeuw, Hanno; Rozendaal, Roel; Camargo, Priscilla; Mans, Anton; Wendling, Markus; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Van Herk, Marcel; Mijnheer, Ben

    2015-05-08

    Portal dosimetry using electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is often applied to verify high-energy photon beam treatments. Due to the change in photon energy spectrum, the resulting dose values are, however, not very accurate in the case of wedged beams if the pixel-to-dose conversion for the situation without wedge is used. A possible solution would be to consider a wedged beam as another photon beam quality requiring separate beam modeling of the dose calculation algorithm. The aim of this study was to investigate a more practical solution: to make aSi EPID-based dosimetry models also applicable for wedged beams without an extra commissioning effort of the parameters of the model. For this purpose two energy-dependent wedge multiplication factors have been introduced to be applied for portal images taken with and without a patient/phantom in the beam. These wedge multiplication factors were derived from EPID and ionization chamber measurements at the EPID level for wedged and nonwedged beams, both with and without a polystyrene slab phantom in the beam. This method was verified for an EPID dosimetry model used for wedged beams at three photon beam energies (6, 10, and 18 MV) by comparing dose values reconstructed in a phantom with data provided by a treatment planning system (TPS), as a function of field size, depth, and off-axis distance. Generally good agreement, within 2%, was observed for depths between dose maximum and 15 cm. Applying the new model to EPID dose measurements performed during ten breast cancer patient treatments with wedged 6 MV photon beams showed that the average isocenter underdosage of 5.3% was reduced to 0.4%. Gamma-evaluation (global 3%/3 mm) of these in vivo data showed an increase in percentage of points with γ ≤ 1 from 60.2% to 87.4%, while γmean reduced from 1.01 to 0.55. It can be concluded that, for wedged beams, the multiplication of EPID pixel values with an energy-dependent correction factor provides good agreement

  10. A Monte Carlo calculation model of electronic portal imaging device for transit dosimetry through heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Jong Oh; Yeo, Inhwan

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a fast Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation model of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based on its effective atomic number modeling in the XVMC code. Methods: A previously developed EPID model, based on the XVMC code by density scaling of EPID structures, was modified by additionally considering effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) of each structure and adopting a phase space file from the EGSnrc code. The model was tested under various homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms and field sizes by comparing the calculations in the model with measurements in EPID. In order to better evaluate the model, the performance of the XVMC code was separately tested by comparing calculated dose to water with ion chamber (IC) array measurement in the plane of EPID. Results: In the EPID plane, calculated dose to water by the code showed agreement with IC measurements within 1.8%. The difference was averaged across the in-field regions of the acquired profiles for all field sizes and phantoms. The maximum point difference was 2.8%, affected by proximity of the maximum points to penumbra and MC noise. The EPID model showed agreement with measured EPID images within 1.3%. The maximum point difference was 1.9%. The difference dropped from the higher value of the code by employing the calibration that is dependent on field sizes and thicknesses for the conversion of calculated images to measured images. Thanks to the Z{sub eff} correction, the EPID model showed a linear trend of the calibration factors unlike those of the density-only-scaled model. The phase space file from the EGSnrc code sharpened penumbra profiles significantly, improving agreement of calculated profiles with measured profiles. Conclusions: Demonstrating high accuracy, the EPID model with the associated calibration system may be used for in vivo dosimetry of radiation therapy. Through this study, a MC model of EPID has been developed, and their performance has been rigorously

  11. Development and testing of an improved dosimetry system using a backscatter shielded electronic portal imaging device

    SciTech Connect

    King, Brian W.; Morf, Daniel; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the properties of a modified backscatter shielded electronic portal imaging device (BSS-EPID) and to develop a dose model to convert BSS-EPID images to dose in water as part of an improved system for dosimetry using EPIDs. Methods: The effectiveness of the shielding of the BSS-EPID was studied by comparing images measured with the BSS-EPID mounted on the support arm to images measured with the BSS-EPID removed from the support arm. A dose model was developed and optimized to reconstruct dose in water at different depths from measured BSS-EPID images. The accuracy of the dose model was studied using BSS-EPID images of 28 IMRT fields to reconstruct dose in water at depths of 2, 5, 10, and 20 cm and comparing to measured dose in water from a two-dimensional diode array at the same depths. The ability of the BSS-EPID system to operate independently of detector position was demonstrated by comparing the dose reconstruction of a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field using different detector offsets to that measured by a two-dimensional diode array. Results: The shielding of the BSS-EPID was found to be effective, with more than 99% of pixels showing less than 0.5% change due to the presence of the support arm and at most a 0.2% effect on the central axis for 2 x 2 cm{sup 2} fields to fully open 30 x 40 cm{sup 2} images. The dose model was shown to accurately reconstruct measurements of dose in water using BSS-EPID images with average {gamma} pass rates (2%, 2 mm criteria) of 92.5%, 98.7%, 97.4%, and 97.2% at depths of 2, 5, 10, and 20 cm, respectively, when compared to two-dimensional diode array measurements. When using 3%, 3 mm {gamma} criteria, the average pass rate was greater than 97% at all depths. Reconstructed dose in water for a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field measured with detector offsets as large as 10 cm agreed with each other and two-dimensional diode array measurements within 0.9%. Conclusions: The modified BSS-EPID and associated dose model provide an

  12. In vivo Portal Imaging Dosimetry Identifies Delivery Errors in Rectal Cancer Radiotherapy on the Belly Board Device.

    PubMed

    Peca, Stefano; Sinha, Richie Siddhartha; Brown, Derek Wilson; Smith, Wendy Lani

    2017-01-01

    We recently developed a novel, open-source in vivo dosimetry that uses the electronic portal imaging device to detect dose delivery discrepancies. We applied our method on patients with rectal cancer treated on a belly board device. In vivo dosimetry was performed on 10 patients with rectal cancer treated prone on the belly board with a 4-field box arrangement. Portal images were acquired approximately once per week from each treatment beam. Our dosimetry method used these images along with the planning CT to reconstruct patient planar dose at isocenter depth. Our algorithm proved sensitive to dose discrepancies and detected discordances in 7 patients. The majority of these were due to soft tissue differences between planning and treatment, present despite matching to bony anatomy. As a result of this work, quality assurance procedures have been implemented for our immobilization devices. In vivo dosimetry is a powerful quality assurance tool that can detect delivery discrepancies, including changes in patient setup and position. The added information on actual dose delivery may be used to evaluate equipment and process quality and to guide for adaptive radiotherapy.

  13. An evaluation of cine-mode 3D portal image dosimetry for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansbacher, W.; Swift, C.-L.; Greer, P. B.

    2010-11-01

    We investigated cine-mode portal imaging on a Varian Trilogy accelerator and found that the linearity and other dosimetric properties are sufficient for 3D dose reconstruction as used in patient-specific quality assurance for VMAT (RapidArc) treatments. We also evaluated the gantry angle label in the portal image file header as a surrogate for the true imaged angle. The precision is only just adequate for the 3D evaluation method chosen, as discrepancies of 2° were observed.

  14. Software tool for portal dosimetry research.

    PubMed

    Vial, P; Hunt, P; Greer, P B; Oliver, L; Baldock, C

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes a software tool developed for research into the use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to verify dose for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams. A portal dose image prediction (PDIP) model that predicts the EPID response to IMRT beams has been implemented into a commercially available treatment planning system (TPS). The software tool described in this work was developed to modify the TPS PDIP model by incorporating correction factors into the predicted EPID image to account for the difference in EPID response to open beam radiation and multileaf collimator (MLC) transmitted radiation. The processes performed by the software tool include; i) read the MLC file and the PDIP from the TPS, ii) calculate the fraction of beam-on time that each point in the IMRT beam is shielded by MLC leaves, iii) interpolate correction factors from look-up tables, iv) create a corrected PDIP image from the product of the original PDIP and the correction factors and write the corrected image to file, v) display, analyse, and export various image datasets. The software tool was developed using the Microsoft Visual Studio.NET framework with the C# compiler. The operation of the software tool was validated. This software provided useful tools for EPID dosimetry research, and it is being utilised and further developed in ongoing EPID dosimetry and IMRT dosimetry projects.

  15. On flattening filter-free portal dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Eduardo; Castro Novais, Juan; Molina López, María Yolanda; Ruiz Maqueda, Sheila

    2016-07-08

    Varian introduced (in 2010) the option of removing the flattening filter (FF) in their C-Arm linacs for intensity-modulated treatments. This mode, called flattening filter-free (FFF), offers the advantage of a greater dose rate. Varian's "Portal Dosimetry" is an electronic portal imager device (EPID)-based tool for IMRT verification. This tool lacks the capability of verifying flattening filter-free (FFF) modes due to saturation and lack of an image prediction algorithm. (Note: the latest versions of this software and EPID correct these issues.) The objective of the present study is to research the feasibility of said verifications (with the older versions of the software and EPID). By placing the EPID at a greater distance, the images can be acquired without saturation, yielding a linearity similar to the flattened mode. For the image prediction, a method was optimized based on the clinically used algorithm (analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA)) over a homogeneous phantom. The depth inside the phantom and its electronic density were tailored. An application was developed to allow the conversion of a dose plane (in DICOM format) to Varian's custom format for Portal Dosimetry. The proposed method was used for the verification of test and clinical fields for the three qualities used in our institution for IMRT: 6X, 6FFF and 10FFF. The method developed yielded a positive verification (more than 95% of the points pass a 2%/2 mm gamma) for both the clinical and test fields. This method was also capable of "predicting" static and wedged fields. A workflow for the verification of FFF fields was developed. This method relies on the clinical algorithm used for dose calculation and is able to verify the FFF modes, as well as being useful for machine quality assurance. The procedure described does not require new hardware. This method could be used as a verification of Varian's Portal Dose Image Prediction.

  16. Feasibility of portal dosimetry for flattening filter-free radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chuter, Robert W; Rixham, Philip A; Weston, Steve J; Cosgrove, Vivian P

    2016-01-08

    The feasibility of using portal dosimetry (PD) to verify 6 MV flattening filter-free (FFF) IMRT treatments was investigated. An Elekta Synergy linear accelerator with an Agility collimator capable of delivering FFF beams and a standard iViewGT amorphous silicon (aSi) EPID panel (RID 1640 AL5P) at a fixed SSD of 160 cm were used. Dose rates for FFF beams are up to four times higher than for conventional flattened beams, meaning images taken at maximum FFF dose rate can saturate the EPID. A dose rate of 800 MU/min was found not to saturate the EPID for open fields. This dose rate was subsequently used to characterize the EPID for FFF portal dosimetry. A range of open and phantom fields were measured with both an ion chamber and the EPID, to allow comparison between the two. The measured data were then used to create a model within The Nederlands Kanker Instituut's (NKI's) portal dosimetry software. The model was verified using simple square fields with a range of field sizes and phantom thicknesses. These were compared to calculations performed with the Monaco treatment planning system (TPS) and isocentric ion chamber measurements. It was found that the results for the FFF verification were similar to those for flattened beams with testing on square fields, indicating a difference in dose between the TPS and portal dosimetry of approximately 1%. Two FFF IMRT plans (prostate and lung SABR) were delivered to a homogeneous phantom and showed an overall dose difference at isocenter of ~0.5% and good agreement between the TPS and PD dose distributions. The feasibility of using the NKI software without any modifications for high-dose-rate FFF beams and using a standard EPID detector has been investigated and some initial limitations highlighted.

  17. Assessment of a 2D electronic portal imaging devices-based dosimetry algorithm for pretreatment and in-vivo midplane dose verification

    PubMed Central

    Jomehzadeh, Ali; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Amouheidari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is a method for the dosimetric verification of radiotherapy plans, both pretreatment and in vivo. The aim of this study is to test a 2D EPID-based dosimetry algorithm for dose verification of some plans inside a homogenous and anthropomorphic phantom and in vivo as well. Materials and Methods: Dose distributions were reconstructed from EPID images using a 2D EPID dosimetry algorithm inside a homogenous slab phantom for a simple 10 × 10 cm2 box technique, 3D conformal (prostate, head-and-neck, and lung), and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) prostate plans inside an anthropomorphic (Alderson) phantom and in the patients (one fraction in vivo) for 3D conformal plans (prostate, head-and-neck and lung). Results: The planned and EPID dose difference at the isocenter, on an average, was 1.7% for pretreatment verification and less than 3% for all in vivo plans, except for head-and-neck, which was 3.6%. The mean γ values for a seven-field prostate IMRT plan delivered to the Alderson phantom varied from 0.28 to 0.65. For 3D conformal plans applied for the Alderson phantom, all γ1% values were within the tolerance level for all plans and in both anteroposterior and posteroanterior (AP-PA) beams. Conclusion: The 2D EPID-based dosimetry algorithm provides an accurate method to verify the dose of a simple 10 × 10 cm2 field, in two dimensions, inside a homogenous slab phantom and an IMRT prostate plan, as well as in 3D conformal plans (prostate, head-and-neck, and lung plans) applied using an anthropomorphic phantom and in vivo. However, further investigation to improve the 2D EPID dosimetry algorithm for a head-and-neck case, is necessary. PMID:28028511

  18. Implementation of IMRT and VMAT using Delta4 phantom and portal dosimetry as dosimetry verification tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daci, Lulzime; Malkaj, Partizan

    2016-03-01

    In this study we analyzed and compared the dose distribution of different IMRT and VMAT plans with the intent to provide pre-treatment quality assurance using two different tools. Materials/Methods: We have used the electronic portal imaging device EPID after calibration to dose and correction for the background offset signal and also the Delta4 phantom after en evaluation of angular sensitivity. The Delta4 phantom has a two-dimensional array with ionization chambers. We analyzed three plans for each anatomical site calculated by Eclipse treatment planning system. The measurements were analyzed using γ-evaluation method with passing criteria 3% absolute dose and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). For all the plans the range of score has been from 97% to 99% for gantry fixed at 0° while for rotational planes there was a slightly decreased pass rates and above 95%. Point measurement with a ionization chamber were done in additional to see the accuracy of portal dosimetry and to evaluate the Delta4 device to various dose rates. Conclusions: Both Delt4 and Portal dosimetry shows good results between the measured and calculated doses. While Delta4 is more accurate in measurements EPID is more time efficient. We have decided to use both methods in the first steps of IMRT and VMAT implementation and later on to decide which of the tools to use depending on the complexity of plans, how much accurate we want to be and the time we have on the machine.

  19. Implementation of IMRT and VMAT using Delta4 phantom and portal dosimetry as dosimetry verification tools

    SciTech Connect

    Daci, Lulzime; Malkaj, Partizan

    2016-03-25

    In this study we analyzed and compared the dose distribution of different IMRT and VMAT plans with the intent to provide pre-treatment quality assurance using two different tools. Materials/Methods: We have used the electronic portal imaging device EPID after calibration to dose and correction for the background offset signal and also the Delta4 phantom after en evaluation of angular sensitivity. The Delta4 phantom has a two-dimensional array with ionization chambers. We analyzed three plans for each anatomical site calculated by Eclipse treatment planning system. The measurements were analyzed using γ-evaluation method with passing criteria 3% absolute dose and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). For all the plans the range of score has been from 97% to 99% for gantry fixed at 0° while for rotational planes there was a slightly decreased pass rates and above 95%. Point measurement with a ionization chamber were done in additional to see the accuracy of portal dosimetry and to evaluate the Delta4 device to various dose rates. Conclusions: Both Delt4 and Portal dosimetry shows good results between the measured and calculated doses. While Delta4 is more accurate in measurements EPID is more time efficient. We have decided to use both methods in the first steps of IMRT and VMAT implementation and later on to decide which of the tools to use depending on the complexity of plans, how much accurate we want to be and the time we have on the machine.

  20. SU-E-T-624: Portal Dosimetry Commissioning of Multiple (6) Varian TrueBeam Linacs Equipped with PortalVision DMI MV Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, M; DiCostanzo, D; Grzetic, S; Hessler, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To show that a single model for Portal Domisetry (PD) can be established for beam-matched TrueBeam™ linacs that are equipped with the DMI imager (43×43cm effective area). Methods: Our department acquired 6 new TrueBeam™s, 4 “Slim” and 2 “Edge” models. The Slims were equipped with 6 and 10MV photons, and the Edges with 6MV. MLCs differed between the Slims and Edges (Millennium 120 vs HD-MLC respectively). PD model was created from data acquired using a single linac (Slim). This includes maximum field size profile, as well as output factors and acquired measured fluence using the DMI imager. All identical linacs were beam-matched, profiles were within 1% at maximum field size at a variety of depths. The profile correction file was generated from 40×40 profile acquired at 5cm depth, 95cm SSD, and was adjusted for deviation at the field edges and corners. The PD model and profile correction was applied to all six TrueBeam™s and imagers. A variety of jaw only and sliding window (SW) MLC test fields, as well as TG-119 and clinical SW and VMAT plans were run on each linac to validate the model. Results: For 6X and 10X, field by field comparison using 3mm/3% absolute gamma criteria passed 90% or better for all cases. This was also true for composite comparisons of TG-199 and clinical plans, matching our current department criteria. Conclusion: Using a single model per photon energy for PD for the TrueBeam™ equipped with a DMI imager can produce clinically acceptable results across multiple identical and matched linacs. It is also possible to use the same PD model despite different MLCs. This can save time during commissioning and software updates.

  1. SU-E-T-335: Transit Dosimetry for Verification of Dose Delivery Using Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, T; Chung, E; Lee, S; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of transit dose, measured with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), in verifying actual dose delivery to patients. Methods: Plans of 5 patients with lung cancer, who received IMRT treatment, were examined using homogeneous solid water phantom and inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. To simulate error in patient positioning, the anthropomorphic phantom was displaced from 5 mm to 10 mm in the inferior to superior (IS), superior to inferior (SI), left to right (LR), and right to left (RL) directions. The transit dose distribution was measured with EPID and was compared to the planed dose using gamma index. Results: Although the average passing rate based on gamma index (GI) with a 3% dose and a 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit was 94.34 % for the transit dose with homogeneous phantom, it was reduced to 84.63 % for the transit dose with inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. The Result also shows that the setup error of 5mm (10mm) in IS, SI, LR and SI direction can Result in the decrease in values of GI passing rates by 1.3% (3.0%), 2.2% (4.3%), 5.9% (10.9%), and 8.9% (16.3%), respectively. Conclusion: Our feasibility study suggests that the transit dose-based quality assurance may provide information regarding accuracy of dose delivery as well as patient positioning.

  2. Denoising portal images by means of wavelet techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Lopez, Antonio Francisco

    Portal images are used in radiotherapy for the verification of patient positioning. The distinguishing feature of this image type lies in its formation process: the same beam used for patient treatment is used for image formation. The high energy of the photons used in radiotherapy strongly limits the quality of portal images: Low contrast between tissues, low spatial resolution and low signal to noise ratio. This Thesis studies the enhancement of these images, in particular denoising of portal images. The statistical properties of portal images and noise are studied: power spectra, statistical dependencies between image and noise and marginal, joint and conditional distributions in the wavelet domain. Later, various denoising methods are applied to noisy portal images. Methods operating in the wavelet domain are the basis of this Thesis. In addition, the Wiener filter and the non local means filter (NLM), operating in the image domain, are used as a reference. Other topics studied in this Thesis are spatial resolution, wavelet processing and image processing in dosimetry in radiotherapy. In this regard, the spatial resolution of portal imaging systems is studied; a new method for determining the spatial resolution of the imaging equipments in digital radiology is presented; the calculation of the power spectrum in the wavelet domain is studied; reducing uncertainty in film dosimetry is investigated; a method for the dosimetry of small radiation fields with radiochromic film is presented; the optimal signal resolution is determined, as a function of the noise level and the quantization step, in the digitization process of films and the useful optical density range is set, as a function of the required uncertainty level, for a densitometric system. Marginal distributions of portal images are similar to those of natural images. This also applies to the statistical relationships between wavelet coefficients, intra-band and inter-band. These facts result in a better

  3. SU-E-T-119: Evaluation of New VMAT and IMRT Planning QA Devices: Portal Dosimetry Vs Compass.

    PubMed

    Kum, O; Shin, H; Han, Y

    2012-06-01

    Wide spread clinical use of advanced radiation treatment delivery techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and IMRT needs an easy-to-use, well-defined, and effective quality assurance (QA) system to ensure the accuracy of dose delivery. The comprehensive evaluation of two delivery QA systems (DQA) (Portal Dosimetry and Compass) for the advanced radiation delivery techniques is necessary for the clinical setting. Portal Dosimetry QA system with Varian PortalVision (PV) provides a quantitative comparison of measured electronic dose profile to a predicted dose profile with Varian's Eclipse™ treatment planning system (TPS) for the VMAT and IMRT plans. Quantitative comparisons of the two images, including dose difference, gamma analysis, points dose measurements, and line profiles are easily acquired in two dimensions. Meanwhile, Compass system with MatriXX can provide an accurate three-dimensional quantitative analysis of dose delivery. We applied the two planning QA systems to our RapidArc patient- specific QAs. Validation of the Compass and Portal Dosimetry systems were performed with ionization chamber measurements for absolute dosimetry and film measurements for gamma index calculations for phantom and patient treatment plans. Compass system was very sensitive to the MLC leaf gap variations in three dimensional gamma analyses. However, Compass system was not enough to fix the errors in dosimetric leaf gap by itself. DQA process with Portal Dosimetry took approximately 6 minutes for the two Arcs VMAT plan. Compass took about 40 minutes for the same plan in our first clinical trial. For the three typical IMRT and VMAT plans, the two systems showed the same passing rates in 95% pixels passing gamma criteria 3%/3mm. Portal Dosimetry DQA system has the advantages of effectiveness and practicality in the clinical setting. On the other hand, Compass was the next supportive system because of its accuracy and reality with patient's anatomy. © 2012

  4. An intercomparison of 11 amorphous silicon EPIDs of the same type: implications for portal dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Peter; Georg, Dietmar

    2006-09-01

    The use of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for portal dosimetry requires knowledge of their dosimetric properties. The pixel value response of amorphous silicon EPIDs of type Elekta iViewGT™ is known to be nonlinear with dose. However, it is not clear whether these nonlinearities vary with time and from one detector to another, respectively. In the present study, the dose-response characteristics of 11 iViewGT EPIDs were investigated with respect to dose rate, total dose and field size. It was found that each detector needs to be individually calibrated, not only in terms of absolute sensitivity but also with respect to its relative response variations with exposure parameters. Doubling the dose rate typically increased the EPID signal between 1.4% and 2.8%. Changing the number of monitor units from 30 to 500 was accompanied by an increase in detector sensitivity between 1.7% and 2.8%. The EPID scatter factors were always within ±1%. It was observed that the dose-response behaviour was not stable with respect to time. Particularly within the first weeks of operation, detector ageing caused variations in both absolute sensitivity and relative response curves. It is recommended to establish a quality assurance programme if the amorphous silicon EPIDs are intended to be used for clinical portal dosimetry.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of portal dosimetry on a rectilinear voxel geometry: a variable gantry angle solution.

    PubMed

    Chin, P W; Spezi, E; Lewis, D G

    2003-08-21

    A software solution has been developed to carry out Monte Carlo simulations of portal dosimetry using the BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc code at oblique gantry angles. The solution is based on an integrated phantom, whereby the effect of incident beam obliquity was included using geometric transformations. Geometric transformations are accurate within +/- 1 mm and +/- 1 degrees with respect to exact values calculated using trigonometry. An application in portal image prediction of an inhomogeneous phantom demonstrated good agreement with measured data, where the root-mean-square of the difference was under 2% within the field. Thus, we achieved a dose model framework capable of handling arbitrary gantry angles, voxel-by-voxel phantom description and realistic particle transport throughout the geometry.

  6. I-124 Imaging and Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Kuker, Russ; Sztejnberg, Manuel; Gulec, Seza

    2017-01-01

    Although radioactive iodine imaging and therapy are one of the earliest applications of theranostics, there still remain a number of unresolved clinical questions as to the optimization of diagnostic techniques and dosimetry protocols. I-124 as a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer has the potential to improve the current clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The higher sensitivity and spatial resolution of PET/computed tomography (CT) compared to standard gamma scintigraphy can aid in the detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and provide more accurate measurements of metabolic tumor volumes. However the complex decay schema of I-124 poses challenges to quantitative PET imaging. More prospective studies are needed to define optimal dosimetry protocols and to improve patient-specific treatment planning strategies, taking into account not only the absorbed dose to tumors but also methods to avoid toxicity to normal organs. A historical perspective of I-124 imaging and dosimetry as well as future concepts are discussed. PMID:28117290

  7. I-124 Imaging and Dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kuker, Russ; Sztejnberg, Manuel; Gulec, Seza

    2016-01-05

    Although radioactive iodine imaging and therapy are one of the earliest applications of theranostics, there still remain a number of unresolved clinical questions as to the optimization of diagnostic techniques and dosimetry protocols. I-124 as a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer has the potential to improve the current clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The higher sensitivity and spatial resolution of PET/computed tomography (CT) compared to standard gamma scintigraphy can aid in the detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and provide more accurate measurements of metabolic tumor volumes. However the complex decay schema of I-124 poses challenges to quantitative PET imaging. More prospective studies are needed to define optimal dosimetry protocols and to improve patient-specific treatment planning strategies, taking into account not only the absorbed dose to tumors but also methods to avoid toxicity to normal organs. A historical perspective of I-124 imaging and dosimetry as well as future concepts are discussed.

  8. Interfractional trend analysis of dose differences based on 2D transit portal dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persoon, L. C. G. G.; Nijsten, S. M. J. J. G.; Wilbrink, F. J.; Podesta, M.; Snaith, J. A. D.; Lustberg, T.; van Elmpt, W. J. C.; van Gils, F.; Verhaegen, F.

    2012-10-01

    Dose delivery of a radiotherapy treatment can be influenced by a number of factors. It has been demonstrated that the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is valuable for transit portal dosimetry verification. Patient related dose differences can emerge at any time during treatment and can be categorized in two types: (1) systematic—appearing repeatedly, (2) random—appearing sporadically during treatment. The aim of this study is to investigate how systematic and random information appears in 2D transit dose distributions measured in the EPID plane over the entire course of a treatment and how this information can be used to examine interfractional trends, building toward a methodology to support adaptive radiotherapy. To create a trend overview of the interfractional changes in transit dose, the predicted portal dose for the different beams is compared to a measured portal dose using a γ evaluation. For each beam of the delivered fraction, information is extracted from the γ images to differentiate systematic from random dose delivery errors. From the systematic differences of a fraction for a projected anatomical structures, several metrics are extracted like percentage pixels with |γ| > 1. We demonstrate for four example cases the trends and dose difference causes which can be detected with this method. Two sample prostate cases show the occurrence of a random and systematic difference and identify the organ that causes the difference. In a lung cancer case a trend is shown of a rapidly diminishing atelectasis (lung fluid) during the course of treatment, which was detected with this trend analysis method. The final example is a breast cancer case where we show the influence of set-up differences on the 2D transit dose. A method is presented based on 2D portal transit dosimetry to record dose changes throughout the course of treatment, and to allow trend analysis of dose discrepancies. We show in example cases that this method can identify the causes of

  9. A portal dosimetry dose prediction method based on collapsed cone algorithm using the clinical beam model.

    PubMed

    Martínez Ortega, J; Gómez González, N; Castro Tejero, P; Pinto Monedero, M; Tolani, N B; Núñez Martín, L; Sánchez Montero, R

    2017-01-01

    Amorphous silicon electronical portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are widely used for dosimetric measurements in Radiation Therapy. The purpose of this work was to determine if a portal dose prediction method can be utilized for dose map calculations based on the linear accelerator model within a commercial treatment planning system (Pinnacle(3) v8.0 m). The method was developed for a 6 MV photon beam on the Varian Clinac 21-EX, at a nominal dose rate of 400 MU/min. The Varian aS1000 EPID was unmounted from the linear accelerator and scanned to acquire CT images of the EPID. The CT images were imported into Pinnacle(3) and were used as a quality assurance phantom to calculate dose on the EPID setup at a source to detector distance of 105 cm. The best match of the dose distributions was obtained considering the image plane located at 106 cm from the source to detector plane. The EPID was calibrated according to the manufacturer procedure and corrections were made for output factors. Arm-backscattering effect, based on profile correction curves, has been introduced. Five low-modulated and three high-modulated clinical planned treatments were predicted and measured with the method presented here and with MatriXX (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). A portal dose prediction method based on Pinnacle(3) was developed without modifying the commissioned parameters of the model in use in the clinic. CT images of the EPID were acquired and used as a quality assurance phantom. The CT images indicated a mean density of 1.16 g/cm(3) for the sensitive area of the EPID. Output factor measured with the EPID were lower for small fields and larger for larger fields (beyond 10 × 10 cm(2) ). Arm-backscatter correction showed a better agreement at the target side of the EPID. Analysis of Gamma index comparison (3%, 3 mm) indicated a minimum of 97.4% pass rate for low modulated and 98.3% for high modulated treatments. Pass rates were similar for MatriXX measurements. The

  10. Three-dimensional heart dose reconstruction to estimate normal tissue complication probability after breast irradiation using portal dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Louwe, R. J. W.; Wendling, M.; Herk, M. B. van; Mijnheer, B. J.

    2007-04-15

    Irradiation of the heart is one of the major concerns during radiotherapy of breast cancer. Three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning would therefore be useful but cannot always be performed for left-sided breast treatments, because CT data may not be available. However, even if 3D dose calculations are available and an estimate of the normal tissue damage can be made, uncertainties in patient positioning may significantly influence the heart dose during treatment. Therefore, 3D reconstruction of the actual heart dose during breast cancer treatment using electronic imaging portal device (EPID) dosimetry has been investigated. A previously described method to reconstruct the dose in the patient from treatment portal images at the radiological midsurface was used in combination with a simple geometrical model of the irradiated heart volume to enable calculation of dose-volume histograms (DVHs), to independently verify this aspect of the treatment without using 3D data from a planning CT scan. To investigate the accuracy of our method, the DVHs obtained with full 3D treatment planning system (TPS) calculations and those obtained after resampling the TPS dose in the radiological midsurface were compared for fifteen breast cancer patients for whom CT data were available. In addition, EPID dosimetry as well as 3D dose calculations using our TPS, film dosimetry, and ionization chamber measurements were performed in an anthropomorphic phantom. It was found that the dose reconstructed using EPID dosimetry and the dose calculated with the TPS agreed within 1.5% in the lung/heart region. The dose-volume histograms obtained with EPID dosimetry were used to estimate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for late excess cardiac mortality. Although the accuracy of these NTCP calculations might be limited due to the uncertainty in the NTCP model, in combination with our portal dosimetry approach it allows incorporation of the actual heart dose. For the anthropomorphic

  11. SU-E-J-235: Varian Portal Dosimetry Accuracy at Detecting Simulated Delivery Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J; Bellon, M; Barton, K; Gulam, M; Chetty, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To use receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to quantify the Varian Portal Dosimetry (VPD) application's ability to detect delivery errors in IMRT fields. Methods: EPID and VPD were calibrated/commissioned using vendor-recommended procedures. Five clinical plans comprising 56 modulated fields were analyzed using VPD. Treatment sites were: pelvis, prostate, brain, orbit, and base of tongue. Delivery was on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator at 6MV using a Millenium120 multi-leaf collimator. Image pairs (VPD-predicted and measured) were exported in dicom format. Each detection test imported an image pair into Matlab, optionally inserted a simulated error (rectangular region with intensity raised or lowered) into the measured image, performed 3%/3mm gamma analysis, and saved the gamma distribution. For a given error, 56 negative tests (without error) were performed, one per 56 image pairs. Also, 560 positive tests (with error) with randomly selected image pairs and randomly selected in-field error location. Images were classified as errored (or error-free) if percent pixels with γ<κ was < (or ≥) τ. (Conventionally, κ=1 and τ=90%.) A ROC curve was generated from the 616 tests by varying τ. For a range of κ and τ, true/false positive/negative rates were calculated. This procedure was repeated for inserted errors of different sizes. VPD was considered to reliably detect an error if images were correctly classified as errored or error-free at least 95% of the time, for some κ+τ combination. Results: 20mm{sup 2} errors with intensity altered by ≥20% could be reliably detected, as could 10mm{sup 2} errors with intensity was altered by ≥50%. Errors with smaller size or intensity change could not be reliably detected. Conclusion: Varian Portal Dosimetry using 3%/3mm gamma analysis is capable of reliably detecting only those fluence errors that exceed the stated sizes. Images containing smaller errors can pass mathematical analysis, though

  12. Practical approach for pretreatment verification of IMRT with flattening filter free(FFF) beams using Varian Portal Dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Min, Soonki; Choi, Young Eun; Kwak, Jungwon; Cho, Byungchul

    2014-01-08

    Patient-specific pretreatment verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is strongly recommended for all patients in order to detect any potential errors in treatment planning process and machine deliverability, and is thus performed routinely in many clinics. Portal dosimetry is an effective method for this purpose because of its prompt setup, easy data acquisition, and high spatial resolution. However, portal dosimetry cannot be applied to IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter-free (FFF) beams because of the high dose-rate saturation effect of the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). In our current report, we suggest a practical QA method of expanding the conventional portal dosimetry to FFF beams with a QA plan generated by the following three steps: 1) replace the FFF beams with flattening filtered (FF) beams of the same nominal energy; 2) reduce the dose rate to avoid the saturation effect of the EPID detector; and 3) adjust the total MU to match the gantry and MLC leaf motions. Two RapidArc plans with 6 and 10 MV FFF beams were selected, and QA plans were created by the aforementioned steps and delivered. The trajectory log files of TrueBeam obtained during the treatment and during the delivery of QA plan were analyzed and compared. The maximum discrepancies in the expected trajectories between the treatment and QA plans were within 0.002 MU for the MU, 0.06° for the motion of gantry rotation, and 0.006 mm for the positions of the MLC leaves, indicating much higher levels of accuracy compared to the mechanical specifications of the machine. For further validation of the method, direct comparisons of the delivered QA FF beam to the treatment FFF beam were performed using film dosimetry and show that gamma passing rates under 2%/2 mm criteria are 99.0%-100% for the all four arc beams. This method can be used on RapidArc plans with FFF beams without any additional procedure or modifications on the

  13. Portal cavernoma cholangiopathy: diagnosis, imaging, and intervention.

    PubMed

    Moomjian, Lauren N; Winks, Sarah G

    2017-01-01

    The term portal cavernoma cholangiopathy refers to the biliary tract abnormalities that accompany extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) and subsequent cavernous transformation of the portal vein. EHPVO is a primary vascular disorder of the portal vein in children and adults manifested by longstanding thrombosis of the main portal vein. Nearly all patients with EHPVO have manifestations of portal cavernoma cholangiopathy, such as extrinsic indentation on the bile duct and mild bile duct narrowing, but the majority are asymptomatic. However, progressive portal cavernoma cholangiopathy may lead to severe complications, including secondary biliary cirrhosis. A spectrum of changes is seen radiologically in the setting of portal cavernoma cholangiopathy, including extrinsic indentation of the bile ducts, bile duct stricturing, bile duct wall thickening, angulation and displacement of the extrahepatic bile duct, cholelithiasis, choledocholithiasis, and hepatolithiasis. Radiologists must be aware of this disorder in order to provide appropriate imaging evaluation and interpretation, to facilitate appropriate treatment and to distinguish this entity from its potential radiologic mimics.

  14. Quantifying the performance of in vivo portal dosimetry in detecting four types of treatment parameter variations

    SciTech Connect

    Bojechko, C.; Ford, E. C.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To quantify the ability of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry used during treatment (in vivo) in detecting variations that can occur in the course of patient treatment. Methods: Images of transmitted radiation from in vivo EPID measurements were converted to a 2D planar dose at isocenter and compared to the treatment planning dose using a prototype software system. Using the treatment planning system (TPS), four different types of variability were modeled: overall dose scaling, shifting the positions of the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves, shifting of the patient position, and changes in the patient body contour. The gamma pass rate was calculated for the modified and unmodified plans and used to construct a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve to assess the detectability of the different parameter variations. The detectability is given by the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The TPS was also used to calculate the impact of the variations on the target dose–volume histogram. Results: Nine intensity modulation radiation therapy plans were measured for four different anatomical sites consisting of 70 separate fields. Results show that in vivo EPID dosimetry was most sensitive to variations in the machine output, AUC = 0.70 − 0.94, changes in patient body habitus, AUC = 0.67 − 0.88, and systematic shifts in the MLC bank positions, AUC = 0.59 − 0.82. These deviations are expected to have a relatively small clinical impact [planning target volume (PTV) D{sub 99} change <7%]. Larger variations have even higher detectability. Displacements in the patient’s position and random variations in MLC leaf positions were not readily detectable, AUC < 0.64. The D{sub 99} of the PTV changed by up to 57% for the patient position shifts considered here. Conclusions: In vivo EPID dosimetry is able to detect relatively small variations in overall dose, systematic shifts of the MLC’s, and changes in the patient habitus. Shifts in the

  15. SU-E-J-70: Evaluation of Multiple Isocentric Intensity Modulated and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Techniques Using Portal Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidhar, K Raja; Pangam, S; Kolla, J; Ponaganti, S; Ali, M; Vuba, S; Mariyappan, P; Babaiah, M; Komanduri, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for verification of dose distribution in a patient during treatment using multiple isocentric Intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc therapy techniques with portal dosimetry. Methods: Varian True Beam accelerator, equipped with an aS1000 megavoltage electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has an integrated image mode for portal dosimetry (PD). The source-to-imager distance was taken at 150 cm to avoid collision to the table. Fourteen fractions were analyzed for this study. During shift in a single plan from one isocenter to another isocenter, EPID also shifted longitudinally for each field by taking the extent of divergence of beam into the consideration for EPID distance of 150cm. Patients were given treatment everyday with EPID placed in proper position for each field. Several parameters were obtained by comparing the dose distribution between fractions to fraction. The impact of the intra-fraction and inter-fraction of the patient in combination with isocenter shift of the beams were observed. Results: During treatment, measurements were performed by EPID and were evaluated by the gamma method. Analysis was done between fractions for multiple isocenter treatments. The pass rates of the gamma analysis with a criterion of 3% and 3 mm for the 14 fractions were over 97.8% with good consistency. Whereas maximum gamma exceeded the criteria in few fractions (in<1 cc vol). Average gamma was observed in the criteria of 0.5%. Maximum dose difference and average dose differences were less than 0.22 CU and 0.01 CU for maximum tolerance of 1.0 CU and 0.2 CU respectively. Conclusion: EPID with extended distance is ideal method to verify the multiple isocentric dose distribution in patient during treatment, especially cold and hot spots in junction dose. Verification of shifts as well as the dose differences between each fraction due to inter-fraction and intra-fraction of the patient can be derived.

  16. Time-resolved versus time-integrated portal dosimetry: the role of an object’s position with respect to the isocenter in volumetric modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schyns, Lotte E. J. R.; Persoon, Lucas C. G. G.; Podesta, Mark; van Elmpt, Wouter J. C.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work is to compare time-resolved (TR) and time-integrated (TI) portal dosimetry, focussing on the role of an object’s position with respect to the isocenter in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Portal dose images (PDIs) are simulated and measured for different cases: a sphere (1), a bovine bone (2) and a patient geometry (3). For the simulated case (1) and the experimental case (2), several transformations are applied at different off-axis positions. In the patient case (3), three simple plans with different isocenters are created and pleural effusion is simulated in the patient. The PDIs before and after the sphere transformations, as well as the PDIs with and without simulated pleural effusion, are compared using a TI and TR gamma analysis. In addition, the performance of the TI and TR gamma analyses for the detection of real geometric changes in patients treated with clinical plans is investigated and a correlation analysis is performed between gamma fail rates and differences in dose volume histogram (DVH) metrics. The TI gamma analysis can show large differences in gamma fail rates for the same transformation at different off-axis positions (or for different plan isocenters). The TR gamma analysis, however, shows consistent gamma fail rates. For the detection of real geometric changes in patients treated with clinical plans, the TR gamma analysis has a higher sensitivity than the TI gamma analysis. However, the specificity for the TR gamma analysis is lower than for the TI gamma analysis. Both the TI and TR gamma fail rates show no correlation with changes in DVH metrics. This work shows that TR portal dosimetry is fundamentally superior to TI portal dosimetry, because it removes the strong dependence of the gamma fail rate on the off-axis position/plan isocenter. However, for 2D TR portal dosimetry, it is still difficult to interpret gamma fail rates in terms of changes in DVH metrics for patients treated with VMAT.

  17. Time-resolved versus time-integrated portal dosimetry: the role of an object's position with respect to the isocenter in volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Schyns, Lotte E J R; Persoon, Lucas C G G; Podesta, Mark; van Elmpt, Wouter J C; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-05-21

    The aim of this work is to compare time-resolved (TR) and time-integrated (TI) portal dosimetry, focussing on the role of an object's position with respect to the isocenter in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Portal dose images (PDIs) are simulated and measured for different cases: a sphere (1), a bovine bone (2) and a patient geometry (3). For the simulated case (1) and the experimental case (2), several transformations are applied at different off-axis positions. In the patient case (3), three simple plans with different isocenters are created and pleural effusion is simulated in the patient. The PDIs before and after the sphere transformations, as well as the PDIs with and without simulated pleural effusion, are compared using a TI and TR gamma analysis. In addition, the performance of the TI and TR gamma analyses for the detection of real geometric changes in patients treated with clinical plans is investigated and a correlation analysis is performed between gamma fail rates and differences in dose volume histogram (DVH) metrics. The TI gamma analysis can show large differences in gamma fail rates for the same transformation at different off-axis positions (or for different plan isocenters). The TR gamma analysis, however, shows consistent gamma fail rates. For the detection of real geometric changes in patients treated with clinical plans, the TR gamma analysis has a higher sensitivity than the TI gamma analysis. However, the specificity for the TR gamma analysis is lower than for the TI gamma analysis. Both the TI and TR gamma fail rates show no correlation with changes in DVH metrics. This work shows that TR portal dosimetry is fundamentally superior to TI portal dosimetry, because it removes the strong dependence of the gamma fail rate on the off-axis position/plan isocenter. However, for 2D TR portal dosimetry, it is still difficult to interpret gamma fail rates in terms of changes in DVH metrics for patients treated with VMAT.

  18. MR imaging in idiopathic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Arai, K; Matsui, O; Kadoya, M; Yoshikawa, J; Gabata, T; Takashima, T; Kobayashi, K; Unoura, M

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in four patients with biopsy proven idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH). The MR images show proximity of medium-sized intrahepatic vessels to each other and to the liver surface in all patients. Small vessels running parallel to the second order branches of the intrahepatic portal vein are commonly seen as collateral pathways of portal flow in IPH and were seen in two patients. These findings were clearly demonstrated on gradient-recalled echo images. Intrahepatic periportal abnormal high intensity was seen in all patients on T2-weighted images and may reflect abnormalities in the portal tracts such as fibrous enlargement and increase in the number of vascular channels. Tiny low-intensity nodules sometimes observed in liver cirrhosis were not seen in any patient. Magnetic resonance was a useful noninvasive method in the differentiation of IPH from liver cirrhosis.

  19. 3-D Imaging Based, Radiobiological Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric; Wahl, Richard; He, Bin; Prideaux, Andrew; Hobbs, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy holds promise as a new treatment against cancer. Advances in imaging are making it possible to evaluate the spatial distribution of radioactivity in tumors and normal organs over time. Matched anatomical imaging such as combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT have also made it possible to obtain tissue density information in conjunction with the radioactivity distribution. Coupled with sophisticated iterative reconstruction algorithims, these advances have made it possible to perform highly patient-specific dosimetry that also incorporates radiobiological modeling. Such sophisticated dosimetry techniques are still in the research investigation phase. Given the attendant logistical and financial costs, a demonstrated improvement in patient care will be a prerequisite for the adoption of such highly-patient specific internal dosimetry methods. PMID:18662554

  20. Detection of anatomical changes in lung cancer patients with 2D time-integrated, 2D time-resolved and 3D time-integrated portal dosimetry: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfs, Cecile J. A.; Brás, Mariana G.; Schyns, Lotte E. J. R.; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M. J. J. G.; van Elmpt, Wouter; Scheib, Stefan G.; Baltes, Christof; Podesta, Mark; Verhaegen, Frank

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this work is to assess the performance of 2D time-integrated (2D-TI), 2D time-resolved (2D-TR) and 3D time-integrated (3D-TI) portal dosimetry in detecting dose discrepancies between the planned and (simulated) delivered dose caused by simulated changes in the anatomy of lung cancer patients. For six lung cancer patients, tumor shift, tumor regression and pleural effusion are simulated by modifying their CT images. Based on the modified CT images, time-integrated (TI) and time-resolved (TR) portal dose images (PDIs) are simulated and 3D-TI doses are calculated. The modified and original PDIs and 3D doses are compared by a gamma analysis with various gamma criteria. Furthermore, the difference in the D 95% (ΔD 95%) of the GTV is calculated and used as a gold standard. The correlation between the gamma fail rate and the ΔD 95% is investigated, as well the sensitivity and specificity of all combinations of portal dosimetry method, gamma criteria and gamma fail rate threshold. On the individual patient level, there is a correlation between the gamma fail rate and the ΔD 95%, which cannot be found at the group level. The sensitivity and specificity analysis showed that there is not one combination of portal dosimetry method, gamma criteria and gamma fail rate threshold that can detect all simulated anatomical changes. This work shows that it will be more beneficial to relate portal dosimetry and DVH analysis on the patient level, rather than trying to quantify a relationship for a group of patients. With regards to optimizing sensitivity and specificity, different combinations of portal dosimetry method, gamma criteria and gamma fail rate should be used to optimally detect certain types of anatomical changes.

  1. Detection of anatomical changes in lung cancer patients with 2D time-integrated, 2D time-resolved and 3D time-integrated portal dosimetry: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Wolfs, Cecile J A; Brás, Mariana G; Schyns, Lotte E J R; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M J J G; van Elmpt, Wouter; Scheib, Stefan G; Baltes, Christof; Podesta, Mark; Verhaegen, Frank

    2017-07-12

    The aim of this work is to assess the performance of 2D time-integrated (2D-TI), 2D time-resolved (2D-TR) and 3D time-integrated (3D-TI) portal dosimetry in detecting dose discrepancies between the planned and (simulated) delivered dose caused by simulated changes in the anatomy of lung cancer patients. For six lung cancer patients, tumor shift, tumor regression and pleural effusion are simulated by modifying their CT images. Based on the modified CT images, time-integrated (TI) and time-resolved (TR) portal dose images (PDIs) are simulated and 3D-TI doses are calculated. The modified and original PDIs and 3D doses are compared by a gamma analysis with various gamma criteria. Furthermore, the difference in the D 95% (ΔD 95%) of the GTV is calculated and used as a gold standard. The correlation between the gamma fail rate and the ΔD 95% is investigated, as well the sensitivity and specificity of all combinations of portal dosimetry method, gamma criteria and gamma fail rate threshold. On the individual patient level, there is a correlation between the gamma fail rate and the ΔD 95%, which cannot be found at the group level. The sensitivity and specificity analysis showed that there is not one combination of portal dosimetry method, gamma criteria and gamma fail rate threshold that can detect all simulated anatomical changes. This work shows that it will be more beneficial to relate portal dosimetry and DVH analysis on the patient level, rather than trying to quantify a relationship for a group of patients. With regards to optimizing sensitivity and specificity, different combinations of portal dosimetry method, gamma criteria and gamma fail rate should be used to optimally detect certain types of anatomical changes.

  2. Quality of treatment plans and accuracy of in vivo portal dosimetry in hybrid intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bedford, James L; Smyth, Gregory; Hanson, Ian M; Tree, Alison C; Dearnaley, David P; Hansen, Vibeke N

    2016-08-01

    Delivering selected parts of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans using step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beams has the potential to increase plan quality by allowing specific aperture positioning. This study investigates the quality of treatment plans and the accuracy of in vivo portal dosimetry in such a hybrid approach for the case of prostate radiotherapy. Conformal and limited-modulation VMAT plans were produced, together with five hybrid IMRT/VMAT plans, in which 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% or 100% of the segments were sequenced for IMRT, while the remainder were sequenced for VMAT. Integrated portal images were predicted for the plans. The plans were then delivered as a single hybrid beam using an Elekta Synergy accelerator with Agility head to a water-equivalent phantom and treatment time, isocentric dose and portal images were measured. Increasing the IMRT percentage improves dose uniformity to the planning target volume (p<0.01 for 50% IMRT or more), substantially reduces the volume of rectum irradiated to 65Gy (p=0.02 for 25% IMRT) and increases the monitor units (p<0.001). Delivery time also increases substantially. All plans show accurate delivery of dose and reliable prediction of portal images. Hybrid IMRT/VMAT can be efficiently planned and delivered as a single beam sequence. Beyond 25% IMRT, the delivery time becomes unacceptably long, with increased risk of intrafraction motion, but 25% IMRT is an attractive compromise. Integrated portal images can be used to perform in vivo dosimetry for this technique. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  4. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  5. Initial Clinical Experience Performing Patient Treatment Verification With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device Transit Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Sean L.; Polvorosa, Cynthia; Cheng, Simon; Deutsch, Israel; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate a 2-dimensional transit dosimetry algorithm's performance on a patient population and to analyze the issues that would arise in a widespread clinical adoption of transit electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients were enrolled on the protocol; 9 completed and were analyzed. Pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient-specific quality assurance was performed using a stringent local 3%, 3-mm γ criterion to verify that the planned fluence had been appropriately transferred to and delivered by the linear accelerator. Transit dosimetric EPID images were then acquired during treatment and compared offline with predicted transit images using a global 5%, 3-mm γ criterion. Results: There were 288 transit images analyzed. The overall γ pass rate was 89.1% ± 9.8% (average ± 1 SD). For the subset of images for which the linear accelerator couch did not interfere with the measurement, the γ pass rate was 95.7% ± 2.4%. A case study is presented in which the transit dosimetry algorithm was able to identify that a lung patient's bilateral pleural effusion had resolved in the time between the planning CT scan and the treatment. Conclusions: The EPID transit dosimetry algorithm under consideration, previously described and verified in a phantom study, is feasible for use in treatment delivery verification for real patients. Two-dimensional EPID transit dosimetry can play an important role in indicating when a treatment delivery is inconsistent with the original plan.

  6. Patient Portal Preferences: Perspectives on Imaging Information.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Mary; Arnold, Corey; Sarma, Karthik; Aberle, Denise; Garon, Edward; Bui, Alex A T

    2015-08-01

    Patient portals have the potential to provide content that is specifically tailored to a patient's information needs based on diagnoses and other factors. In this work, we conducted a survey of 41 lung cancer patients at an outpatient lung cancer clinic at the medical center of the University of California Los Angeles, to gain insight into these perceived information needs and opinions on the design of a portal to fulfill them. We found that patients requested access to information related to diagnosis and imaging, with more than half of the patients reporting that they did not anticipate an increase in anxiety due to access to medical record information via a portal. We also found that patient educational background did not lead to a significant difference in desires for explanations of reports and definitions of terms.

  7. SU-E-T-364: 6X FFF and 10X FFF Portal Dosimetry Output Factor Verification: Application for SRS/SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Gulam, M; Bellon, M; Gopal, A; Wen, N; Chetty, I; Gordon, J; Hames, S; Schmidt, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To enhance portal dosimetry of high dose rate SRS/SBRT plan verifications with extensive imager measurement of output factors (OF). Methods: Electronic portal image dosimetry (EPID), implemented on the Varian Edge allows for acquisition of its two energies: 6X FFF and 10 FFF (1400 and 2400 MU/min, respectively) at source to imager distance (SID) =100cm without imager saturation. Square and rectangular aSi OF following EPID calibration were obtained. Data taken was similar to that obtained during beam commissioning (of almost all field sizes from 1×1 to 15×15 and 20×20 cm{sup 2}, [Trilogy] and [Edge], respectively) to construct a table using the OF tool for use in the Portal Dosimetry Prediction Algorithm (PDIP v11). The Trilogy 6x SRS 1000 MU/min EPID data were taken at 140 SID. The large number of OF were obtained for comparison to that obtained with diode detectors and ion chambers (cc13 for >3×3 field size). As Edge PDIP verification is currently ongoing, EPID measurements of three SRS/SBRT plans for the Trilogy were taken and compared to results obtained prior to these measurements. Results: The relative difference output factors of field sizes 2×2 and higher compared to commissioning data were (mean+/-SD, [range]): Edge 6X (−1.9+/−2.9%, [−5.9%,3.1%]), Edge 10X (−0.7+/−1.2%, [− 3.3%,0.8%] and Trilogy (0.03+/−0.5%, [−1.4%,1.1%]) with EPID over predicting. The results for the 140 SID showed excellent agreement throughout except at the 1×1 to 1×15 and 15×1 field sizes where differences were: −10.6%, −6.0% and −5.8%. The differences were also most pronounced for the 1×1 at 100 SID. They were −7.4% and −11.5% for 6X and 10X, respectively. The Gamma (3%, 1mm) for three clinical plans improved by 8.7+/−1.8%. Conclusion: Results indicate that imager output factor measurements at any SID of high dose rate SRS/SBRT are quite reliable for portal dosimetry plan verification except for the smallest fields. This work was not

  8. [Statistical process control applied to intensity modulated radiotherapy pretreatment controls with portal dosimetry].

    PubMed

    Villani, N; Gérard, K; Marchesi, V; Huger, S; François, P; Noël, A

    2010-06-01

    The first purpose of this study was to illustrate the contribution of statistical process control for a better security in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments. This improvement is possible by controlling the dose delivery process, characterized by pretreatment quality control results. So, it is necessary to put under control portal dosimetry measurements (currently, the ionisation chamber measurements were already monitored by statistical process control thanks to statistical process control tools). The second objective was to state whether it is possible to substitute ionisation chamber with portal dosimetry in order to optimize time devoted to pretreatment quality control. At Alexis-Vautrin center, pretreatment quality controls in IMRT for prostate and head and neck treatments were performed for each beam of each patient. These controls were made with an ionisation chamber, which is the reference detector for the absolute dose measurement, and with portal dosimetry for the verification of dose distribution. Statistical process control is a statistical analysis method, coming from industry, used to control and improve the studied process quality. It uses graphic tools as control maps to follow-up process, warning the operator in case of failure, and quantitative tools to evaluate the process toward its ability to respect guidelines: this is the capability study. The study was performed on 450 head and neck beams and on 100 prostate beams. Control charts, showing drifts, both slow and weak, and also both strong and fast, of mean and standard deviation have been established and have shown special cause introduced (manual shift of the leaf gap of the multileaf collimator). Correlation between dose measured at one point, given with the EPID and the ionisation chamber has been evaluated at more than 97% and disagreement cases between the two measurements were identified. The study allowed to demonstrate the feasibility to reduce the time devoted to

  9. Acoustic images of gel dosimetry phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Silvio L.; Baggio, André; Kinnick, Randall R.; Fatemi, M.; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton O.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents Vibro-acoustography (VA) as a tool to visualize absorbed dose in a polymer gel dosimetry phantom. VA relies on the mechanical excitation introduced by the acoustic radiation force of focused modulated ultrasound in a small region of the object. A hydrophone or microphone is used to measure the sound emitted from the object in response to the excitation, and by using the amplitude or phase of this signal, an image of the object can be generated. To study the phenomena of dose distribution in a gel dosimetry phantom, continuous wave (CW), tone burst and multi-frequency VA were used to image this phantom. The phantom was designed using 'MAGIC' gel polymer with addition of glass microspheres at 2% w/w having an average diameter range between 40-75 μm. The gel was irradiated using conventional 10 MeV X-rays from a linear accelerator. The field size in the surface of the phantom was 1.0×1.0 cm2 and a source-surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm. The irradiated volume corresponds to an approximately 8.0 cm3, where a dose of 50 gray was delivered to the gel. Polymer gel dosimeters are sensitive to radiation-induced chemical changes that occur in the irradiated polymer. VA images of the gel dosimeter showed the irradiate area. It is concluded that VA imaging has potential to visualize dose distribution in a polymer gel dosimeter.

  10. Open source portal to distributed image repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wenchao; Ratib, Osman M.; Kho, Hwa; Hsu, Yung-Chao; Wang, Cun; Lee, Cason; McCoy, J. M.

    2004-04-01

    In large institution PACS, patient data may often reside in multiple separate systems. While most systems tend to be DICOM compliant, none of them offer the flexibility of seamless integration of multiple DICOM sources through a single access point. We developed a generic portal system with a web-based interactive front-end as well as an application programming interface (API) that allows both web users and client applications to query and retrieve image data from multiple DICOM sources. A set of software tools was developed to allow accessing several DICOM archives through a single point of access. An interactive web-based front-end allows user to search image data seamlessly from the different archives and display the results or route the image data to another DICOM compliant destination. An XML-based API allows other software programs to easily benefit from this portal to query and retrieve image data as well. Various techniques are employed to minimize the performance overhead inherent in the DICOM. The system is integrated with a hospital-wide HIPAA-compliant authentication and auditing service that provides centralized management of access to patient medical records. The system is provided under open source free licensing and developed using open-source components (Apache Tomcat for web server, MySQL for database, OJB for object/relational data mapping etc.). The portal paradigm offers a convenient and effective solution for accessing multiple image data sources in a given healthcare enterprise and can easily be extended to multi-institution through appropriate security and encryption mechanisms.

  11. Epid Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Peter B.; Vial, Philip

    2011-05-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were introduced originally for patient position verification. The idea of using EPIDs for dosimetry was realised in the 1980s. Little was published on the topic until the mid 1990's, when the interest in EPIDs for dosimetry increased rapidly and continues to grow. The increasing research on EPID dosimetry coincided with the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). EPIDs are well suited to IMRT dosimetry because they are high resolution, two-dimensional (2D) digital detectors. They are also pre-existing on almost all modern linear accelerators. They generally show a linear response to increasing dose. Different types of EPIDs have been clinically implemented, and these have been described in several review papers. The current generation of commercially available EPIDs are indirect detection active matrix flat panel imagers, also known as amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPIDs. Disadvantages of a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry include non-water equivalent construction materials, and the energy sensitivity and optical scatter of the phosphor scintillators used to create optical signal from the megavoltage beam. This report discusses current knowledge regarding a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry.

  12. Quality Control of Portal Imaging with PTW EPID QC PHANTOM.

    PubMed

    Pesznyák, Csilla; Fekete, Gábor; Mózes, Arpád; Kiss, Balázs; Király, Réka; Polgár, István; Zaránd, Pál; Mayer, Arpád

    2009-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of different electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) and portal images with the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM. Characteristic properties of images of different file formats were measured on Siemens OptiVue500aSi, Siemens BeamView Plus, Elekta iView, and Varian PortalVision and analyzed with the epidSoft 2.0 program in four radiation therapy centers. The portal images were taken with Kodak X-OMAT V and the Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack films and evaluated with the same program. The optimal exposition both for EPIDs and portal films of different kind was determined. For double exposition, the 2+1 MU values can be recommended in the case of Siemens OptiVue500aSi Elekta iView and Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack films, while for Siemens BeamView Plus, Varian PortalVision and Kodak X-OMAT V film 7+7 MU is recommended. The PTW EPID QC PHANTOM can be used not only for amorphous silicon EPIDs but also for images taken with a video-based system or by using an ionization chamber matrix or for portal film. For analysis of QC tests, a standardized format (used at the acceptance test) should be applied, as the results are dependent on the file format used.

  13. Impact of dose rate on accuracy of intensity modulated radiation therapy plan delivery using the pretreatment portal dosimetry quality assurance and setting up the workflow at hospital levels

    PubMed Central

    Kaviarasu, Karunakaran; Raj, N. Arunai Nambi; Murthy, K. Krishna; Babu, A. Ananda Giri; Prasad, Bhaskar Laxman Durga

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of dose rate on accuracy of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan delivery by comparing the gamma agreement between the calculated and measured portal doses by pretreatment quality assurance (QA) using electronic portal imaging device dosimetry and creating a workflow for the pretreatment IMRT QA at hospital levels. As the improvement in gamma agreement leads to increase in the quality of IMRT treatment delivery, gamma evaluation was carried out for the calculated and the measured portal images for the criteria of 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement (DTA). Three gamma parameters: Maximum gamma, average gamma, and percentage of the field area with a gamma value>1.0 were analyzed. Three gamma index parameters were evaluated for 40 IMRT plans (315 IMRT fields) which were calculated for 400 monitor units (MU)/min dose rate and maximum multileaf collimator (MLC) speed of 2.5 cm/s. Gamma parameters for all 315 fields are within acceptable limits set at our center. Further, to improve the gamma results, we set an action level for this study using the mean and standard deviation (SD) values from the 315 fields studied. Forty out of 315 IMRT fields showed low gamma agreement (gamma parameters>2 SD as per action level of the study). The parameters were recalculated and reanalyzed for the dose rates of 300, 400 and 500 MU/min. Lowering the dose rate helped in getting an enhanced gamma agreement between the calculated and measured portal doses of complicated fields. This may be attributed to the less complex motion of MLC over time and the MU of the field/segment. An IMRT QA work flow was prepared which will help in improving the quality of IMRT delivery. PMID:26865759

  14. [PIV: a computer-aided portal image verification system].

    PubMed

    Fu, Weihua; Zhang, Hongzhi; Wu, Jing

    2002-12-01

    Portal image verification (PIV) is one of the key actions in QA procedure for sophisticated accurate radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to develop a PIV software as a tool for improving the accuracy and visualization of portal field verification and computing field placement errors. PIV was developed in the visual C++ integrated environment under Windows 95 operating system. It can improve visualization by providing tools for image processing and multimode images display. Semi-automatic register methods make verification more accurate than view-box method. It can provide useful quantitative errors for regular fields. PIV is flexible and accurate. It is an effective tool for portal field verification.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of the transit dosimetric response of an a-Si electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, S. J.; McNamara, A. L.; Vial, P.; Holloway, L.; Greer, P. B.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-03-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are x-ray detectors frequently used in radiotherapy imaging and dosimetry applications. EPIDs employ a copper plate and gadolinium oxysulfide phosphor screen with an array of a-Si photodiodes to indirectly detect incident radiation. In this study, a previously developed Monte Carlo (MC) model of an a-Si EPID has been extended for transit dosimetry. The GEANT4 MC toolkit was used to integrate an a-Si EPID model with two phantoms and a 6 MV x-ray source. A solid water phantom was used to simulate EPID transmission factors, field size output factors and relative dose profiles and results were compared to experimental measurements. An anthropomorphic head phantom was used to qualitatively compare simulated and measured portal images of humanoid anatomy. Calculated transmission factors and field size output factors agreed to within 2.0% and 1.9% of experimental measurements, respectively. A comparison of calculated and measured relative dose profiles yielded >98% of points passing a gamma analysis with 3%/3 mm criterion for all field sizes. The simulated anthropomorphic head phantom image shows macroscopic anatomical features and qualitatively agrees with the measured image. Results validate the suitability of the MC model for predicting EPID response in transit dosimetry.

  16. Digitalization and networking of analog simulators and portal images.

    PubMed

    Pesznyák, Csilla; Zaránd, Pál; Mayer, Arpád

    2007-03-01

    Many departments have analog simulators and irradiation facilities (especially cobalt units) without electronic portal imaging. Import of the images into the R&V (Record & Verify) system is required. Simulator images are grabbed while portal films scanned by using a laser scanner and both converted into DICOM RT (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine Radiotherapy) images. Image intensifier output of a simulator and portal films are converted to DICOM RT images and used in clinical practice. The simulator software was developed in cooperation at the authors' hospital. The digitalization of analog simulators is a valuable updating in clinical use replacing screen-film technique. Film scanning and digitalization permit the electronic archiving of films. Conversion into DICOM RT images is a precondition of importing to the R&V system.

  17. Imaging informatics for consumer health: towards a radiology patient portal

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Corey W; McNamara, Mary; El-Saden, Suzie; Chen, Shawn; Taira, Ricky K; Bui, Alex A T

    2013-01-01

    Objective With the increased routine use of advanced imaging in clinical diagnosis and treatment, it has become imperative to provide patients with a means to view and understand their imaging studies. We illustrate the feasibility of a patient portal that automatically structures and integrates radiology reports with corresponding imaging studies according to several information orientations tailored for the layperson. Methods The imaging patient portal is composed of an image processing module for the creation of a timeline that illustrates the progression of disease, a natural language processing module to extract salient concepts from radiology reports (73% accuracy, F1 score of 0.67), and an interactive user interface navigable by an imaging findings list. The portal was developed as a Java-based web application and is demonstrated for patients with brain cancer. Results and discussion The system was exhibited at an international radiology conference to solicit feedback from a diverse group of healthcare professionals. There was wide support for educating patients about their imaging studies, and an appreciation for the informatics tools used to simplify images and reports for consumer interpretation. Primary concerns included the possibility of patients misunderstanding their results, as well as worries regarding accidental improper disclosure of medical information. Conclusions Radiologic imaging composes a significant amount of the evidence used to make diagnostic and treatment decisions, yet there are few tools for explaining this information to patients. The proposed radiology patient portal provides a framework for organizing radiologic results into several information orientations to support patient education. PMID:23739614

  18. Quality assurance of electron beams using a Varian electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Heaton, R.; Norrlinger, B.; Islam, M.

    2013-08-01

    The feasibility of utilizing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for the quality assurance of electron beams was investigated. This work was conducted on a Varian 2100iX machine equipped with an amorphous silicon (aS1000) portal imager. The linearity of the imager pixel response as a function of exposed dose was first confirmed. The short-term reproducibility of the EPID response to electron beams was verified. Low (6 MeV), medium (12 MeV) and high (20 MeV) energies were tested, each along with small (6 × 6 cm2), medium (10 × 10 cm2) and large (20 × 20 cm2) applicators. Acquired EPID images were analyzed using an in-house MATLAB code for radiation field size, penumbra, symmetry and flatness. Field sizes and penumbra values agreed with those from film dosimetry to within 1 mm. Field symmetry and flatness constancies were measured over a period of three weeks. The results indicate that EPID can be used for routine quality assurance of electron beams.

  19. Dosimetry of a single ''hockey stick'' portal for treatment of tumors of the cranio-spinal axis

    SciTech Connect

    Glasgow, G.P.; Marks, J.E.

    1983-09-01

    Conventional treatment of tumors of the cranio-spinal axis portal usually involves multiple-field, moving junction treatments to avoid overlapping fields over the spinal cord. To avoid these problems, we irradiate the cranio-spinal axis using a single ''hockey stick'' portal and the 25-MV x-ray beam from a Varian Clinac-35/sup X/ linear accelerator. Patients are positioned prone on the floor 229 cm from the radiation source and the collimators are rotated 45/sup 0/ so the maximum diagonal dimension of the field 116 cm at 229 cm is coincident with the cranio-spinal axis. The head is alternately rotated to treat the right-hand side one day and the left-hand side the next day. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in an anatomical phantom reveals that, relative to the 100% dose delivered at 4-cm depth on the central axis of the blocked field, the midline posterior fossa dose is about 100%, with a maximum dose of about 105% to the extreme posterior portion of the skull. The midline neck dose is about 95% and the dose to the inferior portion of the spinal cord is about 105%. The doses to other critical organs are also presented.

  20. SU-E-T-582: On-Line Dosimetric Verification of Respiratory Gated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Using the Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Schaly, B; Gaede, S; Xhaferllari, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical utility of on-line verification of respiratory gated VMAT dosimetry during treatment. Methods: Portal dose images were acquired during treatment in integrated mode on a Varian TrueBeam (v. 1.6) linear accelerator for gated lung and liver patients that used flattening filtered beams. The source to imager distance (SID) was set to 160 cm to ensure imager clearance in case the isocenter was off midline. Note that acquisition of integrated images resulted in no extra dose to the patient. Fraction 1 was taken as baseline and all portal dose images were compared to that of the baseline, where the gamma comparison and dose difference were used to measure day-to-day exit dose variation. All images were analyzed in the Portal Dosimetry module of Aria (v. 10). The portal imager on the TrueBeam was calibrated by following the instructions for dosimetry calibration in service mode, where we define 1 calibrated unit (CU) equal to 1 Gy for 10×10 cm field size at 100 cm SID. This reference condition was measured frequently to verify imager calibration. Results: The gamma value (3%, 3 mm, 5% threshold) ranged between 92% and 100% for the lung and liver cases studied. The exit dose can vary by as much as 10% of the maximum dose for an individual fraction. The integrated images combined with the information given by the corresponding on-line soft tissue matched cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were useful in explaining dose variation. For gated lung treatment, dose variation was mainly due to the diaphragm position. For gated liver treatment, the dose variation was due to both diaphragm position and weight loss. Conclusion: Integrated images can be useful in verifying dose delivery consistency during respiratory gated VMAT, although the CBCT information is needed to explain dose differences due to anatomical changes.

  1. Personalized Dosimetry for Radionuclide Therapy Using Molecular Imaging Tools

    PubMed Central

    Ljungberg, Michael; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    For treatment of systemic malignancies, when external radiation therapy is not applicable, radionuclide therapy can be an alternative. In this form of therapy, radionuclides are administered to the patient, often in a form where the radionuclide is labelled to a molecule that plays the active part in the localization of the tumor. Since the aim is to impart lethal damage to tumor cells while maintaining possible side-effects to normal tissues at tolerable levels, a proper and accurate personalized dosimetry should be a pre-requisite. In radionuclide therapy, there is a need to measure the distribution of the radiopharmaceutical in vivo, as well as its re-distribution over time, in order estimate the total energy released in radioactive decays and subsequent charged-particle interactions, governing the absorbed dose to different organs and tumors. Measurements are usually performed by molecular imaging, more specifically planar and SPECT (Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography) imaging, combined with CT. This review describes the different parts in the dosimetry chain of radionuclide therapy. Emphasis is given to molecular imaging tools and the requirements for determining absorbed doses from quantitative planar and SPECT images. As example solutions to the different problems that need to be addressed in such a dosimetric chain, we describe our tool, Lundadose, which is a set of methods that we have developed for personalized dosimetry. PMID:28536392

  2. Optimisation of the imaging and dosimetric characteristics of an electronic portal imaging device employing plastic scintillating fibres using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, S. J.; McNamara, A. L.; Vial, P.; Holloway, L.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-11-01

    A Monte Carlo model of a novel electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been developed using Geant4 and its performance for imaging and dosimetry applications in radiotherapy has been characterised. The EPID geometry is based on a physical prototype under ongoing investigation and comprises an array of plastic scintillating fibres in place of the metal plate/phosphor screen in standard EPIDs. Geometrical and optical transport parameters were varied to investigate their impact on imaging and dosimetry performance. Detection efficiency was most sensitive to variations in fibre length, achieving a peak value of 36% at 50 mm using 400 keV x-rays for the lengths considered. Increases in efficiency for longer fibres were partially offset by reductions in sensitivity. Removing the extra-mural absorber surrounding individual fibres severely decreased the modulation transfer function (MTF), highlighting its importance in maximising spatial resolution. Field size response and relative dose profile simulations demonstrated a water-equivalent dose response and thus the prototype’s suitability for dosimetry applications. Element-to-element mismatch between scintillating fibres and underlying photodiode pixels resulted in a reduced MTF for high spatial frequencies and quasi-periodic variations in dose profile response. This effect is eliminated when fibres are precisely matched to underlying pixels. Simulations strongly suggest that with further optimisation, this prototype EPID may be capable of simultaneous imaging and dosimetry in radiotherapy.

  3. 6. AN IMAGE OF THE WEST PORTAL OF THE BRIDGE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. AN IMAGE OF THE WEST PORTAL OF THE BRIDGE, TAKEN FROM AN ELEVATED POSITION, SHOWING THE RURAL QUALITY OF THE RIVER SCENE AND ITS BANKS. - Freedom Bridge, Spanning West Fork of White River at County Road 590 South, Freedom, Owen County, IN

  4. Portal hypertension: Imaging of portosystemic collateral pathways and associated image-guided therapy.

    PubMed

    Bandali, Murad Feroz; Mirakhur, Anirudh; Lee, Edward Wolfgang; Ferris, Mollie Clarke; Sadler, David James; Gray, Robin Ritchie; Wong, Jason Kam

    2017-03-14

    Portal hypertension is a common clinical syndrome, defined by a pathologic increase in the portal venous pressure. Increased resistance to portal blood flow, the primary factor in the pathophysiology of portal hypertension, is in part due to morphological changes occurring in chronic liver diseases. This results in rerouting of blood flow away from the liver through collateral pathways to low-pressure systemic veins. Through a variety of computed tomographic, sonographic, magnetic resonance imaging and angiographic examples, this article discusses the appearances and prevalence of both common and less common portosystemic collateral channels in the thorax and abdomen. A brief overview of established interventional radiologic techniques for treatment of portal hypertension will also be provided. Awareness of the various imaging manifestations of portal hypertension can be helpful for assessing overall prognosis and planning proper management.

  5. Portal hypertension: Imaging of portosystemic collateral pathways and associated image-guided therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bandali, Murad Feroz; Mirakhur, Anirudh; Lee, Edward Wolfgang; Ferris, Mollie Clarke; Sadler, David James; Gray, Robin Ritchie; Wong, Jason Kam

    2017-01-01

    Portal hypertension is a common clinical syndrome, defined by a pathologic increase in the portal venous pressure. Increased resistance to portal blood flow, the primary factor in the pathophysiology of portal hypertension, is in part due to morphological changes occurring in chronic liver diseases. This results in rerouting of blood flow away from the liver through collateral pathways to low-pressure systemic veins. Through a variety of computed tomographic, sonographic, magnetic resonance imaging and angiographic examples, this article discusses the appearances and prevalence of both common and less common portosystemic collateral channels in the thorax and abdomen. A brief overview of established interventional radiologic techniques for treatment of portal hypertension will also be provided. Awareness of the various imaging manifestations of portal hypertension can be helpful for assessing overall prognosis and planning proper management. PMID:28348478

  6. SU-F-BRE-13: Replacing Pre-Treatment Phantom QA with 3D In-Vivo Portal Dosimetry for IMRT Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stroom, J; Vieira, S; Greco, C; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I; Rozendaal, R; Herk, M van; Moser, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Pre-treatment QA of individual treatment plans requires costly linac time and physics effort. Starting with IMRT breast treatments, we aim to replace pre-treatment QA with in-vivo portal dosimetry. Methods: Our IMRT breast cancer plans are routinely measured using the ArcCheck device (SunNuclear). 2D-Gamma analysis is performed with 3%/3mm criteria and the percentage of points with gamma<1 (nG1) is calculated within the 50% isodose surface. Following AAPM recommendations, plans with nG1<90% are approved; others need further inspection and might be rejected. For this study, we used invivo portal dosimetry (IPD) to measure the 3D back-projected dose of the first three fractions for IMRT breast plans. Patient setup was online corrected before for all measured fractions. To reduce patient related uncertainties, the three IPD results were averaged and 3D-gamma analysis was applied with abovementioned criteria . For a subset of patients, phantom portal dosimetry (PPD) was also performed on a slab phantom. Results: Forty consecutive breast patients with plans that fitted the EPID were analysed. The average difference between planned and IPD dose in the reference point was −0.7+/−1.6% (1SD). Variation in nG1 between the 3 invivo fractions was about 6% (1SD). The average nG1 for IPD was 89+/−6%, worse than ArcCheck (95+/−3%). This can be explained by patient related factors such as changes in anatomy and/or model deficiencies due to e.g. inhomogeneities. For the 20 cases with PPD, mean nG1 was equal to ArcCheck values, which indicates that the two systems are equally accurate. These data therefore suggest that proper criteria for 3D invivo verification of breast treatments should be nG1>80% instead of nG1>90%, which, for our breast cases, would result in 5% (2/40) further inspections. Conclusion: First-fraction in-vivo portal dosimetry using new gamma-evaluation criteria will replace phantom measurements in our institution, saving resources and yielding 3D

  7. Noninvasive dosimetry and monitoring of TTT using spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuele, G.; Molnar, F. E.; Yellachich, D.; Vitkin, E.; Perelman, L. T.; Palanker, D.

    2006-02-01

    Transpupillary thermo therapy (TTT) is a slow (60 seconds) photothermal treatment of the fundus with a near-infrared (780-810nm) laser irradiating a large spot (0.5- 1. mm) on the retina. Due to high variability in ocular tissue properties and the lack of immediately observable outcome of the therapy, a real-time dosimetry is highly desirable. We found that fundus spectroscopy and spectrally-resolved imaging allow for non-invasive real-time monitoring and dosimetry of TTT. A 795nm laser was applied in rabbit eyes for 60 seconds using a 0.86mm retinal spot diameter. The fundus was illuminated with a broadband polarized light, and its reflectance spectra were measured in parallel and cross-polarizations. The fundus was also imaged in selected spectral domains. At irradiances that do not create ophthalmoscopically visible lesions the fundus reflectance increases at the wavelengths corresponding to absorption of the oxygenated blood indicating the reduced concentration of blood in the choroid. Vasoconstrictive response of the choroidal and retinal vasculature during TTT was also directly observed using spectrally-resolved imaging. At irradiances that produce ophthalmoscopically visible lesions a rapid reduction of the fundus reflectance was observed within the first 5-10 seconds of the exposure even when the visible lesions developed only by the end of the 60 second exposure. No visible lesions were produced where the laser was terminated after detection of the reduced scattering but prior to appearance of the enhanced scattering.

  8. Comprehensive fluence model for absolute portal dose image prediction.

    PubMed

    Chytyk, K; McCurdy, B M C

    2009-04-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) continue to be investigated as treatment verification tools, with a particular focus on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This verification could be accomplished through a comparison of measured portal images to predicted portal dose images. A general fluence determination tailored to portal dose image prediction would be a great asset in order to model the complex modulation of IMRT. A proposed physics-based parameter fluence model was commissioned by matching predicted EPID images to corresponding measured EPID images of multileaf collimator (MLC) defined fields. The two-source fluence model was composed of a focal Gaussian and an extrafocal Gaussian-like source. Specific aspects of the MLC and secondary collimators were also modeled (e.g., jaw and MLC transmission factors, MLC rounded leaf tips, tongue and groove effect, interleaf leakage, and leaf offsets). Several unique aspects of the model were developed based on the results of detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the linear accelerator including (1) use of a non-Gaussian extrafocal fluence source function, (2) separate energy spectra used for focal and extrafocal fluence, and (3) different off-axis energy spectra softening used for focal and extrafocal fluences. The predicted energy fluence was then convolved with Monte Carlo generated, EPID-specific dose kernels to convert incident fluence to dose delivered to the EPID. Measured EPID data were obtained with an a-Si EPID for various MLC-defined fields (from 1 x 1 to 20 x 20 cm2) over a range of source-to-detector distances. These measured profiles were used to determine the fluence model parameters in a process analogous to the commissioning of a treatment planning system. The resulting model was tested on 20 clinical IMRT plans, including ten prostate and ten oropharyngeal cases. The model predicted the open-field profiles within 2%, 2 mm, while a mean of 96.6% of pixels over all

  9. Two-dimensional in vivo dose verification using portal imaging and correlation ratios.

    PubMed

    Peca, Stefano; Brown, Derek W

    2014-07-08

    The electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has the potential to be used for in vivo dosimetry during radiation therapy as an additional dose delivery check. In this study we have extended a method developed by A. Piermattei and colleagues in 2006 that made use of EPID transit images (acquired during treatment) to calculate dose in the isocenter point. The extension allows calculation of two-dimensional dose maps of the entire radiation field at the depth of isocenter. We quantified the variability of the ratio of EPID signal to dose in the isocenter plane in Solid Water phantoms of various thicknesses and with various field sizes, and designed a field edge dose calculation correction. To validate the method, we designed three realistic conventional radiation therapy treatment plans on a thorax and head anthropomorphic phantom (whole brain, brain primary, lung tumor). Using CT data, EPID transit images, EPID signal-to-dose correlation, and our edge correction, we calculated dose in the isocenter plane and compared it with the treatment planning system's prediction. Gamma evaluation (3%, 3 mm) showed good agreement (Pγ<1 ≥ 96.5%) for all fields of the whole brain and brain primary plans. In the presence of lung, however, our algorithm overestimated dose by 7%-9%. This 2D EPID-based in vivo dosimetry method can be used for posttreatment dose verification, thereby improving the safety and quality of patient treatments. With future work, it may be extended to measure dose in real time and to prevent harmful delivery errors.

  10. Phase contrast portal imaging for image-guided microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kondoh, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy is a unique treatment technique used to destroy tumors without severely affecting circumjacent healthy tissue. We applied a phase contrast technique to portal imaging in preclinical microbeam radiation therapy experiments. Phase contrast portal imaging is expected to enable us to obtain higherresolution X-ray images at therapeutic X-ray energies compared to conventional portal imaging. Frontal view images of a mouse head sample were acquired in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast images depicted edge-enhanced fine structures of the parietal bones surrounding the cerebrum. The phase contrast technique is expected to be effective in bony-landmark-based verification for image-guided radiation therapy.

  11. Integration between in vivo dosimetry and image guided radiotherapy for lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Piermattei, Angelo; Cilla, Savino; Grimaldi, Luca; Sabatino, Domenico; Fidanzio, Andrea; Greco, Francesca; Mameli, Alessandra; Balducci, Mario; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Frascino, Vincenzo; Stimato, Gerardina; Gaudino, Diego; Ramella, Sara; Trodella, Lucio; D'Onofrio, Guido; Zini, Giampaolo; Macchia, Gabriella; Digesu', Cinzia; Morganti, Alessio G; Clemente, Stefania; Cozzolino, Mariella; Pedicini, Piernicola; Fusco, Vincenzo

    2009-06-01

    The article reports a feasibility study about the potentiality of an in vivo dosimetry method for the adaptive radiotherapy of the lung tumors treated by 3D conformal radiotherapy techniques (3D CRTs). At the moment image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) has been used for this aim, but it requires taking many periodic radiological images during the treatment that increase workload and patient dose. In vivo dosimetry reported here can reduce the above efforts, alerting the medical staff for the commissioning of new radiological images for an eventual adaptive plan. The in vivo dosimetry method applied on 20 patients makes use of the transit signal St on the beam central axis measured by a small ion chamber positioned on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) or by the EPID itself. The reconstructed in vivo dosimetry at the isocenter point Diso requires a convolution between the transit signal St and a dose reconstruction factor C that essentially depends on (i) tissue inhomogeneities along the beam central axis and (ii) the in-patient isocenter depth. The C factors, one for every gantry angle, are obtained by processing the patient's computed tomography scan. The method has been recently applied in some Italian centers to check the radiotherapy of pelvis, breast, head, and thorax treatments. In this work the dose reconstruction was carried out in five centers to check the Diso in the lung tumor during the 3D CRT, and the results have been used to detect the interfraction tumor anatomy variations that can require new CT imaging and an adaptive plan. In particular, in three centers a small ion chamber was positioned below the patient and used for the St measurement. In two centers, the St signal was obtained directly by 25 central pixels of an a-Si EPID, equipped with commercial software that enabled its use as a stable detector. A tolerance action level of +/- 6% for every checked beam was assumed. This means that when a difference greater than 6% between the predicted

  12. Advanced millimeter-wave security portal imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-03-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance as a security tool to augment conventional metal detectors and baggage x-ray systems for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This acceptance indicates that the technology has matured; however, many potential improvements can yet be realized. The authors have developed a number of techniques over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, and high-frequency high-bandwidth techniques. All of these may improve the performance of new systems; however, some of these techniques will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. Reducing this cost may require the development of novel array designs. In particular, RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems. Highfrequency, high-bandwidth designs are difficult to achieve with conventional mm-wave electronic devices, and RF photonic devices may be a practical alternative. In this paper, the mm-wave imaging techniques developed at PNNL are reviewed and the potential for implementing RF photonic mm-wave array designs is explored.

  13. Cross-sectional imaging of congenital and acquired abnormalities of the portal venous system

    PubMed Central

    Özbayrak, Mustafa; Tatlı, Servet

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the normal anatomy, variations, congenital and acquired pathologies of the portal venous system are important, especially when planning liver surgery and percutaneous interventional procedures. The portal venous system pathologies can be congenital such as agenesis of portal vein (PV) or can be involved by other hepatic disorders such as cirrhosis and malignancies. In this article, we present normal anatomy, variations, and acquired pathologies involving the portal venous system as seen on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMID:27731302

  14. Dosimetric verification of IMAT delivery with a conventional EPID system and a commercial portal dose image prediction tool

    SciTech Connect

    Iori, Mauro; Cagni, Elisabetta; Paiusco, Marta; Munro, Peter; Nahum, Alan E.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: The electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is a system for checking the patient setup; as a result of its integration with the linear accelerator and software customized for dosimetry, it is increasingly used for verification of the delivery of fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In order to extend such an approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT), the combined use of an EPID system and a portal dose image prediction (PDIP) tool has been investigated. Methods: The dosimetric behavior of an EPID system, mechanically reinforced to maintain its positional stability during the accelerator gantry rotation, has been studied to assess its ability to measure portal dose distributions for IMAT treatment beams. In addition, the PDIP tool of a commercial treatment planning system, commonly used for static IMRT dosimetry, has been validated for simulating the PDIs of IMAT treatment fields. The method has been applied to the delivery verification of 23 treatment fields that were measured in their dual mode of IMRT and IMAT modalities. Results: The EPID system has proved to be appropriate for measuring the PDIs of IMAT fields; additionally the PDIP tool was able to simulate these accurately. The results are quite similar to those obtained for static IMRT treatment verification, although it was necessary to investigate the dependence of the EPID signal and of the accelerator monitor chamber response on variable dose rate. Conclusions: Our initial tests indicate that the EPID system, together with the PDIP tool, is a suitable device for the verification of IMAT plan delivery; however, additional tests are necessary to confirm these results.

  15. Image-based dosimetry for selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using yttrium-90 microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selwyn, Reed G.

    90Y-loaded microspheres are currently used as a palliative treatment for patients with primary and metastatic solid liver tumors. These microspheres contain radioactive 90Y, which decays via beta-minus transition to 90Zr. While the normal liver receives about 75% of its blood supply from the portal vein, hepatic tumors receive their blood supply almost exclusively from the hepatic artery. Taking advantage of this unique blood flow, radioactive microspheres are injected into the hepatic artery resulting in a preferential distribution to tumor sites within the liver. Studies show that the single best prognostic indicator for patient response is the tumor-to-normal tissue (T:N) activity uptake ratio. However, 90Y emits very few photons its broad bremsstrahlung spectrum leads to diffuse, low resolution images, which are insufficient for accurate T:N quantification. Thus, the first objective was to develop a PET-labeled microsphere as a surrogate for the therapeutic microsphere to provide accurate biodistribution information. Furthermore, patient outcome is also suspected to be linked to the mean tumor dose and tumor dose volume histogram. Therefore, a second objective was to develop and validate a method to calculate the dose distribution within the tumor and normal liver tissue. Computer software that generates three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions was validated by comparing results to experimental measurements. The novel development of a 3D gel dosimeter will be discussed as well as a new protocol for 2D film dosimetry. Both dosimetry methods were validated but only film provided the desired accuracy. The overall accuracy of the dose distribution depends on the uncertainty of the 90Y assay, which can extend to 15% at 1sigma. Therefore, the third objective was to develop an accurate non-destructive assay of 90Y. To this end, a new 90Y positron branching ratio was measured and a clinically relevant transfer standard was developed. In summation, this thesis will

  16. Dose response characteristics of a novel CCD camera-based electronic portal imaging device comparison with OCTAVIUS detector.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Akbar; Aghamiri, Seyed Mahmoud Reza; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie; Alaei, Parham

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetric properties of a CCD camera-based Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for clinical dosimetric application have been evaluated. Characteristics obtained by EPID also compared with commercial 2D array of ion chambers. Portal images acquired in dosimetry mode then exported raw fluence or uncorrected images were investigated. Integration time of image acquisition mode has adjusted on 1 s per frame. As saturation of camera of the EPID, dose response does not have linear behavior. The slight nonlinearity of the camera response can be corrected by a logarithmic expression. A fourth order polynomial regression model with coefficient of determination of 0.998 predicts a response to absolute dose values at less than 50 cGy. A field size dependent response of up to 7% (0.99-1.06) relative OCTAVIUS detector measurement was found. The EPID response can be fitted by a cubic regression for field size changes, yielded coefficient of determination of 0.999. These results indicate that the EPID is well suited for accurate dosimetric purposes, the major limitation currently being due to integration time and dead-time in frame acquisition.

  17. Datamining the NOAO NVO Portal: Automated Image Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaswani, Pooja; Miller, C. J.; Barg, I.; Smith, R. C.

    2006-12-01

    Image metadata describes the properties of an image and can be used for classification, e.g., galactic, extra-galactic, solar system, standard star, among others. We are developing a data mining application to automate such a classification process based on supervised learning using decision trees. We are applying this application to the NOAO NVO Portal (www.nvo.noao.edu). The core concepts of Quinlan's C4.5 decision tree induction algorithm are used to train, build a decision tree, and generate classification rules. These rules are then used to classify previously unseen image metadata. We utilize a collection of decision trees instead of a single classifier and average the classification probabilities. The concept of ``Bagging'' was used to create the collection of classifiers. The classification algorithm also facilitates the addition of weights to the probability estimate of the classes when prior knowledge of the class distribution is known.

  18. Quality control of VMAT synchronization using portal imaging.

    PubMed

    Bedford, James L; Chajecka-Szczygielska, Honorata; Thomas, Michael D R

    2015-01-08

    For accurate delivery of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), the gantry position should be synchronized with the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positions and the dose rate. This study, therefore, aims to implement quality control (QC) of VMAT synchronization, with as few arcs as possible and with minimal data handling time, using portal imaging. A steel bar of diameter 12 mm is accurately positioned in the G-T direction, 80 mm laterally from the isocenter. An arc prescription irradiates the bar with a 16 mm × 220 mm field during a complete 360° arc, so as to cast a shadow of the bar onto the portal imager. This results in a sinusoidal sweep of the field and shadow across the portal imager and back. The method is evaluated by simulating gantry position errors of 1°-9° at one control point, dose errors of 2 monitor units to 20 monitor units (MU) at one control point (0.3%-3% overall), and MLC leaf position errors of 1 mm - 6 mm at one control point. Inhomogeneity metrics are defined to characterize the synchronization of all leaves and of individual leaves with respect to the complete set. Typical behavior is also investigated for three models of accelerator. In the absence of simulated errors, the integrated images show uniformity, and with simulated delivery errors, irregular patterns appear. The inhomogeneity metrics increase by 67% due to a 4° gantry position error, 33% due to an 8 MU (1.25%) dose error, and 70% due to a 2 mm MLC leaf position error. The method is more sensitive to errors at gantry angle 90°/270° than at 0°/180° due to the geometry of the test. This method provides fast and effective VMAT QC suitable for inclusion in a monthly accelerator QC program. The test is able to detect errors in the delivery of individual control points, with the possibility of using movie images to further investigate suspicious image features.

  19. Quantitative 3D Optical Imaging: Applications in Dosimetry and Biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Andrew Stephen

    Optical-CT has been shown to be a potentially useful imaging tool for the two very different spheres of biologists and radiation therapy physicists, but it has yet to live up to that potential. In radiation therapy, researchers have used optical-CT for the readout of 3D dosimeters, but it is yet to be a clinically relevant tool as the technology is too slow to be considered practical. Biologists have used the technique for structural imaging, but have struggled with emission tomography as the reality of photon attenuation for both excitation and emission have made the images quantitatively irrelevant. Dosimetry. The DLOS (Duke Large field of view Optical-CT Scanner) was designed and constructed to make 3D dosimetry utilizing optical-CT a fast and practical tool while maintaining the accuracy of readout of the previous, slower readout technologies. Upon construction/optimization/implementation of several components including a diffuser, band pass filter, registration mount & fluid filtration system the dosimetry system provides high quality data comparable to or exceeding that of commercial products. In addition, a stray light correction algorithm was tested and implemented. The DLOS in combination with the 3D dosimeter it was designed for, PREAGETM, then underwent rigorous commissioning and benchmarking tests validating its performance against gold standard data including a set of 6 irradiations. DLOS commissioning tests resulted in sub-mm isotropic spatial resolution (MTF >0.5 for frequencies of 1.5lp/mm) and a dynamic range of ˜60dB. Flood field uniformity was 10% and stable after 45minutes. Stray light proved to be small, due to telecentricity, but even the residual can be removed through deconvolution. Benchmarking tests showed the mean 3D passing gamma rate (3%, 3mm, 5% dose threshold) over the 6 benchmark data sets was 97.3% +/- 0.6% (range 96%-98%) scans totaling ˜10 minutes, indicating excellent ability to perform 3D dosimetry while improving the speed of

  20. Does a Personalized Health Portal for Diabetes Retinal Imaging Positively Affect Motivational Readiness to Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    term complications related to diabetes include diabetic eye disease, nerve damage ( neuropathy ), heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and peripheral ...TITLE: Does a Personalized Health Portal for Diabetes Retinal Imaging Positively Affect Motivational Readiness to Change PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE Does a Personalized Health Portal for Diabetes Retinal Imaging 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-09-2-0166 Positively Affect Motivational

  1. Comparison of the performance between portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional array system on pretreatment quality assurance for volumetric-modulated arc and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yon-Lae; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Choi, Kyoung-Sik

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the dosimetric performance and to evaluate the pretreatment quality assurance (QA) of a portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional (2-D) array system. In the characteristics comparison study, the measured values for the dose linearity, dose rate response, reproducibility, and field size dependence for 6-MV photon beams were analyzed for both detector systems. To perform the qualitative evaluations of the 10 IMRT and the 10 VMAT plans, we used the Gamma index for quantifying the agreement between calculations and measurements. The performance estimates for both systems show that overall, minimal differences in the dosimetric characteristics exist between the Electron portal imaging device (EPID) and 2-D array system. In the qualitative analysis for pretreatment quality assurance, the EPID and 2-D array system yield similar passing rate results for the majority of clinical Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) cases. These results were satisfactory for IMRT and VMAT fields and were within the acceptable criteria of γ%≤1, γ avg <0.5. The EPDI and the 2-D array systems showed comparable dosimetric results. In this study, the results revealed both systems to be suitable for patient-specific QA measurements for IMRT and VMAT. We conclude that, depending on the status of clinic, both systems can be used interchangeably for routine pretreatment QA.

  2. SILICON PHOTOMULTIPLIERS FOR MEDICAL IMAGING AND DOSIMETRY-AN OVERVIEW.

    PubMed

    Herrnsdorf, L; Caccia, M; Mattsson, S

    2016-06-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are an enabling solid-state technology for low light sensing, with single photon sensitivity and photon number resolving capability. They feature an extremely high internal gain at the 10(6) level, comparable to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), with the advantage of low operating voltage (~50 V compared to ~1000 V for PMT) and low energy consumption. The solid-state technology makes SiPMs compact, insensitive to magnetic fields and with an extreme flexibility in the design to cope with different applications. The fast development of the multiplication avalanche opens up the possibility to achieve time resolution at the 30 ps level. Dynamic range is however limited compared to PMT and the dark count rate relatively high, yet today at the level of 50 kHz/mm(2) at room temperature. Interfaced with scintillation material, SiPMs provide a powerful platform for medical imaging applications (in positron emission tomography/computed tomography and in positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance), for X-ray quality control as well as for novel compact radiation protection instruments. This article gives an overview of SiPMs for medical imaging and dosimetry. In addition, a learning and training program targeted to graduate students is described. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Anatomy of hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts evaluated by 3D micro-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Kline, Timothy L; Knudsen, Bruce E; Anderson, Jill L; Vercnocke, Andrew J; Jorgensen, Steven M; Ritman, Erik L

    2014-06-01

    The liver differs from other organs in that two vascular systems deliver its blood - the hepatic artery and the portal vein. However, how the two systems interact is not fully understood. We therefore studied the microvascular geometry of rat liver hepatic artery and portal vein injected with the contrast polymer Microfil(®). Intact isolated rat livers were imaged by micro-CT and anatomic evidence for hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts occurring between hepatic artery and portal vein branches was found. Simulations were performed to rule out the possibility of the observed shunts being artifacts resulting from image blurring. In addition, in the case of specimens where only the portal vein was injected, only the portal vein was opacified, whereas in hepatic artery injections, both the hepatic artery and portal vein were opacified. We conclude that mixing of the hepatic artery and portal vein blood can occur proximal to the sinusoidal level, and that the hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts may function as a one-way valve-like mechanism, allowing flow only from the hepatic artery to the portal vein (and not the other way around).

  4. Evaluation of an aSi-EPID with flattening filter free beams: applicability to the GLAaS algorithm for portal dosimetry and first experience for pretreatment QA of RapidArc.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, G; Clivio, A; Vanetti, E; Krauss, H; Fenoglietto, P; Cozzi, L; Fogliata, A

    2013-11-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of portal dosimetry with an amorphous silicon mega voltage imager for flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams by means of the GLAaS methodology and to validate it for pretreatment quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc). The GLAaS algorithm, developed for flattened beams, was applied to FFF beams of nominal energy of 6 and 10 MV generated by a Varian TrueBeam (TB). The amorphous silicon electronic portal imager [named mega voltage imager (MVI) on TB] was used to generate integrated images that were converted into matrices of absorbed dose to water. To enable GLAaS use under the increased dose-per-pulse and dose-rate conditions of the FFF beams, new operational source-detector-distance (SDD) was identified to solve detector saturation issues. Empirical corrections were defined to account for the shape of the profiles of the FFF beams to expand the original methodology of beam profile and arm backscattering correction. GLAaS for FFF beams was validated on pretreatment verification of RapidArc plans for three different TB linacs. In addition, the first pretreatment results from clinical experience on 74 arcs were reported in terms of γ analysis. MVI saturates at 100 cm SDD for FFF beams but this can be avoided if images are acquired at 150 cm for all nominal dose rates of FFF beams. Rotational stability of the gantry-imager system was tested and resulted in a minimal apparent imager displacement during rotation of 0.2 ± 0.2 mm at SDD = 150 cm. The accuracy of this approach was tested with three different Varian TrueBeam linacs from different institutes. Data were stratified per energy and machine and showed no dependence with beam quality and MLC model. The results from clinical pretreatment quality assurance, provided a gamma agreement index (GAI) in the field area for six and ten FFF beams of (99.8 ± 0.3)% and (99.5 ± 0.6)% with distance to agreement and dose difference criteria set to 3 mm/3% with 2 mm/2

  5. Use of electronic portal imaging devices for electron treatment verification.

    PubMed

    Kairn, T; Aland, T; Crowe, S B; Trapp, J V

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to help broaden the use of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for pre-treatment patient positioning verification, from photon-beam radiotherapy to photon- and electron-beam radiotherapy, by proposing and testing a method for acquiring clinically-useful EPID images of patient anatomy using electron beams, with a view to enabling and encouraging further research in this area. EPID images used in this study were acquired using all available beams from a linac configured to deliver electron beams with nominal energies of 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV, as well as photon beams with nominal energies of 6 and 10 MV. A widely-available heterogeneous, approximately-humanoid, thorax phantom was used, to provide an indication of the contrast and noise produced when imaging different types of tissue with comparatively realistic thicknesses. The acquired images were automatically calibrated, corrected for the effects of variations in the sensitivity of individual photodiodes, using a flood field image. For electron beam imaging, flood field EPID calibration images were acquired with and without the placement of blocks of water-equivalent plastic (with thicknesses approximately equal to the practical range of electrons in the plastic) placed upstream of the EPID, to filter out the primary electron beam, leaving only the bremsstrahlung photon signal. While the electron beam images acquired using a standard (unfiltered) flood field calibration were observed to be noisy and difficult to interpret, the electron beam images acquired using the filtered flood field calibration showed tissues and bony anatomy with levels of contrast and noise that were similar to the contrast and noise levels seen in the clinically acceptable photon beam EPID images. The best electron beam imaging results (highest contrast, signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios) were achieved when the images were acquired using the higher energy electron beams (16 and 20 MeV) when the EPID was

  6. Real-time portal imaging devices operating on high-pressure gaseous electronic principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giakos, George C.; Richardson, Donna B.; Ghotra, P.; Pillai, Bindu; Seetharaman, Lakshmi; Passalaqua, Anthony M.; DiBianca, Frank A.; Endorf, Robert J.; Devidas, Sreenivas

    1995-05-01

    A novel real-time portal imaging scanning detector, based on high-pressure gaseous electronics principles and operating up to 60 atmospheres, is presented and the predicted performance of this detector is analyzed. The idea is to utilize high pressure gaseous electronics imaging detectors operating in the saturation regime, aimed at improving image performance characteristics in real time portal imaging. As a result, beam localization errors are controlled, identified and corrected accurately and the patient radiotherapy treatment becomes more effective.

  7. A radiation-tolerant electronic readout system for portal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Östling, J.; Brahme, A.; Danielsson, M.; Iacobaeus, C.; Peskov, V.

    2004-06-01

    A new electronic portal imaging device, EPID, is under development at the Karolinska Institutet and the Royal Institute of Technology. Due to considerable demands on radiation tolerance in the radiotherapy environment, a dedicated electronic readout system has been designed. The most interesting aspect of the readout system is that it allows to read out ˜1000 pixels in parallel, with all electronics placed outside the radiation beam—making the detector more radiation resistant. In this work we are presenting the function of a small prototype (6×100 pixels) of the electronic readout board that has been tested. Tests were made with continuous X-rays (10-60 keV) and with α particles. The results show that, without using an optimised gas mixture and with an early prototype only, the electronic readout system still works very well.

  8. Denoising portal images by minimizing the SURE estimator on a parameterized family of shrinkage functions.

    PubMed

    González-López, Antonio; Campos-Morcillo, Pedro

    2017-06-01

    The number of verification portal images in radiotherapy has increased in the last years. On the other hand, radiation delivered during imaging is not confined to the treatment volumes, but also affects the surrounding organs and tissues. In order to reduce the overall radiation dose due to imaging, one approach would be to reduce the dose per image, but noise would increase and the quality of portal images would reduce. The limited quality of portal images makes it difficult to propose a reduction of dose if there is no way to effectively reduce noise. Denoising algorithms could be the solution if the quality of the restored image can match the image obtained with a standard dose. In this work the statistical properties of noise in a portal imaging system and the statistical properties of portal images are used to develop an efficient denoising method. The result is a method that minimizes the Stein's unbiased risk estimator (SURE) in the image domain over a parametric family of shrinkage functions operating in the wavelet domain. The presented denoising method shows a better performance than the adaptive Wiener estimator for different portal images and noise energies. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dosimetry in x-ray-based breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, David R.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2016-10-01

    The estimation of the mean glandular dose to the breast (MGD) for x-ray based imaging modalities forms an essential part of quality control and is needed for risk estimation and for system design and optimisation. This review considers the development of methods for estimating the MGD for mammography, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and dedicated breast CT (DBCT). Almost all of the methodology used employs Monte Carlo calculated conversion factors to relate the measurable quantity, generally the incident air kerma, to the MGD. After a review of the size and composition of the female breast, the various mathematical models used are discussed, with particular emphasis on models for mammography. These range from simple geometrical shapes, to the more recent complex models based on patient DBCT examinations. The possibility of patient-specific dose estimates is considered as well as special diagnostic views and the effect of breast implants. Calculations using the complex models show that the MGD for mammography is overestimated by about 30% when the simple models are used. The design and uses of breast-simulating test phantoms for measuring incident air kerma are outlined and comparisons made between patient and phantom-based dose estimates. The most widely used national and international dosimetry protocols for mammography are based on different simple geometrical models of the breast, and harmonisation of these protocols using more complex breast models is desirable.

  10. Dosimetry software Hermes Internal Radiation Dosimetry: from quantitative image reconstruction to voxel-level absorbed dose distribution.

    PubMed

    Hippeläinen, Eero T; Tenhunen, Mikko J; Mäenpää, Hanna O; Heikkonen, Jorma J; Sohlberg, Antti O

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work is to validate a software package called Hermes Internal Radiation Dosimetry (HIRD) for internal dose assessment tailored for clinical practice. The software includes all the necessary steps to perform voxel-level absorbed dose calculations including quantitative reconstruction, image coregistration and volume of interest tools. The basics of voxel-level dosimetry methods and implementations to HIRD software are reviewed. Then, HIRD is validated using simulated SPECT/CT data and data from Lu-DOTATATE-treated patients by comparing absorbed kidney doses with OLINDA/EXM-based dosimetry. In addition, electron and photon dose components are studied separately in an example patient case. The simulation study showed that HIRD can reproduce time-activity curves accurately and produce absorbed doses with less than 10% error for the kidneys, liver and spleen. From the patient data, the absorbed kidney doses calculated using HIRD and using OLINDA/EXM were highly correlated (Pearson's correlation coefficient, r=0.98). From Bland-Altman plot analysis, an average absorbed dose difference of -2% was found between the methods. In addition, we found that in Lu-DOTATATE-treated patients, photons can contribute over 10% of the kidney's total dose and is partly because of cross-irradiation from high-uptake lesions close to the kidneys. HIRD is a straightforward voxel-level internal dosimetry software. Its clinical utility was verified with simulated and clinical Lu-DOTATATE-treated patient data. Patient studies also showed that photon contribution towards the total dose can be relatively high and voxel-level dose calculations can be valuable in cases where the target organ is in close proximity to high-uptake organs.

  11. [The image noise effect on the results of Gamma knife dosimetry parameters test].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Zhang, Conghua; Hu, Chuanpeng; Dai, Fuyou; Wei, Kunjie; Chu, Caifang

    2012-12-01

    In order to analyze the image noise effect on the results of Gamma knife dosimetry parameter test, we tested the dosimetry parameters of the Gamma knives according to GBZ 168-2005. Radiological protection standards of X (gamma)-ray stereotactic radiosurgery for head treatment. Dose analysis software was applied to examine the testing film before and after image denoising, and SPSS 11.0 software was used for statistical analysis. The results showed that there was a significant difference in the results of the maximum deviation between radiation field size and its nominal value (t = 7.600, P < 0.01) and the radiation field's penumbra region width of collimators also had significantly different sizes (t = 5.334, P < 0.01) before and after image denoising. This study indicated that the image noise could influence the results of testing Gamma knife dosimetry parameters, so as to cause deviations.

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Electronic portal imaging devices: a review and historical perspective of contemporary technologies and research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuk, Larry E.

    2002-03-01

    A review of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) used in external beam, megavoltage radiation therapy is presented. The review consists of a brief introduction to the definition, role and clinical significance of portal imaging, along with a discussion of radiotherapy film systems and the motivations for EPIDs. This is followed by a summary of the challenges and constraints inherent to portal imaging along with a concise, historical review of the technologies that have been explored and developed. The paper then examines, in greater depth, the two first-generation technologies that have found widespread clinical use starting from the late 1980s. This is followed by a broad overview of the physics, operation, properties and advantages of active matrix, flat-panel, megavoltage imagers, presently being commercially introduced to clinical environments or expected to be introduced in the future. Finally, a survey of contemporary research efforts focused on improving portal imaging performance by addressing various weaknesses in existing commercial systems is presented.

  13. Real-time imaging detectors for portal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrig, Hans; Cheng, Chee-Wai

    1993-12-01

    This paper reviews the status of real-time imaging systems which are used in radiation-therapy for radiotherapy localization and verification. Imaging systems under review include (1) metal- fluorescent screens, optically coupled to video cameras; (2) metal-phosphor screen in direct contact with two-dimensional photo-diode array (flat panel detector); (3) two-dimensional liquid ionization chamber; and (4) linear diode arrays. These systems permit frequent verification during the treatment and have been shown to be very useful. Unfortunately the image quality achieved, while impressive considering the short time the devices have been on the market, is significantly inferior to that which is available from the metal/film combination (port film).

  14. A new silicon tracker for proton imaging and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J T; Waltham, C; Price, T; Allinson, N M; Allport, P P; Casse, G L; Kacperek, A; Manger, S; Smith, N A; Tsurin, I

    2016-09-21

    For many years, silicon micro-strip detectors have been successfully used as tracking detectors for particle and nuclear physics experiments. A new application of this technology is to the field of particle therapy where radiotherapy is carried out by use of charged particles such as protons or carbon ions. Such a treatment has been shown to have advantages over standard x-ray radiotherapy and as a result of this, many new centres offering particle therapy are currently under construction around the world today. The Proton Radiotherapy, Verification and Dosimetry Applications (PRaVDA) consortium are developing instrumentation for particle therapy based upon technology from high-energy physics. The characteristics of a new silicon micro-strip tracker for particle therapy will be presented. The array uses specifically designed, large area sensors with technology choices that follow closely those taken for the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC. These detectors will be arranged into four units each with three layers in an x-u-v configuration to be suitable for fast proton tracking with minimal ambiguities. The sensors will form a tracker capable of tracing the path of ~200 MeV protons entering and exiting a patient allowing a new mode of imaging known as proton computed tomography (pCT). This will aid the accurate delivery of treatment doses and in addition, the tracker will also be used to monitor the beam profile and total dose delivered during the high fluences used for treatment. We present here details of the design, construction and assembly of one of the four units that will make up the complete tracker along with its characterisation using radiation tests carried out using a (90)Sr source in the laboratory and a 60 MeV proton beam at the Clatterbridge Cancer Centre.

  15. A new silicon tracker for proton imaging and dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. T.; Waltham, C.; Price, T.; Allinson, N. M.; Allport, P. P.; Casse, G. L.; Kacperek, A.; Manger, S.; Smith, N. A.; Tsurin, I.

    2016-09-01

    For many years, silicon micro-strip detectors have been successfully used as tracking detectors for particle and nuclear physics experiments. A new application of this technology is to the field of particle therapy where radiotherapy is carried out by use of charged particles such as protons or carbon ions. Such a treatment has been shown to have advantages over standard x-ray radiotherapy and as a result of this, many new centres offering particle therapy are currently under construction around the world today. The Proton Radiotherapy, Verification and Dosimetry Applications (PRaVDA) consortium are developing instrumentation for particle therapy based upon technology from high-energy physics. The characteristics of a new silicon micro-strip tracker for particle therapy will be presented. The array uses specifically designed, large area sensors with technology choices that follow closely those taken for the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC. These detectors will be arranged into four units each with three layers in an x-u-v configuration to be suitable for fast proton tracking with minimal ambiguities. The sensors will form a tracker capable of tracing the path of 200 MeV protons entering and exiting a patient allowing a new mode of imaging known as proton computed tomography (pCT). This will aid the accurate delivery of treatment doses and in addition, the tracker will also be used to monitor the beam profile and total dose delivered during the high fluences used for treatment. We present here details of the design, construction and assembly of one of the four units that will make up the complete tracker along with its characterisation using radiation tests carried out using a 90Sr source in the laboratory and a 60 MeV proton beam at the Clatterbridge Cancer Centre.

  16. SU-E-J-15: Automatically Detect Patient Treatment Position and Orientation in KV Portal Images

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, J; Yang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In the course of radiation therapy, the complex information processing workflow will Result in potential errors, such as incorrect or inaccurate patient setups. With automatic image check and patient identification, such errors could be effectively reduced. For this purpose, we developed a simple and rapid image processing method, to automatically detect the patient position and orientation in 2D portal images, so to allow automatic check of positions and orientations for patient daily RT treatments. Methods: Based on the principle of portal image formation, a set of whole body DRR images were reconstructed from multiple whole body CT volume datasets, and fused together to be used as the matching template. To identify the patient setup position and orientation shown in a 2D portal image, the 2D portal image was preprocessed (contrast enhancement, down-sampling and couch table detection), then matched to the template image so to identify the laterality (left or right), position, orientation and treatment site. Results: Five day’s clinical qualified portal images were gathered randomly, then were processed by the automatic detection and matching method without any additional information. The detection results were visually checked by physicists. 182 images were correct detection in a total of 200kV portal images. The correct rate was 91%. Conclusion: The proposed method can detect patient setup and orientation quickly and automatically. It only requires the image intensity information in KV portal images. This method can be useful in the framework of Electronic Chart Check (ECCK) to reduce the potential errors in workflow of radiation therapy and so to improve patient safety. In addition, the auto-detection results, as the patient treatment site position and patient orientation, could be useful to guide the sequential image processing procedures, e.g. verification of patient daily setup accuracy. This work was partially supported by research grant from

  17. Portal biliopathy, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography findings: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Baskan, Ozdil; Erol, Cengiz; Sahingoz, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy (PB) is a rare disorder, characterized by biliary ductal and gallbladder wall abnormalities seen in patients with portal hypertension. It most commonly occurs due to idiopathic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO). The abnormalities consist mainly of bile duct compression, stenoses, fibrotic strictures and dilation of both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts, as well as gallbladder varices. PB may mimic cholangiocarcinoma, sclerosing cholangitis, or choledocholithiasis. Misdiagnosis can be avoided using appropriate imaging modalities to prevent complications. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP) features of three patients with PB. PMID:25216728

  18. Novel Image Guidance Techniques for Portal Vein Targeting During Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Creation.

    PubMed

    Farsad, Khashayar; Kaufman, John A

    2016-03-01

    The most challenging part of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation is arguably the transvenous access from the hepatic vein to the portal vein. As experience and technology have evolved, the image guidance aspect of this critical step in the procedure has become more robust. Improved means to target the portal vein include both direct and indirect methods of portal vein opacification, cross-sectional imaging for both targeting and access, and novel use of transabdominal and intravascular ultrasound guidance. These techniques are described herein.

  19. Novel detector for portal imaging in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostling, Janina; Wallmark, M.; Brahme, Anders; Danielsson, Mats; Iacobaeus, Christian; Fonte, P.; Peskov, Vladimir N.

    2000-04-01

    We are developing a novel concept for portal imaging that would allow for on-line control and verification of the radiation treatment of cancer patients both at diagnostic and therapeutic energies. This device will consist of two consecutive detectors confided in one gas chamber: a KeV- photon detector, which can visualize the internal soft tissue of the patient, and an MeV-photon detector, which will measure the absolute intensity of the therapeutic beam and its position with respect to the tumor and normal tissues. Both detectors are based on gas and solid photon to electron converters combined with recently invented gas electron multipliers. The device will have a common charge collecting pad-type readout plate equipped with ASIC-based electronics for both detectors. A first simplified prototype device has recently been built and extensively tested. Special efforts were made to find conditions for a safe and reliable operation of the readout electronics that can be damaged by plasma-type discharge effects induced specially at high dose rates. Results obtained so far indicate that our new detector concept may satisfy all requirements on advanced therapy beam monitoring systems.

  20. The Influence of Acquisition Mode on the Dosimetric Performance of an Amorphous Silicon Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    PubMed Central

    Bawazeer, Omemh; Herath, Sisira; Sarasanandarajah, Siva; Kron, Tomas; Deb, Pradip

    2017-01-01

    Aims: This study investigates the impact of cine acquisition mode on the dosimetric characteristics of a Varian aS500 amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (a-Si EPID). Materials and Methods: The performance of an a-Si EPID operated in cine mode was assessed and compared to its performance when operated in an integrated mode and dose measurements using an ionization chamber. This study was conducted at different photon energies and the EPID performance was assessed as function of the delivered dose, dose rate, multileaf collimator speed, field size, phantom thickness, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy fields. Results: The worst nonlinearity was observed at low monitor unit (MU) settings < 100 MU with the highest dose per frame. The nonlinearity of response at a low MU setting was attributed due to the loss of four cine images during each delivery. The EPID response with changing dose rate for 10 MU delivered had similar results to its performance in an integrated mode and ionization chamber. Despite the nonlinearity of response with low MU delivered, EPID performance operated in cine and integrated acquisition modes had comparable responses within 2%. Conclusions: For EPID dosimetry application using cine mode, this study recommends the calibration of the EPID images to be undertaken at a large MU. There were no additional corrections that were required when the EPID operated in cine acquisition mode as compared to calibration in integrated mode. PMID:28706355

  1. 3D Modeling of Patient-Specific Geometries of Portal Veins Using MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; George, Stephanie; Martin, Diego R.; Tannenbaum, Allen R.; Giddens, Don P.

    2013-01-01

    In this note, we present an approach for developing patient-specific 3D models of portal veins to provide geometric boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the blood flow inside portal veins. The study is based on MRI liver images of individual patients to which we apply image registration and segmentation techniques and inlet and outlet velocity profiles acquired using PC-MRI in the same imaging session. The portal vein and its connected veins are then extracted and visualized in 3D as surfaces. Image registration is performed to align shifted images between each breath-hold when the MRI images are acquired. The image segmentation method first labels each voxel in the 3D volume of interest by using a Bayesian probability approach, and then isolates the portal veins via active surfaces initialized inside the vessel. The method was tested with two healthy volunteers. In both cases, the main portal vein and its connected veins were successfully modeled and visualized. PMID:17946691

  2. 3D modeling of patient-specific geometries of portal veins using MR images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; George, Stephanie; Martin, Diego R; Tannenbaum, Allen R; Giddens, Don P

    2006-01-01

    In this note, we present an approach for developing patient-specific 3D models of portal veins to provide geometric boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the blood flow inside portal veins. The study is based on MRI liver images of individual patients to which we apply image registration and segmentation techniques and inlet and outlet velocity profiles acquired using PC-MRI in the same imaging session. The portal vein and its connected veins are then extracted and visualized in 3D as surfaces. Image registration is performed to align shifted images between each breath-hold when the MRI images are acquired. The image segmentation method first labels each voxel in the 3D volume of interest by using a Bayesian probability approach, and then isolates the portal veins via active surfaces initialized inside the vessel. The method was tested with two healthy volunteers. In both cases, the main portal vein and its connected veins were successfully modeled and visualized.

  3. Dosimetry of yttrium-labelled radiopharmaceuticals for internal therapy: 86Y or 90Y imaging?

    PubMed

    Walrand, Stephan; Flux, Glenn D; Konijnenberg, Mark W; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P; Lhommel, Renaud; Pauwels, Stanislas; Jamar, Francois

    2011-05-01

    This paper reviews issues concerning (86)Y positron emission tomography (PET), (90)Y PET and (90)Y bremsstrahlung imaging. Specific methods and corrections developed for quantitative imaging, for application in preclinical and clinical studies, and to assess (90)Y dosimetry are discussed. The potential imaging capabilities with the radioisotopes (87)Y and (88)Y are also considered. Additional studies required to assess specific unaddressed issues are also identified.

  4. In Vivo Imaging of Human 11C-Metformin in Peripheral Organs: Dosimetry, Biodistribution, and Kinetic Analyses.

    PubMed

    Gormsen, Lars C; Sundelin, Elias Immanuel; Jensen, Jonas Brorson; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Jakobsen, Steen; Munk, Ole Lajord; Hougaard Christensen, Mette Marie; Brøsen, Kim; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Jessen, Niels

    2016-12-01

    Metformin is the most widely prescribed oral antiglycemic drug, with few adverse effects. However, surprisingly little is known about its human biodistribution and target tissue metabolism. In animal experiments, we have shown that metformin can be labeled by (11)C and that (11)C-metformin PET can be used to measure renal function. Here, we extend these preclinical findings by a first-in-human (11)C-metformin PET dosimetry, biodistribution, and tissue kinetics study. Nine subjects (3 women and 6 men) participated in 2 studies: in the first study, human radiation dosimetry and biodistribution of (11)C-metformin were estimated in 4 subjects (2 women and 2 men) by whole-body PET. In the second study, (11)C-metformin tissue kinetics were measured in response to both intravenous and oral radiotracer administration. A dynamic PET scan with a field of view covering target tissues of metformin (liver, kidneys, intestines, and skeletal muscle) was obtained for 90 (intravenous) and 120 (oral) min. Radiation dosimetry was acceptable, with effective doses of 9.5 μSv/MBq (intravenous administration) and 18.1 μSv/MBq (oral administration). Whole-body PET revealed that (11)C-metformin was primarily taken up by the kidneys, urinary bladder, and liver but also to a lesser extent in salivary glands, skeletal muscle, and intestines. Reversible 2-tissue-compartment kinetics was observed in the liver, and volume of distribution was calculated to be 2.45 mL/mL (arterial input) or 2.66 mL/mL (portal and arterial input). In the kidneys, compartmental models did not adequately fit the experimental data, and volume of distribution was therefore estimated by a linear approach to be 6.83 mL/mL. Skeletal muscle and intestinal tissue kinetics were best described by 2-tissue-compartment kinetics and showed only discrete tracer uptake. Liver (11)C-metformin uptake was pronounced after oral administration of the tracer, with tissue-to-blood ratio double what was observed after intravenous

  5. Multimodality imaging of obliterative portal venopathy: what every radiologist should know.

    PubMed

    Arora, A; Sarin, S K

    2015-02-01

    Obliterative portal venopathy (OPV) is an important cause of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, which is often erroneously misdiagnosed as cryptogenic cirrhosis. It has a worldwide distribution with majority of cases hailing from the Asian subcontinent. However, recently the disease has gained global attention particularly because of its association with human immunodeficiency virus infection and use of antiretroviral drug therapy (didanosine). As the name suggests, the disorder is characterized by sclerosis and obliteration of the intrahepatic portal vein branches (with attendant periportal fibrosis) leading to portal hypertension amid intriguingly little liver dysfunction. It primarily affects young adults who present with clinically significant portal hypertension in the form of episodes of variceal bleed; however, contrasting liver cirrhosis, the liver function and liver structure remain normal or near normal until late in the disease process. Radiological findings during advanced disease are often indistinguishable from cirrhosis often warranting a liver biopsy. Nevertheless, recent studies have suggested that certain imaging manifestations, if present, can help us to prospectively suggest the possibility of OPV. At imaging, OPV is characterized by a wide range of intrahepatic and/or extrahepatic portal venous abnormalities with attendant changes in liver and splenic volume and stiffness. We shall, through this pictorial review, appraise the literature and illustrate the germane radiological manifestations of OPV that can be seen using different imaging modalities including ultrasonography, CT, MRI, elastography and hepatic haemodynamic studies.

  6. Dose reconstruction for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using a non-iterative method and portal dose image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Inhwan Jason; Jung, Jae Won; Chew, Meng; Kim, Jong Oh; Wang, Brian; Di Biase, Steven; Zhu, Yunping; Lee, Dohyung

    2009-09-01

    A straightforward and accurate method was developed to verify the delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to reconstruct the dose in a patient. The method is based on a computational algorithm that linearly describes the physical relationship between beamlets and dose-scoring voxels in a patient and the dose image from an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The relationship is expressed in the form of dose response functions (responses) that are quantified using Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport techniques. From the dose information measured by the EPID the received patient dose is reconstructed by inversely solving the algorithm. The unique and novel non-iterative feature of this algorithm sets it apart from many existing dose reconstruction methods in the literature. This study presents the algorithm in detail and validates it experimentally for open and IMRT fields. Responses were first calculated for each beamlet of the selected fields by MC simulation. In-phantom and exit film dosimetry were performed on a flat phantom. Using the calculated responses and the algorithm, the exit film dose was used to inversely reconstruct the in-phantom dose, which was then compared with the measured in-phantom dose. The dose comparison in the phantom for all irradiated fields showed a pass rate of higher than 90% dose points given the criteria of dose difference of 3% and distance to agreement of 3 mm.

  7. Detection of patient setup errors with a portal image - DRR registration software application.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Kenneth; Ishikawa, Masayori; Bengua, Gerard; Ito, Yoichi M; Miyamoto, Yoshiko; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-02-18

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a custom portal image - digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) registration software application. The software works by transforming the portal image into the coordinate space of the DRR image using three control points placed on each image by the user, and displaying the fused image. In order to test statistically that the software actually improves setup error estimation, an intra- and interobserver phantom study was performed. Portal images of anthropomorphic thoracic and pelvis phantoms with virtually placed irradiation fields at known setup errors were prepared. A group of five doctors was first asked to estimate the setup errors by examining the portal and DRR image side-by-side, not using the software. A second group of four technicians then estimated the same set of images using the registration software. These two groups of human subjects were then compared with an auto-registration feature of the software, which is based on the mutual information between the portal and DRR images. For the thoracic case, the average distance between the actual setup error and the estimated error was 4.3 ± 3.0 mm for doctors using the side-by-side method, 2.1 ± 2.4 mm for technicians using the registration method, and 0.8 ± 0.4mm for the automatic algorithm. For the pelvis case, the average distance between the actual setup error and estimated error was 2.0 ± 0.5 mm for the doctors using the side-by-side method, 2.5 ± 0.4 mm for technicians using the registration method, and 2.0 ± 1.0 mm for the automatic algorithm. The ability of humans to estimate offset values improved statistically using our software for the chest phantom that we tested. Setup error estimation was further improved using our automatic error estimation algorithm. Estimations were not statistically different for the pelvis case. Consistency improved using the software for both the chest and pelvis phantoms. We also tested the automatic algorithm with a

  8. Evaluation of administered dose using portal images in craniospinal irradiation of pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carina Marques; Calçada, Raquel; Rodrigues, Sofia; Barragán, Juan Antonio; Sá, Ana Cravo; Macedo, Ana Paula; de Fátima Monsanto, Maria

    2017-03-21

    This study aimed to assess the administered dose based on portal imaging in craniospinal pediatric irradiation by evaluating cases in which portal images did or did not account for the total administered dose. We also intended to calculate the mean increase in total administered dose. Data were collected from General University Hospital Gregorio Marañón; we evaluated the total dose administered, total dose planned, number of portal images per treatment and corresponding monitor units of two different groups: one in which the dose from portal images is deducted from the total administered dose (D), and another in which it was not (N). We used descriptive statistics to analyze the collected data, including the mean and respective standard deviation. We used the Shapiro-Wilk and Spearman rank correlation coefficient tests and estimated the linear regression coefficients. Patients in group D received a mean dose of 29.00 ± 10.28 cGy based on the verification portal images, a quantity that was deducted from the planned dose to match the total administered dose. Patients in group N received a mean dose of 41.50 ± 30.53 cGy, which was not deducted from the planned dose, evidencing a mean increase of 41.50 ± 30.55 cGy over the total administered dose. The acquisition of the set-up verification portal images, without their inclusion in the total administered dose, reflects an average increase in total dose for craniospinal irradiation of pediatric patients. Subtraction of the monitor units used to acquire the verification images is recommended.

  9. Using multileaf collimator interleaf leakage to extract absolute spatial information from electronic portal imaging device images.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhanrong; Szanto, Janos; Gerig, Lee

    2005-12-15

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are potentially valuable tools for linear accelerator quality assurance and for measuring and analyzing geometric variations in radiation treatment delivery. Geometric analysis is more robust if referenced against an absolute position such as the isocenter (collimator axis of rotation), allowing the observer to discriminate between various setup errors and jaw or multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration errors. Unfortunately, mechanical instabilities in EPIDs make such analysis difficult. In the present work, we describe how MLC interleaf radiation leakage, hidden in the background of portal images, can be extracted and analyzed to find the field isocenter perpendicular to leaf travel direction. The signal from the interleaf radiation leakage is extracted to provide a precise and accurate determination of the isocenter location in the direction perpendicular to MLC leaf travel. In the direction of leaf travel, the minimization of residuals between planned and measured leaf positions is used to determine the isocenter. This method assumes that leaf positioning errors are randomly distributed. The validity of the method for determining the angular deviation between EPID image grid lines and collimator angle and for determining the known isocenter position is experimentally established.

  10. Hepatic flow parameters measured with MR imaging and Doppler US: correlations with degree of cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Annet, Laurence; Materne, Roland; Danse, Etienne; Jamart, Jacques; Horsmans, Yves; Van Beers, Bernard E

    2003-11-01

    To determine the correlations between hemodynamic parameters of hepatic flow measured with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and Doppler ultrasonography (US) and the severity of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Forty-six patients referred for measurements of portal venous pressure (three with normal liver, 12 with chronic hepatitis, and 31 with cirrhosis [10 with Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis; 13 with class B cirrhosis; and eight with class C cirrhosis]) were included in the study. Apparent liver perfusion, apparent arterial and portal perfusion, portal fraction, distribution volume, and mean transit time were measured with dynamic contrast material-enhanced MR imaging. Portal velocity, portal flow, congestion index, right hepatic artery resistance index, and modified hepatic index were measured with Doppler US. Results in patients with cirrhosis and those without cirrhosis were compared with the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Correlations were assessed with Spearman rank correlation coefficients. With MR imaging, all flow parameters except distribution volume were significantly different between patients with and those without cirrhosis (P <.05). There was a significant correlation between all flow parameters measured with MR imaging and portal pressure (P <.02). Apparent arterial (P =.024) and portal (P <.001) perfusion, portal fraction (P <.001), and mean transit time (P =.004) were correlated with Child-Pugh class. Flow parameters measured with Doppler US did not differ significantly between patients with and those without cirrhosis. Only right hepatic arterial resistance (P <.007) and portal flow (P <.043) were weakly (r < 0.7) correlated with portal pressure. No Doppler US parameter was correlated with Child-Pugh class. Hepatic flow parameters measured with MR imaging correlate with the severity of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Doppler US parameters are only weakly correlated with portal pressure. Copyright RSNA, 2003

  11. Quantitative imaging of (124)I with PET/ CT in pretherapy lesion dosimetry. Effects impairing image quantification and their corrections.

    PubMed

    Jentzen, W; Freudenberg, L; Bockisch, A

    2011-02-01

    Iodine-131-labelled agents are successfully used in cancer treatment. In the pretherapy dosimetry approach, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using (124)I provides a modality to estimate absorbed dose to tumours and can be considered as the preferred imaging method for this purpose in (131)I radiopharmaceutical therapies. For accurate dosimetry, serial measurements of activity concentrations (ACs) over an appropriate time period are necessary. Consequently, accurate AC determination is of paramount importance in PET/CT-based lesion dosimetry using (124)I-labelled agents. After presenting an historical overview of (124)I clinical application, this review focuses on factors impairing PET image quantification accuracy and on methods of correcting for these effects. Specifically, the emission of prompt gamma photons in the (124)I decay process that are detected in coincidence with each other and with the annihilation photon, and the low (124)I positron branching ration of only 23% raise concerns regarding image quantification accuracy. This review discusses this prompt gamma effect, its impact and approaches to correct for this phenomenon. In (124)I lesion dosimetry, recovery coefficients (RCs) are commonly used to compensate primarily for partial-volume effect but also, in a simplistic way, for prompt gamma coincidence effect; the main methodological factors affecting the RC-corrected (124)I AC are described. Finally, special issues in image (124)I quantification are reviewed, including coadministration of high therapeutic activities of 131I, shine-through artefact, and transmission-contamination effect occurring in stand-alone PET systems.

  12. Contrast enhancement for portal images by combination of subtraction and reprojection processes for Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Hariu, Masatsugu; Suda, Yuhi; Chang, Weishan; Myojoyama, Atsushi; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2017-09-12

    For patient setup of the IGRT technique, various imaging systems are currently available. MV portal imaging is performed in identical geometry with the treatment beam so that the portal image provides accurate geometric information. However, MV imaging suffers from poor image contrast due to larger Compton scatter photons. In this work, an original image processing algorithm is proposed to improve and enhance the image contrast without increasing the imaging dose. Scatter estimation was performed in detail by MC simulation based on patient CT data. In the image processing, scatter photons were eliminated and then they were reprojected as primary photons on the assumption that Compton interaction did not take place. To improve the processing efficiency, the dose spread function within the EPID was investigated and implemented on the developed code. Portal images with and without the proposed image processing were evaluated by the image contrast profile. By the subtraction process, the image contrast was improved but the EPID signal was weakened because 15.2% of the signal was eliminated due to the contribution of scatter photons. Hence, these scatter photons were reprojected in the reprojection process. As a result, the tumor, bronchi, mediastinal space and ribs were observed more clearly than in the original image. It was clarified that image processing with the dose spread functions provides stronger contrast enhancement while maintaining a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. This work shows the feasibility of improving and enhancing the contrast of portal images. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. A region-based Retinex with data filling for the enhancement of electronic portal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuan-Po; Yeh, Shyh-An; Huang, Yung-Hui; Chang, Li-Yun; Kuo, Chung-Ming; Ding, Hueisch-Jy

    2013-05-01

    PurposePortal images are acquired by electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) with megavoltage (MV) x-ray, but they are inherently poor in terms of contrast, due to Compton Effect. In comparison with diagnostic x-ray images, portal images usually lack sufficient detail information for normal human vision. Therefore, an effective method of enhancing these images would be very useful. This paper proposes a new approach that combines global and local enhancement techniques. Materials and methodsA portal image usually has a high dynamic range (HDR) of up to 16 bits, so it could records details that are imperceptible to the naked eye. However, this property provides the potential for enhancement of the portal image. In order to overcome the low contrast appearance caused by innate physical properties, two phases and four sequential steps were proposed. At phase 1, global enhancement, HE is used to stretch narrow range histogram of original raw image to reasonable wide range so that we can easily partition the image into regions for local enhancement. At phase 2, local enhancement, EPIs were first segmented into regions based on histogram distribution. Then a new concept of local enhancement, pseudo-data filling, in which enhancement is controlled by manipulating the pseudo-data, is proposed in order to maximize the regional enhancement. Finally each region of EPI is enhanced by Retinex with optimized parameter and synthesized as output image. ResultsAt phase 1, HE can successfully improve EPIs contrast at varies body sites by redistribution histogram. This step provides possibility of histogram analyzing at phase 2. Therefore, histogram-based segmentation is feasible for nearly every patient as we expected. Simulation of pseudo-data filling and region-based Retinex enhancement demonstrate that the proposed method provides a more detailed portal image, which is proved by objective evaluation of two groups of radiation oncology staffs. ConclusionsAn effective enhancement

  14. Imaging and dosimetry for radium-223: the potential for personalized treatment.

    PubMed

    Flux, Glenn D

    2017-08-01

    Radium-223 ((223)Ra) offers a new option for the treatment of bone metastases from prostate cancer. As cancer treatment progresses towards personalization, the potential for an individualized approach is exemplified in treatments with radiotherapeutics due to the unique ability to image in vivo the uptake and retention of the therapeutic agent. This is unmatched in any other field of medicine. Currently, (223)Ra is administered according to standard fixed administrations, modified according to patient weight. Although gamma emissions comprise only 1% of the total emitted energy, there are increasing reports that quantitative imaging is feasible and can facilitate patient-specific dosimetry. The aim of this article is to review the application of imaging and dosimetry for (223)Ra and to consider the potential for treatment optimization accordingly, in order to ensure clinical and cost effectiveness of this promising agent.

  15. Imaging diagnosis--celiacomesenteric trunk and portal vein hypoplasia in a pit bull terrier.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Mario; Martino, Rosmara; Assad, Eyad Abu

    2014-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) imaging findings of a celiacomesenteric trunk (CMT) in a 1-year-old dog with primary hypoplasia of the portal vein (PHPV) are described. Computed tomography angiography revealed acquired porto-systemic shunts secondary to portal hypertension and a common origin of the celiac and cranial mesenteric arteries. The imaging findings and the association of a CMT with other vascular diseases have never been reported in dogs. The recognition of this rare arterial anomaly should prompt to investigate possible concurrent vascular diseases and may influence the planning of abdominal surgeries.

  16. Imaging and radiological interventions in extra-hepatic portal vein obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pargewar, Sudheer S; Desai, Saloni N; Rajesh, S; Singh, Vaibhav P; Arora, Ankur; Mukund, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) is a primary vascular condition characterized by chronic long standing blockage and cavernous transformation of portal vein with or without additional involvement of intrahepatic branches, splenic or superior mesenteric vein. Patients generally present in childhood with multiple episodes of variceal bleed and EHPVO is the predominant cause of paediatric portal hypertension (PHT) in developing countries. It is a pre-hepatic type of PHT in which liver functions and morphology are preserved till late. Characteristic imaging findings include multiple parabiliary venous collaterals which form to bypass the obstructed portal vein with resultant changes in biliary tree termed portal biliopathy or portal cavernoma cholangiopathy. Ultrasound with Doppler, computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiography and magnetic resonance portovenography are non-invasive techniques which can provide a comprehensive analysis of degree and extent of EHPVO, collaterals and bile duct abnormalities. These can also be used to assess in surgical planning as well screening for shunt patency in post-operative patients. The multitude of changes and complications seen in EHPVO can be addressed by various radiological interventional procedures. The myriad of symptoms arising secondary to vascular, biliary, visceral and neurocognitive changes in EHPVO can be managed by various radiological interventions like transjugular intra-hepatic portosystemic shunt, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, partial splenic embolization, balloon occluded retrograde obliteration of portosystemic shunt (PSS) and revision of PSS. PMID:27358683

  17. Imaging and radiological interventions in extra-hepatic portal vein obstruction.

    PubMed

    Pargewar, Sudheer S; Desai, Saloni N; Rajesh, S; Singh, Vaibhav P; Arora, Ankur; Mukund, Amar

    2016-06-28

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) is a primary vascular condition characterized by chronic long standing blockage and cavernous transformation of portal vein with or without additional involvement of intrahepatic branches, splenic or superior mesenteric vein. Patients generally present in childhood with multiple episodes of variceal bleed and EHPVO is the predominant cause of paediatric portal hypertension (PHT) in developing countries. It is a pre-hepatic type of PHT in which liver functions and morphology are preserved till late. Characteristic imaging findings include multiple parabiliary venous collaterals which form to bypass the obstructed portal vein with resultant changes in biliary tree termed portal biliopathy or portal cavernoma cholangiopathy. Ultrasound with Doppler, computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiography and magnetic resonance portovenography are non-invasive techniques which can provide a comprehensive analysis of degree and extent of EHPVO, collaterals and bile duct abnormalities. These can also be used to assess in surgical planning as well screening for shunt patency in post-operative patients. The multitude of changes and complications seen in EHPVO can be addressed by various radiological interventional procedures. The myriad of symptoms arising secondary to vascular, biliary, visceral and neurocognitive changes in EHPVO can be managed by various radiological interventions like transjugular intra-hepatic portosystemic shunt, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, partial splenic embolization, balloon occluded retrograde obliteration of portosystemic shunt (PSS) and revision of PSS.

  18. Portal imaging practice patterns of children's oncology group institutions: Dosimetric assessment and recommendations for minimizing unnecessary exposure.

    PubMed

    Olch, Arthur J; Geurts, Mark; Thomadsen, Bruce; Famiglietti, Robin; Chang, Eric L

    2007-02-01

    To determine and analyze the dosimetric consequences of current portal imaging practices for pediatric patients, and make specific recommendations for reducing exposure from portal imaging procedures. A survey was sent to approximately 250 Children's Oncology Group (COG) member institutions asking a series of questions about their portal imaging practices. Three case studies are presented with dosimetric analysis to illustrate the magnitude of unintended dose received by nontarget tissues using the most common techniques from the survey. The vast majority of centers use double-exposure portal image techniques with a variety of open field margins. Only 17% of portal images were obtained during treatment, and for other imaging methods, few centers subtract monitor units from the treatment delivery. The number of monitor units used was nearly the same regardless of imager type, including electronic portal imaging devices. Eighty-six percent imaged all fields the first week and 17% imaged all fields every week. An additional 1,112 cm3 of nontarget tissue received 1 Gy in one of the example cases. Eight new recommendations are made, which will lower nontarget radiation doses with minimal impact on treatment verification accuracy. Based on the survey, changes can be made in portal imaging practices that will lower nontarget doses. It is anticipated that treatment verification accuracy will be minimally affected. Specific recommendations made to decrease the imaging dose and help lower the rate of radiation-induced secondary cancers in children are proposed for inclusion in future COG protocols using radiation therapy.

  19. Focal spot motion of linear accelerators and its effect on portal image analysis.

    PubMed

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Brand, Bob; van Herk, Marcel

    2003-06-01

    The focal spot of a linear accelerator is often considered to have a fully stable position. In practice, however, the beam control loop of a linear accelerator needs to stabilize after the beam is turned on. As a result, some motion of the focal spot might occur during the start-up phase of irradiation. When acquiring portal images, this motion will affect the projected position of anatomy and field edges, especially when low exposures are used. In this paper, the motion of the focal spot and the effect of this motion on portal image analysis are quantified. A slightly tilted narrow slit phantom was placed at the isocenter of several linear accelerators and images were acquired (3.5 frames per second) by means of an amorphous silicon flat panel imager positioned approximately 0.7 m below the isocenter. The motion of the focal spot was determined by converting the tilted slit images to subpixel accurate line spread functions. The error in portal image analysis due to focal spot motionwas estimated by a subtraction of the relative displacement of the projected slit from the relative displacement of the field edges. It was found that the motion of the focal spot depends on the control system and design of the accelerator. The shift of the focal spot at the start of irradiation ranges between 0.05-0.7 mm in the gun-target (GT) direction. In the left-right (AB) direction the shift is generally smaller. The resulting error in portal image analysis due to focal spotmotion ranges between 0.05-1.1 mm for a dose corresponding to two monitor units (MUs). For 20 MUs, the effect of the focal spot motion reduces to 0.01-0.3 mm. The error in portal image analysis due to focal spot motion can be reduced by reducing the applied dose rate.

  20. Multimodality imaging of primary extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO): what every radiologist should know

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, S K

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis, but it can also occur as a primary vascular disorder amid absent liver disease. Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) refers to the obstruction of the extrahepatic portal vein with or without involvement of the intrahepatic portal vein branches, splenic and/or superior mesenteric vein. It is a distinct disorder that excludes PVT occurring in concurrence with liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The term “EHPVO” implies chronicity and is principally reserved for a long-standing condition characterized by cavernous transformation of the portal vein. The most characteristic imaging manifestation is the formation of portoportal collaterals (via the venous plexi of Petren and Saint) that allow hepatopetal flow. However, this collateral circulation is insufficient resulting in clinically significant pre-hepatic portal hypertension, wherein the liver function and structure remain preserved until late. Although the long-term (more than 10 years) survival with controlled variceal bleeding is up to 100%, affected individuals have an impaired quality of life owing to portal cavernoma cholangiopathy, hypersplenism, neurocognitive dysfunction and growth retardation. Imaging diagnosis is not always straightforward as the collaterals can also present as a tumour-like solid mass that can be inadvertently biopsied. Moreover, EHPVO has its implications for the biliary tree, arterial circulation, liver/splenic volumes and stiffness, which merit proper understanding but have not been so well described in literature. In this review, we present the complete spectrum of the vascular, biliary and visceral changes with a particular emphasis on what our medical/surgical hepatology colleagues need to know from us in the pre-operative and post-operative settings. PMID:26111208

  1. Real-time Cherenkov emission portal imaging during CyberKnife® radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Roussakis, Yiannis; Zhang, Rongxiao; Heyes, Geoff; Webster, Gareth; Mason, Suzannah; Green, Stuart; Pogue, Brian; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-11-21

    The feasibility of real-time portal imaging during radiation therapy, through the Cherenkov emission (CE) effect is investigated via a medical linear accelerator (CyberKnife(®)) irradiating a partially-filled water tank with a 60 mm circular beam. A graticule of lead/plywood and a number of tissue equivalent materials were alternatively placed at the beam entrance face while the induced CE at the exit face was imaged using a gated electron-multiplying-intensified-charged-coupled device (emICCD) for both stationary and dynamic scenarios. This was replicated on an Elekta Synergy(®) linear accelerator with portal images acquired using the iViewGT(™) system. Profiles across the acquired portal images were analysed to reveal the potential resolution and contrast limits of this novel CE based portal imaging technique and compared against the current standard. The CE resolution study revealed that using the lead/plywood graticule, separations down to 3.4  ±  0.5 mm can be resolved. A 28 mm thick tissue-equivalent rod with electron density of 1.69 relative to water demonstrated a CE contrast of 15% through air and 14% through water sections, as compared to a corresponding contrast of 19% and 12% using the iViewGT(™) system. For dynamic scenarios, video rate imaging with 30 frames per second was achieved. It is demonstrated that CE-based portal imaging is feasible to identify both stationary and dynamic objects within a CyberKnife(®) radiotherapy treatment field.

  2. Real-time Cherenkov emission portal imaging during CyberKnife® radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussakis, Yiannis; Zhang, Rongxiao; Heyes, Geoff; Webster, Gareth; Mason, Suzannah; Green, Stuart; Pogue, Brian; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-11-01

    The feasibility of real-time portal imaging during radiation therapy, through the Cherenkov emission (CE) effect is investigated via a medical linear accelerator (CyberKnife®) irradiating a partially-filled water tank with a 60 mm circular beam. A graticule of lead/plywood and a number of tissue equivalent materials were alternatively placed at the beam entrance face while the induced CE at the exit face was imaged using a gated electron-multiplying-intensified-charged-coupled device (emICCD) for both stationary and dynamic scenarios. This was replicated on an Elekta Synergy® linear accelerator with portal images acquired using the iViewGT™ system. Profiles across the acquired portal images were analysed to reveal the potential resolution and contrast limits of this novel CE based portal imaging technique and compared against the current standard. The CE resolution study revealed that using the lead/plywood graticule, separations down to 3.4  ±  0.5 mm can be resolved. A 28 mm thick tissue-equivalent rod with electron density of 1.69 relative to water demonstrated a CE contrast of 15% through air and 14% through water sections, as compared to a corresponding contrast of 19% and 12% using the iViewGT™ system. For dynamic scenarios, video rate imaging with 30 frames per second was achieved. It is demonstrated that CE-based portal imaging is feasible to identify both stationary and dynamic objects within a CyberKnife® radiotherapy treatment field.

  3. Assessment of the influence of a carbon fiber tabletop on portal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiarz, Agnieszka; Krawczyk, Paweł; Swat, Kaja; Andrasiak, Michał

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate beam attenuation caused by a carbon-fiber tabletop and its influence on portal image quality. The dose was measured by a Farmer type jonization chamber. The measurements of the portal image quality were performed with an EPID QC phantom for 6 MV beam for a specified field size (covering all test elements of the phantom completely -26×26 cm2 in the isocenter, SSD 96.2 cm) and various portal—isocenter distances. The beam attenuation factor was measured for Polkam 16 treatment table with a carbon fiber tabletop. Carbon fiber tabletop induces beam attenuation in vertical direction by a factor of 3.39%. The lowest maximum deviation to the regression line for linearity was measured for 40 cm portal—phantom distance. The lowest signal to noise ratio was observed for the portal—phantom distance of 30 cm. This factor dropped by 9% for images with a tabletop. The difference in high contrast: horizontal is 3.64; 0.32; 3.25 for 50 cm, 40 cm and 30 cm respectively and vertical—3.64%; 0.32%; 4.01% for 50 cm, 40 cm and 30 cm respectively. The visibility of the holes with the smallest diameters (1 mm) is the same for 50 and 40 cm while it is better for 30 cm, as can be expected due to the lower SNR. Carbon-fiber inserts, tabletops play a vital role in modern radiotherapy. One of the most important advantages of carbon-fiber tabletops is the lack of the gantry direction limitations. In this paper the attenuation of a carbon-fiber tabletop and its influence on a portal image quality were investigated. Dose attenuation effects, comparable to other measurements, were found. That effect influences dose distribution delivered to the target volume and can increase the time of irradiation needed to take a portal image. It has been found that the best conditions for taking portal image occur when the distance from the phantom (patient) to the portal is 40 cm and the portal is parallel to the tabletop. In such conditions one observes the

  4. Three-dimensional portal image-based dose reconstruction in a virtual phantom for rapid evaluation of IMRT plans.

    PubMed

    Ansbacher, W

    2006-09-01

    A new method for rapid evaluation of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans has been developed, using portal images for reconstruction of the dose delivered to a virtual three-dimensional (3D) phantom. This technique can replace an array of less complete but more time-consuming measurements. A reference dose calculation is first created by transferring an IMRT plan to a cylindrical phantom, retaining the treatment gantry angles. The isocenter of the fields is placed on or near the phantom axis. This geometry preserves the relative locations of high and low dose regions and has the required symmetry for the dose reconstruction. An electronic portal image (EPI) is acquired for each field, representing the dose in the midplane of a virtual phantom. The image is convolved with a kernel to correct for the lack of scatter, replicating the effect of the cylindrical phantom surrounding the dose plane. This avoids the need to calculate fluence. Images are calibrated to a reference field that delivers a known dose to the isocenter of this phantom. The 3D dose matrix is reconstructed by attenuation and divergence corrections and summed to create a dose matrix (PI-dose) on the same grid spacing as the reference calculation. Comparison of the two distributions is performed with a gradient-weighted 3D dose difference based on dose and position tolerances. Because of its inherent simplicity, the technique is optimally suited for detecting clinically significant variances from a planned dose distribution, rather than for use in the validation of IMRT algorithms. An analysis of differences between PI-dose and calculation, delta PI, compared to differences between conventional quality assurance (QA) and calculation, delta CQ, was performed retrospectively for 20 clinical IMRT cases. PI-dose differences at the isocenter were in good agreement with ionization chamber differences (mean delta PI = -0.8%, standard deviation sigma = 1.5%, against delta CQ = 0.3%, sigma = 1

  5. Portal cavernoma cholangiopathy: an endoscopic ultrasound based imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Malay; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram S

    2014-02-01

    In patients with portal cavernoma cholangiopathy (PCC), appearance and location of collateral channels depends on extent and location of occlusive thrombus in the porto-mesenteric venous system. If the porto-mesenteric venous system is occluded near the formation of portal vein, blood tends to flow through collateral channels that form varices in and around the common bile duct. Though endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is considered the investigative modality of choice for evaluating common bile duct obstruction, its role in evaluating collateral pathways in and around the common bile duct is poorly defined. This article reviews the anatomy, genesis and appearance of these collateral pathways in PCC. EUS identifies different layers of the common bile duct (CBD) wall and, in PCC, where varices are in close contact with or part of these different layers, can establish the relationship between them. Thus, EUS appears to be the investigation of choice for tracing the origin and course of collaterals in PCC. Careful study of varices in the common bile duct wall prior to ERCP for bile duct stones or biliary strictures may help to plan the procedure and to manage anticipated complications such as hemobilia.

  6. Dosimetry for spectral molecular imaging of small animals with MARS-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganet, Noémie; Anderson, Nigel; Bell, Stephen; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phil; Carbonez, Pierre; Cook, Nicholas; Cotterill, Tony; Marsh, Steven; Panta, Raj Kumar; Laban, John; Walker, Sophie; Yeabsley, Adam; Damet, Jérôme

    2015-03-01

    The Medipix All Resolution Scanner (MARS) spectral CT is intended for small animal, pre-clinical imaging and uses an x-ray detector (Medipix) operating in single photon counting mode. The MARS system provides spectrometric information to facilitate differentiation of tissue types and bio-markers. For longitudinal studies of disease models, it is desirable to characterise the system's dosimetry. This dosimetry study is performed using three phantoms each consisting of a 30 mm diameter homogeneous PMMA cylinder simulating a mouse. The imaging parameters used for this study are derived from those used for gold nanoparticle identification in mouse kidneys. Dosimetry measurement are obtained with thermo-luminescent Lithium Fluoride (LiF:CuMgP) detectors, calibrated in terms of air kerma and placed at different depths and orientations in the phantoms. Central axis TLD air kerma rates of 17.2 (± 0.71) mGy/min and 18.2 (± 0.75) mGy/min were obtained for different phantoms and TLD orientations. Validation measurements were acquired with a pencil ionization chamber, giving an air-kerma rate of 20.3 (±1) mGy/min and an estimated total air kerma of 81.2 (± 4) mGy for a 720 projection acquisition. It is anticipated that scanner design improvements will significantly decrease future dose requirements. The procedures developed in this work will be used for further dosimetry calculations when optimizing image acquisition for the MARS system as it undergoes development towards human clinical applications.

  7. A new approach for the pixel map sensitivity (PMS) evaluation of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID).

    PubMed

    Boriano, Alberto; Lucio, Francesco; Calamia, Elisa; Russi, Elvio; Marchetto, Flavio

    2013-11-04

    When using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for dosimetric verifications, the calibration of the sensitive area is of paramount importance. Two calibration methods are generally adopted: one, empirical, based on an external reference dosimeter or on multiple narrow beam irradiations, and one based on the EPID response simulation. In this paper we present an alternative approach based on an intercalibration procedure, independent from external dosimeters and from simulations, and is quick and easy to perform. Each element of a detector matrix is characterized by a different gain; the aim of the calibration procedure is to relate the gain of each element to a reference one. The method that we used to compute the relative gains is based on recursive acquisitions with the EPID placed in different positions, assuming a constant fluence of the beam for subsequent deliveries. By applying an established procedure and analysis algorithm, the EPID calibration was repeated in several working conditions. Data show that both the photons energy and the presence of a medium between the source and the detector affect the calibration coefficients less than 1%. The calibration coefficients were then applied to the acquired images, comparing the EPID dose images with films. Measurements were performed with open field, placing the film at the level of the EPID. The standard deviation of the distribution of the point-to-point difference is 0.6%. An approach of this type for the EPID calibration has many advantages with respect to the standard methods - it does not need an external dosimeter, it is not related to the irradiation techniques, and it is easy to implement in the clinical practice. Moreover, it can be applied in case of transit or nontransit dosimetry, solving the problem of the EPID calibration independently from the dose reconstruction method.

  8. The landsat image mosaic of the Antarctica Web Portal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rusanowski, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    People believe what they can see. The Poles exist as a frozen dream to most people. The International Polar Year wants to break the ice (so to speak), open up the Poles to the general public, support current polar research, and encourage new research projects. The IPY officially begins in March, 2007. As part of this effort, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), are developing three Landsat mosaics of Antarctica and an Antarctic Web Portal with a Community site and an online map viewer. When scientists are able to view the entire scope of polar research, they will be better able to collaborate and locate the resources they need. When the general public more readily sees what is happening in the polar environments, they will understand how changes to the polar areas affect everyone.

  9. Direct Portal Vein Thrombosis Visualization with T2*-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuanming; Hu, Alice; Haacke, Mark; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Jun; Zhou, Daiquan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility of direct magnetic resonance portal vein thrombosis (PVT) visualization with T2*-weighted imaging (T2*WI) without contrast agent. METHODS: Thirty patients with PVT were included in this study. All of them were imaged with contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) as well as non-contrast MRI T1, T2 and T2*WI. Imaging data was independently analyzed by two experienced radiologists. T2*WI of all PVT was compared slice-by-slice with each of the comparison sequences (T1WI, T2WI and CE-CT) on the following categories: the location, size, boundary, and conspicuity of thrombus and portal veins. RESULTS: The average score of PVT visualization in T2*WI was higher than T1WI and T2WI in location, size, boundary and conspicuity (t = 7.54 - 84.16, P<0.05), and higher than CE-CT in boundary and conspicuity (t = 3.03- 6.98, P<0.05). For portal vein visualization, there was no significant score difference in left, middle and right portal veins between CE-CT and T2*WI (t = -1.76- 1.35, P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest T2*WI can characterize PVT accurately with high quality without the use of intravenous contrast agents. PMID:24046533

  10. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Yue; Wang Hesheng; Johnson, Timothy D.; Pan, Charlie; Hussain, Hero; Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  11. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Wang, Hesheng; Johnson, Timothy D.; Pan, Charlie; Hussain, Hero; Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  12. Review on the characteristics of radiation detectors for dosimetry and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Joao; Clasie, Ben; Partridge, Mike

    2014-10-01

    The enormous advances in the understanding of human anatomy, physiology and pathology in recent decades have led to ever-improving methods of disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Many of these achievements have been enabled, at least in part, by advances in ionizing radiation detectors. Radiology has been transformed by the implementation of multi-slice CT and digital x-ray imaging systems, with silver halide films now largely obsolete for many applications. Nuclear medicine has benefited from more sensitive, faster and higher-resolution detectors delivering ever-higher SPECT and PET image quality. PET/MR systems have been enabled by the development of gamma ray detectors that can operate in high magnetic fields. These huge advances in imaging have enabled equally impressive steps forward in radiotherapy delivery accuracy, with 4DCT, PET and MRI routinely used in treatment planning and online image guidance provided by cone-beam CT. The challenge of ensuring safe, accurate and precise delivery of highly complex radiation fields has also both driven and benefited from advances in radiation detectors. Detector systems have been developed for the measurement of electron, intensity-modulated and modulated arc x-ray, proton and ion beams, and around brachytherapy sources based on a very wide range of technologies. The types of measurement performed are equally wide, encompassing commissioning and quality assurance, reference dosimetry, in vivo dosimetry and personal and environmental monitoring. In this article, we briefly introduce the general physical characteristics and properties that are commonly used to describe the behaviour and performance of both discrete and imaging detectors. The physical principles of operation of calorimeters; ionization and charge detectors; semiconductor, luminescent, scintillating and chemical detectors; and radiochromic and radiographic films are then reviewed and their principle applications discussed. Finally, a general

  13. Value of multi-planar CT images in interactive dosimetry planning of intracavitary therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sewchand, W.; Prempree, T.; Pantanaphan, V.; Whitley, N.O.; Heidtman, B.; Scott, R.M.

    1982-02-01

    A method of intracavitary treatment planning and dosimetry analysis which uses multi-planar reconstructed computerized tomography (CT) images is presented. The aim of the method is to improve ability to precisely locate clinical reference points, to fully define pertinent anatomic structures and to provide dose distributions and their relationship to these structures in multiple planes. Our approach is based on interactive treatment planning and point dose display on sagittal and coronal reconstructed CT images as well as the usual transaxial image. The advantages of clinical evaluation of isodoses directly on multi-planar CT images are assessed. These include precise anatomic and dose relationships between the cervix and paracervical structures, the bladder, rectum and pelvic node-bearing sites. Problems of image magnification, blurred images and inadequate resolution attendant to orthogonal radiographs, which are the basis of current techniques, are minimal. Analysis and results of the method and a comparison with the technique of orthogonal radiographs are presented for a demonstration case.

  14. Value of multi-planar CT images in interactive dosimetry planning of intracavitary therapy.

    PubMed

    Sewchand, W; Prempree, T; Patanaphan, V; Whitley, N O; Heidtman, B; Scott, R M

    1982-02-01

    A method of intracavitary treatment planning and dosimetry analysis which uses multi-planar reconstructed computerized tomography (CT) images is presented. The aim of the method is to improve ability to precisely locate clinical reference points, to fully define pertinent anatomic structures and to provide dose distributions and their relationship to these structures in multiple planes. Our approach is based on interactive treatment planning and point dose display on sagittal and coronal reconstructed CT images as well as the usual transaxial image. The advantages of clinical evaluation of isodoses directly on multi-planar CT images are assessed. These include precise anatomic and dose relationships between the cervix and paracervical structures, the bladder, rectum and pelvic node-bearing sites. Problems of image magnification, blurred images and inadequate resolution attendant to orthogonal radiographs, which are the basis of current techniques, are minimal. Analysis and results of the method and a comparison with the technique of orthogonal radiographs are presented for a demonstration case.

  15. Pharmacokinetic digital phantoms for accuracy assessment of image-based dosimetry in (177)Lu-DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Gustav; Gustafsson, Johan; Ljungberg, Michael; Gleisner, Katarina Sjögreen

    2015-08-07

    Patient-specific image-based dosimetry is considered to be a useful tool to limit toxicity associated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). To facilitate the establishment and reliability of absorbed-dose response relationships, it is essential to assess the accuracy of dosimetry in clinically realistic scenarios. To this end, we developed pharmacokinetic digital phantoms corresponding to patients treated with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. Three individual voxel phantoms from the XCAT population were generated and assigned a dynamic activity distribution based on a compartment model for (177)Lu-DOTATATE, designed specifically for this purpose. The compartment model was fitted to time-activity data from 10 patients, primarily acquired using quantitative scintillation camera imaging. S values for all phantom source-target combinations were calculated based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Combining the S values and time-activity curves, reference values of the absorbed dose to the phantom kidneys, liver, spleen, tumours and whole-body were calculated. The phantoms were used in a virtual dosimetry study, using Monte-Carlo simulated gamma-camera images and conventional methods for absorbed-dose calculations. The characteristics of the SPECT and WB planar images were found to well represent those of real patient images, capturing the difficulties present in image-based dosimetry. The phantoms are expected to be useful for further studies and optimisation of clinical dosimetry in (177)Lu PRRT.

  16. Pharmacokinetic digital phantoms for accuracy assessment of image-based dosimetry in 177Lu-DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolin, Gustav; Gustafsson, Johan; Ljungberg, Michael; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina

    2015-08-01

    Patient-specific image-based dosimetry is considered to be a useful tool to limit toxicity associated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). To facilitate the establishment and reliability of absorbed-dose response relationships, it is essential to assess the accuracy of dosimetry in clinically realistic scenarios. To this end, we developed pharmacokinetic digital phantoms corresponding to patients treated with 177Lu-DOTATATE. Three individual voxel phantoms from the XCAT population were generated and assigned a dynamic activity distribution based on a compartment model for 177Lu-DOTATATE, designed specifically for this purpose. The compartment model was fitted to time-activity data from 10 patients, primarily acquired using quantitative scintillation camera imaging. S values for all phantom source-target combinations were calculated based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Combining the S values and time-activity curves, reference values of the absorbed dose to the phantom kidneys, liver, spleen, tumours and whole-body were calculated. The phantoms were used in a virtual dosimetry study, using Monte-Carlo simulated gamma-camera images and conventional methods for absorbed-dose calculations. The characteristics of the SPECT and WB planar images were found to well represent those of real patient images, capturing the difficulties present in image-based dosimetry. The phantoms are expected to be useful for further studies and optimisation of clinical dosimetry in 177Lu PRRT.

  17. Dosimetry and image quality assessment in a direct radiography system

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Paixão, Lucas; Teixeira, Maria Helena Araújo; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the mean glandular dose with a solid state detector and the image quality in a direct radiography system, utilizing phantoms. Materials and Methods Irradiations were performed with automatic exposure control and polymethyl methacrylate slabs with different thicknesses to calculate glandular dose values. The image quality was evaluated by means of the structures visualized on the images of the phantoms. Results Considering the uncertainty of the measurements, the mean glandular dose results are in agreement with the values provided by the equipment and with internationally adopted reference levels. Results obtained from images of the phantoms were in agreement with the reference values. Conclusion The present study contributes to verify the equipment conformity as regards dose values and image quality. PMID:25741119

  18. An automated voxelized dosimetry tool for radionuclide therapy based on serial quantitative SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Price A.; Kron, Tomas; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Hofman, Michael S.; Hogg, Annette; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To create an accurate map of the distribution of radiation dose deposition in healthy and target tissues during radionuclide therapy.Methods: Serial quantitative SPECT/CT images were acquired at 4, 24, and 72 h for 28 {sup 177}Lu-octreotate peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) administrations in 17 patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors. Deformable image registration was combined with an in-house programming algorithm to interpolate pharmacokinetic uptake and clearance at a voxel level. The resultant cumulated activity image series are comprised of values representing the total number of decays within each voxel's volume. For PRRT, cumulated activity was translated to absorbed dose based on Monte Carlo-determined voxel S-values at a combination of long and short ranges. These dosimetric image sets were compared for mean radiation absorbed dose to at-risk organs using a conventional MIRD protocol (OLINDA 1.1).Results: Absorbed dose values to solid organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) were within 10% using both techniques. Dose estimates to marrow were greater using the voxelized protocol, attributed to the software incorporating crossfire effect from nearby tumor volumes.Conclusions: The technique presented offers an efficient, automated tool for PRRT dosimetry based on serial post-therapy imaging. Following retrospective analysis, this method of high-resolution dosimetry may allow physicians to prescribe activity based on required dose to tumor volume or radiation limits to healthy tissue in individual patients.

  19. The Feasibility of Thermal Imaging as a Future Portal Imaging Device for Therapeutic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miloro, Piero; Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; Shaw, Adam

    2016-08-01

    This technical note describes a prototype thermally based portal imaging device that allows mapping of energy deposition on the surface of a tissue mimicking material in a focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) beam by using an infrared camera to measure the temperature change on that surface. The aim of the work is to explore the feasibility of designing and building a system suitable for rapid quality assurance (QA) for use with both ultrasound- and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided clinical therapy ultrasound systems. The prototype was tested using an MR-guided Sonalleve FUS system (with the treatment couch outside the magnet bore). The system's effective thermal noise was 0.02°C, and temperature changes as low as 0.1°C were easily quantifiable. The advantages and drawbacks of thermal imaging for QA are presented through analysis of the results of an experimental session. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Testing the portal imager GLAaS algorithm for machine quality assurance

    PubMed Central

    Nicolini, G; Vanetti, E; Clivio, A; Fogliata, A; Boka, G; Cozzi, L

    2008-01-01

    Background To report about enhancements introduced in the GLAaS calibration method to convert raw portal imaging images into absolute dose matrices and to report about application of GLAaS to routine radiation tests for linac quality assurance procedures programmes. Methods Two characteristic effects limiting the general applicability of portal imaging based dosimetry are the over-flattening of images (eliminating the "horns" and "holes" in the beam profiles induced by the presence of flattening filters) and the excess of backscattered radiation originated by the detector robotic arm supports. These two effects were corrected for in the new version of GLAaS formalism and results are presented to prove the improvements for different beams, detectors and support arms. GLAaS was also tested for independence from dose rate (fundamental to measure dynamic wedges). With the new corrections, it is possible to use GLAaS to perform standard tasks of linac quality assurance. Data were acquired to analyse open and wedged fields (mechanical and dynamic) in terms of output factors, MU/Gy, wedge factors, profile penumbrae, symmetry and homogeneity. In addition also 2D Gamma Evaluation was applied to measurement to expand the standard QA methods. GLAaS based data were compared against calculations on the treatment planning system (the Varian Eclipse) and against ion chamber measurements as consolidated benchmark. Measurements were performed mostly on 6 MV beams from Varian linacs. Detectors were the PV-as500/IAS2 and the PV-as1000/IAS3 equipped with either the robotic R- or Exact- arms. Results Corrections for flattening filter and arm backscattering were successfully tested. Percentage difference between PV-GLAaS measurements and Eclipse calculations relative doses at the 80% of the field size, for square and rectangular fields larger than 5 × 5 cm2 showed a maximum range variation of -1.4%, + 1.7% with a mean variation of <0.5%. For output factors, average percentage

  1. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm3 CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0±5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0±6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0±4.0 mGy and 97.0±5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0±5.0 mGy. The author’s results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality. PMID:18841837

  2. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J.

    2008-09-15

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

  3. Motion estimation accuracy for visible-light/gamma-ray imaging fusion for portable portal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnowski, Thomas P.; Cunningham, Mark F.; Goddard, James S.; Cheriyadat, Anil M.; Hornback, Donald E.; Fabris, Lorenzo; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Gee, Timothy F.

    2010-01-01

    The use of radiation sensors as portal monitors is increasing due to heightened concerns over the smuggling of fissile material. Portable systems that can detect significant quantities of fissile material that might be present in vehicular traffic are of particular interest. We have constructed a prototype, rapid-deployment portal gamma-ray imaging portal monitor that uses machine vision and gamma-ray imaging to monitor multiple lanes of traffic. Vehicles are detected and tracked by using point detection and optical flow methods as implemented in the OpenCV software library. Points are clustered together but imperfections in the detected points and tracks cause errors in the accuracy of the vehicle position estimates. The resulting errors cause a "blurring" effect in the gamma image of the vehicle. To minimize these errors, we have compared a variety of motion estimation techniques including an estimate using the median of the clustered points, a "best-track" filtering algorithm, and a constant velocity motion estimation model. The accuracy of these methods are contrasted and compared to a manually verified ground-truth measurement by quantifying the rootmean- square differences in the times the vehicles cross the gamma-ray image pixel boundaries compared with a groundtruth manual measurement.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulation on EGEE grid architecture: a web portal design.

    PubMed

    Bellet, F; Nistoreanu, I; Pera, C; Benoit-Cattin, H

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a web portal that enables simulation of MRI images on the grid. Such simulations are done using the SIMRI MRI simulator that is implemented on the grid using MPI and the LCG2 middleware. MRI simulations are mainly used to study MRI sequence, and to validate image processing algorithms. As MRI simulation is computationally very expensive, grid technologies appear to be a real added value for the MRI simulation task. Nevertheless the grid access should be simplified to enable final user running MRI simulations. That is why we develop this specific web portal to propose a user friendly interface for MRI simulation on the grid. The web portal is designed using a three layers client/server architecture. Its main component is the process layer part that manages the simulation jobs. This part is mainly based on a java thread that screens a data base of simulation jobs. The thread submits the new jobs to the grid and updates the status of the running jobs. When a job is terminated, the thread sends the simulated image to the user. Through a client web interface, the user can submit new simulation jobs, get a detailed status of the running jobs, have the history of all the terminated jobs as well as their status and corresponding simulated image.

  5. LIVER FUNCTION AFTER IRRADIATION BASED UPON CT PORTAL VEIN PERFUSION IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Pan, Charlie; Balter, James M.; Platt, Joel F.; Francis, Isaac R.; Knol, James A.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The role of radiation in the treatment of intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD), which occurs weeks after the course of radiation is completed. We hypothesized that, as the pathophysiology of RILD is veno-occlusive disease, we could assess individual and regional liver sensitivity to radiation by measuring liver perfusion during a course of treatment using dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) scanning. Materials and Methods Patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing conformal radiotherapy underwent DCE-CT (to measure perfusion distribution) and an indocyanine extraction study (to measure liver function) prior to, during, and one month after treatment. We wished to determine if the residual functioning liver (i.e. those regions showing portal vein perfusion) could be used to predict overall liver function after irradiation. Results Radiation doses from 45 to 84 Gy resulted in undectable regional portal vein perfusion one month after treatment. The volume of each liver with undectable portal vein perfusion ranged from 0% to 39% and depended both on the patient’s sensitivity and dose distribution. There was a significant correlation between indocyanine green clearance and the mean of the estimated portal vein perfusion in the functional liver parenchyma (P < .001). Conclusion This study reveals substantial individual variability in the sensitivity of the liver to irradiation. In addition, these findings suggest that hepatic perfusion imaging may be a marker for liver function, and has the potential to be a tool for individualizing therapy. PMID:17855011

  6. A review of 3D image-based dosimetry, technical considerations and emerging perspectives in 90Y microsphere therapy

    PubMed Central

    O’ Doherty, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Yttrium-90 radioembolization (90Y-RE) is a well-established therapy for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and also of metastatic liver deposits from other malignancies. Nuclear Medicine and Cath Lab diagnostic imaging takes a pivotal role in the success of the treatment, and in order to fully exploit the efficacy of the technique and provide reliable quantitative dosimetry that are related to clinical endpoints in the era of personalized medicine, technical challenges in imaging need to be overcome. In this paper, the extensive literature of current 90Y-RE techniques and challenges facing it in terms of quantification and dosimetry are reviewed, with a focus on the current generation of 3D dosimetry techniques. Finally, new emerging techniques are reviewed which seek to overcome these challenges, such as high-resolution imaging, novel surgical procedures and the use of other radiopharmaceuticals for therapy and pre-therapeutic planning. PMID:27182449

  7. Evaluation of a high-density scintillating glass for portal imaging.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, J P; Munro, P

    1996-03-01

    One of the main factors that limits the performance of T.V. camera-based portal imaging systems is the poor light-collection efficiency of the lens and T.V. camera. An x-ray detector that produces more light per incident x ray would help overcome this limitation. We have been evaluating a high-density (3.8 g/cm3), thick (12 mm) glass scintillator for its suitability as an x-ray detector for T.V. camera-based portal imaging systems. The light output and spatial resolution of the glass scintillator has been compared to that of a copper plate/phosphor screen detector using radiographic film and the T.V. camera of our portal imaging system. The film measurements show that the light output of the glass scintillator is 82% of that of the copper plate/phosphor screen, while the T.V. camera measurements show that this value is 48%. A theoretical model of light transport described in this paper suggests that this discrepancy is due to refraction at the glass-air interface. Our measurements of the modulation transfer function (MTF) show that the spatial resolution obtained with the glass scintillator is similar to that obtained with the copper plate phosphor screen. However, the spatial resolution obtained with the glass scintillator decreases as the angle of x-ray incidence increase; this decrease, which is not observed for the copper plate/phosphor screen detector, is due to the large thickness of the glass scintillator. Due to the limited light output and the variable spatial resolution, the transparent glass scintillator, in its current form, is not suitable for portal imaging.

  8. Portal imaging practice patterns of children's oncology group institutions: Dosimetric assessment and recommendations for minimizing unnecessary exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Olch, Arthur J. . E-mail: aolch@chla.usc.edu; Geurts, Mark; Thomadsen, Bruce; Famiglietti, Robin; Chang, Eric L.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine and analyze the dosimetric consequences of current portal imaging practices for pediatric patients, and make specific recommendations for reducing exposure from portal imaging procedures. Methods and Materials: A survey was sent to approximately 250 Children's Oncology Group (COG) member institutions asking a series of questions about their portal imaging practices. Three case studies are presented with dosimetric analysis to illustrate the magnitude of unintended dose received by nontarget tissues using the most common techniques from the survey. Results: The vast majority of centers use double-exposure portal image techniques with a variety of open field margins. Only 17% of portal images were obtained during treatment, and for other imaging methods, few centers subtract monitor units from the treatment delivery. The number of monitor units used was nearly the same regardless of imager type, including electronic portal imaging devices. Eighty-six percent imaged all fields the first week and 17% imaged all fields every week. An additional 1,112 cm{sup 3} of nontarget tissue received 1 Gy in one of the example cases. Eight new recommendations are made, which will lower nontarget radiation doses with minimal impact on treatment verification accuracy. Conclusion: Based on the survey, changes can be made in portal imaging practices that will lower nontarget doses. It is anticipated that treatment verification accuracy will be minimally affected. Specific recommendations made to decrease the imaging dose and help lower the rate of radiation-induced secondary cancers in children are proposed for inclusion in future COG protocols using radiation therapy.

  9. Accurate setup of paraspinal patients using a noninvasive patient immobilization cradle and portal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lovelock, D. Michael; Hua Chiaho; Wang Ping; Hunt, Margie; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Yenice, Kamil; Toner, Sean; Lutz, Wendell; Amols, Howard; Bilsky, Mark; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2005-08-15

    Because of the proximity of the spinal cord, effective radiotherapy of paraspinal tumors to high doses requires highly conformal dose distributions, accurate patient setup, setup verification, and patient immobilization. An immobilization cradle has been designed to facilitate the rapid setup and radiation treatment of patients with paraspinal disease. For all treatments, patients were set up to within 2.5 mm of the design using an amorphous silicon portal imager. Setup reproducibility of the target using the cradle and associated clinical procedures was assessed by measuring the setup error prior to any correction. From 350 anterior/posterior images, and 303 lateral images, the standard deviations, as determined by the imaging procedure, were 1.3 m, 1.6 m, and 2.1 in the ant/post, right/left, and superior/inferior directions. Immobilization was assessed by measuring patient shifts between localization images taken before and after treatment. From 67 ant/post image pairs and 49 lateral image pairs, the standard deviations were found to be less than 1 mm in all directions. Careful patient positioning and immobilization has enabled us to develop a successful clinical program of high dose, conformal radiotherapy of paraspinal disease using a conventional Linac equipped with dynamic multileaf collimation and an amorphous silicon portal imager.

  10. Theoretical analysis and experimental evaluation of a Csl(TI) based electronic portal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Amit; Zeman, Herbert; Samant, Sanjiv; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Weinberg, Brent; DiBianca, Frank

    2002-06-01

    This article discusses the design and analysis of a portal imaging system based on a thick transparent scintillator. A theoretical analysis using Monte Carlo simulation was performed to calculate the x-ray quantum detection efficiency (QDE), signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the zero frequency detective quantum efficiency [DQE(0)] of the system. A prototype electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was built, using a 12.7 mm thick, 20.32 cm diameter, Csl(Tl) scintillator, coupled to a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD TV camera. The system geometry of the prototype EPID was optimized to achieve high spatial resolution. The experimental evaluation of the prototype EPID involved the determination of contrast resolution, depth of focus, light scatter and mirror glare. Images of humanoid and contrast detail phantoms were acquired using the prototype EPID and were compared with those obtained using conventional and high contrast portal film and a commercial EPID. A theoretical analysis was also carried out for a proposed full field of view system using a large area, thinned CCD camera and a 12.7 mm thick CsI(TI) crystal. Results indicate that this proposed design could achieve DQE(0) levels up to 11%, due to its order of magnitude higher QDE compared to phosphor screen-metal plate based EPID designs, as well as significantly higher light collection compared to conventional TV camera based systems.

  11. Dosimetry of portable image intensifiers in pacemaker insertions.

    PubMed

    Hayt, D B; Malsky, S J; Blatt, C J; Greenberg, E I; Pochaczevsky, R; Simon, D F; Perez, L A

    1975-01-01

    With the increased utilization of portable image intensifiers for pacemaker insertions, an investigation of the radiation hazards to operative personnel was undertaken. The personnel were tested first utilizing a Rando phantom and later during actual pacemaker insertions. Studies of medical personnel show the critical organs to be the thyroid (approximately 15mR per procedure) and the lens of the eye (approximately 13mR per procedure). While the MPD/week was not exceeded, the radiation dosage was substantial and could increase under operating conditions other than those measured. Recommendations to insure safer operation of this equipment are presented.

  12. Improved dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy using nonrigid registration on sequential SPECT images

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, Edwin C. I.; Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Song, Na

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Voxel-level and patient-specific 3D dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) typically involves serial nuclear medicine scans. Misalignment of the images can result in reduced dosimetric accuracy. Since the scans are typically performed over a period of several days, there will be patient movement between scans and possible nonrigid organ deformation. This work aims to implement and evaluate the use of nonrigid image registration on a series of quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) images for TRT dosimetry. Methods: A population of 4D extended cardiac torso phantoms, comprised of three In-111 Zevalin biokinetics models and three anatomical variations, was generated based on the patient data. The authors simulated QSPECT acquisitions at five time points. At each time point, individual organ and whole-body deformation between scans were modeled by translating/rotating organs and the body up to 5°/voxels, keeping ≤5% difference in organ volume. An analytical projector was used to generate realistic noisy projections for a medium energy general purpose collimator. Projections were reconstructed using OS-EM algorithm with geometric collimator detector response, attenuation, and scatter corrections. The QSPECT images were registered using organ-based nonrigid image registration method. The cumulative activity in each voxel was obtained by integrating the activity over time. Dose distribution images were obtained by convolving the cumulative activity images with a Y-90 dose kernel. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) for organs-of-interest were analyzed. Results: After nonrigid registration, the mean differences in organ doses compared to the case without misalignment were improved from (−15.50 ± 5.59)% to (−2.12 ± 1.05)% and (−7.28 ± 2.30)% to (−0.23 ± 0.71)% for the spleen and liver, respectively. For all organs, the cumulative DVHs showed improvement after nonrigid registration and the normalized absolute error of differential DVHs ranged from 6.79% to

  13. The GLAaS algorithm for portal dosimetry and quality assurance of RapidArc, an intensity modulated rotational therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Clivio, Alessandro; Fogliata, Antonella; Korreman, Stine; Bocanek, Jiri; Cozzi, Luca

    2008-01-01

    Background To expand and test the dosimetric procedure, known as GLAaS, for amorphous silicon detectors to the RapidArc intensity modulated arc delivery with Varian infrastructures and to test the RapidArc dosimetric reliability between calculation and delivery. Methods The GLAaS algorithm was applied and tested on a set of RapidArc fields at both low (6 MV) and high (18 MV) beam energies with a PV-aS1000 detector. Pilot tests for short arcs were performed on a 6 MV beam associated to a PV-aS500. RapidArc is a novel planning and delivery method in the category of intensity modulated arc therapies aiming to deliver highly modulated plans with variable MLC shapes, dose rate and gantry speed during rotation. Tests were repeated for entire (360 degrees) gantry rotations on composite dose plans and for short partial arcs (of ~6 or 12 degrees) to assess GLAaS and RapidArc mutual relationships on global and fine delivery scales. The gamma index concept of Low and the Modulation Index concept of Webb were applied to compare quantitatively TPS dose matrices and dose converted PV images. Results The Gamma Agreement Index computed for a Distance to Agreement of 3 mm and a Dose Difference (ΔD) of 3% was, as mean ± 1 SD, 96.7 ± 1.2% at 6 MV and 94.9 ± 1.3% at 18 MV, over the field area. These findings deteriorated slightly is ΔD was reduced to 2% (93.4 ± 3.2% and 90.1 ± 3.1%, respectively) and improved with ΔD = 4% (98.3 ± 0.8% and 97.3 ± 0.9%, respectively). For all tests a grid of 1 mm and the AAA photon dose calculation algorithm were applied. The spatial resolution of the PV-aS1000 is 0.392 mm/pxl. The Modulation Index for calculations resulted 17.0 ± 3.2 at 6 MV and 15.3 ± 2.7 at 18 MV while the corresponding data for measurements were: 18.5 ± 3.7 and 17.5 ± 3.7. Partial arcs findings were (for ΔD = 3%): GAI = 96.7 ± 0.9% for 6° rotations and 98.0 ± 1.1% for 12° rotations. Conclusion The GLAaS method can be considered as a valid Quality Assurance tool

  14. Reference radiochromic film dosimetry in kilovoltage photon beams during CBCT image acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Tomic, Nada; Devic, Slobodan; DeBlois, Francois; Seuntjens, Jan

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: A common approach for dose assessment during cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition is to use thermoluminescent detectors for skin dose measurements (on patients or phantoms) or ionization chamber (in phantoms) for body dose measurements. However, the benefits of a daily CBCT image acquisition such as margin reduction in planning target volume and the image quality must be weighted against the extra dose received during CBCT acquisitions. Methods: The authors describe a two-dimensional reference dosimetry technique for measuring dose from CBCT scans using the on-board imaging system on a Varian Clinac-iX linear accelerator that employs the XR-QA radiochromic film model, specifically designed for dose measurements at low energy photons. The CBCT dose measurements were performed for three different body regions (head and neck, pelvis, and thorax) using humanoid Rando phantom. Results: The authors report on both surface dose and dose profiles measurements during clinical CBCT procedures carried out on a humanoid Rando phantom. Our measurements show that the surface doses per CBCT scan can range anywhere between 0.1 and 4.7 cGy, with the lowest surface dose observed in the head and neck region, while the highest surface dose was observed for the Pelvis spot light CBCT protocol in the pelvic region, on the posterior side of the Rando phantom. The authors also present results of the uncertainty analysis of our XR-QA radiochromic film dosimetry system. Conclusions: Radiochromic film dosimetry protocol described in this work was used to perform dose measurements during CBCT acquisitions with the one-sigma dose measurement uncertainty of up to 3% for doses above 1 cGy. Our protocol is based on film exposure calibration in terms of ''air kerma in air,'' which simplifies both the calibration procedure and reference dosimetry measurements. The results from a full Monte Carlo investigation of the dose conversion of measured XR-QA film dose at the surface into

  15. Relative dosimetry using active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology.

    PubMed

    El-Mohri, Y; Antonuk, L E; Yorkston, J; Jee, K W; Maolinbay, M; Lam, K L; Siewerdsen, J H

    1999-08-01

    The first examination of the use of active matrix flat-panel arrays for dosimetry in radiotherapy is reported. Such arrays are under widespread development for diagnostic and radiotherapy imaging. In the current study, an array consisting of 512 x 512 pixels with a pixel pitch of 508 microm giving an area of 26 x 26 cm2 has been used. Each pixel consists of a light sensitive amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photodiode coupled to an a-Si:H thin-film transistor. Data was obtained from the array using a dedicated electronics system allowing real-time data acquisition. In order to examine the potential of such arrays as quality assurance devices for radiotherapy beams, field profile data at photon energies of 6 and 15 MV were obtained as a function of field size and thickness of overlying absorbing material (solid water). Two detection configurations using the array were considered: a configuration (similar to the imaging configuration) in which an overlying phosphor screen is used to convert incident radiation to visible light photons which are detected by the photodiodes; and a configuration without the screen where radiation is directly sensed by the photodiodes. Compared to relative dosimetry data obtained with an ion chamber, data taken using the former configuration exhibited significant differences whereas data obtained using the latter configuration was generally found to be in close agreement. Basic signal properties, which are pertinent to dosimetry, have been investigated through measurements of individual pixel response for fluoroscopic and radiographic array operation. For signal levels acquired within the first 25% of pixel charge capacity, the degree of linear response with dose was found to be better than 99%. The independence of signal on dose rate was demonstrated by means of stability of pixel response over the range of dose rates allowed by the radiation source (80-400 MU/min). Finally, excellent long-term stability in pixel response, extending over a 2

  16. Dosimetry of 11C-carfentanil, a micro-opioid receptor imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Newberg, Andrew B; Ray, Riju; Scheuermann, Joshua; Wintering, Nancy; Saffer, Janet; Schmitz, Alexander; Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel; Lerman, Caryn; Divgi, Chaitanya

    2009-04-01

    11C-carfentanil is a radiopharmaceutical that selectively binds the mu-opiate receptor of the central nervous system. However, its dosimetry throughout the body and other organs has never been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study was to measure the radiation dosimetry of 11C-carfentanil in healthy human volunteers. The study was conducted within a regulatory framework that required its pharmacological safety to be assessed simultaneously. The sample included two male and three female participants ranging in age from 28 to 49 years. Three to four scans were obtained over approximately 2 h starting immediately after the intravenous administration of 0.03 microg/kg of [C]carfentanil injected as a slow bolus (mean activity injected was 280+/-68 MBq). The fraction of the administered dose in 10 regions of interest was quantified from the attenuation-corrected counts obtained on the axial images. Monoexponential functions were fit to each time-activity curve using a nonlinear, least-squares regression algorithm. These curves were numerically integrated to yield the number of disintegrations per unit activity administered in source organs. Sex-specific radiation doses were then estimated with the medical internal radiation dose technique. A few participants reported mild pharmacological effects of the radiotracer, primarily mild drowsiness, which is an expected side effect. The dose-limiting organ was the bladder wall, which received a mean of 3.65E-02 mGy/MBq. The mean effective dose equivalent and effective dose for 11C-carfentanil were 5.38E-03 and 4.59E-03 mSv/MBq, respectively. The observed dosimetry values for 11C-carfentanil indicate that it is safe for imaging micro-opiate receptors in the central nervous system and periphery.

  17. Superficial dosimetry imaging of Čerenkov emission in electron beam radiotherapy of phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Fox, Colleen J.; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-08-01

    Čerenkov emission is generated from ionizing radiation in tissue above 264 keV energy. This study presents the first examination of this optical emission as a surrogate for the absorbed superficial dose. Čerenkov emission was imaged from the surface of flat tissue phantoms irradiated with electrons, using a range of field sizes from 6 cm × 6 cm to 20 cm × 20 cm, incident angles from 0° to 50°, and energies from 6 to 18 MeV. The Čerenkov images were compared with the estimated superficial dose in phantoms from direct diode measurements, as well as calculations by Monte Carlo and the treatment planning system. Intensity images showed outstanding linear agreement (R2 = 0.97) with reference data of the known dose for energies from 6 to 18 MeV. When orthogonal delivery was carried out, the in-plane and cross-plane dose distribution comparisons indicated very little difference (±2-4% differences) between the different methods of estimation as compared to Čerenkov light imaging. For an incident angle 50°, the Čerenkov images and Monte Carlo simulation show excellent agreement with the diode data, but the treatment planning system had a larger error (OPT = ±1˜2%, diode = ±2˜3%, TPS = ±6-8% differences) as would be expected. The sampling depth of superficial dosimetry based on Čerenkov radiation has been simulated in a layered skin model, showing the potential of sampling depth tuning by spectral filtering. Taken together, these measurements and simulations indicate that Čerenkov emission imaging might provide a valuable method of superficial dosimetry imaging from incident radiotherapy beams of electrons.

  18. Computational high-resolution heart phantoms for medical imaging and dosimetry simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Songxiang; Gupta, Rajiv; Kyprianou, Iacovos

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease in general and coronary artery disease (CAD) in particular, are the leading cause of death worldwide. They are principally diagnosed using either invasive percutaneous transluminal coronary angiograms or non-invasive computed tomography angiograms (CTA). Minimally invasive therapies for CAD such as angioplasty and stenting are rendered under fluoroscopic guidance. Both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities employ ionizing radiation and there is concern for deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation. Accurate simulation to optimize image quality with minimal radiation dose requires detailed, gender-specific anthropomorphic phantoms with anatomically correct heart and associated vasculature. Such phantoms are currently unavailable. This paper describes an open source heart phantom development platform based on a graphical user interface. Using this platform, we have developed seven high-resolution cardiac/coronary artery phantoms for imaging and dosimetry from seven high-quality CTA datasets. To extract a phantom from a coronary CTA, the relationship between the intensity distribution of the myocardium, the ventricles and the coronary arteries is identified via histogram analysis of the CTA images. By further refining the segmentation using anatomy-specific criteria such as vesselness, connectivity criteria required by the coronary tree and image operations such as active contours, we are able to capture excellent detail within our phantoms. For example, in one of the female heart phantoms, as many as 100 coronary artery branches could be identified. Triangular meshes are fitted to segmented high-resolution CTA data. We have also developed a visualization tool for adding stenotic lesions to the coronaries. The male and female heart phantoms generated so far have been cross-registered and entered in the mesh-based Virtual Family of phantoms with matched age/gender information. Any phantom in this family, along with user

  19. A semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detector for space radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Martin; Bahadori, Amir; Campbell-Ricketts, Thomas; Empl, Anton; Hoang, Son Minh; Idarraga-Munoz, John; Rios, Ryan; Semones, Edward; Stoffle, Nicholas; Tlustos, Lukas; Turecek, Daniel; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Progress in the development of high-performance semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. Such detectors can provide real-time information concerning radiation exposure, along with detailed analysis of the individual particles incident on the active medium. Recent results from the deployment of detectors based on the Timepix from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS) are reviewed, along with a glimpse of developments to come. Preliminary results from Orion MPCV Exploration Flight Test 1 are also presented. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). All rights reserved.

  20. Physical characterization and optimal magnification of a portal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Jaffray, David A.; Fenster, Aaron; Munro, Peter

    1992-06-01

    One problem in radiation therapy is ensuring accurate positioning of the patient so that the prescribed dose is delivered to the diseased regions while healthy tissues are spared. Positioning is usually assessed by exposing film to the high-energy treatment beam. Unfortunately, these films exhibit poor image quality (primarily due to low subject contrast) and the development delays make film impractical to check patient positioning routinely. Therefore, we have been developing a digital video-based imaging system to replace film. The system consists of a copper plate/fluorescent screen detector, a 45 degree(s) mirror, and a TV camera equipped with a large aperture lens. We have determined the signal and noise transfer properties of the imaging system by measuring its MTF(f) and NPS(f) and used these valued to estimate the optimal magnification for the imaging system. We have found that the optimal magnification is 2.3 - 2.5 when optimizing signal transfer (spatial resolution) alone; however, the optimal magnification is only 1.5 - 2.0 if SNR transfer is considered.

  1. Incorporating multislice imaging into x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Johnston, H; Hilts, M; Jirasek, A

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate multislice computed tomography (CT) scanning for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD) and to establish a baseline assessment of image noise and uniformity in an unirradiated gel dosimeter. A 16-slice CT scanner was used to acquire images through a 1 L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine. The variability in CT number (NCT) associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background subtraction artifact removal technique for CT PGD. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by evaluating image noise and uniformity. The agreement in NCT for slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also examined. Further study was performed to assess the effects of increasing x-ray tube load on the constancy of measured NCT and overall scan time. In all cases, results were compared to the single slice machine. Finally, images were collected throughout the volume of an unirradiated gel dosimeter to quantify image noise and uniformity before radiation is delivered. Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in NCT observed across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image noise was higher for the multislice system compared to the single slice scanner, but overall image quality was comparable between the two systems. Further study showed NCT was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thicknesses examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in NCT due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to imaging a large volume using a single slice scanner. Images

  2. Incorporating multislice imaging into x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, H.; Hilts, M.; Jirasek, A.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate multislice computed tomography (CT) scanning for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD) and to establish a baseline assessment of image noise and uniformity in an unirradiated gel dosimeter. Methods: A 16-slice CT scanner was used to acquire images through a 1 L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine. The variability in CT number (N{sub CT}) associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background subtraction artifact removal technique for CT PGD. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by evaluating image noise and uniformity. The agreement in N{sub CT} for slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also examined. Further study was performed to assess the effects of increasing x-ray tube load on the constancy of measured N{sub CT} and overall scan time. In all cases, results were compared to the single slice machine. Finally, images were collected throughout the volume of an unirradiated gel dosimeter to quantify image noise and uniformity before radiation is delivered. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in N{sub CT} observed across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image noise was higher for the multislice system compared to the single slice scanner, but overall image quality was comparable between the two systems. Further study showed N{sub CT} was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thicknesses examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in N{sub CT} due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to

  3. Discrepant imaging findings of portal vein thrombosis with dynamic computed tomography and computed tomography during arterial portography in hepatocellular carcinoma: possible cause leading to inappropriate treatment selection.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi; Tada, Toshifumi; Mizuno, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Natsuko; Inukai, Yosuke; Takeda, Akira; Sone, Yasuhiro

    2017-04-01

    We encountered a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who had discrepant imaging findings on portal vein thrombosis with portal phase dynamic computed tomography (CT) and CT during arterial portography (CTAP). CTAP, via the superior mesenteric artery and via the splenic artery, both showed a portal perfusion defect in the right hepatic lobe, indicating portal vein thrombosis in the main trunk of the right portal vein. Portal phase dynamic CT clearly depicted portal perfusion of the same hepatic area. Transarterial chemoembolization was successfully performed, but it was associated with severe liver injury. Clinicians should be cautious about this possible discrepancy based on imaging technique. The inaccurate evaluation of portal vein thrombosis may result in inappropriate treatment selection, which can worsen patient prognosis.

  4. Portal biliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy refers to cholangiographic abnormalities which occur in patients with portal cavernoma. These changes occur as a result of pressure on bile ducts from bridging tortuous paracholedochal, epicholedochal and cholecystic veins. Bile duct ischemia may occur due prolonged venous pressure effect or result from insufficient blood supply. In addition, encasement of ducts may occur due fibrotic cavernoma. Majority of patients are asymptomatic. Portal biliopathy is a progressive disease and patients who have long standing disease and more severe bile duct abnormalities present with recurrent episodes of biliary pain, cholangitis and cholestasis. Serum chemistry, ultrasound with color Doppler imaging, magnetic resonance imaging with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and magnetic resonance portovenography are modalities of choice for evaluation of portal biliopathy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography being an invasive procedure is indicated for endotherapy only. Management of portal biliopathy is done in a stepwise manner. First, endotherapy is done for dilation of biliary strictures, placement of biliary stents to facilitate drainage and removal of bile duct calculi. Next portal venous pressure is reduced by formation of surgical porto-systemic shunt or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. This causes significant resolution of biliary changes. Patients who persist with biliary symptoms and bile duct changes may benefit from surgical biliary drainage procedures (hepaticojejunostomy or choledechoduodenostomy). PMID:27672292

  5. Portal biliopathy.

    PubMed

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-09-21

    Portal biliopathy refers to cholangiographic abnormalities which occur in patients with portal cavernoma. These changes occur as a result of pressure on bile ducts from bridging tortuous paracholedochal, epicholedochal and cholecystic veins. Bile duct ischemia may occur due prolonged venous pressure effect or result from insufficient blood supply. In addition, encasement of ducts may occur due fibrotic cavernoma. Majority of patients are asymptomatic. Portal biliopathy is a progressive disease and patients who have long standing disease and more severe bile duct abnormalities present with recurrent episodes of biliary pain, cholangitis and cholestasis. Serum chemistry, ultrasound with color Doppler imaging, magnetic resonance imaging with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and magnetic resonance portovenography are modalities of choice for evaluation of portal biliopathy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography being an invasive procedure is indicated for endotherapy only. Management of portal biliopathy is done in a stepwise manner. First, endotherapy is done for dilation of biliary strictures, placement of biliary stents to facilitate drainage and removal of bile duct calculi. Next portal venous pressure is reduced by formation of surgical porto-systemic shunt or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. This causes significant resolution of biliary changes. Patients who persist with biliary symptoms and bile duct changes may benefit from surgical biliary drainage procedures (hepaticojejunostomy or choledechoduodenostomy).

  6. Model-based pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images.

    PubMed

    Hammon, Matthias; Cavallaro, Alexander; Erdt, Marius; Dankerl, Peter; Kirschner, Matthias; Drechsler, Klaus; Wesarg, Stefan; Uder, Michael; Janka, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to automatically detect and segment the pancreas in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. The institutional review board of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg approved this study and waived the need for informed consent. Discriminative learning is used to build a pancreas tissue classifier incorporating spatial relationships between the pancreas and surrounding organs and vessels. Furthermore, discrete cosine and wavelet transforms are used to build texture features to describe local tissue appearance. Classification is used to guide a constrained statistical shape model to fit the data. The algorithm to detect and segment the pancreas was evaluated on 40 consecutive CT data that were acquired in the portal venous contrast agent phase. Manual segmentation of the pancreas was carried out by experienced radiologists and served as reference standard. Threefold cross validation was performed. The algorithm-based detection and segmentation yielded an average surface distance of 1.7 mm and an average overlap of 61.2 % compared with the reference standard. The overall runtime of the system was 20.4 min. The presented novel approach enables automatic pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images which are included in almost every clinical routine abdominal CT examination. Reliable pancreatic segmentation is crucial for computer-aided detection systems and an organ-specific decision support.

  7. Application for internal dosimetry using biokinetic distribution of photons based on nuclear medicine images.

    PubMed

    Leal Neto, Viriato; Vieira, José Wilson; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a way to obtain estimates of dose in patients submitted to radiotherapy with basis on the analysis of regions of interest on nuclear medicine images. A software called DoRadIo (Dosimetria das Radiações Ionizantes [Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry]) was developed to receive information about source organs and target organs, generating graphical and numerical results. The nuclear medicine images utilized in the present study were obtained from catalogs provided by medical physicists. The simulations were performed with computational exposure models consisting of voxel phantoms coupled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code. The software was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack and the project template Windows Presentation Foundation for C# programming language. With the mentioned tools, the authors obtained the file for optimization of Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc; organization and compaction of dosimetry results with all radioactive sources; selection of regions of interest; evaluation of grayscale intensity in regions of interest; the file of weighted sources; and, finally, all the charts and numerical results. The user interface may be adapted for use in clinical nuclear medicine as a computer-aided tool to estimate the administered activity.

  8. Application for internal dosimetry using biokinetic distribution of photons based on nuclear medicine images*

    PubMed Central

    Leal Neto, Viriato; Vieira, José Wilson; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Objective This article presents a way to obtain estimates of dose in patients submitted to radiotherapy with basis on the analysis of regions of interest on nuclear medicine images. Materials and Methods A software called DoRadIo (Dosimetria das Radiações Ionizantes [Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry]) was developed to receive information about source organs and target organs, generating graphical and numerical results. The nuclear medicine images utilized in the present study were obtained from catalogs provided by medical physicists. The simulations were performed with computational exposure models consisting of voxel phantoms coupled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code. The software was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack and the project template Windows Presentation Foundation for C# programming language. Results With the mentioned tools, the authors obtained the file for optimization of Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc; organization and compaction of dosimetry results with all radioactive sources; selection of regions of interest; evaluation of grayscale intensity in regions of interest; the file of weighted sources; and, finally, all the charts and numerical results. Conclusion The user interface may be adapted for use in clinical nuclear medicine as a computer-aided tool to estimate the administered activity. PMID:25741101

  9. NOTE: Radiological thickness measurement using a liquid ionization chamber electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Philip M.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Partridge, Mike; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Garton, Andrew; Mubata, Cephas

    1999-06-01

    We present a method of calibrating the Portal Vision electronic portal imaging device to obtain radiological thickness maps for compensator design. In this method, coefficients are derived to describe the relationship between intensity and thickness for a set of water-equivalent blocks. The effects of four parameters were studied: (a) The dose response of the system was measured and found to be describable by a square-root function. (b) The calibration data and images were taken with a wedge in situ. The effects of using different wedges and different wedge orientations were investigated. The intrinsic accuracy of the accelerator/imager system was found to be 1.9 mm, for both 15° and 30° wedges. Changing the wedge orientation between calibration and imaging and rotating the calibration coefficients accordingly led to an error of 3.5 mm. (c) The variation in detector response with gantry angle was measured and corrected. The residual error in this process was 2.4 mm. (d) The use of a model to correct the effects of imaging with different field sizes was investigated and found to yield a residual error of 2.9 mm. The overall error in image calibrations was approx 4 mm or 2% in dose. This is considered to be sufficiently small for the intended use of designing compensators for tangential breast irradiation.

  10. Portal imaging: Performance improvement in noise reduction by means of wavelet processing.

    PubMed

    González-López, Antonio; Morales-Sánchez, Juan; Larrey-Ruiz, Jorge; Bastida-Jumilla, María-Consuelo; Verdú-Monedero, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the suitability, in terms of noise reduction, of various methods which can be applied to an image type often used in radiation therapy: the portal image. Among these methods, the analysis focuses on those operating in the wavelet domain. Wavelet-based methods tested on natural images--such as the thresholding of the wavelet coefficients, the minimization of the Stein unbiased risk estimator on a linear expansion of thresholds (SURE-LET), and the Bayes least-squares method using as a prior a Gaussian scale mixture (BLS-GSM method)--are compared with other methods that operate on the image domain--an adaptive Wiener filter and a nonlocal mean filter (NLM). For the assessment of the performance, the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), the structural similarity index (SSIM), the Pearson correlation coefficient, and the Spearman rank correlation (ρ) coefficient are used. The performance of the wavelet filters and the NLM method are similar, but wavelet filters outperform the Wiener filter in terms of portal image denoising. It is shown how BLS-GSM and NLM filters produce the smoothest image, while keeping soft-tissue and bone contrast. As for the computational cost, filters using a decimated wavelet transform (decimated thresholding and SURE-LET) turn out to be the most efficient, with calculation times around 1 s.

  11. Applications of Storage Phosphor Technology to High-Energy Portal Imaging in Radiation Therapy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiser, John Conrad

    1990-01-01

    This investigation is a study of the application of a storage phosphor based digital image acquisition and processing system to portal imaging. Laser printed storage phosphor film is compared to conventional film, and digitized conventional film is compared to storage phosphor images using CRT displays. The reader's impression of image quality, general perception of anatomical detail, accuracy of interpretation, and ability to detect low contrast objects are used as comparison criteria. In addition unsharp masking, analog contrast stretching, and digital windowing and leveling are evaluated as image processing options. A new technique for obtaining electron treatment verification images is developed and used to investigate the precision of high energy electron treatment delivery. The results indicate that the quality of unprocessed laser printed storage phosphor images is perceived to be at least as good as that of conventional film, with a notable increase in perceived quality of head, neck, and chest images as compared to images of the abdomen and pelvis. Application of an analog contrast enhancement technique to storage phosphor images of the abdomen and pelvis does not result in a statistically significant improvement over conventional film, but the combination of contrast and edge enhancement by unsharp masking does result in a significant improvement in perception of anatomical landmarks. Digitized conventional film is perceived to be as good as storage phosphor images when similarly processed by an unsharp masking routine and displayed on a workstation with window and level control. The reader's perception of anatomical detail and accuracy of interpretation show the most promise as comparison criteria for evaluation of the various modalities available for portal imaging. The development of a scoring system based on perception of specific anatomical landmarks for the various treatment fields would provide a more objective method of assessing alternative

  12. Pseudothrombosis with T2-weighted fast spin-echo MR images caused by static portal venous flow in severe cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Masayuki; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Nishigaki, Youichi; Kondo, Hiroshi; Goshima, Satoshi; Maeda, Sunaho; Tomita, Eiichi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2002-02-01

    Unenhanced T2-weighted fast spin-echo images obtained in a 65-year-old woman with severe cirrhosis showed an area of high signal intensity occupying the left second-order portal vein branch, suggesting portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis. Doppler sonography, which revealed virtually no blood flow in the vessel, also supported the diagnosis. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI subsequently revealed the patency of the vessel. The extremely slow portal venous flow was considered to be the cause of false-positive findings with unenhanced MRI and sonography.

  13. Megavoltage image contrast with low-atomic number target materials and amorphous silicon electronic portal imagers.

    PubMed

    Orton, E J; Robar, J L

    2009-03-07

    Low-atomic number (Z) targets have been shown to improve contrast in megavoltage (MV) images when using film-screen detection systems. This research aims to quantify the effect of low-Z targets on MV image contrast using an amorphous silicon electronic portal image detector (a-Si EPID) through both experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Experimental beams were produced with the linac running in the 6 MeV electron mode and with a 1.0 cm aluminum (Al, Z = 13) target replacing flattening filtration in the carousel, (6 MeV/Al). A 2100EX Varian linac equipped with an aS500 EPID was used with the QC3 MV phantom for the majority of contrast measurements. The BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC package was used to build a model of the full imaging system including beam generation (linac head), the a-Si detector and the contrast phantom. The model accurately reproduces contrast measurements to within 2.5% for both the standard 6 MV therapy beam and the 6 MeV/Al beam. The contrast advantage of 6 MeV/Al over 6 MV, as quantified with the QC3 phantom, ranged from a factor increase of 1.6 +/- 0.1 to 2.8 +/- 0.2. Only a modest improvement in contrast was seen when the incident electron energy was reduced to 4 MeV (up to factor of 1.2 +/- 0.1 over 6 MeV/Al) or with removal of the copper build-up layer in the detector, (up to factor of 1.2 +/- 0.1 over 6 MeV/Al). Further decreasing the target Z, to beryllium (Be, Z = 4), at 4 MeV showed no significant improvement over 4 MeV/Al. Experimentally, the contrast advantage of 6 MeV/Al over 6 MV was found to decrease with increasing patient thickness, as can be expected due to selective attenuation of low-energy photons. At head and neck-like thicknesses, the low-Z advantage is a factor increase of 1.7 +/- 0.1.

  14. Digital Rocks Portal: Preservation, Sharing, Remote Visualization and Automated Analysis of Imaged Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodanovic, M.; Esteva, M.; Ketcham, R. A.; Hanlon, M.; Pettengill, M.; Ranganath, A.; Venkatesh, A.

    2016-12-01

    Due to advances in imaging modalities such as X-ray microtomography and scattered electron microscopy, 2D and 3D imaged datasets of rock microstructure on nanometer to centimeter length scale allow investigation of nonlinear flow and mechanical phenomena using numerical approaches. This in turn produces various upscaled parameters required by subsurface flow and deformation simulators. However, a single research group typically specializes in an imaging modality and/or related modeling on a single length scale, and lack of data-sharing infrastructure makes it difficult to integrate different length scales. We developed a sustainable, open and easy-to-use repository called the Digital Rocks Portal (http://www.digitalrocksportal.org), that (1) organizes images and related experimental measurements of different porous materials, (2) improves access to them for a wider community of geosciences or engineering researchers not necessarily trained in computer science or data analysis. Our objective is to enable scientific inquiry and engineering decisions founded on a data-driven basis. We show how the data loaded in the portal can be documented, referenced in publications via digital object identifiers, visualize and linked to other repositories. We then show preliminary results on integrating remote parallel visualization and flow simulation workflow with the pore structures currently stored in the repository. We finally discuss the issues of collecting correct metadata, data discoverability and repository sustainability. This is the first repository for this particular data, but is part of the wider ecosystem of geoscience data and model cyber-infrastructure called "Earthcube" (http://earthcube.org/) sponsored by National Science Foundation. For data sustainability and continuous access, the portal is implemented within the reliable, 24/7 maintained High Performance Computing Infrastructure supported by the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at the University of

  15. Dose to craniofacial region through portal imaging of pediatric brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hitchen, Christine J; Osa, Etin-Osa; Dewyngaert, J Keith; Chang, Jenghwa; Narayana, Ashwatha

    2012-01-05

    The purpose of this study was to determine dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) from portal imaging (PI) of the craniofacial region in pediatric brain tumor patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Twenty pediatric brain tumor patients were retrospectively studied. Each received portal imaging of treatment fields and orthogonal setup fields in the craniofacial region. The number of PI and monitor units used for PI were documented for each patient. Dose distributions and dose-volume histograms were generated to quantify the maximum, minimum, and mean dose to the PTV, and the mean dose to OARs through PI acquisition. The doses resulting from PI are reported as percentage of prescribed dose. The average maximum, minimum, and mean doses to PTV from PI were 2.9 ± 0.7%, 2.2 ± 1.0%, and 2.5 ± 0.7%, respectively. The mean dose to the OARs from PI were brainstem 2.8 ± 1.1%, optic nerves/chiasm 2.6 ± 0.9%, cochlea 2.6 ± 0.9%, hypothalamus/pituitary 2.4 ± 0.6%, temporal lobes 2.3 ± 0.6%, thyroid 1.6 ± 0.8%, and eyes 2.6 ± 0.9%. The mean number of portal images and the mean number of PI monitor units per patient were 58.8 and 173.3, respectively. The dose from PI while treating pediatric brain tumors using IMRT is significant (2%-3% of the prescribed dose). This may result in exceeding the tolerance limit of many critical structures and lead to unwanted late complications and secondary malignancies. Dose contributions from PI should be considered in the final documented dose. Attempts must be made in PI practices to lower the imaging dose when feasible.

  16. The impact of image reconstruction bias on PET/CT 90Y dosimetry after radioembolization.

    PubMed

    Tapp, Katie N; Lea, William B; Johnson, Matthew S; Tann, Mark; Fletcher, James W; Hutchins, Gary D

    2014-09-01

    PET/CT imaging after radioembolization is a viable method for determining the posttreatment (90)Y distribution in the liver. Low true-to-random coincidence ratios in (90)Y PET studies limit the quantitative accuracy of these studies when reconstruction algorithms optimized for traditional PET imaging are used. This study examined these quantitative limitations and assessed the feasibility of generating radiation dosimetry maps in liver regions with high and low (90)Y concentrations. (90)Y PET images were collected on a PET/CT scanner and iteratively reconstructed with the vendor-supplied reconstruction algorithm. PET studies on a Jaszczak cylindric phantom were performed to determine quantitative accuracy and minimum detectable concentration (MDC). (90)Y and (18)F point-source studies were used to investigate the possible increase in detected random coincidence events due to bremsstrahlung photons. Retrospective quantitative analyses were performed on (90)Y PET/CT images obtained after 65 right or left hepatic artery radioembolizations in 59 patients. Quantitative image errors were determined by comparing the measured image activity with the assayed (90)Y activity. PET images were converted to dose maps through convolution with voxel S values generated using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo N-particle transport code system for multiparticle and high-energy applications. Tumor and parenchyma doses and potential bias based on measurements found below the MDC were recorded. Random coincidences were found to increase in (90)Y acquisitions, compared with (18)F acquisitions, at similar positron emission rates because of bremsstrahlung photons. Positive bias was observed in all images. Quantitative accuracy was achieved for phantom inserts above the MDC of 1 MBq/mL. The mean dose to viable tumors was 183.6 ± 156.5 Gy, with an average potential bias of 3.3 ± 6.4 Gy. The mean dose to the parenchyma was 97.1 ± 22.1 Gy, with an average potential bias of 8.9 ± 4.9 Gy. The low signal

  17. A simple method to quantify the coincidence between portal image graticules and radiation field centers or radiation isocenter

    SciTech Connect

    Du Weiliang; Yang, James; Luo Dershan; Martel, Mary

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a computerized method to quantify the coincidence between portal image graticules and radiation field centers or radiation isocenter. Three types of graticules were included in this study: Megavoltage (MV) mechanical graticule, MV electronic portal imaging device digital graticule, and kilovoltage (kV) on-board imaging digital graticule. Methods: A metal ball bearing (BB) was imaged with MV and kV x-ray beams in a procedure similar to a Winston-Lutz test. The radiation fields, graticules, and BB were localized in eight portal images using Hough transform-based computer algorithms. The center of the BB served as a static reference point in the 3D space so that the distances between the graticule centers and the radiation field centers were calculated. The radiation isocenter was determined from the radiation field centers at different gantry angles. Results: Misalignments of MV and kV portal imaging graticules varied with the gantry or x-ray source angle as a result of mechanical imperfections of the linear accelerator and its imaging system. While the three graticules in this study were aligned to the radiation field centers and the radiation isocenter within 2.0 mm, misalignments of 1.5-2.0 mm were found at certain gantry angles. These misalignments were highly reproducible with the gantry rotation. Conclusions: A simple method was developed to quantify the alignments of portal image graticules directly against the radiation field centers or the radiation isocenter. The advantage of this method is that it does not require the BB to be placed exactly at the radiation isocenter through a precalibrated surrogating device such as room lasers or light field crosshairs. The present method is useful for radiation therapy modalities that require high-precision portal imaging such as image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy.

  18. A simple method to quantify the coincidence between portal image graticules and radiation field centers or radiation isocenter.

    PubMed

    Du, Weiliang; Yang, James; Luo, Dershan; Martel, Mary

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a computerized method to quantify the coincidence between portal image graticules and radiation field centers or radiation isocenter. Three types of graticules were included in this study: Megavoltage (MV) mechanical graticule, MV electronic portal imaging device digital graticule, and kilovoltage (kV) on-board imaging digital graticule. A metal ball bearing (BB) was imaged with MV and kV x-ray beams in a procedure similar to a Winston-Lutz test. The radiation fields, graticules, and BB were localized in eight portal images using Hough transform-based computer algorithms. The center of the BB served as a static reference point in the 3D space so that the distances between the graticule centers and the radiation field centers were calculated. The radiation isocenter was determined from the radiation field centers at different gantry angles. Misalignments of MV and kV portal imaging graticules varied with the gantry or x-ray source angle as a result of mechanical imperfections of the linear accelerator and its imaging system. While the three graticules in this study were aligned to the radiation field centers and the radiation isocenter within 2.0 mm, misalignments of 1.5-2.0 mm were found at certain gantry angles. These misalignments were highly reproducible with the gantry rotation. A simple method was developed to quantify the alignments of portal image graticules directly against the radiation field centers or the radiation isocenter. The advantage of this method is that it does not require the BB to be placed exactly at the radiation isocenter through a precalibrated surrogating device such as room lasers or light field crosshairs. The present method is useful for radiation therapy modalities that require high-precision portal imaging such as image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy.

  19. Patient dosimetry and image quality in digital radiology from online audit of the X-ray system.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Fernandez, J M; Ten, J I; Gonzalez, L; Guibelalde, E; Prieto, C

    2005-01-01

    The present work describes an online patient dosimetry and an image quality system in digital radiology. For the patient dosimetry audit, current mean values of entrance surface dose (ESD) were compared with local and national reference values (RVs) for the specific examination type evaluated. Mean values exceeding the RV trigger an alarm signal and then an evaluation of the technical parameters, operational practice and image quality was begun, using data available in the DICOM header to derive any abnormal settings or performance to obtain the image. The X-ray tube output for different kVp values is measured periodically, to allow for the automatic calculation of ESD. The system allows also for image audit, linking the dose imparted, the image quality and the alarm condition, if produced. Results and the benefits derived from this online quality control are discussed here.

  20. SU-C-201-05: Silicon Array Dosimeter in Situ with Electronic Portal Image Device for Simultaneous Transit Dose and Image Verification in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, S; Alhujaili, S; Vial, P; Holloway, L; Petasecca, M; Rozenfeld, A; Metcalfe, P

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) coupled to a 2D array dosimeter to provide simultaneous imaging and dose verification. Methods: The novel dual detector configuration comprised of a 2D diode array dosimeter, referred to as a Magic Plate (MP) placed directly on a standard EPID. Dose response of the MP was evaluated by measuring the detector’s response with respect to off-axis position and field size with 30 cm of solid water (SW) acting as a transit object in the beam. Measurements were performed with 3, 5, 10 and 15 mm SW build-up and compared to 2D ionisation chamber array (ICA) measurements and the PinnacleTM treatment planning system (TPS) at a source to detector distance of 150 cm with a 6 MV beam. Clinical dosimetric performance was evaluated by measuring a number of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams in transit geometry. Imaging performance of the EPID was quantified by measuring the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution. Images of a Rando phantom were used for qualitative assessment. Results: Measured MP off-axis and field size response agreed within 2% of TPS and ICA responses when measured using 15 mm SW build-up. Clinical IMRT beams had gamma pass rates of ≥95% at 3%/3mm criteria. Measured CNR and spatial resolution (f50) were 264.96, 210.6, and 0.41, 0.40 with build-up of 5 and 15 mm respectively for the dual detector configuration. CNR and spatial resolution of 643.9 and 0.41 were measured for standard EPID. CNR was quantitatively worse in the dual detector configuration. Differences in imaging performance were not visible in a qualitative assessment using a Rando phantom. Conclusion: Combining a prototype MP 2D dosimeter with a conventional EPID did not significantly detract from the performance of either device and has the potential for simultaneous on-line patient transit dosimetry and image assessment in radiation therapy. Cancer Institute NSW Australia(Research Equipment Grant 10

  1. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-02: Automatic Recognition of Patient Treatment Site in Portal Images Using Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, X; Yang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the method to automatically recognize the treatment site in the X-Ray portal images. It could be useful to detect potential treatment errors, and to provide guidance to sequential tasks, e.g. automatically verify the patient daily setup. Methods: The portal images were exported from MOSAIQ as DICOM files, and were 1) processed with a threshold based intensity transformation algorithm to enhance contrast, and 2) where then down-sampled (from 1024×768 to 128×96) by using bi-cubic interpolation algorithm. An appearance-based vector space model (VSM) was used to rearrange the images into vectors. A principal component analysis (PCA) method was used to reduce the vector dimensions. A multi-class support vector machine (SVM), with radial basis function kernel, was used to build the treatment site recognition models. These models were then used to recognize the treatment sites in the portal image. Portal images of 120 patients were included in the study. The images were selected to cover six treatment sites: brain, head and neck, breast, lung, abdomen and pelvis. Each site had images of the twenty patients. Cross-validation experiments were performed to evaluate the performance. Results: MATLAB image processing Toolbox and scikit-learn (a machine learning library in python) were used to implement the proposed method. The average accuracies using the AP and RT images separately were 95% and 94% respectively. The average accuracy using AP and RT images together was 98%. Computation time was ∼0.16 seconds per patient with AP or RT image, ∼0.33 seconds per patient with both of AP and RT images. Conclusion: The proposed method of treatment site recognition is efficient and accurate. It is not sensitive to the differences of image intensity, size and positions of patients in the portal images. It could be useful for the patient safety assurance. The work was partially supported by a research grant from Varian Medical System.

  2. First clinical results of adaptive radiotherapy based on 3D portal dosimetry for lung cancer patients with atelectasis treated with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT).

    PubMed

    Persoon, Lucas C G G; Egelmeer, Ada G T M; Ollers, Michel C; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M J J G; Troost, Esther G C; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Atelectasis in lung cancer patients can change rapidly during a treatment course, which may displace the tumor/healthy tissues, or change tissue densities locally. This may result in differences between the planned and the actually delivered dose. With complex delivery techniques treatment verification is essential and inter-fractional adaptation may be necessary. We present the first clinical results of treatment adaptation based on an in-house developed three-dimensional (3D) portal dose measurement (PDM) system. A method was developed for 3D PDM combined with cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) imaging. Lung cancer patients are monitored routinely with this imaging technique. During treatment, the first three fractions are analyzed with 3D PDM and weekly thereafter. The reconstructed measured dose is compared to the planned dose using dose-volume histograms and a γ evaluation. Patients having |γ|> 1 in more than 5% of the (primary tumor or organ at risk) volume were subjected to further analysis. In this study we show the PDM dose changes for five patients. We detected relevant dose changes induced by changes in atelectasis in the presented cases. Two patients received two treatment adaptations after being detected with PDM confirmed by visual inspection of the kV-CBCTs, and in two other patients the radiation treatment plan was adapted once. In one case no dose delivery change was detected with PDM. The first clinical patients show that 3D PDM combined with kV-CBCT is a valuable quality assurance tool for detecting anatomical alterations and their dosimetric consequences during the course of radiotherapy. In our clinic, 3D PDM is fully automated for ease and speed of the procedure, and for minimization of human error. The technique is able to flag patients with suspected dose discrepancies for potential adaptation of the treatment plan.

  3. Study of a prototype high quantum efficiency thick scintillation crystal video-electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sanjiv S; Gopal, Arun

    2006-08-01

    Image quality in portal imaging suffers significantly from the loss in contrast and spatial resolution that results from the excessive Compton scatter associated with megavoltage x rays. In addition, portal image quality is further reduced due to the poor quantum efficiency (QE) of current electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). Commercial video-camera-based EPIDs or VEPIDs that utilize a thin phosphor screen in conjunction with a metal buildup plate to convert the incident x rays to light suffer from reduced light production due to low QE (<2% for Eastman Kodak Lanex Fast-B). Flat-panel EPIDs that utilize the same luminescent screen along with an a-Si:H photodiode array provide improved image quality compared to VEPIDs, but they are expensive and can be susceptible to radiation damage to the peripheral electronics. In this article, we present a prototype VEPID system for high quality portal imaging at sub-monitor-unit (subMU) exposures based on a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) that acts as a high QE luminescent screen. The prototype TSC system utilizes a 12 mm thick transparent CsI(Tl) (thallium-activated cesium iodide) scintillator for QE=0.24, resulting in significantly higher light production compared to commercial phosphor screens. The 25 X 25 cm2 CsI(Tl) screen is coupled to a high spatial and contrast resolution Video-Optics plumbicon-tube camera system (1240 X 1024 pixels, 250 microm pixel width at isocenter, 12-bit ADC). As a proof-of-principle prototype, the TSC system with user-controlled camera target integration was adapted for use in an existing clinical gantry (Siemens BEAMVIEW(PLUS)) with the capability for online intratreatment fluoroscopy. Measurements of modulation transfer function (MTF) were conducted to characterize the TSC spatial resolution. The measured MTF along with measurements of the TSC noise power spectrum (NPS) were used to determine the system detective quantum efficiency (DQE). A theoretical expression of DQE(0) was developed

  4. Dosimetry and image quality in digital mammography facilities in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Sabrina Donato; Joana, Geórgia Santos; Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Leyton, Fernando; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2015-11-01

    According to the National Register of Health Care Facilities (CNES), there are approximately 477 mammography systems operating in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, of which an estimated 200 are digital apparatus using mainly computerized radiography (CR) or direct radiography (DR) systems. Mammography is irreplaceable in the diagnosis and early detection of breast cancer, the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. A high standard of image quality alongside smaller doses and optimization of procedures are essential if early detection is to occur. This study aimed to determine dosimetry and image quality in 68 mammography services in Minas Gerais using CR or DR systems. The data of this study were collected between the years of 2011 and 2013. The contrast-to-noise ratio proved to be a critical point in the image production chain in digital systems, since 90% of services were not compliant in this regard, mainly for larger PMMA thicknesses (60 and 70 mm). Regarding the image noise, only 31% of these were compliant. The average glandular dose found is of concern, since more than half of the services presented doses above acceptable limits. Therefore, despite the potential benefits of using CR and DR systems, the employment of this technology has to be revised and optimized to achieve better quality image and reduce radiation dose as much as possible.

  5. A Comparison of Techniques for (90)Y PET/CT Image-Based Dosimetry Following Radioembolization with Resin Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Pasciak, Alexander S; Bourgeois, Austin C; Bradley, Yong C

    2014-01-01

    (90)Y PET/CT following radioembolization has recently been established as a viable diagnostic tool, capable of producing images that are both quantitative and have superior image quality than alternative (90)Y imaging modalities. Because radioembolization is assumed to be a permanent implant, it is possible to convert quantitative (90)Y PET image sets into data representative of spatial committed absorbed-dose. Multiple authors have performed this transformation using dose-point kernel (DPK) convolution to account for the transport of the high-energy (90)Y β-particles. This article explores a technique called the Local Deposition Method (LDM), an alternative to DPK convolution for (90)Y image-based dosimetry. The LDM assumes that the kinetic energy from each (90)Y β-particle is deposited locally, within the voxel where the decay occurred. Using the combined analysis of phantoms scanned using (90)Y PET/CT and ideal mathematical phantoms, an accuracy comparison of DPK convolution and the LDM has been performed. Based on the presented analysis, DPK convolution provides no detectible accuracy benefit over the LDM for (90)Y PET-based dosimetry. For PET systems with (90)Y resolution poorer than 3.25 mm at full-width and half-max using a small voxel size, the LDM may produce a dosimetric solution that is more accurate than DPK convolution under ideal conditions; however, image noise can obscure some of the perceived benefit. As voxel size increases and resolution decreases, differences between the LDM and DPK convolution are reduced. The LDM method of post-radioembolization dosimetry has the advantage of not requiring additional post-processing. The provided conversion factors can be used to determine committed absorbed-dose using conventional PET image analysis tools. The LDM is a recommended option for routine post-radioembolization (90)Y dosimetry based on PET/CT imaging.

  6. A Comparison of Techniques for 90Y PET/CT Image-Based Dosimetry Following Radioembolization with Resin Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Pasciak, Alexander S.; Bourgeois, Austin C.; Bradley, Yong C.

    2014-01-01

    90Y PET/CT following radioembolization has recently been established as a viable diagnostic tool, capable of producing images that are both quantitative and have superior image quality than alternative 90Y imaging modalities. Because radioembolization is assumed to be a permanent implant, it is possible to convert quantitative 90Y PET image sets into data representative of spatial committed absorbed-dose. Multiple authors have performed this transformation using dose-point kernel (DPK) convolution to account for the transport of the high-energy 90Y β-particles. This article explores a technique called the Local Deposition Method (LDM), an alternative to DPK convolution for 90Y image-based dosimetry. The LDM assumes that the kinetic energy from each 90Y β-particle is deposited locally, within the voxel where the decay occurred. Using the combined analysis of phantoms scanned using 90Y PET/CT and ideal mathematical phantoms, an accuracy comparison of DPK convolution and the LDM has been performed. Based on the presented analysis, DPK convolution provides no detectible accuracy benefit over the LDM for 90Y PET-based dosimetry. For PET systems with 90Y resolution poorer than 3.25 mm at full-width and half-max using a small voxel size, the LDM may produce a dosimetric solution that is more accurate than DPK convolution under ideal conditions; however, image noise can obscure some of the perceived benefit. As voxel size increases and resolution decreases, differences between the LDM and DPK convolution are reduced. The LDM method of post-radioembolization dosimetry has the advantage of not requiring additional post-processing. The provided conversion factors can be used to determine committed absorbed-dose using conventional PET image analysis tools. The LDM is a recommended option for routine post-radioembolization 90Y dosimetry based on PET/CT imaging. PMID:24904832

  7. Skeletal dosimetry based on µCT images of trabecular bone: update and comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, R.; Cassola, V. F.; Vieira, J. W.; Khoury, H. J.; de Oliveira Lira, C. A. B.; Robson Brown, K.

    2012-06-01

    Two skeletal dosimetry methods using µCT images of human bone have recently been developed: the paired-image radiation transport (PIRT) model introduced by researchers at the University of Florida (UF) in the US and the systematic-periodic cluster (SPC) method developed by researchers at the Federal University of Pernambuco in Brazil. Both methods use µCT images of trabecular bone (TB) to model spongiosa regions of human bones containing marrow cavities segmented into soft tissue volumes of active marrow (AM), trabecular inactive marrow and the bone endosteum (BE), which is a 50 µm thick layer of marrow on all TB surfaces and on cortical bone surfaces next to TB as well as inside the medullary cavities. With respect to the radiation absorbed dose, the AM and the BE are sensitive soft tissues for the induction of leukaemia and bone cancer, respectively. The two methods differ mainly with respect to the number of bone sites and the size of the µCT images used in Monte Carlo calculations and they apply different methods to simulate exposure from radiation sources located outside the skeleton. The PIRT method calculates dosimetric quantities in isolated human bones while the SPC method uses human bones embedded in the body of a phantom which contains all relevant organs and soft tissues. Consequently, the SPC method calculates absorbed dose to the AM and to the BE from particles emitted by radionuclides concentrated in organs or from radiation sources located outside the human body in one calculation step. In order to allow for similar calculations of AM and BE absorbed doses using the PIRT method, the so-called dose response functions (DRFs) have been developed based on absorbed fractions (AFs) of energy for electrons isotropically emitted in skeletal tissues. The DRFs can be used to transform the photon fluence in homogeneous spongiosa regions into absorbed dose to AM and BE. This paper will compare AM and BE AFs of energy from electrons emitted in skeletal

  8. Dosimetric verification of radiation therapy including intensity modulated treatments, using an amorphous-silicon electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chytyk-Praznik, Krista Joy

    Radiation therapy is continuously increasing in complexity due to technological innovation in delivery techniques, necessitating thorough dosimetric verification. Comparing accurately predicted portal dose images to measured images obtained during patient treatment can determine if a particular treatment was delivered correctly. The goal of this thesis was to create a method to predict portal dose images that was versatile and accurate enough to use in a clinical setting. All measured images in this work were obtained with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (a-Si EPID), but the technique is applicable to any planar imager. A detailed, physics-motivated fluence model was developed to characterize fluence exiting the linear accelerator head. The model was further refined using results from Monte Carlo simulations and schematics of the linear accelerator. The fluence incident on the EPID was converted to a portal dose image through a superposition of Monte Carlo-generated, monoenergetic dose kernels specific to the a-Si EPID. Predictions of clinical IMRT fields with no patient present agreed with measured portal dose images within 3% and 3 mm. The dose kernels were applied ignoring the geometrically divergent nature of incident fluence on the EPID. A computational investigation into this parallel dose kernel assumption determined its validity under clinically relevant situations. Introducing a patient or phantom into the beam required the portal image prediction algorithm to account for patient scatter and attenuation. Primary fluence was calculated by attenuating raylines cast through the patient CT dataset, while scatter fluence was determined through the superposition of pre-calculated scatter fluence kernels. Total dose in the EPID was calculated by convolving the total predicted incident fluence with the EPID-specific dose kernels. The algorithm was tested on water slabs with square fields, agreeing with measurement within 3% and 3 mm. The

  9. A geospatial web portal for sharing and analyzing greenhouse gas data derived from satellite remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hao; Yu, Bailang; Chen, Zuoqi; Hu, Yingjie; Huang, Yan; Wu, Jianping; Wu, Bin; Ge, Rong

    2013-09-01

    Greenhouse gas data collected by different institutions throughout the world have significant scientific values for global climate change studies. Due to the diversity of data formats and different specifications of data access interfaces, most of those data should be first downloaded onto a local machine before they can be used. To overcome this limitation, we present a geospatial web portal for sharing and analyzing greenhouse gas data derived from remote sensing images. As a proof-of-concept, a prototype has also been designed and implemented. The workflow of the web portal contains four processes: data access, data analysis, results visualization, and results output. A large volume of greenhouse gas data have been collected, described, and indexed in the portal, and a variety of data analysis services, such as calculating the temporal variation of regionally averaged column CO2 values and analyzing the latitudinal variations of globally averaged column CO2 values, are integrated into this portal. With the integrated geospatial data and services, researchers can collect and analyze greenhouse gas data online, and can preview and download the analysis results directly from the web portal. The geospatial web portal has been implemented as a web application, and we also used a study case to illustrate this framework.

  10. Validation of a precision radiochromic film dosimetry system for quantitative two-dimensional imaging of acute exposure dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, J F; Low, D A; Mutic, S; Markman, J; Kirov, A S; Nussbaum, G H; Williamson, J F

    2000-10-01

    We present an evaluation of the precision and accuracy of image-based radiochromic film (RCF) dosimetry performed using a commercial RCF product (Gafchromic MD-55-2, Nuclear Associates, Inc.) and a commercial high-spatial resolution (100 microm pixel size) He-Ne scanning-laser film-digitizer (Personal Densitometer, Molecular Dynamics, Inc.) as an optical density (OD) imaging system. The precision and accuracy of this dosimetry system are evaluated by performing RCF imaging dosimetry in well characterized conformal external beam and brachytherapy high dose-rate (HDR) radiation fields. Benchmarking of image-based RCF dosimetry is necessary due to many potential errors inherent to RCF dosimetry including: a temperature-dependent time evolution of RCF dose response; nonuniform response of RCF; and optical-polarization artifacts. In addition, laser-densitometer imaging artifacts can produce systematic OD measurement errors as large as 35% in the presence of high OD gradients. We present a RCF exposure and readout protocol that was developed for the accurate dosimetry of high dose rate (HDR) radiation sources. This protocol follows and expands upon the guidelines set forth by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 55 report. Particular attention is focused on the OD imaging system, a scanning-laser film digitizer, modified to eliminate OD artifacts that were not addressed in the AAPM Task Group 55 report. RCF precision using this technique was evaluated with films given uniform 6 MV x-ray doses between 1 and 200 Gy. RCF absolute dose accuracy using this technique was evaluated by comparing RCF measurements to small volume ionization chamber measurements for conformal external-beam sources and an experimentally validated Monte Carlo photon-transport simulation code for a 192Ir brachytherapy source. Pixel-to-pixel standard deviations of uniformly irradiated films were less than 1% for doses between 10 and 150 Gy; between 1% and 5% for lower

  11. Determination of dosimetric leaf gap using amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device and its influence on intensity modulated radiotherapy dose delivery

    PubMed Central

    Balasingh, S. Timothy Peace; Singh, I. Rabi Raja; Rafic, K. Mohamathu; Babu, S. Ebenezer Suman; Ravindran, B. Paul

    2015-01-01

    As complex treatment techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) entail the modeling of rounded leaf-end transmission in the treatment planning system, it is important to accurately determine the dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) value for a precise calculation of dose. The advancements in the application of the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) in quality assurance (QA) and dosimetry have facilitated the determination of DLG in this study. The DLG measurements were performed using both the ionization chamber (DLGion) and EPID (DLGEPID) for sweeping gap fields of different widths. The DLGion values were found to be 1.133 mm and 1.120 mm for perpendicular and parallel orientations of the 0.125 cm3 ionization chamber, while the corresponding DLGEPID values were 0.843 mm and 0.819 mm, respectively. It was found that the DLG was independent of volume and orientation of the ionization chamber, depth, source to surface distance (SSD), and the rate of dose delivery. Since the patient-specific QA tests showed comparable results between the IMRT plans based on the DLGEPID and DLGion, it is concluded that the EPID can be a suitable alternative in the determination of DLG. PMID:26500398

  12. Transition from Paris dosimetry system to 3D image-guided planning in interstitial breast brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wronczewska, Anna; Kabacińska, Renata; Makarewicz, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate our first experience with 3D image-guided breast brachytherapy and to compare dose distribution parameters between Paris dosimetry system (PDS) and image-based plans. Material and methods First 49 breast cancer patients treated with 3D high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy as a boost were selected for the study. Every patient underwent computed tomography, and the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR) were outlined. Two treatment plans were created for every patient. First, based on a Paris dosimetry system (PDS), and the second one, imaged-based plan with graphical optimization (OPT). The reference isodose in PDS implants was 85%, whereas in OPT plans the isodose was chosen to obtain proper target coverage. Dose and volume parameters (D90, D100, V90, V100), doses at OARs, total reference air kerma (TRAK), and quality assurance parameters: dose nonuniformity ratio (DNR), dose homogeneity index (DHI), and conformity index (COIN) were used for a comparison of both plans. Results The mean number of catheters was 7 but the mean for 20 first patients was 5 and almost 9 for the next 29 patients. The mean value of prescribed isodose for OPT plans was 73%. The mean D90 was 88.2% and 105.8%, the D100 was 59.8% and 75.7%, the VPTV90 was 88.6% and 98.1%, the VPTV100 was 79.9% and 98.9%, and the TRAK was 0.00375 Gym–1 and 0.00439 Gym–1 for the PDS and OPT plans, respectively. The mean DNR was 0.29 and 0.42, the DHI was 0.71 and 0.58, and the COIN was 0.68 and 0.76, respectively. Conclusions The target coverage in image-guided plans (OPT) was significantly higher than in PDS plans but the dose homogeneity was worse. Also, the value of TRAK increased because of change of prescribing isodose. The learning curve slightly affected our results. PMID:26816505

  13. Digital Rocks Portal: a sustainable platform for imaged dataset sharing, translation and automated analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodanovic, M.; Esteva, M.; Hanlon, M.; Nanda, G.; Agarwal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in imaging have provided a wealth of 3D datasets that reveal pore space microstructure (nm to cm length scale) and allow investigation of nonlinear flow and mechanical phenomena from first principles using numerical approaches. This framework has popularly been called "digital rock physics". Researchers, however, have trouble storing and sharing the datasets both due to their size and the lack of standardized image types and associated metadata for volumetric datasets. This impedes scientific cross-validation of the numerical approaches that characterize large scale porous media properties, as well as development of multiscale approaches required for correct upscaling. A single research group typically specializes in an imaging modality and/or related modeling on a single length scale, and lack of data-sharing infrastructure makes it difficult to integrate different length scales. We developed a sustainable, open and easy-to-use repository called the Digital Rocks Portal, that (1) organizes images and related experimental measurements of different porous materials, (2) improves access to them for a wider community of geosciences or engineering researchers not necessarily trained in computer science or data analysis. Once widely accepter, the repository will jumpstart productivity and enable scientific inquiry and engineering decisions founded on a data-driven basis. This is the first repository of its kind. We show initial results on incorporating essential software tools and pipelines that make it easier for researchers to store and reuse data, and for educators to quickly visualize and illustrate concepts to a wide audience. For data sustainability and continuous access, the portal is implemented within the reliable, 24/7 maintained High Performance Computing Infrastructure supported by the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at the University of Texas at Austin. Long-term storage is provided through the University of Texas System Research

  14. Denoising techniques combined to Monte Carlo simulations for the prediction of high-resolution portal images in radiotherapy treatment verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaro, D.; Barat, E.; Le Loirec, C.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T.; Guérin, L.; Batalla, A.

    2013-05-01

    This work investigates the possibility of combining Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to a denoising algorithm for the accurate prediction of images acquired using amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). An accurate MC model of the Siemens OptiVue1000 EPID was first developed using the penelope code, integrating a non-uniform backscatter modelling. Two already existing denoising algorithms were then applied on simulated portal images, namely the iterative reduction of noise (IRON) method and the locally adaptive Savitzky-Golay (LASG) method. A third denoising method, based on a nonparametric Bayesian framework and called DPGLM (for Dirichlet process generalized linear model) was also developed. Performances of the IRON, LASG and DPGLM methods, in terms of smoothing capabilities and computation time, were compared for portal images computed for different values of the RMS pixel noise (up to 10%) in three different configurations, a heterogeneous phantom irradiated by a non-conformal 15 × 15 cm2 field, a conformal beam from a pelvis treatment plan, and an IMRT beam from a prostate treatment plan. For all configurations, DPGLM outperforms both IRON and LASG by providing better smoothing performances and demonstrating a better robustness with respect to noise. Additionally, no parameter tuning is required by DPGLM, which makes the denoising step very generic and easy to handle for any portal image. Concerning the computation time, the denoising of 1024 × 1024 images takes about 1 h 30 min, 2 h and 5 min using DPGLM, IRON, and LASG, respectively. This paper shows the feasibility to predict within a few hours and with the same resolution as real images accurate portal images, combining MC simulations with the DPGLM denoising algorithm.

  15. Dosimetry and quantitative radionuclide imaging in radioimmunotherapy: Final report, July 15, 1992-July 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Leichner, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    Brief summaries of the principal accomplishments of this project on the development of quantitative SPECT for high energy photons (87Y, 19F) and stability testing of 87Y-labeled antibodies in the nude mouse model, development of an unified approach to photon and beta particle dosimetry, quantitative SPECT for nonuniform attenuation, and development of patient-specific dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy.

  16. Improved dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy using high resolution contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Morancy, Tye; Kaplan, Irving; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Rofksy, Neil M.; Holupka, Edward; Oismueller, Renee; Hawliczek, Robert; Helbich, Thomas H.; Bloch, B. Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess detailed dosimetry data for prostate and clinical relevant intra- and peri-prostatic structures including neurovascular bundles (NVB), urethra, and penile bulb (PB) from postbrachytherapy computed tomography (CT) versus high resolution contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (HR-CEMRI). Material and methods Eleven postbrachytherapy prostate cancer patients underwent HR-CEMRI and CT imaging. Computed tomography and HR-CEMRI images were randomized and 2 independent expert readers created contours of prostate, intra- and peri-prostatic structures on each CT and HR-CEMRI scan for all 11 patients. Dosimetry data including V100, D90, and D100 was calculated from these contours. Results Mean V100 values from CT and HR-CEMRI contours were as follows: prostate (98.5% and 96.2%, p = 0.003), urethra (81.0% and 88.7%, p = 0.027), anterior rectal wall (ARW) (8.9% and 2.8%, p < 0.001), left NVB (77.9% and 51.5%, p = 0.002), right NVB (69.2% and 43.1%, p = 0.001), and PB (0.09% and 11.4%, p = 0.005). Mean D90 (Gy) derived from CT and HR-CEMRI contours were: prostate (167.6 and 150.3, p = 0.012), urethra (81.6 and 109.4, p = 0.041), ARW (2.5 and 0.11, p = 0.003), left NVB (98.2 and 58.6, p = 0.001), right NVB (87.5 and 55.5, p = 0.001), and PB (11.2 and 12.4, p = 0.554). Conclusions Findings of this study suggest that HR-CEMRI facilitates accurate and meaningful dosimetric assessment of prostate and clinically relevant structures, which is not possible with CT. Significant differences were seen between CT and HR-CEMRI, with volume overestimation of CT derived contours compared to HR-CEMRI. PMID:25834576

  17. Initial experiments with gel-water: towards MRI-linac dosimetry and imaging.

    PubMed

    Alnaghy, Sarah J; Gargett, Maegan; Liney, Gary; Petasecca, Marco; Begg, Jarrad; Espinoza, Anthony; Newall, Matthew K; Duncan, Mitchell; Holloway, Lois; Lerch, Michael L F; Lazea, Mircea; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B; Metcalfe, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Tracking the position of a moving radiation detector in time and space during data acquisition can replicate 4D image-guided radiotherapy (4DIGRT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-linacs need MRI-visible detectors to achieve this, however, imaging solid phantoms is an issue. Hence, gel-water, a material that provides signal for MRI-visibility, and which will in future work, replace solid water for an MRI-linac 4DIGRT quality assurance tool, is discussed. MR and CT images of gel-water were acquired for visualisation and electron density verification. Characterisation of gel-water at 0 T was compared to Gammex-RMI solid water, using MagicPlate-512 (M512) and RMI Attix chamber; this included percentage depth dose, tissue-phantom ratio (TPR20/10), tissue-maximum ratio (TMR), profiles, output factors, and a gamma analysis to investigate field penumbral differences. MR images of a non-powered detector in gel-water demonstrated detector visualisation. The CT-determined gel-water electron density agreed with the calculated value of 1.01. Gel-water depth dose data demonstrated a maximum deviation of 0.7% from solid water for M512 and 2.4% for the Attix chamber, and by 2.1% for TPR20/10 and 1.0% for TMR. FWHM and output factor differences between materials were ≤0.3 and ≤1.4%. M512 data passed gamma analysis with 100% within 2%, 2 mm tolerance for multileaf collimator defined fields. Gel-water was shown to be tissue-equivalent for dosimetry and a feasible option to replace solid water.

  18. Biokinetics and dosimetry of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Torres-García, Eugenio; Gonz&Ález-v&Ázquez, Armando; de Murphy, Consuelo Arteaga

    Molecular imaging techniques directly or indirectly monitor and record the spatiotemporal distribution of molecular or cellular processes for biochemical, biologic, diagnostic or therapeutic applications. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC has shown high stability both in vitro and in vivo and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Therapies using radiolabeled anti-CD20 have demonstrated their efficacy in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The aim of this study was to establish biokinetic models for 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 188Re-anti-CD20 and to evaluate their dosimetry as target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. The OLINDA/EXM code was used to calculate patient-specific internal radiation dose estimates. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC images showed an average tumor/blood ratio of 4.3±0.7 in receptor-positive tumors with an average effective dose of 4.4 mSv. Dosimetric studies indicated that after administration of 5.8 to 7.5 GBq of 188Re-anti-CD20 the absorbed dose to total body would be 0.75 Gy which corresponds to the recommended dose for NHL therapies.

  19. Planning target volume margins for prostate radiotherapy using daily electronic portal imaging and implanted fiducial markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fiducial markers and daily electronic portal imaging (EPI) can reduce the risk of geographic miss in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to estimate CTV to PTV margin requirements, without and with the use of this image guidance strategy. Methods 46 patients underwent placement of 3 radio-opaque fiducial markers prior to prostate RT. Daily pre-treatment EPIs were taken, and isocenter placement errors were corrected if they were ≥ 3 mm along the left-right or superior-inferior axes, and/or ≥ 2 mm along the anterior-posterior axis. During-treatment EPIs were then obtained to estimate intra-fraction motion. Results Without image guidance, margins of 0.57 cm, 0.79 cm and 0.77 cm, along the left-right, superior-inferior and anterior-posterior axes respectively, are required to give 95% probability of complete CTV coverage each day. With the above image guidance strategy, these margins can be reduced to 0.36 cm, 0.37 cm and 0.37 cm respectively. Correction of all isocenter placement errors, regardless of size, would permit minimal additional reduction in margins. Conclusions Image guidance, using implanted fiducial markers and daily EPI, permits the use of narrower PTV margins without compromising coverage of the target, in the radiotherapy of prostate cancer. PMID:20537161

  20. Image guided portal vein access techniques in TIPS creation and considerations regarding their use

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a difficult procedure to perform and accessing the portal vein is a very challenging step. There are three broad categories of image guided TIPS creation techniques. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. TIPS procedure carries some risk of complications regardless of the guidance technique employed. The technology for TIPS has evolved in parallel with the expanding indications for TIPS. Ultrasound guidance technique offers a safe option, particularly for patients with challenging anatomy. Patient safety should always come first and the US guided technique should be more routinely used. Experience is the main factor in the success of TIPS. Other factors to consider in reducing the all-cause morbidity and mortality are patient selection, patient management and the clinical setting. PMID:27385392

  1. Verification of multileaf collimator leaf positions using an electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sanjiv S; Zheng, Wei; Parra, Nestor Andres; Chandler, Jason; Gopal, Arun; Wu, Jian; Jain, Jinesh; Zhu, Yunping; Sontag, Marc

    2002-12-01

    An automated method is presented for determining individual leaf positions of the Siemens dual focus multileaf collimator (MLC) using the Siemens BEAMVIEW(PLUS) electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Leaf positions are computed with an error of 0.6 mm at one standard deviation (sigma) using separate computations of pixel dimensions, image distortion, and radiation center. The pixel dimensions are calculated by superimposing the film image of a graticule with the corresponding EPID image. A spatial correction is used to compensate for the optical distortions of the EPID, reducing the mean distortion from 3.5 pixels (uncorrected) per localized x-ray marker to 2 pixels (1 mm) for a rigid rotation and 1 pixel for a third degree polynomial warp. A correction for a nonuniform dosimetric response across the field of view of the EPID images is not necessary due to the sharp intensity gradients across leaf edges. The radiation center, calculated from the average of the geometric centers of a square field at 0 degrees and 180 degrees collimator angles, is independent of graticule placement error. Its measured location on the EPID image was stable to within 1 pixel based on 3 weeks of repeated extensions/retractions of the EPID. The MLC leaf positions determined from the EPID images agreed to within a pixel of the corresponding values measured using film and ionization chamber. Several edge detection algorithms were tested: contour, Sobel, Roberts, Prewitt, Laplace, morphological, and Canny. These agreed with each other to within < or = 1.2 pixels for the in-air EPID images. Using a test pattern, individual MLC leaves were found to be typically within 1 mm of the corresponding record-and-verify values, with a maximum difference of 1.8 mm, and standard deviations of <0.3 mm in the daily reproducibility. This method presents a fast, automatic, and accurate alternative to using film or a light field for the verification and calibration of the MLC.

  2. The Use of Gamma-Ray Imaging to Improve Portal Monitor Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Collins, Jeff; Fabris, Lorenzo; Gee, Timothy Felix; Goddard, James K; Habte Ghebretatios, Frezghi; Karnowski, Thomas Paul

    2008-01-01

    We have constructed a prototype, rapid-deployment portal monitor that uses visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to allow simultaneous monitoring of multiple lanes of traffic from the side of a roadway. Our Roadside Tracker uses automated target acquisition and tracking (TAT) software to identify and track vehicles in visible light images. The field of view of the visible camera overlaps with and is calibrated to that of a one-dimensional gamma-ray imager. The TAT code passes information on when vehicles enter and exit the system field of view and when they cross gamma-ray pixel boundaries. Based on this in-formation, the gamma-ray imager "harvests" the gamma-ray data specific to each vehicle, integrating its radiation signature for the entire time that it is in the field of view. In this fashion we are able to generate vehicle-specific radiation signatures and avoid source confusion problems that plague nonimaging approaches to the same problem.

  3. Detection of Renal Stones on Portal Venous Phase CT: Comparison of Thin Axial and Coronal Maximum-Intensity-Projection Images.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Michael T; Lee, Justin S; Fananapazir, Ghaneh; Wilson, Machelle; Lamba, Ramit

    2016-12-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the sensitivity of thin axial and coronal maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) images for the detection of renal stones on contrast-enhanced CT performed in the portal venous phase. This retrospective study included 72 patients, 59 of whom had at least one renal stone, who underwent unenhanced CT immediately followed by contrast-enhanced CT in the portal venous phase. Two abdominal imaging fellowship-trained radiologists independently recorded the number of stones on both thin (1-1.50 mm) axial and 5-mm coronal MIP images in the portal venous phase. The reference standard was determined by consensus review of the thin axial unenhanced images. Reviewer sensitivity was calculated and categorized by stone diameter. One hundred forty-eight stones were present; the mean number of stones per patient was 2.5 (SD, 2.7). The mean stone size was 2.5 mm (SD, 2.7). The sensitivity of thin axial images was 89.9%, 99.0%, and 100.0% for reviewer 1 and 83.1%, 98.0%, and 100.0% for reviewer 2 for all stones, stones ≥ 2 mm, and stones ≥ 3 mm, respectively. The sensitivity of coronal MIP images was 86.5%, 96.2%, and 100.0% for reviewer 1 and 79.0%, 91.4%, and 96.6% for reviewer 2 for all stones, stones ≥ 2 mm, and stones ≥ 3 mm, respectively. Thin axial images are highly sensitive for the detection of renal stones ≥ 2 mm on portal venous phase CT. Coronal MIP images do not improve renal stone detection over thin axial images.

  4. Feasibility study of patient positioning verification in electron beam radiotherapy with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID).

    PubMed

    Ramm, U; Köhn, J; Rodriguez Dominguez, R; Licher, J; Koch, N; Kara, E; Scherf, C; Rödel, C; Weiß, C

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of verification and documentation in electron beam radiotherapy using the photon contamination detected with an electronic portal imaging device. For investigation of electron beam verification with an EPID, the portal images are acquired irradiating two different tissue equivalent phantoms at different electron energies. Measurements were performed on an Elekta SL 25 linear accelerator with an amorphous-Si electronic portal imaging device (EPID: iViewGT, Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK). As a measure of EPID image quality contrast (CR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are determined. For characterisation of the imaging of the EPID RW3 slabs and a Gammex 467 phantom with different material inserts are used. With increasing electron energy the intensity of photon contamination increases, yielding an increasing signal-to-noise ratio, but images are showing a decreasing contrast. As the signal-to-noise ratio saturates with increasing dose a minimum of 50 MUs is recommended. Even image quality depends on electron energy and diameter of the patient, the acquired results are mostly sufficient to assess the accuracy of beam positioning. In general, the online EPID acquisition has been demonstrated to be an effective electron beam verification and documentation method. The results are showing that this procedure can be recommended to be routinely and reliably done in patient treatment with electron beams.

  5. The importance of the accuracy of image registration of SPECT images for 3D targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Papavasileiou, Periklis; Divoli, Antigoni; Hatziioannou, Konstantinos; Flux, Glenn D

    2007-12-21

    In this paper, the importance of the accuracy of image registration of time-sequential SPECT images for 3D targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry is studied. Image registration of a series of SPECT scans is required to allow the computation of the 3D absorbed dose distribution for both tumour sites and normal organs. Three simulated 4D datasets, based on patient therapy studies, were generated to allow the effect of mis-registration on the absorbed dose distribution to be investigated. The tumour sites studied range in size, shape and position, relative to the centre of the 3D SPECT scan. Randomly generated transformations along the x-, y- and z-axes and rotations around the z-axis were employed and the maximum and average absorbed dose distribution statistics, for the tumour sites present, were computed. It was shown that even small mis-registrations, translation of less than 9 mm and rotation of less than 5 degrees might cause differences in the absorbed dose statistics of up to 90%, especially when the size of the tumour is comparable to the induced mis-registration or when the tumour is situated close to the edge of the 3D dataset.

  6. Phantom dosimetry and image quality of i-CAT FLX cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, John B.; Walker, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Increasing use of cone-beam computed tomography in orthodontics has been coupled with heightened concern with the long-term risks of x-ray exposure in orthodontic populations. An industry response to this has been to offer low-exposure alternative scanning options in newer cone-beam computed tomography models. Methods Effective doses resulting from various combinations of field size, and field location comparing child and adult anthropomorphic phantoms using the recently introduced i-CAT FLX cone-beam computed tomography unit were measured with Optical Stimulated Dosimetry using previously validated protocols. Scan protocols included High Resolution (360° rotation, 600 image frames, 120 kVp, 5 mA, 7.4 sec), Standard (360°, 300 frames, 120 kVp, 5 mA, 3.7 sec), QuickScan (180°, 160 frames, 120 kVp, 5 mA, 2 sec) and QuickScan+ (180°, 160 frames, 90 kVp, 3 mA, 2 sec). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated as a quantitative measure of image quality for the various exposure options using the QUART DVT phantom. Results Child phantom doses were on average 36% greater than Adult phantom doses. QuickScan+ protocols resulted in significantly lower doses than Standard protocols for child (p=0.0167) and adult (p=0.0055) phantoms. 13×16 cm cephalometric fields of view ranged from 11–85 μSv in the adult phantom and 18–120 μSv in the child for QuickScan+ and Standard protocols respectively. CNR was reduced by approximately 2/3rds comparing QuickScan+ to Standard exposure parameters. Conclusions QuickScan+ effective doses are comparable to conventional panoramic examinations. Significant dose reductions are accompanied by significant reductions in image quality. However, this trade-off may be acceptable for certain diagnostic tasks such as interim assessment of treatment results. PMID:24286904

  7. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mijnheer, Ben; Beddar, Sam; Izewska, Joanna; Reft, Chester

    2013-07-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20∕20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  8. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mijnheer, Ben; Beddar, Sam; Izewska, Joanna; Reft, Chester

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  9. Characterization of a new polymer gel for radiosurgery dosimetry using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrokokkinos, L.; Kozicki, M.; Pantelis, E.; Antypas, C.; Fijuth, J.; Karaiskos, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.

    2009-06-01

    The VIPAR polymer gel dosimeter formulation was modified in an effort to eliminate the need for deoxygenation in the manufacturing procedure while preserving its favorable characteristics of dose rate independence and a wide dose response range. Aiming at an adequate dose sensitivity and the extension of dose response in the low dose region to facilitate the dose verification of radiosurgery applications where narrow beams are employed and steep dose gradients are involved, the new formulation consists of 8% N-Vinylpyrrolidone, 7.5% gelatine, 4% N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide, as well as of 0.0008% Copper Sulfate and 0.007% Ascorbic Acid as oxygen scavengers. To study the dose-R2 response, dose rate dependence and ``edge effect'' behaviour of the new formulation, one batch of two gel filled glass vials was prepared. Before MR Imaging, one vial was irradiated with a brachytherapy source while the other one was irradiated using circular CyberKnife radiation fields of 60, 10, 7.5 and 5 mm in diameter. Results of this study suggest that the new gel dosimeter responds linearly in the dose range of about 3 to 30 Gy, whilst the full dose response range exceeds the maximum delivered dose of 50 Gy. No dose rate dependence was observed for the new gel, while Cyberknife dosimetry results in the form of stereotactic field size and penumbra measurements suggest that the new formulation could be effective in the dose verification of demanding radiosurgery techniques.

  10. A comprehensive tool for image-based generation of fetus and pregnant women mesh models for numerical dosimetry studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahdouh, S.; Varsier, N.; Serrurier, A.; De la Plata, J.-P.; Anquez, J.; Angelini, E. D.; Wiart, J.; Bloch, I.

    2014-08-01

    Fetal dosimetry studies require the development of accurate numerical 3D models of the pregnant woman and the fetus. This paper proposes a 3D articulated fetal growth model covering the main phases of pregnancy and a pregnant woman model combining the utero-fetal structures and a deformable non-pregnant woman body envelope. The structures of interest were automatically or semi-automatically (depending on the stage of pregnancy) segmented from a database of images and surface meshes were generated. By interpolating linearly between fetal structures, each one can be generated at any age and in any position. A method is also described to insert the utero-fetal structures in the maternal body. A validation of the fetal models is proposed, comparing a set of biometric measurements to medical reference charts. The usability of the pregnant woman model in dosimetry studies is also investigated, with respect to the influence of the abdominal fat layer.

  11. Portfolio: a prototype workstation for development and evaluation of tools for analysis and management of digital portal images.

    PubMed

    Boxwala, A A; Chaney, E L; Fritsch, D S; Friedman, C P; Rosenman, J G

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to design and implement a prototype physician workstation, called PortFolio, as a platform for developing and evaluating, by means of controlled observer studies, user interfaces and interactive tools for analyzing and managing digital portal images. The first observer study was designed to measure physician acceptance of workstation technology, as an alternative to a view box, for inspection and analysis of portal images for detection of treatment setup errors. The observer study was conducted in a controlled experimental setting to evaluate physician acceptance of the prototype workstation technology exemplified by PortFolio. PortFolio incorporates a windows user interface, a compact kit of carefully selected image analysis tools, and an object-oriented data base infrastructure. The kit evaluated in the observer study included tools for contrast enhancement, registration, and multimodal image visualization. Acceptance was measured in the context of performing portal image analysis in a structured protocol designed to simulate clinical practice. The acceptability and usage patterns were measured from semistructured questionnaires and logs of user interactions. Radiation oncologists, the subjects for this study, perceived the tools in PortFolio to be acceptable clinical aids. Concerns were expressed regarding user efficiency, particularly with respect to the image registration tools. The results of our observer study indicate that workstation technology is acceptable to radiation oncologists as an alternative to a view box for clinical detection of setup errors from digital portal images. Improvements in implementation, including more tools and a greater degree of automation in the image analysis tasks, are needed to make PortFolio more clinically practical.

  12. 1D pixelated MV portal imager with structured privacy film: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Pavlo; Shedlock, Daniel; Myronakis, Marios; Berbeco, Ross; Star-Lack, Josh

    2017-03-01

    Modern amorphous silicon flat panel-based electronic portal imaging devices that utilize thin gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators suffer from low quantum efficiencies (QEs). Thick two dimensionally (2D) pixelated scintillator arrays offer an effective but expensive option for increasing QE. To reduce costs, we have investigated the possibility of combining a thick one dimensional (1D) pixelated scintillator (PS) with an orthogonally placed 1D structured optical filter to provide for overall good 2D spatial resolution. In this work, we studied the potential for using a 1D video screen privacy film (PF) to serve as a directional optical attenuator and filter. A Geant4 model of the PF was built based on reflection and transmission measurements taken with a laser-based optical reflectometer. This information was incorporated into a Geant4-based x-ray detector simulator to generate modulation transfer functions (MTFs), noise power spectra (NPS), and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) for various 1D and 2D configurations. It was found that the 1D array with PF can provide the MTFs and DQEs of 2D arrays. Although the PF significantly reduced the amount of optical photons detected by the flat panel, we anticipate using a scintillator with an inherently high optical yield (e.g. cesium iodide) for MV imaging, where fluence rates are inherently high, will still provide adequate signal intensities for the imaging tasks associated with radiotherapy.

  13. Feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using electronic portal imaging: A comparison of methods

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Emma J. . E-mail: eharris@icr.ac.uk; McNair, Helen A.; Evans, Phillip M.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using portal images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device. Methods and Materials: We have made a direct comparison of 4 different methods (2 template matching-based methods, a method incorporating attenuation and constellation analyses and a cross correlation method) that have been published in the literature for the automatic detection of fiducial markers. The cross-correlation technique requires a-priory information from the portal images, therefore the technique is not fully automated for the first treatment fraction. Images of 7 patients implanted with gold fiducial markers (8 mm in length and 1 mm in diameter) were acquired before treatment (set-up images) and during treatment (movie images) using 1MU and 15MU per image respectively. Images included: 75 anterior (AP) and 69 lateral (LAT) set-up images and 51 AP and 83 LAT movie images. Using the different methods described in the literature, marker positions were automatically identified. Results: The method based upon cross correlation techniques gave the highest percentage detection success rate of 99% (AP) and 83% (LAT) set-up (1MU) images. The methods gave detection success rates of less than 91% (AP) and 42% (LAT) set-up images. The amount of a-priory information used and how it affects the way the techniques are implemented, is discussed. Conclusions: Fully automated marker detection in set-up images for the first treatment fraction is unachievable using these methods and that using cross-correlation is the best technique for automatic detection on subsequent radiotherapy treatment fractions.

  14. Clinical implementation and rapid commissioning of an EPID based in-vivo dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; van Herk, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    Using an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to perform in-vivo dosimetry is one of the most effective and efficient methods of verifying the safe delivery of complex radiotherapy treatments. Previous work has detailed the development of an EPID based in-vivo dosimetry system that was subsequently used to replace pre-treatment dose verification of IMRT and VMAT plans. Here we show that this system can be readily implemented on a commercial megavoltage imaging platform without modification to EPID hardware and without impacting standard imaging procedures. The accuracy and practicality of the EPID in-vivo dosimetry system was confirmed through a comparison with traditional TLD in-vivo measurements performed on five prostate patients. The commissioning time required for the EPID in-vivo dosimetry system was initially prohibitive at approximately 10 h per linac. Here we present a method of calculating linac specific EPID dosimetry correction factors that allow a single energy specific commissioning model to be applied to EPID data from multiple linacs. Using this method reduced the required per linac commissioning time to approximately 30 min. The validity of this commissioning method has been tested by analysing in-vivo dosimetry results of 1220 patients acquired on seven linacs over a period of 5 years. The average deviation between EPID based isocentre dose and expected isocentre dose for these patients was (-0.7  ±  3.2)%. EPID based in-vivo dosimetry is now the primary in-vivo dosimetry tool used at our centre and has replaced nearly all pre-treatment dose verification of IMRT treatments.

  15. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult female-internal electron sources.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Shannon E; DeWeese, Lindsay S; Maynard, Matthew R; Rajon, Didier A; Wayson, Michael B; Marshall, Emily L; Bolch, Wesley E

    2016-12-21

    An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for internal electron sources was created for the ICRP-defined reference adult female. Many previous skeletal dosimetry models, which are still employed in commonly used internal dosimetry software, do not properly account for electron escape from trabecular spongiosa, electron cross-fire from cortical bone, and the impact of marrow cellularity on active marrow self-irradiation. Furthermore, these existing models do not employ the current ICRP definition of a 50 µm bone endosteum (or shallow marrow). Each of these limitations was addressed in the present study. Electron transport was completed to determine specific absorbed fractions to both active and shallow marrow of the skeletal regions of the University of Florida reference adult female. The skeletal macrostructure and microstructure were modeled separately. The bone macrostructure was based on the whole-body hybrid computational phantom of the UF series of reference models, while the bone microstructure was derived from microCT images of skeletal region samples taken from a 45 years-old female cadaver. The active and shallow marrow are typically adopted as surrogate tissue regions for the hematopoietic stem cells and osteoprogenitor cells, respectively. Source tissues included active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surfaces, cortical bone volume, and cortical bone surfaces. Marrow cellularity was varied from 10 to 100 percent for active marrow self-irradiation. All other sources were run at the defined ICRP Publication 70 cellularity for each bone site. A total of 33 discrete electron energies, ranging from 1 keV to 10 MeV, were either simulated or analytically modeled. The method of combining skeletal macrostructure and microstructure absorbed fractions assessed using MCNPX electron transport was found to yield results similar to those determined with the PIRT model applied to the UF adult male skeletal dosimetry model. Calculated

  16. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult female—internal electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Shannon E.; DeWeese, Lindsay S.; Maynard, Matthew R.; Rajon, Didier A.; Wayson, Michael B.; Marshall, Emily L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2016-12-01

    An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for internal electron sources was created for the ICRP-defined reference adult female. Many previous skeletal dosimetry models, which are still employed in commonly used internal dosimetry software, do not properly account for electron escape from trabecular spongiosa, electron cross-fire from cortical bone, and the impact of marrow cellularity on active marrow self-irradiation. Furthermore, these existing models do not employ the current ICRP definition of a 50 µm bone endosteum (or shallow marrow). Each of these limitations was addressed in the present study. Electron transport was completed to determine specific absorbed fractions to both active and shallow marrow of the skeletal regions of the University of Florida reference adult female. The skeletal macrostructure and microstructure were modeled separately. The bone macrostructure was based on the whole-body hybrid computational phantom of the UF series of reference models, while the bone microstructure was derived from microCT images of skeletal region samples taken from a 45 years-old female cadaver. The active and shallow marrow are typically adopted as surrogate tissue regions for the hematopoietic stem cells and osteoprogenitor cells, respectively. Source tissues included active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surfaces, cortical bone volume, and cortical bone surfaces. Marrow cellularity was varied from 10 to 100 percent for active marrow self-irradiation. All other sources were run at the defined ICRP Publication 70 cellularity for each bone site. A total of 33 discrete electron energies, ranging from 1 keV to 10 MeV, were either simulated or analytically modeled. The method of combining skeletal macrostructure and microstructure absorbed fractions assessed using MCNPX electron transport was found to yield results similar to those determined with the PIRT model applied to the UF adult male skeletal dosimetry model. Calculated

  17. A quantum accounting and detective quantum efficiency analysis for video-based portal imaging.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, J P; Cunningham, I A; Jaffray, D A; Fenster, A; Munro, P

    1997-06-01

    The quality of images generated with radiographic imaging systems can be degraded if an inadequate number of secondary quanta are used at any stage before production of the final image. A theoretical technique known as a "quantum accounting diagram" (QAD) analysis has been developed recently to predict the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of an imaging system as a function of spatial frequency based on an analysis of the propagation of quanta. It is used to determine the "quantum sink" stage(s) (stages which degrade the DQE of an imaging system due to quantum noise caused by a finite number of quanta), and to suggest design improvements to maximize image quality. We have used this QAD analysis to evaluate a video-based portal imaging system to determine where changes in design will have the most benefit. The system consists of a thick phosphor layer bonded to a 1 mm thick copper plate which is viewed by a T.V. camera. The imaging system has been modeled as ten cascaded stages, including: (i) conversion of x-ray quanta to light quanta; (ii) collection of light by a lens; (iii) detection of light quanta by a T.V. camera; (iv) the various blurring processes involved with each component of the imaging system; and, (v) addition of noise from the T.V. camera. The theoretical DQE obtained with the QAD analysis is in excellent agreement with the experimental DQE determined from previously published data. It is shown that the DQE is degraded at low spatial frequencies (< 0.25 cycles/mm) by quantum sinks both in the number of detected x rays and the number of detected optical quanta. At higher spatial frequencies, the optical quantum sink becomes the limiting factor in image quality. The secondary quantum sinks can be prevented, up to a spatial frequency of 0.5 cycles/mm, by increasing the overall system gain by a factor of 9 or more, or by improving the modulation transfer function (MTF) of components in the optical chain.

  18. A self-sufficient method for calibration of Varian electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baozhou; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Goddu, Sreekrishna M.; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is currently used for dosimetric verification of IMRT fields and linac quality assurance (QA). It is critical to understand the dosimetric response and perform an accurate and robust calibration of EPID. We present the implementation of an efficient method for the calibration and the validation of a Varian EPID, which relies only on data collected with that specific device. The calibration method is based on images obtained with five shifts of EPID panel. With this method, the relative gain (sensitivity) of each element of a detector matrix is calculated and applied on top of the calibration determined with the flood-field procedure. The calibration procedure was verified using a physical wedge inserted in the beam line and the corrected profile shows consistent results with the measurements using a calibrated 2D array. This method does not rely on the beam profile used in the flood-field calibration process, which allows EPID calibration in 10 minutes with no additional equipment compared to at least 2 hours to obtain beam profile and scanning beam equipment requirement with the conventional method.

  19. Portal vein territory identification using indocyanine green fluorescence imaging: Technical details and short-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuta; Kawaguchi, Yoshikuni; Kobayashi, Kosuke; Mori, Kazuhiro; Arita, Junichi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2017-07-10

    Portal vein (PV) territory identification during liver resection may be performed using indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence imaging technique. However, the technical details of the fluorescence staining technique have not been fully elucidated. This study was performed to demonstrate the technical details of PV territory identification using fluorescence imaging and evaluates the short-term outcomes. From 2011 to 2015, 105 underwent liver resection at the University of Tokyo Hospital with one of the following fluorescence staining techniques by transhepatic PV injection or intravenous injection of ICG: single staining (n = 36), multiple staining (n = 31), counterstaining (n = 22), negative staining (n = 13), or paradoxical negative staining (n = 3). The PV territory was identified as a region with fluorescence or a defect of fluorescence using one of the five staining techniques. ICG was administered by transhepatic PV injection in all but the negative staining technique, which employed intravenous injection. No adverse events associated with the ICG administration occurred. The mortality, postoperative total morbidity, and the major complication (Clavien-Dindo grade ≥III) rates were 0.0%, 14.3%, and 7.6%. We have demonstrated the technical details of five types of fluorescence staining techniques. These techniques are safe to perform and facilitate clear visualization of the PV territory in real time, enhancing the efficacy of anatomical removal of such territories. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Prepancreatic postduodenal portal vein: a rare vascular variant detected on imaging.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishal Kumar; Rajesh, S; Bhatnagar, Shorav; Dev, Ankur; Mukund, Amar; Arora, Ankur

    2013-09-01

    Anomalous preduodenal portal vein is a rare abdominal vascular variant; even rarer is the prepancreatic postduodenal position. We report an anomalous portal vein positioned in between duodenum and pancreatic head detected on contrast enhanced computed tomography. Awareness and accurate radiological interpretation of this unique and rare vascular pattern can prevent inadvertent injury during surgical and radiological interventions.

  1. Analysis of the kinestatic charge detection system as a high detective quantum efficiency electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sanjiv S; Gopal, Arun

    2006-09-01

    Megavoltage x-ray imaging suffers from reduced image quality due to low differential x-ray attenuation and large Compton scatter compared with kilovoltage imaging. Notwithstanding this, electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are now widely used in portal verification in radiotherapy as they offer significant advantages over film, including immediate digital imaging and superior contrast range. However video-camera-based EPIDs (VEPIDs) are limited by problems of low light collection efficiency and significant light scatter, leading to reduced contrast and spatial resolution. Indirect and direct detection-based flat-panel EPIDs have been developed to overcome these limitations. While flat-panel image quality has been reported to exceed that achieved with portal film, these systems have detective quantum efficiency (DQE) limited by the thin detection medium and are sensitive to radiation damage to peripheral read-out electronics. An alternative technology for high-quality portal imaging is presented here: kinesatic charge detection (KCD). The KCD is a scanning tri-electrode ion-chamber containing high-pressure noble gas (xenon at 100 atm) used in conjunction with a strip-collimated photon beam. The chamber is scanned across the patient, and an external electric field is used to regulate the cation drift velocity. By matching the scanning velocity with that of the cation (i.e., ion) drift velocity, the cations remain static in the object frame of reference, allowing temporal integration of the signal. The KCD offers several advantages as a portal imaging system. It has a thick detector geometry with an active detection depth of 6.1 cm, compared to the sub-millimeter thickness of the phosphor layer in conventional phosphor screens, leading to an order of magnitude advantage in quantum efficiency (>0.3). The unique principle of and the use of the scanning strip-collimated x-ray beam provide further integration of charges in time, reduced scatter, and a significantly

  2. Analysis of the kinestatic charge detection system as a high detective quantum efficiency electronic portal imaging device

    SciTech Connect

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Gopal, Arun

    2006-09-15

    Megavoltage x-ray imaging suffers from reduced image quality due to low differential x-ray attenuation and large Compton scatter compared with kilovoltage imaging. Notwithstanding this, electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are now widely used in portal verification in radiotherapy as they offer significant advantages over film, including immediate digital imaging and superior contrast range. However video-camera-based EPIDs (VEPIDs) are limited by problems of low light collection efficiency and significant light scatter, leading to reduced contrast and spatial resolution. Indirect and direct detection-based flat-panel EPIDs have been developed to overcome these limitations. While flat-panel image quality has been reported to exceed that achieved with portal film, these systems have detective quantum efficiency (DQE) limited by the thin detection medium and are sensitive to radiation damage to peripheral read-out electronics. An alternative technology for high-quality portal imaging is presented here: kinesatic charge detection (KCD). The KCD is a scanning tri-electrode ion-chamber containing high-pressure noble gas (xenon at 100 atm) used in conjunction with a strip-collimated photon beam. The chamber is scanned across the patient, and an external electric field is used to regulate the cation drift velocity. By matching the scanning velocity with that of the cation (i.e., ion) drift velocity, the cations remain static in the object frame of reference, allowing temporal integration of the signal. The KCD offers several advantages as a portal imaging system. It has a thick detector geometry with an active detection depth of 6.1 cm, compared to the sub-millimeter thickness of the phosphor layer in conventional phosphor screens, leading to an order of magnitude advantage in quantum efficiency (>0.3). The unique principle of kinestatis and the use of the scanning strip-collimated x-ray beam provide further integration of charges in time, reduced scatter, and a

  3. Total lymphoid irradiation in the Wistar rat: technique and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogenhout, J.; Kazem, I.; de Jong, J.

    1983-01-01

    The technical and dosimetric aspects of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) in the Wistar rat were evaluated as part of a set-up to develop a new model for tumor xenotransplantation. Information obtained from anatomical dissections, radionuclide imaging of the spleen, lymphography and chromolymphography was used to standardize the localization portals cut out in a lead plate. The two portals encompassed the lymphoid tissue above and below the diaphragm. A specially designed masonite phantom was used to measure the dose distribution in the simulated target volumes. Ionization chamber dosimetery, thermoluminescence dosimetry and film densitometry were used for measuring exposure and absorbed dose. Irradiation was performed with 250 kV X rays (HVL 3.1 mm Cu). The dose rate was regulated by adjusting the treatment distance. The dose inhomogeneity measured in the target volumes varied between 80-100%. The side scatter dose to non target tissues under the shielded area between the two portals ranged between 20-30%. The technique and dosimetry of total lymphoid irradiation in Wistar rats are now standardized and validated and pave the way for tumor xenotransplantation experiments.

  4. A two-dimensional matrix correction for off-axis portal dose prediction errors

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Daniel W.; Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Bakhtiari, Mohammad; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This study presents a follow-up to a modified calibration procedure for portal dosimetry published by Bailey et al. ['An effective correction algorithm for off-axis portal dosimetry errors,' Med. Phys. 36, 4089-4094 (2009)]. A commercial portal dose prediction system exhibits disagreement of up to 15% (calibrated units) between measured and predicted images as off-axis distance increases. The previous modified calibration procedure accounts for these off-axis effects in most regions of the detecting surface, but is limited by the simplistic assumption of radial symmetry. Methods: We find that a two-dimensional (2D) matrix correction, applied to each calibrated image, accounts for off-axis prediction errors in all regions of the detecting surface, including those still problematic after the radial correction is performed. The correction matrix is calculated by quantitative comparison of predicted and measured images that span the entire detecting surface. The correction matrix was verified for dose-linearity, and its effectiveness was verified on a number of test fields. The 2D correction was employed to retrospectively examine 22 off-axis, asymmetric electronic-compensation breast fields, five intensity-modulated brain fields (moderate-high modulation) manipulated for far off-axis delivery, and 29 intensity-modulated clinical fields of varying complexity in the central portion of the detecting surface. Results: Employing the matrix correction to the off-axis test fields and clinical fields, predicted vs measured portal dose agreement improves by up to 15%, producing up to 10% better agreement than the radial correction in some areas of the detecting surface. Gamma evaluation analyses (3 mm, 3% global, 10% dose threshold) of predicted vs measured portal dose images demonstrate pass rate improvement of up to 75% with the matrix correction, producing pass rates that are up to 30% higher than those resulting from the radial correction technique alone. As in

  5. An attenuation integral digital imaging technique for the treatment portal verification of conventional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Huaiqun

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To propose an attenuation integral digital imaging (AIDI) technique for the treatment portal verification of conventional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: In AIDI technique, an open in air fluence image I{sub o} and a patient fluence image I were acquired under the same exposure. Then after doing the dark field correction for both the I{sub o} and I, the AIDI image was simply calculated as log(I{sub o}/I), which is the attenuation integral along the ray path from the x-ray source to a detector pixel element. Theoretical analysis for the low contrast detection and the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of AIDI was presented and compared to those for the fluence imaging. With AIDI, the variation of x-ray fluence and the variation of individual detector pixel's response can be automatically compensated without using the flood field correction. Results: The AIDI image for a contrast detail phantom demonstrated that it can efficiently suppress the background structures such as the couch and generate better visibility for low contrast objects with megavoltage x rays. The AIDI image acquired for a Catphan 500 phantom using a 60 deg. electronic dynamic wedge field also revealed more contrast disks than the fluence imaging did. Finally, AIDI for an IMRT field of a head/neck patient successfully displayed the anatomical structures underneath the treatment portal but not shown in fluence imaging. Conclusions: For IMRT and high degree wedge beams, direct imaging using them is difficult because their photon fluence is highly nonuniform. But AIDI can be used for the treatment portal verification of these beams.

  6. Localization of linked {sup 125}I seeds in postimplant TRUS images for prostate brachytherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Jinyu . E-mail: Jinyu.Xue@mail.tju.edu; Waterman, Frank; Handler, Jay; Gressen, Eric

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that {sup 125}I seeds can be localized in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images obtained with a high-resolution probe when the implant is performed with linked seeds and spacers. Adequate seed localization is essential to the implementation of TRUS-based intraoperative dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirteen preplanned peripherally loaded prostate implants were performed using {sup 125}I seeds and spacers linked together in linear arrays that prevent seed migration and maintain precise seed spacing. A set of two-dimensional transverse images spaced at 0.50-cm intervals were obtained with a high-resolution TRUS probe at the conclusion of the procedure with the patient still under anesthesia. The image set extended from 1.0 cm superior to the base to 1.0 cm inferior to the apex. The visible echoes along each needle track were first localized and then compared with the known construction of the implanted array. The first step was to define the distal and proximal ends of each array. The visible echoes were then identified as seeds or spacers from the known sequence of the array. The locations of the seeds that did not produce a visible echo were interpolated from their known position in the array. A CT scan was obtained after implantation for comparison with the TRUS images. Results: On average, 93% (range, 86-99%) of the seeds were visible in the TRUS images. However, it was possible to localize 100% of the seeds in each case, because the locations of the missing seeds could be determined from the known construction of the arrays. Two factors complicated the interpretation of the TRUS images. One was that the spacers also produced echoes. Although weak and diffuse, these echoes could be mistaken for seeds. The other was that the number of echoes along a needle track sometimes exceeded the number of seeds and spacers implanted. This was attributed to the overall length of the array, which was approximately 0.5 cm

  7. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference newborn—internal electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pafundi, Deanna; Rajon, Didier; Jokisch, Derek; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of newborn skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida newborn hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 3309-33), the newborn skeletal tissue model of Pafundi et al (2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 4497-531) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow (surrogate tissue for hematopoietic stem cells), shallow marrow (surrogate tissue for osteoprogenitor cells) and unossified cartilage (surrogate tissue for chondrocytes). Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following source tissues: active marrow, trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), cortical bone (surfaces and volumes) and cartilage. Transport results are reported as specific absorbed fractions according to the MIRD schema and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with bone-specific values reported in both tabular and graphic format as electronic annexes (supplementary data). The method utilized in this work uniquely includes (1) explicit accounting for the finite size and shape of newborn ossification centers (spongiosa regions), (2) explicit accounting for active and shallow marrow dose from electron emissions in cortical bone as well as sites of unossified cartilage, (3) proper accounting of the distribution of trabecular and cortical volumes and surfaces in the newborn skeleton when considering mineral bone sources and (4) explicit consideration of the marrow cellularity changes for active marrow self-irradiation as applicable to radionuclide therapy of diseased marrow in the newborn child.

  8. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference newborn--internal electron sources.

    PubMed

    Pafundi, Deanna; Rajon, Didier; Jokisch, Derek; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley

    2010-04-07

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of newborn skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida newborn hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 3309-33), the newborn skeletal tissue model of Pafundi et al (2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 4497-531) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow (surrogate tissue for hematopoietic stem cells), shallow marrow (surrogate tissue for osteoprogenitor cells) and unossified cartilage (surrogate tissue for chondrocytes). Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following source tissues: active marrow, trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), cortical bone (surfaces and volumes) and cartilage. Transport results are reported as specific absorbed fractions according to the MIRD schema and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with bone-specific values reported in both tabular and graphic format as electronic annexes (supplementary data). The method utilized in this work uniquely includes (1) explicit accounting for the finite size and shape of newborn ossification centers (spongiosa regions), (2) explicit accounting for active and shallow marrow dose from electron emissions in cortical bone as well as sites of unossified cartilage, (3) proper accounting of the distribution of trabecular and cortical volumes and surfaces in the newborn skeleton when considering mineral bone sources and (4) explicit consideration of the marrow cellularity changes for active marrow self-irradiation as applicable to radionuclide therapy of diseased marrow in the newborn child.

  9. Tracking lung tumour motion using a dynamically weighted optical flow algorithm and electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, P. T.; Crow, R.; Van Nest, S.; Sasaki, D.; Pistorius, S.

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility and accuracy of using a computer vision algorithm and electronic portal images to track the motion of a tumour-like target from a breathing phantom. A multi-resolution optical flow algorithm that incorporates weighting based on the differences between frames was used to obtain a set of vectors corresponding to the motion between two frames. A global value representing the average motion was obtained by computing the average weighted mean from the set of vectors. The tracking accuracy of the optical flow algorithm as a function of the breathing rate and target visibility was investigated. Synthetic images with different contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were created, and motions were tracked. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm was compared against potentiometer measurements giving average position errors of 0.6 ± 0.2 mm, 0.2 ± 0.2 mm and 0.1 ± 0.1 mm with average velocity errors of 0.2 ± 0.2 mm s-1, 0.4 ± 0.3 mm s-1 and 0.6 ± 0.5 mm s-1 for 6, 12 and 16 breaths min-1 motions, respectively. The cumulative average position error reduces more rapidly with the greater number of breathing cycles present in higher breathing rates. As the CNR increases from 4.27 to 5.6, the average relative error approaches zero and the errors are less dependent on the velocity. When tracking a tumour on a patient's digitally reconstructed radiograph images, a high correlation was obtained between the dynamically weighted optical flow algorithm, a manual delineation process and a centroid tracking algorithm. While the accuracy of our approach is similar to that of other methods, the benefits are that it does not require manual delineation of the target and can therefore provide accurate real-time motion estimation during treatment.

  10. Comparison between X-rays spectra and their effective energies in small animal CT tomographic imaging and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Mahdjoub; Mimi, Malika; Bentourkia, M'hamed

    2017-03-01

    Small animal CT imaging and dosimetry usually rely on X-ray radiation produced by X-ray tubes. These X-rays typically cover a large energy range. In this study, we compared poly-energetic X-ray spectra against estimated equivalent (effective) mono-energetic beams with the same number of simulated photons for small animal CT imaging and dosimetry applications. Two poly-energetic X-ray spectra were generated from a tungsten anode at 50 and 120 kVp. The corresponding effective mono-energetic beams were established as 36 keV for the 50 kVp spectrum and 49.5 keV for the 120 kVp spectrum. To assess imaging applications, we investigated the spatial resolution by a tungsten wire, and the contrast-to-noise ratio in a reference phantom and in a realistic mouse phantom. For dosimetry investigation, we calculated the absorbed dose in a segmented digital mouse atlas in the skin, fat, heart and bone tissues. Differences of 2.1 and 2.6% in spatial resolution were respectively obtained between the 50 and 120 kVp poly-energetic spectra and their respective 36 and 49.5 keV mono-energetic beams. The differences in contrast-to-noise ratio between the poly-energetic 50 kVp spectrum and its corresponding mono-energetic 36 keV beam for air, fat, brain and bone were respectively -2.9, -0.2, 11.2 and -4.8%, and similarly between the 120 kVp and its effective energy 49.5 keV: -11.3, -20.2, -4.2 and -13.5%. Concerning the absorbed dose, for the lower X-ray beam energies, 50 kVp against 36 keV, the poly-energetic radiation doses were higher than the mono-energetic doses. Instead, for the higher X-ray beam energies, 120 kVp and 49.5 keV, the absorbed dose to the bones and lungs were higher for the mono-energetic 49.5 keV. The intensity and energy of the X-ray beam spectrum have an impact on both imaging and dosimetry in small animal studies. Simulations with mono-energetic beams should take into account these differences in order to study biological effects or to be compared to

  11. Preclinical acute toxicity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry and microPET imaging studies of [(18)F]fluorocholine in mice.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Marina B; Ferreira, Soraya M Z M D; Nascimento, Leonardo T C; Costa, Flávia M; Mendes, Bruno M; Ferreira, Andrea V; Malamut, Carlos; Silva, Juliana B; Mamede, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    [(18)F]Fluorocholine ([(18)F]FCH) has been proven to be effective in prostate cancer. Since [(18)F]FCH is classified as a new radiopharmaceutical in Brazil, preclinical safety and efficacy data are required to support clinical trials and to obtain its approval. The aim of this work was to perform acute toxicity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry and microPET imaging studies of [(18)F]FCH. The results could support its use in nuclear medicine as an important piece of work for regulatory in Brazil.

  12. SU-E-J-237: Image Feature Based DRR and Portal Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X; Chang, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Two-dimensional (2D) matching of the kV X-ray and digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) images is an important setup technique for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). In our clinics, mutual information based methods are used for this purpose on commercial linear accelerators, but with often needs for manual corrections. This work proved the feasibility that feature based image transform can be used to register kV and DRR images. Methods: The scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) method was implemented to detect the matching image details (or key points) between the kV and DRR images. These key points represent high image intensity gradients, and thus the scale invariant features. Due to the poor image contrast from our kV image, direct application of the SIFT method yielded many detection errors. To assist the finding of key points, the center coordinates of the kV and DRR images were read from the DICOM header, and the two groups of key points with similar relative positions to their corresponding centers were paired up. Using these points, a rigid transform (with scaling, horizontal and vertical shifts) was estimated. We also artificially introduced vertical and horizontal shifts to test the accuracy of our registration method on anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral pelvic images. Results: The results provided a satisfactory overlay of the transformed kV onto the DRR image. The introduced vs. detected shifts were fit into a linear regression. In the AP image experiments, linear regression analysis showed a slope of 1.15 and 0.98 with an R2 of 0.89 and 0.99 for the horizontal and vertical shifts, respectively. The results are 1.2 and 1.3 with R2 of 0.72 and 0.82 for the lateral image shifts. Conclusion: This work provided an alternative technique for kV to DRR alignment. Further improvements in the estimation accuracy and image contrast tolerance are underway.

  13. Dosimetry of an iodine-123-labeled tropane to image dopamine transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Mozley, P.D.; Stubbs, J.B.; Kim, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}(4-chlorophenyl)tropane (IPT) is an analog of cocaine that selectively binds the presynaptic dopamine transporter. The present study sought to measure the radiation dosimetry of IPT in seven healthy human volunteers. Dynamic renal scans were acquired immediately after the intravenous administration of 165 {+-} 16 MBq (4.45 {+-} 0.42 mCi) of [{sup 123}I]IPT. Between 7 and 12 sets of whole-body scans were acquired over the next 24 hr. The 24-hr renal excretion fractions were measured from conjugate emission scans of 7-11 discreet voided urine specimens. The fraction of the administered dose in 11 organs and each urine specimen was quantified from the attenuation-corrected geometric mean counts in opposing views. Subject-specific residence times were evaluated for each subject independently by fitting the time-activity curves to a multicompartmental model. The radiation doses were estimated with the MIRD technique from the residence times for each subject individually before any results were averaged. The findings showed that IPT was excreted rapidly by the renal system. There were no reservoirs of retained activity outside the basal ganglia, where SPECT images in these subjects showed that the mean ratio of caudate to calcarine cortex averaged 25:1 at 3 hr after injection (range 19.6-32 hr). The basal ganglia received a radiation dose of 0.028 mGy/MBq (0.10 rad/mCi). The dose-limiting organ in men was the stomach, which received an estimated 0.11 mGy/MBq (0.37 rad/mCi). In women, the critical organ was the urinary bladder at 0.14 mGy/MBq (0.51 rad/mCi). Relatively high-contrast images of the presynaptic dopamine transporters in the basal ganglia can be acquired with 185 MBq (5 mCi) of [{sup 123}I]IPT. The radiation exposure that results is significantly less than the maximum allowed by current safety guidelines for research volunteers. 33 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Use of a line-pair resolution phantom for comprehensive quality assurance of electronic portal imaging devices based on fundamental imaging metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Arun; Samant, Sanjiv S.

    2009-06-15

    Image guided radiation therapy solutions based on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) involve the extension of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) from their traditional role of weekly localization imaging and planar dose mapping to volumetric imaging for 3D setup and dose verification. To sustain the potential advantages of MVCT, EPIDs are required to provide improved levels of portal image quality. Therefore, it is vital that the performance of EPIDs in clinical use is maintained at an optimal level through regular and rigorous quality assurance (QA). Traditionally, portal imaging QA has been carried out by imaging calibrated line-pair and contrast resolution phantoms and obtaining arbitrarily defined QA indices that are usually dependent on imaging conditions and merely indicate relative trends in imaging performance. They are not adequately sensitive to all aspects of image quality unlike fundamental imaging metrics such as the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) that are widely used to characterize detector performance in radiographic imaging and would be ideal for QA purposes. However, due to the difficulty of performing conventional MTF measurements, they have not been used for routine clinical QA. The authors present a simple and quick QA methodology based on obtaining the MTF, NPS, and DQE of a megavoltage imager by imaging standard open fields and a bar-pattern QA phantom containing 2 mm thick tungsten line-pair bar resolution targets. Our bar-pattern based MTF measurement features a novel zero-frequency normalization scheme that eliminates normalization errors typically associated with traditional bar-pattern measurements at megavoltage x-ray energies. The bar-pattern QA phantom and open-field images are used in conjunction with an automated image analysis algorithm that quickly computes the MTF, NPS, and DQE of an EPID system. Our approach combines the fundamental advantages of

  15. Reconstruction of four-dimensional computed tomography images during treatment time using electronic portal imaging device images based on a dynamic 2D/3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, T.; Arimura, H.; Hirose, T. A.; Ohga, S.; Umezu, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Honda, H.; Sasaki, T.

    2017-03-01

    The goal of our study was to develop a computational framework for reconstruction of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) images during treatment time using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images based on a dynamic 2D/3D registration. The 4D-CT images during treatment time ("treatment" 4D-CT images) were reconstructed by performing an affine transformation-based dynamic 2D/3D registration between dynamic clinical portal dose images (PDIs) derived from the EPID images with planning CT images through planning PDIs for all frames. Elements of the affine transformation matrices (transformation parameters) were optimized using a Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm so that the planning PDIs could be similar to the dynamic clinical PDIs for all frames. Initial transformation parameters in each frame should be determined for finding optimum transformation parameters in the LM algorithm. In this study, the optimum transformation parameters in a frame employed as the initial transformation parameters for optimizing the transformation parameter in the consecutive frame. Gamma pass rates (3 mm/3%) were calculated for evaluating a similarity of the dose distributions between the dynamic clinical PDIs and "treatment" PDIs, which were calculated from "treatment" 4D-CT images, for all frames. The framework was applied to eight lung cancer patients who were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A mean of the average gamma pass rates between the dynamic clinical PDIs and the "treatment" PDIs for all frames was 98.3+/-1.2% for eight cases. In conclusion, the proposed framework makes it possible to dynamically monitor patients' movement during treatment time.

  16. SU-D-BRF-07: Ultrasound and Fluoroscopy Based Intraoperative Image-Guidance System for Dynamic Dosimetry in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, N; Le, Y; Deguet, A; Prince, J; Song, D; Lee, J; Dehghan, E; Burdette, E; Fichtinger, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy is a common treatment method for low-risk prostate cancer patients. Intraoperative treatment planning is known to improve the treatment procedure and the outcome. The current limitation of intraoperative treatment planning is the inability to localize the seeds in relation to the prostate. We developed an image-guidance system to fulfill this need to achieve intraoperative dynamic dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Our system is based on standard imaging equipments available in the operating room, including the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and the mobile C-arm. A simple fiducial is added to compute the C-arm pose. Three fluoroscopic images and an ultrasound volume of the seeds and the prostate are acquired and processed by four image processing algorithms: seed segmentation, fiducial detection with pose estimation, seed reconstruction, and seeds-to-TRUS registration. The updated seed positions allow the physician to assess the quality of implantation and dynamically adjust the treatment plan during the course of surgery to achieve improved exit dosimetry. Results: The system was tested on 10 phantoms and 37 patients. Seed segmentation resulted in a 1% false negative and 2% false positive rates. Fiducial detection with pose estimation resulted in a detection rate of 98%. Seed reconstruction had a mean reconstruction error of 0.4 mm. Seeds-to-TRUS registration had a mean registration error of 1.3 mm. The total processing time from image acquisition to registration was approximately 1 minute. Conclusion: We present an image-guidance system for intraoperative dynamic dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Using standard imaging equipments and a simple fiducial, our system can be easily adopted in any clinics. Robust image processing algorithms enable accurate and fast computation of the delivered dose. Especially, the system enables detection of possible hot/cold spots during the surgery, allowing the physician to address these

  17. Can dual-energy computed tomography improve visualization of hypoenhancing liver lesions in portal venous phase? Assessment of advanced image-based virtual monoenergetic images.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Damiano; De Cecco, Carlo N; Schoepf, U Joseph; Schaefer, Amanda R; Leland, Parker W; Johnson, Dustin; Laghi, Andrea; Hardie, Andrew D

    The purpose was to assess image quality of portal-venous phase dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) for liver lesions. We performed 120-kVp-equivalent linear-blended (LB) and monoenergetic reconstructions from 40 to 190 keV by standard (VMI) and advanced virtual monoenergetic (VMI+) methods. Diagnostic performance, and quantitative and qualitative image analyses were assessed and compared. Liver contrast to noise ratio peaked at 40 keV_VMI+, while image quality and reader preference peaked at 50 keV_VMI+. 50 keV_VMI+ scored overall higher diagnostic performance: lesion sensitivity 95.4% vs. 83.3% for both 75 keV_VMI and LB. DECT improves assessment of hypoenhancing liver lesions on portal venous phase. 50 keV_VMI+ demonstrated the highest image quality and diagnostic performance over VMI and LB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A study of Winston-Lutz test on two different electronic portal imaging devices and with low energy imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Paul B

    2016-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery requires sub-millimetre accuracy in patient positioning and target localization. Therefore, verification of the linear accelerator (linac) isocentre and the laser alignment to the isocentre is performed in some clinics prior to the treatment using the Winston-Lutz (W-L) test with films and more recently with images obtained using the electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). The W-L test is performed by acquiring EPID images of a radio-opaque ball of 6 mm diameter (the W-L phantom) placed at the isocentre of the linac at various gantry and table angles, with a predefined small square or circular radiation beam. In this study, the W-L test was performed on two linacs having EPIDs of different size and resolution, viz, a TrueBeam™ linac with aS1000 EPID of size 40 × 30 cm(2) with 1024 × 768 pixel resolution and an EDGE™ linac having an EPID of size 43 × 43 cm(2) with pixel resolution of 1280 × 1280. In order to determine the displacement of the radio-opaque ball centre from the radiation beam centre of the W-L test, an in-house MATLAB™ image processing code was developed using morphological operations. The displacement in radiation beam centre at each gantry and couch position was obtained by determining the distance between the radiation field centre and the radio-opaque ball centre for every image. Since the MATLAB code was based on image processing that was dependent on the image contrast and resolution, the W-L test was also compared for images obtained with different beam energies. The W-L tests were performed for 6 and 8 MV beams on the TrueBeam™ linac and for 2.5 and 6 MV beams on the EDGE™ linac with a higher resolution EPID. It was observed that the images obtained with the EPID of higher resolution resulted in same accuracy in the determination of the displacement between the centres of the radio-opaque ball and the radiation beam, and significant difference was not observed with images acquired with

  19. Verifying 4D gated radiotherapy using time-integrated electronic portal imaging: a phantom and clinical study

    PubMed Central

    van Sörnsen de Koste, John R; Cuijpers, Johan P; de Geest, Frank GM; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Slotman, Ben J; Senan, Suresh

    2007-01-01

    Background Respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT) can decrease treatment toxicity by allowing for smaller treatment volumes for mobile tumors. RGRT is commonly performed using external surrogates of tumor motion. We describe the use of time-integrated electronic portal imaging (TI-EPI) to verify the position of internal structures during RGRT delivery Methods TI-EPI portals were generated by continuously collecting exit dose data (aSi500 EPID, Portal vision, Varian Medical Systems) when a respiratory motion phantom was irradiated during expiration, inspiration and free breathing phases. RGRT was delivered using the Varian RPM system, and grey value profile plots over a fixed trajectory were used to study object positions. Time-related positional information was derived by subtracting grey values from TI-EPI portals sharing the pixel matrix. TI-EPI portals were also collected in 2 patients undergoing RPM-triggered RGRT for a lung and hepatic tumor (with fiducial markers), and corresponding planning 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) scans were analyzed for motion amplitude. Results Integral grey values of phantom TI-EPI portals correlated well with mean object position in all respiratory phases. Cranio-caudal motion of internal structures ranged from 17.5–20.0 mm on planning 4DCT scans. TI-EPI of bronchial images reproduced with a mean value of 5.3 mm (1 SD 3.0 mm) located cranial to planned position. Mean hepatic fiducial markers reproduced with 3.2 mm (SD 2.2 mm) caudal to planned position. After bony alignment to exclude set-up errors, mean displacement in the two structures was 2.8 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively, and corresponding reproducibility in anatomy improved to 1.6 mm (1 SD). Conclusion TI-EPI appears to be a promising method for verifying delivery of RGRT. The RPM system was a good indirect surrogate of internal anatomy, but use of TI-EPI allowed for a direct link between anatomy and breathing patterns. PMID:17760960

  20. The importance of 3D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been getting progressively more complex for the past 20 years. Early radiation therapy techniques needed only basic dosimetry equipment; motorized water phantoms, ionization chambers, and basic radiographic film techniques. As intensity modulated radiation therapy and image guided therapy came into widespread practice, medical physicists were challenged with developing effective and efficient dose measurement techniques. The complex 3-dimensional (3D) nature of the dose distributions that were being delivered demanded the development of more quantitative and more thorough methods for dose measurement. The quality assurance vendors developed a wide array of multidetector arrays that have been enormously useful for measuring and characterizing dose distributions, and these have been made especially useful with the advent of 3D dose calculation systems based on the array measurements, as well as measurements made using film and portal imagers. Other vendors have been providing 3D calculations based on data from the linear accelerator or the record and verify system, providing thorough evaluation of the dose but lacking quality assurance (QA) of the dose delivery process, including machine calibration. The current state of 3D dosimetry is one of a state of flux. The vendors and professional associations are trying to determine the optimal balance between thorough QA, labor efficiency, and quantitation. This balance will take some time to reach, but a necessary component will be the 3D measurement and independent calculation of delivered radiation therapy dose distributions.

  1. Biodistribution and Radiation Dosimetry for a Probe Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Ken; Bluemel, Christina; Weineisen, Martina; Schottelius, Margret; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Czernin, Johannes; Eberlein, Uta; Beykan, Seval; Lapa, Constantin; Riedmiller, Hubertus; Krebs, Markus; Kropf, Saskia; Schirbel, Andreas; Buck, Andreas K.; Lassmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising target for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. EuK-Subkff-68Ga-DOTAGA (68Ga-PSMA Imaging & Therapy [PSMA I&T]) is a recently introduced PET tracer for imaging PSMA expression in vivo. Whole-body distribution and radiation dosimetry of this new probe were evaluated. Methods Five patients with a history of prostate cancer were injected intravenously with 91–148 MBq of 68Ga-PSMA I&T (mean ± SD, 128 ± 23 MBq). After an initial series of rapid whole-body scans, 3 static whole-body scans were acquired at 1, 2, and 4 h after tracer injection. Time-dependent changes of the injected activity per organ were determined. Mean organ-absorbed doses and effective doses were calculated using OLINDA/EXM. Results Injection of 150 MBq of 68Ga-PSMA I&T resulted in an effective dose of 3.0 mSv. The kidneys were the critical organ (33 mGy), followed by the urinary bladder wall and spleen (10 mGy each), salivary glands (9 mGy each), and liver (7 mGy). Conclusion 68Ga-PSMA I&T exhibits a favorable dosimetry, delivering organ doses that are comparable to (kidneys) or lower than those delivered by 18F-FDG. PMID:25883128

  2. Whole organ and islet of Langerhans dosimetry for calculation of absorbed doses resulting from imaging with radiolabeled exendin

    PubMed Central

    van der Kroon, Inge; Woliner-van der Weg, Wietske; Brom, Maarten; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Konijnenberg, Mark W.; Visser, Eric P.; Gotthardt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Radiolabeled exendin is used for non-invasive quantification of beta cells in the islets of Langerhans in vivo. High accumulation of radiolabeled exendin in the islets raised concerns about possible radiation-induced damage to these islets in man. In this work, islet absorbed doses resulting from exendin-imaging were calculated by combining whole organ dosimetry with small scale dosimetry for the islets. Our model contains the tissues with high accumulation of radiolabeled exendin: kidneys, pancreas and islets. As input for the model, data from a clinical study (radiolabeled exendin distribution in the human body) and from a preclinical study with Biobreeding Diabetes Prone (BBDP) rats (islet-to-exocrine uptake ratio, beta cell mass) were used. We simulated 111In-exendin and 68Ga-exendin absorbed doses in patients with differences in gender, islet size, beta cell mass and radiopharmaceutical uptake in the kidneys. In all simulated cases the islet absorbed dose was small, maximum 1.38 mGy for 68Ga and 66.0 mGy for 111In. The two sources mainly contributing to the islet absorbed dose are the kidneys (33–61%) and the islet self-dose (7.5–57%). In conclusion, all islet absorbed doses are low (<70 mGy), so even repeated imaging will hardly increase the risk on diabetes. PMID:28067253

  3. The use of high field strength and parallel imaging techniques for MRI-based gel dosimetry in stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seimenis, I.; Moutsatsos, A.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Kantemiris, I.; Benekos, O.; Efstathopoulos, E.; Papagiannis, P.; Spevacek, V.; Semnicka, J.; Dvorak, P.

    2009-07-01

    The poor clinical acceptance of polymer gel dosimetry for dose verification in stereotactic radio-surgery applications stems, inter alia, from the increased MRI acquisition times needed to meet the associated spatial resolution demands. To examine whether this could be partly alleviated by the employment of 3 Tesla imagers and parallel imaging techniques, a PolyAcrylamide Gel filled tube was irradiated in a Leksell Gamma Knife unit with two single irradiation shots (4 mm and 8 mm) and underwent four different scanning sessions using an optimised, volume selective, 32 echo CPMG pulse sequence: One performed on a 1.5 T imager with 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 in-plane spatial resolution and 0.75 mm slice thickness (scan A), while the rest three on a 3.0 T imager; one with the same spatial resolution as in scan A (scan B) and two with finer in-plane resolution (scans C and D). In scans B and C the sensitivity encoding (SENSE) parallel imaging technique was employed. Relative dose distributions derived by scan A were benchmarked against Monte Carlo and treatment planning system calculations, and then used as the reference for the comparison of 2D relative dose distributions derived by each scan in terms of dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria (γ index tool). Findings suggest that careful MRI planning based on a figure of merit accounting for scanning time and precision for a given increase in spatial resolution, could facilitate the introduction of polymer gel dosimetry into the clinical setting as a practical quality assurance tool for complex radio-surgery techniques.

  4. Four-dimensional dose reconstruction through in vivo phase matching of cine images of electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Jong Oh; Yi, Byong Yong; Yeo, Inhwan

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using phase matching of measured cine images to precalculated images of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). (1) A phantom, designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with a 3 cm diameter embedded in cork), was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with an amplitude of 1 cm and a period of 4 s. Ten-phase 4D computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired. A planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a margin of 1 cm around the internal target volume of the tumor. (2) Three beams were designed, which included a static beam, a theoretical dynamic beam, and a planning-optimized dynamic beam (PODB). While the theoretical beam was made by manually programming a simplistic sliding leaf motion, the planning-optimized beam was obtained from treatment planning. From the three beams, three-dimensional (3D) doses on the phantom were calculated; 4D dose was calculated by means of the ten phase images (integrated over phases afterward); serving as "reference" images, phase-specific EPID dose images under the lung phantom were also calculated for each of the ten phases. (3) Cine EPID images were acquired while the beams were irradiated to the moving phantom. (4) Each cine image was phase-matched to a phase-specific CT image at which common irradiation occurred by intercomparing the cine image with the reference images. (5) Each cine image was used to reconstruct dose in the phase-matched CT image, and the reconstructed doses were summed over all phases. (6) The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Accounting for realistic situations, intratreatment breathing irregularity was simulated by assuming an amplitude of 0.5 cm for the phantom during a portion of breathing trace in which the phase matching could not be performed. Intertreatment breathing irregularity between the time of treatment and the time of planning CT was

  5. 3D dosimetry estimation for selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using SPECT/CT images: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debebe, Senait A.; Franquiz, Juan; McGoron, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a common way to treat liver cancer that cannot be treated surgically. SIRT involves administration of Yttrium - 90 (90Y) microspheres via the hepatic artery after a diagnostic procedure using 99mTechnetium (Tc)-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) to detect extrahepatic shunting to the lung or the gastrointestinal tract. Accurate quantification of radionuclide administered to patients and radiation dose absorbed by different organs is of importance in SIRT. Accurate dosimetry for SIRT allows optimization of dose delivery to the target tumor and may allow for the ability to assess the efficacy of the treatment. In this study, we proposed a method that can efficiently estimate radiation absorbed dose from 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT images of liver and the surrounding organs. Bremsstrahlung radiation from 90Y was simulated using the Compton window of 99mTc (78keV at 57%). 99mTc images acquired at the photopeak energy window were used as a standard to examine the accuracy of dosimetry prediction by the simulated bremsstrahlung images. A Liqui-Phil abdominal phantom with liver, stomach and two tumor inserts was imaged using a Philips SPECT/CT scanner. The Dose Point Kernel convolution method was used to find the radiation absorbed dose at a voxel level for a three dimensional dose distribution. This method will allow for a complete estimate of the distribution of radiation absorbed dose by tumors, liver, stomach and other surrounding organs at the voxel level. The method provides a quantitative predictive method for SIRT treatment outcome and administered dose response for patients who undergo the treatment.

  6. Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand; Ranouil, Julien; Morgand, Loïc; Raguin, Olivier; Walker, Paul; Brunotte, François

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 ± 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 ± 2.1 and 110.7 ± 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 ± 4.6 and 203.6 ± 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse

  7. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Thierry; Soltys, Remigiusz; Loarte, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is the blockage or narrowing of the portal vein by a thrombus. It is relatively rare and has been linked with the presence of an underlying liver disease or prothrombotic disorders. We present a case of a young male who presented with vague abdominal symptoms for approximately one week. Imaging revealed the presence of multiple nonocclusive thrombi involving the right portal vein, the splenic vein, and the left renal vein, as well as complete occlusion of the left portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein. We discuss pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of both acute and chronic thrombosis. The presence of PVT should be considered as a clue for prothrombotic disorders, liver disease, and other local and general factors that must be carefully investigated. It is hoped that this case report will help increase awareness of the complexity associated with portal vein thrombosis among the medical community. PMID:25802795

  8. Computerized estimation of patient setup errors in portal images based on localized pelvic templates for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Itano, Wataru; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Matsushita, Norimasa; Magome, Taiki; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Anai, Shigeo; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Yamagami, Akihiko; Honda, Hiroshi; Ohki, Masafumi; Toyofuku, Fukai; Hirata, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a computerized method for estimating patient setup errors in portal images based on localized pelvic templates for prostate cancer radiotherapy. The patient setup errors were estimated based on a template-matching technique that compared the portal image and a localized pelvic template image with a clinical target volume produced from a digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) image of each patient. We evaluated the proposed method by calculating the residual error between the patient setup error obtained by the proposed method and the gold standard setup error determined by consensus between two radiation oncologists. Eleven training cases with prostate cancer were used for development of the proposed method, and then we applied the method to 10 test cases as a validation test. As a result, the residual errors in the anterior–posterior, superior–inferior and left–right directions were smaller than 2 mm for the validation test. The mean residual error was 2.65 ± 1.21 mm in the Euclidean distance for training cases, and 3.10 ± 1.49 mm for the validation test. There was no statistically significant difference in the residual error between the test for training cases and the validation test (P = 0.438). The proposed method appears to be robust for detecting patient setup error in the treatment of prostate cancer radiotherapy. PMID:22843375

  9. Computational dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  10. Poster - Thur Eve - 18: Characterization of a camera and LED lightbox imaging system for radiochromic film dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Alexander, K; Percy, E; Olding, T; Schreiner, L J; Salomons, G

    2012-07-01

    Radiation therapy treatment modalities continue to develop and have become increasingly complex. With this, dose verification and quality assurance (QA) is of great importance to ensure that a prescribed dose is accurately and precisely delivered to a patient. Radiochromic film dosimetry has been adopted as a convenient option for QA, because it is relatively energy independent, is near tissue equivalent, and has high spatial resolution. Unfortunately, it is not always easy to use. In this study, preliminary work towards developing a novel method of imaging radiochromic film is presented. The setup consists of a camera mounted vertically above a lightbox containing red LEDs, interfaced with computer image acquisition software. Imaging results from this system will be compared with imaging performed using an Epson Expression 10000XL scanner (a device in common clinical use). The lightbox imaging technique with camera readout is much faster relative to a flatbed scanner. The film measurements made using the camera are independent of film orientation, and show reduced artifacts, so that there are fewer corrections required compared to the use of flatbed scanners. Optical scatter also appears to be less of an issue with this design than with the flat bed scanner. While further work needs to be done to optimize the lightbox imaging system, the lightbox system shows great promise for a rapid, simple, and orientation independent setup, improving on existing film scanning systems. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Feasibility study on dosimetry verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy-based total marrow irradiation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yun; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Pawlicki, Todd; Mundt, Arno J; Mell, Loren K

    2013-03-04

    The purpose of this study was to develop dosimetry verification procedures for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based total marrow irradiation (TMI). The VMAT based TMI plans were generated for three patients: one child and two adults. The planning target volume (PTV) was defined as bony skeleton, from head to mid-femur, with a 3 mm margin. The plan strategy similar to published studies was adopted. The PTV was divided into head and neck, chest, and pelvic regions, with separate plans each of which is composed of 2-3 arcs/fields. Multiple isocenters were evenly distributed along the patient's axial direction. The focus of this study is to establish a dosimetry quality assurance procedure involving both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric verifications, which is desirable for a large PTV treated with multiple isocenters. The 2D dose verification was performed with film for gamma evaluation and absolute point dose was measured with ion chamber, with attention to the junction between neighboring plans regarding hot/cold spots. The 3D volumetric dose verification used commercial dose reconstruction software to reconstruct dose from electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) images. The gamma evaluation criteria in both 2D and 3D verification were 5% absolute point dose difference and 3 mm of distance to agreement. With film dosimetry, the overall average gamma passing rate was 98.2% and absolute dose difference was 3.9% in junction areas among the test patients; with volumetric portal dosimetry, the corresponding numbers were 90.7% and 2.4%. A dosimetry verification procedure involving both 2D and 3D was developed for VMAT-based TMI. The initial results are encouraging and warrant further investigation in clinical trials.

  12. The Effect of E-Portal System on Corporate Image of Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunji, Oyedepo; Nelson, Okorie

    2011-01-01

    Internet connectivity in tertiary institutions in Africa has been summarized in three characteristics-- too little, too expensive and poorly managed (African Tertiary Institutions Connectivity Survey (ATICS), 2006 report). The Internet portal system offers educational organizations the ability to track students needs and promote their programs and…

  13. Dosimetry tools and techniques for IMRT.

    PubMed

    Low, Daniel A; Moran, Jean M; Dempsey, James F; Dong, Lei; Oldham, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) poses a number of challenges for properly measuring commissioning data and quality assurance (QA) radiation dose distributions. This report provides a comprehensive overview of how dosimeters, phantoms, and dose distribution analysis techniques should be used to support the commissioning and quality assurance requirements of an IMRT program. The proper applications of each dosimeter are described along with the limitations of each system. Point detectors, arrays, film, and electronic portal imagers are discussed with respect to their proper use, along with potential applications of 3D dosimetry. Regardless of the IMRT technique utilized, some situations require the use of multiple detectors for the acquisition of accurate commissioning data. The overall goal of this task group report is to provide a document that aids the physicist in the proper selection and use of the dosimetry tools available for IMRT QA and to provide a resource for physicists that describes dosimetry measurement techniques for purposes of IMRT commissioning and measurement-based characterization or verification of IMRT treatment plans. This report is not intended to provide a comprehensive review of commissioning and QA procedures for IMRT. Instead, this report focuses on the aspects of metrology, particularly the practical aspects of measurements that are unique to IMRT. The metrology of IMRT concerns the application of measurement instruments and their suitability, calibration, and quality control of measurements. Each of the dosimetry measurement tools has limitations that need to be considered when incorporating them into a commissioning process or a comprehensive QA program. For example, routine quality assurance procedures require the use of robust field dosimetry systems. These often exhibit limitations with respect to spatial resolution or energy response and need to themselves be commissioned against more established dosimeters. A chain of

  14. Patient-specific dosimetry based on quantitative SPECT imaging and 3D-DFT convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Hawkins, W.G.; Eckblade, M.B.; Leichner, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the use of a 3-D discrete Fourier Transform (3D-DFT) convolution method to carry out the dosimetry for I-131 for soft tissues in radioimmunotherapy procedures. To validate this convolution method, mathematical and physical phantoms were used as a basis of comparison with Monte Carlo transport (MCT) calculations which were carried out using the EGS4 system code. The mathematical phantom consisted of a sphere containing uniform and nonuniform activity distributions. The physical phantom consisted of a cylinder containing uniform and nonuniform activity distributions. Quantitative SPECT reconstruction was carried out using the Circular Harmonic Transform (CHT) algorithm.

  15. Bone marrow dosimetry via microCT imaging and stem cell spatial mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielar, Kayla N.

    In order to make predictions of radiation dose in patients undergoing targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer, an accurate model of skeletal tissues is necessary. Concerning these tissues, the dose-limiting factor in these therapies is the toxicity of the hematopoietically active bone marrow. In addition to acute effects, one must be concerned as well with long-term stochastic effects such as radiation-induced leukemia. Particular cells of interest for both toxicity and cancer risk are the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), found within the active marrow regions of the skeleton. At present, cellular-level dosimetry models are complex, and thus we cannot model individual stem cells in an anatomic model of the patient. As a result, one reverts to looking at larger tissue regions where these cell populations may reside. To provide a more accurate marrow dose assessment, the skeletal dosimetry model must also be patient-specific. That is, it should be designed to match as closely as possible to the patient undergoing treatment. Absorbed dose estimates then can be tailored based on the skeletal size and trabecular microstructure of an individual for an accurate prediction of marrow toxicity. Thus, not only is it important to accurately model the target tissues of interest in a normal patient, it is important to do so for differing levels of marrow health. A skeletal dosimetry model for the adult female was provided for better predictions of marrow toxicity in patients undergoing radionuclide therapy. This work is the first fully established gender specific model for these applications, and supersedes previous models in scalability of the skeleton and radiation transport methods. Furthermore, the applicability of using bone marrow biopsies was deemed sufficient in prediction of bone marrow health, specifically for the hematopoietic stem cell population. The location and concentration of the HSC in bone marrow was found to follow a spatial gradient from the bone trabeculae

  16. Portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Basit, Syed Abdul; Stone, Christian D; Gish, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare event in the general medical setting that commonly complicates cirrhosis with portal hypertension, and can also occur with liver tumors. The diagnosis is often incidental when a thrombus is found in the portal vein on imaging tests. However, PVT may also present with clinical symptoms and can progress to life-threatening complications of ischemic hepatitis, liver failure, and/or small intestinal infarction. This article reviews the pathophysiology of this disorder, with a major focus on PVT in patients with cirrhosis, and presents detailed guidelines on optimal diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Real-time 3D dose imaging in water phantoms: reconstruction from simultaneous EPID-Cherenkov 3D imaging (EC3D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruza, P.; Andreozzi, J. M.; Gladstone, D. J.; Jarvis, L. A.; Rottmann, J.; Pogue, B. W.

    2017-05-01

    Combination of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) transmission imaging with frontal Cherenkov imaging enabled real-time 3D dosimetry of clinical X-ray beams in water phantoms. The EPID provides a 2D transverse distribution of attenuation which can be back-projected to estimate accumulated dose, while the Cherenkov image provides an accurate lateral view of the dose versus depth. Assuming homogeneous density and composition of the phantom, both images can be linearly combined into a true 3D distribution of the deposited dose. We describe the algorithm for volumetric dose reconstruction, and demonstrate the results of a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) 3D dosimetry.

  18. SU-C-201-06: Utility of Quantitative 3D SPECT/CT Imaging in Patient Specific Internal Dosimetry of 153-Samarium with GATE Monte Carlo Package

    SciTech Connect

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M; Sen, A; Parach, A; Kalantari, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific 3-dimensional (3D) internal dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy is essential for efficient treatment. Two major steps to achieve reliable results are: 1) generating quantitative 3D images of radionuclide distribution and attenuation coefficients and 2) using a reliable method for dose calculation based on activity and attenuation map. In this research, internal dosimetry for 153-Samarium (153-Sm) was done by SPECT-CT images coupled GATE Monte Carlo package for internal dosimetry. Methods: A 50 years old woman with bone metastases from breast cancer was prescribed 153-Sm treatment (Gamma: 103keV and beta: 0.81MeV). A SPECT/CT scan was performed with the Siemens Simbia-T scanner. SPECT and CT images were registered using default registration software. SPECT quantification was achieved by compensating for all image degrading factors including body attenuation, Compton scattering and collimator-detector response (CDR). Triple energy window method was used to estimate and eliminate the scattered photons. Iterative ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) with correction for attenuation and distance-dependent CDR was used for image reconstruction. Bilinear energy mapping is used to convert Hounsfield units in CT image to attenuation map. Organ borders were defined by the itk-SNAP toolkit segmentation on CT image. GATE was then used for internal dose calculation. The Specific Absorbed Fractions (SAFs) and S-values were reported as MIRD schema. Results: The results showed that the largest SAFs and S-values are in osseous organs as expected. S-value for lung is the highest after spine that can be important in 153-Sm therapy. Conclusion: We presented the utility of SPECT-CT images and Monte Carlo for patient-specific dosimetry as a reliable and accurate method. It has several advantages over template-based methods or simplified dose estimation methods. With advent of high speed computers, Monte Carlo can be used for treatment planning

  19. SU-E-T-497: Semi-Automated in Vivo Radiochromic Film Dosimetry Using a Novel Image Processing Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Reyhan, M; Yue, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To validate an automated image processing algorithm designed to detect the center of radiochromic film used for in vivo film dosimetry against the current gold standard of manual selection. Methods: An image processing algorithm was developed to automatically select the region of interest (ROI) in *.tiff images that contain multiple pieces of radiochromic film (0.5x1.3cm{sup 2}). After a user has linked a calibration file to the processing algorithm and selected a *.tiff file for processing, an ROI is automatically detected for all films by a combination of thresholding and erosion, which removes edges and any additional markings for orientation. Calibration is applied to the mean pixel values from the ROIs and a *.tiff image is output displaying the original image with an overlay of the ROIs and the measured doses. Validation of the algorithm was determined by comparing in vivo dose determined using the current gold standard (manually drawn ROIs) versus automated ROIs for n=420 scanned films. Bland-Altman analysis, paired t-test, and linear regression were performed to demonstrate agreement between the processes. Results: The measured doses ranged from 0.2-886.6cGy. Bland-Altman analysis of the two techniques (automatic minus manual) revealed a bias of -0.28cGy and a 95% confidence interval of (5.5cGy,-6.1cGy). These values demonstrate excellent agreement between the two techniques. Paired t-test results showed no statistical differences between the two techniques, p=0.98. Linear regression with a forced zero intercept demonstrated that Automatic=0.997*Manual, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.999. The minimal differences between the two techniques may be explained by the fact that the hand drawn ROIs were not identical to the automatically selected ones. The average processing time was 6.7seconds in Matlab on an IntelCore2Duo processor. Conclusion: An automated image processing algorithm has been developed and validated, which will help

  20. Superficial dosimetry imaging based on Čerenkov emission for external beam radiotherapy with megavoltage x-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Fox, Colleen J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Čerenkov radiation emission occurs in all tissue, when charged particles (either primary or secondary) travel at velocity above the threshold for the Čerenkov effect (about 220 KeV in tissue for electrons). This study presents the first examination of optical Čerenkov emission as a surrogate for the absorbed superficial dose for MV x-ray beams.Methods: In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of flat and curved surfaces were studied to analyze the energy spectra of charged particles produced in different regions near the surfaces when irradiated by MV x-ray beams. Čerenkov emission intensity and radiation dose were directly simulated in voxelized flat and cylindrical phantoms. The sampling region of superficial dosimetry based on Čerenkov radiation was simulated in layered skin models. Angular distributions of optical emission from the surfaces were investigated. Tissue mimicking phantoms with flat and curved surfaces were imaged with a time domain gating system. The beam field sizes (50 × 50–200 × 200 mm{sup 2}), incident angles (0°–70°) and imaging regions were all varied.Results: The entrance or exit region of the tissue has nearly homogeneous energy spectra across the beam, such that their Čerenkov emission is proportional to dose. Directly simulated local intensity of Čerenkov and radiation dose in voxelized flat and cylindrical phantoms further validate that this signal is proportional to radiation dose with absolute average discrepancy within 2%, and the largest within 5% typically at the beam edges. The effective sampling depth could be tuned from near 0 up to 6 mm by spectral filtering. The angular profiles near the theoretical Lambertian emission distribution for a perfect diffusive medium, suggesting that angular correction of Čerenkov images may not be required even for curved surface. The acquisition speed and signal to noise ratio of the time domain gating system were investigated for different acquisition procedures, and the

  1. Development of a one-stop beam verification system using electronic portal imaging devices for routine quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Sangwook; Ma, Sun Young; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yi, Byong Yong; Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Suk; Cho, Sam Ju; Choi, Jinho

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a computer-based system for routine quality assurance (QA) of a linear accelerator (linac) was developed by using the dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID). An acrylic template phantom was designed such that it could be placed on the EPID and be aligned with the light field of the collimator. After irradiation, portal images obtained from the EPID were transferred in DICOM format to a computer and analyzed using a program we developed. The symmetry, flatness, field size, and congruence of the light and radiation fields of the photon beams from the linac were verified simultaneously. To validate the QA system, the ion chamber and film (X-Omat V2; Kodak, New York, NY) measurements were compared with the EPID measurements obtained in this study. The EPID measurements agreed with the film measurements. Parameters for beams with energies of 6 MV and 15 MV were obtained daily for 1 month using this system. It was found that our QA tool using EPID could substitute for the film test, which is a time-consuming method for routine QA assessment.

  2. Analysis of the rigid and deformable component of setup inaccuracies on portal images in head and neck radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkner, Mattias; Thorwarth, Daniela; Poser, Alexander; Ammazzalorso, Filippo; Alber, Markus

    2007-09-01

    The issue of setup errors consisting of translation, rotation and deformation components in head and neck radiotherapy is addressed with a piecewise registration of small independent regions on a portal image to their reference position. These rectangular regions are termed featurelets as they contain relevant anatomical features. The resulting displacement vectors of each featurelet reflect both the center-of-mass (COM), i.e. the rigid, and the non-rigid component of the setup error. The displacement vectors of a series of daily portal images were subjected to a principal component analysis. In addition to the mean, systematic displacement of each featurelet, this analysis yields correlated patterns of anatomical deformations. Hence, the physiological movements of an individual patient can be obtained without a biomechanical model. It is shown that in the presence of setup errors that are due to rotations or deformations a correction by the COM displacement may deteriorate the error of parts of the anatomy further. The featurelet analysis can be used to refine setup correction protocols, tune spatially variable setup margins in treatment planning and optimize patient immobilization devices.

  3. The NOAO NVO Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.; Gasson, D.; Fuentes, E.

    2007-10-01

    The NOAO NVO Portal is a web application for one-stop discovery, analysis, and access to VO-compliant imaging data and services. The current release allows for GUI-based discovery of nearly a half million images from archives such as the NOAO Science Archive, the Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 and ACS instruments, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ESO's INT Wide-Field Survey, among others. The NOAO Portal allows users to view image metadata, footprint wire-frames, FITS image previews, and provides one-click access to science quality imaging data throughout the entire sky via the Firefox web browser (i.e., no applet or code to download). Users can stage images from multiple archives at the NOAO NVO Portal for quick and easy bulk downloads. The NOAO NVO Portal also provides simplified and direct access to VO analysis services, such as the WESIX catalog generation service. We highlight the features of the NOAO NVO Portal (http://nvo.noao.edu).

  4. Patient-specific dosimetry using quantitative SPECT imaging and three-dimensional discrete fourier transform convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Hawkins, W.G.; Eckblade, M.B.; Leichner, P.K.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a three-dimensional discrete Fourier transform (3D-DFT) convolution method to perform the dosimetry for {sup 131}I-labeled antibodies in soft tissues. Mathematical and physical phantoms were used to compare 3D-DFT with Monte Carlo transport (MCT) calculations based on the EGS4 code. The mathematical and physical phantoms consisted of a sphere and cylinder, respectively, containing uniform and nonuniform activity distributions. Quantitative SPECT reconstruction was carried out using the circular harmonic transform (CHT) algorithm. The radial dose profile obtained from MCT calculations and the 3D-DFT convolution method for the mathematical phantom were in close agreement. The root mean square error (RMSE) for the two methods was <0.1%, with a maximum difference <21%. Results obtained for the physical phantom gave a RMSE <0.1% and a maximum difference of <13%; isodose contours were in good agreement. SPECT data for two patients who had undergone {sup 131}I radioimmunotherapy (RIT) were used to compare absorbed-dose rates and isodose rate contours with the two methods of calculations. This yielded a RMSE <0.02% and a maximum difference of <13%. Our results showed that the 3D-DFT convolution method compared well with MCT calculations. The 3D-DFT approach is computationally much more efficient and, hence, the method of choice. This method is patient-specific and applicable to the dosimetry of soft-tissue tumors and normal organs. It can be implemented on personal computers. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Design of Dual-Road Transportable Portal Monitoring System for Visible Light and Gamma-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Cunningham, Mark F; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Cheriyadat, Anil M; Hornback, Donald Eric; Fabris, Lorenzo; Kerekes, Ryan A; Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Bradley, Eric Craig; Chesser, Joel B; Marchant, William

    2010-01-01

    The use of radiation sensors as portal monitors is increasing due to heightened concerns over the smuggling of fissile material. Transportable systems that can detect significant quantities of fissile material that might be present in vehicular traffic are of particular interest, especially if they can be rapidly deployed to different locations. To serve this application, we have constructed a rapid-deployment portal monitor that uses visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to allow simultaneous monitoring of multiple lanes of traffic from the side of a roadway. The system operation uses machine vision methods on the visible-light images to detect vehicles as they enter and exit the field of view and to measure their position in each frame. The visible-light and gamma-ray cameras are synchronized which allows the gamma-ray imager to harvest gamma-ray data specific to each vehicle, integrating its radiation signature for the entire time that it is in the field of view. Thus our system creates vehicle-specific radiation signatures and avoids source confusion problems that plague non-imaging approaches to the same problem. Our current prototype instrument was designed for measurement of upto five lanes of freeway traffic with a pair of instruments, one on either side of the roadway. Stereoscopic cameras are used with a third alignment camera for motion compensation and are mounted on a 50 deployable mast. In this paper we discuss the design considerations for the machine-vision system, the algorithms used for vehicle detection and position estimates, and the overall architecture of the system. We also discuss system calibration for rapid deployment. We conclude with notes on preliminary performance and deployment.

  6. Design of dual-road transportable portal monitoring system for visible light and gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnowski, Thomas P.; Cunningham, Mark F.; Goddard, James S.; Cheriyadat, Anil M.; Hornback, Donald E.; Fabris, Lorenzo; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Bradley, E. Craig; Chesser, J.; Marchant, W.

    2010-04-01

    The use of radiation sensors as portal monitors is increasing due to heightened concerns over the smuggling of fissile material. Transportable systems that can detect significant quantities of fissile material that might be present in vehicular traffic are of particular interest, especially if they can be rapidly deployed to different locations. To serve this application, we have constructed a rapid-deployment portal monitor that uses visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to allow simultaneous monitoring of multiple lanes of traffic from the side of a roadway. The system operation uses machine vision methods on the visible-light images to detect vehicles as they enter and exit the field of view and to measure their position in each frame. The visible-light and gamma-ray cameras are synchronized which allows the gamma-ray imager to harvest gamma-ray data specific to each vehicle, integrating its radiation signature for the entire time that it is in the field of view. Thus our system creates vehicle-specific radiation signatures and avoids source confusion problems that plague non-imaging approaches to the same problem. Our current prototype instrument was designed for measurement of upto five lanes of freeway traffic with a pair of instruments, one on either side of the roadway. Stereoscopic cameras are used with a third "alignment" camera for motion compensation and are mounted on a 50' deployable mast. In this paper we discuss the design considerations for the machine-vision system, the algorithms used for vehicle detection and position estimates, and the overall architecture of the system. We also discuss system calibration for rapid deployment. We conclude with notes on preliminary performance and deployment.

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Polymer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, C.; De Deene, Y.; Doran, S.; Ibbott, G.; Jirasek, A.; Lepage, M.; McAuley, K. B.; Oldham, M.; Schreiner, L. J.

    2010-03-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented.

  8. Topical Review: Polymer gel dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, C; De Deene, Y; Doran, S; Ibbott, G; Jirasek, A; Lepage, M; McAuley, K B; Oldham, M; Schreiner, L J

    2010-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented. PMID:20150687

  9. Complications of Portal Vein Embolization: Evaluation on Cross-Sectional Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Yoo Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein embolization (PVE) is known as an effective and safe preoperative procedure that increases the future liver remnant (FLR) in patients with insufficient FLR. However, some possible major complications can lead to non-resectability or delayed elective surgery that results in increased morbidity and mortality. Although the majority of these complications are rare, knowledge of the radiologic findings of post-procedural complications facilitate an accurate diagnosis and ensure prompt management. We accordingly reviewed the CT findings of the complications of PVE. PMID:26357502

  10. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult male--internal electron sources.

    PubMed

    Hough, Matthew; Johnson, Perry; Rajon, Didier; Jokisch, Derek; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley

    2011-04-21

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of the adult male skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida adult male hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2010 Phys. Med. Biol. 55 339-63) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow, associated with radiogenic leukemia, and total shallow marrow, associated with radiogenic bone cancer. Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following sources: bone marrow (active and inactive), trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), and cortical bone (surfaces and volumes). Specific absorbed fractions are computed according to the MIRD schema, and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with site-specific values reported in both tabular and graphical format in an electronic annex available from http://stacks.iop.org/0031-9155/56/2309/mmedia. The distribution of cortical bone and spongiosa at the macroscopic dimensions of the phantom, as well as the distribution of trabecular bone and marrow tissues at the microscopic dimensions of the phantom, is imposed through detailed analyses of whole-body ex vivo CT images (1 mm resolution) and spongiosa-specific ex vivo microCT images (30 µm resolution), respectively, taken from a 40 year male cadaver. The method utilized in this work includes: (1) explicit accounting for changes in marrow self-dose with variations in marrow cellularity, (2) explicit accounting for electron escape from spongiosa, (3) explicit consideration of spongiosa cross-fire from cortical bone, and (4) explicit consideration of the ICRP's change in the surrogate tissue region defining the location of the osteoprogenitor cells (from a 10 µm endosteal layer covering the trabecular and cortical surfaces to a 50 µm shallow marrow layer covering trabecular and medullary cavity surfaces). Skeletal

  11. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult male—internal electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hough, Matthew; Johnson, Perry; Rajon, Didier; Jokisch, Derek; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley

    2011-04-01

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of the adult male skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida adult male hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2010 Phys. Med. Biol. 55 339-63) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow, associated with radiogenic leukemia, and total shallow marrow, associated with radiogenic bone cancer. Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following sources: bone marrow (active and inactive), trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), and cortical bone (surfaces and volumes). Specific absorbed fractions are computed according to the MIRD schema, and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with site-specific values reported in both tabular and graphical format in an electronic annex available from http://stacks.iop.org/0031-9155/56/2309/mmedia. The distribution of cortical bone and spongiosa at the macroscopic dimensions of the phantom, as well as the distribution of trabecular bone and marrow tissues at the microscopic dimensions of the phantom, is imposed through detailed analyses of whole-body ex vivo CT images (1 mm resolution) and spongiosa-specific ex vivo microCT images (30 µm resolution), respectively, taken from a 40 year male cadaver. The method utilized in this work includes: (1) explicit accounting for changes in marrow self-dose with variations in marrow cellularity, (2) explicit accounting for electron escape from spongiosa, (3) explicit consideration of spongiosa cross-fire from cortical bone, and (4) explicit consideration of the ICRP's change in the surrogate tissue region defining the location of the osteoprogenitor cells (from a 10 µm endosteal layer covering the trabecular and cortical surfaces to a 50 µm shallow marrow layer covering trabecular and medullary cavity surfaces). Skeletal

  12. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, Markus; McDermott, Leah N.; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Pecharroman-Gallego, Raul; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Stroom, Joep; Herk, Marcel J.; Mijnheer, Ben van

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: At the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because the original back-projection dose-reconstruction algorithm uses water-based scatter-correction kernels and therefore does not account for tissue inhomogeneities accurately. The aim of this study was to test a new method, in aqua vivo EPID dosimetry, for fast dose verification of lung cancer irradiations during actual patient treatment. Methods: The key feature of our method is the dose reconstruction in the patient from EPID images, obtained during the actual treatment, whereby the images have been converted to a situation as if the patient consisted entirely of water; hence, the method is termed in aqua vivo. This is done by multiplying the measured in vivo EPID image with the ratio of two digitally reconstructed transmission images for the unit-density and inhomogeneous tissue situation. For dose verification, a comparison is made with the calculated dose distribution with the inhomogeneity correction switched off. IMRT treatment verification is performed for each beam in 2D using a 2D {gamma} evaluation, while for the verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments in 3D a 3D {gamma} evaluation is applied using the same parameters (3%, 3 mm). The method was tested using two inhomogeneous phantoms simulating a tumor in lung and measuring its sensitivity for patient positioning errors. Subsequently five IMRT and five VMAT clinical lung cancer treatments were investigated, using both the conventional back-projection algorithm and the in aqua vivo method. The verification results of the in aqua vivo method were statistically analyzed for 751 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT and 50 lung cancer patients treated with VMAT. Results: The improvements by

  13. Assessment of flatness and symmetry of megavoltage x-ray beam with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID).

    PubMed

    Liu, G; van Doorn, T; Bezak, E

    2002-07-01

    The input/output characteristics of the Wellhofer BIS 710 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) have been investigated to establish its efficacy for periodic quality assurance (QA) applications. Calibration curves have been determined for the energy fluence incident on the detector versus the pixel values. The effect of the charge coupled device (CCD) camera sampling time and beam parameters (such as beam field size, dose rate, photon energy) on the calibration have been investigated for a region of interest (ROI) around the central beam axis. The results demonstrate that the pixel output is a linear function of the incident exposure, as expected for a video-based electronic portal imaging system. The field size effects of the BIS 710 are similar to that of an ion chamber for smaller field sizes up to 10 x 10 cm2. However, for larger field sizes the pixel value increases more rapidly. Furthermore, the system is slightly sensitive to dose rate and is also energy dependent The BIS 710 has been used in the current study to develop a QA procedure for measurements of flatness and symmetry of a linac x-ray beam. As a two-dimensional image of the radiation field is obtained from a single exposure of the BIS 710, a technique has been developed to calculate flatness and symmetry from a defined radiation area. The flatness and symmetry values obtained are different from those calculated conventionally from major axes only (inplane, crossplane). This demonstrates that the technique can pick up the "cold" and "hot" spots in the analysed area, providing thus more information about the radiation beam. When calibrated against the water tank measurements, the BIS 710 can be used as a secondary device to monitor the x-ray beam flatness and symmetry.

  14. Image quality of mean temporal arterial and mean temporal portal venous phase images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT datasets in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Henzler, T; Gawlitza, J; Diehl, S; Wilhelm, T; Schoenberg, S O; Jin, Z Y; Xue, H D; Smakic, A

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) provides valuable information on tissue perfusion in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and pancreatic cancer. However, currently dVPCT is often performed in addition to conventional CT acquisitions due to the limited morphologic image quality of dose optimized dVPCT protocols. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare objective and subjective image quality, lesion detectability and radiation dose between mean temporal arterial (mTA) and mean temporal portal venous (mTPV) images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) datasets with linearly blended 120-kVp arterial and portal venous datasets in patients with HCC and pancreatic cancer. All patients gave written informed consent for this institutional review board-approved HIPAA compliant study. 27 consecutive patients (18 men, 9 women, mean age, 69.1 years±9.4) with histologically proven HCC or suspected pancreatic cancer were prospectively enrolled. The study CT protocol included a dVPCT protocol performed with 70 or 80kVp tube voltage (18 spiral acquisitions, 71.2s total acquisition times) and standard dual-energy (90/150kVpSn) arterial and portal venous acquisition performed 25min after the dVPCT. The mTA and mTPV images were manually reconstructed from the 3 to 5 best visually selected single arterial and 3 to 5 best single portal venous phases dVPCT dataset. The linearly blended 120-kVp images were calculated from dual-energy CT (DECT) raw data. Image noise, SNR, and CNR of the liver, abdominal aorta (AA) and main portal vein (PV) were compared between the mTA/mTPV and the linearly blended 120-kVp dual-energy arterial and portal venous datasets, respectively. Subjective image quality was evaluated by two radiologists regarding subjective image noise, sharpness and overall diagnostic image quality using a 5-point Likert Scale. In addition, liver lesion detectability was performed for each liver segment by the two radiologists using the

  15. Transjugular Portal Venous Stenting in Inflammatory Extrahepatic Portal Vein Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schaible, Rolf; Textor, Jochen; Decker, Pan; Strunk, Holger; Schild, Hans

    2002-12-15

    We report the case of a 37-year-old man with necrotizing pancreatitis associated with inflammatory extrahepatic portal vein stenosis and progressive ascites. Four months after the acute onset, when no signs of infection were present, portal decompression was performed to treat refractory ascites. Transjugulartranshepatic venoplasty failed to dilate the stenosis in the extrahepatic portion of the portal vein sufficiently. Therefore a Wallstent was implanted, resulting in almost normal diameter of the vessel. In follow-up imaging studies the stent and the portal vein were still patent 12 months after the intervention and total resolution of the ascites was observed.

  16. Radioembolization Dosimetry: The Road Ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, Maarten L. J. Elschot, Mattijs; Sze, Daniel Y.; Kao, Yung H.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Iagaru, Andre H.; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.

    2015-04-15

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  17. Radioembolization dosimetry: the road ahead.

    PubMed

    Smits, Maarten L J; Elschot, Mattijs; Sze, Daniel Y; Kao, Yung H; Nijsen, Johannes F W; Iagaru, Andre H; de Jong, Hugo W A M; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Lam, Marnix G E H

    2015-04-01

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  18. WE-EF-303-10: Single- Detector Proton Radiography as a Portal Imaging Equivalent for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Doolan, P; Bentefour, E; Testa, M; Cascio, E; Lu, H; Royle, G; Gottschalk, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In proton therapy, patient alignment is of critical importance due to the sensitivity of the proton range to tissue heterogeneities. Traditionally proton radiography is used for verification of the water-equivalent path length (WEPL), which dictates the depth protons reach. In this work we propose its use for alignment. Additionally, many new proton centers have cone-beam computed tomography in place of beamline X-ray imaging and so proton radiography offers a unique patient alignment verification similar to portal imaging in photon therapy. Method: Proton radiographs of a CIRS head phantom were acquired using the Beam Imaging System (BIS) (IBA, Louvain-la-Neuve) in a horizontal beamline. A scattered beam was produced using a small, dedicated, range modulator (RM) wheel fabricated out of aluminum. The RM wheel was rotated slowly (20 sec/rev) using a stepper motor to compensate for the frame rate of the BIS (120 ms). Dose rate functions (DRFs) over two RM wheel rotations were acquired. Calibration was made with known thicknesses of homogeneous solid water. For each pixel the time width, skewness and kurtosis of the DRFs were computed. The time width was used to compute the object WEPL. In the heterogeneous phantom, the excess skewness and excess kurtosis (i.e. difference from homogeneous cases) were computed and assessed for suitability for patient set up. Results: The technique allowed for the simultaneous production of images that can be used for WEPL verification, showing few internal details, and excess skewness and kurtosis images that can be used for soft tissue alignment. These latter images highlight areas where range mixing has occurred, correlating with phantom heterogeneities. Conclusion: The excess skewness and kurtosis images contain details that are not visible in the WET images. These images, unique to the time-resolved proton radiographic method, could be used for patient set up according to soft tissues.

  19. Automatic Prostate Tracking and Motion Assessment in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Li, Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing, Lei

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the prostate intrafraction motion in volumetric modulated arc therapy treatments using cine megavoltage (MV) images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy using a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator equipped with an EPID for acquiring cine MV images during treatment. Cine MV images acquisition was scheduled for single or multiple treatment fractions (between 1 and 8). A novel automatic fiducial detection algorithm that can handle irregular multileaf collimator apertures, field edges, fast leaf and gantry movement, and MV image noise and artifacts in patient anatomy was used. All sets of images (approximately 25,000 images in total) were analyzed to measure the positioning accuracy of implanted fiducial markers and assess the prostate movement. Results: Prostate motion can vary greatly in magnitude among different patients. Different motion patterns were identified, showing its unpredictability. The mean displacement and standard deviation of the intrafraction motion was generally less than 2.0 ± 2.0 mm in each of the spatial directions. In certain patients, however, the percentage of the treatment time in which the prostate is displaced more than 5 mm from its planned position in at least 1 spatial direction was 10% or more. The maximum prostate displacement observed was 13.3 mm. Conclusion: Prostate tracking and motion assessment was performed with MV imaging and an EPID. The amount of prostate motion observed suggests that patients will benefit from its real-time monitoring. Megavoltage imaging can provide the basis for real-time prostate tracking using conventional linear accelerators.

  20. Portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis: indirect assessment of hepatic venous pressure gradient by measuring azygos flow with 2D-cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gouya, Hervé; Grabar, Sophie; Vignaux, Olivier; Saade, Anastasia; Pol, Stanislas; Legmann, Paul; Sogni, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    To measure azygos, portal and aortic flow by two-dimensional cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D-cine PC MRI), and to compare the MRI values to hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurements, in patients with cirrhosis. Sixty-nine patients with cirrhosis were prospectively included. All patients underwent HVPG measurements, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 2D-cine PC MRI measurements of azygos, portal and aortic blood flow. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate the correlation between the blood flow and HVPG. The performance of 2D-cine PC MRI to diagnose severe portal hypertension (HVPG ≥ 16 mmHg) was determined by receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis, and area under the curves (AUC) were compared. Azygos and aortic flow values were associated with HVPG in univariate linear regression model. Azygos flow (p < 10(-3)), aortic flow (p = 0.001), age (p = 0.001) and presence of varices (p < 10(-3)) were independently associated with HVPG. Azygos flow (AUC = 0.96 (95 % CI [0.91-1.00]) had significantly higher AUC than aortic (AUC = 0.64 (95 % CI [0.51-0.77]) or portal blood flow (AUC = 0.40 (95 % CI [0.25-0.54]). 2D-cine PC MRI is a promising technique to evaluate significant portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis. • Noninvasive HVPG assessment can be performed with MRI azygos flow. • Azygos MRI flow is an easy-to-measure marker to detect significant portal hypertension. • MRI flow is more specific that varice grade to detect portal hypertension.

  1. Evaluation of radiograph-based interstitial implant dosimetry on computed tomography images using dose volume indices for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Ritu Raj; Dayananda, S.; Bhalawat, R. L.; Bedre, Girish N.; Deshpande, D. D.

    2007-01-01

    Conventional radiograph-based implant dosimetry fails to correlate the spatial dose distribution on patient anatomy with lack in dosimetry quality. Though these limitations are overcome in computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry, it requires an algorithm which can reconstruct catheters on the multi-planner CT images. In the absence of such algorithm, we proposed a technique in which the implanted geometry and dose distribution generated from orthogonal radiograph were mapped onto the CT data using coordinate transformation method. Radiograph-based implant dosimetry was generated for five head and neck cancer patients on Plato Sunrise treatment planning system. Dosimetry was geometrically optimized on volume, and dose was prescribed according to the natural prescription dose. The final dose distribution was retrospectively mapped onto the CT data set of the same patients using coordinate transformation method, which was verified in a phantom prior to patient study. Dosimetric outcomes were evaluated qualitatively by visualizing isodose distribution on CT images and quantitatively using the dose volume indices, which includes coverage index (CI), external volume index (EI), relative dose homogeneity index (HI), overdose volume index (OI) and conformal index (COIN). The accuracy of coordinate transformation was within ±1 mm in phantom and ±2 mm in patients. Qualitative evaluation of dosimetry on the CT images shows reasonably good coverage of target at the expense of excessive normal tissue irradiation. The mean (SD) values of CI, EI and HI were estimated to be 0.81 (0.039), 0.55 (0.174) and 0.65 (0.074) respectively. The maximum OI estimated was 0.06 (mean 0.04, SD = 0.015). Finally, the COIN computed for each patient ranged from 0.4 to 0.61 (mean 0.52, SD = 0.078). The proposed technique is feasible and accurate to implement even for the most complicated implant geometry. It allows the physicist and physician to evaluate the plan both qualitatively and

  2. [Portal cavenorma: diagnosis, aetiologies and consequences].

    PubMed

    Vibert, Eric; Azoulay, Daniel; Castaing, Denis; Bismuth, Henri

    2002-12-01

    Portal cavernoma is a network of veins whose caliber, initially millimetric or microscopic, is increased and which contain hepatopedal portal blood. It results from occlusion, thrombotic and always chronic, of the extra-hepatic portal system. Diagnosis is mainly done by imaging. Clinical signs of portal cavernoma are usually related to extra-hepatic portal hypertension (hematemesis due to rupture of oeso-gastric varices, splenomegaly, rectal bleeding from ano-rectal varices, growth retardation in children) and sometimes to the cause of portal hypertension (abdominal pain, venous bowel infarction). Occurrence of portal thrombosis is often the conjunction of a local cause and a prothrombotic disorder which must be systematically detected. Biliary consequences of cavernoma are related to compression of common bile duct and are usually asymptomatic. In case of jaundice or cholangitis, portal decompression by portosystemic shunt can be performed to treat both biliary symptoms and portal hypertension.

  3. 3-Dimensional Resin Casting and Imaging of Mouse Portal Vein or Intrahepatic Bile Duct System

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Teagan J.; Sparks, Erin E.; Huppert, Stacey S.

    2012-01-01

    In organs, the correct architecture of vascular and ductal structures is indispensable for proper physiological function, and the formation and maintenance of these structures is a highly regulated process. The analysis of these complex, 3-dimensional structures has greatly depended on either 2-dimensional examination in section or on dye injection studies. These techniques, however, are not able to provide a complete and quantifiable representation of the ductal or vascular structures they are intended to elucidate. Alternatively, the nature of 3-dimensional plastic resin casts generates a permanent snapshot of the system and is a novel and widely useful technique for visualizing and quantifying 3-dimensional structures and networks. A crucial advantage of the resin casting system is the ability to determine the intact and connected, or communicating, structure of a blood vessel or duct. The structure of vascular and ductal networks are crucial for organ function, and this technique has the potential to aid study of vascular and ductal networks in several ways. Resin casting may be used to analyze normal morphology and functional architecture of a luminal structure, identify developmental morphogenetic changes, and uncover morphological differences in tissue architecture between normal and disease states. Previous work has utilized resin casting to study, for example, architectural and functional defects within the mouse intrahepatic bile duct system that were not reflected in 2-dimensional analysis of the structure1,2, alterations in brain vasculature of a Alzheimer's disease mouse model3, portal vein abnormalities in portal hypertensive and cirrhotic mice4, developmental steps in rat lymphatic maturation between immature and adult lungs5, immediate microvascular changes in the rat liver, pancreas, and kidney in response in to chemical injury6. Here we present a method of generating a 3-dimensional resin cast of a mouse vascular or ductal network, focusing

  4. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Sega, G.A.

    1990-11-06

    The traveler participated in an International Symposium on Trends in Biological Dosimetry and presented an invited paper entitled, Adducts in sperm protamine and DNA vs mutation frequency.'' The purpose of the Symposium was to examine the applicability of new methods to study quantitatively the effects of xenobiotic agents (radiation and chemicals) on molecular, cellular and organ systems, with special emphasis on human biological dosimetry. The general areas covered at the meeting included studies on parent compounds and metabolites; protein adducts; DNA adducts; gene mutations; cytogenetic end-points and reproductive methods.

  5. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Dance, David R; McLean, Donald; Kramer, Hans-Michael

    2010-10-01

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as skin and eyes. The formulation and measurement procedures for diagnostic radiology dosimetry have recently been standardised through an international code of practice which describes the methodologies necessary to address the diverging imaging modalities used in diagnostic radiology. Common to all dosimetry methodologies is the measurement of the air kerma from the X-ray device under defined conditions. To ensure the accuracy of the dosimetric determination, such measurements need to be made with appropriate instrumentation that has a calibration that is traceable to a standards laboratory. Dosimetric methods are used in radiology departments for a variety of purposes including the determination of patient dose levels to allow examinations to be optimized and to assist in decisions on the justification of examination choices. Patient dosimetry is important for special cases such as for X-ray examinations of children and pregnant patients. It is also a key component of the quality control of X-ray equipment and procedures. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, G

    2001-05-01

    Portal hypertension is the main complication of cirrhosis and is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow, which in turn is the result of splanchnic vasodilatation. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which is, in turn, secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency that result in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain. This paper reviews the recent advances in the pathophysiology and management of the complications of portal hypertension.

  7. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2003-05-01

    Portal hypertension, the main complication of cirrhosis, is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and the hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which, in turn, is secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation, with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency that result in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain. This review covers the recent advances in the pathophysiology and management of the complications of portal hypertension.

  8. Investigation of the mechanical performance of Siemens linacs components during arc: gantry, MLC, and electronic portal imaging device

    PubMed Central

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Häring, Peter; Riis, Hans L; Zimmermann, Sune J; Ebert, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    Background In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linac components including gantry, collimation system, and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. Methods The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in leaf bank assembly due to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with five ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Three Siemens linacs were investigated. Results The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. Two machines showed >1 mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 7.5 mm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in leaf bank assembly was <1 mm. Conclusion The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behavior of Siemens linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Siemens machines. PMID:26604840

  9. Investigation of the mechanical performance of Siemens linacs components during arc: gantry, MLC, and electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Häring, Peter; Riis, Hans L; Zimmermann, Sune J; Ebert, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linac components including gantry, collimation system, and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in leaf bank assembly due to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with five ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Three Siemens linacs were investigated. The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. Two machines showed >1 mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 7.5 mm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in leaf bank assembly was <1 mm. The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behavior of Siemens linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Siemens machines.

  10. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  11. SU-E-T-428: Feasibility Study of 4D Image Reconstruction by Organ Motion Vector Extension Based On Portal Images

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, J; Jung, J; Yeo, I; Kim, J; Yi, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and to test a method to generate a new 4D CT images of the treatment day from the old 4D CT and the portal images of the day when the motion extent exceeded from that represented by plan CTs. Methods: A motion vector of a moving tumor in a patient may be extended to reconstruct the tumor position when the motion extent exceeded from that represented by plan CTs. To test this, 1. a phantom that consists of a polystyrene cylinder (tumor) embedded in cork (lung) was placed on a moving platform with 4 sec/cycle and amplitudes of 1 cm and 2 cm, and was 4D-scanned. 2. A 6MV photon beam was irradiated on the moving phantoms and cineEPID images were obtained. 3. A motion vector of the tumor was acquired from 4D CT images of the phantom with 1 cm amplitude. 4. From cine EPID images of the phantom with the 2 cm amplitude, various motion extents (0.3 cm, 0.5 cm, etc) were acquired and programmed into the motion vector, producing CT images at each position. 5. The reconstructed CT images were then compared with pre-acquired “reference” 4D CT images at each position (i.e. phase). Results: The CT image was reconstructed and compared with the reference image, showing a slight mismatch in the transition direction limited by voxel size (slice thickness) in CT image. Due to the rigid nature of the phantom studied, the modeling the displacement of the center of object was sufficient. When deformable tumors are to be modeled, more complex scheme is necessary, which utilize cine EPID and 4D CT images. Conclusion: The new idea of CT image reconstruction was demonstrated. Deformable tumor movements need to be considered in the future.

  12. Comparison of CT on Rails With Electronic Portal Imaging for Positioning of Prostate Cancer Patients With Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Rebecca Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Milner, Alvin; Cox, Jennifer; Duchesne, Gillian; Cleeve, Laurence; Zhu Li; Cramb, Jim; Sparks, Laura; Laferlita, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this investigation was to measure the agreement between in-room computed tomography (CT) on rails and electronic portal image (EPI) radiography. Methods and Materials: Agreement between the location of the center of gravity (COG) of fiducial markers (FMs) on CT and EPI images was determined in phantom studies and a patient cohort. A secondary analysis between the center of volume (COV) of the prostate on CT and the COG of FMs on CT and EPI was performed. Agreement was defined as the 95% probability of a difference of {<=}3.0 mm between images. Systematic and random errors from CT and EPI are reported. Results: From 8 patients, 254 CT and EPI pairs were analyzed. FMs were localized to within 3 mm on CT and EPI images 96.9% of the time in the left-right (LR) plane, 85.8% superior-inferior (SI), and 89% anterior-posterior (AP). The differences between the COV on CT and the COG on EPI were not within 3 mm in any plane: 87.8% (LR), 64.2% (SI), and 70.9% (AP). The systematic error varied from 1.2 to 2.9 mm (SI) and 1.8-2.9 mm (AP) between the COG on EPI and COV on CT. Conclusions: Considerable differences between in-room CT and EPI exist. The phantom measurements showed slice thickness affected the accuracy of localization in the SI plane, and couch sag that occurs at the CT on rails gantry could not be totally corrected for in the AP plane. Other confounding factors are the action of rotating the couch and associated time lag between image acquisitions (prostate motion), EPI image quality, and outlining uncertainties.

  13. WE-E-BRE-01: An Image-Based Skeletal Dosimetry Model for the ICRP Reference Adult Female - Internal Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    O'Reilly, S; Maynard, M; Marshall, E; Bolch, W; Sinclair, L; Rajon, D; Wayson, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Limitations seen in previous skeletal dosimetry models, which are still employed in commonly used software today, include the lack of consideration of electron escape and cross-fire from cortical bone, the modeling of infinite spongiosa, the disregard of the effect of varying cellularity on active marrow self-irradiation, and the lack of use of the more recent ICRP definition of a 50 micron surrogate tissue region for the osteoprogenitor cells - shallow marrow. These limitations were addressed in the present dosimetry model. Methods: Electron transport was completed to determine specific absorbed fractions to active marrow and shallow marrow of the skeletal regions of the adult female. The bone macrostructure was obtained from the whole-body hybrid computational phantom of the UF series of reference phantoms, while the bone microstructure was derived from microCT images of skeletal region samples taken from a 45 year-old female cadaver. The target tissue regions were active marrow and shallow marrow. The source tissues were active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surfaces, cortical bone volume and cortical bone surfaces. The marrow cellularity was varied from 10 to 100 percent for active marrow self-irradiation. A total of 33 discrete electron energies, ranging from 1 keV to 10 MeV, were either simulated or modeled analytically. Results: The method of combining macro- and microstructure absorbed fractions calculated using MCNPX electron transport was found to yield results similar to those determined with the PIRT model for the UF adult male in the Hough et al. study. Conclusion: The calculated skeletal averaged absorbed fractions for each source-target combination were found to follow similar trends of more recent dosimetry models (image-based models) and did not follow current models used in nuclear medicine dosimetry at high energies (due to that models use of an infinite expanse of trabecular spongiosa)

  14. Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Affairs, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University Get the Quick Facts For this topic NOTE: ... at least 6 months) Drinking large amounts of alcohol over a long period of time Portal hypertension ...

  15. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2002-05-01

    Portal hypertension is the main complication of cirrhosis and is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and the hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which is in turn secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. Hepatic hydrothorax results from the passage of ascites across the diaphragm and into the pleural space. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency resulting in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain.

  16. SU-C-204-05: Simulations of a Portal Imaging System for Conformal and Intensity Modulated Fast Neutron Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    James, S St.; Argento, D; Stewart, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The University of Washington Medical Center offers neutron therapy for the palliative and definitive treatment of selected cancers. In vivo field verification has the potential to improve the safe and effective delivery of neutron therapy. We propose a portal imaging method that relies on the creation of positron emitting isotopes (11C and 15O) through (n, 2n) reactions with a PMMA plate placed below the patient. After field delivery, the plate is retrieved from the vault and imaged using a reader that detects annihilation photons. The spatial pattern of activity produced in the PMMA plate provides information to reconstruct the neutron fluence map needed to confirm treatment delivery. Methods: We used MCNP to simulate the accumulation of 11C activity in a slab of PMMA 2 mm thick, and GATE was used to simulate the sensitivity and spatial resolution of a prototype imaging system. BGO crystal thicknesses of 1 cm, 2 cm and 3 cm were simulated with detector separations of 2 cm. Crystal pitches of 2 mm and 4 mm were evaluated. Back-projection of the events was used to create a planar image. The spatial resolution was taken to be the FWHM of the reconstructed point source image. Results: The system sensitivity for a point source in the center of the field of view was found to range from 58% for 1 cm thick BGO with 2 mm crystal pitch to 74% for the 3 cm thick BGO crystals with 4 mm crystal pitch. The spatial resolution at the center of the field of view was found to be 1.5 mm for the system with 2 mm crystal pitch and 2.8 mm for the system with the 4 mm crystal pitch. Conclusion: BGO crystals with 4 mm crystal pitch and 3 cm length would offer the best sensitivity reader.

  17. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.

    1981-06-16

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments. (ACR)

  18. Registration of serial SPECT/CT images for three-dimensional dosimetry in radionuclide therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjögreen-Gleisner, K.; Rueckert, D.; Ljungberg, M.

    2009-10-01

    For radionuclide therapy, individual patient pharmacokinetics can be measured in three dimensions by sequential SPECT imaging. Accurate registration of the time series of images is central for voxel-based calculations of the residence time and absorbed dose. In this work, rigid and non-rigid methods are evaluated for registration of 6-7 SPECT/CT images acquired over a week, in anatomical regions from the head-and-neck region down to the pelvis. A method for calculation of the absorbed dose, including a voxel mass determination from the CT images, is also described. Registration of the SPECT/CT images is based on a CT-derived spatial transformation. Evaluation is focused on the CT registration accuracy, and on its impact on values of residence time and absorbed dose. According to the CT evaluation, the non-rigid method produces a more accurate registration than the rigid one. For images of the residence time and absorbed dose, registration produces a sharpening of the images. For volumes-of-interest, the differences between rigid and non-rigid results are generally small. However, the non-rigid method is more consistent for regions where non-rigid patient movements are likely, such as in the head-neck-shoulder region.

  19. Methodology and dosimetry in adrenal medullary imaging with iodine-131 MIBG

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, S.; Fjaelling, M.J.; Jacobsson, L.; Jansson, S.; Tisell, L.E.

    1988-10-01

    Iodine-131 MIBG scans were performed in 59 patients in order to localize intra- or extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas (pheos), or to visualize hyperplastic adrenal medulla. Images were obtained from the pelvis to the base of the skull on Days 1, 4, and 7 after tracer injection. The 15 patients with histopathologic confirmation of adrenal medullary disease had positive scans. In three of these, the pheos were visible only on images obtained on Day 7. One scan was false negative. After excluding patients with a predisposition to adrenal medullary disease, nine subjects (28%) without verification of pheo displayed adrenal uptake of the radionuclide. Late images produce a low rate of false-negative scans; the background activity diminishes and even small pheos can be detected. In order to increase the quality of late images, 40 MBq (/sup 131/I)MIBG was used instead of 20 MBq. The dosimetric considerations are discussed.

  20. ELECTRON ABSORBED FRACTIONS IN AN IMAGE-BASED MICROSCOPIC SKELETAL DOSIMETRY MODEL OF CHINESE ADULT MALE.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shenshen; Ren, Li; Qiu, Rui; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Li, Junli

    2017-01-10

    Based on the Chinese reference adult male voxel model, a set of microscopic skeletal models of Chinese adult male is constructed through the processes of computed tomography (CT) imaging, bone coring, micro-CT imaging, image segmentation, merging into macroscopic bone model and implementation in Geant4. At the step of image segmentation, a new bone endosteum (BE) segmentation method is realized by sampling. The set of model contains 32 spongiosa samples with voxel size of 19 μm cubes. The microscopic spongiosa bone data for Chinese adult male are provided. Electron absorbed fractions in red bone marrow (RBM) and BE are calculated. Source tissues include the bone marrow (red and yellow), trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes) and cortical bone (surfaces and volumes). Target tissues include RBM and BE. Electron energies range from 10 keV to 10 MeV. Additionally, comparison of the result with other investigations is provided.

  1. Pulsed light imaging for wide-field dosimetry of photodynamic therapy in the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott C.; Sexton, Kristian; Chapman, Michael Shane; Maytin, Edward; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy using aminoluvelinic acid (ALA) is an FDA-approved treatment for actinic keratoses, pre-cancerous skin lesions which pose a significant risk for immunocompromised individuals, such as organ transplant recipients. While PDT is generally effective, response rates vary, largely due to variations in the accumulation of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) after ALA application. The ability to quantify PpIX production before treatment could facilitate the use of additional interventions to improve outcomes. While many groups have demonstrated the ability to image PpIX in the clinic, these systems generally require darkening the room lights during imaging, which is unpopular with clinicians. We have developed a novel wide-field imaging system based on pulsed excitation and gated acquisition to image photosensitizer activity in the skin. The tissue is illuminated using four pulsed LED's to excite PpIX, and the remitted light acquired with a synchronized ICCD. This approach facilitates real-time background subtraction of ambient light, precluding the need to darken the exam room. Delivering light in short bursts also allows the use of elevated excitation intensity while remaining under the maximum permissible exposure limits, making the modality more sensitive to photosensitizer fluorescence than standard approaches. Images of tissue phantoms indicate system sensitivity down to 250nM PpIX and images of animals demonstrate detection of PpIX fluorescence in vivo under normal room light conditions.

  2. Image guidance during breast radiotherapy: a phantom dosimetry and radiation-induced second cancer risk study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, A.; Holloway, L.; Metcalfe, P.

    2013-06-01

    Imaging procedures utilised for patient position verification during breast radiotherapy can add a considerable dose to organs surrounding the target volume on top of therapeutic scatter dose. This study investigated the dose from a breast kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT), a breast megavoltage fan-beam CT (MV-FBCT), and a TomoDirectTM breast treatment. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed within a female anthropomorphic phantom were utilised to measure the dose to various organs and tissues. The contralateral breast, lungs and heart received 0.40 cGy, 0.45 cGy and 0.40 cGy from the kV-CBCT and 1.74 cGy, 1.39 cGy and 1.73 cGy from the MV-FBCT. In comparison to treatment alone, daily imaging would increase the contralateral breast, contralateral lung and heart dose by a relative 12%, 24% and 13% for the kV-CBCT, and 52%, 101% and 58% for the MV-FBCT. The impact of the imaging dose relative to the treatment dose was assessed with linear and linear-quadratic radiation-induced secondary cancer risk models for the contralateral breast. The additional imaging dose and risk estimates presented in this study should be taken into account when considering an image modality and frequency for patient position verification protocols in breast radiotherapy.

  3. Image-based dosimetry of an implanted radioactive stent using intravascular ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Stephen W.

    Angioplasty has become an increasingly popular and effective treatment for heart disease. Unfortunately, restenosis, a cellular and biological reaction to the procedure, has hindered its effectiveness. Two of the most successful methods of inhibiting restenosis are radiation and stents. The combination of these two components, radioactive stents, is not as common as some of the other methods, yet still has potential of slowing restenosis. Investigation into source characteristics and artery wall radiobiology may illuminate some possible solutions to the problems of restenosis. This work has developed a calculational method to look at in-vivo images of implanted stents and determine the dose to the artery walls in order to test different source characteristics. The images are Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) cross-sectional slices of the stent and the artery. From these images, it is possible to determine the implanted stent structure. The pieces of the stent are identified in the images and modeled in a Monte Carlo simulation, using MCNP4c3. The simulation results were combined with the images to give three-dimensional absolute dose contours of the stent. The absolute dose values were verified using radiochromic film and 198Au-plated stents. This work was able to successfully verify the dose results and create a three-dimensional dose map of the implanted stent.

  4. Effect of recombination in a high quantum efficiency prototype ionization-chamber-based electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Gopal, A; Samant, S S

    2007-08-01

    The quantum efficiency (QE) of an imaging detector can be increased by utilizing a thick, high-density detection medium to increase the number of quantum interactions. However, image quality is more accurately described by the detection quantum efficiency (DQE). If a significant fraction of the increase in the number of detected quanta from a thick, dense detector were to result in useful imaging signal, this represents a favorable case where enhanced QE leads to increased DQE. However, for ionization-type detectors, one factor that limits DQE is the recombination between ion pairs that acts as a secondary quantum sink due to which enhancement in QE may not result in higher DQE depending on the extent of the signal loss from recombination. Therefore, an analysis of signal loss mechanisms or quantum sinks in an imaging system is essential for validating the overall benefit of high QE detectors. In this paper, a study of ion recombination as a secondary quantum sink is presented for a high QE prototype ion-chamber-based electronic portal imaging device (EPID): the kinestatic charge detector (KCD). The KCD utilizes a high pressure noble gas (krypton or xenon at 100 atm) and an arbitrarily large detector thickness (of the order of centimeters), resulting in a high QE imager. Compared with commercial amorphous silicon flat panel imagers that provide DQE(0) approximately 0.01, the KCD has much higher DQE. Studies indicated that DQE(0) = 0.20 for 6.1 cm thick, 100 atm (rho = 3.4 g/cm3) xenon chamber, and DQE(0)=0.34 for a 9.1 cm thick chamber. A series of experiments was devised and conducted to determine the signal loss due to recombination for a KCD chamber. The measurements indicated a fractional recombination loss of about 14% for a krypton chamber and about 18% for a xenon chamber under standard operating conditions (100 atm chamber pressure and 1275 V/cm electric field intensity). A theoretical treatment of the effect of recombination on imaging signal

  5. Radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists. PMID:2040250

  6. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for 3D patient-specific dosimetry on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images*

    PubMed Central

    Botta, F; Mairani, A; Hobbs, R F; Vergara Gil, A; Pacilio, M; Parodi, K; Cremonesi, M; Coca Pérez, M A; Di Dia, A; Ferrari, M; Guerriero, F; Battistoni, G; Pedroli, G; Paganelli, G; Torres Aroche, L A; Sgouros, G

    2014-01-01

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculation for nuclear medicine therapy is a topic of increasing interest. 3D dosimetry at the voxel level is one of the major improvements for the development of more accurate calculation techniques, as compared to the standard dosimetry at the organ level. This study aims to use the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to perform patient-specific 3D dosimetry through direct Monte Carlo simulation on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images. To this aim, dedicated routines were developed in the FLUKA environment. Two sets of simulations were performed on model and phantom images. Firstly, the correct handling of PET and SPECT images was tested under the assumption of homogeneous water medium by comparing FLUKA results with those obtained with the voxel kernel convolution method and with other Monte Carlo-based tools developed to the same purpose (the EGS-based 3D-RD software and the MCNP5-based MCID). Afterwards, the correct integration of the PET/SPECT and CT information was tested, performing direct simulations on PET/CT images for both homogeneous (water) and non-homogeneous (water with air, lung and bone inserts) phantoms. Comparison was performed with the other Monte Carlo tools performing direct simulation as well. The absorbed dose maps were compared at the voxel level. In the case of homogeneous water, by simulating 108 primary particles a 2% average difference with respect to the kernel convolution method was achieved; such difference was lower than the statistical uncertainty affecting the FLUKA results. The agreement with the other tools was within 3–4%, partially ascribable to the differences among the simulation algorithms. Including the CT-based density map, the average difference was always within 4% irrespective of the medium (water, air, bone), except for a maximum 6% value when comparing FLUKA and 3D-RD in air. The results confirmed that the routines were properly developed, opening the way for the use of FLUKA for patient-specific, image

  7. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for 3D patient-specific dosimetry on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Mairani, A.; Hobbs, R. F.; Vergara Gil, A.; Pacilio, M.; Parodi, K.; Cremonesi, M.; Coca Pérez, M. A.; Di Dia, A.; Ferrari, M.; Guerriero, F.; Battistoni, G.; Pedroli, G.; Paganelli, G.; Torres Aroche, L. A.; Sgouros, G.

    2013-11-01

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculation for nuclear medicine therapy is a topic of increasing interest. 3D dosimetry at the voxel level is one of the major improvements for the development of more accurate calculation techniques, as compared to the standard dosimetry at the organ level. This study aims to use the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to perform patient-specific 3D dosimetry through direct Monte Carlo simulation on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images. To this aim, dedicated routines were developed in the FLUKA environment. Two sets of simulations were performed on model and phantom images. Firstly, the correct handling of PET and SPECT images was tested under the assumption of homogeneous water medium by comparing FLUKA results with those obtained with the voxel kernel convolution method and with other Monte Carlo-based tools developed to the same purpose (the EGS-based 3D-RD software and the MCNP5-based MCID). Afterwards, the correct integration of the PET/SPECT and CT information was tested, performing direct simulations on PET/CT images for both homogeneous (water) and non-homogeneous (water with air, lung and bone inserts) phantoms. Comparison was performed with the other Monte Carlo tools performing direct simulation as well. The absorbed dose maps were compared at the voxel level. In the case of homogeneous water, by simulating 108 primary particles a 2% average difference with respect to the kernel convolution method was achieved; such difference was lower than the statistical uncertainty affecting the FLUKA results. The agreement with the other tools was within 3-4%, partially ascribable to the differences among the simulation algorithms. Including the CT-based density map, the average difference was always within 4% irrespective of the medium (water, air, bone), except for a maximum 6% value when comparing FLUKA and 3D-RD in air. The results confirmed that the routines were properly developed, opening the way for the use of FLUKA for patient-specific, image

  8. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for 3D patient-specific dosimetry on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images.

    PubMed

    Botta, F; Mairani, A; Hobbs, R F; Vergara Gil, A; Pacilio, M; Parodi, K; Cremonesi, M; Coca Pérez, M A; Di Dia, A; Ferrari, M; Guerriero, F; Battistoni, G; Pedroli, G; Paganelli, G; Torres Aroche, L A; Sgouros, G

    2013-11-21

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculation for nuclear medicine therapy is a topic of increasing interest. 3D dosimetry at the voxel level is one of the major improvements for the development of more accurate calculation techniques, as compared to the standard dosimetry at the organ level. This study aims to use the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to perform patient-specific 3D dosimetry through direct Monte Carlo simulation on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images. To this aim, dedicated routines were developed in the FLUKA environment. Two sets of simulations were performed on model and phantom images. Firstly, the correct handling of PET and SPECT images was tested under the assumption of homogeneous water medium by comparing FLUKA results with those obtained with the voxel kernel convolution method and with other Monte Carlo-based tools developed to the same purpose (the EGS-based 3D-RD software and the MCNP5-based MCID). Afterwards, the correct integration of the PET/SPECT and CT information was tested, performing direct simulations on PET/CT images for both homogeneous (water) and non-homogeneous (water with air, lung and bone inserts) phantoms. Comparison was performed with the other Monte Carlo tools performing direct simulation as well. The absorbed dose maps were compared at the voxel level. In the case of homogeneous water, by simulating 10(8) primary particles a 2% average difference with respect to the kernel convolution method was achieved; such difference was lower than the statistical uncertainty affecting the FLUKA results. The agreement with the other tools was within 3–4%, partially ascribable to the differences among the simulation algorithms. Including the CT-based density map, the average difference was always within 4% irrespective of the medium (water, air, bone), except for a maximum 6% value when comparing FLUKA and 3D-RD in air. The results confirmed that the routines were properly developed, opening the way for the use of FLUKA for patient-specific, image

  9. Dosimetry of an In-Line Kilovoltage Imaging System and Implementation in Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Alaei, Parham; Licht, Norbert; Rübe, Christian

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To present the beam properties of the Siemens 70-kV and 121-kV linear accelerator-mounted imaging modalities and commissioning of the 121-kV beam in the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS); measurements in an Alderson phantom were performed for verification of the model and to estimate the cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging dose in the head and neck, thorax, and pelvis. Methods and Materials: The beam profiles and depth–dose curve were measured in an acrylic phantom using thermoluminescent dosimeters and a soft x-ray ionization chamber. Measurements were imported into the TPS, modeled, and verified by phantom measurements. Results: Modeling of the profiles and the depth–dose curve can be achieved with good quality. Comparison with the measurements in the Alderson phantom is generally good; only very close to bony structures is the dose underestimated by the TPS. For a 200° arc CBCT of the head and neck, a maximum dose of 7 mGy is measured; the thorax and pelvis 360° CBCTs give doses of 4-10 mGy and 7-15 mGy, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric characteristics of the Siemens kVision imaging modalities are presented and modeled in the Pinnacle TPS. Thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in the Alderson phantom agree well with the calculated TPS dose, validating the model and providing an estimate of the imaging dose for different protocols.

  10. Characterization of the homogeneous tissue mixture approximation in breast imaging dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Bliznakova, Kristina; Qin Xulei; Fei Baowei; Feng, Steve Si Jia

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the estimate of normalized glandular dose in mammography and breast CT imaging obtained using the actual glandular tissue distribution in the breast to that obtained using the homogeneous tissue mixture approximation. Methods: Twenty volumetric images of patient breasts were acquired with a dedicated breast CT prototype system and the voxels in the breast CT images were automatically classified into skin, adipose, and glandular tissue. The breasts in the classified images underwent simulated mechanical compression to mimic the conditions present during mammographic acquisition. The compressed thickness for each breast was set to that achieved during each patient's last screening cranio-caudal (CC) acquisition. The volumetric glandular density of each breast was computed using both the compressed and uncompressed classified images, and additional images were created in which all voxels representing adipose and glandular tissue were replaced by a homogeneous mixture of these two tissues in a proportion corresponding to each breast's volumetric glandular density. All four breast images (compressed and uncompressed; heterogeneous and homogeneous tissue) were input into Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the normalized glandular dose during mammography (compressed breasts) and dedicated breast CT (uncompressed breasts). For the mammography simulations the x-ray spectra used was that used during each patient's last screening CC acquisition. For the breast CT simulations, two x-ray spectra were used, corresponding to the x-ray spectra with the lowest and highest energies currently being used in dedicated breast CT prototype systems under clinical investigation. The resulting normalized glandular dose for the heterogeneous and homogeneous versions of each breast for each modality was compared. Results: For mammography, the normalized glandular dose based on the homogeneous tissue approximation was, on average, 27% higher than that estimated using the

  11. Characterization of the homogeneous tissue mixture approximation in breast imaging dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Bliznakova, Kristina; Qin, Xulei; Fei, Baowei; Feng, Steve Si Jia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the estimate of normalized glandular dose in mammography and breast CT imaging obtained using the actual glandular tissue distribution in the breast to that obtained using the homogeneous tissue mixture approximation. Methods: Twenty volumetric images of patient breasts were acquired with a dedicated breast CT prototype system and the voxels in the breast CT images were automatically classified into skin, adipose, and glandular tissue. The breasts in the classified images underwent simulated mechanical compression to mimic the conditions present during mammographic acquisition. The compressed thickness for each breast was set to that achieved during each patient's last screening cranio-caudal (CC) acquisition. The volumetric glandular density of each breast was computed using both the compressed and uncompressed classified images, and additional images were created in which all voxels representing adipose and glandular tissue were replaced by a homogeneous mixture of these two tissues in a proportion corresponding to each breast's volumetric glandular density. All four breast images (compressed and uncompressed; heterogeneous and homogeneous tissue) were input into Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the normalized glandular dose during mammography (compressed breasts) and dedicated breast CT (uncompressed breasts). For the mammography simulations the x-ray spectra used was that used during each patient's last screening CC acquisition. For the breast CT simulations, two x-ray spectra were used, corresponding to the x-ray spectra with the lowest and highest energies currently being used in dedicated breast CT prototype systems under clinical investigation. The resulting normalized glandular dose for the heterogeneous and homogeneous versions of each breast for each modality was compared. Results: For mammography, the normalized glandular dose based on the homogeneous tissue approximation was, on average, 27% higher than that estimated using the

  12. SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Elzibak, A; Fatemi-Ardekani, A; Soliman, A; Mashouf, S; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, WY; Han, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify and analyze the appearance of calcifications and brachytherapy seeds on magnitude and phase MRI images and to investigate whether they can be distinguished from each other on corrected phase images for application to prostate and breast low dose rate (LDR) implant dosimetry. Methods: An agar-based gel phantom containing two LDR brachytherapy seeds (Advantage Pd-103, IsoAid, 0.8mm diameter, 4.5mm length) and two spherical calcifications (large: 7mm diameter and small: 4mm diameter) was constructed and imaged on a 3T Philips MR scanner using a 16-channel head coil and a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence (2mm slices, 320mm FOV, TR/ TE= 26.5/5.3ms, 15 degree flip angle). The phase images were unwrapped and corrected using a 32×32, 2D Hanning high pass filter to remove background phase noise. Appearance of the seeds and calcifications was assessed visually and quantitatively using Osirix (http://www.osirix-viewer.com/). Results: As expected, calcifications and brachytherapy seeds appeared dark (hypointense) relative to the surrounding gel on the magnitude MRI images. The diameter of each seed without the surrounding artifact was measured to be 0.1 cm on the magnitude image, while diameters of 0.79 and 0.37 cm were measured for the larger and smaller calcifications, respectively. On the corrected phase images, the brachytherapy seeds and the calcifications appeared bright (hyperintense). The diameter of the seeds was larger on the phase images (0.17 cm) likely due to the dipole effect. Conclusion: MRI has the best soft tissue contrast for accurate organ delineation leading to most accurate implant dosimetry. This work demonstrated that phase images can potentially be useful in identifying brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate and breast due to their bright appearance, which helps in their visualization and quantification for accurate dosimetry using MR-only. Future work includes optimizing phase filters to best identify

  13. Breast Patient Setup Error Assessment: Comparison of Electronic Portal Image Devices and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Matching Results

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Nijkamp, Jasper; Rasch, Coen; Minkema, Danny; Remeijer, Peter; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify the differences in setup errors measured with the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and electronic portal image devices (EPID) in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Repeat CBCT scan were acquired for routine offline setup verification in 20 breast cancer patients. During the CBCT imaging fractions, EPID images of the treatment beams were recorded. Registrations of the bony anatomy for CBCT to planning CT and EPID to digitally reconstructed-radiographs (DRRs) were compared. In addition, similar measurements of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom were acquired. Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis were performed for clinical and phantom registrations. Systematic and random setup errors were quantified for CBCT and EPID-driven correction protocols in the EPID coordinate system (U, V), with V parallel to the cranial-caudal axis and U perpendicular to V and the central beam axis. Results: Bland-Altman analysis of clinical EPID and CBCT registrations yielded 4 to 6-mm limits of agreement, indicating that both methods were not compatible. The EPID-based setup errors were smaller than the CBCT-based setup errors. Phantom measurements showed that CBCT accurately measures setup error whereas EPID underestimates setup errors in the cranial-caudal direction. In the clinical measurements, the residual bony anatomy setup errors after offline CBCT-based corrections were {Sigma}{sub U} = 1.4 mm, {Sigma}{sub V} = 1.7 mm, and {sigma}{sub U} = 2.6 mm, {sigma}{sub V} = 3.1 mm. Residual setup errors of EPID driven corrections corrected for underestimation were estimated at {Sigma}{sub U} = 2.2mm, {Sigma}{sub V} = 3.3 mm, and {sigma}{sub U} = 2.9 mm, {sigma}{sub V} = 2.9 mm. Conclusion: EPID registration underestimated the actual bony anatomy setup error in breast cancer patients by 20% to 50%. Using CBCT decreased setup uncertainties significantly.

  14. Whole-body biodistribution and dosimetry estimates of a novel radiotracer for imaging of serotonin 4 receptors in brain: [¹⁸F]MNI-698.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S; Caillé, Fabien; Barret, Olivier; Papin, Caroline; Lee, Hsiaoju; Morley, Thomas J; Fowles, Krista; Holden, Daniel; Seibyl, John P; Alagille, David; Tamagnan, Gilles D

    2014-01-01

    A new radiotracer for imaging the serotonin 4 receptors (5-HT4) in brain, [¹⁸F]MNI-698, was recently developed by our group. Evaluation in nonhuman primates indicates the novel radiotracer holds promise as an imaging agent of 5-HT4 in brain. This paper aims to describe the whole-body biodistribution and dosimetry estimates of [¹⁸F]MNI-698. Whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) images were acquired over 240 minutes after intravenous bolus injection of [¹⁸F]MNI-698 in adult rhesus monkeys. Different models were investigated for quantification of radiation absorbed and effective doses using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 software. The radiotracer main elimination route was found to be urinary and the critical organ was the urinary bladder. Modeling of the urinary bladder voiding interval had a considerable effect on the estimated effective dose. Normalization of rhesus monkeys' organs and whole-body masses to human equivalent reduced the calculated dosimetry values. The effective dose ranged between 0.017 and 0.027 mSv/MBq. The dosimetry estimates, obtained when normalizing organ and whole-body weights and applying the urinary bladder model, indicate that the radiation doses from [¹⁸F]MNI-698 comply with limits and guidelines recommended by key regulatory authorities that govern the translation of radiotracers to human clinical trials. The timing of urinary bladder emptying should be considered when designing future clinical protocols with [¹⁸F]MNI-698, in order to minimize the subject absorbed doses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dosimetry and Image Quality in Control Studies in Computerised Tomography Realized to Paediatric Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, M. R.; Dies, P.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Rickards, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2008-08-01

    Computerised tomography (CT) is a favourite method of medical diagnosis. Its use has thus increased rapidly throughout the world, particularly in studies relating to children. However to avoid administering unnecessarily high doses of radiation to paediatric patients it is important to have correct dose reference levels to minimize risk. The research is being developed within the public health sector at the Hospital Infantil de México "Dr. Federico Gómez." We measured the entrance surface air kerma (KP) in paediatric patients, during the radiological studies of control in CT (studies of head, thorax and abdomen). Phantom was used to evaluate image quality as the tomograph requires a high resolution image in order to operate at its optimum level.

  16. Dosimetry and Image Quality in Control Studies in Computerised Tomography Realized to Paediatric Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, M. R.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Dies, P.; Rickards, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2008-08-11

    Computerised tomography (CT) is a favourite method of medical diagnosis. Its use has thus increased rapidly throughout the world, particularly in studies relating to children. However to avoid administering unnecessarily high doses of radiation to paediatric patients it is important to have correct dose reference levels to minimize risk. The research is being developed within the public health sector at the Hospital Infantil de Mexico 'Dr. Federico Gomez.' We measured the entrance surface air kerma (K{sub P}) in paediatric patients, during the radiological studies of control in CT (studies of head, thorax and abdomen). Phantom was used to evaluate image quality as the tomograph requires a high resolution image in order to operate at its optimum level.

  17. Cherenkov radiation dosimetry in water tanks - video rate imaging, tomography and IMRT & VMAT plan verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Glaser, Adam K.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gladstone, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of three types of imaging of radiation beams in water tanks for comparison to dose maps. The first was simple depth and lateral profile verification, showing excellent agreement between Cherenkov and planned dose, as predicted by the treatment planning system for a square 5cm beam. The second approach was 3D tomography of such beams, using a rotating water tank with camera attached, and using filtered backprojection for the recovery of the 3D volume. The final presentation was real time 2D imaging of IMRT or VMAT treatments in a water tank. In all cases the match to the treatment planning system was within what would be considered acceptable for clinical medical physics acceptance.

  18. Dosimetry for Radiopharmaceutical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Hobbs, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) involves the use of radionuclides that are either conjugated to tumor-targeting agents (eg, nanoscale constructs, antibodies, peptides, and small molecules) or concentrated in tissue through natural physiological mechanisms that occur predominantly in neoplastic or otherwise targeted cells (eg, Graves disease). The ability to collect pharmacokinetic data by imaging and use this to perform dosimetry calculations for treatment planning distinguishes RPT from other systemic treatment modalities. Treatment planning has not been widely adopted, in part, because early attempts to relate dosimetry to outcome were not successful. This was partially because a dosimetry methodology appropriate to risk evaluation rather than efficacy and toxicity was being applied to RPT. The weakest links in both diagnostic and therapeutic dosimetry are the accuracy of the input and the reliability of the radiobiological models used to convert dosimetric data to the relevant biologic end points. Dosimetry for RPT places a greater demand on both of these weak links. To date, most dosimetric studies have been retrospective, with a focus on tumor dose-response correlations rather than prospective treatment planning. In this regard, transarterial radioembolization also known as intra-arterial radiation therapy, which uses radiolabeled (90Y) microspheres of glass or resin to treat lesions in the liver holds much promise for more widespread dosimetric treatment planning. The recent interest in RPT with alpha-particle emitters has highlighted the need to adopt a dosimetry methodology that specifically accounts for the unique aspects of alpha particles. The short range of alpha-particle emitters means that in cases in which the distribution of activity is localized to specific functional components or cell types of an organ, the absorbed dose will be equally localized and dosimetric calculations on the scale of organs or even voxels (~5 mm) are no longer sufficient

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of a novel water-equivalent electronic portal imaging device using plastic scintillating fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Teymurazyan, A.; Pang, G.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Most electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) developed so far use a thin Cu plate/phosphor screen to convert x-ray energies into light photons, while maintaining a high spatial resolution. This results in a low x-ray absorption and thus a low quantum efficiency (QE) of approximately 2-4% for megavoltage (MV) x-rays. A significant increase of QE is desirable for applications such as MV cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). Furthermore, the Cu plate/phosphor screen contains high atomic number (high-Z) materials, resulting in an undesirable over-response to low energy x-rays (due to photoelectric effect) as well as high energy x-rays (due to pair production) when used for dosimetric verification. Our goal is to develop a new MV x-ray detector that has a high QE and uses low-Z materials to overcome the obstacles faced by current MV x-ray imaging technologies. Methods: A new high QE and low-Z EPID is proposed. It consists of a matrix of plastic scintillating fibers embedded in a water-equivalent medium and coupled to an optically sensitive 2D active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) for image readout. It differs from the previous approach that uses segmented crystalline scintillators made of higher density and higher atomic number materials to detect MV x-rays. The plastic scintillating fibers are focused toward the x-ray source to avoid image blurring due to oblique incidence of off-axis x-rays. When MV x-rays interact with the scintillating fibers in the detector, scintillation light will be produced. The light photons produced in a fiber core and emitted within the acceptance angle of the fiber will be guided toward the AMFPI by total internal reflection. A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to investigate imaging and dosimetric characteristics of the proposed detector under irradiation of MV x-rays. Results: Properties, such as detection efficiency, modulation transfer function, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), energy dependence of detector

  20. Patient dosimetry for 90Y selective internal radiation treatment based on 90Y PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sherry C; Lee, Victor H; Law, Martin W; Liu, Rico K; Ma, Vivian W; Tso, Wai Kuen; Leung, To Wai

    2013-09-06

    Until recently, the radiation dose to patients undergoing the 90Y selective internal radiation treatment (SIRT) procedure is determined by applying the partition model to 99mTc MAA pretreatment scan. There can be great uncertainty in radiation dose calculated from this approach and we presented a method to compute the 3D dose distributions resulting from 90Y SIRT based on 90Y positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Five 90Y SIRT treatments were retrospectively analyzed. After 90Y SIRT, patients had 90Y PET/CT imaging within 6 hours of the procedure. To obtain the 3D dose distribution of the patients, their respective 90Y PET images were convolved with a Monte Carlo generated voxel dose kernel. The sensitivity of the PET/CT scanner for 90Y was determined through phantom studies. The 3D dose distributions were then presented in DICOM RT dose format. By applying the linear quadratic model to the dose data, we derived the biologically effective dose and dose equivalent to 2 Gy/fraction delivery, taking into account the spatial and temporal dose rate variations specific for SIRT. Based on this data, we intend to infer tumor control probability and risk of radiation induced liver injury from SIRT by comparison with established dose limits. For the five cases, the mean dose to target ranged from 51.7 ± 28.6 Gy to 163 ± 53.7 Gy. Due to the inhomogeneous nature of the dose distribution, the GTVs were not covered adequately, leading to very low values of tumor control probability. The mean dose to the normal liver ranged from 21.4 ± 30.7 to 36.7 ± 25.9 Gy. According to QUANTEC recommendation, a patient with primary liver cancer and a patient with metastatic liver cancer has more than 5% risk of radiotherapy-induced liver disease (RILD).

  1. Small field of view cone beam CT temporomandibular joint imaging dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Lukat, T D; Wong, J C M; Lam, E W N

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Cone beam CT (CBCT) is generally accepted as the imaging modality of choice for visualisation of the osseous structures of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation dose of a protocol for CBCT TMJ imaging using a large field of view Hitachi CB MercuRay™ unit (Hitachi Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) with an alternative approach that utilizes two CBCT acquisitions of the right and left TMJs using the Kodak 9000® 3D system (Carestream, Rochester, NY). Methods: 25 optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters were placed in various locations of an anthropomorphic RANDO® Man phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories, Stanford, CT). Dosimetric measurements were performed for each technique, and effective doses were calculated using the 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection tissue weighting factor recommendations for all protocols. Results: The radiation effective dose for the CB MercuRay technique was 223.6 ± 1.1 μSv compared with 9.7 ± 0.1 μSv (child), 13.5 ± 0.9 μSv (adolescent/small adult) and 20.5 ± 1.3 μSv (adult) for the bilateral Kodak acquisitions. Conclusions: Acquisitions of individual right and left TMJ volumes using the Kodak 9000 3D CBCT imaging system resulted in a more than ten-fold reduction in the effective dose compared with the larger single field acquisition with the Hitachi CB MercuRay. This decrease is made even more significant when lower tube potential and tube current settings are used. PMID:24048693

  2. Small field of view cone beam CT temporomandibular joint imaging dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Lukat, T D; Wong, J C M; Lam, E W N

    2013-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) is generally accepted as the imaging modality of choice for visualisation of the osseous structures of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation dose of a protocol for CBCT TMJ imaging using a large field of view Hitachi CB MercuRay™ unit (Hitachi Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) with an alternative approach that utilizes two CBCT acquisitions of the right and left TMJs using the Kodak 9000(®) 3D system (Carestream, Rochester, NY). 25 optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters were placed in various locations of an anthropomorphic RANDO(®) Man phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories, Stanford, CT). Dosimetric measurements were performed for each technique, and effective doses were calculated using the 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection tissue weighting factor recommendations for all protocols. The radiation effective dose for the CB MercuRay technique was 223.6 ± 1.1 μSv compared with 9.7 ± 0.1 μSv (child), 13.5 ± 0.9 μSv (adolescent/small adult) and 20.5 ± 1.3 μSv (adult) for the bilateral Kodak acquisitions. Acquisitions of individual right and left TMJ volumes using the Kodak 9000 3D CBCT imaging system resulted in a more than ten-fold reduction in the effective dose compared with the larger single field acquisition with the Hitachi CB MercuRay. This decrease is made even more significant when lower tube potential and tube current settings are used.

  3. aSi EPIDs for the in-vivo dosimetry of static and dynamic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermattei, A.; Cilla, S.; Azario, L.; Greco, F.; Russo, M.; Grusio, M.; Orlandini, L.; Fidanzio, A.

    2015-10-01

    Portal imaging by amorphous silicon (aSi) photodiode is currently the most applied technology for in-vivo dosimetry (IVD) of static and dynamic radiotherapy beams. The strategy, adopted in this work to perform the IVD procedure by aSi EPID, is based on: in patient reconstruction of the isocenter dose and day to day comparison between 2D-portal images to verify the reproducibility of treatment delivery. About 20.000 tests have been carried out in this last 3 years in 8 radiotherapy centers using the SOFTDISO program. The IVD results show that: (i) the procedure can be implemented for linacs of different manufacturer, (ii) the IVD analysis can be obtained on a computer screen, in quasi real time (about 2 min after the treatment delivery) and (iii) once the causes of the discrepancies were eliminated, all the global IVD tests for single patient were within the acceptance criteria defined by: ±5% for the isocenter dose, and Pγ<1≥90% of the checked points for the 2D portal image γ-analysis. This work is the result of a project supported by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) and Università Cattolica del S.Cuore (UCSC).

  4. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  5. Safety, pharmacokinetic and dosimetry evaluation of the proposed thrombus imaging agent 99mTc-DI-DD-3B6/22-80B3 Fab'.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, David J; Smart, Richard C; Tsui, Wendy W; Gerometta, Michael; Eisenberg, Paul R; Scott, Andrew M

    2006-06-01

    (99m)Tc-DI-DD-3B6/22-80B3 (Thromboview, hereafter abbreviated to (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab') is a humanised, radiolabelled monoclonal antibody Fab' fragment with high affinity and specificity for the D-dimer domain of cross-linked fibrin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of four increasing doses of (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' in healthy volunteers. Thirty-two healthy volunteers (18-70 years; 16 male, 16 female) received a single intravenous injection of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 or 4.0 mg of (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab'. Safety outcomes (vital signs, electrocardiography, haematology, biochemistry, adverse events and development of human anti-human antibodies) were assessed up to 30 days post injection. Blood and urine samples were collected up to 48 h post injection. Gamma camera images were acquired at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h post injection. Dosimetry was performed using standard MIRD methodology. No adverse events considered to be drug related were observed. Human anti-human antibody was not detectable in any subject during the follow-up period. (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' had a rapid initial plasma clearance (t (1/2)alpha=1 h). The pharmacokinetic profile of the Fab' fragment was generally linear across the four dose cohorts. By 24 h, 30-35% of the administered radioactivity appeared in the urine. There was marked renal accumulation with time, but no specific uptake was identified within other normal tissues. The effective dose was 9 mSv/750 MBq. (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' is well tolerated, is rapidly cleared and exhibits clinically acceptable dosimetry-characteristics well suited to a potential thrombus imaging agent.

  6. Radiation dosimetry of iodine-123 HEAT, an alpha-1 receptor imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.D.; Greer, D.M.; Couch, M.W.; Williams, C.M.

    1987-11-01

    Biologic distribution data in the rat were obtained for the alpha-1 adrenoceptor imaging agent (+/-) 2-(beta-(iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylaminomethyl)tetralone (HEAT) labeled with (/sup 123/I). The major excretory routes were through the liver (67%) and the kidney (33%). Internal radiation absorbed dose estimates to nine source organs, total body, the GI tract, gonads, and red bone marrow were calculated for the human using the physical decay data for (/sup 123/I). The critical organ was found to be the lower large intestine, receiving 1.1 rad per mCi of (/sup 123/I)HEAT administered. The total-body dose was found to be 58 mrad per mCi.

  7. Effect of image uncertainty on the dosimetry of trigeminal neuralgia irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jursinic, Paul A. . E-mail: Pjursinic@radonc.mcw.edu; Rickert, Kim; Gennarelli, Thomas A.; Schultz, Christopher J.

    2005-08-01

    Objective: Our objective was to quantify the uncertainty in localization of the trigeminal nerve (TGN) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) and to determine the effect of this uncertainty on gamma-knife dose delivery. Methods: An MR/CT test phantom with 9, 0.6-mm diameter, copper rings was devised. The absolute ring positions in stereotactic space were determined by the angiographic module of the LGP software. The standard deviation, {sigma}, in the difference between the absolute and MR-measured or CT-measured coordinates of the rings was determined. The trigeminal nerve in 52 previously treated patients was contoured and expanded by 1{sigma} and 2{sigma} margins to model the uncertainty in the location of the nerve. For gamma-knife treatment, a single isocenter was used and was located at the distal cisternal portion of the trigeminal nerve root. Irradiation methods included a 4-mm collimator, 90 Gy to isocenter and a 4 and 8-mm collimator, 70 Gy to isocenter. A patient outcome survey that sampled pain relief and morbidity was done. Results: The MR coordinate {sigma} was 0.7 mm left-right, 0.8 mm anterior-posterior, and 0.6 mm superior-inferior, and the CT coordinate {sigma} was 0.4 mm left-right, 0.2 mm anterior-posterior, and 0.2 mm superior-inferior. A 45% higher dose line covered the TGN with the 4 and 8-mm method. No significant increase in pain reduction or morbidity occurred. Conclusions: The uncertainty of target location by MRI is more than twice that found in CT imaging. The 4 and 8-mm collimator method covers the trigeminal root cross section with a higher isodose line than does the 4-mm method. This higher dose did not significantly reduce pain or increase morbidity.

  8. The CEOS-Land Surface Imaging Constellation Portal for GEOSS: A resource for land surface imaging system information and data access

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holm, Thomas; Gallo, Kevin P.; Bailey, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites is an international group that coordinates civil space-borne observations of the Earth, and provides the space component of the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). The CEOS Virtual Constellations concept was implemented in an effort to engage and coordinate disparate Earth observing programs of CEOS member agencies and ultimately facilitate their contribution in supplying the space-based observations required to satisfy the requirements of the GEOSS. The CEOS initially established Study Teams for four prototype constellations that included precipitation, land surface imaging, ocean surface topography, and atmospheric composition. The basic mission of the Land Surface Imaging (LSI) Constellation [1] is to promote the efficient, effective, and comprehensive collection, distribution, and application of space-acquired image data of the global land surface, especially to meet societal needs of the global population, such as those addressed by the nine Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs) of agriculture, biodiversity, climate, disasters, ecosystems, energy, health, water, and weather. The LSI Constellation Portal is the result of an effort to address important goals within the LSI Constellation mission and provide resources to assist in planning for future space missions that might further contribute to meeting those goals.

  9. The CEOS-Land Surface Imaging Constellation Portal for GEOSS: A resource for land surface imaging system information and data access

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holm, Thomas; Gallo, Kevin P.; Bailey, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites is an international group that coordinates civil space-borne observations of the Earth, and provides the space component of the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). The CEOS Virtual Constellations concept was implemented in an effort to engage and coordinate disparate Earth observing programs of CEOS member agencies and ultimately facilitate their contribution in supplying the space-based observations required to satisfy the requirements of the GEOSS. The CEOS initially established Study Teams for four prototype constellations that included precipitation, land surface imaging, ocean surface topography, and atmospheric composition. The basic mission of the Land Surface Imaging (LSI) Constellation [1] is to promote the efficient, effective, and comprehensive collection, distribution, and application of space-acquired image data of the global land surface, especially to meet societal needs of the global population, such as those addressed by the nine Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs) of agriculture, biodiversity, climate, disasters, ecosystems, energy, health, water, and weather. The LSI Constellation Portal is the result of an effort to address important goals within the LSI Constellation mission and provide resources to assist in planning for future space missions that might further contribute to meeting those goals.

  10. Secure portal.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Cynthia Lee

    2007-09-01

    There is a need in security systems to rapidly and accurately grant access of authorized personnel to a secure facility while denying access to unauthorized personnel. In many cases this role is filled by security personnel, which can be very costly. Systems that can perform this role autonomously without sacrificing accuracy or speed of throughput are very appealing. To address the issue of autonomous facility access through the use of technology, the idea of a ''secure portal'' is introduced. A secure portal is a defined zone where state-of-the-art technology can be implemented to grant secure area access or to allow special privileges for an individual. Biometric technologies are of interest because they are generally more difficult to defeat than technologies such as badge swipe and keypad entry. The biometric technologies selected for this concept were facial and gait recognition. They were chosen since they require less user cooperation than other biometrics such as fingerprint, iris, and hand geometry and because they have the most potential for flexibility in deployment. The secure portal concept could be implemented within the boundaries of an entry area to a facility. As a person is approaching a badge and/or PIN portal, face and gait information can be gathered and processed. The biometric information could be fused for verification against the information that is gathered from the badge. This paper discusses a facial recognition technology that was developed for the purposes of providing high verification probabilities with low false alarm rates, which would be required of an autonomous entry control system. In particular, a 3-D facial recognition approach using Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis is described. Gait recognition technology, based on Hidden Markov Models has been explored, but those results are not included in this paper. Fusion approaches for combining the results of the biometrics would be the next step in realizing the secure portal

  11. Portal MV imaging with thin-film High-Energy Current X-ray detectors: A Monte Carlo Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Zygmanski, Piotr; Sajo, Erno

    2017-10-04

    We investigate the potential of the recently introduced High-Energy Current (HEC) thin-film detector as an alternative design to existing electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). The HEC radiation detectors employ multiple nano-/micro-meter layers made of disparate atomic number (Z) conductors separated by solid or gaseous (e.g., air) dielectrics. The HEC detector may be designed as an external structure or an auxiliary device integrated into the existing EPID. Using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations, we compare the image contrast of a HEC detector to that of a commercial EPID device (AS500) for a 2.5 MV X-ray beam. The detector response was modeled using a series of mono-energetic incident photons with detector signal scored as the energy deposition in the air gaps (HEC) and in the phosphor layer (EPID). Las Vegas (LV) phantom was employed to test the spatial resolution and contrast of the single- and multi-element HEC detector. The HEC detector pixel size was the same as for AS500 (0.78 mm × 0.78 mm). In addition, image contrast of a water/bone phantom using both the multi-element HEC and EPID detectors was simulated and compared. The HEC detector has higher relative response to low-energy photons compared to EPID. The multi-element HEC has 32.3 times greater response at 100 keV than at 500 keV, while the EPID without copper shows a factor of 6.8 between the same energies. LV phantom images indicate that the image contrast is approximately the same for single- and multi-element HEC detectors, but the latter has lower noise. Both single- and multi-element HEC could resolve a 2 mm diameter hole with an image magnification factor of 1.2. In the present design, the HEC detector has much less material (9.66 mg/cm(2) gold) compared to EPID (133 mg/cm(2) Gd2 O2 S) to interact with incident photons. For imaging bony structures, the HEC detector needs about 9 times greater photon flux as the EPID to acquire data at same uncertainty level. Despite this, the HEC sensor

  12. The linear accelerator mechanical and radiation isocentre assessment with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID).

    PubMed

    Liu, G; van Doorn, T; Bezak, E

    2004-09-01

    Regular checks on the performance of radiotherapy treatment units are essential and a variety of protocols has been published. These protocols identify that the determination of isocentre must be accurate and unambiguous since both the localization of a radiation field on a patient and positioning aids are referenced to it. An EPID (BIS 710) with a combined light and radiation scintillation detector screen was used to assess mechanical and radiation isocentres for different collimator and gantry angles. Crosshair positions within light field images were determined from fitted Gaussian intensity profiles and then used to calculate the displacement of the mechanical isocentre. For comparison, the position of the crosshair was also recorded on a graph paper. The radiation field centre was first calculated from the set up geometry for given gantry/collimator angles and then compared with measured values to assess the displacement of the radiation isocentre. The radiation isocentre was also checked by locating a marker, positioned on the couch, on the EPID radiation images for different treatment couch angles. The mechanical and radiation isocentres were determined from the EPID light field and radiation images respectively with an accuracy of 0.3 mm using simple PC based programs. The study has demonstrated the feasibility of using the EPID to assess mechanical and radiation isocentres of a linear accelerator in a quick and efficient way with a higher degree of accuracy achieved as compared to more conventional methods, e.g. the star shot.

  13. Review of tissue simulating phantoms for optical spectroscopy, imaging and dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Patterson, Michael S.

    2006-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy, imaging, and therapy tissue phantoms must have the scattering and absorption properties that are characteristic of human tissues, and over the past few decades, many useful models have been created. In this work, an overview of their composition and properties is outlined, by separating matrix, scattering, and absorbing materials, and discussing the benefits and weaknesses in each category. Matrix materials typically are water, gelatin, agar, polyester or epoxy and polyurethane resin, room-temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone, or polyvinyl alcohol gels. The water and hydrogel materials provide a soft medium that is biologically and biochemically compatible with addition of organic molecules, and are optimal for scientific laboratory studies. Polyester, polyurethane, and silicone phantoms are essentially permanent matrix compositions that are suitable for routine calibration and testing of established systems. The most common three choices for scatters have been: (1.) lipid based emulsions, (2.) titanium or aluminum oxide powders, and (3.) polymer microspheres. The choice of absorbers varies widely from hemoglobin and cells for biological simulation, to molecular dyes and ink as less biological but more stable absorbers. This review is an attempt to indicate which sets of phantoms are optimal for specific applications, and provide links to studies that characterize main phantom material properties and recipes.

  14. A field size specific backscatter correction algorithm for accurate EPID dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Berry, Sean L; Polvorosa, Cynthia S; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2010-06-01

    Portal dose images acquired with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) suffer from artifacts related to backscattered radiation. The backscatter signal varies as a function of field size (FS) and location on the EPID. Most current portal dosimetry algorithms fail to account for the FS dependence. The ramifications of this omission are investigated and solutions for correcting the measured dose images for FS specific backscatter are proposed. A series of open field dose images were obtained for field sizes ranging from 2×2 to 30×40cm2. Each image was analyzed to determine the amount of backscatter present. Two methods to account for the relationship between FS and backscatter are offered. These include the use of discrete FS specific correction matrices and the use of a single generalized equation. The efficacy of each approach was tested on the clinical dosimetric images for ten patients, 49 treatment fields. The fields were evaluated to determine whether there was an improvement in the dosimetric result over the commercial vendor's current algorithm. It was found that backscatter manifests itself as an asymmetry in the measured signal primarily in the inplane direction. The maximum error is approximately 3.6% for 10×10 and 12.5×12.5cm2 field sizes. The asymmetry decreased with increasing FS to approximately 0.6% for fields larger than 30×30cm2. The dosimetric comparison between the measured and predicted dose images was significantly improved (p⪡.001) when a FS specific backscatter correction was applied. The average percentage of points passing a 2%, 2 mm gamma criteria increased from 90.6% to between 96.7% and 97.2% after the proposed methods were employed. The error observed in a measured portal dose image depends on how much its FS differs from the 30×40cm2 calibration conditions. The proposed methods for correcting for FS specific backscatter effectively improved the ability of the EPID to perform dosimetric measurements

  15. Standard Specimen Reference Set: Breast Cancer and Imaging — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The primary objective of this study is to assemble a well-characterized set of blood specimens and images to test biomarkers that, in conjunction with mammography, can detect and discriminate breast cancer. These samples will be divided to provide “sets” of specimens that can be tested in a number of different laboratories. Since tests will be performed on the same sets of samples, the data will be directly comparable and decisions regarding which biomarker or set of biomarkers have value in breast cancer detection can be made. These sets will reside at a National Cancer Institute facility at Frederick, MD.

  16. The Effect of Registration Surrogate and Patient Factors on the Interobserver Variability of Electronic Portal Image Guidance During Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Vickie Lockwood, Gina; Yan Jing; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter; Bayley, Andrew; Rosewall, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Intraprostatic fiducial markers (IPM) and electronic portal imaging (EPI) are commonly used to identify and correct for prostate motion during radiotherapy. However, little data is available on the precision of this image-guidance technique. This study quantified impact of different registration surrogates and patient factors on the interobserver variability of manual EPI alignment during prostate radiotherapy. For 50 prostate radiotherapy patients previously implanted with 3 IPM, five observers manually aligned 150 pairs of orthogonal EPI to the reference digital reconstructed radiograph using Varian Vision EPI analysis software. Images were aligned using: Bony anatomy (BA), single mid-prostate IPM (SM); and 2 strategies using 3 IPM: center of mass (COM) and rotate and translate (R and T). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to quantify interobserver variability. The absolute displacements measured using SM and R and T were compared with those using COM. The impact of patients' pelvic diameter and adjuvant hormone therapy on interobserver variability were also evaluated. Twelve thousand displacement values were collected for analysis. The maximum discrepancy between the 5 observers was >2 mm in 47% of measurements using BA, 5% using SM, 4% using R and T, and 3% using COM. Both of the 3 IPM alignment strategies demonstrated lower interobserver variability than the single IPM strategy (ICC 0.94-0.97 vs. 0.82-0.94). BA had the highest interobserver variability (ICC = 0.43-0.90). Pelvic diameter and hormone therapy had no discernible impact on interobserver variability. Compared with COM, the absolute displacements measured using the other IPM strategies were statistically different (p < 0.001), but 95% of the absolute magnitude of differences between the strategies were {<=}1 mm. The high reproducibility among the observers demonstrated the precision of prostate localization using multiple IPM and EPI, which was not influenced by the patient

  17. Fast 3D dosimetric verifications based on an electronic portal imaging device using a GPU calculation engine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinhan; Chen, Lixin; Chen, Along; Luo, Guangwen; Deng, Xiaowu; Liu, Xiaowei

    2015-04-11

    To use a graphic processing unit (GPU) calculation engine to implement a fast 3D pre-treatment dosimetric verification procedure based on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The GPU algorithm includes the deconvolution and convolution method for the fluence-map calculations, the collapsed-cone convolution/superposition (CCCS) algorithm for the 3D dose calculations and the 3D gamma evaluation calculations. The results of the GPU-based CCCS algorithm were compared to those of Monte Carlo simulations. The planned and EPID-based reconstructed dose distributions in overridden-to-water phantoms and the original patients were compared for 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans based on dose differences and gamma analysis. The total single-field dose computation time was less than 8 s, and the gamma evaluation for a 0.1-cm grid resolution was completed in approximately 1 s. The results of the GPU-based CCCS algorithm exhibited good agreement with those of the Monte Carlo simulations. The gamma analysis indicated good agreement between the planned and reconstructed dose distributions for the treatment plans. For the target volume, the differences in the mean dose were less than 1.8%, and the differences in the maximum dose were less than 2.5%. For the critical organs, minor differences were observed between the reconstructed and planned doses. The GPU calculation engine was used to boost the speed of 3D dose and gamma evaluation calculations, thus offering the possibility of true real-time 3D dosimetric verification.

  18. SU-E-T-438: Commissioning of An In-Vivo Quality Assurance Method Using the Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, O; Held, M; Pouliot, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient specific pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) using arrays of detectors or film have been the standard approach to assure the correct treatment is delivered to the patient. This QA approach is expensive, labor intensive and does not guarantee or document that all remaining fractions were treated properly. The purpose of this abstract is to commission and evaluate the performance of a commercially available in-vivo QA software using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to record the daily treatments. Methods: The platform EPIgray V2.0.2 (Dosisoft), which machine model compares ratios of TMR with EPID signal to predict dose was commissioned for an Artiste (Siemens Oncology Care Systems) and a Truebeam (Varian medical systems) linear accelerator following the given instructions. The systems were then tested on three different phantoms (homogeneous stack of solid water, anthropomorphic head and pelvis) and on a library of patient cases. Simple and complex fields were delivered at different exposures and for different gantry angles. The effects of the table attenuation and the EPID sagging were evaluated. Gamma analysis of the measured dose was compared to the predicted dose for complex clinical IMRT cases. Results: Commissioning of the EPIgray system for two photon energies took 8 hours. The difference between the dose planned and the dose measured with EPIgray was better than 3% for all phantom scenarios tested. Preliminary results on patients demonstrate an accuracy of 5% is achievable in high dose regions for both 3DCRT and IMRT. Large discrepancies (>5%) were observed due to metallic structures or air cavities and in low dose areas. Flat panel sagging was visible and accounted for in the EPIgray model. Conclusion: The accuracy achieved by EPIgray is sufficient to document the safe delivery of complex IMRT treatments. Future work will evaluate EPIgray for VMAT and high dose rate deliveries. This work is supported by Dosisoft, Cachan, France.

  19. The effect of iodine uptake on radiation dose absorbed by patient tissues in contrast enhanced CT imaging: Implications for CT dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Tzedakis, Antonis; Spanakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E; Hatzidakis, Adam; Damilakis, John

    2017-07-14

    To investigate the effect of iodine uptake on tissue/organ absorbed doses from CT exposure and its implications in CT dosimetry. The contrast-induced CT number increase of several radiosensitive tissues was retrospectively determined in 120 CT examinations involving both non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced CT imaging. CT images of a phantom containing aqueous solutions of varying iodine concentration were obtained. Plots of the CT number increase against iodine concentration were produced. The clinically occurring iodine tissue uptake was quantified by attributing recorded CT number increase to a certain concentration of aqueous iodine solution. Clinically occurring iodine uptake was represented in mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms. Standard 120 kV CT exposures were simulated using Monte Carlo methods and resulting organ doses were derived for non-enhanced and iodine contrast-enhanced CT imaging. The mean iodine uptake range during contrast-enhanced CT imaging was found to be 0.02-0.46% w/w for the investigated tissues, while the maximum value recorded was 0.82% w/w. For the same CT exposure, iodinated tissues were found to receive higher radiation dose than non-iodinated tissues, with dose increase exceeding 100% for tissues with high iodine uptake. Administration of iodinated contrast medium considerably increases radiation dose to tissues from CT exposure. • Radiation absorption ability of organs/tissues is considerably affected by iodine uptake • Iodinated organ/tissues may absorb up to 100 % higher radiation dose • Compared to non-enhanced, contrast-enhanced CT may deliver higher dose to patient tissues • CT dosimetry of contrast-enhanced CT imaging should encounter tissue iodine uptake.

  20. TU-AB-201-11: A Novel Theoretical Framework for MRI-Only Image Guided LDR Prostate and Breast Brachytherapy Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Soliman, A; Elzibak, A; Fatemi, A; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, W; Han, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a novel framework for accurate model-based dose calculations using only MR images for LDR prostate and breast seed implant brachytherapy. Methods: Model-based dose calculation methodologies recommended by TG-186 require further knowledge about specific tissue composition, which is challenging with MRI. However, relying on MRI-only for implant dosimetry would reduce the soft tissue delineation uncertainty, costs, and uncertainties associated with multi-modality registration and fusion processes. We propose a novel framework to address this problem using quantitative MRI acquisitions and reconstruction techniques. The framework includes three steps: (1) Identify the locations of seeds(2) Identify the presence (or absence) of calcification(s)(3) Quantify the water and fat content in the underlying tissueSteps (1) and (2) consider the sources that limit patient dosimetry, particularly the inter-seed attenuation and the calcified regions; while step (3) targets the quantification of the tissue composition to consider the heterogeneities in the medium. Our preliminary work has shown that the seeds and the calcifications can be identified with MRI using both the magnitude and the phase images. By employing susceptibility-weighted imaging with specific post-processing techniques, the phase images can be further explored to distinguish the seeds from the calcifications. Absolute quantification of tissue, water, and fat content is feasible and was previously demonstrated in phantoms and in-vivo applications, particularly for brain diseases. The approach relies on the proportionality of the MR signal to the number of protons in an image volume. By employing appropriate correction algorithms for T1 - and T2*-related biases, B1 transmit and receive field inhomogeneities, absolute water/fat content can be determined. Results: By considering calcification and interseed attenuation, and through the knowledge of water and fat mass density, accurate patient

  1. WE-D-BRA-03: Four-Dimensional Dose Reconstruction Through Retrospective Phase Determination Using Cine Images of Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, J; Jung, J; Yi, B; Kim, J; Yeo, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To test a method to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using the correlation of pre-calculated 4D electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images and measured cine-EPID images. Methods: 1. A phantom designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with 3.0 cm diameter embedded in cork) was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with 2 cm amplitude and 4 sec/cycle. Ten-phase 4D CT images were acquired for treatment planning and dose reconstruction. A 6MV photon beam was irradiated on the phantom with static (field size=5×8.5 cm{sup 2}) and dynamic fields (sliding windows, 10×10 cm{sup 2}, X1 MLC closing in parallel with the tumor movement). 2. 4D and 3D doses were calculated forwardly on PTV (1 cm margin). 3. Dose images on EPID under the fields were calculated for 10 phases. 4. Cine EPID images were acquired during irradiation. 5. Their acquisition times were correlated to the phases of the phantom at which irradiation occurred by inter-comparing calculated “reference” EPID images with measured images (2D gamma comparison). For the dynamic beam, the tumor was hidden under MLCs during a portion of irradiation time; the correlation performed when the tumor was visible was extrapolated. 6. Dose for each phase was reconstructed on the 4D CT images and summed over all phases. The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Monte Carlo methods were used for all calculations. Results: For the open and dynamic beams, the 4D reconstructed doses showed the pass rates of 92.7 % and 100 %, respectively, at the isocenter plane given 3% / 3 mm criteria. The better agreement of the dynamic beam was from its dose gradient which blurred the otherwise sharp difference between forward and reconstructed doses. This also contributed slightly better agreement in DVH of PTV. Conclusion: The feasibility of 4D reconstruction was demonstrated.

  2. Personalized image-based radiation dosimetry for routine clinical use in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy: pretherapy experience.

    PubMed

    Celler, Anna; Grimes, Joshua; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Piwowarska-Bilska, Hanna; Birkenfeld, Bozena

    2013-01-01

    Patient-specific dose calculations are not routinely performed for targeted radionuclide therapy procedures, partly because they are time consuming and challenging to perform. However, it is becoming widely recognized that a personalized dosimetry approach can help plan treatment and improve understanding of the dose-response relationship. In this chapter, we review the procedures and essential elements of an accurate internal dose calculation and propose a simplified approach that is aimed to be practical for use in a busy nuclear medicine department.

  3. 4-Step renal dosimetry dependent on cortex geometry applied to 90Y peptide receptor radiotherapy: evaluation using a fillable kidney phantom imaged by 90Y PET.

    PubMed

    Walrand, Stephan; Jamar, François; van Elmbt, Larry; Lhommel, Renaud; Bekonde, Edgar Bidja'a; Pauwels, Stanislas

    2010-12-01

    Accurate dosimetry in (90)Y peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) helps to optimize the injected activity, to prevent kidney or red marrow toxicity, while giving the highest absorbed dose to tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether direct (90)Y bismuth germanate or lutetium yttrium orthosilicate time-of-flight PET was accurate enough to provide dosimetry estimates suitable to (90)Y PRRT. To overcome the statistical uncertainty arising from the low (90)Y positron counting rate, the computation of the cortex mean-absorbed dose was divided into 4 steps: delineation of the cortex volume of interest (VOI) on the CT scan, determination of the recovery coefficient from the cortex VOI using the point-spread function of the whole imaging process, determination of the mean cortex-absorbed dose per unit cumulated activity in the cortex (S(cortex←cortex) value) from the cortex VOI using a (90)Y voxel S value kernel, and determination of the number of decays in the cortex VOI from the PET reconstruction. Our 4-step method was evaluated using an anthropomorphic abdominal phantom containing a fillable kidney phantom based on the MIRD kidney model. Vertebrae with an attenuation similar to that of bone were also modeled. Two tumors were modeled by 7-mL hollow acrylic spheres and the spleen by a plastic bag. Activities corresponded to typical tissue uptake in a first (90)Y-DOTATOC cycle of 4.4 GBq, considered as free of significant renal toxicity. Eight successive 45-min scans were acquired on both systems. Both PET systems were successful in determining absorbed dose to modeled tumors but failed to provide accurate red marrow dosimetry. Renal cortex dosimetry was reproducible for both PET systems, with an accuracy of 3% for the bismuth germanate system but only 18% for the lutetium yttrium orthosilicate time-of-flight system, which was hindered by the natural radioactivity of the crystal, especially in the most attenuated area of the kidney. This study

  4. Image reconstruction algorithm for optically stimulated luminescence 2D dosimetry using laser-scanned Al2O3:C and Al2O3:C,Mg films.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M F; Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; Yukihara, E G

    2016-10-21

    The objective of this work was to develop an image reconstruction algorithm for 2D dosimetry using Al2O3:C and Al2O3:C,Mg optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) films imaged using a laser scanning system. The algorithm takes into account parameters associated with detector properties and the readout system. Pieces of Al2O3:C films (~8 mm  ×  8 mm  ×  125 µm) were irradiated and used to simulate dose distributions with extreme dose gradients (zero and non-zero dose regions). The OSLD film pieces were scanned using a custom-built laser-scanning OSL reader and the data obtained were used to develop and demonstrate a dose reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm includes corrections for: (a) galvo hysteresis, (b) photomultiplier tube (PMT) linearity, (c) phosphorescence, (d) 'pixel bleeding' caused by the 35 ms luminescence lifetime of F-centers in Al2O3, (e) geometrical distortion inherent to Galvo scanning system, and (f) position dependence of the light collection efficiency. The algorithm was also applied to 6.0 cm  ×  6.0 cm  ×  125 μm or 10.0 cm  ×  10.0 cm  ×  125 µm Al2O3:C and Al2O3:C,Mg films exposed to megavoltage x-rays (6 MV) and (12)C beams (430 MeV u(-1)). The results obtained using pieces of irradiated films show the ability of the image reconstruction algorithm to correct for pixel bleeding even in the presence of extremely sharp dose gradients. Corrections for geometric distortion and position dependence of light collection efficiency were shown to minimize characteristic limitations of this system design. We also exemplify the application of the algorithm to more clinically relevant 6 MV x-ray beam and a (12)C pencil beam, demonstrating the potential for small field dosimetry. The image reconstruction algorithm described here provides the foundation for laser-scanned OSL applied to 2D dosimetry.

  5. Image reconstruction algorithm for optically stimulated luminescence 2D dosimetry using laser-scanned Al2O3:C and Al2O3:C,Mg films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. F.; Schnell, E.; Ahmad, S.; Yukihara, E. G.

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this work was to develop an image reconstruction algorithm for 2D dosimetry using Al2O3:C and Al2O3:C,Mg optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) films imaged using a laser scanning system. The algorithm takes into account parameters associated with detector properties and the readout system. Pieces of Al2O3:C films (~8 mm  ×  8 mm  ×  125 µm) were irradiated and used to simulate dose distributions with extreme dose gradients (zero and non-zero dose regions). The OSLD film pieces were scanned using a custom-built laser-scanning OSL reader and the data obtained were used to develop and demonstrate a dose reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm includes corrections for: (a) galvo hysteresis, (b) photomultiplier tube (PMT) linearity, (c) phosphorescence, (d) ‘pixel bleeding’ caused by the 35 ms luminescence lifetime of F-centers in Al2O3, (e) geometrical distortion inherent to Galvo scanning system, and (f) position dependence of the light collection efficiency. The algorithm was also applied to 6.0 cm  ×  6.0 cm  ×  125 μm or 10.0 cm  ×  10.0 cm  ×  125 µm Al2O3:C and Al2O3:C,Mg films exposed to megavoltage x-rays (6 MV) and 12C beams (430 MeV u-1). The results obtained using pieces of irradiated films show the ability of the image reconstruction algorithm to correct for pixel bleeding even in the presence of extremely sharp dose gradients. Corrections for geometric distortion and position dependence of light collection efficiency were shown to minimize characteristic limitations of this system design. We also exemplify the application of the algorithm to more clinically relevant 6 MV x-ray beam and a 12C pencil beam, demonstrating the potential for small field dosimetry. The image reconstruction algorithm described here provides the foundation for laser-scanned OSL applied to 2D dosimetry.

  6. Recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine on dosimetry, imaging, and quality assurance procedures for (90) Y microsphere brachytherapy in the treatment of hepatic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dezarn, William A; Cessna, Jeffery T; DeWerd, Larry A; Feng, Wenzheng; Gates, Vanessa L; Halama, James; Kennedy, Andrew S; Nag, Subir; Sarfaraz, Mehrdad; Sehgal, Varun; Selwyn, Reed; Stabin, Michael G; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Williams, Lawrence E; Salem, Riad

    2011-08-01

    Yttrium-90 microsphere brachytherapy of the liver exploits the distinctive features of the liver anatomy to treat liver malignancies with beta radiation and is gaining more wide spread clinical use. This report provides a general overview of microsphere liver brachytherapy and assists the treatment team in creating local treatment practices to provide safe and efficient patient treatment. Suggestions for future improvements are incorporated with the basic rationale for the therapy and currently used procedures. Imaging modalities utilized and their respective quality assurance are discussed. General as well as vendor specific delivery procedures are reviewed. The current dosimetry models are reviewed and suggestions for dosimetry advancement are made. Beta activity standards are reviewed and vendor implementation strategies are discussed. Radioactive material licensing and radiation safety are discussed given the unique requirements of microsphere brachytherapy. A general, team-based quality assurance program is reviewed to provide guidance for the creation of the local procedures. Finally, recommendations are given on how to deliver the current state of the art treatments and directions for future improvements in the therapy. © 2011 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine on dosimetry, imaging, and quality assurance procedures for {sup 90}Y microsphere brachytherapy in the treatment of hepatic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Dezarn, William A.; Cessna, Jeffery T.; DeWerd, Larry A.; and others

    2011-08-15

    Yttrium-90 microsphere brachytherapy of the liver exploits the distinctive features of the liver anatomy to treat liver malignancies with beta radiation and is gaining more wide spread clinical use. This report provides a general overview of microsphere liver brachytherapy and assists the treatment team in creating local treatment practices to provide safe and efficient patient treatment. Suggestions for future improvements are incorporated with the basic rationale for the therapy and currently used procedures. Imaging modalities utilized and their respective quality assurance are discussed. General as well as vendor specific delivery procedures are reviewed. The current dosimetry models are reviewed and suggestions for dosimetry advancement are made. Beta activity standards are reviewed and vendor implementation strategies are discussed. Radioactive material licensing and radiation safety are discussed given the unique requirements of microsphere brachytherapy. A general, team-based quality assurance program is reviewed to provide guidance for the creation of the local procedures. Finally, recommendations are given on how to deliver the current state of the art treatments and directions for future improvements in the therapy.

  8. IDL Grid Web Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massimino, P.; Costa, A.

    2008-08-01

    Image Data Language is a software for data analysis, visualization and cross-platform application development. The potentiality of IDL is well-known in the academic scientific world, especially in the astronomical environment where thousands of procedures are developed by using IDL. The typical use of IDL is the interactive mode but it is also possible to run IDL programs that do not require any interaction with the user, submitting them in batch or background modality. Through the interactive mode the user immediately receives images or other data produced in the running phase of the program; in batch or background mode, the user will have to wait for the end of the program, sometime for many hours or days to obtain images or data that IDL produced as output: in fact in Grid environment it is possible to access to or retrieve data only after completion of the program. The work that we present gives flexibility to IDL procedures submitted to the Grid computer infrastructure. For this purpose we have developed an IDL Grid Web Portal to allow the user to access the Grid and to submit IDL programs granting a full job control and the access to images and data generated during the running phase, without waiting for their completion. We have used the PHP technology and we have given the same level of security that Grid normally offers to its users. In this way, when the user notices that the intermediate program results are not those expected, he can stop the job, change the parameters to better satisfy the computational algorithm and resubmit the program, without consuming the CPU time and other Grid resources. The IDL Grid Web Portal allows you to obtain IDL generated images, graphics and data tables by using a normal browser. All conversations from the user and the Grid resources occur via Web, as well as authentication phases. The IDL user has not to change the program source much because the Portal will automatically introduce the appropriate modification before

  9. A computerized framework for monitoring four-dimensional dose distributions during stereotactic body radiation therapy using a portal dose image-based 2D/3D registration approach.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takahiro; Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Asumi; Hirose, Taka-Aki; Honda, Hiroshi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Hirata, Hideki

    2015-03-01

    A computerized framework for monitoring four-dimensional (4D) dose distributions during stereotactic body radiation therapy based on a portal dose image (PDI)-based 2D/3D registration approach has been proposed in this study. Using the PDI-based registration approach, simulated 4D "treatment" CT images were derived from the deformation of 3D planning CT images so that a 2D planning PDI could be similar to a 2D dynamic clinical PDI at a breathing phase. The planning PDI was calculated by applying a dose calculation algorithm (a pencil beam convolution algorithm) to the geometry of the planning CT image and a virtual water equivalent phantom. The dynamic clinical PDIs were estimated from electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dynamic images including breathing phase data obtained during a treatment. The parameters of the affine transformation matrix were optimized based on an objective function and a gamma pass rate using a Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. The proposed framework was applied to the EPID dynamic images of ten lung cancer patients, which included 183 frames (mean: 18.3 per patient). The 4D dose distributions during the treatment time were successfully obtained by applying the dose calculation algorithm to the simulated 4D "treatment" CT images. The mean±standard deviation (SD) of the percentage errors between the prescribed dose and the estimated dose at an isocenter for all cases was 3.25±4.43%. The maximum error for the ten cases was 14.67% (prescribed dose: 1.50Gy, estimated dose: 1.72Gy), and the minimum error was 0.00%. The proposed framework could be feasible for monitoring the 4D dose distribution and dose errors within a patient's body during treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. TH-C-17A-03: Dynamic Visualization and Dosimetry of IMRT and VMAT Treatment Plans by Video-Rate Imaging of Cherenkov Radiation in Pure Water

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, A; Andreozzi, J; Davis, S; Zhang, R; Fox, C; Gladstone, D; Pogue, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A novel optical dosimetry technique for the QA and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) radiotherapy plans was investigated for the first time by capturing images of the induced Cherenkov radiation in water. Methods: An intensified CCD camera (ICCD) was used to acquire a two-dimensional (2D) projection image of the Cherenkov radiation induced by IMRT and VMAT plans, based on the Task Group 119 C-Shape geometry. Plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered using 6 MV x-rays from a Varian TrueBeam Linear Accelerator (Linac) incident on a water tank. The ICCD acquisition was gated to the Linac, operated for single pulse imaging, and binned to a resolution of 512×512 pixels. The resulting videos were analyzed temporally for regions of interest (ROI) covering the planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR) and summed to obtain an overall light distribution, which was compared to the expected dose distribution from the TPS using a gammaindex analysis. Results: The chosen camera settings resulted in data at 23.5 frames per second. Temporal intensity plots of the PTV and OAR ROIs confirmed the preferential delivery of dose to the PTV versus the OAR, and the gamma analysis yielded 95.2% and 95.6% agreement between the light distribution and expected TPS dose distribution based upon a 3% / 3 mm dose difference and distance-to-agreement criterion for the IMRT and VMAT plans respectively. Conclusion: The results from this initial study demonstrate the first documented use of Cherenkov radiation for optical dosimetry of dynamic IMRT and VMAT treatment plans. The proposed modality has several potential advantages over alternative methods including the real-time nature of the acquisition, and upon future refinement may prove to be a robust and novel dosimetry method with both research and clinical applications. NIH R01CA109558 and R21EB017559.

  11. Cardiovascular MR imaging findings of total anomalous pulmonary venous connection to the portal vein in a patient with right atrial isomerism.

    PubMed

    Koplay, Mustafa; Paksoy, Yahya; Erol, Cengiz; Arslan, Derya; Kivrak, Ali Sami; Karaaslan, Sevim

    2012-12-01

    Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) is a rare congenital cardiovascular anomaly in which the pulmonary veins fail to join to the left atrium and drain directly to the right atrium or to one of the systemic veins. This anomaly is frequently seen together with complex cardiac anomalies especially as a part of right atrial isomerism syndrome. Atrial isomerism is called that the same morphological structure of both atria. We reported a very rare case demonstrating TAPVC between the portal vein and the pulmonary veins in a patient with right atrial isomerism by magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. Evaluation of an edge method for computed radiography and an electronic portal imaging device in radiotherapy: Image quality measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Soon-Yong; Choe, Bo-Young; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jung-Min; Jeong, Hoi-Woun; Kim, Ham-Gyum; Kim, Wha-Sun; Lyu, Kwang-Yeul; Min, Jung-Whan; Kim, Ki-Won

    2014-12-01

    Regular quality assurance (QA) of image quality is essential for reasonable patient dose and accurate treatment. Thus, QA should be performed as a routine for correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the computed radiography (CR) system and the digital radiography (DR) system by using the edge method in megavoltage X-ray imaging (MVI). We used an edge block, which consisting of tungsten with dimensions of 19 (thickness) × 10 (length) × 1 (width) cm3 and measured the pre-sampling MTF by using a 6-megavolt (MV) energy. Computed radiography with an image plate (CR-IP) showed the values of 0.4 mm-1 and 1.19 mm-1 for MTF 0.5 and 0.1. In the DR group, Elekta iViewGT showed the highest value of 0.27 mm-1 for MTF 0.5, and Siemens BEAMVIEW PLUS showed the highest value of 0.98 mm-1 for MTF 0.1. In CR, the NPS of CR-IP showed a favorable noise distribution. Thus, in the DR group, the NPS of Elekta iViewGT showed the highest noise distribution. CR-IP showed values at peak DQE and 1 mm-1 DQE of 0.0013 and 0.00011, respectively. In the DR group, Elekta iViewGT showed the best efficiency at a peak DQE of 0.0009, and Siemens BEAMVIEW PLUS showed the best efficiency at a 1-mm-1 DQE of 0.000008. The edge method produced fast assessments of the MTF and the DQE. We could validate the evaluation of the edge method by comparing of the CR system to the DR system. This study demonstrated that the edge method can be used for not only traditional QA imaging but also quantitative MTF, NPS and DQE measurements in detector development.

  13. Preduodenal portal vein: surgery and radiographic appearance.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, E T; Burton, E M; Hixson, S D; Hollabaugh, R S

    1990-12-01

    Preduodenal portal vein is rare, with 63 cases reported in the literature. In general, this anomaly occurs in children with associated small bowel obstruction. We report a newborn infant who presented with duodenal stenosis, mongolism, and preduodenal portal vein. Treatment consisted of a duodenoduodenal anastomosis without mobilizing the portal vein. The correlation between imaging techniques and the operative findings is discussed. Because identification of preduodenal portal vein at surgery is important, preoperative sonography may be useful in selected cases to define the position of the vein.

  14. Characterization of Portal Vein Thrombosis (Neoplastic Versus Bland) on CT Images Using Software-Based Texture Analysis and Thrombus Density (Hounsfield Units).

    PubMed

    Canellas, Rodrigo; Mehrkhani, Farhad; Patino, Manuel; Kambadakone, Avinash; Sahani, Dushyant

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CT texture analysis and thrombus density (measured in Hounsfield units) in distinguishing between neoplastic and bland portal vein thrombosis (PVT) on portal venous phase CT. In this retrospective study, 117 contrast-enhanced CT studies of 109 patients were included for characterization of PVT. Assessment of PVT was performed by estimation of CT textural features using CT texture analysis software and measurement of attenuation values. For CT texture analysis, filtered and unfiltered images were assessed to quantify heterogeneity using a set of predefined histogram-based texture parameters. The Mann-Whitney U test and binary logistic regression were applied for statistical significance. ROC curves were used to identify accuracy and optimal cutoff values. Of the 117 CT studies, 63 neoplastic thrombi and 54 bland thrombi were identified on the images. The two most discriminative CT texture analysis parameters to differentiate neoplastic from bland thrombus were mean value of positive pixels (without filtration, p < 0.001) and entropy (with fine filtration, p < 0.001). Mean thrombus density values could also reliably distinguish neoplastic (81.39 HU) and bland (32.88 HU) thrombi (p < 0.001). The AUCs were 0.97 for mean value of positive pixels (p < 0.001), 0.93 for entropy (p < 0.001), 0.99 for the model combining mean value of positive pixels and entropy (p < 0.001), 0.91 for thrombus density (p < 0.001), and 0.61 for the radiologist's subjective evaluation (p = 0.037). The optimal cutoffs values were 56.9 for mean value of positive pixels, 4.50 for entropy, and 54.0 HU for thrombus density. CT texture analysis and CT attenuation values allow reliable differentiation between neoplastic and bland thrombi on a single portal venous phase CT examination.

  15. A quantification of the effectiveness of EPID dosimetry and software-based plan verification systems in detecting incidents in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bojechko, Casey; Phillps, Mark; Kalet, Alan; Ford, Eric C.

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Complex treatments in radiation therapy require robust verification in order to prevent errors that can adversely affect the patient. For this purpose, the authors estimate the effectiveness of detecting errors with a “defense in depth” system composed of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based dosimetry and a software-based system composed of rules-based and Bayesian network verifications. Methods: The authors analyzed incidents with a high potential severity score, scored as a 3 or 4 on a 4 point scale, recorded in an in-house voluntary incident reporting system, collected from February 2012 to August 2014. The incidents were categorized into different failure modes. The detectability, defined as the number of incidents that are detectable divided total number of incidents, was calculated for each failure mode. Results: In total, 343 incidents were used in this study. Of the incidents 67% were related to photon external beam therapy (EBRT). The majority of the EBRT incidents were related to patient positioning and only a small number of these could be detected by EPID dosimetry when performed prior to treatment (6%). A large fraction could be detected by in vivo dosimetry performed during the first fraction (74%). Rules-based and Bayesian network verifications were found to be complimentary to EPID dosimetry, able to detect errors related to patient prescriptions and documentation, and errors unrelated to photon EBRT. Combining all of the verification steps together, 91% of all EBRT incidents could be detected. Conclusions: This study shows that the defense in depth system is potentially able to detect a large majority of incidents. The most effective EPID-based dosimetry verification is in vivo measurements during the first fraction and is complemented by rules-based and Bayesian network plan checking.

  16. A quantification of the effectiveness of EPID dosimetry and software-based plan verification systems in detecting incidents in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bojechko, Casey; Phillps, Mark; Kalet, Alan; Ford, Eric C

    2015-09-01

    Complex treatments in radiation therapy require robust verification in order to prevent errors that can adversely affect the patient. For this purpose, the authors estimate the effectiveness of detecting errors with a "defense in depth" system composed of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based dosimetry and a software-based system composed of rules-based and Bayesian network verifications. The authors analyzed incidents with a high potential severity score, scored as a 3 or 4 on a 4 point scale, recorded in an in-house voluntary incident reporting system, collected from February 2012 to August 2014. The incidents were categorized into different failure modes. The detectability, defined as the number of incidents that are detectable divided total number of incidents, was calculated for each failure mode. In total, 343 incidents were used in this study. Of the incidents 67% were related to photon external beam therapy (EBRT). The majority of the EBRT incidents were related to patient positioning and only a small number of these could be detected by EPID dosimetry when performed prior to treatment (6%). A large fraction could be detected by in vivo dosimetry performed during the first fraction (74%). Rules-based and Bayesian network verifications were found to be complimentary to EPID dosimetry, able to detect errors related to patient prescriptions and documentation, and errors unrelated to photon EBRT. Combining all of the verification steps together, 91% of all EBRT incidents could be detected. This study shows that the defense in depth system is potentially able to detect a large majority of incidents. The most effective EPID-based dosimetry verification is in vivo measurements during the first fraction and is complemented by rules-based and Bayesian network plan checking.

  17. SU-E-J-84: Quantitative Dosimetry Assessment of the Impact of Image Artifacts of Metal Implants in Spinal SABR Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T; Zhang, M; Hanft, S; Green, R; Yue, N; Goyal, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Metal rods are frequently used to stabilize the spine in patients with metastatic disease. The high Z material causes imaging artifacts in the surrounding tissue in CT scans, which introduces dosimetric uncertainty when inhomogeneity correction is enabled for radiation treatment planning. The purpose of this study is to quantify the dosimetric deviations caused by the imaging artifacts and to evaluate the effectiveness of using Hounsfield units (HU) overwriting to reduce dosimetric uncertainties. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed treatment plans for 4 patients with metal implants who received stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for metastatic disease to the spine on Tomotherapy HiArt. For all four patients, the region of imaging artifact surrounding the metal implants was contoured and the pixel HU’s were overwritten to be water equivalent. We then generated adaptive treatment plans for these patients using the MVCT pretreatment set up images and batched beamlets in the original treatment plans. The dosimetry deviation between the adaptive and original plans were compared and quantitatively analyzed. Results: For three out of four patient, the major OAR (spinal cord) dose (0.35cc or 10% according to protocols and fractionation) increased (2.7%, 5.5%, 0%, 3.9%, mean=3.0±2.3%, p=0.04), and the PTV dose (D90 or D95 as per prescription) increased for all four patients ( 2%, 5%, 0.7%, 3.6%, mean=2.8±1.9%, p=0.03) in the adaptive plan with HU overwriting. The average point dose deviation of the Tomotherapy DQA for the same patients was −1.0±1.0%. For plans without HU overwriting, the dose deviation from the treatment plan will increase. Conclusion: The metal implant and the imaging artifacts may cause a significant dosimetric impact on radiation treatment plans for spinal disease. The dose to the PTV and the spinal cord was under-calculated in treatment plans without considering the imaging artifacts. HU overwriting can reduce the dosimetry

  18. Validation of prospective whole-body bone marrow dosimetry by SPECT/CT multimodality imaging in (131)I-anti-CD20 rituximab radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Boucek, Jan A; Turner, J Harvey

    2005-04-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is emerging as a promising treatment strategy. Myelosuppression is the dose-limiting toxicity and may be particularly problematic in patients heavily pretreated with chemotherapy. Reliable dosimetry is likely to minimise toxicity and improve treatment efficacy, and the aim of this study was to elucidate the complex problems of dosimetry of RIT by using an integrated SPECT/CT system. As a part of a clinical trial of (131)I-anti-CD20 rituximab RIT of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, we employed a patient-specific prospective dosimetry method utilising the whole-body effective half-life of antibody and the patient's ideal weight to calculate the administered activity for RIT corresponding to a prescribed radiation absorbed dose of 0.75 Gy to the whole body. A novel technique of quantitation of bone marrow uptake with hybrid SPECT/CT imaging was developed to validate this methodology by using post-RIT extended imaging and data collection. A strong, statistically significant correlation (p=0.001) between whole-body effective half-life of antibody and effective marrow half-life was demonstrated. Furthermore, it was found that bone marrow activity concentration was proportional to administered activity per unit weight, height or body surface area (p<0.001). The results of this study show the proposed whole-body dosimetry method to be valid and clinically applicable for safe, effective RIT.

  19. SU-C-12A-04: Diagnostic Imaging Research Using Decedents as a Proxy for the Living: Are Radiation Dosimetry and Tissue Property Measurements Affected by Post-Mortem Changes?

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D; Heintz, P; Weber, W; Melo, D; Adolphi, N; Hatch, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation dose (RD) from diagnostic imaging is a growing public health concern. Implanting dosimeters is a more accurate way to assess organ dose, relative to commonly used mathematical estimations. However, performing accurate dosimetry using live subjects is hindered by patient motion and safety considerations, which limit the RD and placement of implanted dosimeters. Performing multiple scans on the same subject would be the ideal way to assess the impact of dose reduction on image quality; however, performing multiple non-standard-of-care scans on live subjects for dosimetry and image quality measurements is generally prohibited by IRB committees. Our objective is to assess whether RD and tissue property (TP) measurements in post-mortem (PM) subjects are sufficiently similar to those in live subjects to justify the use of deceased subjects in future dosimetry and image quality studies. Methods: 4 MOSFET radiation dosimeters were placed enterically in each subject (2 sedated Rhesus Macaques) to measure the RD at 4 levels (carina, lung, heart, and liver) during CT scanning. The CT protocol was performed ante-mortem (AM) and 2 and 3 hours PM. For TP analysis, additional scans were taken at 24 hours PM. To compare AM and PM TP, regions-of-interest were drawn on selected organs and the average CT density with standard deviation (in units of HU) were taken; additionally, visual comparisons of images were made at each PM interval. Results: No significant difference was observed in 8 of 9 measurements comparing AM and PM RD. Only one measurement (liver of the first subject) showed a significant difference (7% lower on PM measurement), possibly due to subject re-positioning. Initial TP visual and quantitative analyses show little to no change PM. Conclusion: Our results suggest that realistic radiation dosimetry and image quality measurements based on tissue properties can be performed reliably on recently deceased subjects.

  20. Quantification of activity by alpha-camera imaging and small-scale dosimetry within ovarian carcinoma micrometastases treated with targeted alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Chouin, N; Lindegren, S; Jensen, H; Albertsson, P; Bäck, T

    2012-12-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) a promising treatment for small, residual, and micrometastatic diseases has questionable efficacy against malignant lesions larger than the α-particle range, and likely requires favorable intratumoral activity distribution. Here, we characterized and quantified the activity distribution of an alpha-particle emitter radiolabelled antibody within >100-µm micrometastases in a murine ovarian carcinoma model. Nude mice bearing ovarian micrometastases were injected intra-peritoneally with 211At-MX35 (total injected activity 6 MBq, specific activity 650 MBq/mg). Animals were sacrificed at several time points, and peritoneal samples were excised and prepared for alpha-camera imaging. Spatial and temporal activity distributions within micrometastases were derived and used for small-scale dosimetry. We observed two activity distribution patterns: uniform distribution and high stable uptake (>100% IA/g at all time points) in micrometastases with no visible stromal compartment, and radial distribution (high activity on the edge and poor uptake in the core) in tumor cell lobules surrounded by fibroblasts. Activity distributions over time were characterized by a peak (140% IA/g at 4 h) in the outer tumor layer and a sharp drop beyond a depth of 50 µm. Small-scale dosimetry was performed on a multi-cellular micrometastasis model, using time-integrated activities derived from the experimental data. With injected activity of 400 kBq, tumors exhibiting uniform activity distribution received <25 Gy (EUD=13 Gy), whereas tumors presenting radial activity distribution received mean absorbed doses of <8 Gy (EUD=5 Gy). These results provide new insight into important aspects of TAT, and may explain why micrometastases >100 µm might not be effectively treated by the examined regimen.

  1. Whole-body distribution and radiation dosimetry of (68)Ga-NOTA-RGD, a positron emission tomography agent for angiogenesis imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Hyun; Lee, Jae Sung; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Ho-Young; Han, Sae-Won; Kim, Tae-You; Lee, Yun-Sang; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo

    2012-02-01

    (68)Ga labeled NOTA-RGD was a recently developed positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer for the visualization of angiogenesis, and is regarded as a promising imaging agent for cancer and several other disorders. In this study, we investigated the whole-body distribution and radiation dosimetry of (68)Ga-NOTA-RGD in humans. Ten cancer patients (53.7 ± 13.5 years; 61.5 ± 7.4  kg) participated in this study. PET scans were performed using a PET/computed tomography (scanner in three-dimensional mode). After an intravenous injection of 172.4 ± 20.5  MBq of (68)Ga-NOTA-RGD, eight serial whole-body scans were performed during 90 minutes. Volumes of interest were drawn manually over the entire volumes of the urinary bladder, the gallbladder, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, pancreas, spleen, and stomach. Time-activity curves were obtained from serial PET scan data. Residence times were calculated from areas under curve of time-activity curves and used as input to the OLINDA/EXM 1.1 software. The uptake of (68)Ga-NOTA-RGD was highest in the kidneys and urinary bladder. Radiation doses to kidneys and urinary bladder were 71.6 ± 28.4  μ Gy/MBq and 239.6 ± 56.6  μ Gy/MBq. Mean effective doses were 25.0 ± 4.4  μ Sv/MBq using International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) publication 60 and 22.4 ± 3.8  μ Sv/MBq using ICRP publication 103 weighting factor. We evaluated the radiation dosimetry of (68)Ga labeled NOTA-RGD, which has an acceptable effective radiation dose.

  2. A new technique for rendering complex portals.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Nick; Datta, Amitava

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we identify a general paradigm for portal-based rendering and present an image-space algorithm for rendering complex portals. Our general paradigm is an abstraction of portal-based rendering that is independent of scene geometry. It provides a framework for flexible and dynamic scene composition by connecting cells with transformative portals. Our rendering algorithm maintains a visible volume in image-space and uses fragment culling to discard fragments outside of this volume. We discuss our implementation in OpenGL and present results that show it provides correct rendering of complex portals at interactive rates on current hardware. We believe that our work will be useful in many applications that require a means of creating dynamic and meaningful visual connections between different sets of data.

  3. Are Lateral Electronic Portal Images Adequate for Accurate On-Line Daily Targeting of the Prostate? Results of a Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lometti, Michael W. Thurston, Damon; Aubin, Michele; Bock, Andrea; Verhey, Lynn; Lockhart, James M.; Bland, Roger; Pouliot, Jean; Roach, Mack

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this report was to evaluate the magnitude of the error that would be introduced if only a lateral (LAT) portal image, as opposed to a pair of orthogonal images, was used to verify and correct daily setup errors and organ motion in external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) of prostate cancer. The 3-dimensional (3D) coordinates of gold markers from 12 consecutive prostate patients were reconstructed using a pair of orthogonal images. The data were re-analyzed using only the LAT images. Couch moves from the 2-dimensional (2D)-only data were compared with the complete 3D data set. The 2D-only data provided couch moves that differed on average from the 3D data by 2.3 {+-} 3.0, 0.0 {+-} 0.0, and 0.8 {+-} 1.0 mm in the Lat, AP, and SI directions, respectively. Along AP and SI axes, the LAT image provided positional information similar to the orthogonal pair. The error along the LAT axis may be acceptable provided lateral margins are large enough. A LAT-only setup protocol reduces patient treatment times and increases patient throughput. In most circumstances, with exceptions such as morbidly obese patients, acquisition of only a LAT image for daily targeting of the prostate will provide adequate positional precision.

  4. The utility of the Philips SRI-100 Real Time Portal Imaging Device in a case of postoperative irradiation for prevention of heterotopic bone formation following total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Kiffer, J D; Quong, G; Bergman, N R; Lawlor, M; Schumer, W; Aitken, L; Wallace, A

    1994-11-01

    The new Radiation Oncology Department at the Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital in Melbourne, Australia commenced operation in June 1992. As part of quality control the Philips SL-15 linear accelerator was fitted with the Philips SRI-100 Real Time Portal Imaging Device (RTPID), the first such apparatus in Australia. One of its major advantages over older systems is its ability to provide a permanent hard copy of the image of the field treated. The computer image can be immediately manipulated and enhanced on the screen (with respect to such qualities as brightness and contrast) prior to the printing of the hard copy. This is a significant improvement over the more cumbersome older port films that required developing time, without any pre-assessment of the image quality. The utility of the Philips SRI-100 RTPID is demonstrated in the case of a patient irradiated soon after total hip replacement, as prophylaxis against heterotopic bone formation (HBF). The rapidity and quality of image production is a major advantage in these patients where post-operative pain may result in positional change between film exposure and image production. Extremely accurate shielding block position is essential to shield the prosthesis (and allow bone ingrowth for fixation) whilst avoiding inadvertent shielding of the areas at risk for HBF. A review of the literature is provided.

  5. A simple quality assurance test tool for the visual verification of light and radiation field congruent using electronic portal images device and computed radiography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The radiation field on most megavoltage radiation therapy units are shown by a light field projected through the collimator by a light source mounted inside the collimator. The light field is traditionally used for patient alignment. Hence it is imperative that the light field is congruent with the radiation field. Method A simple quality assurance tool has been designed for rapid and simple test of the light field and radiation field using electronic portal images device (EPID) or computed radiography (CR). We tested this QA tool using Varian PortalVision and Elekta iViewGT EPID systems and Kodak CR system. Results Both the single and double exposure techniques were evaluated, with double exposure technique providing a better visualization of the light-radiation field markers. The light and radiation congruency could be detected within 1 mm. This will satisfy the American Association of Physicists in Medicine task group report number 142 recommendation of 2 mm tolerance. Conclusion The QA tool can be used with either an EPID or CR to provide a simple and rapid method to verify light and radiation field congruence. PMID:22452821

  6. (90)Y-PET/CT Imaging Quantification for Dosimetry in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy: Analysis and Corrections of the Impairing Factors.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Cinzia; Bartolomei, Mirco; Mattone, Vincenzo; Casi, Michela; De Lauro, Francesco; Bartolini, Nerio; Gentili, Giovanni; Amadori, Sonia; Agostini, Monica; Sarti, Graziella

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the possibility to assess (90)Y-PET/CT imaging quantification for dosimetry in (90)Y-peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Tests were performed by Discovery 710 Elite (GE) PET/CT equipment. A body-phantom containing radioactive-coplanar-spheres was filled with (90)Y water solution to reproduce different signal-to-background-activity-ratios (S/N). We studied minimum detectable activity (MDA) concentration, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM). Subsequently, three recovery coefficients (RC)-based correction approaches were evaluated: maximum-RC, resolution-RC, and isovolume-RC. The analysis of the volume segmentation thresholding method was also assessed to derive a relationship between the true volume of the targets and the threshold to be applied to the PET images. (90)Y-PET/CT imaging quantification was then achieved on some patients and related with preclinical tests. Moreover, the dosimetric evaluation was obtained on the target regions. CNR value was greater than 5 if the MDA was greater than 0.2 MBq/mL with no background activity and 0.5-0.7 MBq/mL with S/N ranging from 3 to 6. FWHM was equal to 7 mm. An exponential fitting of isovolume RCs-based correction technique was adopted for activity quantification. Adaptive segmentation thresholding exponential curves were obtained and applied for target volume identification in three signal-to-background-activity-ratios. The imaging quantification study and dosimetric evaluations in clinical cases was feasible and the results were coherent with those obtained in preclinical tests. (90)Y-PET/CT imaging quantification is possible both in phantoms and in patients. Absorbed dose evaluations in clinical applications are strongly related to targets activity concentration.

  7. Thin film tritium dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Paul R.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for tritium dosimetry. A dosimeter comprising a thin film of a material having relatively sensitive RITAC-RITAP dosimetry properties is exposed to radiation from tritium, and after the dosimeter has been removed from the source of the radiation, the low energy electron dose deposited in the thin film is determined by radiation-induced, thermally-activated polarization dosimetry techniques.

  8. Dynamic conformal arc therapy: Transmitted signal in vivo dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Piermattei, Angelo; Stimato, Gerardina; Gaudino, Diego; Ramella, Sara; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria; Cellini, Francesco; Trodella, Lucio; D'Onofrio, Guido; Grimaldi, Luca; Cilla, Savino; Fidanzio, Andrea; Placidi, Elisa; Azario, Luigi

    2008-05-15

    A method for the determination of the in vivo isocenter dose, D{sub iso}, has been applied to the dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT) for thoracic tumors. The method makes use of the transmitted signal, S{sub t,{alpha}}, measured at different gantry angles, {alpha}, by a small ion chamber positioned on the electronic portal imaging device. The in vivo method is implemented by a set of correlation functions obtained by the ratios between the transmitted signal and the midplane dose in a solid phantom, irradiated by static fields. The in vivo dosimetry at the isocenter for the DCAT requires the convolution between the signals , S{sub t,{alpha}}, and the dose reconstruction factors, C{sub {alpha}}, that depend on the patient's anatomy and on its tissue inhomogeneities along the beam central axis in the {alpha} direction. The C{sub {alpha}} factors are obtained by processing the patient's computed tomography scan. The method was tested by taking measurements in a cylindrical phantom and in a Rando Alderson phantom. The results show that the difference between the convolution calculations and the phantom measurements is within {+-}2%. The in vivo dosimetry of the stereotactic DCAT for six lung tumors, irradiated with three or four arcs, is reported. The isocenter dose up to 17 Gy per therapy fraction was delivered on alternating days for three fractions. The agreement obtained in this pilot study between the total in vivo dose D{sub iso} and the planned dose D{sub iso,TPS} at the isocenter is {+-}4%. The method has been applied on the DCAT obtaining a more extensive monitoring of possible systematic errors, the effect of which can invalidate the current therapy which uses a few high-dose fractions.

  9. Uncertainty in 3D gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Yves; Jirasek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) gel dosimetry has a unique role to play in safeguarding conformal radiotherapy treatments as the technique can cover the full treatment chain and provides the radiation oncologist with the integrated dose distribution in 3D. It can also be applied to benchmark new treatment strategies such as image guided and tracking radiotherapy techniques. A major obstacle that has hindered the wider dissemination of gel dosimetry in radiotherapy centres is a lack of confidence in the reliability of the measured dose distribution. Uncertainties in 3D dosimeters are attributed to both dosimeter properties and scanning performance. In polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout, discrepancies in dose response of large polymer gel dosimeters versus small calibration phantoms have been reported which can lead to significant inaccuracies in the dose maps. The sources of error in polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout are well understood and it has been demonstrated that with a carefully designed scanning protocol, the overall uncertainty in absolute dose that can currently be obtained falls within 5% on an individual voxel basis, for a minimum voxel size of 5 mm3. However, several research groups have chosen to use polymer gel dosimetry in a relative manner by normalizing the dose distribution towards an internal reference dose within the gel dosimeter phantom. 3D dosimetry with optical scanning has also been mostly applied in a relative way, although in principle absolute calibration is possible. As the optical absorption in 3D dosimeters is less dependent on temperature it can be expected that the achievable accuracy is higher with optical CT. The precision in optical scanning of 3D dosimeters depends to a large extend on the performance of the detector. 3D dosimetry with X-ray CT readout is a low contrast imaging modality for polymer gel dosimetry. Sources of error in x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry (XCT) are currently under investigation and include inherent

  10. Portal-systemic encephalopathy in two patients without liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    K C, Sudhamshu; Matsutani, Shoichi; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Fukamachi, Tadahiro; Nomoto, Hiromasa; Akiike, Taro; Ebara, Masaaki; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2002-06-01

    The portal-systemic venous shunt is uncommon in patients without portal hypertension. We present two cases of portal-systemic encephalopathy due to extrahepatic shunt without liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Two women in their seventies were admitted to our hospital because of recurrent episodes of altered sensorium, drowsiness, slurred speech, disorientation, asterexis and high blood ammonia levels. There was no history of abdominal surgery or abdominal trauma. Clinical examination revealed no signs of portal hypertension or stigmata of chronic liver diseases. Brain CT and MRI scanning were unremarkable except for a high intensity signal in the basal ganglia on T1 weighted MRI images. Laboratory tests were almost normal except for the hyperammonemia occurring on several occasions. There was no evidence of liver cirrhosis by imaging. However, color Doppler showed an extra-hepatic shunt in both patients and pulsed Doppler showed decreased velocity and volume of the portal venous flow. These sonographic findings were confirmed during percutaneous transhepatic portography (PTP). Portal pressures measured during PTP were 9 and 11 mmHg. Needle biopsy ruled out idiopathic portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis. The diagnosis was portal systemic encephalopathy due to extra-hepatic portosystemic venous shunting. Both patients were treated by embolization of the shunting vessel with metallic coils.

  11. Reference dosimetry at the Australian Synchrotron's imaging and medical beamline using free-air ionization chamber measurements and theoretical predictions of air kerma rate and half value layer

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, Peter A. W.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Hall, Christopher J.; Lye, Jessica E.; Nordstroem, Terese; Midgley, Stewart M.; Lewis, Robert A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Novel, preclinical radiotherapy modalities are being developed at synchrotrons around the world, most notably stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and microbeam radiotherapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron has recently become available for preclinical radiotherapy and imaging research with clinical trials, a distinct possibility in the coming years. The aim of this present study was to accurately characterize the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam for the purposes of air kerma-based absolute dosimetry. Methods: The authors used a theoretical model of the energy spectrum from the wiggler source and validated this model by comparing the transmission through copper absorbers (0.1-3.0 mm) against real measurements conducted at the beamline. The authors used a low energy free air ionization chamber (LEFAC) from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and a commercially available free air chamber (ADC-105) for the measurements. The dimensions of these two chambers are different from one another requiring careful consideration of correction factors. Results: Measured and calculated half value layer (HVL) and air kerma rates differed by less than 3% for the LEFAC when the ion chamber readings were corrected for electron energy loss and ion recombination. The agreement between measured and predicted air kerma rates was less satisfactory for the ADC-105 chamber, however. The LEFAC and ADC measurements produced a first half value layer of 0.405 {+-} 0.015 and 0.412 {+-} 0.016 mm Cu, respectively, compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.427 {+-} 0.012 mm Cu. The theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean beam energy of 61.4 keV with a first half value layer of approximately 30 mm in water. Conclusions: The authors showed in this study their ability to verify the predicted air kerma rate and x-ray attenuation

  12. Skeletal dosimetry for external exposures to photons based on {mu}CT images of spongiosa: Consideration of voxel resolution, cluster size, and medullary bone surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, R.; Khoury, H. J.; Vieira, J. W.; Brown, K. A. Robson

    2009-11-15

    Skeletal dosimetry based on {mu}CT images of trabecular bone has recently been introduced to calculate the red bone marrow (RBM) and the bone surface cell (BSC) equivalent doses in human phantoms for external exposure to photons. In order to use the {mu}CT images for skeletal dosimetry, spongiosa voxels in the skeletons were replaced at run time by so-called micromatrices, which have exactly the size of a spongiosa voxel and contain segmented trabecular bone and marrow microvoxels. A cluster (=parallelepiped) of 2x2x2=8 micromatrices was used systematically and periodically throughout the spongiosa volume during the radiation transport calculation. Systematic means that when a particle leaves a spongiosa voxel to enter into a neighboring spongiosa voxel, then the next micromatrix in the cluster will be used. Periodical means that if the particle travels through more than two spongiosa voxels in a row, then the cluster will be repeated. Based on the bone samples available at the time, clusters of up to 3x3x3=27 micromatrices were studied. While for a given trabecular bone volume fraction the whole-body RBM equivalent dose showed converging results for cluster sizes between 8 and 27 micromatrices, this was not the case for the BSC equivalent dose. The BSC equivalent dose seemed to be very sensitive to the number, form, and thickness of the trabeculae. In addition, the cluster size and/or the microvoxel resolution were considered to be possible causes for the differences observed. In order to resolve this problem, this study used a bone sample large enough to extract clusters containing up to 8x8x8=512 micromatrices and which was scanned with two different voxel resolutions. Taking into account a recent proposal, this investigation also calculated the BSC equivalent dose on medullary surfaces of cortical bone in the arm and leg bones. The results showed (1) that different voxel resolutions have no effect on the RBM equivalent dose but do influence the BSC equivalent

  13. Reference dosimetry at the Australian Synchrotron's imaging and medical beamline using free-air ionization chamber measurements and theoretical predictions of air kerma rate and half value layer.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Rogers, Peter A W; Stevenson, Andrew W; Hall, Christopher J; Lye, Jessica E; Nordström, Terese; Midgley, Stewart M; Lewis, Robert A

    2013-06-01

    Novel, preclinical radiotherapy modalities are being developed at synchrotrons around the world, most notably stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and microbeam radiotherapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron has recently become available for preclinical radiotherapy and imaging research with clinical trials, a distinct possibility in the coming years. The aim of this present study was to accurately characterize the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam for the purposes of air kerma-based absolute dosimetry. The authors used a theoretical model of the energy spectrum from the wiggler source and validated this model by comparing the transmission through copper absorbers (0.1-3.0 mm) against real measurements conducted at the beamline. The authors used a low energy free air ionization chamber (LEFAC) from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and a commercially available free air chamber (ADC-105) for the measurements. The dimensions of these two chambers are different from one another requiring careful consideration of correction factors. Measured and calculated half value layer (HVL) and air kerma rates differed by less than 3% for the LEFAC when the ion chamber readings were corrected for electron energy loss and ion recombination. The agreement between measured and predicted air kerma rates was less satisfactory for the ADC-105 chamber, however. The LEFAC and ADC measurements produced a first half value layer of 0.405 ± 0.015 and 0.412 ± 0.016 mm Cu, respectively, compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.427 ± 0.012 mm Cu. The theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean beam energy of 61.4 keV with a first half value layer of approximately 30 mm in water. The authors showed in this study their ability to verify the predicted air kerma rate and x-ray attenuation curve on the IMBL using a simple experimental

  14. Skeletal dosimetry in the MAX06 and the FAX06 phantoms for external exposure to photons based on vertebral 3D-microCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, R.; Khoury, H. J.; Vieira, J. W.; Kawrakow, I.

    2006-12-01

    3D-microCT images of vertebral bodies from three different individuals have been segmented into trabecular bone, bone marrow and bone surface cells (BSC), and then introduced into the spongiosa voxels of the MAX06 and the FAX06 phantoms, in order to calculate the equivalent dose to the red bone marrow (RBM) and the BSC in the marrow cavities of trabecular bone with the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code from whole-body exposure to external photon radiation. The MAX06 and the FAX06 phantoms consist of about 150 million 1.2 mm cubic voxels each, a part of which are spongiosa voxels surrounded by cortical bone. In order to use the segmented 3D-microCT images for skeletal dosimetry, spongiosa voxels in the MAX06 and the FAX06 phantom were replaced at runtime by so-called micro matrices representing segmented trabecular bone, marrow and BSC in 17.65, 30 and 60 µm cubic voxels. The 3D-microCT image-based RBM and BSC equivalent doses for external exposure to photons presented here for the first time for complete human skeletons are in agreement with the results calculated with the three correction factor method and the fluence-to-dose response functions for the same phantoms taking into account the conceptual differences between the different methods. Additionally the microCT image-based results have been compared with corresponding data from earlier studies for other human phantoms. This article is dedicated to Prof. Dr Guenter Drexler from the Laboratório de Ciências Radiológicas, State University of Rio de Janeiro, on the occasion of his 70th birthday.

  15. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, L.W.

    1982-03-23

    A portal radiation monitor combines .1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  16. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, Lyle W.

    1985-01-01

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  17. Development of Fast and Highly Efficient Gas Ionization Chamber For Patient Imaging and Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    R. Hinderler; H. Keller; T.R. Mackie; M.L. Corradini

    2003-09-08

    In radiation therapy of cancer, more accurate delivery techniques spur the need for improved patient imaging during treatment. To this purpose, the megavoltage radiation protocol that is used for treatment is also used for imaging.

  18. Evaluating Open Source Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, Dion; Luyt, Brendan; Chua, Alton; Yee, See-Yong; Poh, Kia-Ngoh; Ng, How-Yeu

    2008-01-01

    Portals have become indispensable for organizations of all types trying to establish themselves on the Web. Unfortunately, there have only been a few evaluative studies of portal software and even fewer of open source portal software. This study aims to add to the available literature in this important area by proposing and testing a checklist for…

  19. The Advent of Portals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Mary E.

    2002-01-01

    Explains portals as tools that gather a variety of electronic information resources, including local library resources, into a single Web page. Highlights include cross-database searching; integration with university portals and course management software; the ARL (Association of Research Libraries) Scholars Portal Initiative; and selected vendors…

  20. Evaluating Open Source Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, Dion; Luyt, Brendan; Chua, Alton; Yee, See-Yong; Poh, Kia-Ngoh; Ng, How-Yeu

    2008-01-01

    Portals have become indispensable for organizations of all types trying to establish themselves on the Web. Unfortunately, there have only been a few evaluative studies of portal software and even fewer of open source portal software. This study aims to add to the available literature in this important area by proposing and testing a checklist for…

  1. REVIEW OF DOSIMETRY FIELD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    three, oxalic acid , polyisobutylene, and Mylar film, seem sufficiently promising to warrant further development. Their current states of development...ceric sulfate dosimeters be included in the dosimetry handbook, but that additional work should be done on oxalic acid , polyisobutylene, and Mylar as dosimetry materials. (Author)

  2. Evaluation of IsoCal geometric calibration system for Varian linacs equipped with on-board imager and electronic portal imaging device imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Du, Weiliang; Balter, Peter; Munro, Peter; Jeung, Andrew

    2014-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of the IsoCal geometric calibration system for kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imagers on Varian C-series linear accelerators (linacs). IsoCal calibration starts by imaging a phantom and collimator plate using MV images with different collimator angles, as well as MV and kV images at different gantry angles. The software then identifies objects on the collimator plate and in the phantom to determine the location of the treatment isocenter and its relation to the MV and kV imager centers. It calculates offsets between the positions of the imaging panels and the treatment isocenter as a function of gantry angle and writes a correction file that can be applied to MV and kV systems to correct for those offsets in the position of the panels. We performed IsoCal calibration three times on each of five Varian C-series linacs, each time with an independent setup. We then compared the IsoCal calibrations with a simplified Winston-Lutz (WL)-based system and with a Varian cubic phantom (VC)-based system. The maximum IsoCal corrections ranged from 0.7 mm to 1.5 mm for MV and 0.9 mm to 1.8 mm for kV imagers across the five linacs. The variations in the three calibrations for each linac were less than 0.2 mm. Without IsoCal correction, the WL results showed discrepancies between the treatment isocenter and the imager center of 0.9 mm to 1.6 mm (for the MV imager) and 0.5 mm to 1.1 mm (for the kV imager); with IsoCal corrections applied, the differences were reduced to 0.2 mm to 0.6 mm (MV) and 0.3 mm to 0.6 mm (kV) across the five linacs. The VC system was not as precise as the WL system, but showed similar results, with discrepancies of less than 1.0 mm when the IsoCal corrections were applied. We conclude that IsoCal is an accurate and consistent method for calibration and periodic quality assurance of MV and kV imaging systems.

  3. SU-F-P-36: Automation of Linear Accelerator Star Shot Measurement with Advanced XML Scripting and Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, N; Knutson, N; Schmidt, M; Price, M

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To verify a method used to automatically acquire jaw, MLC, collimator and couch star shots for a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator utilizing Developer Mode and an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID). Methods: An XML script was written to automate motion of the jaws, MLC, collimator and couch in TrueBeam Developer Mode (TBDM) to acquire star shot measurements. The XML script also dictates MV imaging parameters to facilitate automatic acquisition and recording of integrated EPID images. Since couch star shot measurements cannot be acquired using a combination of EPID and jaw/MLC collimation alone due to a fixed imager geometry, a method utilizing a 5mm wide steel ruler placed on the table and centered within a 15×15cm2 open field to produce a surrogate of the narrow field aperture was investigated. Four individual star shot measurements (X jaw, Y jaw, MLC and couch) were obtained using our proposed as well as traditional film-based method. Integrated EPID images and scanned measurement films were analyzed and compared. Results: Star shot (X jaw, Y jaw, MLC and couch) measurements were obtained in a single 5 minute delivery using the TBDM XML script method compared to 60 minutes for equivalent traditional film measurements. Analysis of the images and films demonstrated comparable isocentricity results, agreeing within 0.3mm of each other. Conclusion: The presented automatic approach of acquiring star shot measurements using TBDM and EPID has proven to be more efficient than the traditional film approach with equivalent results.

  4. Small fields: Nonequilibrium radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Indra J.; Ding, George X.; Ahnesjoe, Anders

    2008-01-15

    Advances in radiation treatment with beamlet-based intensity modulation, image-guided radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery (including specialized equipments like CyberKnife, Gamma Knife, tomotherapy, and high-resolution multileaf collimating systems) have resulted in the use of reduced treatment fields to a subcentimeter scale. Compared to the traditional radiotherapy with fields {>=}4x4 cm{sup 2}, this can result in significant uncertainty in the accuracy of clinical dosimetry. The dosimetry of small fields is challenging due to nonequilibrium conditions created as a consequence of the secondary electron track lengths and the source size projected through the collimating system that are comparable to the treatment field size. It is further complicated by the prolonged electron tracks in the presence of low-density inhomogeneities. Also, radiation detectors introduced into such fields usually perturb the level of disequilibrium. Hence, the dosimetric accuracy previously achieved for standard radiotherapy applications is at risk for both absolute and relative dose determination. This article summarizes the present knowledge and gives an insight into the future procedures to handle the nonequilibrium radiation dosimetry problems. It is anticipated that new miniature detectors with controlled perturbations and corrections will be available to meet the demand for accurate measurements. It is also expected that the Monte Carlo techniques will increasingly be used in assessing the accuracy, verification, and calculation of dose, and will aid perturbation calculations of detectors used in small and highly conformal radiation beams.

  5. Classification of cryo electron microscopy images, noisy tomographic images recorded with unknown projection directions, by simultaneously estimating reconstructions and application to an assembly mutant of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and portals of the bacteriophage P22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junghoon; Zheng, Yili; Yin, Zhye; Doerschuk, Peter C.; Johnson, John E.

    2010-08-01

    Cryo electron microscopy is frequently used on biological specimens that show a mixture of different types of object. Because the electron beam rapidly destroys the specimen, the beam current is minimized which leads to noisy images (SNR substantially less than 1) and only one projection image per object (with an unknown projection direction) is collected. For situations where the objects can reasonably be described as coming from a finite set of classes, an approach based on joint maximum likelihood estimation of the reconstruction of each class and then use of the reconstructions to label the class of each image is described and demonstrated on two challenging problems: an assembly mutant of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and portals of the bacteriophage P22.

  6. (18)F-Tetrafluoroborate, a PET Probe for Imaging Sodium/Iodide Symporter Expression: Whole-Body Biodistribution, Safety, and Radiation Dosimetry in Thyroid Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, Jim; Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Brothwood, Teresa; Szyszko, Teresa; Marsden, Paul K; O'Doherty, Michael J; Cook, Gary J R; Blower, Philip J; Lewington, Val

    2017-10-01

    We report the safety, biodistribution, and internal radiation dosimetry, in humans with thyroid cancer, of (18)F-tetrafluoroborate ((18)F-TFB), a novel PET radioligand for imaging the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS). Methods: Serial whole-body PET scans of 5 subjects with recently diagnosed thyroid cancer were acquired before surgery for up to 4 h after injection of 184 ± 15 MBq of (18)F-TFB. Activity was determined in whole blood, plasma, and urine. Mean organ-absorbed doses and effective doses were calculated via quantitative image analysis and using OLINDA/EXM software. Results: Images showed a high uptake of (18)F-TFB in known areas of high hNIS expression (thyroid, salivary glands, and stomach). Excretion was predominantly renal. No adverse effects in relation to safety of the radiopharmaceutical were observed. The effective dose was 0.0326 ± 0.0018 mSv/MBq. The critical tissues/organs receiving the highest mean sex-averaged absorbed doses were the thyroid (0.135 ± 0.079 mSv/MBq), stomach (0.069 ± 0.022 mSv/MBq), and salivary glands (parotids, 0.031 ± 0.011 mSv/MBq; submandibular, 0.061 ± 0.031 mSv/MBq). Other organs of interest were the bladder (0.102 ± 0.046 mSv/MBq) and kidneys (0.029 ± 0.009 mSv/MBq). Conclusion: Imaging using (18)F-TFB imparts a radiation exposure similar in magnitude to many other (18)F-labeled radiotracers. (18)F-TFB shows a biodistribution similar to (99m)Tc-pertechnetate, a known nonorganified hNIS tracer, and is pharmacologically and radiobiologically safe in humans. Phase 2 trials for (18)F-TFB as an hNIS imaging agent are warranted. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  7. (99m)Tc-labeled PSMA inhibitor: Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry in healthy subjects and imaging of prostate cancer tumors in patients.

    PubMed

    Santos-Cuevas, Clara; Davanzo, Jenny; Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; García-Pérez, Francisco O; Ocampo-García, Blanca; Ignacio-Alvarez, Eleazar; Gómez-Argumosa, Edgar; Pedraza-López, Martha

    2017-09-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed in epithelial cells of the prostate and highly overexpressed in 95% of advanced prostate cancers. The aims of this study was to estimate the biokinetics and dosimetry of (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-iPSMA ((99m)Tc-labeled PSMA inhibitor) in eight healthy subjects and evaluate its usefulness as a tumor-imaging agent in eight prostate cancer patients. (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-iPSMA was obtained from a lyophilized formulation with radiochemical purities >98%, determined by reversed-phase HPLC and ITLC-SG analyses. Whole-body images from eight healthy subjects were acquired at 20min, and at 2, 6 and 24h after (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-iPSMA administration. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around the source organs on each time frame. Each ROI was corrected by background, attenuation, scattered radiation and physical decay. The image sequence was used to extrapolate the (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-iPSMA time-activity curves of each organ to adjust the biokinetic model and calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation doses. In eight prostate cancer patients with histologically confirmed cancer, whole-body SPECT/CT images were obtained at 3h. The blood activity showed a half-life value of 4.98min for the fast component (T1/2α=ln2/8.34), 2.49h for the first slow component (T1/2β=ln2/0.278), and 9.24h for the second slow component (T1/2γ=ln2/0.076). Images from patients showed an average tumor/background ratio of 8.99±3.27 at 3h. The average equivalent doses calculated for a study using 740MBq were 3.80, 7.06, 9.69, 10.70, and 28.80mSv for the breast, spleen, salivary glands, liver, and kidneys respectively, with an effective dose of 3.42±0.78mSv. All the absorbed doses were comparable to those known for most of the (99m)Tc studies. (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-iPSMA obtained from kit formulations showed high tumor uptake in

  8. Noncirrhotic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-09-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension.

  9. Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25755321

  10. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish; Minniti, Ronaldo; Parry, Marie I.; Skopec, Marlene

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 m

  11. Quasi real time in vivo dosimetry for VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Fidanzio, A.; Azario, L.; Porcelli, A.; Greco, F.; Cilla, S.; Grusio, M.; Balducci, M.; Valentini, V.; Piermattei, A.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Results about the feasibility of a method for quasi real timein vivo dosimetry (IVD) at the isocenter point for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are here reported. The method is based on correlations between the EPID signal and the dose on the beam central axis. Moreover, the γ-analysis of EPID images was adopted to verify off-axis reproducibility of fractionated plan delivery. Methods: An algorithm to reconstructin vivo the isocenter dose, D{sub iso}, for RapidArc treatments has been developed. 20 VMAT plans, optimized with two opposite arcs, for prostate, pancreas, and head treatments have been delivered by a Varian linac both to a conic PMMA phantom with elliptical section and to patients. The ratios R between reconstructed D{sub iso} and the planned doses were determined for phantom and patient irradiations adopting an acceptance criterion of ±5%. In total, 40 phantom checks and 400 patient checks were analyzed. Moreover, 3% and 3 mm criteria were adopted for portal image γ-analysis to assess patient irradiation reproducibility. Results: The average ratio R, between reconstructed and planned doses for the PMMA phantom irradiations was equal to 1.007 ± 0.024. When the IVD method was applied to the 20 patients, the average R ratio was equal to 1.003 ± 0.017 and 96% of the tests were within the acceptance criteria. The portal image γ-analysis supplied 88% of the tests within the pass rates γ{sub mean} ≤ 0.4 and P{sub γ<1} ≥ 98%. All the warnings were understood comparing the CT and the cone beam CT images and in one case a patient's setup error was detected and corrected for the successive fractions. Conclusions: This preliminary experience suggests that the method is able to detect dosimetric errors in quasi real time at the end of the therapy session. The authors intend to extend this procedure to other pathologies with the integration of in-room imaging verification by cone beam CT.

  12. Safety, Dosimetry, and Tumor Detection Ability of (68)Ga-NOTA-AE105: First-in-Human Study of a Novel Radioligand for uPAR PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Persson, Morten; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Christensen, Camilla; Madsen, Jacob; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Holm, Søren; Andersen, Flemming Littrup; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Pappot, Helle; Brasso, Klaus; Kroman, Niels; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    The overexpression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptors (uPARs) represents an established biomarker for aggressiveness in most common malignant diseases, including breast cancer (BC), prostate cancer (PC), and urinary bladder cancer (UBC), and is therefore an important target for new cancer therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. In this study, uPAR PET imaging using a (68)Ga-labeled version of the uPAR-targeting peptide (AE105) was investigated in a group of patients with BC, PC, and UBC. The aim of this first-in-human, phase I clinical trial was to investigate the safety and biodistribution in normal tissues and uptake in tumor lesions. Methods: Ten patients (6 PC, 2 BC, and 2 UBC) received a single intravenous dose of (68)Ga-NOTA-AE105 (154 ± 59 MBq; range, 48-208 MBq). The biodistribution and radiation dosimetry were assessed by serial whole-body PET/CT scans (10 min, 1 h, and 2 h after injection). Safety assessment included measurements of vital signs with regular intervals during the imaging sessions and laboratory blood screening tests performed before and after injection. In a subgroup of patients, the in vivo stability of (68)Ga-NOTA-AE105 was determined in collected blood and urine. PET images were visually analyzed for visible tumor uptake of (68)Ga-NOTA-AE105, and SUVs were obtained from tumor lesions by manually drawing volumes of interest in the malignant tissue. Results: No adverse events or clinically detectable pharmacologic effects were found. The radioligand exhibited good in vivo stability and fast clearance from tissue compartments primarily by renal excretion. The effective dose was 0.015 mSv/MBq, leading to a radiation burden of 3 mSv when the clinical target dose of 200 MBq was used. In addition, radioligand accumulation was seen in primary tumor lesions as well as in metastases. Conclusion: This first-in-human, phase I clinical trial demonstrates the safe use and clinical potential of (68)Ga-NOTA-AE105 as a new radioligand for

  13. TU-C-BRE-10: A Streamlined Approach to EPID Transit Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, B; Fontenot, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a simple and efficient transit dosimetry method using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for dose delivery error detection and prevention. Methods: In the proposed method, 2D reference transit images are generated for comparison with online images acquired during treatment. Reference transit images are generated by convolving through-air EPID measurements of each field with pixel-specific kernels selected from a library of pre-calculated Monte Carlo pencil kernels of varying radiological thickness. The kernel used for each pixel is selected based on the calculated radiological thickness of the patient along a line joining the pixel and the virtual source. The accuracy of the technique was evaluated in flat homogeneous and heterogeneous plastic water phantoms, a heterogeneous cylindrical phantom, and an anthropomorphic head phantom. Gamma criteria of 3%/3 mm was used to quantify the accuracy of the technique for the various cases. Results: An average of 99.9% and 99.7% of the points in the comparison between the measured and predicted images passed a 3%/3mm gamma for the homogeneous and heterogeneous plastic water phantoms, respectively. 97.1% of the points passed for the analysis of the heterogeneous cylindrical phantom. For the anthropomorphic head phantom, an average of 97.8% of points passed the 3%/3mm gamma criteria for all field sizes. Failures were observed primarily in areas of drastic thickness or material changes and at the edges of the fields. Conclusion: The data suggest that the proposed transit dosimetry method is a feasible approach to in vivo dose monitoring. Future research efforts could include implementation for more complex fields and sensitivity testing of the method to setup errors and changes in anatomy. Oncology Data Systems provided partial funding support but did not participate in the collection or analysis of data.

  14. A simple backprojection algorithm for 3D in vivo EPID dosimetry of IMRT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, Markus; McDermott, Leah N.; Mans, Anton; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Herk, Marcel van; Mijnheer, Ben J.

    2009-07-15

    Treatment plans are usually designed, optimized, and evaluated based on the total 3D dose distribution, motivating a total 3D dose verification. The purpose of this study was to develop a 2D transmission-dosimetry method using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) into a simple 3D method that provides 3D dose information. In the new method, the dose is reconstructed within the patient volume in multiple planes parallel to the EPID for each gantry angle. By summing the 3D dose grids of all beams, the 3D dose distribution for the total treatment fraction is obtained. The algorithm uses patient contours from the planning CT scan but does not include tissue inhomogeneity corrections. The 3D EPID dosimetry method was tested for IMRT fractions of a prostate, a rectum, and a head-and-neck cancer patient. Planned and in vivo-measured dose distributions were within 2% at the dose prescription point. Within the 50% isodose surface of the prescribed dose, at least 97% of points were in agreement, evaluated with a 3D {gamma} method with criteria of 3% of the prescribed dose and 0.3 cm. Full 3D dose reconstruction on a 0.1x0.1x0.1 cm{sup 3} grid and 3D {gamma} evaluation took less than 15 min for one fraction on a standard PC. The method allows in vivo determination of 3D dose-volume parameters that are common in clinical practice. The authors conclude that their EPID dosimetry method is an accurate and fast tool for in vivo dose verification of IMRT plans in 3D. Their approach is independent of the treatment planning system and provides a practical safety net for radiotherapy.

  15. A Web Portal that Enables Collaborative Use of Advanced Medical Image Processing and Informatics Tools through the Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN)

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shawn N.; Mendis, Michael E.; Grethe, Jeffrey S.; Gollub, Randy L.; Kennedy, David; Rosen, Bruce R.

    2006-01-01

    Launched in 2001, the Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN; http://www.nbirn.net) is an NIH – NCRR initiative that enables researchers to collaborate in an environment for biomedical research and clinical information management, focused particularly upon medical imaging. Although it supports a vast array of programs to transform and calculate upon medical images, three fundamental problems emerged that inhibited collaborations. The first was that the complexity of the programs, and at times legal restrictions, combined to prohibit these programs from being accessible to all members of the teams and indeed the general researcher, although this was a fundamental mission of the BIRN. Second, the calculations that needed to be performed were very complex, and required many steps that often needed to be performed by different groups. Third, many of the analysis programs were not interoperable. These problems combined to created tremendous logistical problems. The solution was to create a portal-based workflow application that allowed the complex, collaborative tasks to take place and enabled new kinds of calculations that had not previously been practical. PMID:17238407

  16. Internal dosimetry - a review.

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus

    2004-06-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  17. Internal dosimetry: a review.

    PubMed

    Potter, Charles A

    2005-06-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  18. WE-E-18A-08: Towards a Next-Generation Electronic Portal Device for Simultaneous Imaging and Dose Verification in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, S; Vial, P; Holloway, L; Kuncic, Z

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work forms part of an ongoing study to develop a next-generation electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for simultaneous imaging and dose verification in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to characterize the imaging performance of a novel EPID that has previously been demonstrated to exhibit a water-equivalent response. The EPID ' s response was quantified in several configurations and model parameters were empirically validated against experimental measurements. Methods: A MC model of a novel a-Si EPID incorporating an array of plastic scintillating fibers was developed. Square BCF-99-06A scintillator fibers with PMMA cladding (Saint-Gobain Crystals) were modelled in a matrix with total area measuring 150×150 mm{sup 2}. The standard electromagnetic and optical physics Geant4 classes were used to simulate radiation transport from an angled slit source (6 MV energy spectrum) through the EPID and optical photons reaching the photodiodes were scored. The prototype's modulation transfer function (MTF) was simulated and validated against experimental measurements. Several optical transport parameters, fiber lengths and thicknesses of an air gap between the scintillator and photodiodes were investigated to quantify their effects on the prototype's detection efficiency, sensitivity and MTF. Results: Simulated EPID response was more sensitive to variations in geometry than in the optical parameters studied. The MTF was particularly sensitive to the introduction of a 0.5–1.0 mm air gap between the scintillator and photodiodes, which lowered the MTF relative to that simulated without the gap. As expected, increasing the fiber length increased the detector efficiency and sensitivity while decreasing the MTF. Conclusion: A model of a novel water-equivalent EPID has been developed and benchmarked against measurements using a physical prototype. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this new device and are continuing to optimize the design

  19. Evaluation of 3D printing materials for fabrication of a novel multi-functional 3D thyroid phantom for medical dosimetry and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alssabbagh, Moayyad; Tajuddin, Abd Aziz; Abdulmanap, Mahayuddin; Zainon, Rafidah

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the three-dimensional printer has started to be utilized strongly in medical industries. In the human body, many parts or organs can be printed from 3D images to meet accurate organ geometries. In this study, five common 3D printing materials were evaluated in terms of their elementary composition and the mass attenuation coefficients. The online version of XCOM photon cross-section database was used to obtain the attenuation values of each material. The results were compared with the attenuation values of the thyroid listed in the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements - ICRU 44. Two original thyroid models (hollow-inside and solid-inside) were designed from scratch to be used in nuclear medicine, diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy for dosimetry and image quality purposes. Both designs have three holes for installation of radiation dosimeters. The hollow-inside model has more two holes in the top for injection the radioactive materials. The attenuation properties of the Polylactic Acid (PLA) material showed a very good match with the thyroid tissue, which it was selected to 3D print the phantom using open source RepRap, Prusa i3 3D printer. The scintigraphy images show that the phantom simulates a real healthy thyroid gland and thus it can be used for image quality purposes. The measured CT numbers of the PA material after the 3D printing show a close match with the human thyroid CT numbers. Furthermore, the phantom shows a good accommodation of the TLD dosimeters inside the holes. The 3D fabricated thyroid phantom simulates the real shape of the human thyroid gland with a changeable geometrical shape-size feature to fit different age groups. By using 3D printing technology, the time required to fabricate the 3D phantom was considerably shortened compared to the longer conventional methods, where it took only 30 min to print out the model. The 3D printing material used in this study is commercially available and cost

  20. Development and implementation in the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE of a new virtual source model for radiotherapy photon beams and portal image calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabert, I.; Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T.; Agelou, M.; Croc de Suray, A.; Garcia-Hernandez, J. C.; Gempp, S.; Benkreira, M.; de Carlan, L.; Lazaro, D.

    2016-07-01

    This work aims at developing a generic virtual source model (VSM) preserving all existing correlations between variables stored in a Monte Carlo pre-computed phase space (PS) file, for dose calculation and high-resolution portal image prediction. The reference PS file was calculated using the PENELOPE code, after the flattening filter (FF) of an Elekta Synergy 6 MV photon beam. Each particle was represented in a mobile coordinate system by its radial position (r s ) in the PS plane, its energy (E), and its polar and azimuthal angles (φ d and θ d ), describing the particle deviation compared to its initial direction after bremsstrahlung, and the deviation orientation. Three sub-sources were created by sorting out particles according to their last interaction location (target, primary collimator or FF). For each sub-source, 4D correlated-histograms were built by storing E, r s , φ d and θ d values. Five different adaptive binning schemes were studied to construct 4D histograms of the VSMs, to ensure histogram efficient handling as well as an accurate reproduction of E, r s , φ d and θ d distribution details. The five resulting VSMs were then implemented in PENELOPE. Their accuracy was first assessed in the PS plane, by comparing E, r s , φ d and θ d distributions with those obtained from the reference PS file. Second, dose distributions computed in water, using the VSMs and the reference PS file located below the FF, and also after collimation in both water and heterogeneous phantom, were compared using a 1.5%-0 mm and a 2%-0 mm global gamma index, respectively. Finally, portal images were calculated without and with phantoms in the beam. The model was then evaluated using a 1%-0 mm global gamma index. Performance of a mono-source VSM was also investigated and led, as with the multi-source model, to excellent results when combined with an adaptive binning scheme.

  1. Development and implementation in the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE of a new virtual source model for radiotherapy photon beams and portal image calculation.

    PubMed

    Chabert, I; Barat, E; Dautremer, T; Montagu, T; Agelou, M; Croc de Suray, A; Garcia-Hernandez, J C; Gempp, S; Benkreira, M; de Carlan, L; Lazaro, D

    2016-07-21

    This work aims at developing a generic virtual source model (VSM) preserving all existing correlations between variables stored in a Monte Carlo pre-computed phase space (PS) file, for dose calculation and high-resolution portal image prediction. The reference PS file was calculated using the PENELOPE code, after the flattening filter (FF) of an Elekta Synergy 6 MV photon beam. Each particle was represented in a mobile coordinate system by its radial position (r s ) in the PS plane, its energy (E), and its polar and azimuthal angles (φ d and θ d ), describing the particle deviation compared to its initial direction after bremsstrahlung, and the deviation orientation. Three sub-sources were created by sorting out particles according to their last interaction location (target, primary collimator or FF). For each sub-source, 4D correlated-histograms were built by storing E, r s , φ d and θ d values. Five different adaptive binning schemes were studied to construct 4D histograms of the VSMs, to ensure histogram efficient handling as well as an accurate reproduction of E, r s , φ d and θ d distribution details. The five resulting VSMs were then implemented in PENELOPE. Their accuracy was first assessed in the PS plane, by comparing E, r s , φ d and θ d distributions with those obtained from the reference PS file. Second, dose distributions computed in water, using the VSMs and the reference PS file located below the FF, and also after collimation in both water and heterogeneous phantom, were compared using a 1.5%-0 mm and a 2%-0 mm global gamma index, respectively. Finally, portal images were calculated without and with phantoms in the beam. The model was then evaluated using a 1%-0 mm global gamma index. Performance of a mono-source VSM was also investigated and led, as with the multi-source model, to excellent results when combined with an adaptive binning scheme.

  2. Patient-Specific Dosimetry Using Pretherapy [124I]m-iodobenzylguanidine ([124I]mIBG) Dynamic PET/CT Imaging Before [131I]mIBG Targeted Radionuclide Therapy for Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-ying; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik; Van Brocklin, Henry F.; Pampaloni, Miguel H.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Sznewajs, Aimee; DuBois, Steven G.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Seo, Youngho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Iodine-131-m-iodobenzylguanidine ([131I]mIBG) targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) is a standard treatment for recurrent or refractory neuroblastoma with response rates of 30–40%. The aim of this study is to demonstrate patient-specific dosimetry using quantitative [124I]mIBG PET/CT imaging with a Geant4-based Monte Carlo method for better treatment planning. Procedures A Monte Carlo dosimetry method was developed using the Geant4 toolkit with voxelized anatomical geometry and source distribution as input. The pre-segmented hybrid computational human phantoms developed by the University of Florida and the National Cancer Institute (UF/NCI) were used as a surrogate to characterize the anatomy of a given patient. S-values for I-131 were estimated by the phantoms coupled with Geant4 and compared with those estimated by OLINDA|EXM and MCNPX for the newborn model. To obtain patient-specific biodistribution of [131I]mIBG, a 10-year-old girl with relapsed neuroblastoma was imaged with [124I]mIBG PET/CT at four time points prior to the planned [131I]mIBG TRT. The organ and tumor absorbed dose of the clinical case were estimated with the Geant4 method using the modified UF/NCI 10-year-old phantom with tumors and the patient-specific residence time. Results For the newborn model, the Geant4 S-values were consistent with the MCNPX S- values. The S-value ratio of the Geant4 method to OLINDA|EXM ranged from 0.08 to 6.5 of all major organs. The [131I]mIBG residence time quantified from the pretherapy [124I]mIBG PET/CT imaging of the 10-year-old patient was mostly comparable to those previously reported. Organ absorbed dose for the salivary glands were 98.0 Gy, heart wall, 36.5 Gy, and liver, 34.3 Gy; while tumor absorbed dose ranged from 143.9 Gy to 1641.3 Gy in different sites. Conclusions Patient-specific dosimetry for [131I]mIBG targeted radionuclide therapy was accomplished using pretherapy [124I]mIBG PET/CT imaging and a Geant4-based Monte Carlo dosimetry method

  3. Nitroglycerine effects on portal vein mechanics and oxidative stress in portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vujanac, Andreja; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Djordjevic, Dusica; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Stojkovic, Mirjana; Celikovic, Dragan; Andjelkovic, Nebojsa; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Djuric, Dragan

    2012-01-28

    Тo examine the effects of nitroglycerine on portal vein haemodynamics and oxidative stress in patients with portal hypertension. Thirty healthy controls and 39 patients with clinically verified portal hypertension and increased vascular resistance participated in the study. Liver diameters, portal diameters and portal flow velocities were recorded using color flow imaging/pulsed Doppler detection. Cross-section area, portal flow and index of vascular resistance were calculated. In collected blood samples, superoxide anion radical (O(2) (-)), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), index of lipid peroxidation (measured as TBARS) and nitric oxide (NO) as a marker of endothelial response (measured as nitrite-NO(2) (-)) were determined. Time-dependent analysis was performed at basal state and in 10th and 15th min after nitroglycerine (sublingual 0.5 mg) administration. Oxidative stress parameters changed significantly during the study. H(2)O(2) decreased at the end of study, probably via O(2) (-) mediated disassembling in Haber Weiss and Fenton reaction; O(2) (-) increased significantly probably due to increased diameter and tension and decreased shear rate level. Consequently O(2) (-) and H(2)O(2) degradation products, like hydroxyl radical, initiated lipid peroxidation. Increased blood flow was to some extent lower in patients than in controls due to double paradoxes, flow velocity decreased, shear rate decreased significantly indicating non Newtonian characteristics of portal blood flow. This pilot study could be a starting point for further investigation and possible implementation of some antioxidants in the treatment of portal hypertension.

  4. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of (68)Ga-PSMA HBED CC-a PSMA specific probe for PET imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pfob, Christian H; Ziegler, Sibylle; Graner, Frank Philipp; Köhner, Markus; Schachoff, Sylvia; Blechert, Birgit; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Scheidhauer, Klemens; Schwaiger, Markus; Maurer, Tobias; Eiber, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) agents targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are currently under broad clinical and scientific investigation. (68)Ga-PSMA HBED-CC constitutes the first (68)Ga-labelled PSMA-inhibitor and has evolved as a promising agent for imaging PSMA expression in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the whole-body distribution and radiation dosimetry of this new probe. Five patients with a history or high suspicion of prostate cancer were injected intravenously with a mean of 139.8 ± 13.7 MBq of (68)Ga-PSMA HBED-CC (range 120-158 MBq). Four static skull to mid-thigh scans using a whole-body fully integrated PET/MR-system were performed 10 min, 60 min, 130 min, and 175 min after the tracer injection. Time-dependent changes of the injected activity per organ were determined. Mean organ-absorbed doses and effective doses (ED) were calculated using OLINDA/EXM. Injection of a standard activity of 150 MBq (68)Ga-PSMA HBED-CC resulted in a median effective dose of 2.37 mSv (Range 1.08E-02 - 2.46E-02 mSv/MBq). The urinary bladder wall (median absorbed dose 1.64E-01 mGv/MBq; range 8.76E-02 - 2.91E-01 mGv/MBq) was the critical organ, followed by the kidneys (median absorbed dose 1.21E-01 mGv/MBq; range 7.16E-02 - 1.75E-01), spleen (median absorbed dose 4.13E-02 mGv/MBq; range 1.57E-02 - 7.32E-02 mGv/MBq) and liver (median absorbed dose 2.07E-02 mGv/MBq; range 1.80E-02 - 2.57E-02 mGv/MBq). No drug-related pharmacological effects occurred. The use of (68)Ga-PSMA HBED-CC results in a relatively low radiation exposure, delivering organ doses that are comparable to those of other (68)Ga-labelled PSMA-inhibitors used for PET-imaging. Total effective dose is lower than for other PET-agents used for prostate cancer imaging (e.g. (11)C- and (18)F-Choline).

  5. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-05: Radiation Dosimetry of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2, a SPECT Agent for Angiogenesis Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tc-99m labeled IDA-D-[c(RGDfK){sub 2} ( {sup 99m}Tc-RGD) is a recently developed radiotracer for gamma camera or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and promising agent for the visualization of angiogenesis. In this study, we investigated the internal radiation dosimetry of {sup 99m}Tc-RGD in humans. Methods: Six normal controls (F:M=4:2; 68.3±3.2 years; 56.5±10.7 kg) were participated in this study. Simultaneous anterior and posterior scans of whole-body were performed using dual head gamma camera system. Before the emission scan, transmission scan was performed just before injection of {sup 99m}Tc-RGD using Co-57 flood source. After an intravenous injection of 388.7±29.3 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-RGD, six serial emission scans were performed at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 24 hours post-injection. The anterior and posterior images were geometrically averaged and attenuation correction was applied using transmission scan image. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on liver, gallbladder, kidneys, urinary bladder, spleen, brain, and large intestine. Time activity curves were obtained from serial emission scan and ROIs. The number of disintegrations per unit activity administered (residence time) were calculated from the area under the curve of time activity curves and injected dose of each patient. Finally, the radiation dose for each organ and effective doses were obtained using OLINDA/EXM 1.1 software and residence time. Results: High radiation doses were reported on renal and biliary excretion tracks such as urinary bladder wall, upper large intestine, kidneys, liver and gallbladder wall and their doses were 19.15±6.84, 19.28±4.78, 15.67±0.90, 9.13±1.71 and 9.09±2.03 µGy/MBq, respectively. The effective dose and effective dose equivalent were 5.08±0.53 and 7.11±0.58 µSv/MBq, respectively. Conclusion: We evaluated the radiation dose of 99mTc-RGD, which has an acceptable effective radiation dose compare to the other Tc-99m labeled radio-tracers.

  6. High-precision γ -ray spectroscopy of the cardiac PET imaging isotope Rb82 and its impact on dosimetry

    DOE PAGES

    Nino, M. N.; McCutchan, E. A.; Smith, S. V.; ...

    2016-02-01

    82Rb is a positron-emitting isotope used in cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) imaging which has been reported to deliver a significantly lower effective radiation dose than analogous imaging isotopes like 201Tl and 99mTc sestamibi. High-quality β-decay data are essential to accurately appraise the total dose received by the patients. A source of 82Sr was produced at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), transported to Argonne National Laboratory, and studied with the Gammasphere facility. Significant revisions have been made to the level scheme of 82Kr including 12 new levels, 50 new γ-ray transitions, and the determination of many new spin assignmentsmore » through angular correlations. Lastly, these new high-quality data allow a precise reappraisal of the β-decay strength function and thus the consequent dose received by patients.« less

  7. High-precision γ -ray spectroscopy of the cardiac PET imaging isotope 82Rb and its impact on dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, M. N.; McCutchan, E. A.; Smith, S. V.; Lister, C. J.; Greene, J. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Muench, L.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Zhu, S.

    2016-02-01

    82Rb is a positron-emitting isotope used in cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) imaging which has been reported to deliver a significantly lower effective radiation dose than analogous imaging isotopes like 201Tl and 99 mTc sestamibi. High-quality β -decay data are essential to accurately appraise the total dose received by the patients. A source of 82Sr was produced at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), transported to Argonne National Laboratory, and studied with the Gammasphere facility. Significant revisions have been made to the level scheme of 82Kr including 12 new levels, 50 new γ -ray transitions, and the determination of many new spin assignments through angular correlations. These new high-quality data allow a precise reappraisal of the β -decay strength function and thus the consequent dose received by patients.

  8. Multi-spectral wide-field imaging for PplX PDT dosimetry of skin (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRochelle, Ethan; Chun, Hayden H.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.; Maytin, Edward V.; Chapman, Michael S.; Davis, Scott C.

    2016-03-01

    Actinic Kertoses (AK) are common pre-cancerous lesions associated with sun-damaged skin. While generally benign, the condition can progress to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and is a particular concern for immunosuppressed patients who are susceptible to uncontrolled AK and SCC. Among the FDA-approved treatment options for AK, ALA-based photodynamic therapy is unique in that it is non-scarring and can be repeated on the same area. However, response rates vary widely due to variations in drug and light delivery, PpIX production, and tissue oxygenation. Thus, developing modalities to predict response is critical to enable patient-specific treatment-enhancing interventions. To that end, we have developed a wide-field spectrally-resolved fluorescence imaging system capable of red and blue light excitation. While blue light excites PpIX efficiently, poor photon penetration limits the image content to superficial layers of skin. Red light excitation, on the other hand, can reveal fluorescence information originating from deeper in tissue, which may provide relevant information about PpIX distribution. Our instrument illuminates the skin via a fiber-based ring illuminator, into which is coupled sequentially a white light source, and blue and red laser diodes. Light emitted from the tissue passes through a high-speed filter wheel with filters selected to resolve the PpIX emission spectrum. This configuration enables the use of spectral fitting to decouple PpIX fluorescence from background signal, improving sensitivity to low concentrations of PpIX. Images of tissue-simulating phantoms and animal models confirm a linear response to PpIX, and the ability to image sub-surface PpIX inaccessible with blue light using red excitation.

  9. Dosimetry of a cone-beam computed tomography machine compared with a digital x-ray machine in orthodontic imaging.

    PubMed

    Grünheid, Thorsten; Kolbeck Schieck, Jacquelyn R; Pliska, Benjamin T; Ahmad, Mansur; Larson, Brent E

    2012-04-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has become a routine imaging modality for many orthodontic clinics. However, questions remain about the amount of radiation patients are exposed to during the scans. This study determined the amounts of radiation potentially absorbed by a patient during orthodontic imaging with a CBCT machine with various scan settings compared with a conventional 2-dimensional digital x-ray machine. The radiation exposures delivered by a next generation i-CAT CBCT machine (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, Pa) at various scan settings and orthopantomograph OP100/OC100 digital x-ray machine (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland) during panoramic and cephalometric radiography were recorded using thermoluminescent dosimeters placed inside a head and neck phantom. The manufacturer-recommended settings for an average adult male were used for both types of machines. Effective doses were calculated using the tissue-weighting factors recommended by the 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection. The effective doses at various voxel sizes and field of view settings ranged from 64.7 to 69.2 μSv for standard resolution CBCT scans (scan time 8.9 s) and 127.3 to 131.3 μSv for high resolution full field of view scans (scan time 17.8 s), and measured 134.2 μSv for a high-resolution landscape scan with a voxel size as would be used for SureSmile (OraMetrix, Richardson, Tex) therapy (scan time 26.9 s). The effective doses for digital panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs measured 21.5 and 4.5 μSv, respectively. CBCT, although providing additional diagnostic and therapeutic benefits, also exposes patients to higher levels of radiation than conventional digital radiography. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Time dependent pre-treatment EPID dosimetry for standard and FFF VMAT.

    PubMed

    Podesta, Mark; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M J J G; Persoon, Lucas C G G; Scheib, Stefan G; Baltes, Christof; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-08-21

    Methods to calibrate Megavoltage electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for dosimetry have been previously documented for dynamic treatments such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using flattened beams and typically using integrated fields. While these methods verify the accumulated field shape and dose, the dose rate and differential fields remain unverified. The aim of this work is to provide an accurate calibration model for time dependent pre-treatment dose verification using amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPIDs in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for both flattened and flattening filter free (FFF) beams. A general calibration model was created using a Varian TrueBeam accelerator, equipped with an aS1000 EPID, for each photon spectrum 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MV-FFF, 10 MV-FFF. As planned VMAT treatments use control points (CPs) for optimization, measured images are separated into corresponding time intervals for direct comparison with predictions. The accuracy of the calibration model was determined for a range of treatment conditions. Measured and predicted CP dose images were compared using a time dependent gamma evaluation using criteria (3%, 3 mm, 0.5 sec). Time dependent pre-treatment dose verification is possible without an additional measurement device or phantom, using the on-board EPID. Sufficient data is present in trajectory log files and EPID frame headers to reliably synchronize and resample portal images. For the VMAT plans tested, significantly more deviation is observed when analysed in a time dependent manner for FFF and non-FFF plans than when analysed using only the integrated field. We show EPID-based pre-treatment dose verification can be performed on a CP basis for VMAT plans. This model can measure pre-treatment doses for both flattened and unflattened beams in a time dependent manner which highlights deviations that are missed in integrated field verifications.

  11. Re-186 and Sm-153 dosimetry based on scintigraphic imaging data in skeletal metastasis palliative treatment and Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreou, M.; Lagopati, N.; Lyra, M.

    2011-09-01

    Optimum treatment planning of patients suffering from painful skeletal metastases requires accurate calculations concerning absorbed dose in metastatic lesions and critical organs, such as red marrow. Delivering high doses to tumor cells while limiting radiation dose to normal tissue, is the key for successful palliation treatment. The aim of this study is to compare the dosimetric calculations, obtained by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and the MIRDOSE model, in therapeutic schemes of skeleton metastatic lesions, with Rhenium-186 (Sn) -HEDP and Samarium-153 -EDTMP. A bolus injection of 1295 MBq (35mCi) Re-186- HEDP was infused in 11 patients with multiple skeletal metastases. The administered dose for the 8 patients who received Sm-153 was 1 mCi /kg. Planar scintigraphic images for the two groups of patients were obtained, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h post injection, by an Elscint Apex SPX gamma camera. The images were processed, utilizing ROI quantitative methods, to determine residence times and radionuclide uptakes. Dosimetric calculations were performed using the patient specific scintigraphic data by the MIRDOSE3 code of MIRD. Also, MCNPX was employed, simulating the distribution of the radioisotope in the ROI and calculating the absorbed doses in the metastatic lesion, and in critical organs. Summarizing, there is a good agreement between the results, derived from the two pathways, the patient specific and the mathematical, with a deviation of less than 9% for planar scintigraphic data compared to MC, for both radiopharmaceuticals.

  12. SU-C-304-02: Robust and Efficient Process for Acceptance Testing of Varian TrueBeam Linacs Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    SciTech Connect

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S; Harry, T; Pawlicki, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop a process that utilizes the onboard kV and MV electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) to perform rapid acceptance testing (AT) of linacs in order to improve efficiency and standardize AT equipment and processes. Methods: In this study a Varian TrueBeam linac equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPID (aSi1000) was used. The conventional set of AT tests and tolerances was used as a baseline guide, and a novel methodology was developed to perform as many tests as possible using EPID exclusively. The developer mode on Varian TrueBeam linac was used to automate the process. In the current AT process there are about 45 tests that call for customer demos. Many of the geometric tests such as jaw alignment and MLC positioning are performed with highly manual methods, such as using graph paper. The goal of the new methodology was to achieve quantitative testing while reducing variability in data acquisition, analysis and interpretation of the results. The developed process was validated on two machines at two different institutions. Results: At least 25 of the 45 (56%) tests which required customer demo can be streamlined and performed using EPIDs. More than half of the AT tests can be fully automated using the developer mode, while others still require some user interaction. Overall, the preliminary data shows that EPID-based linac AT can be performed in less than a day, compared to 2–3 days using conventional methods. Conclusions: Our preliminary results show that performance of onboard imagers is quite suitable for both geometric and dosimetric testing of TrueBeam systems. A standardized AT process can tremendously improve efficiency, and minimize the variability related to third party quality assurance (QA) equipment and the available onsite expertise. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical

  13. Patient-specific internal radionuclide dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Loudos, George; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Theodorou, Kiki; Kappas, Constantin

    2010-02-01

    The development of patient-specific treatment planning systems is of outmost importance in the development of radionuclide dosimetry, taking into account that quantitative three-dimensional nuclear medical imaging can be used in this regard. At present, the established method for dosimetry is based on the measurement of the biokinetics by serial gamma-camera scans, followed by calculations of the administered activity and the residence times, resulting in the radiation-absorbed doses of critical organs. However, the quantification of the activity in different organs from planar data is hampered by inaccurate attenuation and scatter correction as well as because of background and organ overlay. In contrast, dosimetry based on quantitative three-dimensional data can be more accurate and allows an individualized approach, provided that all effects that degrade the quantitative content of the images have been corrected for. In addition, inhomogeneous organ accumulation of the radionuclide can be detected and possibly taken into account. The aim of this work is to provide adequate information on internal emitter dosimetry and a state-of-the-art review of the current methodology and future trends.

  14. Biodistribution and Radiation Dosimetry of (11)C-Nicotine from Whole-Body PET Imaging in Humans.

    PubMed

    Garg, Pradeep K; Lokitz, Stephen J; Nazih, Rachid; Garg, Sudha

    2017-03-01

    This study assessed the in vivo distribution of (11)C-nicotine and the absorbed radiation dose from whole-body (11)C-nicotine PET imaging of 11 healthy (5 male and 6 female) subjects. Methods: After an initial CT attenuation scan, (11)C-nicotine was administered via intravenous injection. A dynamic PET scan was acquired for 90 s with the brain in the field of view, followed by a series of 13 whole-body PET scans acquired over a 90-min period. Regions of interest were drawn over organs visible in the reconstructed PET images. Time-activity curves were generated, and the residence times were calculated. The absorbed radiation dose for the whole body was calculated by entering the residence time in OLINDA/EXM 1.0 software to model the equivalent organ dose and the effective dose for a 70-kg man. Results: The mean residence times for (11)C-nicotine in the liver, red marrow, brain, and lungs were 0.048 ± 0.010, 0.031 ± 0.005, 0.021 ± 0.004, and 0.020 ± 0.005 h, respectively. The mean effective dose for (11)C-nicotine was 5.44 ± 0.67 μSv/MBq. The organs receiving the highest absorbed dose from the (11)C-nicotine injection were the urinary bladder wall (14.68 ± 8.70 μSv/MBq), kidneys (9.56 ± 2.46 μSv/MBq), liver (8.94 ± 1.67 μSv/MBq), and spleen (9.49 ± 3.89 μSv/MBq). The renal and hepatobiliary systems were the major clearance and excretion routes for radioactivity. Conclusion: The estimated radiation dose from (11)C-nicotine administration is relatively modest and would allow for multiple PET examinations on the same subject. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  15. Prepancreatic preduodenal portal vein.

    PubMed

    Lal, N S; Kuruvila, A P; Natesh, P B; Koshy, M M; Anandakumar, M

    1992-10-01

    We report a 17 year old girl with prepancreatic and preduodenal portal vein. She presented with recurrent vomiting. Barium study revealed malrotation of the gut. Laparotomy confirmed malrotation of the gut with a prepancreatic and preduodenal portal vein. The patient is asymptomatic after gastrojejunostomy and vagotomy.

  16. Properties of thin film radiation detectors and their application to dosimetry and quality assurance in x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshahat, Bassem

    The characteristics of two different types of thin-film radiation detectors are experimentally investigated: organic photovoltaic cells (OPV) and a new self-powered detector that operates based on high-energy secondary electrons (HEC). Although their working principles are substantially different, they both can be used for radiation detection and image formation in medical applications. OPVs with different active layer material thicknesses and aluminum electrode areas were fabricated. The OPV cell consisted of P3HT: PCBM photoactive materials, composed of donor and acceptor semiconducting organic materials, sandwiched between an aluminum electrode as anode and an indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode as a cathode. The detectors were exposed to 60150 kVp x rays, which generated photocurrent in the active layer. The electric charge production in the OPV cells was measured. The net current as function of beam energy (kVp) was proportional to ~1/kVp0.45 when adjusted for x-ray beam output. The best combination of parameters for these cells was 270-nm active layer thicknesses for 0.7cm-2 electrode area. The measured current ranged from about 0.7 to 2.4 nA/cm2 for 60-150 kVp, corresponding to about 0.09 -- 0.06 nA/cm2/mGy, respectively, when adjusted for the output x-ray source flux. The HEC detection concept was recently proposed and experimentally demonstrated by a UML/HMS research group. HEC detection employs direct conversion of high-energy electron current to detector signal without external power and amplification. The potential of using HEC detectors for diagnostic imaging application was investigated by using a heterogeneous phantom consisting of a water cylinder with Al and wax rod inserts.

  17. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of radioiodinated-SCH 23982, a potential dopamine D-1 receptor imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Thonoor, C.M.; Couch, M.W.; Greer, D.M.; Thomas, K.D.; Williams, C.M.

    1988-10-01

    Radioiodinated-SCH 23982 is a potential agent for the imaging of dopamine D-1 receptors in the human brain. In vivo binding of (125I)SCH 23982 to D-1 receptors in rat brain was determined over 4 hr. The ratio of activity in striatum and frontal cortex to that in cerebellum increased over the first 2 hr to maximum values of 4.4:1 and 2.1:1, respectively. The percent injected dose in whole brain at 0.5 and 2 hr were 0.62 and 0.15, respectively. Administration of the antagonists propranolol (beta-1), prazosin (alpha-1), haloperidol (D-2) and ketanserin (5HT-2) did not significantly alter the striatum/cerebellum ratio; however, SCH 23390, a D-1 antagonist, totally blocked ligand uptake by striatum and frontal cortex. Biologic distribution data in the rat were determined after injection of 3 microCi of (125I)SCH 23982. 76%