Science.gov

Sample records for position-based quantum cryptography

  1. Position-based quantum cryptography over untrusted networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, Muhammad

    2014-08-01

    In this article, we propose quantum position verification (QPV) schemes where all the channels are untrusted except the position of the prover and distant reference stations of verifiers. We review and analyze the existing QPV schemes containing some pre-shared data between the prover and verifiers. Most of these schemes are based on non-cryptographic assumptions, i.e. quantum/classical channels between the verifiers are secure. It seems impractical in an environment fully controlled by adversaries and would lead to security compromise in practical implementations. However, our proposed formula for QPV is more robust, secure and according to the standard assumptions of cryptography. Furthermore, once the position of the prover is verified, our schemes establish secret keys in parallel and can be used for authentication and secret communication between the prover and verifiers.

  2. Unconditionally secure commitment in position-based quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Muhammad

    2014-10-27

    A new commitment scheme based on position-verification and non-local quantum correlations is presented here for the first time in literature. The only credential for unconditional security is the position of committer and non-local correlations generated; neither receiver has any pre-shared data with the committer nor does receiver require trusted and authenticated quantum/classical channels between him and the committer. In the proposed scheme, receiver trusts the commitment only if the scheme itself verifies position of the committer and validates her commitment through non-local quantum correlations in a single round. The position-based commitment scheme bounds committer to reveal valid commitment within allocated time and guarantees that the receiver will not be able to get information about commitment unless committer reveals. The scheme works for the commitment of both bits and qubits and is equally secure against committer/receiver as well as against any third party who may have interests in destroying the commitment. Our proposed scheme is unconditionally secure in general and evades Mayers and Lo-Chau attacks in particular.

  3. Unconditionally secure commitment in position-based quantum cryptography

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    A new commitment scheme based on position-verification and non-local quantum correlations is presented here for the first time in literature. The only credential for unconditional security is the position of committer and non-local correlations generated; neither receiver has any pre-shared data with the committer nor does receiver require trusted and authenticated quantum/classical channels between him and the committer. In the proposed scheme, receiver trusts the commitment only if the scheme itself verifies position of the committer and validates her commitment through non-local quantum correlations in a single round. The position-based commitment scheme bounds committer to reveal valid commitment within allocated time and guarantees that the receiver will not be able to get information about commitment unless committer reveals. The scheme works for the commitment of both bits and qubits and is equally secure against committer/receiver as well as against any third party who may have interests in destroying the commitment. Our proposed scheme is unconditionally secure in general and evades Mayers and Lo-Chau attacks in particular. PMID:25346509

  4. Insecurity of position-based quantum-cryptography protocols against entanglement attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2011-01-15

    Recently, position-based quantum cryptography has been claimed to be unconditionally secure. On the contrary, here we show that the existing proposals for position-based quantum cryptography are, in fact, insecure if entanglement is shared among two adversaries. Specifically, we demonstrate how the adversaries can incorporate ideas of quantum teleportation and quantum secret sharing to compromise the security with certainty. The common flaw to all current protocols is that the Pauli operators always map a codeword to a codeword (up to an irrelevant overall phase). We propose a modified scheme lacking this property in which the same cheating strategy used to undermine the previous protocols can succeed with a rate of at most 85%. We prove the modified protocol is secure when the shared quantum resource between the adversaries is a two- or three-level system.

  5. Insecurity of position-based quantum-cryptography protocols against entanglement attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2011-01-01

    Recently, position-based quantum cryptography has been claimed to be unconditionally secure. On the contrary, here we show that the existing proposals for position-based quantum cryptography are, in fact, insecure if entanglement is shared among two adversaries. Specifically, we demonstrate how the adversaries can incorporate ideas of quantum teleportation and quantum secret sharing to compromise the security with certainty. The common flaw to all current protocols is that the Pauli operators always map a codeword to a codeword (up to an irrelevant overall phase). We propose a modified scheme lacking this property in which the same cheating strategy used to undermine the previous protocols can succeed with a rate of at most 85%. We prove the modified protocol is secure when the shared quantum resource between the adversaries is a two- or three-level system.

  6. Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruß, D.; Meyer, T.

    The Greek words "kryptos" ≡ "hidden" and "logos" ≡ "word" are the etymological sources for "cryptology," the science of secure communication. Within cryptology, one distinguishes cryptography (or "code-making") and cryptanalysis (or "code-breaking"). The aim of cryptography is to ensure secret or "secure" communication between a sender, traditionally called Alice, and a receiver, called Bob. The encryption and decryption of a so-called plain text into a cipher text and back is achieved using a certain key (not necessarily the same for Alice and Bob), as illustrated in Fig. 1. Here, "secure" means that an eavesdropper, called Eve, has no information on the message. In this chapter we will show that in classical cryptography (using classical signals), security relies on the assumed difficulty to solve certain mathematical tasks, whereas in quantum cryptography (using quantum signals), security arises from the laws of quantum physics.

  7. Post-quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Daniel J; Lange, Tanja

    2017-09-13

    Cryptography is essential for the security of online communication, cars and implanted medical devices. However, many commonly used cryptosystems will be completely broken once large quantum computers exist. Post-quantum cryptography is cryptography under the assumption that the attacker has a large quantum computer; post-quantum cryptosystems strive to remain secure even in this scenario. This relatively young research area has seen some successes in identifying mathematical operations for which quantum algorithms offer little advantage in speed, and then building cryptographic systems around those. The central challenge in post-quantum cryptography is to meet demands for cryptographic usability and flexibility without sacrificing confidence.

  8. Post-quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Daniel J.; Lange, Tanja

    2017-09-01

    Cryptography is essential for the security of online communication, cars and implanted medical devices. However, many commonly used cryptosystems will be completely broken once large quantum computers exist. Post-quantum cryptography is cryptography under the assumption that the attacker has a large quantum computer; post-quantum cryptosystems strive to remain secure even in this scenario. This relatively young research area has seen some successes in identifying mathematical operations for which quantum algorithms offer little advantage in speed, and then building cryptographic systems around those. The central challenge in post-quantum cryptography is to meet demands for cryptographic usability and flexibility without sacrificing confidence.

  9. Quantum cryptography: a view from classical cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, Johannes; Braun, Johannes; Demirel, Denise; Geihs, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    Much of digital data requires long-term protection of confidentiality, for example, medical health records. Cryptography provides such protection. However, currently used cryptographic techniques such as Diffe-Hellman key exchange may not provide long-term security. Such techniques rely on certain computational assumptions, such as the hardness of the discrete logarithm problem that may turn out to be incorrect. On the other hand, quantum cryptography---in particular quantum random number generation and quantum key distribution---offers information theoretic protection. In this paper, we explore the challenge of providing long-term confidentiality and we argue that a combination of quantum cryptography and classical cryptography can provide such protection.

  10. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  11. Quantum Computational Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawachi, Akinori; Koshiba, Takeshi

    As computational approaches to classical cryptography have succeeded in the establishment of the foundation of the network security, computational approaches even to quantum cryptography are promising, since quantum computational cryptography could offer richer applications than the quantum key distribution. Our project focused especially on the quantum one-wayness and quantum public-key cryptosystems. The one-wayness of functions (or permutations) is one of the most important notions in computational cryptography. First, we give an algorithmic characterization of quantum one-way permutations. In other words, we show a necessary and sufficient condition for quantum one-way permutations in terms of reflection operators. Second, we introduce a problem of distinguishing between two quantum states as a new underlying problem that is harder to solve than the graph automorphism problem. The new problem is a natural generalization of the distinguishability problem between two probability distributions, which are commonly used in computational cryptography. We show that the problem has several cryptographic properties and they enable us to construct a quantum publickey cryptosystem, which is likely to withstand any attack of a quantum adversary.

  12. Practical quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balygin, K. A.; Zaitsev, V. I.; Klimov, A. N.; Klimov, A. I.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2017-05-01

    A quantum cryptography system based on a 4-basis protocol with geometrically uniform states is tested in a series of experiments. Quantum states of light transmitted through real fiber optic communication channels to a distance of 32 km in the presence of uncontrolled external actions are prepared, transformed, and measured. It is shown that the chosen algorithms of processing quantum information are adequate and can be used as foundations of practical devices in protected communication lines.1

  13. Counterfactual quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Noh, Tae-Gon

    2009-12-04

    Quantum cryptography allows one to distribute a secret key between two remote parties using the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. The well-known established paradigm for the quantum key distribution relies on the actual transmission of signal particle through a quantum channel. In this Letter, we show that the task of a secret key distribution can be accomplished even though a particle carrying secret information is not in fact transmitted through the quantum channel. The proposed protocols can be implemented with current technologies and provide practical security advantages by eliminating the possibility that an eavesdropper can directly access the entire quantum system of each signal particle.

  14. Introduction to optical quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamski, Tomasz

    2008-01-01

    In recent years very fast progress in the domain of Optical Quantum Cryptography is observed both in theoretical and practical aspects. The paper is a short tutorial review of basic concepts of Optical Quantum Cryptography (OQC) and Quantum Key Distribution (QKD).

  15. Single photon quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Beveratos, Alexios; Brouri, Rosa; Gacoin, Thierry; Villing, André; Poizat, Jean-Philippe; Grangier, Philippe

    2002-10-28

    We report the full implementation of a quantum cryptography protocol using a stream of single photon pulses generated by a stable and efficient source operating at room temperature. The single photon pulses are emitted on demand by a single nitrogen-vacancy color center in a diamond nanocrystal. The quantum bit error rate is less that 4.6% and the secure bit rate is 7700 bits/s. The overall performances of our system reaches a domain where single photons have a measurable advantage over an equivalent system based on attenuated light pulses.

  16. Composability in quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Quade, Jörn; Renner, Renato

    2009-08-01

    If we combine two secure cryptographic systems, is the resulting system still secure? Answering this question is highly nontrivial and has recently sparked a considerable research effort, in particular, in the area of classical cryptography. A central insight was that the answer to the question is yes, but only within a well-specified composability framework and for carefully chosen security definitions. In this article, we review several aspects of composability in the context of quantum cryptography. The first part is devoted to key distribution. We discuss the security criteria that a quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol must fulfill to allow its safe use within a larger security application (e.g. for secure message transmission); and we demonstrate—by an explicit example—what can go wrong if conventional (non-composable) security definitions are used. Finally, to illustrate the practical use of composability, we show how to generate a continuous key stream by sequentially composing rounds of a QKD protocol. In the second part, we take a more general point of view, which is necessary for the study of cryptographic situations involving, for example, mutually distrustful parties. We explain the universal composability (UC) framework and state the composition theorem that guarantees that secure protocols can securely be composed to larger applications. We focus on the secure composition of quantum protocols into unconditionally secure classical protocols. However, the resulting security definition is so strict that some tasks become impossible without additional security assumptions. Quantum bit commitment is impossible in the UC framework even with mere computational security. Similar problems arise in the quantum bounded storage model and we observe a trade-off between the UC and the use of the weakest possible security assumptions.

  17. Single Sign-On Under Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Guiping; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Single Sign-On (SSO) is an important cryptography mechanism in distributed systems and is implemented in many known systems, such as the famous Kerberos. Quantum cryptography has excellent security properties guaranteed by physical principles and makes great influence on traditional cryptography. In this paper, we combines the SSO mechanism and quantum cryptography together. A SSO solution under quantum cryptography is designed. Through security analysis, we show that this solution has good security properties.

  18. Mesoscopic quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2017-03-01

    Since a strictly single-photon source is not yet available, in quantum cryptography systems, one uses, as information quantum states, coherent radiation of a laser with an average number of photons of μ ≈ 0.1-0.5 in a pulse, attenuated to the quasi-single-photon level. The linear independence of a set of coherent quasi-single-photon information states leads to the possibility of unambiguous measurements that, in the presence of losses in the line, restrict the transmission range of secret keys. Starting from a certain value of critical loss (the length of the line), the eavesdropper knows the entire key, does not make errors, and is not detected—the distribution of secret keys becomes impossible. This problem is solved by introducing an additional reference state with an average number of photons of μcl ≈ 103-106, depending on the length of the communication line. It is shown that the use of a reference state does not allow the eavesdropper to carry out measurements with conclusive outcome while remaining undetected. A reference state guarantees detecting an eavesdropper in a channel with high losses. In this case, information states may contain a mesoscopic average number of photons in the range of μ q ≈ 0.5-102. The protocol proposed is easy to implement technically, admits flexible adjustment of parameters to the length of the communication line, and is simple and transparent for proving the secrecy of keys.

  19. Relativistic quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniewski, Jedrzej

    Special relativity states that information cannot travel faster than the speed of light, which means that communication between agents occupying distinct locations incurs some minimal delay. Alternatively, we can see it as temporary communication constraints between distinct agents and such constraints turn out to be useful for cryptographic purposes. In relativistic cryptography we consider protocols in which interactions occur at distinct locations at well-defined times and we investigate why such a setting allows to implement primitives which would not be possible otherwise. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  20. Relativistic quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2011-03-15

    A new protocol of quantum key distribution is proposed to transmit keys through free space. Along with quantum-mechanical restrictions on the discernibility of nonorthogonal quantum states, the protocol uses additional restrictions imposed by special relativity theory. Unlike all existing quantum key distribution protocols, this protocol ensures key secrecy for a not strictly one-photon source of quantum states and an arbitrary length of a quantum communication channel.

  1. Secure communications using quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.

    1997-08-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as {open_quotes}key{close_quotes} material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). We have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non-orthogonal single-photon states to generate shared key material over multi-kilometer optical fiber paths and over line-of-sight links. In both cases, key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. In our optical fiber experiment we have performed quantum key distribution over 24-km of underground optical fiber using single-photon interference states, demonstrating that secure, real-time key generation over {open_quotes}open{close_quotes} multi-km node-to-node optical fiber communications links is possible. We have also constructed a quantum key distribution system for free-space, line-of-sight transmission using single-photon polarization states, which is currently undergoing laboratory testing. 7 figs.

  2. Key distillation in quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutsky, Boris Aron

    1998-11-01

    Quantum cryptography is a technique which permits two parties to communicate over an open channel and establish a shared sequence of bits known only to themselves. This task, provably impossible in classical cryptography, is accomplished by encoding the data on quantum particles and harnessing their unique properties. It is believed that no eavesdropping attack consistent with the laws of quantum theory can compromise the secret data unknowingly to the legitimate users of the channel. Any attempt by a hostile actor to monitor the data carrying particles while in transit reveals itself through transmission errors it must inevitably introduce. Unfortunately, in practice a communication is not free of errors even when no eavesdropping is present. Key distillation is a technique that permits the parties to overcome this difficulty and establish a secret key despite channel defects, under the assumption that every particle is handled independently from other particles by the enemy. In the present work, key distillation is described and its various aspects are studied. A relationship is derived between the average error rate resulting from an eavesdropping attack and the amount of information obtained by the attacker. Formal definition is developed of the security of the final key. The net throughput of secret bits in a quantum cryptosystem employing key distillation is assessed. An overview of quantum cryptographic protocols and related information theoretical results is also given.

  3. Quantum cryptography without switching.

    PubMed

    Weedbrook, Christian; Lance, Andrew M; Bowen, Warwick P; Symul, Thomas; Ralph, Timothy C; Lam, Ping Koy

    2004-10-22

    We propose a new coherent state quantum key distribution protocol that eliminates the need to randomly switch between measurement bases. This protocol provides significantly higher secret key rates with increased bandwidths than previous schemes that only make single quadrature measurements. It also offers the further advantage of simplicity compared to all previous protocols which, to date, have relied on switching.

  4. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  5. Link-layer vulnerabilities of quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartalopoulos, Stamatios V.

    2005-09-01

    The last two decades have witnessed an exciting advanced research field that stems from non-classical atomic theory, quantum mechanics. This field promises an important applicability in secure data communications, known as quantum cryptography. Quantum cryptography takes advantage of the inherent random polarization state of single photons, which is not reproducible by a third party or an eavesdropper located between the source and the destination. Thus, when polarization states of photons are associated with binary logic an algorithm may intelligently developed according to which a cryptographic key is disseminated by the source terminal to the destination. This is a process known as quantum key distribution. However, as photons propagate in a non-linear medium such as fiber, their polarization state does not remain intact and thus the quantum key distribution and quantum cryptography becomes vulnerable to attacks. In this paper we consider the applicability of quantum cryptography in a pragmatic fiber-optic medium and in a popular communication network topology. We identify major weaknesses for each step of the quantum key distribution process, and also potential attacks to incapacitate quantum cryptography in fiber communications, so that better countermeasure strategies can be developed.

  6. Quantum cryptography over underground optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.; Simmons, C.

    1996-05-01

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generated shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light whose security is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics. An adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg`s uncertainty principle. In this paper the authors describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from their experimental system with which they are generating key material over 14-km of underground optical fiber. These results show that optical-fiber based quantum cryptography could allow secure, real-time key generation over ``open`` multi-km node-to-node optical fiber communications links between secure ``islands.``

  7. Quantum asymmetric cryptography with symmetric keys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Wen, Qiaoyan; Qin, Sujuan; Zhu, Fuchen

    2009-12-01

    Based on quantum encryption, we present a new idea for quantum public-key cryptography (QPKC) and construct a whole theoretical framework of a QPKC system. We show that the quantum-mechanical nature renders it feasible and reasonable to use symmetric keys in such a scheme, which is quite different from that in conventional public-key cryptography. The security of our scheme is analyzed and some features are discussed. Furthermore, the state-estimation attack to a prior QPKC scheme is demonstrated.

  8. Counterfactual quantum cryptography network with untrusted relay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Gu, Xuemei; Jiang, Dong; Xie, Ling; Chen, Lijun

    2015-07-01

    Counterfactual quantum cryptography allows two remote parties to share a secret key even though a physical particle is not in fact transmitted through the quantum channel. In order to extend the scope of counterfactual quantum cryptography, we use an untrusted relay to construct a multi-user network. The implementation issues are discussed to show that the scheme can be realized with current technologies. We also prove the practical security advantages of the scheme by eliminating the probability that an eavesdropper can directly access the signal or an untrusted relay can perform false operations.

  9. Distinguishability of quantum states and shannon complexity in quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbekov, I. M.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2017-07-01

    The proof of the security of quantum key distribution is a rather complex problem. Security is defined in terms different from the requirements imposed on keys in classical cryptography. In quantum cryptography, the security of keys is expressed in terms of the closeness of the quantum state of an eavesdropper after key distribution to an ideal quantum state that is uncorrelated to the key of legitimate users. A metric of closeness between two quantum states is given by the trace metric. In classical cryptography, the security of keys is understood in terms of, say, the complexity of key search in the presence of side information. In quantum cryptography, side information for the eavesdropper is given by the whole volume of information on keys obtained from both quantum and classical channels. The fact that the mathematical apparatuses used in the proof of key security in classical and quantum cryptography are essentially different leads to misunderstanding and emotional discussions [1]. Therefore, one should be able to answer the question of how different cryptographic robustness criteria are related to each other. In the present study, it is shown that there is a direct relationship between the security criterion in quantum cryptography, which is based on the trace distance determining the distinguishability of quantum states, and the criterion in classical cryptography, which uses guesswork on the determination of a key in the presence of side information.

  10. Quantum cryptography approaching the classical limit.

    PubMed

    Weedbrook, Christian; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Ralph, Timothy C

    2010-09-10

    We consider the security of continuous-variable quantum cryptography as we approach the classical limit, i.e., when the unknown preparation noise at the sender's station becomes significantly noisy or thermal (even by as much as 10(4) times greater than the variance of the vacuum mode). We show that, provided the channel transmission losses do not exceed 50%, the security of quantum cryptography is not dependent on the channel transmission, and is therefore incredibly robust against significant amounts of excess preparation noise. We extend these results to consider for the first time quantum cryptography at wavelengths considerably longer than optical and find that regions of security still exist all the way down to the microwave.

  11. Recent advances in quantum cryptography: quantum cryptography using single sideband scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merolla, Jean-Marc; Guerreau, Olivier L.; Malassenet, Francois J.; Goedgebuer, Jean-Pierre

    2004-06-01

    We present recent advances in the field of quantum cryptography. The system developed at the GTL-CNRS Telecom Lab uses a Single Sideband detection scheme to enable long distance transmission over standard telecom fiber.

  12. Quantum cryptography over non-Markovian channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapliyal, Kishore; Pathak, Anirban; Banerjee, Subhashish

    2017-05-01

    A three-party scheme for secure quantum communication, namely controlled quantum dialogue (CQD), is analyzed under the influence of non-Markovian channels. By comparing with the corresponding Markovian cases, it is seen that the average fidelity can be maintained for relatively longer periods of time. Interestingly, a number of facets of quantum cryptography, such as quantum secure direct communication, deterministic secure quantum communication and their controlled counterparts, quantum dialogue, quantum key distribution, quantum key agreement, can be reduced from the CQD scheme. Therefore, the CQD scheme is analyzed under the influence of damping, dephasing and depolarizing non-Markovian channels, and subsequently, the effect of these non-Markovian channels on the other schemes of secure quantum communication is deduced from the results obtained for CQD. The damped non-Markovian channel causes a periodic revival in the fidelity, while fidelity is observed to be sustained under the influence of the dephasing non-Markovian channel.

  13. Quantum discord as a resource for quantum cryptography

    PubMed Central

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Quantum discord is the minimal bipartite resource which is needed for a secure quantum key distribution, being a cryptographic primitive equivalent to non-orthogonality. Its role becomes crucial in device-dependent quantum cryptography, where the presence of preparation and detection noise (inaccessible to all parties) may be so strong to prevent the distribution and distillation of entanglement. The necessity of entanglement is re-affirmed in the stronger scenario of device-independent quantum cryptography, where all sources of noise are ascribed to the eavesdropper. PMID:25378231

  14. Quantum discord as a resource for quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2014-11-07

    Quantum discord is the minimal bipartite resource which is needed for a secure quantum key distribution, being a cryptographic primitive equivalent to non-orthogonality. Its role becomes crucial in device-dependent quantum cryptography, where the presence of preparation and detection noise (inaccessible to all parties) may be so strong to prevent the distribution and distillation of entanglement. The necessity of entanglement is re-affirmed in the stronger scenario of device-independent quantum cryptography, where all sources of noise are ascribed to the eavesdropper.

  15. Spectral coherent-state quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Cincotti, Gabriella; Spiekman, Leo; Wada, Naoya; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2008-11-01

    A novel implementation of quantum-noise optical cryptography is proposed, which is based on a simplified architecture that allows long-haul, high-speed transmission in a fiber optical network. By using a single multiport encoder/decoder and 16 phase shifters, this new approach can provide the same confidentiality as other implementations of Yuen's encryption protocol, which use a larger number of phase or polarization coherent states. Data confidentiality and error probability for authorized and unauthorized receivers are carefully analyzed.

  16. Partially Blind Signatures Based on Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiao-Qiu; Niu, Hui-Fang

    2012-12-01

    In a partially blind signature scheme, the signer explicitly includes pre-agreed common information in the blind signature, which can improve the availability and performance. We present a new partially blind signature scheme based on fundamental properties of quantum mechanics. In addition, we analyze the security of this scheme, and show it is not possible to forge valid partially blind signatures. Moreover, the comparisons between this scheme and those based on public-key cryptography are also discussed.

  17. Free-space quantum cryptography in daylight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard J.; Buttler, William T.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Lamoreaux, Steve K.; Morgan, George L.; Nordholt, Jane E.; Peterson, C. Glen

    2000-05-01

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics and information-theoretically secure post-processing methods. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. In this paper we describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from our experimental free-space system with which we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of quantum key generation over a point-to-point outdoor atmospheric path in daylight. We achieved a transmission distance of 0.5 km, which was limited only by the length of the test range. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on orbit. We present a feasibility analysis of surface-to-satellite quantum key generation.

  18. FREE-SPACE QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY IN DAYLIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.

    2000-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics and information-theoretically secure post-processing methods. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. In this paper we describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from our experimental free-space system with which we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of quantum key generation over a point-to-point outdoor atmospheric path in daylight. We achieved a transmission distance of 0.5 km, which was limited only by the length of the test range. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on orbit. We present a feasibility analysis of surface-to-satellite quantum key generation.

  19. Experimental quantum secret sharing and third-man quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Ao; Zhang, An-Ning; Zhao, Zhi; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Lu, Chao-Yang; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Yang, Tao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2005-11-11

    Quantum secret sharing (QSS) and third-man quantum cryptography (TQC) are essential for advanced quantum communication; however, the low intensity and fragility of the multiphoton entanglement source in previous experiments have made their realization an extreme experimental challenge. Here, we develop and exploit an ultrastable high intensity source of four-photon entanglement to report an experimental realization of QSS and TQC. The technology developed in our experiment will be important for future multiparty quantum communication.

  20. Entanglement-Based Quantum Cryptography and Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Anton

    2007-03-01

    Quantum entanglement, to Erwin Schroedinger the essential feature of quantum mechanics, has become a central resource in various quantum communication protocols including quantum cryptography and quantum teleportation. From a fundamental point of view what is exploited in these experiments is the very fact which led Schroedinger to his statement namely that in entangled states joint properties of the entangled systems may be well defined while the individual subsystems may carry no information at all. In entanglement-based quantum cryptography it leads to the most elegant possible solution of the classic key distribution problem. It implies that the key comes into existence at spatially distant location at the same time and does not need to be transported. A number recent developments include for example highly efficient, robust and stable sources of entangled photons with a broad bandwidth of desired features. Also, entanglement-based quantum cryptography is successfully joining other methods in the work towards demonstrating quantum key distribution networks. Along that line recently decoy-state quantum cryptography over a distance of 144 km between two Canary Islands was demonstrated successfully. Such experiments also open up the possibility of quantum communication on a really large scale using LEO satellites. Another important possible future branch of quantum communication involves quantum repeaters in order to cover larger distances with entangled states. Recently the connection of two fully independent lasers in an entanglement swapping experiment did demonstrate that the timing control of such systems on a femtosecond time scale is possible. A related development includes recent demonstrations of all-optical one-way quantum computation schemes with the extremely short cycle time of only 100 nanoseconds.

  1. Security of counterfactual quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Zhenqiang; Li Hongwei; Chen Wei; Han Zhengfu; Guo Guangcan

    2010-10-15

    Recently, a 'counterfactual' quantum-key-distribution scheme was proposed by T.-G. Noh [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 230501 (2009)]. In this scheme, two legitimate distant peers may share secret keys even when the information carriers are not traveled in the quantum channel. We find that this protocol is equivalent to an entanglement distillation protocol. According to this equivalence, a strict security proof and the asymptotic key bit rate are both obtained when a perfect single-photon source is applied and a Trojan horse attack can be detected. We also find that the security of this scheme is strongly related to not only the bit error rate but also the yields of photons. And our security proof may shed light on the security of other two-way protocols.

  2. Quantum teleportation for keyless cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parakh, Abhishek

    2015-05-01

    This paper looks at using quantum teleportation for secure message exchange. Although the proposed protocol has parallels with Ekert's protocol for key distribution, we look at the issue of directly teleporting message bits instead of encryption keys. Further, it is the first protocol of it's type where the role of the sender and receiver are flipped around. In other words, unlike traditional protocols, in the proposed protocol the receiver first performs certain measurements thus implicitly determining a stream of bits that she combines with the bit stream received from the sender to determine the secret message. There are no qubits wasted in random measurements.

  3. Free-space quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.

    1998-12-31

    An experimental free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system has been tested over an outdoor optical path of {approximately}1 km under nighttime conditions at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system employs the Bennett 92 protocol; here the authors give a brief overview of this protocol, and describe the experimental implementation of it. An analysis of the system efficiency is presented, as well as a description of the error detection protocol, which employs a two-dimensional parity check scheme. Finally, the susceptibility of this system to eavesdropping by various techniques is determined. Possible applications include the rekeying of satellites in low earth orbit.

  4. High Data Rate Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiat, Paul; Christensen, Bradley; McCusker, Kevin; Kumor, Daniel; Gauthier, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    While quantum key distribution (QKD) systems are now commercially available, the data rate is a limiting factor for some desired applications (e.g., secure video transmission). Most QKD systems receive at most a single random bit per detection event, causing the data rate to be limited by the saturation of the single-photon detectors. Recent experiments have begun to explore using larger degree of freedoms, i.e., temporal or spatial qubits, to optimize the data rate. Here, we continue this exploration using entanglement in multiple degrees of freedom. That is, we use simultaneous temporal and polarization entanglement to reach up to 8.3 bits of randomness per coincident detection. Due to current technology, we are unable to fully secure the temporal degree of freedom against all possible future attacks; however, by assuming a technologically-limited eavesdropper, we are able to obtain 23.4 MB/s secure key rate across an optical table, after error reconciliation and privacy amplification. In this talk, we will describe our high-rate QKD experiment, with a short discussion on our work towards extending this system to ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore communication, aiming to secure the temporal degree of freedom and to implement a 30-km free-space link over a marine environment.

  5. Twenty Seven Years of Quantum Cryptography!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard

    2011-03-01

    One of the fundamental goals of cryptographic research is to minimize the assumptions underlying the protocols that enable secure communications between pairs or groups of users. In 1984, building on earlier research by Stephen Wiesner, Charles Bennett and Gilles Brassard showed how quantum physics could be harnessed to provide information-theoretic security for protocols such as the distribution of cryptographic keys, which enables two parties to secure their conventional communications. Bennett and Brassard and colleagues performed a proof-of-principle quantum key distribution (QKD) experiment with single-photon quantum state transmission over a 32-cm air path in 1991. This seminal experiment led other researchers to explore QKD in optical fibers and over line-of-sight outdoor atmospheric paths (``free-space''), resulting in dramatic increases in range, bit rate and security. These advances have been enabled by improvements in sources and single-photon detectors. Also in 1991 Artur Ekert showed how the security of QKD could be related to quantum entanglement. This insight led to a deeper understanding and proof of QKD security with practical sources and detectors in the presence of transmission loss and channel noise. Today, QKD has been implemented over ranges much greater than 100km in both fiber and free-space, multi-node network testbeds have been demonstrated, and satellite-based QKD is under study in several countries. ``Quantum hacking'' researchers have shown the importance of extending security considerations to the classical devices that produce and detect the photon quantum states. New quantum cryptographic protocols such as secure identification have been proposed, and others such as quantum secret splitting have been demonstrated. It is now possible to envision quantum cryptography providing a more secure alternative to present-day cryptographic methods for many secure communications functions. My talk will survey these remarkable developments.

  6. PREFACE: Quantum Information, Communication, Computation and Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benatti, F.; Fannes, M.; Floreanini, R.; Petritis, D.

    2007-07-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to information related fields such as communication, computation and cryptography is a fast growing line of research that has been witnessing an outburst of theoretical and experimental results, with possible practical applications. On the one hand, quantum cryptography with its impact on secrecy of transmission is having its first important actual implementations; on the other hand, the recent advances in quantum optics, ion trapping, BEC manipulation, spin and quantum dot technologies allow us to put to direct test a great deal of theoretical ideas and results. These achievements have stimulated a reborn interest in various aspects of quantum mechanics, creating a unique interplay between physics, both theoretical and experimental, mathematics, information theory and computer science. In view of all these developments, it appeared timely to organize a meeting where graduate students and young researchers could be exposed to the fundamentals of the theory, while senior experts could exchange their latest results. The activity was structured as a school followed by a workshop, and took place at The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and The International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy, from 12-23 June 2006. The meeting was part of the activity of the Joint European Master Curriculum Development Programme in Quantum Information, Communication, Cryptography and Computation, involving the Universities of Cergy-Pontoise (France), Chania (Greece), Leuven (Belgium), Rennes1 (France) and Trieste (Italy). This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical collects 22 contributions from well known experts who took part in the workshop. They summarize the present day status of the research in the manifold aspects of quantum information. The issue is opened by two review articles, the first by G Adesso and F Illuminati discussing entanglement in continuous variable

  7. Strong connections between quantum encodings, nonlocality, and quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Jamie; Chailloux, André; Kerenidis, Iordanis

    2014-02-01

    Encoding information in quantum systems can offer surprising advantages but at the same time there are limitations that arise from the fact that measuring an observable may disturb the state of the quantum system. In our work, we provide an in-depth analysis of a simple question: What happens when we perform two measurements sequentially on the same quantum system? This question touches upon some fundamental properties of quantum mechanics, namely the uncertainty principle and the complementarity of quantum measurements. Our results have interesting consequences, for example, they can provide a simple proof of the optimal quantum strategy in the famous Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt game. Moreover, we show that the way information is encoded in quantum systems can provide a different perspective in understanding other fundamental aspects of quantum information, like nonlocality and quantum cryptography. We prove some strong equivalences between these notions and provide a number of applications in all areas.

  8. On the complexity of search for keys in quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    The trace distance is used as a security criterion in proofs of security of keys in quantum cryptography. Some authors doubted that this criterion can be reduced to criteria used in classical cryptography. The following question has been answered in this work. Let a quantum cryptography system provide an ɛ-secure key such that ½‖ρ XE - ρ U ⊗ ρ E ‖1 < ɛ, which will be repeatedly used in classical encryption algorithms. To what extent does the ɛ-secure key reduce the number of search steps (guesswork) as compared to the use of ideal keys? A direct relation has been demonstrated between the complexity of the complete consideration of keys, which is one of the main security criteria in classical systems, and the trace distance used in quantum cryptography. Bounds for the minimum and maximum numbers of search steps for the determination of the actual key have been presented.

  9. Efficient multiuser quantum cryptography network based on entanglement.

    PubMed

    Xue, Peng; Wang, Kunkun; Wang, Xiaoping

    2017-04-04

    We present an efficient quantum key distribution protocol with a certain entangled state to solve a special cryptographic task. Also, we provide a proof of security of this protocol by generalizing the proof of modified of Lo-Chau scheme. Based on this two-user scheme, a quantum cryptography network protocol is proposed without any quantum memory.

  10. Efficient multiuser quantum cryptography network based on entanglement

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Peng; Wang, Kunkun; Wang, Xiaoping

    2017-01-01

    We present an efficient quantum key distribution protocol with a certain entangled state to solve a special cryptographic task. Also, we provide a proof of security of this protocol by generalizing the proof of modified of Lo-Chau scheme. Based on this two-user scheme, a quantum cryptography network protocol is proposed without any quantum memory. PMID:28374854

  11. Efficient multiuser quantum cryptography network based on entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Peng; Wang, Kunkun; Wang, Xiaoping

    2017-04-01

    We present an efficient quantum key distribution protocol with a certain entangled state to solve a special cryptographic task. Also, we provide a proof of security of this protocol by generalizing the proof of modified of Lo-Chau scheme. Based on this two-user scheme, a quantum cryptography network protocol is proposed without any quantum memory.

  12. Proposal for founding mistrustful quantum cryptography on coin tossing

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Adrian

    2003-07-01

    A significant branch of classical cryptography deals with the problems which arise when mistrustful parties need to generate, process, or exchange information. As Kilian showed a while ago, mistrustful classical cryptography can be founded on a single protocol, oblivious transfer, from which general secure multiparty computations can be built. The scope of mistrustful quantum cryptography is limited by no-go theorems, which rule out, inter alia, unconditionally secure quantum protocols for oblivious transfer or general secure two-party computations. These theorems apply even to protocols which take relativistic signaling constraints into account. The best that can be hoped for, in general, are quantum protocols which are computationally secure against quantum attack. Here a method is described for building a classically certified bit commitment, and hence every other mistrustful cryptographic task, from a secure coin-tossing protocol. No security proof is attempted, but reasons are sketched why these protocols might resist quantum computational attack.

  13. Postselection technique for quantum channels with applications to quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Christandl, Matthias; König, Robert; Renner, Renato

    2009-01-16

    We propose a general method for studying properties of quantum channels acting on an n-partite system, whose action is invariant under permutations of the subsystems. Our main result is that, in order to prove that a certain property holds for an arbitrary input, it is sufficient to consider the case where the input is a particular de Finetti-type state, i.e., a state which consists of n identical and independent copies of an (unknown) state on a single subsystem. Our technique can be applied to the analysis of information-theoretic problems. For example, in quantum cryptography, we get a simple proof for the fact that security of a discrete-variable quantum key distribution protocol against collective attacks implies security of the protocol against the most general attacks. The resulting security bounds are tighter than previously known bounds obtained with help of the exponential de Finetti theorem.

  14. Quantum entanglement and composite keys in quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2017-06-01

    The security of quantum cryptography protocols after a quantum key distribution (QKD) session is formulated in terms of proximity between two situations: quantum states corresponding to real and ideal situations after QKD. The measure of proximity is the trace distance. It is more reasonable to formulate security directly in terms of the smallness of probability of successive guessing of keys by an eavesdropper after an arbitrary number of QKD sessions. There is a fundamental question the answer to which is a priori very unobvious: Is the security criterion in terms of the proximity of the real and ideal situations for a single QKD session sufficient to guarantee the security of keys in terms of the smallness of probability of guessing of keys by the eavesdropper after an arbitrary number of QKD sessions? It has been shown that the answer to this question is positive.

  15. Analysis of limiting information characteristics of quantum-cryptography protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Sych, D V; Grishanin, Boris A; Zadkov, Viktor N

    2005-01-31

    The problem of increasing the critical error rate of quantum-cryptography protocols by varying a set of letters in a quantum alphabet for space of a fixed dimensionality is studied. Quantum alphabets forming regular polyhedra on the Bloch sphere and the continual alphabet equally including all the quantum states are considered. It is shown that, in the absence of basis reconciliation, a protocol with the tetrahedral alphabet has the highest critical error rate among the protocols considered, while after the basis reconciliation, a protocol with the continual alphabet possesses the highest critical error rate. (quantum optics and quantum computation)

  16. Quantum cryptography and applications in the optical fiber network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuhui

    2005-09-01

    Quantum cryptography, as part of quantum information and communications, can provide absolute security for information transmission because it is established on the fundamental laws of quantum theory, such as the principle of uncertainty, No-cloning theorem and quantum entanglement. In this thesis research, a novel scheme to implement quantum key distribution based on multiphoton entanglement with a new protocol is proposed. Its advantages are: a larger information capacity can be obtained with a longer transmission distance and the detection of multiple photons is easier than that of a single photon. The security and attacks pertaining to such a system are also studied. Next, a quantum key distribution over wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) optical fiber networks is realized. Quantum key distribution in networks is a long-standing problem for practical applications. Here we combine quantum cryptography and WDM to solve this problem because WDM technology is universally deployed in the current and next generation fiber networks. The ultimate target is to deploy quantum key distribution over commercial networks. The problems arising from the networks are also studied in this part. Then quantum key distribution in multi-access networks using wavelength routing technology is investigated in this research. For the first time, quantum cryptography for multiple individually targeted users has been successfully implemented in sharp contrast to that using the indiscriminating broadcasting structure. It overcomes the shortcoming that every user in the network can acquire the quantum key signals intended to be exchanged between only two users. Furthermore, a more efficient scheme of quantum key distribution is adopted, hence resulting in a higher key rate. Lastly, a quantum random number generator based on quantum optics has been experimentally demonstrated. This device is a key component for quantum key distribution as it can create truly random numbers, which is an

  17. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Cryptography: Theory and Practice FOCUS ON QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY: THEORY AND PRACTICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütkenhaus, N.; Shields, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    Quantum cryptography, and especially quantum key distribution (QKD), is steadily progressing to become a viable tool for cryptographic services. In recent years we have witnessed a dramatic increase in the secure bit rate of QKD, as well as its extension to ever longer fibre- and air-based links and the emergence of metro-scale trusted networks. In the foreseeable future even global-scale communications may be possible using quantum repeaters or Earth-satellite links. A handful of start-ups and some bigger companies are already active in the field. The launch of an initiative to form industrial standards for QKD, under the auspices of the European Telecommunication Standards Institute, described in the paper by Laenger and Lenhart in this Focus Issue, can be taken as a sign of the growing commercial interest. Recent progress has seen an increase in the secure bit rate of QKD links, by orders of magnitude, to over 1 Mb s-1. This has resulted mainly from an improvement in the detection technology. Here changes in the way conventional semiconductor detectors are gated, as well as the development of novel devices based on non-linear processes and superconducting materials, are leading the way. Additional challenges for QKD at GHz clock rates include the design of high speed electronics, remote synchronization and high rate random number generation. Substantial effort is being devoted to increasing the range of individual links, which is limited by attenuation and other losses in optical fibres and air links. An important advance in the past few years has been the introduction of protocols with the same scaling as an ideal single-photon set-up. The good news is that these schemes use standard optical devices, such as weak laser pulses. Thanks to these new protocols and improvements in the detection technology, the range of a single fibre link can exceed a few hundred km. Outstanding issues include proving the unconditional security of some of the schemes. Much of the

  18. Research on Electrically Driven Single Photon Emitter by Diamond for Quantum Cryptography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-24

    by diamond for quantum cryptography 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-4037 5b. GRANT NUMBE R Grant 14IOA093_144037 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...emerged as a highly competitive platform for applications in quantum cryptography , quantum computing, spintronics, and sensing or metrology...15. SUBJECT TERMS Diamond LED, Nitrogen Vacancy Complex, Quantum Computing, Quantum Cryptography , Single Spin Single Photon 16. SECURITY

  19. A Generic Simulation Framework for Non-Entangled based Experimental Quantum Cryptography and Communication: Quantum Cryptography and Communication Simulator (QuCCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhari, Abudhahir; Zukarnain, Zuriati Ahmad; Khalid, Roszelinda; Zakir Dato', Wira Jaafar Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    The applications of quantum information science move towards bigger and better heights for the next generation technology. Especially, in the field of quantum cryptography and quantum computation, the world already witnessed various ground-breaking tangible product and promising results. Quantum cryptography is one of the mature field from quantum mechanics and already available in the markets. The current state of quantum cryptography is still under various researches in order to reach the heights of digital cryptography. The complexity of quantum cryptography is higher due to combination of hardware and software. The lack of effective simulation tool to design and analyze the quantum cryptography experiments delays the reaching distance of the success. In this paper, we propose a framework to achieve an effective non-entanglement based quantum cryptography simulation tool. We applied hybrid simulation technique i.e. discrete event, continuous event and system dynamics. We also highlight the limitations of a commercial photonic simulation tool based experiments. Finally, we discuss ideas for achieving one-stop simulation package for quantum based secure key distribution experiments. All the modules of simulation framework are viewed from the computer science perspective.

  20. Practical Quantum Cryptography for Secure Free-Space Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, W.T.; Hughes, R.J.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-02-01

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics and information-theoretically secure post-processing methods. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. In this paper we describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from our experimental free-space system with which we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of quantum key generation over a point-to-point outdoor atmospheric path in daylight. We achieved a transmission distance of 0.5 km, which was limited only by the length of the test range. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on orbit. We present a feasibility analysis of surface-to-satellite quantum key generation.

  1. Quantum cryptography as a retrodiction problem.

    PubMed

    Werner, A H; Franz, T; Werner, R F

    2009-11-27

    We propose a quantum key distribution protocol based on a quantum retrodiction protocol, known as the Mean King problem. The protocol uses a two way quantum channel. We show security against coherent attacks in a transmission-error free scenario, even if Eve is allowed to attack both transmissions. This establishes a connection between retrodiction and key distribution.

  2. An Online Banking System Based on Quantum Cryptography Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ri-gui; Li, Wei; Huan, Tian-tian; Shen, Chen-yi; Li, Hai-sheng

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, an online banking system has been built. Based on quantum cryptography communication, this system is proved unconditional secure. Two sets of GHZ states are applied, which can ensure the safety of purchase and payment, respectively. In another word, three trading participants in each triplet state group form an interdependent and interactive relationship. In the meantime, trading authorization and blind signature is introduced by means of controllable quantum teleportation. Thus, an effective monitor is practiced on the premise that the privacy of trading partners is guaranteed. If there is a dispute or deceptive behavior, the system will find out the deceiver immediately according to the relationship mentioned above.

  3. Staging quantum cryptography with chocolate ballsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svozil, Karl

    2006-09-01

    Moderated by a director, laypeople and students assume the role of quanta and enact a quantum cryptographic protocol. The performance is based on a generalized urn model capable of reproducing complementarity even for classical chocolate balls.

  4. Quantum cryptography: Round-robin with photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, Bernd; Yuan, Zhiliang

    2015-12-01

    Last year the common notion that signal disturbance has to be monitored in a quantum cryptographic link to guarantee secrecy was challenged by a new protocol. The formidable task of demonstrating it experimentally has now been achieved.

  5. Quantum cryptography for secure free-space communications

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-03-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as key material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is a new technique for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions: Heisenberg`s uncertainty principle ensures that an adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). The authors have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non-orthogonal photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. The authors have developed and tested a free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system over an outdoor optical path of {approximately}1 km at Los Alamos National Laboratory under nighttime conditions. Results show that free-space QKD can provide secure real-time key distribution between parties who have a need to communicate secretly. Finally, they examine the feasibility of surface to satellite QKD.

  6. High-rate measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Ottaviani, Carlo; Spedalieri, Gaetana; Weedbrook, Christian; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Lloyd, Seth; Gehring, Tobias; Jacobsen, Christian S.; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2015-06-01

    Quantum cryptography achieves a formidable task—the remote distribution of secret keys by exploiting the fundamental laws of physics. Quantum cryptography is now headed towards solving the practical problem of constructing scalable and secure quantum networks. A significant step in this direction has been the introduction of measurement-device independence, where the secret key between two parties is established by the measurement of an untrusted relay. Unfortunately, although qubit-implemented protocols can reach long distances, their key rates are typically very low, unsuitable for the demands of a metropolitan network. Here we show, theoretically and experimentally, that a solution can come from the use of continuous-variable systems. We design a coherent-state network protocol able to achieve remarkably high key rates at metropolitan distances, in fact three orders of magnitude higher than those currently achieved. Our protocol could be employed to build high-rate quantum networks where devices securely connect to nearby access points or proxy servers.

  7. Quantum cryptography for secure free-space communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard J.; Buttler, William T.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Lamoreaux, Steve K.; Luther, Gabriel G.; Morgan, George L.; Nordholt, Jane E.; Peterson, C. Glen

    1999-04-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as 'key' material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is a new technique for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions: Heisenberg's uncertainty principle ensures that an adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). We have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non- orthogonal photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. We have developed and tested a free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system over an outdoor optical path of approximately 1 km at Los Alamos National Laboratory under nighttime conditions. Results show that free-space QKD can provide secure real-time key distribution between parties who have a need to communicate secretly. Finally, we examine the feasibility of surface to satellite QKD.

  8. Quantum random number generators and their applications in cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipcevic, Mario

    2012-06-01

    Random number generators (RNG) are an important resource in many areas: cryptography (both quantum and classical), probabilistic computation (Monte Carlo methods), numerical simulations, industrial testing and labeling, hazard games, scientific research etc. Because today's computers are deterministic, they can not create random numbers unless complemented with a physical RNG. Randomness of a RNG can be defined and scientifically characterized and measured. Especially valuable is the information-theoretic provable RNG which, at state of the art, seem to be possible only by harvest of randomness inherent to certain (simple) quantum systems and such a generator we call Quantum RNG (QRNG). On the other hand, current industry standards dictate use of RNGs based on free running oscillators (FRO) whose randomness is derived from electronics noise present in logic circuits and which, although quantum in nature, cannot be strictly proven. This approach is currently used in FPGA and ASIC chips. We compare weak and strong aspects of the two approaches for use in cryptography and in general. We also give an alternative definition of randomness, discuss usage of single photon detectors in realization of QRNGs and give several examples where QRNG can significantly improve security of a cryptographic system.

  9. Cryptanalysis of a sessional blind signature based on quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qi; Li, Wen-Min

    2014-09-01

    A digital signature is a mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of a digital message or document. A blind signature is a form of digital signature in which the content of a message is disguised (blinded) before it is signed to protect the privacy of the message from the signatory. For signing quantum messages, some quantum blind signature protocols have been proposed. Recently, Khodambashi et al. (Quantum Inf Process 13:121, 2014) proposed a sessional blind signature based on quantum cryptography. It was claimed that these protocol could guarantee unconditional security. However, after our analysis, we find that the signature protocol will cause the key information leakage in the view of information theory. Taking advantage of loophole, the message sender can succeed in forging the signature without the knowledge of the whole exact key between the verifier and him. To conquer this shortcoming, we construct an improved protocol based on it and the new protocol can resist the key information leakage attacks.

  10. Faraday-Michelson system for quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiao-Fan; Zhu, Bing; Han, Zheng-Fu; Gui, You-Zhen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2005-10-01

    Quantum key distribution provides unconditional security for communication. Unfortunately, current experimental schemes are not suitable for long-distance fiber transmission because of phase drift or Rayleigh backscattering. In this Letter we present a unidirectional intrinsically stable scheme that is based on Michelson-Faraday interferometers, in which ordinary mirrors are replaced with 90 degree Faraday mirrors. With the scheme, a demonstration setup was built and excellent stability of interference fringe visibility was achieved over a fiber length of 175 km. Through a 125 km long commercial communication fiber cable between Beijing and Tianjin, the key exchange was performed with a quantum bit-error rate of less than 6%, which is to our knowledge the longest reported quantum key distribution experiment under field conditions.

  11. Continuous variable quantum cryptography using coherent states.

    PubMed

    Grosshans, Frédéric; Grangier, Philippe

    2002-02-04

    We propose several methods for quantum key distribution (QKD) based on the generation and transmission of random distributions of coherent or squeezed states, and we show that they are secure against individual eavesdropping attacks. These protocols require that the transmission of the optical line between Alice and Bob is larger than 50%, but they do not rely on "sub-shot-noise" features such as squeezing. Their security is a direct consequence of the no-cloning theorem, which limits the signal-to-noise ratio of possible quantum measurements on the transmission line. Our approach can also be used for evaluating various QKD protocols using light with Gaussian statistics.

  12. Quantum cryptography with perfect multiphoton entanglement.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuhui; Chan, Kam Tai

    2005-05-01

    Multiphoton entanglement in the same polarization has been shown theoretically to be obtainable by type-I spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC), which can generate bright pulses more easily than type-II SPDC. A new quantum cryptographic protocol utilizing polarization pairs with the detected type-I entangled multiphotons is proposed as quantum key distribution. We calculate the information capacity versus photon number corresponding to polarization after considering the transmission loss inside the optical fiber, the detector efficiency, and intercept-resend attacks at the level of channel error. The result compares favorably with all other schemes employing entanglement.

  13. Deterministic and efficient quantum cryptography based on Bell's theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zengbing; Pan Jianwei; Zhang Qiang; Bao Xiaohui; Schmiedmayer, Joerg

    2006-05-15

    We propose a double-entanglement-based quantum cryptography protocol that is both efficient and deterministic. The proposal uses photon pairs with entanglement both in polarization and in time degrees of freedom; each measurement in which both of the two communicating parties register a photon can establish one and only one perfect correlation, and thus deterministically create a key bit. Eavesdropping can be detected by violation of local realism. A variation of the protocol shows a higher security, similar to the six-state protocol, under individual attacks. Our scheme allows a robust implementation under the current technology.

  14. One-way entangled-photon autocompensating quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Zachary D.; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Sergienko, Alexander V.; Saleh, Bahaa E.; Teich, Malvin C.

    2003-06-01

    A quantum cryptography implementation is presented that uses entanglement to combine one-way operation with an autocompensating feature that has hitherto only been available in implementations that require the signal to make a round trip between the users. Using the concept of advanced waves, it is shown that this proposed implementation is related to the round-trip implementation in the same way that Ekert’s two-particle scheme is related to the original one-particle scheme of Bennett and Brassard. The practical advantages and disadvantages of the proposed implementation are discussed in the context of existing schemes.

  15. Teleportation-based continuous variable quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luiz, F. S.; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2017-03-01

    We present a continuous variable (CV) quantum key distribution (QKD) scheme based on the CV quantum teleportation of coherent states that yields a raw secret key made up of discrete variables for both Alice and Bob. This protocol preserves the efficient detection schemes of current CV technology (no single-photon detection techniques) and, at the same time, has efficient error correction and privacy amplification schemes due to the binary modulation of the key. We show that for a certain type of incoherent attack, it is secure for almost any value of the transmittance of the optical line used by Alice to share entangled two-mode squeezed states with Bob (no 3 dB or 50% loss limitation characteristic of beam splitting attacks). The present CVQKD protocol works deterministically (no postselection needed) with efficient direct reconciliation techniques (no reverse reconciliation) in order to generate a secure key and beyond the 50% loss case at the incoherent attack level.

  16. Measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2014-12-18

    In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD, which has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities. To fill this gap, a novel approach, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), has been proposed. In addition, it can remove all side-channels from the measurement unit, arguably the most vulnerable part in QKD systems, thus offering a clear avenue toward secure QKD realisations. In this study, we review the latest developments in the framework of mdiQKD, together with its assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses.

  17. Measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; ...

    2014-12-18

    In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD, which has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities. To fill this gap, a novel approach, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), has been proposed. In addition, it can remove all side-channels from the measurement unit, arguably the most vulnerable part in QKD systems, thus offering a clear avenue toward secure QKD realisations. In this study, we review the latest developments in the framework of mdiQKD,more » together with its assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses.« less

  18. Security of quantum cryptography against individual attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutsky, Boris A.; Rao, Ramesh; Sun, Pang-Chen; Fainman, Y.

    1998-04-01

    An attempt to eavesdrop on a quantum cryptographic channel reveals itself through errors it inevitably introduces into the transmission. We investigate the relationship between the induced error rate and the maximum amount of information the eavesdropper can extract, in both the two-state B92 [B92 refers to the work of C. H. Bennett, Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 3121 (1992)] and the four-state BB84 [BB84 refers to the work of C. H. Bennett and G. Brassard, in Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Computers, Systems, and Signal Processing, Bangalore, India (IEEE, New York, 1984), pp. 175-179] quantum cryptographic protocols. In each case, the optimal eavesdropping method that on average yields the most information for a given error rate is explicitly constructed. Analysis is limited to eavesdropping strategies where each bit of the quantum transmission is attacked individually and independently from other bits. Subject to this restriction, however, we believe that all attacks not forbidden by physical laws are covered. Unlike previous work, the eavesdropper's advantage is measured in terms of Renyi (rather than Shannon) information, and with respect only to bits received error-free by Bob (rather than all bits). This alters both the maximum extractable information and the optimal eavesdropping attack. The result can be used directly at the privacy amplification stage of the protocol to accomplish secure communication over a noisy channel.

  19. Superlinear threshold detectors in quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Lydersen, Lars; Maroey, Oystein; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Jain, Nitin; Wittmann, Christoffer; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2011-09-15

    We introduce the concept of a superlinear threshold detector, a detector that has a higher probability to detect multiple photons if it receives them simultaneously rather than at separate times. Highly superlinear threshold detectors in quantum key distribution systems allow eavesdropping the full secret key without being revealed. Here, we generalize the detector control attack, and analyze how it performs against quantum key distribution systems with moderately superlinear detectors. We quantify the superlinearity in superconducting single-photon detectors based on earlier published data, and gated avalanche photodiode detectors based on our own measurements. The analysis shows that quantum key distribution systems using detector(s) of either type can be vulnerable to eavesdropping. The avalanche photodiode detector becomes superlinear toward the end of the gate. For systems expecting substantial loss, or for systems not monitoring loss, this would allow eavesdropping using trigger pulses containing less than 120 photons per pulse. Such an attack would be virtually impossible to catch with an optical power meter at the receiver entrance.

  20. Cloning and cryptography with quantum continuous variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerf, N. J.; Iblisdir, S.; van Assche, G.

    2002-02-01

    The cloning of quantum variables with continuous spectra is investigated. We define a Gaussian 1-to-2 cloning machine that copies equally well two conjugate variables such as position and momentum or the two quadrature components of a light mode. The resulting cloning fidelity for coherent states, namely F=2/3, is shown to be optimal. An asymmetric version of this Gaussian cloner is then used to assess the security of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution scheme that allows two remote parties to share a Gaussian key. The information versus disturbance tradeoff underlying this continuous quantum cryptographic scheme is then analyzed for the optimal individual attack. Methods to convert the resulting Gaussian keys into secret key bits are also studied. Finally, the extension of the Gaussian cloner to optimal N-to-M continuous cloners is discussed, and it is shown how to implement these cloners for light modes using a phase-insensitive optical amplifier and beam splitters. In addition, a phase-conjugate input cloner is defined, yielding M clones and M' anticlones from N replicas of a coherent state and N' replicas of its phase-conjugate (with M'-M=N'-N). This novel kind of cloners is shown to outperform the standard N-to-M cloners in some cases.

  1. Practical free-space quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.; Simmons, C.M.

    1998-12-01

    An experimental free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system has been tested over an outdoor optical path of {approx} 1 km under nighttime conditions at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system employs the Bennett 92 protocol; here the authors give a brief overview of this protocol, and describe the experimental implementation of it. An analysis of the system efficiency is presented, as well as a description of the error detection protocol, which employs a two-dimensional parity check scheme. Finally, the susceptibility of this system to eavesdropping by various techniques is determined, and the effectiveness of privacy amplification procedures is discussed. The conclusions are that free-space QKD is both effective and secure; possible applications include the rekeying of satellites in low earth orbit.

  2. Free-space quantum cryptography with quantum and telecom communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Klaus, Werner; Kunimori, Hiroo; Fujiwara, Mikio; Sasaki, Masahide

    2008-07-01

    Quantum cryptography is a new technique that uses the laws of physics to transmit information securely. In such systems, the vehicle to transfer quantum information is a single photon. However, the transmission distance is limited by the absorption of photons in an optical fiber in which the maximum demonstrated range is about 100 km. Free-space quantum cryptography between a ground station and a satellite is a way of sending the quantum information further distances than that with optical fibers since there is no birefringence effect in the atmosphere. At the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), the laser communication demonstration between the NICT optical ground station and a low earth orbit satellite was successfully conducted in 2006. For such space communication links, free-space quantum cryptography is considered to be an important application in the future. We have developed a prototype system for free-space quantum cryptography using a weak coherent light and a telecom communication channel. The preliminary results are presented.

  3. Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhiyuan

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) enables two legitimate parties to share a secret key even in the presence of an eavesdropper. The unconditional security of QKD is based on the fundamental laws of quantum physics. Original security proofs of QKD are based on a few assumptions, e.g., perfect single photon sources and perfect single-photon detectors. However, practical implementations of QKD systems do not fully comply with such assumptions due to technical limitations. The gap between theory and implementations leads to security loopholes in most QKD systems, and several attacks have been launched on sophisticated QKD systems. Particularly, the detectors have been found to be the most vulnerable part of QKD. Much effort has been put to build side-channel-free QKD systems. Solutions such as security patches and device-independent QKD have been proposed. However, the former are normally ad-hoc, and cannot close unidentified loopholes. The latter, while having the advantages of removing all assumptions on devices, is impractical to implement today. Measurement-device-independent QKD (MDI-QKD) turns out to be a promising solution to the security problem of QKD. In MDI-QKD, all security loopholes, including those yet-to-be discovered, have been removed from the detectors, the most critical part in QKD. In this thesis, we investigate issues related to the practical implementation and security of MDI-QKD. We first present a demonstration of polarization-encoding MDI-QKD. Taking finite key effect into account, we achieve a secret key rate of 0.005 bit per second (bps) over 10 km spooled telecom fiber, and a 1600-bit key is distributed. This work, together with other demonstrations, shows the practicality of MDI-QKD. Next we investigate a critical assumption of MDI-QKD: perfect state preparation. We apply the loss-tolerant QKD protocol and adapt it to MDI-QKD to quantify information leakage due to imperfect state preparation. We then present an experimental demonstration of

  4. Experimental quantum-cryptography scheme based on orthogonal states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avella, Alessio; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo Pietro; Genovese, Marco; Gramegna, Marco; Traina, Paolo

    2010-12-01

    Since, in general, nonorthogonal states cannot be cloned, any eavesdropping attempt in a quantum-communication scheme using nonorthogonal states as carriers of information introduces some errors in the transmission, leading to the possibility of detecting the spy. Usually, orthogonal states are not used in quantum-cryptography schemes since they can be faithfully cloned without altering the transmitted data. Nevertheless, L. Goldberg and L. Vaidman [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.75.1239 75, 1239 (1995)] proposed a protocol in which, even if the data exchange is realized using two orthogonal states, any attempt to eavesdrop is detectable by the legal users. In this scheme the orthogonal states are superpositions of two localized wave packets traveling along separate channels. Here we present an experiment realizing this scheme.

  5. Experimental quantum cryptography scheme based on orthogonal states: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avella, Alessio; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo P.; Genovese, Marco; Gramegna, Marco; Traina, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    Since, in general, non-orthogonal states cannot be cloned, any eavesdropping attempt in a Quantum Communication scheme using non-orthogonal states as carriers of information introduces some errors in the transmission, leading to the possibility of detecting the spy. Usually, orthogonal states are not used in Quantum Cryptography schemes since they can be faithfully cloned without altering the transmitted data. Nevertheless, L. Goldberg and L. Vaidman [Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 (7), pp. 12391243, 1995] proposed a protocol in which, even if the data exchange is realized using two orthogonal states, any attempt to eavesdrop is detectable by the legal users. In this scheme the orthogonal states are superpositions of two localized wave packets which travel along separate channels, i.e. two different paths inside a balanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Here we present an experiment realizing this scheme.

  6. Tight finite-key analysis for quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Tomamichel, Marco; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Gisin, Nicolas; Renner, Renato

    2012-01-17

    Despite enormous theoretical and experimental progress in quantum cryptography, the security of most current implementations of quantum key distribution is still not rigorously established. One significant problem is that the security of the final key strongly depends on the number, M, of signals exchanged between the legitimate parties. Yet, existing security proofs are often only valid asymptotically, for unrealistically large values of M. Another challenge is that most security proofs are very sensitive to small differences between the physical devices used by the protocol and the theoretical model used to describe them. Here we show that these gaps between theory and experiment can be simultaneously overcome by using a recently developed proof technique based on the uncertainty relation for smooth entropies.

  7. Experimental quantum-cryptography scheme based on orthogonal states

    SciTech Connect

    Avella, Alessio; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo Pietro; Genovese, Marco; Gramegna, Marco; Traina, Paolo

    2010-12-15

    Since, in general, nonorthogonal states cannot be cloned, any eavesdropping attempt in a quantum-communication scheme using nonorthogonal states as carriers of information introduces some errors in the transmission, leading to the possibility of detecting the spy. Usually, orthogonal states are not used in quantum-cryptography schemes since they can be faithfully cloned without altering the transmitted data. Nevertheless, L. Goldberg and L. Vaidman [Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1239 (1995)] proposed a protocol in which, even if the data exchange is realized using two orthogonal states, any attempt to eavesdrop is detectable by the legal users. In this scheme the orthogonal states are superpositions of two localized wave packets traveling along separate channels. Here we present an experiment realizing this scheme.

  8. Tight finite-key analysis for quantum cryptography

    PubMed Central

    Tomamichel, Marco; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Gisin, Nicolas; Renner, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Despite enormous theoretical and experimental progress in quantum cryptography, the security of most current implementations of quantum key distribution is still not rigorously established. One significant problem is that the security of the final key strongly depends on the number, M, of signals exchanged between the legitimate parties. Yet, existing security proofs are often only valid asymptotically, for unrealistically large values of M. Another challenge is that most security proofs are very sensitive to small differences between the physical devices used by the protocol and the theoretical model used to describe them. Here we show that these gaps between theory and experiment can be simultaneously overcome by using a recently developed proof technique based on the uncertainty relation for smooth entropies. PMID:22252558

  9. Effect of source tampering in the security of quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Xu, Feihu; Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Ma, Xiang-Chun; Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2015-08-01

    The security of source has become an increasingly important issue in quantum cryptography. Based on the framework of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), the source becomes the only region exploitable by a potential eavesdropper (Eve). Phase randomization is a cornerstone assumption in most discrete-variable (DV) quantum communication protocols (e.g., QKD, quantum coin tossing, weak-coherent-state blind quantum computing, and so on), and the violation of such an assumption is thus fatal to the security of those protocols. In this paper, we show a simple quantum hacking strategy, with commercial and homemade pulsed lasers, by Eve that allows her to actively tamper with the source and violate such an assumption, without leaving a trace afterwards. Furthermore, our attack may also be valid for continuous-variable (CV) QKD, which is another main class of QKD protocol, since, excepting the phase random assumption, other parameters (e.g., intensity) could also be changed, which directly determine the security of CV-QKD.

  10. Quantum signal processing-based visual cryptography with unexpanded shares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Surya Sarathi; Sharma, Kaushik Das; Chandra, Jayanta K.; Bera, Jitendra Nath

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a visual cryptography scheme (VCS) based on quantum signal processing (QSP). VCS is an image encryption technique that is very simple in formulation and is secure. In (k,n)-VCS, a secret binary image is encoded into n share images and minimum k shares are needed to decrypt the secret image. The efforts to encrypt a grayscale image are few in number and the majority are related to grayscale to binary conversion. Thus, a generalized approach of encryption for all types of images, i.e., binary, gray, and color is needed. Here, a generic VCS is proposed based on QSP where all types of images can be encrypted without pixel expansion along with a smoothing technique to enhance the quality of the decrypted image. The proposed scheme is tested and compared for benchmark images, and the result shows the effectiveness of the scheme.

  11. Quantum cryptography using coherent states: Randomized encryption and key generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corndorf, Eric

    With the advent of the global optical-telecommunications infrastructure, an increasing number of individuals, companies, and agencies communicate information with one another over public networks or physically-insecure private networks. While the majority of the traffic flowing through these networks requires little or no assurance of secrecy, the same cannot be said for certain communications between banks, between government agencies, within the military, and between corporations. In these arenas, the need to specify some level of secrecy in communications is a high priority. While the current approaches to securing sensitive information (namely the public-key-cryptography infrastructure and deterministic private-key ciphers like AES and 3DES) seem to be cryptographically strong based on empirical evidence, there exist no mathematical proofs of secrecy for any widely deployed cryptosystem. As an example, the ubiquitous public-key cryptosystems infer all of their secrecy from the assumption that factoring of the product of two large primes is necessarily time consuming---something which has not, and perhaps cannot, be proven. Since the 1980s, the possibility of using quantum-mechanical features of light as a physical mechanism for satisfying particular cryptographic objectives has been explored. This research has been fueled by the hopes that cryptosystems based on quantum systems may provide provable levels of secrecy which are at least as valid as quantum mechanics itself. Unfortunately, the most widely considered quantum-cryptographic protocols (BB84 and the Ekert protocol) have serious implementation problems. Specifically, they require quantum-mechanical states which are not readily available, and they rely on unproven relations between intrusion-level detection and the information available to an attacker. As a result, the secrecy level provided by these experimental implementations is entirely unspecified. In an effort to provably satisfy the cryptographic

  12. Topics in quantum cryptography, quantum error correction, and channel simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhicheng

    In this thesis, we mainly investigate four different topics: efficiently implementable codes for quantum key expansion [51], quantum error-correcting codes based on privacy amplification [48], private classical capacity of quantum channels [44], and classical channel simulation with quantum side information [49, 50]. For the first topic, we propose an efficiently implementable quantum key expansion protocol, capable of increasing the size of a pre-shared secret key by a constant factor. Previously, the Shor-Preskill proof [64] of the security of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) [6] quantum key distribution protocol relied on the theoretical existence of good classical error-correcting codes with the "dual-containing" property. But the explicit and efficiently decodable construction of such codes is unknown. We show that we can lift the dual-containing constraint by employing the non-dual-containing codes with excellent performance and efficient decoding algorithms. For the second topic, we propose a construction of Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) [19, 68] quantum error-correcting codes, which are originally based on pairs of mutually dual-containing classical codes, by combining a classical code with a two-universal hash function. We show, using the results of Renner and Koenig [57], that the communication rates of such codes approach the hashing bound on tensor powers of Pauli channels in the limit of large block-length. For the third topic, we prove a regularized formula for the secret key assisted capacity region of a quantum channel for transmitting private classical information. This result parallels the work of Devetak on entanglement assisted quantum communication capacity. This formula provides a new family protocol, the private father protocol, under the resource inequality framework that includes the private classical communication without the assisted secret keys as a child protocol. For the fourth topic, we study and solve the problem of classical channel

  13. Simplified quantum mechanics of light detection for quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, John M.; Madjid, F. Hadi

    2004-08-01

    Strong light signals are detected reliably on a time scale of a nanosecond; however, known detectors of weak light signals used in quantum key distribution (QKD) are much slower; they involve pulse-shaping arbiters based on flip-flops that take many nanoseconds to produce a stable output. Based on a recently shown logical independence of quantum particles from the devices that they are employed to explain, we make use of quantum mechanics fine-tuned so that particles serve not as rigid foundations but as improvised hypotheses useful in models that describe the recorded behavior of devices. On the experimental side, we augment the arbitrating flip-flop of a detector so that it fans out to a matched pair of auxiliary flip-flops, and show how this imparts to a detector a "self-awareness" of its own teetering, as announced by disagreements between the auxiliary flip-flops. We introduce a quantum model of this arrangement, invoking a pair of probe particles, and show this model corresponds well to an experiment. The matched pair of auxiliary flip-flops not only confirms the model of hesitation in a detector, but serves as an instrument, both conceptual and practical, that gives an added dimension to the characterization of signal sources.

  14. Fast and simple high-capacity quantum cryptography with error detection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hong; Luo, Ming-Xing; Pieprzyk, Josef; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Lei; Li, Shudong; Orgun, Mehmet A.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is commonly used to generate fresh secure keys with quantum signal transmission for instant use between two parties. However, research shows that the relatively low key generation rate hinders its practical use where a symmetric cryptography component consumes the shared key. That is, the security of the symmetric cryptography demands frequent rate of key updates, which leads to a higher consumption of the internal one-time-pad communication bandwidth, since it requires the length of the key to be as long as that of the secret. In order to alleviate these issues, we develop a matrix algorithm for fast and simple high-capacity quantum cryptography. Our scheme can achieve secure private communication with fresh keys generated from Fibonacci- and Lucas- valued orbital angular momentum (OAM) states for the seed to construct recursive Fibonacci and Lucas matrices. Moreover, the proposed matrix algorithm for quantum cryptography can ultimately be simplified to matrix multiplication, which is implemented and optimized in modern computers. Most importantly, considerably information capacity can be improved effectively and efficiently by the recursive property of Fibonacci and Lucas matrices, thereby avoiding the restriction of physical conditions, such as the communication bandwidth. PMID:28406240

  15. Fast and simple high-capacity quantum cryptography with error detection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hong; Luo, Ming-Xing; Pieprzyk, Josef; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Lei; Li, Shudong; Orgun, Mehmet A

    2017-04-13

    Quantum cryptography is commonly used to generate fresh secure keys with quantum signal transmission for instant use between two parties. However, research shows that the relatively low key generation rate hinders its practical use where a symmetric cryptography component consumes the shared key. That is, the security of the symmetric cryptography demands frequent rate of key updates, which leads to a higher consumption of the internal one-time-pad communication bandwidth, since it requires the length of the key to be as long as that of the secret. In order to alleviate these issues, we develop a matrix algorithm for fast and simple high-capacity quantum cryptography. Our scheme can achieve secure private communication with fresh keys generated from Fibonacci- and Lucas- valued orbital angular momentum (OAM) states for the seed to construct recursive Fibonacci and Lucas matrices. Moreover, the proposed matrix algorithm for quantum cryptography can ultimately be simplified to matrix multiplication, which is implemented and optimized in modern computers. Most importantly, considerably information capacity can be improved effectively and efficiently by the recursive property of Fibonacci and Lucas matrices, thereby avoiding the restriction of physical conditions, such as the communication bandwidth.

  16. Fast and simple high-capacity quantum cryptography with error detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hong; Luo, Ming-Xing; Pieprzyk, Josef; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Lei; Li, Shudong; Orgun, Mehmet A.

    2017-04-01

    Quantum cryptography is commonly used to generate fresh secure keys with quantum signal transmission for instant use between two parties. However, research shows that the relatively low key generation rate hinders its practical use where a symmetric cryptography component consumes the shared key. That is, the security of the symmetric cryptography demands frequent rate of key updates, which leads to a higher consumption of the internal one-time-pad communication bandwidth, since it requires the length of the key to be as long as that of the secret. In order to alleviate these issues, we develop a matrix algorithm for fast and simple high-capacity quantum cryptography. Our scheme can achieve secure private communication with fresh keys generated from Fibonacci- and Lucas- valued orbital angular momentum (OAM) states for the seed to construct recursive Fibonacci and Lucas matrices. Moreover, the proposed matrix algorithm for quantum cryptography can ultimately be simplified to matrix multiplication, which is implemented and optimized in modern computers. Most importantly, considerably information capacity can be improved effectively and efficiently by the recursive property of Fibonacci and Lucas matrices, thereby avoiding the restriction of physical conditions, such as the communication bandwidth.

  17. A Secure Key Distribution System of Quantum Cryptography Based on the Coherent State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Guang-Can; Zhang, Xiao-Yu

    1996-01-01

    The cryptographic communication has a lot of important applications, particularly in the magnificent prospects of private communication. As one knows, the security of cryptographic channel depends crucially on the secrecy of the key. The Vernam cipher is the only cipher system which has guaranteed security. In that system the key must be as long as the message and most be used only once. Quantum cryptography is a method whereby key secrecy can be guaranteed by a physical law. So it is impossible, even in principle, to eavesdrop on such channels. Quantum cryptography has been developed in recent years. Up to now, many schemes of quantum cryptography have been proposed. Now one of the main problems in this field is how to increase transmission distance. In order to use quantum nature of light, up to now proposed schemes all use very dim light pulses. The average photon number is about 0.1. Because of the loss of the optical fiber, it is difficult for the quantum cryptography based on one photon level or on dim light to realize quantum key-distribution over long distance. A quantum key distribution based on coherent state is introduced in this paper. Here we discuss the feasibility and security of this scheme.

  18. Quantum Cryptography for Secure Communications to Low-Earth Orbit Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.; Twyeffort, E.; Simmons, C.M.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1999-06-03

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit. We have developed an experimental quantum cryptography system based on the transmission of non-orthogonal single-photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on in orbit.

  19. Quantum-tomographic cryptography with a semiconductor single-photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Kaszlikowski, D.; Yang, L.J.; Yong, L.S.; Willeboordse, F.H.; Kwek, L.C.

    2005-09-15

    We analyze the security of so-called quantum-tomographic cryptography with the source producing entangled photons via an experimental scheme proposed by Fattal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 37903 (2004)]. We determine the range of the experimental parameters for which the protocol is secure against the most general incoherent attacks.

  20. Characterization of collective Gaussian attacks and security of coherent-state quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Pirandola, Stefano; Braunstein, Samuel L; Lloyd, Seth

    2008-11-14

    We provide a simple description of the most general collective Gaussian attack in continuous-variable quantum cryptography. In the scenario of such general attacks, we analyze the asymptotic secret-key rates which are achievable with coherent states, joint measurements of the quadratures and one-way classical communication.

  1. One-time pad, complexity of verification of keys, and practical security of quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-11-15

    A direct relation between the complexity of the complete verification of keys, which is one of the main criteria of security in classical systems, and a trace distance used in quantum cryptography is demonstrated. Bounds for the minimum and maximum numbers of verification steps required to determine the actual key are obtained.

  2. One-time pad, complexity of verification of keys, and practical security of quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    A direct relation between the complexity of the complete verification of keys, which is one of the main criteria of security in classical systems, and a trace distance used in quantum cryptography is demonstrated. Bounds for the minimum and maximum numbers of verification steps required to determine the actual key are obtained.

  3. On a two-pass scheme without a faraday mirror for free-space relativistic quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, K. S.; Radchenko, I. V.; Korol'kov, A. V.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2013-05-15

    The stability of destructive interference independent of the input polarization and the state of a quantum communication channel in fiber optic systems used in quantum cryptography plays a principal role in providing the security of communicated keys. A novel optical scheme is proposed that can be used both in relativistic quantum cryptography for communicating keys in open space and for communicating them over fiber optic lines. The scheme ensures stability of destructive interference and admits simple automatic balancing of a fiber interferometer.

  4. Comment on 'Two-way protocols for quantum cryptography with a nonmaximally entangled qubit pair'

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Sujuan; Gao Fei; Wen Qiaoyan; Guo Fenzhuo

    2010-09-15

    Three protocols of quantum cryptography with a nonmaximally entangled qubit pair [Phys. Rev. A 80, 022323 (2009)] were recently proposed by Shimizu, Tamaki, and Fukasaka. The security of these protocols is based on the quantum-mechanical constraint for a state transformation between nonmaximally entangled states. However, we find that the second protocol is vulnerable under the correlation-elicitation attack. An eavesdropper can obtain the encoded bit M although she has no knowledge about the random bit R.

  5. The Structure of Bipartite Quantum States - Insights from Group Theory and Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christandl, Matthias

    2006-04-01

    This thesis presents a study of the structure of bipartite quantum states. In the first part, the representation theory of the unitary and symmetric groups is used to analyse the spectra of quantum states. In particular, it is shown how to derive a one-to-one relation between the spectra of a bipartite quantum state and its reduced states, and the Kronecker coefficients of the symmetric group. In the second part, the focus lies on the entanglement of bipartite quantum states. Drawing on an analogy between entanglement distillation and secret-key agreement in classical cryptography, a new entanglement measure, `squashed entanglement', is introduced.

  6. Experimental System for Quantum Cryptography Based on Two Nonorthogonal Photon Polarization States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Deng, Le; Mao, Min; Ding, Liang-en

    1998-04-01

    Quantum cryptography allows the establishing of a highly confidential sequence of random bits between two parties who share no secret information in advance. Its security is guaranteed by the basic laws of quantum mechanics rather than mathematical difficulty. An experimental system based on a novel protocol for quantum cryptography using only two nonorthogonal photon polarization states is implemented. The photon sources are two semiconductor laser diodes operated at 680 nm, their light pulses which are heavily attenuated to far below one photon per pulse are employed to encode the key. Gated single photon detection technique is used to minimize the dark count effect of the photon multiplier tube. Key establishing rate of 40 b/s and error rate of 2.1% are obtained. Compared with other systems, our system has the simplest experimental setup.

  7. Femtosecond Laser--Pumped Source of Entangled Photons for Quantum Cryptography Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, D.; Donaldson, W.; Sobolewski, R.

    2007-07-31

    We present an experimental setup for generation of entangled-photon pairs via spontaneous parametric down-conversion, based on the femtosecond-pulsed laser. Our entangled-photon source utilizes a 76-MHz-repetition-rate, 100-fs-pulse-width, mode-locked, ultrafast femtosecond laser, which can produce, on average, more photon pairs than a cw laser of an equal pump power. The resulting entangled pairs are counted by a pair of high-quantum-efficiency, single-photon, silicon avalanche photodiodes. Our apparatus is intended as an efficient source/receiver system for the quantum communications and quantum cryptography applications.

  8. Public classical communication in quantum cryptography: Error correction, integrity, and authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A. V.; Pomozov, D. I.; Makkaveev, A. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2007-05-15

    Quantum cryptography systems combine two communication channels: a quantum and a classical one. (They can be physically implemented in the same fiber-optic link, which is employed as a quantum channel when one-photon states are transmitted and as a classical one when it carries classical data traffic.) Both channels are supposed to be insecure and accessible to an eavesdropper. Error correction in raw keys, interferometer balancing, and other procedures are performed by using the public classical channel. A discussion of the requirements to be met by the classical channel is presented.

  9. The Modeling Library of Eavesdropping Methods in Quantum Cryptography Protocols by Model Checking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Yang, Guowu; Hao, Yujie

    2016-07-01

    The most crucial issue of quantum cryptography protocols is its security. There exists many ways to attack the quantum communication process. In this paper, we present a model checking method for modeling the eavesdropping in quantum information protocols. So when the security properties of a certain protocol are needed to be verified, we can directly use the models which are already built. Here we adopt the probabilistic model checking tool—PRISM to model these attack methods. The verification results show that the detection rate of eavesdropping is approximately close to 1 when enough photons are transmitted.

  10. Free space relativistic quantum cryptography with faint laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.; Potapova, T. A.

    2013-07-01

    A new protocol for quantum key distribution through empty space is proposed. Apart from the quantum mechanical restrictions on distinguishability of non-orthogonal states, the protocol employs additional restrictions imposed by special relativity. The protocol ensures generation of a secure key even for the source generating non-strictly single-photon quantum states and for arbitrary losses in quantum communication channel.

  11. Cryptographic robustness of practical quantum cryptography: BB84 key distribution protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2008-07-15

    In real fiber-optic quantum cryptography systems, the avalanche photodiodes are not perfect, the source of quantum states is not a single-photon one, and the communication channel is lossy. For these reasons, key distribution is impossible under certain conditions for the system parameters. A simple analysis is performed to find relations between the parameters of real cryptography systems and the length of the quantum channel that guarantee secure quantum key distribution when the eavesdropper's capabilities are limited only by fundamental laws of quantum mechanics while the devices employed by the legitimate users are based on current technologies. Critical values are determined for the rate of secure real-time key generation that can be reached under the current technology level. Calculations show that the upper bound on channel length can be as high as 300 km for imperfect photodetectors (avalanche photodiodes) with present-day quantum efficiency ({eta} {approx} 20%) and dark count probability (p{sub dark} {approx} 10{sup -7})

  12. Field test of a practical secure communication network with decoy-state quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Teng-Yun; Liang, Hao; Liu, Yang; Cai, Wen-Qi; Ju, Lei; Liu, Wei-Yue; Wang, Jian; Yin, Hao; Chen, Kai; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2009-04-13

    We present a secure network communication system that operated with decoy-state quantum cryptography in a real-world application scenario. The full key exchange and application protocols were performed in real time among three nodes, in which two adjacent nodes were connected by approximate 20 km of commercial telecom optical fiber. The generated quantum keys were immediately employed and demonstrated for communication applications, including unbreakable real-time voice telephone between any two of the three communication nodes, or a broadcast from one node to the other two nodes by using one-time pad encryption.

  13. Practical limitation for continuous-variable quantum cryptography using coherent States.

    PubMed

    Namiki, Ryo; Hirano, Takuya

    2004-03-19

    In this Letter, first, we investigate the security of a continuous-variable quantum cryptographic scheme with a postselection process against individual beam splitting attack. It is shown that the scheme can be secure in the presence of the transmission loss owing to the postselection. Second, we provide a loss limit for continuous-variable quantum cryptography using coherent states taking into account excess Gaussian noise on quadrature distribution. Since the excess noise is reduced by the loss mechanism, a realistic intercept-resend attack which makes a Gaussian mixture of coherent states gives a loss limit in the presence of any excess Gaussian noise.

  14. Reduced randomness in quantum cryptography with sequences of qubits encoded in the same basis

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoureux, L.-P.; Cerf, N. J.; Bechmann-Pasquinucci, H.; Gisin, N.; Macchiavello, C.

    2006-03-15

    We consider the cloning of sequences of qubits prepared in the states used in the BB84 or six-state quantum cryptography protocol, and show that the single-qubit fidelity is unaffected even if entire sequences of qubits are prepared in the same basis. This result is only valid provided that the sequences are much shorter than the total key. It is of great importance for practical quantum cryptosystems because it reduces the need for high-speed random number generation without impairing on the security against finite-size cloning attacks.

  15. Device-independent security of quantum cryptography against collective attacks.

    PubMed

    Acín, Antonio; Brunner, Nicolas; Gisin, Nicolas; Massar, Serge; Pironio, Stefano; Scarani, Valerio

    2007-06-08

    We present the optimal collective attack on a quantum key distribution protocol in the "device-independent" security scenario, where no assumptions are made about the way the quantum key distribution devices work or on what quantum system they operate. Our main result is a tight bound on the Holevo information between one of the authorized parties and the eavesdropper, as a function of the amount of violation of a Bell-type inequality.

  16. Cryptography in the Bounded-Quantum-Storage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffner, Christian

    2007-09-01

    This thesis initiates the study of cryptographic protocols in the bounded-quantum-storage model. On the practical side, simple protocols for Rabin Oblivious Transfer, 1-2 Oblivious Transfer and Bit Commitment are presented. No quantum memory is required for honest players, whereas the protocols can only be broken by an adversary controlling a large amount of quantum memory. The protocols are efficient, non-interactive and can be implemented with today's technology. On the theoretical side, new entropic uncertainty relations involving min-entropy are established and used to prove the security of protocols according to new strong security definitions. For instance, in the realistic setting of Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) against quantum-memory-bounded eavesdroppers, the uncertainty relation allows to prove the security of QKD protocols while tolerating considerably higher error rates compared to the standard model with unbounded adversaries.

  17. A weak blind signature scheme based on quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaojun; Niu, Xiamu; Ji, Liping; Tian, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present a weak blind signature scheme based on the correlation of EPR (Einstein-Padolsky-Rosen) pairs. Different from classical blind signature schemes and current quantum signature schemes, our quantum blind signature scheme could guarantee not only the unconditionally security but also the anonymity of the message owner. To achieve that, quantum key distribution and one-time pad are adopted in our scheme. Experimental analysis proved that our scheme have the characteristics of non-counterfeit, non-disavowal, blindness and traceability. It has a wide application to E-payment system, E-government, E-business, and etc.

  18. Quantum Cryptography Based on the Deutsch-Jozsa Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Nakamura, Tadao; Farouk, Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Recently, secure quantum key distribution based on Deutsch's algorithm using the Bell state is reported (Nagata and Nakamura, Int. J. Theor. Phys. doi: 10.1007/s10773-017-3352-4, 2017). Our aim is of extending the result to a multipartite system. In this paper, we propose a highly speedy key distribution protocol. We present sequre quantum key distribution based on a special Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm using Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states. Bob has promised to use a function f which is of one of two kinds; either the value of f(x) is constant for all values of x, or else the value of f(x) is balanced, that is, equal to 1 for exactly half of the possible x, and 0 for the other half. Here, we introduce an additional condition to the function when it is balanced. Our quantum key distribution overcomes a classical counterpart by a factor O(2 N ).

  19. Multipartite Gaussian steering: Monogamy constraints and quantum cryptography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yu; Kogias, Ioannis; Adesso, Gerardo; He, Qiongyi

    2017-01-01

    We derive laws for the distribution of quantum steering among different parties in multipartite Gaussian states under Gaussian measurements. We prove that a monogamy relation akin to the generalized Coffman-Kundu-Wootters inequality holds quantitatively for a recently introduced measure of Gaussian steering. We then define the residual Gaussian steering, stemming from the monogamy inequality, as an indicator of collective steering-type correlations. For pure three-mode Gaussian states, the residual acts as a quantifier of genuine multipartite steering, and is interpreted operationally in terms of the guaranteed key rate in the task of secure quantum secret sharing. Optimal resource states for the latter protocol are identified, and their possible experimental implementation discussed. Our results pin down the role of multipartite steering for quantum communication.

  20. Quantum Cryptography Based on the Deutsch-Jozsa Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Nakamura, Tadao; Farouk, Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    Recently, secure quantum key distribution based on Deutsch's algorithm using the Bell state is reported (Nagata and Nakamura, Int. J. Theor. Phys. doi: 10.1007/s10773-017-3352-4, 2017). Our aim is of extending the result to a multipartite system. In this paper, we propose a highly speedy key distribution protocol. We present sequre quantum key distribution based on a special Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm using Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states. Bob has promised to use a function f which is of one of two kinds; either the value of f( x) is constant for all values of x, or else the value of f( x) is balanced, that is, equal to 1 for exactly half of the possible x, and 0 for the other half. Here, we introduce an additional condition to the function when it is balanced. Our quantum key distribution overcomes a classical counterpart by a factor O(2 N ).

  1. Hacking commercial quantum cryptography systems by tailored bright illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lydersen, Lars; Wiechers, Carlos; Wittmann, Christoffer; Elser, Dominique; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim

    2010-10-01

    The peculiar properties of quantum mechanics allow two remote parties to communicate a private, secret key, which is protected from eavesdropping by the laws of physics. So-called quantum key distribution (QKD) implementations always rely on detectors to measure the relevant quantum property of single photons. Here we demonstrate experimentally that the detectors in two commercially available QKD systems can be fully remote-controlled using specially tailored bright illumination. This makes it possible to tracelessly acquire the full secret key; we propose an eavesdropping apparatus built from off-the-shelf components. The loophole is likely to be present in most QKD systems using avalanche photodiodes to detect single photons. We believe that our findings are crucial for strengthening the security of practical QKD, by identifying and patching technological deficiencies.

  2. Optimality of Gaussian attacks in continuous-variable quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Navascués, Miguel; Grosshans, Frédéric; Acín, Antonio

    2006-11-10

    We analyze the asymptotic security of the family of Gaussian modulated quantum key distribution protocols for continuous-variables systems. We prove that the Gaussian unitary attack is optimal for all the considered bounds on the key rate when the first and second momenta of the canonical variables involved are known by the honest parties.

  3. Quantum cryptography: Theoretical protocols for quantum key distribution and tests of selected commercial QKD systems in commercial fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, Monika; Jacak, Janusz; Jóźwiak, Piotr; Jóźwiak, Ireneusz

    2016-06-01

    The overview of the current status of quantum cryptography is given in regard to quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols, implemented both on nonentangled and entangled flying qubits. Two commercial R&D platforms of QKD systems are described (the Clavis II platform by idQuantique implemented on nonentangled photons and the EPR S405 Quelle platform by AIT based on entangled photons) and tested for feasibility of their usage in commercial TELECOM fiber metropolitan networks. The comparison of systems efficiency, stability and resistivity against noise and hacker attacks is given with some suggestion toward system improvement, along with assessment of two models of QKD.

  4. Invisible transmission in quantum cryptography using continuous variables: A proof of Eve's vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navez, Patrick; Gatti, Alessandra; Lugiato, Luigi A.

    2002-03-01

    By analogy to classical cryptography, we develop a quantum cryptographic scheme in which the two public and private keys consist in each of two entangled beams of squeezed light. An analog secret information is encrypted by modulating the phase of the beam sent in public. The knowledge of the degree of nonclassical correlation between the beam quadratures measured in private and in public allows only the receiver to decrypt the secret information. Finally, in a view towards absolute security, we formally prove that any external intervention of an eavesdropper makes him vulnerable to any subsequent detection.

  5. Full-field implementation of a perfect eavesdropper on a quantum cryptography system.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Ilja; Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Skaar, Johannes; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Makarov, Vadim

    2011-06-14

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows two remote parties to grow a shared secret key. Its security is founded on the principles of quantum mechanics, but in reality it significantly relies on the physical implementation. Technological imperfections of QKD systems have been previously explored, but no attack on an established QKD connection has been realized so far. Here we show the first full-field implementation of a complete attack on a running QKD connection. An installed eavesdropper obtains the entire 'secret' key, while none of the parameters monitored by the legitimate parties indicate a security breach. This confirms that non-idealities in physical implementations of QKD can be fully practically exploitable, and must be given increased scrutiny if quantum cryptography is to become highly secure.

  6. On protection against a bright-pulse attack in the two-pass quantum cryptography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balygin, K. A.; Klimov, A. N.; Korol'kov, A. V.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-06-01

    The security of keys in quantum cryptography systems, in contrast to mathematical cryptographic algorithms, is guaranteed by fundamental quantum-mechanical laws. However, the cryptographic resistance of such systems, which are distributed physical devices, fundamentally depends on the method of their implementation and particularly on the calibration and control of critical parameters. The most important parameter is the number of photons in quasi-single-photon information states in a communication channel. The sensitivity to a bright-pulse attack has been demonstrated in an explicit form for a number of systems. A method guaranteeing the resistance to such attacks has been proposed and implemented. Furthermore, the relation of physical observables used and obtained at the control of quantum states to the length of final secret keys has been obtained for the first time.

  7. Thermal blinding of gated detectors in quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Lydersen, Lars; Wiechers, Carlos; Wittmann, Christoffer; Elser, Dominique; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim

    2010-12-20

    It has previously been shown that the gated detectors of two commercially available quantum key distribution (QKD) systems are blindable and controllable by an eavesdropper using continuous-wave illumination and short bright trigger pulses, manipulating voltages in the circuit [Nat. Photonics 4, 686 (2010)]. This allows for an attack eavesdropping the full raw and secret key without increasing the quantum bit error rate (QBER). Here we show how thermal effects in detectors under bright illumination can lead to the same outcome. We demonstrate that the detectors in a commercial QKD system Clavis2 can be blinded by heating the avalanche photo diodes (APDs) using bright illumination, so-called thermal blinding. Further, the detectors can be triggered using short bright pulses once they are blind. For systems with pauses between packet transmission such as the plug-and-play systems, thermal inertia enables Eve to apply the bright blinding illumination before eavesdropping, making her more difficult to catch.

  8. Optimal alphabets for noise-resistant quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, Denis V.; Grishanin, Boris A.; Zadkov, Victor N.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities of improving critical error rate of quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols for different strategies of eavesdropping are investigated. QKD-protocols with discrete alphabets letters of which form regular polyhedrons on the Bloch sphere (tetrahedron octahedron cube icosahedron and dodecahedron which have 4, 6, 8, 12 and 20 vertexes respectively) and QKD-protocol with continuous alphabet which corresponds to the limiting case of a polyhedron with infinitive number of vortexes are considered. Stability of such QKD-protocols to the noise in a quantum channel which is due to the Eve's interference that apply either intercept-receipt or optimal eavesdropping strategy at the individual attacks is studied in detail. It is shown that in case of optimal eavesdropping strategy after bases reconciliation the QKD-protocol with continuous alphabet surpasses all other protocols in terms of noise-resistance. Without basis reconciliation the highest critical error rate have the protocol with tetrahedron-type alphabet.

  9. Loss-tolerant quantum cryptography with imperfect sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Curty, Marcos; Kato, Go; Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Azuma, Koji

    2014-11-01

    In principle, quantum key distribution (QKD) offers unconditional security based on the laws of physics. Unfortunately, all previous QKD experiments assume perfect state preparation in their security analysis. Therefore, the generated key is not proven to be secure in the presence of unavoidable modulation errors. The key reason that modulation errors are not considered in previous QKD experiments lies in a crucial weakness of the standard Gottesman-Lo-Lütkenhaus-Preskill (GLLP) model, namely, it is not loss tolerant and Eve may in principle enhance imperfections through losses. Here, we propose a QKD protocol that is loss tolerant to state preparation flaws. Importantly, we show conclusively that the state preparation process in QKD can be much less precise than initially thought. Our method can also be applied to other quantum cryptographic protocols.

  10. A sessional blind signature based on quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodambashi, Siavash; Zakerolhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a sessional blind signature protocol whose security is guaranteed by fundamental principles of quantum physics. It allows a message owner to get his message signed by an authorized signatory. However, the signatory is not capable of reading the message contents and everyone can verify authenticity of the message. For this purpose, we took advantage of a sessional signature as well as quantum entangled pairs which are generated with respect to it in our proposed protocol. We describe our proposed blind signature through an example and briefly discuss about its unconditional security. Due to the feasibility of the protocol, it can be widely employed for e-payment, e-government, e-business and etc.

  11. Manipulating transverse modes of photons for quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luda, Marcelo Alejandro; Larotonda, Miguel Antonio; Paz, Juan Pablo; Schmiegelow, Christian Tomás

    2014-04-01

    Several schemes have been proposed to extend quantum key distribution protocols aimed at improving their security or at providing new physical substrates for qubit implementation. We present a toolbox to jointly create, manipulate, and measure qubits stored in polarization and transverse-modes degrees of freedom of single photons. The toolbox includes local operations on single qubits, controlled operations between the two qubits, and projective measurements over a wide variety of nonlocal bases in the four-dimensional space of states. We describe how to implement the toolbox to perform an extended version of the BB84 protocol for this Hilbert space (ideally transmitting two key bits per photon). We present the experimental implementation of the measurement scheme both in the regimes of intense light beams and with single photons. Thus, we show the feasibility of implementing the protocol, providing an interesting example of a method for quantum information processing using the polarization and transverse modes of light as qubits.

  12. High-Rate Strong-Signal Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, Horace P.

    1996-01-01

    Several quantum cryptosystems utilizing different kinds of nonclassical lights, which can accommodate high intensity fields and high data rate, are described. However, they are all sensitive to loss and both the high rate and the strong-signal character rapidly disappear. A squeezed light homodyne detection scheme is proposed which, with present-day technology, leads to more than two orders of magnitude data rate improvement over other current experimental systems for moderate loss.

  13. Laser Damage Helps the Eavesdropper in Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugge, Audun Nystad; Sauge, Sebastien; Ghazali, Aina Mardhiyah M.; Skaar, Johannes; Lydersen, Lars; Makarov, Vadim

    2014-02-01

    We propose a class of attacks on quantum key distribution (QKD) systems where an eavesdropper actively engineers new loopholes by using damaging laser illumination to permanently change properties of system components. This can turn a perfect QKD system into a completely insecure system. A proof-of-principle experiment performed on an avalanche photodiode-based detector shows that laser damage can be used to create loopholes. After ˜1 W illumination, the detectors' dark count rate reduces 2-5 times, permanently improving single-photon counting performance. After ˜1.5 W, the detectors switch permanently into the linear photodetection mode and become completely insecure for QKD applications.

  14. Memory attacks on device-independent quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jonathan; Colbeck, Roger; Kent, Adrian

    2013-01-04

    Device-independent quantum cryptographic schemes aim to guarantee security to users based only on the output statistics of any components used, and without the need to verify their internal functionality. Since this would protect users against untrustworthy or incompetent manufacturers, sabotage, or device degradation, this idea has excited much interest, and many device-independent schemes have been proposed. Here we identify a critical weakness of device-independent protocols that rely on public communication between secure laboratories. Untrusted devices may record their inputs and outputs and reveal information about them via publicly discussed outputs during later runs. Reusing devices thus compromises the security of a protocol and risks leaking secret data. Possible defenses include securely destroying or isolating used devices. However, these are costly and often impractical. We propose other more practical partial defenses as well as a new protocol structure for device-independent quantum key distribution that aims to achieve composable security in the case of two parties using a small number of devices to repeatedly share keys with each other (and no other party).

  15. Memory Attacks on Device-Independent Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Jonathan; Colbeck, Roger; Kent, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Device-independent quantum cryptographic schemes aim to guarantee security to users based only on the output statistics of any components used, and without the need to verify their internal functionality. Since this would protect users against untrustworthy or incompetent manufacturers, sabotage, or device degradation, this idea has excited much interest, and many device-independent schemes have been proposed. Here we identify a critical weakness of device-independent protocols that rely on public communication between secure laboratories. Untrusted devices may record their inputs and outputs and reveal information about them via publicly discussed outputs during later runs. Reusing devices thus compromises the security of a protocol and risks leaking secret data. Possible defenses include securely destroying or isolating used devices. However, these are costly and often impractical. We propose other more practical partial defenses as well as a new protocol structure for device-independent quantum key distribution that aims to achieve composable security in the case of two parties using a small number of devices to repeatedly share keys with each other (and no other party).

  16. Laser damage helps the eavesdropper in quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Bugge, Audun Nystad; Sauge, Sebastien; Ghazali, Aina Mardhiyah M; Skaar, Johannes; Lydersen, Lars; Makarov, Vadim

    2014-02-21

    We propose a class of attacks on quantum key distribution (QKD) systems where an eavesdropper actively engineers new loopholes by using damaging laser illumination to permanently change properties of system components. This can turn a perfect QKD system into a completely insecure system. A proof-of-principle experiment performed on an avalanche photodiode-based detector shows that laser damage can be used to create loopholes. After ∼1  W illumination, the detectors' dark count rate reduces 2-5 times, permanently improving single-photon counting performance. After ∼1.5  W, the detectors switch permanently into the linear photodetection mode and become completely insecure for QKD applications.

  17. Advanced active quenching circuit for ultra-fast quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipčević, Mario; Christensen, Bradley G.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2017-09-01

    Commercial photon-counting modules based on actively quenched solid-state avalanche photodiode sensors are used in a wide variety of applications. Manufacturers characterize their detectors by specifying a small set of parameters, such as detection efficiency, dead time, dark counts rate, afterpulsing probability and single-photon arrival-time resolution (jitter). However, they usually do not specify the range of conditions over which these parameters are constant or present a sufficient description of the characterization process. In this work, we perform a few novel tests on two commercial detectors and identify an additional set of imperfections that must be specified to sufficiently characterize their behavior. These include rate-dependence of the dead time and jitter, detection delay shift, and "twilighting." We find that these additional non-ideal behaviors can lead to unexpected effects or strong deterioration of the performance of a system using these devices. We explain their origin by an in-depth analysis of the active quenching process. To mitigate the effects of these imperfections, a custom-built detection system is designed using a novel active quenching circuit. Its performance is compared against two commercial detectors in a fast quantum key distribution system with hyper-entangled photons and a random number generator.

  18. Upper bounds for the security of two distributed-phase reference protocols of quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branciard, Cyril; Gisin, Nicolas; Scarani, Valerio

    2008-01-01

    The differential-phase-shift (DPS) and the coherent-one-way (COW) are among the most practical protocols for quantum cryptography, and are therefore the object of fast-paced experimental developments. The assessment of their security is also a challenge for theorists: the existing tools, that allow to prove security against the most general attacks, do not apply to these two protocols in any straightforward way. We present new upper bounds for their security in the limit of large distances (dgsim50 km with typical values in optical fibers) by considering a large class of collective attacks, namely those in which the adversary attaches ancillary quantum systems to each pulse or to each pair of pulses. We introduce also two modified versions of the COW protocol, which may prove more robust than the original one.

  19. Application of practical noiseless linear amplifier in no-switching continuous-variable quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichen; Yu, Song; Guo, Hong

    2015-11-01

    We propose a modified no-switching continuous-variable quantum key distribution protocol by employing a practical noiseless linear amplifier at the receiver to increase the maximal transmission distance and tolerable excess noise. A security analysis is presented to derive the secure bound of the protocol in presence of a Gaussian noisy lossy channel. Simulation results show that the modified protocol can not only transmit longer distance and tolerate more channel excess noise than the original protocol, but also distribute more secure keys in the enhanced region where we define a critical point to separate the enhanced and degenerative region. This critical point presents the condition of using a practical noiseless linear amplifier in the no-switching continuous-variable quantum cryptography, which is meaningful and instructive to implement a practical experiment.

  20. Quantum Cryptography, Quantum Communication, and Quantum Computer in a Noisy Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Nakamura, Tadao

    2017-07-01

    First, we study several information theories based on quantum computing in a desirable noiseless situation. (1) We present quantum key distribution based on Deutsch's algorithm using an entangled state. (2) We discuss the fact that the Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm can be used for quantum communication including an error correction. Finally, we discuss the main result. We study the Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm in a noisy environment. The original algorithm determines a noiseless function. Here we consider the case that the function has an environmental noise. We introduce a noise term into the function f( x). So we have another noisy function g( x). The relation between them is g( x) = f( x) ± O( 𝜖). Here O( 𝜖) ≪ 1 is the noise term. The goal is to determine the noisy function g( x) with a success probability. The algorithm overcomes classical counterpart by a factor of N in a noisy environment.

  1. de Finetti Representation Theorem for Infinite-Dimensional Quantum Systems and Applications to Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, R.; Cirac, J. I.

    2009-03-01

    We show that the quantum de Finetti theorem holds for states on infinite-dimensional systems, provided they satisfy certain experimentally verifiable conditions. This result can be applied to prove the security of quantum key distribution based on weak coherent states or other continuous variable states against general attacks.

  2. De Finetti representation theorem for infinite-dimensional quantum systems and applications to quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Renner, R; Cirac, J I

    2009-03-20

    We show that the quantum de Finetti theorem holds for states on infinite-dimensional systems, provided they satisfy certain experimentally verifiable conditions. This result can be applied to prove the security of quantum key distribution based on weak coherent states or other continuous variable states against general attacks.

  3. Quantum quadrature amplitude modulation system and its applicability to coherent-state quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kentaro; Hirota, Osamu

    2005-08-01

    The quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) signal of coherent state of light is applied to the quantum stream cipher by Y-00 protocol. We first discuss on the performance of the square-root measurement (SRM) for the QAM signals in comparison with the optimum receiver. It is shown that the quantum stream cipher with the QAM signals is designed by using the SRM, taking account of the ciphertext-only attack and the known/chosen plain attack. Furthermore, the modification of the quantum stream cipher with the QAM signals is considered.

  4. Quantum Privacy Amplification and the Security of Quantum Cryptography over Noisy Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, D.; Ekert, A.; Jozsa, R.; Macchiavello, C.; Popescu, S.; Sanpera, A. ||

    1996-09-01

    Existing quantum cryptographic schemes are not, as they stand, operable in the presence of noise on the quantum communication channel. Although they become operable if they are supplemented by classical privacy-amplification techniques, the resulting schemes are difficult to analyze and have not been proved secure. We introduce the concept of quantum privacy amplification and a cryptographic scheme incorporating it which is provably secure over a noisy channel. The scheme uses an {open_quote}{open_quote}entanglement purification{close_quote}{close_quote} procedure which, because it requires only a few quantum controlled-not and single-qubit operations, could be implemented using technology that is currently being developed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Calculator Cryptography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Uses cryptography to demonstrate the importance of algebra and the use of technology as an effective real application of mathematics. Explains simple encoding and decoding of messages for student learning of modular arithmetic. This elementary encounter with cryptography along with its historical and modern background serves to motivate student…

  6. Conventional Cryptography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Marie A.

    1993-01-01

    Cryptography is the science that renders data unintelligible to prevent its unauthorized disclosure or modification. Presents an application of matrices used in linear transformations to illustrate a cryptographic system. An example is provided. (17 references) (MDH)

  7. Conventional Cryptography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Marie A.

    1993-01-01

    Cryptography is the science that renders data unintelligible to prevent its unauthorized disclosure or modification. Presents an application of matrices used in linear transformations to illustrate a cryptographic system. An example is provided. (17 references) (MDH)

  8. RSA cryptography and multi prime RSA cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, Nur Atiqah Abdul; Kamarulhaili, Hailiza

    2017-08-01

    RSA cryptography is one of the most powerful and popular cryptosystem which is being applied until now. There is one variant of RSA cryptography named Multi Prime RSA (MPRSA) cryptography. MPRSA cryptography is the improved version of RSA cryptography. We only need to modify a few steps in key generation part and apply the Chinese Remainder Theorem (CRT) in the decryption part to get the MPRSA algorithm. The focus of this research is to compare between the standard RSA cryptography and MPRSA cryptography in a few aspects. The research shows that MPRSA cryptography is more efficient than the RSA cryptography. Time complexity using Mathematica software is also conducted and it is proven that MPRSA cryptography has shorter time taken. It also implies the computational time is less than RSA cryptography. Mathematica software version 9.0 and a laptop HP ProBook 4331s are used to check the timing and to implement both algorithms.

  9. Applications of single-qubit rotations in quantum public-key cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M.

    2008-03-01

    We discuss cryptographic applications of single-qubit rotations from the perspective of trapdoor one-way functions and public-key encryption. In particular, we present an asymmetric cryptosystem whose security relies on fundamental principles of quantum physics. A quantum public key is used for the encryption of messages while decryption is possible by means of a classical private key only. The trapdoor one-way function underlying the proposed cryptosystem maps integer numbers to quantum states of a qubit and its inversion can be infeasible by virtue of the Holevo’s theorem.

  10. Quantum cryptography: individual eavesdropping with the knowledge of the error-correcting protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Horoshko, D B

    2007-12-31

    The quantum key distribution protocol BB84 combined with the repetition protocol for error correction is analysed from the point of view of its security against individual eavesdropping relying on quantum memory. It is shown that the mere knowledge of the error-correcting protocol changes the optimal attack and provides the eavesdropper with additional information on the distributed key. (fifth seminar in memory of d.n. klyshko)

  11. Shor's factoring algorithm and modern cryptography. An illustration of the capabilities inherent in quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerjuoy, Edward

    2005-06-01

    The security of messages encoded via the widely used RSA public key encryption system rests on the enormous computational effort required to find the prime factors of a large number N using classical (conventional) computers. In 1994 Peter Shor showed that for sufficiently large N, a quantum computer could perform the factoring with much less computational effort. This paper endeavors to explain, in a fashion comprehensible to the nonexpert, the RSA encryption protocol; the various quantum computer manipulations constituting the Shor algorithm; how the Shor algorithm performs the factoring; and the precise sense in which a quantum computer employing Shor's algorithm can be said to accomplish the factoring of very large numbers with less computational effort than a classical computer. It is made apparent that factoring N generally requires many successive runs of the algorithm. Our analysis reveals that the probability of achieving a successful factorization on a single run is about twice as large as commonly quoted in the literature.

  12. Stability assessment of QKD procedures in commercial quantum cryptography systems versus quality of dark channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, Monika; Melniczuk, Damian; Jacak, Janusz; Jóźwiak, Ireneusz; Gruber, Jacek; Jóźwiak, Piotr

    2015-02-01

    In order to assess the susceptibility of the quantum key distribution (QKD) systems to the hacking attack including simultaneous and frequent system self-decalibrations, we analyze the stability of the QKD transmission organized in two commercially available systems. The first one employs non-entangled photons as flying qubits in the dark quantum channel for communication whereas the second one utilizes the entangled photon pairs to secretly share the cryptographic key. Applying standard methods of the statistical data analysis to the characteristic indicators of the quality of the QKD communication (the raw key exchange rate [RKER] and the quantum bit error rate [QBER]), we have estimated the pace of the self-decalibration of both systems and the repeatability rate in the case of controlled worsening of the dark channel quality.

  13. Security of coherent-state quantum cryptography in the presence of Gaussian noise

    SciTech Connect

    Heid, Matthias; Luetkenhaus, Norbert

    2007-08-15

    We investigate the security against collective attacks of a continuous variable quantum key distribution scheme in the asymptotic key limit for a realistic setting. The quantum channel connecting the two honest parties is assumed to be lossy and imposes Gaussian noise on the observed quadrature distributions. Secret key rates are given for direct and reverse reconciliation schemes including post-selection in the collective attack scenario. The effect of a nonideal error correction and two-way communication in the classical post-processing step is also taken into account.

  14. Beating the photon-number-splitting attack in practical quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2005-06-17

    We propose an efficient method to verify the upper bound of the fraction of counts caused by multiphoton pulses in practical quantum key distribution using weak coherent light, given whatever type of Eve's action. The protocol simply uses two coherent states for the signal pulses and vacuum for the decoy pulse. Our verified upper bound is sufficiently tight for quantum key distribution with a very lossy channel, in both the asymptotic and nonasymptotic case. So far our protocol is the only decoy-state protocol that works efficiently for currently existing setups.

  15. Trojan-horse attacks threaten the security of practical quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Nitin; Anisimova, Elena; Khan, Imran; Makarov, Vadim; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2014-12-01

    A quantum key distribution (QKD) system may be probed by an eavesdropper Eve by sending in bright light from the quantum channel and analyzing the back-reflections. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a setup for mounting such a Trojan-horse attack. We show it in operation against the quantum cryptosystem Clavis2 from ID Quantique, as a proof-of-principle. With just a few back-reflected photons, Eve discerns Bob's (secret) basis choice, and thus the raw key bit in the Scarani-Acín-Ribordy-Gisin 2004 protocol, with higher than 90% probability. This would clearly breach the security of the cryptosystem. Unfortunately, Eve's bright pulses have a side effect of causing a high level of afterpulsing in Bob's single-photon detectors, resulting in a large quantum bit error rate that effectively protects this system from our attack. However, in a Clavis2-like system equipped with detectors with less-noisy but realistic characteristics, an attack strategy with positive leakage of the key would exist. We confirm this by a numerical simulation. Both the eavesdropping setup and strategy can be generalized to attack most of the current QKD systems, especially if they lack proper safeguards. We also propose countermeasures to prevent such attacks.

  16. Bell state entanglement swappings over collective noises and their applications on quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jason; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2013-02-01

    This work presents two robust entanglement swappings against two types of collective noises, respectively. The entanglement swapping can be achieved by performing two Bell state measurements on two logical qubits that come from two original logical Bell states, respectively. Two fault tolerant quantum secret sharing (QSS) protocols are further proposed to demonstrate the usefulness of the newly proposed entanglement swappings. The proposed QSS schemes are not only free from Trojan horse attacks but also quite efficient. Moreover, by adopting two Bell state measurements instead of four-qubit joint measurements, the proposed protocols are practical in combating collective noises. The proposed fault tolerant entanglement swapping can also be used to replace the traditional Bell-state entanglement swapping used in various quantum cryptographic protocols to provide robustness in combating collective noises.

  17. Hybrid ququart-encoded quantum cryptography protected by Kochen-Specker contextuality

    SciTech Connect

    Cabello, Adan; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Nagali, Eleonora; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2011-09-15

    Quantum cryptographic protocols based on complementarity are not secure against attacks in which complementarity is imitated with classical resources. The Kochen-Specker (KS) theorem provides protection against these attacks, without requiring entanglement or spatially separated composite systems. We analyze the maximum tolerated noise to guarantee the security of a KS-protected cryptographic scheme against these attacks and describe a photonic realization of this scheme using hybrid ququarts defined by the polarization and orbital angular momentum of single photons.

  18. Advanced techniques for free-space optical quantum cryptography over water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Alexander D.; Christensen, Bradley; Kwiat, Paul G.

    2016-03-01

    Free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) over water (e.g., ship to ship) may be limited by ship motion and atmospheric effects, such as mode distortion and beam wander due to turbulence. We report on a technique which reduces noise by excluding spatial modes which are less likely to contain QKD signal photons and experimentally demonstrate an improvement in QKD key generation rates in various noise and turbulence regimes.

  19. Analysis of coherent quantum cryptography protocol vulnerability to an active beam-splitting attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, D. A.; Kiktenko, E. O.; Fedorov, A. K.; Kurochkin, Yu V.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a new type of attack on a coherent quantum key distribution protocol [coherent one-way (COW) protocol]. The main idea of the attack consists in measuring individually the intercepted states and sending the rest of them unchanged. We have calculated the optimum values of the attack parameters for an arbitrary length of a communication channel and compared this novel attack with a standard beam-splitting attack.

  20. Security of continuous-variable quantum cryptography using coherent states: Decline of postselection advantage

    SciTech Connect

    Namiki, Ryo; Hirano, Takuya

    2005-08-15

    We investigate the security of continuous-variable (CV) quantum key distribution (QKD) using coherent states in the presence of quadrature excess noise. We consider an eavesdropping attack that uses a linear amplifier and a beam splitter. This attack makes a link between the beam-splitting attack and the intercept-resend attack (classical teleportation attack). We also show how postselection loses its efficiency in a realistic channel.

  1. General immunity and superadditivity of two-way Gaussian quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Carlo; Pirandola, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    We consider two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution, studying its security against general eavesdropping strategies. Assuming the asymptotic limit of many signals exchanged, we prove that two-way Gaussian protocols are immune to coherent attacks. More precisely we show the general superadditivity of the two-way security thresholds, which are proven to be higher than the corresponding one-way counterparts in all cases. We perform the security analysis first reducing the general eavesdropping to a two-mode coherent Gaussian attack, and then showing that the superadditivity is achieved by exploiting the random on/off switching of the two-way quantum communication. This allows the parties to choose the appropriate communication instances to prepare the key, accordingly to the tomography of the quantum channel. The random opening and closing of the circuit represents, in fact, an additional degree of freedom allowing the parties to convert, a posteriori, the two-mode correlations of the eavesdropping into noise. The eavesdropper is assumed to have no access to the on/off switching and, indeed, cannot adapt her attack. We explicitly prove that this mechanism enhances the security performance, no matter if the eavesdropper performs collective or coherent attacks.

  2. Modeling light entangled in polarization and frequency: case study in quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, John M.

    2005-08-01

    With the recognition of a logical gap between experiments and equations of quantum mechanics comes: (1) a chance to clarify such purely mathematical entities as probabilities, density operators, and partial traces-separated out from the choices and judgments necessary to apply them to describing experiments with devices, and (2) an added freedom to invent equations by which to model devices, stemming from the corresponding freedom in interpreting how these equations connect to experiments. Here I apply a few of these clarifications and freedoms to model polarization-entangled light pulses called for in quantum key distribution (QKD). Available light pulses are entangled not only in polarization but also in frequency. Although absent from the simplified models that initiated QKD, the degree of frequency entanglement of polarization-entangled light pulses is shown to affect the amount of key that can be distilled from raw light signals, in one case by a factor of 4/3. Open questions remain, because QKD brings concepts of quantum decision theory, such as measures of distinguishability, mostly worked out in the context of finite-dimensional vector spaces, into contact with infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces needed to give expression to optical frequency spectra.

  3. Quantifying the leakage of quantum protocols for classical two-party cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvail, Louis; Schaffner, Christian; Sotáková, Miroslava

    2014-12-01

    We study quantum protocols among two distrustful parties. By adopting a rather strict definition of correctness — guaranteeing that honest players obtain their correct outcomes only — we can show that every strictly correct quantum protocol implementing a non-trivial classical primitive necessarily leaks information to a dishonest player. This extends known impossibility results to all non-trivial primitives. We provide a framework for quantifying this leakage and argue that leakage is a good measure for the privacy provided to the players by a given protocol. Our framework also covers the case where the two players are helped by a trusted third party. We show that despite the help of a trusted third party, the players cannot amplify the cryptographic power of any primitive. All our results hold even against quantum honest-but-curious adversaries who honestly follow the protocol but purify their actions and apply a different measurement at the end of the protocol. As concrete examples, we establish lower bounds on the leakage of standard universal two-party primitives such as oblivious transfer.

  4. Quantifying the leakage of quantum protocols for classical two-party cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvail, Louis; Schaffner, Christian; Sotáková, Miroslava

    2015-12-01

    We study quantum protocols among two distrustful parties. By adopting a rather strict definition of correctness — guaranteeing that honest players obtain their correct outcomes only — we can show that every strictly correct quantum protocol implementing a non-trivial classical primitive necessarily leaks information to a dishonest player. This extends known impossibility results to all non-trivial primitives. We provide a framework for quantifying this leakage and argue that leakage is a good measure for the privacy provided to the players by a given protocol. Our framework also covers the case where the two players are helped by a trusted third party. We show that despite the help of a trusted third party, the players cannot amplify the cryptographic power of any primitive. All our results hold even against quantum honest-but-curious adversaries who honestly follow the protocol but purify their actions and apply a different measurement at the end of the protocol. As concrete examples, we establish lower bounds on the leakage of standard universal two-party primitives such as oblivious transfer.

  5. General immunity and superadditivity of two-way Gaussian quantum cryptography

    PubMed Central

    Ottaviani, Carlo; Pirandola, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We consider two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution, studying its security against general eavesdropping strategies. Assuming the asymptotic limit of many signals exchanged, we prove that two-way Gaussian protocols are immune to coherent attacks. More precisely we show the general superadditivity of the two-way security thresholds, which are proven to be higher than the corresponding one-way counterparts in all cases. We perform the security analysis first reducing the general eavesdropping to a two-mode coherent Gaussian attack, and then showing that the superadditivity is achieved by exploiting the random on/off switching of the two-way quantum communication. This allows the parties to choose the appropriate communication instances to prepare the key, accordingly to the tomography of the quantum channel. The random opening and closing of the circuit represents, in fact, an additional degree of freedom allowing the parties to convert, a posteriori, the two-mode correlations of the eavesdropping into noise. The eavesdropper is assumed to have no access to the on/off switching and, indeed, cannot adapt her attack. We explicitly prove that this mechanism enhances the security performance, no matter if the eavesdropper performs collective or coherent attacks. PMID:26928053

  6. Gaussian two-mode attacks in one-way quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottaviani, Carlo; Mancini, Stefano; Pirandola, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the asymptotic security of one-way continuous variable quantum key distribution against Gaussian two-mode coherent attacks. The one-way protocol is implemented by arranging the channel uses in two-mode blocks. By applying symmetric random permutations over these blocks, the security analysis is in fact reduced to study two-mode coherent attacks and, in particular, Gaussian ones, due to the extremality of Gaussian states. We explicitly show that the use of two-mode Gaussian correlations by an eavesdropper leads to asymptotic secret key rates which are strictly larger than the rate obtained under standard single-mode Gaussian attacks.

  7. Cryptographic robustness of a quantum cryptography system using phase-time coding

    SciTech Connect

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2008-01-15

    A cryptographic analysis is presented of a new quantum key distribution protocol using phase-time coding. An upper bound is obtained for the error rate that guarantees secure key distribution. It is shown that the maximum tolerable error rate for this protocol depends on the counting rate in the control time slot. When no counts are detected in the control time slot, the protocol guarantees secure key distribution if the bit error rate in the sifted key does not exceed 50%. This protocol partially discriminates between errors due to system defects (e.g., imbalance of a fiber-optic interferometer) and eavesdropping. In the absence of eavesdropping, the counts detected in the control time slot are not caused by interferometer imbalance, which reduces the requirements for interferometer stability.

  8. Discrete and continuous variables for measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; ...

    2015-11-16

    In a recent Article in Nature Photonics, Pirandola et al.1 claim that the achievable secret key rates of discrete-variable (DV) measurementdevice- independent (MDI) quantum key distribution (QKD) (refs 2,3) are “typically very low, unsuitable for the demands of a metropolitan network” and introduce a continuous-variable (CV) MDI QKD protocol capable of providing key rates which, they claim, are “three orders of magnitude higher” than those of DV MDI QKD. We believe, however, that the claims regarding low key rates of DV MDI QKD made by Pirandola et al.1 are too pessimistic. Here in this paper, we show that the secretmore » key rate of DV MDI QKD with commercially available high-efficiency single-photon detectors (SPDs) (for example, see http://www.photonspot.com/detectors and http://www.singlequantum.com) and good system alignment is typically rather high and thus highly suitable for not only long-distance communication but also metropolitan networks.« less

  9. Discrete and continuous variables for measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; Qian, Li; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-11-16

    In a recent Article in Nature Photonics, Pirandola et al.1 claim that the achievable secret key rates of discrete-variable (DV) measurementdevice- independent (MDI) quantum key distribution (QKD) (refs 2,3) are “typically very low, unsuitable for the demands of a metropolitan network” and introduce a continuous-variable (CV) MDI QKD protocol capable of providing key rates which, they claim, are “three orders of magnitude higher” than those of DV MDI QKD. We believe, however, that the claims regarding low key rates of DV MDI QKD made by Pirandola et al.1 are too pessimistic. Here in this paper, we show that the secret key rate of DV MDI QKD with commercially available high-efficiency single-photon detectors (SPDs) (for example, see http://www.photonspot.com/detectors and http://www.singlequantum.com) and good system alignment is typically rather high and thus highly suitable for not only long-distance communication but also metropolitan networks.

  10. On a simple attack, limiting the range transmission of secret keys in a system of quantum cryptography based on coding in a sub-carrier frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, A. N.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.; Potapova, T. A.

    2017-03-01

    In the paper by Gleim et al (2016 Opt. Express 24 2619), it was declared that the system of quantum cryptography, exploiting quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol BB84 with the additional reference state and encoding in a sub-carrier, is able to distribute secret keys at a distance of 210 km. The following shows that a simple attack realized with a beam splitter results in a loss of privacy of the keys over substantially smaller distances. It turns out that the actual length of the secret key transmission for the QKD system encoding in the sub-carrier frequency is ten times less than that declared in Gleim et al (2016 Opt. Express 24 2619). Therefore it is impossible to safely use the keys when distributed at a larger length of the communication channel than shown below. The maximum communication distance does not exceed 22 km, even in the most optimistic scenario.

  11. Tripartite counterfactual quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salih, Hatim

    2014-07-01

    We show how two distrustful parties, "Bob" and "Charlie," can share a secret key with the help of a mutually trusted "Alice" counterfactually; that is, with no information-carrying particles traveling between any of the three.

  12. Chocolate Key Cryptography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Dale J.; Brown, Ezra A.; Norton, Anderson H.

    2010-01-01

    Cryptography is the science of hidden or secret writing. More generally, cryptography refers to the science of safeguarding information. Cryptography allows people to use a public medium such as the Internet to transmit private information securely, thus enabling a whole range of conveniences, from online shopping to personally printed movie…

  13. Chocolate Key Cryptography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Dale J.; Brown, Ezra A.; Norton, Anderson H.

    2010-01-01

    Cryptography is the science of hidden or secret writing. More generally, cryptography refers to the science of safeguarding information. Cryptography allows people to use a public medium such as the Internet to transmit private information securely, thus enabling a whole range of conveniences, from online shopping to personally printed movie…

  14. Advanced Quantum Communication Protocols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-17

    theoretically optimal configuration, and compared hyperentangled and multi-pair encoding. Table of Contents: Summary 2 Relativistic Quantum Cryptography ( RQC ...error rates, for 4- and 6-state RQC 4. Intensity pulses to generate uniform time-interval probability distributions 5. Schematic of photon-arrival...Protocols: Scientific Progress and Accomplishments “Relativistic” Quantum Cryptography We have implemented relativistic quantum cryptography ( RQC ) using

  15. Physical Cryptography: A New Approach to Key Generation and Direct Encryption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-18

    Std Z39-18 P a g e  | 2    Abstract: The security of key generation and direct encryption in quantum and physical cryptography have been...emerging development of classical-noise cryptography [1, 2] and quantum cryptography [3] suggests that a new way of building cryptosystems may be...has been  further studied theoretically and P a g e  | 4    experimentally to only a limited extent. The second is quantum cryptography [3] based on

  16. Popescu-Rohrlich correlations imply efficient instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, Anne

    2016-08-01

    In instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation, two parties cooperate in order to perform a quantum computation on their joint inputs, while being restricted to a single round of simultaneous communication. Previous results showed that instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation is possible, at the cost of an exponential amount of prior shared entanglement (in the size of the input). Here, we show that a linear amount of entanglement suffices, (in the size of the computation), as long as the parties share nonlocal correlations as given by the Popescu-Rohrlich box. This means that communication is not required for efficient instantaneous nonlocal quantum computation. Exploiting the well-known relation to position-based cryptography, our result also implies the impossibility of secure position-based cryptography against adversaries with nonsignaling correlations. Furthermore, our construction establishes a quantum analog of the classical communication complexity collapse under nonsignaling correlations.

  17. High-speed data encryption over 25 km of fiber by two-mode coherent-state quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Corndorf, Eric; Barbosa, Geraldo; Liang, Chuang; Yuen, Horace P; Kumar, Prem

    2003-11-01

    We demonstrate high-speed (250 Mbps) data encryption over 25 km of telecommunication fiber by use of coherent states. For the parameter values used in the experiment, the demonstration is secure against individual ciphertext-only eavesdropping attacks near the transmitter with ideal detection equipment. Whereas other quantum-cryptographic schemes require the use of fragile quantum states and ultrasensitive detection equipment, our protocol is loss tolerant, uses off-the-shelf components, and is optically amplifiable.

  18. Public Key Cryptography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapson, Frank

    1996-01-01

    Describes public key cryptography, also known as RSA, which is a system using two keys, one used to put a message into cipher and another used to decipher the message. Presents examples using small prime numbers. (MKR)

  19. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    PubMed

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  20. Neural cryptography with feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  1. Halftone visual cryptography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Arce, Gonzalo R; Di Crescenzo, Giovanni

    2006-08-01

    Visual cryptography encodes a secret binary image (SI) into n shares of random binary patterns. If the shares are xeroxed onto transparencies, the secret image can be visually decoded by superimposing a qualified subset of transparencies, but no secret information can be obtained from the superposition of a forbidden subset. The binary patterns of the n shares, however, have no visual meaning and hinder the objectives of visual cryptography. Extended visual cryptography [1] was proposed recently to construct meaningful binary images as shares using hypergraph colourings, but the visual quality is poor. In this paper, a novel technique named halftone visual cryptography is proposed to achieve visual cryptography via halftoning. Based on the blue-noise dithering principles, the proposed method utilizes the void and cluster algorithm [2] to encode a secret binary image into n halftone shares (images) carrying significant visual information. The simulation shows that the visual quality of the obtained halftone shares are observably better than that attained by any available visual cryptography method known to date.

  2. Entropy uncertainty relations and stability of phase-temporal quantum cryptography with finite-length transmitted strings

    SciTech Connect

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2012-12-15

    Any key-generation session contains a finite number of quantum-state messages, and it is there-fore important to understand the fundamental restrictions imposed on the minimal length of a string required to obtain a secret key with a specified length. The entropy uncertainty relations for smooth min and max entropies considerably simplify and shorten the proof of security. A proof of security of quantum key distribution with phase-temporal encryption is presented. This protocol provides the maximum critical error compared to other protocols up to which secure key distribution is guaranteed. In addition, unlike other basic protocols (of the BB84 type), which are vulnerable with respect to an attack by 'blinding' of avalanche photodetectors, this protocol is stable with respect to such an attack and guarantees key security.

  3. Cryptography for Big Data Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-13

    Cryptography for Big Data Security Book Chapter for Big Data: Storage, Sharing, and Security (3S) Distribution A: Public Release Ariel Hamlin1 Nabil...Email: arkady@ll.mit.edu ii Contents 1 Cryptography for Big Data Security 1 1.1 Introduction...48 Chapter 1 Cryptography for Big Data Security 1.1 Introduction With the amount

  4. Quantum Cryptography II: How to re-use a one-time pad safely even if P=NP.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Charles H; Brassard, Gilles; Breidbart, Seth

    2014-01-01

    When elementary quantum systems, such as polarized photons, are used to transmit digital information, the uncertainty principle gives rise to novel cryptographic phenomena unachievable with traditional transmission media, e.g. a communications channel on which it is impossible in principle to eavesdrop without a high probability of being detected. With such a channel, a one-time pad can safely be reused many times as long as no eavesdrop is detected, and, planning ahead, part of the capacity of these uncompromised transmissions can be used to send fresh random bits with which to replace the one-time pad when an eavesdrop finally is detected. Unlike other schemes for stretching a one-time pad, this scheme does not depend on complexity-theoretic assumptions such as the difficulty of factoring.

  5. Quantum cryptography with finite resources: unconditional security bound for discrete-variable protocols with one-way postprocessing.

    PubMed

    Scarani, Valerio; Renner, Renato

    2008-05-23

    We derive a bound for the security of quantum key distribution with finite resources under one-way postprocessing, based on a definition of security that is composable and has an operational meaning. While our proof relies on the assumption of collective attacks, unconditional security follows immediately for standard protocols such as Bennett-Brassard 1984 and six-states protocol. For single-qubit implementations of such protocols, we find that the secret key rate becomes positive when at least N approximately 10(5) signals are exchanged and processed. For any other discrete-variable protocol, unconditional security can be obtained using the exponential de Finetti theorem, but the additional overhead leads to very pessimistic estimates.

  6. Intrinsic imperfection of self-differencing single-photon detectors harms the security of high-speed quantum cryptography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Sun, Shi-Hai; Tang, Guang-Zhao; Ma, Xiang-Chun; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2013-12-01

    Thanks to the high-speed self-differencing single-photon detector (SD-SPD), the secret key rate of quantum key distribution (QKD), which can, in principle, offer unconditionally secure private communications between two users (Alice and Bob), can exceed 1 Mbit/s. However, the SD-SPD may contain loopholes, which can be exploited by an eavesdropper (Eve) to hack into the unconditional security of the high-speed QKD systems. In this paper, we analyze the fact that the SD-SPD can be remotely controlled by Eve in order to spy on full information without being discovered, then proof-of-principle experiments are demonstrated. Here, we point out that this loophole is introduced directly by the operating principle of the SD-SPD, thus, it cannot be removed, except for the fact that some active countermeasures are applied by the legitimate parties.

  7. A Non-Entanglement Quantum Single Sign-On Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Guiping; Wang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Single Sign-On (SSO) is an important cryptography mechanism in distributed systems. Quantum cryptography has gained great successes and makes great influence on traditional cryptography. In this paper, A SSO protocol under almost pure quantum cryptography without entanglement is designed. Through security analysis, we show that this protocol has good security properties.

  8. A Non-entanglement Quantum Single Sign-On Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Guiping; Wang, Yong

    2014-04-01

    Single Sign-On (SSO) is an important cryptography mechanism in distributed systems and is implemented by many known distributed systems, such as the famous Kerberos. Quantum cryptography has gained great successes and makes great influence on traditional cryptography. In this paper, we combines the SSO mechanism and quantum cryptography together. A SSO solution under almost pure quantum cryptography is designed. Through security analysis, we show that this solution has good security properties.

  9. Quantum cryptography without Bell's theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Charles H.; Brassard, Gilles; Mermin, N. David

    1992-02-01

    Ekert has described a cryptographic scheme in which Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pairs of particles are used to generate identical random numbers in remote places, while Bell's theorem certifies that the particles have not been measured in transit by an eavesdropper. We describe a related but simpler EPR scheme and, without invoking Bell's theorem, prove it secure against more general attacks, including substitution of a fake EPR source. Finally we show our scheme is equivalent to the original 1984 key distribution scheme of Bennett and Brassard, which uses single particles instead of EPR pairs.

  10. A Quantum Single Sign-On Protocol Based on GHZ States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xingtian; Wang, Yong; Dai, Guiping

    2015-10-01

    Single Sign-On (SSO) is an important cryptography mechanism in distributed systems. Quantum cryptography has gained great successes and makes great influence on traditional cryptography. In this paper, we combines the SSO mechanism and quantum cryptography together. A SSO protocol based on GHZ states is designed. Through security analysis, we show that this protocol has good security properties.

  11. A Four-State Entanglement Based Quantum Single Sign-On Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Xu, RongQiang; Dai, Guiping

    2015-06-01

    Single Sign-On (SSO) is an important cryptography mechanism in distributed systems. Quantum cryptography has gained great successes and makes great influence on traditional cryptography. In this paper, we combines the SSO mechanism and quantum cryptography together. A SSO protocol based on four-state entanglement is designed. Through security analysis, we show that this protocol has good security properties.

  12. Neural cryptography with queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2005-01-01

    Neural cryptography is based on synchronization of tree parity machines by mutual learning. We extend previous key-exchange protocols by replacing random inputs with queries depending on the current state of the neural networks. The probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that queries restore the security against cooperating attackers. The success probability can be reduced without increasing the average synchronization time.

  13. Dynamics of neural cryptography.

    PubMed

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-01

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  14. Dynamics of neural cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-15

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  15. Dynamics of neural cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-01

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  16. Chaos and Cryptography: A new dimension in secure communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Santo; Kurths, J.

    2014-06-01

    This issue is a collection of contributions on recent developments and achievements of cryptography and communications using chaos. The various contributions report important and promising results such as synchronization of networks and data transmissions; image cipher; optical and TDMA communications, quantum keys etc. Various experiments and applications such as FPGA, smartphone cipher, semiconductor lasers etc, are also included.

  17. Cryptography in a communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, M. R.

    1982-10-01

    Communication system protection by cryptography is reviewed. Privacy and authentication problems are discussed. Conventional cryptographic systems as well as public key systems are complementary. Classical security methods such as signed contracts, physical locks, passwords and keys remain important.

  18. FIFTH SEMINAR IN MEMORY OF D.N. KLYSHKO: Quantum cryptography: individual eavesdropping with the knowledge of the error-correcting protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoshko, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    The quantum key distribution protocol BB84 combined with the repetition protocol for error correction is analysed from the point of view of its security against individual eavesdropping relying on quantum memory. It is shown that the mere knowledge of the error-correcting protocol changes the optimal attack and provides the eavesdropper with additional information on the distributed key.

  19. Visual cryptography by use of polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Imagawa, Takanori; Suyama, Shiro

    2010-01-01

    Visual cryptography is a powerful method to share secret information, such as identification numbers, between plural members. There have been many papers on visual cryptography by use of intensity modulation. Although the use of intensity modulation is suitable for printing, degradation of image quality is a problem. Another problem for conventional visual cryptography is a risk of theft of physical keys. To cope with these problems, we propose a new field of visual cryptography by use of polarization. In this study, we have implemented polarization decoding by stacking films. Use of polarization processing improves image quality of visual cryptography. The purpose of this paper is to construct visual cryptography based on polarization processing. Furthermore, we construct a new type of visual cryptography that uses stacking order as a key for decryption. The use of stacking order multiplies the complexity of encryption. Then, it is effective to prevent secret against theft because the theft cannot determine the secret only by collecting encrypted films.

  20. Cryptography from noisy storage.

    PubMed

    Wehner, Stephanie; Schaffner, Christian; Terhal, Barbara M

    2008-06-06

    We show how to implement cryptographic primitives based on the realistic assumption that quantum storage of qubits is noisy. We thereby consider individual-storage attacks; i.e., the dishonest party attempts to store each incoming qubit separately. Our model is similar to the model of bounded-quantum storage; however, we consider an explicit noise model inspired by present-day technology. To illustrate the power of this new model, we show that a protocol for oblivious transfer is secure for any amount of quantum-storage noise, as long as honest players can perform perfect quantum operations. Our model also allows us to show the security of protocols that cope with noise in the operations of the honest players and achieve more advanced tasks such as secure identification.

  1. Cryptography as a Pedagogical Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaur, Manmohan

    2008-01-01

    In order to get undergraduates interested in mathematics, it is necessary to motivate them, give them good reasons to spend time on a subject that requires hard work, and, if possible, involve them in undergraduate research. This article discusses how cryptography can be used for all these purposes. In particular, a special topics course on…

  2. The Changing Face of Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, Fred

    The last few decades have seen cryptography ‘transform’ from a black art - practised mainly by governments, the military and a few financial organisations - to a popular science that is widely taught as an academic subject and features in a number of popular novels and films.

  3. Finding Cryptography in Object Code

    SciTech Connect

    Jason L. Wright

    2008-10-01

    Finding and identifying Cryptography is a growing concern in the malware analysis community. In this paper, a heuristic method for determining the likelihood that a given function contains a cryptographic algorithm is discussed and the results of applying this method in various environments is shown. The algorithm is based on frequency analysis of opcodes that make up each function within a binary.

  4. Multivariate Cryptography Based on Clipped Hopfield Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Cheng, Lee-Ming; Su, Tong

    2016-11-23

    Designing secure and efficient multivariate public key cryptosystems [multivariate cryptography (MVC)] to strengthen the security of RSA and ECC in conventional and quantum computational environment continues to be a challenging research in recent years. In this paper, we will describe multivariate public key cryptosystems based on extended Clipped Hopfield Neural Network (CHNN) and implement it using the MVC (CHNN-MVC) framework operated in GF(p) space. The Diffie--Hellman key exchange algorithm is extended into the matrix field, which illustrates the feasibility of its new applications in both classic and postquantum cryptography. The efficiency and security of our proposed new public key cryptosystem CHNN-MVC are simulated and found to be NP-hard. The proposed algorithm will strengthen multivariate public key cryptosystems and allows hardware realization practicality.

  5. Numerical simulation of the optimal two-mode attacks for two-way continuous-variable quantum cryptography in reverse reconciliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichen; Li, Zhengyu; Zhao, Yijia; Yu, Song; Guo, Hong

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the security of the two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution protocol in reverse reconciliation against general two-mode attacks, which represent all accessible attacks at fixed channel parameters. Rather than against one specific attack model, the expression of secret key rates of the two-way protocol are derived against all accessible attack models. It is found that there is an optimal two-mode attack to minimize the performance of the protocol in terms of both secret key rates and maximal transmission distances. We identify the optimal two-mode attack, give the specific attack model of the optimal two-mode attack and show the performance of the two-way protocol against the optimal two-mode attack. Even under the optimal two-mode attack, the performances of two-way protocol are still better than the corresponding one-way protocol, which shows the advantage of making double use of the quantum channel and the potential of long-distance secure communication using a two-way protocol.

  6. Secure quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Curty, Marcos; Tamaki, Kiyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Secure communication is crucial in the Internet Age, and quantum mechanics stands poised to revolutionize cryptography as we know it today. In this Review, we introduce the motivation and the current state of the art of research in quantum cryptography. In particular, we discuss the present security model together with its assumptions, strengths and weaknesses. After briefly introducing recent experimental progress and challenges, we survey the latest developments in quantum hacking and countermeasures against it.

  7. Cryptography with DNA binary strands.

    PubMed

    Leier, A; Richter, C; Banzhaf, W; Rauhe, H

    2000-06-01

    Biotechnological methods can be used for cryptography. Here two different cryptographic approaches based on DNA binary strands are shown. The first approach shows how DNA binary strands can be used for steganography, a technique of encryption by information hiding, to provide rapid encryption and decryption. It is shown that DNA steganography based on DNA binary strands is secure under the assumption that an interceptor has the same technological capabilities as sender and receiver of encrypted messages. The second approach shown here is based on steganography and a method of graphical subtraction of binary gel-images. It can be used to constitute a molecular checksum and can be combined with the first approach to support encryption. DNA cryptography might become of practical relevance in the context of labelling organic and inorganic materials with DNA 'barcodes'.

  8. Practicality of quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan

    Quantum Information Processing (QIP) is expected to bring revolutionary enhancement to various technological areas. However, today's QIP applications are far from being practical. The problem involves both hardware issues, i.e., quantum devices are imperfect, and software issues, i.e., the functionality of some QIP applications is not fully understood. Aiming to improve the practicality of QIP, in my PhD research I have studied various topics in quantum cryptography and ion trap quantum computation. In quantum cryptography, I first studied the security of position-based quantum cryptography (PBQC). I discovered a wrong assumption in the previous literature that the cheaters are not allowed to share entangled resources. I proposed entanglement attacks that could cheat all known PBQC protocols. I also studied the practicality of continuous-variable (CV) quantum secret sharing (QSS). While the security of CV QSS was considered by the literature only in the limit of infinite squeezing, I found that finitely squeezed CV resources could also provide finite secret sharing rate. Our work relaxes the stringent resources requirement of implementing QSS. In ion trap quantum computation, I studied the phase error of quantum information induced by dc Stark effect during ion transportation. I found an optimized ion trajectory for which the phase error is the minimum. I also defined a threshold speed, above which ion transportation would induce significant error. In addition, I proposed a new application for ion trap systems as universal bosonic simulators (UBS). I introduced two architectures, and discussed their respective strength and weakness. I illustrated the implementations of bosonic state initialization, transformation, and measurement by applying radiation fields or by varying the trap potential. When comparing with conducting optical experiments, the ion trap UBS is advantageous in higher state initialization efficiency and higher measurement accuracy. Finally, I

  9. Report of the Public Cryptography Study Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    Concerns of the National Security Agency (NSA) that information contained in some articles about cryptography in learned and professional journals and in monographs might be inimical to the national security are addressed. The Public Cryptography Study Group, with one dissenting opinion, recommends that a voluntary system of prior review of…

  10. Cooperating attackers in neural cryptography.

    PubMed

    Shacham, Lanir N; Klein, Einat; Mislovaty, Rachel; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2004-06-01

    A successful attack strategy in neural cryptography is presented. The neural cryptosystem, based on synchronization of neural networks by mutual learning, has been recently shown to be secure under different attack strategies. The success of the advanced attacker presented here, called the "majority-flipping attacker," does not decay with the parameters of the model. This attacker's outstanding success is due to its using a group of attackers which cooperate throughout the synchronization process, unlike any other attack strategy known. An analytical description of this attack is also presented, and fits the results of simulations.

  11. Advanced quantum communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Evan Robert

    Quantum communication provides several examples of communication protocols which cannot be implemented securely using only classical communication. Currently, the most widely known of these is quantum cryptography, which allows secure key exchange between parties sharing a quantum channel subject to an eavesdropper. This thesis explores and extends the realm of quantum communication. Two new quantum communication protocols are described. The first is a new form of quantum cryptography---relativistic quantum cryptography---which increases communication efficiency by exploiting a relativistic bound on the power of an eavesdropper, in addition to the usual quantum mechanical restrictions intrinsic to quantum cryptography. By doing so, we have observed over 170% improvement in communication efficiency over a similar protocol not utilizing relativity. A second protocol, Quantum Orienteering, allows two cooperating parties to communicate a specific direction in space. This application shows the possibility of using joint measurements, or projections onto an entangled state, in order to extract the maximum useful information from quantum bits. For two-qubit communication, the maximal fidelity of communication using only separable operations is 73.6%, while joint measurements can improve the efficiency to 78.9%. In addition to implementing these protocols, we have improved several resources for quantum communication and quantum computing. Specifically, we have developed improved sources of polarization-entangled photons, a low-loss quantum memory for polarization qubits, and a quantum random number generator. These tools may be applied to a wide variety of future quantum and classical information systems.

  12. Quantum entanglement, quantum communication and the limits of quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambainis, Andris

    Quantum entanglement is a term describing the quantum correlations between different parts of a quantum system. Quantum information theory has developed sophisticated techniques to quantify and study quantum entanglement. In this thesis, we show how to apply those techniques to problems in quantum algorithms, complexity theory, communication and cryptography. The main results are: (1) quantum communication protocols that are exponentially more efficient that conventional (classical) communication protocols, (2) unconditionally secure quantum protocols for cryptographic problems, (3) a new "quantum adversary" method for proving lower bounds on quantum algorithms, (4) a study of "one clean qubit computation", a model related to the experimental implementation of quantum computers using NMR (nucleo-magnetic resonance) technology.

  13. A Foundational Proof Framework for Cryptography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    A Foundational Proof Framework for Cryptography A P T S E A S D P C S H U C , M M 2015 Distribution A: Public Release ©2014 – A P . T U S A F I A... Cryptography A I present a state-of-the-art mechanized framework for developing and checking proofs of secu- rity for cryptographic schemes in the computational...model. This system, called the Foundational Cryptography Framework (FCF) is based on the Coq proof assistant, and it provides a sophisticated

  14. A Two-State Entanglement Based Quantum Single Sign-On Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Ma, Bingzhan; Dai, Guiping

    2014-12-01

    Single Sign-On (SSO) is an important cryptography mechanism in distributed systems. Quantum cryptography has gained great successes and makes great influence on traditional cryptography. In this paper, a SSO protocol based on two-state entanglement is designed. Through security analysis, we show that this protocol has good security properties.

  15. Genetic attack on neural cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-03-15

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size.

  16. Cheating prevention in visual cryptography.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chih-Ming; Tzeng, Wen-Guey

    2007-01-01

    Visual cryptography (VC) is a method of encrypting a secret image into shares such that stacking a sufficient number of shares reveals the secret image. Shares are usually presented in transparencies. Each participant holds a transparency. Most of the previous research work on VC focuses on improving two parameters: pixel expansion and contrast. In this paper, we studied the cheating problem in VC and extended VC. We considered the attacks of malicious adversaries who may deviate from the scheme in any way. We presented three cheating methods and applied them on attacking existent VC or extended VC schemes. We improved one cheat-preventing scheme. We proposed a generic method that converts a VCS to another VCS that has the property of cheating prevention. The overhead of the conversion is near optimal in both contrast degression and pixel expansion.

  17. Genetic attack on neural cryptography.

    PubMed

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-03-01

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size.

  18. Cryptographie quantique à variables continues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencheikh, K.; Jankovic, A.; Symul, T.; Levenson, J. A.

    2002-06-01

    Nous avons élaboré un protocole de cryptographie quantique qui permet de générer et de distribuer une clé secrète aléatoire. Le protocole repose sur l'utilisation de paires de champs électromagnétiques dont les quadratures présentent des corrélations quantiques de type Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen. Les fluctuations quantiques instantanése constituent les bits aléatoires de la clé secrète, et la dégradation irréversible des corrélations quantiques des quadratures causée par une tierce personne permet de la détecter et de garantir la sécurité d'échange.

  19. Cryptography with chaos using Chua's system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C. H.; Pizolato, J. C., Jr.

    2011-03-01

    In the last years, chaotic systems have been applied in information security. These systems have a complex and unpredictable behavior, what makes them more attractive for data cryptography applications. In this work, the chaotic behavior of signals generated by Chua's system is combined with the original information in order to obtain a safe cryptographic method. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can be used in data cryptography applications.

  20. High-Rate Field Demonstration of Large-Alphabet Quantum Key Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-12

    distribution. Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 021101 (2014). [3] Bechmann-Pasquinucci, H. & Tittel, W. Quantum cryptography using larger alphabets. Phys. Rev. A 61...Brendel, J., Zbinden, H. & Gisin, N. Quantum Cryptography Using Entangled Photons in Energy-Time Bell States. Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4737–4740 (2000...unbiased bases. Phys. Rev. A 88, 032305 (2013). [11] Mirhosseini, M. et al. High-dimensional quantum cryptography with twisted light. New J. Phys. 17

  1. Quantum Error Correction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-06

    many families of quantum MDS codes. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Quantum Information Science , Quantum Algorithms, Quantum Cryptography 16. SECURITY...separable codes over alphabets of arbitrary size,” a preprint, 2005; to be presented at ERATO conference on quantum information science , Tokyo, Japan...β, γ〉〉 = 1. Due to the Chinese remainder theorem, we have one more equivalent ∗ERATO Conference on Quantum Information Science , 2005 †jkim

  2. Quantum algorithms: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Quantum computers are designed to outperform standard computers by running quantum algorithms. Areas in which quantum algorithms can be applied include cryptography, search and optimisation, simulation of quantum systems and solving large systems of linear equations. Here we briefly survey some known quantum algorithms, with an emphasis on a broad overview of their applications rather than their technical details. We include a discussion of recent developments and near-term applications of quantum algorithms.

  3. Eavesdropping without quantum memory

    SciTech Connect

    Bechmann-Pasquinucci, H.

    2006-04-15

    In quantum cryptography the optimal eavesdropping strategy requires that the eavesdropper uses ancillas and quantum memories in order to optimize her information. What happens if the eavesdropper has no quantum memory? It is shown that in this case the eavesdropper obtains a better information/disturbance trade-off by adopting the simple intercept/resend strategy.

  4. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  5. Neural Network Approach to Locating Cryptography in Object Code

    SciTech Connect

    Jason L. Wright; Milos Manic

    2009-09-01

    Finding and identifying cryptography is a growing concern in the malware analysis community. In this paper, artificial neural networks are used to classify functional blocks from a disassembled program as being either cryptography related or not. The resulting system, referred to as NNLC (Neural Net for Locating Cryptography) is presented and results of applying this system to various libraries are described.

  6. Number theoretical foundations in cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atan, Kamel Ariffin Mohd

    2017-08-01

    In recent times the hazards in relationships among entities in different establishments worldwide have generated exciting developments in cryptography. Central to this is the theory of numbers. This area of mathematics provides very rich source of fundamental materials for constructing secret codes. Some number theoretical concepts that have been very actively used in designing crypto systems will be highlighted in this presentation. This paper will begin with introduction to basic number theoretical concepts which for many years have been thought to have no practical applications. This will include several theoretical assertions that were discovered much earlier in the historical development of number theory. This will be followed by discussion on the "hidden" properties of these assertions that were later exploited by designers of cryptosystems in their quest for developing secret codes. This paper also highlights some earlier and existing cryptosystems and the role played by number theoretical concepts in their constructions. The role played by cryptanalysts in detecting weaknesses in the systems developed by cryptographers concludes this presentation.

  7. Quantum key management

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Richard John; Thrasher, James Thomas; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth

    2016-11-29

    Innovations for quantum key management harness quantum communications to form a cryptography system within a public key infrastructure framework. In example implementations, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a Merkle signature scheme (using Winternitz one-time digital signatures or other one-time digital signatures, and Merkle hash trees) to constitute a cryptography system. More generally, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a hash-based signature scheme. This provides a secure way to identify, authenticate, verify, and exchange secret cryptographic keys. Features of the quantum key management innovations further include secure enrollment of users with a registration authority, as well as credential checking and revocation with a certificate authority, where the registration authority and/or certificate authority can be part of the same system as a trusted authority for quantum key distribution.

  8. Color extended visual cryptography using error diffusion.

    PubMed

    Kang, InKoo; Arce, Gonzalo R; Lee, Heung-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    Color visual cryptography (VC) encrypts a color secret message into n color halftone image shares. Previous methods in the literature show good results for black and white or gray scale VC schemes, however, they are not sufficient to be applied directly to color shares due to different color structures. Some methods for color visual cryptography are not satisfactory in terms of producing either meaningless shares or meaningful shares with low visual quality, leading to suspicion of encryption. This paper introduces the concept of visual information pixel (VIP) synchronization and error diffusion to attain a color visual cryptography encryption method that produces meaningful color shares with high visual quality. VIP synchronization retains the positions of pixels carrying visual information of original images throughout the color channels and error diffusion generates shares pleasant to human eyes. Comparisons with previous approaches show the superior performance of the new method.

  9. Course 10: Basic Concepts in Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekert, A.; Hayden, P. M.; Inamori, H.

    Contents 1 Qubits, gates and networks 2 Quantum arithmetic and function evaluations 3 Algorithms and their complexity 4 From interferometers to computers 5 The first quantum algorithms 6 Quantum search 7 Optimal phase estimation 8 Periodicity and quantum factoring 9 Cryptography 10 Conditional quantum dynamics 11 Decoherence and recoherence 12 Concluding remarks

  10. Quantum Information, Computation and Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jonathan A.; Jaksch, Dieter

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Quantum Information: 1. Quantum bits and quantum gates; 2. An atom in a laser field; 3. Spins in magnetic fields; 4. Photon techniques; 5. Two qubits and beyond; 6. Measurement and entanglement; Part II. Quantum Computation: 7. Principles of quantum computing; 8. Elementary quantum algorithms; 9. More advanced quantum algorithms; 10. Trapped atoms and ions; 11. Nuclear magnetic resonance; 12. Large scale quantum computers; Part III. Quantum Communication: 13. Basics of information theory; 14. Quantum information; 15. Quantum communication; 16. Testing EPR; 17. Quantum cryptography; Appendixes; References; Index.

  11. Report on Pairing-based Cryptography.

    PubMed

    Moody, Dustin; Peralta, Rene; Perlner, Ray; Regenscheid, Andrew; Roginsky, Allen; Chen, Lily

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes study results on pairing-based cryptography. The main purpose of the study is to form NIST's position on standardizing and recommending pairing-based cryptography schemes currently published in research literature and standardized in other standard bodies. The report reviews the mathematical background of pairings. This includes topics such as pairing-friendly elliptic curves and how to compute various pairings. It includes a brief introduction to existing identity-based encryption (IBE) schemes and other cryptographic schemes using pairing technology. The report provides a complete study of the current status of standard activities on pairing-based cryptographic schemes. It explores different application scenarios for pairing-based cryptography schemes. As an important aspect of adopting pairing-based schemes, the report also considers the challenges inherent in validation testing of cryptographic algorithms and modules. Based on the study, the report suggests an approach for including pairing-based cryptography schemes in the NIST cryptographic toolkit. The report also outlines several questions that will require further study if this approach is followed.

  12. Number Theory and Public-Key Cryptography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefton, Phyllis

    1991-01-01

    Described are activities in the study of techniques used to conceal the meanings of messages and data. Some background information and two BASIC programs that illustrate the algorithms used in a new cryptographic system called "public-key cryptography" are included. (CW)

  13. Report on Pairing-based Cryptography

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Dustin; Peralta, Rene; Perlner, Ray; Regenscheid, Andrew; Roginsky, Allen; Chen, Lily

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes study results on pairing-based cryptography. The main purpose of the study is to form NIST’s position on standardizing and recommending pairing-based cryptography schemes currently published in research literature and standardized in other standard bodies. The report reviews the mathematical background of pairings. This includes topics such as pairing-friendly elliptic curves and how to compute various pairings. It includes a brief introduction to existing identity-based encryption (IBE) schemes and other cryptographic schemes using pairing technology. The report provides a complete study of the current status of standard activities on pairing-based cryptographic schemes. It explores different application scenarios for pairing-based cryptography schemes. As an important aspect of adopting pairing-based schemes, the report also considers the challenges inherent in validation testing of cryptographic algorithms and modules. Based on the study, the report suggests an approach for including pairing-based cryptography schemes in the NIST cryptographic toolkit. The report also outlines several questions that will require further study if this approach is followed. PMID:26958435

  14. Harry Potter and the Cryptography with Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chua, Boon Liang

    2006-01-01

    This article describes Cryptography, defined as the science of encrypting and deciphering messages written in secret codes, it has played a vital role in securing information since ancient times. There are several cryptographic techniques and many make extensive use of mathematics to secure information. The author discusses an activity built…

  15. Number Theory and Public-Key Cryptography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefton, Phyllis

    1991-01-01

    Described are activities in the study of techniques used to conceal the meanings of messages and data. Some background information and two BASIC programs that illustrate the algorithms used in a new cryptographic system called "public-key cryptography" are included. (CW)

  16. Asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiang; Wei, Hengzheng; Zhang, Peng

    2006-12-15

    A system of asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing (ACWS) is proposed for the first time to our knowledge. One of the most significant features of the asymmetric cryptography is that a trapdoor one-way function is required and constructed by analogy to wavefront sensing, in which the public key may be derived from optical parameters, such as the wavelength or the focal length, while the private key may be obtained from a kind of regular point array. The ciphertext is generated by the encoded wavefront and represented with an irregular array. In such an ACWS system, the encryption key is not identical to the decryption key, which is another important feature of an asymmetric cryptographic system. The processes of asymmetric encryption and decryption are formulized mathematically and demonstrated with a set of numerical experiments.

  17. Cryptography and the Internet: lessons and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    McCurley, K.S.

    1996-12-31

    The popularization of the Internet has brought fundamental changes to the world, because it allows a universal method of communication between computers. This carries enormous benefits with it, but also raises many security considerations. Cryptography is a fundamental technology used to provide security of computer networks, and there is currently a widespread engineering effort to incorporate cryptography into various aspects of the Internet. The system-level engineering required to provide security services for the Internet carries some important lessons for researchers whose study is focused on narrowly defined problems. It also offers challenges to the cryptographic research community by raising new questions not adequately addressed by the existing body of knowledge. This paper attempts to summarize some of these lessons and challenges for the cryptographic research community.

  18. Modular Integer Arithmetic for Public Key Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güneysu, Tim; Paar, Christof

    This chapter discusses building blocks for implementing popular public key cryptosystems, like RSA, Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange (DHKE) and Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC). Therefore, we briefly introduce field-based arithmetic on which most of recently established public key cryptosystems rely. As most popular fields, we give examples for architecture implementing efficient arithmetic operations over prime and binary extension fields for use in cryptographic applications.

  19. Logic Functions for Cryptography - A Tutorial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Logic Functions for Cryptography - A Tutorial Jon T. Butler Tsutomu Sasao Department of Electrical Department of Computer Science and Computer ... of Computer Programming, Vol- ume 4” [9]. Definition 2.1 A linear function is the constant 0 function or the Exclusive OR of one or more variables...S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School,Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering,Monterey,CA,93943 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  20. Increasing complexity with quantum physics.

    PubMed

    Anders, Janet; Wiesner, Karoline

    2011-09-01

    We argue that complex systems science and the rules of quantum physics are intricately related. We discuss a range of quantum phenomena, such as cryptography, computation and quantum phases, and the rules responsible for their complexity. We identify correlations as a central concept connecting quantum information and complex systems science. We present two examples for the power of correlations: using quantum resources to simulate the correlations of a stochastic process and to implement a classically impossible computational task.

  1. Device-independent two-party cryptography secure against sequential attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniewski, Jędrzej; Wehner, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    The goal of two-party cryptography is to enable two parties, Alice and Bob, to solve common tasks without the need for mutual trust. Examples of such tasks are private access to a database, and secure identification. Quantum communication enables security for all of these problems in the noisy-storage model by sending more signals than the adversary can store in a certain time frame. Here, we initiate the study of device-independent (DI) protocols for two-party cryptography in the noisy-storage model. Specifically, we present a relatively easy to implement protocol for a cryptographic building block known as weak string erasure and prove its security even if the devices used in the protocol are prepared by the dishonest party. DI two-party cryptography is made challenging by the fact that Alice and Bob do not trust each other, which requires new techniques to establish security. We fully analyse the case of memoryless devices (for which sequential attacks are optimal) and the case of sequential attacks for arbitrary devices. The key ingredient of the proof, which might be of independent interest, is an explicit (and tight) relation between the violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality observed by Alice and Bob and uncertainty generated by Alice against Bob who is forced to measure his system before finding out Alice’s setting (guessing with postmeasurement information). In particular, we show that security is possible for arbitrarily small violation.

  2. Nonequivalence of two flavors of oblivious transfer at the quantum level

    SciTech Connect

    He Guangping; Wang, Z. D.

    2006-04-15

    Though all-or-nothing oblivious transfer and one-out-of-two oblivious transfer are equivalent in classical cryptography, we here show that a protocol built upon secure quantum all-or-nothing oblivious transfer cannot satisfy the rigorous definition of quantum one-out-of-two oblivious transfer due to the nature of quantum cryptography. Thus the securities of the two oblivious transfer protocols are not equivalent at the quantum level.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Cryptography Library in IoT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Uday; Borgohain, Tuhin; Sanyal, Sugata

    2015-05-01

    The paper aims to do a survey along with a comparative analysis of the various cryptography libraries that are applicable in the field of Internet of Things (IoT). The first half of the paper briefly introduces the various cryptography libraries available in the field of cryptography along with a list of all the algorithms contained within the libraries. The second half of the paper deals with cryptography libraries specifically aimed for application in the field of Internet of Things. The various libraries and their performance analysis listed down in this paper are consolidated from various sources with the aim of providing a single comprehensive repository for reference to the various cryptography libraries and the comparative analysis of their features in IoT.

  4. Comment on "Cheating prevention in visual cryptography".

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chi; Horng, Gwoboa; Tsai, Du-Shiau

    2012-07-01

    Visual cryptography (VC), proposed by Naor and Shamir, has numerous applications, including visual authentication and identification, steganography, and image encryption. In 2006, Horng showed that cheating is possible in VC, where some participants can deceive the remaining participants by forged transparencies. Since then, designing cheating-prevention visual secret-sharing (CPVSS) schemes has been studied by many researchers. In this paper, we cryptanalyze the Hu-Tzeng CPVSS scheme and show that it is not cheating immune. We also outline an improvement that helps to overcome the problem.

  5. Gaussian quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedbrook, Christian; Pirandola, Stefano; García-Patrón, Raúl; Cerf, Nicolas J.; Ralph, Timothy C.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Lloyd, Seth

    2012-04-01

    The science of quantum information has arisen over the last two decades centered on the manipulation of individual quanta of information, known as quantum bits or qubits. Quantum computers, quantum cryptography, and quantum teleportation are among the most celebrated ideas that have emerged from this new field. It was realized later on that using continuous-variable quantum information carriers, instead of qubits, constitutes an extremely powerful alternative approach to quantum information processing. This review focuses on continuous-variable quantum information processes that rely on any combination of Gaussian states, Gaussian operations, and Gaussian measurements. Interestingly, such a restriction to the Gaussian realm comes with various benefits, since on the theoretical side, simple analytical tools are available and, on the experimental side, optical components effecting Gaussian processes are readily available in the laboratory. Yet, Gaussian quantum information processing opens the way to a wide variety of tasks and applications, including quantum communication, quantum cryptography, quantum computation, quantum teleportation, and quantum state and channel discrimination. This review reports on the state of the art in this field, ranging from the basic theoretical tools and landmark experimental realizations to the most recent successful developments.

  6. Quantum Information in Non-physics Departments at Liberal Arts Colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westmoreland, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Quantum information and quantum computing have changed our thinking about the basic concepts of quantum physics. These fields have also introduced exciting new applications of quantum mechanics such as quantum cryptography and non-interactive measurement. It is standard to teach such topics only to advanced physics majors who have completed coursework in quantum mechanics. Recent encounters with teaching quantum cryptography to non-majors and a bout of textbook-writing suggest strategies for teaching this interesting material to those without the standard quantum mechanics background. This talk will share some of those strategies.

  7. Quantum tasks in Minkowski space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Adrian

    2012-11-01

    The fundamental properties of quantum information and its applications to computing and cryptography have been greatly illuminated by considering information-theoretic tasks that are provably possible or impossible within non-relativistic quantum mechanics. I describe here a general framework for defining tasks within (special) relativistic quantum theory and illustrate it with examples from relativistic quantum cryptography and relativistic distributed quantum computation. The framework gives a unified description of all tasks previously considered and also defines a large class of new questions about the properties of quantum information in relation to Minkowski causality. It offers a way of exploring interesting new fundamental tasks and applications, and also highlights the scope for a more systematic understanding of the fundamental information-theoretic properties of relativistic quantum theory.

  8. Quantum tagging for tags containing secret classical data

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Adrian

    2011-08-15

    Various authors have considered schemes for quantum tagging, that is, authenticating the classical location of a classical tagging device by sending and receiving quantum signals from suitably located distant sites, in an environment controlled by an adversary whose quantum information processing and transmitting power is potentially unbounded. All of the schemes proposed elsewhere in the literature assume that the adversary is able to inspect the interior of the tagging device. All of these schemes have been shown to be breakable if the adversary has unbounded predistributed entanglement. We consider here the case in which the tagging device contains a finite key string shared with distant sites but kept secret from the adversary, and show this allows the location of the tagging device to be authenticated securely and indefinitely. Our protocol relies on quantum key distribution between the tagging device and at least one distant site, and demonstrates a new practical application of quantum key distribution. It also illustrates that the attainable security in position-based cryptography can depend crucially on apparently subtle details in the security scenario considered.

  9. Evaluation of correlation in optical encryption by using visual cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Sang-Yi; Ryu, Chung-Sang; Ryu, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Hyun

    2001-03-01

    Visual cryptography made it possible to decrypt the information encrypted by thresholding scheme not with digital system but with human vision system. This method, however, has some limit in it because of the rack of resolution in both the spatial and amplitude domain. Optical visual cryptography, which used laser system instead of human eyesight, was proposed by conjunction of the optical theory with the cryptography. However, it also had some difficulties because it did not overcome the existing problem of visual cryptography completely. The problems occurred in the process of transferring data processing system from visual to optics. Therefore, it is appropriate to approach these problems in terms of optics. The results show that the optical visual cryptograph system has both the effectiveness and reliability as well as real-time implementation property.

  10. Experimental quantum forgery of quantum optical money

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Černoch, Antonín; Chimczak, Grzegorz; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Nori, Franco

    2017-03-01

    Unknown quantum information cannot be perfectly copied (cloned). This statement is the bedrock of quantum technologies and quantum cryptography, including the seminal scheme of Wiesner's quantum money, which was the first quantum-cryptographic proposal. Surprisingly, to our knowledge, quantum money has not been tested experimentally yet. Here, we experimentally revisit the Wiesner idea, assuming a banknote to be an image encoded in the polarization states of single photons. We demonstrate that it is possible to use quantum states to prepare a banknote that cannot be ideally copied without making the owner aware of only unauthorized actions. We provide the security conditions for quantum money by investigating the physically-achievable limits on the fidelity of 1-to-2 copying of arbitrary sequences of qubits. These results can be applied as a security measure in quantum digital right management.

  11. Dynamic visual cryptography based on chaotic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrauskiene, Vilma; Palivonaite, Rita; Aleksa, Algiment; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic visual cryptography scheme based on chaotic oscillations is proposed in this paper. Special computational algorithms are required for hiding the secret image in the cover moiré grating, but the decryption of the secret is completely visual. The secret image is leaked in the form of time-averaged geometric moiré fringes when the cover image is oscillated by a chaotic law. The relationship among the standard deviation of the stochastic time variable, the pitch of the moiré grating and the pixel size ensuring visual decryption of the secret is derived. The parameters of these chaotic oscillations must be carefully preselected before the secret image is leaked from the cover image. Several computational experiments are used to illustrate the functionality and the applicability of the proposed image hiding technique.

  12. Securing information display by use of visual cryptography.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Hayasaki, Yoshio; Nishida, Nobuo

    2003-09-01

    We propose a secure display technique based on visual cryptography. The proposed technique ensures the security of visual information. The display employs a decoding mask based on visual cryptography. Without the decoding mask, the displayed information cannot be viewed. The viewing zone is limited by the decoding mask so that only one person can view the information. We have developed a set of encryption codes to maintain the designed viewing zone and have demonstrated a display that provides a limited viewing zone.

  13. Quantum walk public-key cryptographic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachou, C.; Rodrigues, J.; Mateus, P.; Paunković, N.; Souto, A.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum Cryptography is a rapidly developing field of research that benefits from the properties of Quantum Mechanics in performing cryptographic tasks. Quantum walks are a powerful model for quantum computation and very promising for quantum information processing. In this paper, we present a quantum public-key cryptographic system based on quantum walks. In particular, in the proposed protocol the public-key is given by a quantum state generated by performing a quantum walk. We show that the protocol is secure and analyze the complexity of public key generation and encryption/decryption procedures.

  14. Quantum authencryption: one-step authenticated quantum secure direct communications for off-line communicants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Luo, Yi-Ping; Yang, Chun-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Han

    2014-04-01

    This work proposes a new direction in quantum cryptography called quantum authencryption. Quantum authencryption (QA), a new term to distinguish from authenticated quantum secure direct communications, is used to describe the technique of combining quantum encryption and quantum authentication into one process for off-line communicants. QA provides a new way of quantum communications without the presence of a receiver on line, and thus makes many applications depending on secure one-way quantum communications, such as quantum E-mail systems, possible. An example protocol using single photons and one-way hash functions is presented to realize the requirements on QA.

  15. Optical scanning cryptography for secure wireless transmission.

    PubMed

    Poon, Ting-Chung; Kim, Taegeun; Doh, Kyu

    2003-11-10

    We propose a method for secure wireless transmission of encrypted information. By use of an encryption key, an image or document is optically encrypted by optical heterodyne scanning and hence encryption is performed on the fly. We call this technique optical scanning cryptography. The output of the heterodyne encrypted signal is at radio frequency and can be directly sent through an antenna to a secure site for digital storage to be prepared for decryption. In the secure site, an identical optical scanning system to that used for encryption is used, together with a decryption key, to generate an electrical signal. The electrical signal is then processed and sent to a computer to be used for decryption. Utilizing the stored information received from the encryption stage and the electrical information from the secure site, a digital decryption unit performs a decryption algorithm. If the encryption key and the decryption key are matched, the decryption unit will decrypt the image or document faithfully. The overall cryptosystem can perform the incoherent optical processing counterpart of the well-known coherent double-random phase-encoding technique. We present computer simulations of the idea.

  16. Optical scanning cryptography for secure wireless transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ting-Chung; Kim, Taegeun; Doh, Kyu

    2003-11-01

    We propose a method for secure wireless transmission of encrypted information. By use of an encryption key, an image or document is optically encrypted by optical heterodyne scanning and hence encryption is performed on the fly. We call this technique optical scanning cryptography. The output of the heterodyne encrypted signal is at radio frequency and can be directly sent through an antenna to a secure site for digital storage to be prepared for decryption. In the secure site, an identical optical scanning system to that used for encryption is used, together with a decryption key, to generate an electrical signal. The electrical signal is then processed and sent to a computer to be used for decryption. Utilizing the stored information received from the encryption stage and the electrical information from the secure site, a digital decryption unit performs a decryption algorithm. If the encryption key and the decryption key are matched, the decryption unit will decrypt the image or document faithfully. The overall cryptosystem can perform the incoherent optical processing counterpart of the well-known coherent double-random phase-encoding technique. We present computer simulations of the idea.

  17. Large-alphabet quantum key distribution with two-mode coherently correlated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenko, Vladyslav C.; Lev, Bohdan I.

    2005-12-01

    The large-alphabet quantum cryptography protocol based on the two-mode coherently correlated multi-photon beams is proposed. The alphabet extension for the protocol is shown to result in the increase of the QKD effectiveness and security.

  18. Towards secure quantum key distribution protocol for wireless LANs: a hybrid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, R. Lalu; Reddy, P. Chenna

    2015-12-01

    The primary goals of security such as authentication, confidentiality, integrity and non-repudiation in communication networks can be achieved with secure key distribution. Quantum mechanisms are highly secure means of distributing secret keys as they are unconditionally secure. Quantum key distribution protocols can effectively prevent various attacks in the quantum channel, while classical cryptography is efficient in authentication and verification of secret keys. By combining both quantum cryptography and classical cryptography, security of communications over networks can be leveraged. Hwang, Lee and Li exploited the merits of both cryptographic paradigms for provably secure communications to prevent replay, man-in-the-middle, and passive attacks. In this paper, we propose a new scheme with the combination of quantum cryptography and classical cryptography for 802.11i wireless LANs. Since quantum cryptography is premature in wireless networks, our work is a significant step forward toward securing communications in wireless networks. Our scheme is known as hybrid quantum key distribution protocol. Our analytical results revealed that the proposed scheme is provably secure for wireless networks.

  19. Secure communications with low-orbit spacecraft using quantum cryptography

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Richard J.; Buttler, William T.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Luther, Gabriel G.; Morgan, George L; Nordholt, Jane E.; Peterson, Charles G.; Simmons, Charles M.

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus and method for secure communication between an earth station and spacecraft. A laser outputs single pulses that are split into preceding bright pulses and delayed attenuated pulses, and polarized. A Pockels cell changes the polarization of the polarized delayed attenuated pulses according to a string of random numbers, a first polarization representing a "1," and a second polarization representing a "0." At the receiving station, a beamsplitter randomly directs the preceding bright pulses and the polarized delayed attenuated pulses onto longer and shorter paths, both terminating in a beamsplitter which directs the preceding bright pulses and a first portion of the polarized delayed attenuated pulses to a first detector, and a second portion of the polarized delayed attenuated pulses to a second detector to generate a key for secure communication between the earth station and the spacecraft.

  20. Quantum Image Encryption and Decryption Algorithms Based on Quantum Image Geometric Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ri-Gui; Wu, Qian; Zhang, Man-Qun; Shen, Chen-Yi

    2013-06-01

    Cryptography is the essential subject for network information security to protect important data. Although following the symmetric cryptosystem for which the participations in the communication keep exactly the same keys, the special for the encryption and decryption algorithms proposed in this paper lays in the operational objectives, the quantum image. Firstly, extracts the properties of gray-scale and position from the quantum gray-scale image which the storage expression of image in quantum states is achieved. Along with the geometric transformations in classical images, this article realizes the quantum image geometric transforms by means of designing quantum circuits. Eventually, through a combination of the proposals in previous, the encryption and decryption algorithms on quantum gray-scale images is finally accomplished, which could ensure the confidentiality and security of the information in delivery. The algorithms belong to the application of quantum image geometric transformations, for further, the new explorations for quantum image cryptography researches.

  1. Efficient Quantum Pseudorandomness.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Harrow, Aram W; Horodecki, Michał

    2016-04-29

    Randomness is both a useful way to model natural systems and a useful tool for engineered systems, e.g., in computation, communication, and control. Fully random transformations require exponential time for either classical or quantum systems, but in many cases pseudorandom operations can emulate certain properties of truly random ones. Indeed, in the classical realm there is by now a well-developed theory regarding such pseudorandom operations. However, the construction of such objects turns out to be much harder in the quantum case. Here, we show that random quantum unitary time evolutions ("circuits") are a powerful source of quantum pseudorandomness. This gives for the first time a polynomial-time construction of quantum unitary designs, which can replace fully random operations in most applications, and shows that generic quantum dynamics cannot be distinguished from truly random processes. We discuss applications of our result to quantum information science, cryptography, and understanding the self-equilibration of closed quantum dynamics.

  2. Efficient Quantum Pseudorandomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Harrow, Aram W.; Horodecki, Michał

    2016-04-01

    Randomness is both a useful way to model natural systems and a useful tool for engineered systems, e.g., in computation, communication, and control. Fully random transformations require exponential time for either classical or quantum systems, but in many cases pseudorandom operations can emulate certain properties of truly random ones. Indeed, in the classical realm there is by now a well-developed theory regarding such pseudorandom operations. However, the construction of such objects turns out to be much harder in the quantum case. Here, we show that random quantum unitary time evolutions ("circuits") are a powerful source of quantum pseudorandomness. This gives for the first time a polynomial-time construction of quantum unitary designs, which can replace fully random operations in most applications, and shows that generic quantum dynamics cannot be distinguished from truly random processes. We discuss applications of our result to quantum information science, cryptography, and understanding the self-equilibration of closed quantum dynamics.

  3. Quantum relays and noise suppression using linear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, B.C.; Pittman, T.B.; Franson, J.D.

    2002-11-01

    Probabilistic quantum nondemolition (QND) measurements can be performed using linear optics and postselection. Here we show how QND devices of this kind can be used in a straightforward way to implement a quantum relay, which is capable of extending the range of a quantum cryptography system by suppressing the effects of detector noise. Unlike a quantum repeater, a quantum relay system does not require entanglement purification or the ability to store photons.

  4. Enhancing Undergraduate Mathematics Curriculum via Coding Theory and Cryptography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Nuh

    2009-01-01

    The theory of error-correcting codes and cryptography are two relatively recent applications of mathematics to information and communication systems. The mathematical tools used in these fields generally come from algebra, elementary number theory, and combinatorics, including concepts from computational complexity. It is possible to introduce the…

  5. Steganography and Cryptography Inspired Enhancement of Introductory Programming Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kortsarts, Yana; Kempner, Yulia

    2015-01-01

    Steganography is the art and science of concealing communication. The goal of steganography is to hide the very existence of information exchange by embedding messages into unsuspicious digital media covers. Cryptography, or secret writing, is the study of the methods of encryption, decryption and their use in communications protocols.…

  6. Securing resource constraints embedded devices using elliptic curve cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Tony; Alfasi, Mohamed; Mozumdar, Mohammad

    2014-06-01

    The use of smart embedded device has been growing rapidly in recent time because of miniaturization of sensors and platforms. Securing data from these embedded devices is now become one of the core challenges both in industry and research community. Being embedded, these devices have tight constraints on resources such as power, computation, memory, etc. Hence it is very difficult to implement traditional Public Key Cryptography (PKC) into these resource constrained embedded devices. Moreover, most of the public key security protocols requires both public and private key to be generated together. In contrast with this, Identity Based Encryption (IBE), a public key cryptography protocol, allows a public key to be generated from an arbitrary string and the corresponding private key to be generated later on demand. While IBE has been actively studied and widely applied in cryptography research, conventional IBE primitives are also computationally demanding and cannot be efficiently implemented on embedded system. Simplified version of the identity based encryption has proven its competence in being robust and also satisfies tight budget of the embedded platform. In this paper, we describe the choice of several parameters for implementing lightweight IBE in resource constrained embedded sensor nodes. Our implementation of IBE is built using elliptic curve cryptography (ECC).

  7. Enhancing Undergraduate Mathematics Curriculum via Coding Theory and Cryptography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Nuh

    2009-01-01

    The theory of error-correcting codes and cryptography are two relatively recent applications of mathematics to information and communication systems. The mathematical tools used in these fields generally come from algebra, elementary number theory, and combinatorics, including concepts from computational complexity. It is possible to introduce the…

  8. Quantum random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Collantes, Miguel; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Random numbers are a fundamental resource in science and engineering with important applications in simulation and cryptography. The inherent randomness at the core of quantum mechanics makes quantum systems a perfect source of entropy. Quantum random number generation is one of the most mature quantum technologies with many alternative generation methods. This review discusses the different technologies in quantum random number generation from the early devices based on radioactive decay to the multiple ways to use the quantum states of light to gather entropy from a quantum origin. Randomness extraction and amplification and the notable possibility of generating trusted random numbers even with untrusted hardware using device-independent generation protocols are also discussed.

  9. Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbaz, Edgard

    This book gives a new insight into the interpretation of quantum mechanics (stochastic, integral paths, decoherence), a completely new treatment of angular momentum (graphical spin algebra) and an introduction to Fermion fields (Dirac equation) and Boson fields (e.m. and Higgs) as well as an introduction to QED (quantum electrodynamics), supersymmetry and quantum cosmology.

  10. Experimental quantum multiparty communication protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smania, Massimiliano; Elhassan, Ashraf M.; Tavakoli, Armin; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Quantum information science breaks limitations of conventional information transfer, cryptography and computation by using quantum superpositions or entanglement as resources for information processing. Here we report on the experimental realisation of three-party quantum communication protocols using single three-level quantum system (qutrit) communication: secret-sharing, detectable Byzantine agreement and communication complexity reduction for a three-valued function. We have implemented these three schemes using the same optical fibre interferometric setup. Our realisation is easily scalable without compromising on detection efficiency or generating extremely complex many-particle entangled states.

  11. Quantum Entanglement and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Anton

    2002-04-01

    The development of quantum entanglement presents a very interesting and typical case how fundamental reasearch leads to new technologically interesting concepts. Initially it was introduced by Einstein and Schroedinger because of its philosophical interest. This, together with Bell's theorem, led to experiments beginning in the early 1970-s which also were only motivated by their importance for the foundations of physics. Most remarkably, in recent years people discovered that quantum entanglement can be useful in completely novel ways of transmitting and processing of information with no analog in classical physics. Here the most developed areas are quantum communication, quantum cryptography, quantum teleportation and quantum computation. In the talk I will present the basics of these applications of entanglement and I will discuss some existing experimental realisations. Finally I will argue that, while it is impossible to foresee where the present development will lead us, it is very likely that in the end a novel kind of information technology will emerge.

  12. Trojan horse attacks on counterfactual quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiuqing; Wei, Kejin; Ma, Haiqiang; Sun, Shihai; Du, Yungang; Wu, Lingan

    2016-04-01

    There has been much interest in ;counterfactual quantum cryptography; (T.-G. Noh, 2009 [10]). It seems that the counterfactual quantum key distribution protocol without any photon carrier through the quantum channel provides practical security advantages. However, we show that it is easy to break counterfactual quantum key distribution systems in practical situations. We introduce the two types of Trojan horse attacks that are available for the two-way protocol and become possible for practical counterfactual systems with our eavesdropping schemes.

  13. QUANTUM MECHANICS: Enhanced: Schrodinger's Cat Is Out of the Hat.

    PubMed

    Tesche, C

    2000-10-27

    In 1935, Erwin Schrödinger suggested his famous gedanken experiment of the cat that is simultaneously "dead" and "alive" inside its box until the box is opened. But as Tesche explains in her Perspective, such a macroscopic manifestation of quantum mechanics has remained elusive until recently. The experiments by van der Wal et al. are an important step toward demonstrating that quantum mechanics can describe macroscopic phenomena. The approach may be exploited in quantum computing and quantum cryptography.

  14. Electronic Voting Protocol Using Identity-Based Cryptography.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Garcia, Gina; Tapia-Recillas, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    Electronic voting protocols proposed to date meet their properties based on Public Key Cryptography (PKC), which offers high flexibility through key agreement protocols and authentication mechanisms. However, when PKC is used, it is necessary to implement Certification Authority (CA) to provide certificates which bind public keys to entities and enable verification of such public key bindings. Consequently, the components of the protocol increase notably. An alternative is to use Identity-Based Encryption (IBE). With this kind of cryptography, it is possible to have all the benefits offered by PKC, without neither the need of certificates nor all the core components of a Public Key Infrastructure (PKI). Considering the aforementioned, in this paper we propose an electronic voting protocol, which meets the privacy and robustness properties by using bilinear maps.

  15. Electronic Voting Protocol Using Identity-Based Cryptography

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos-Garcia, Gina; Tapia-Recillas, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    Electronic voting protocols proposed to date meet their properties based on Public Key Cryptography (PKC), which offers high flexibility through key agreement protocols and authentication mechanisms. However, when PKC is used, it is necessary to implement Certification Authority (CA) to provide certificates which bind public keys to entities and enable verification of such public key bindings. Consequently, the components of the protocol increase notably. An alternative is to use Identity-Based Encryption (IBE). With this kind of cryptography, it is possible to have all the benefits offered by PKC, without neither the need of certificates nor all the core components of a Public Key Infrastructure (PKI). Considering the aforementioned, in this paper we propose an electronic voting protocol, which meets the privacy and robustness properties by using bilinear maps. PMID:26090515

  16. Elliptic Curve Cryptography on Smart Cards Without Coprocessors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-20

    ELLIPTIC CURVE CRYPTOGRAPHY ON SMART CARDS WITHOUT COPROCESSORS Adam D. Woodbury Electrical and Computer Engineering Department adw@ece.wpi.edu...christof@ece.wpi.edu Worcester Polytechnic Institute Worcester, MA 01609 USA The Fourth Smart Card Research and Advanced Applications (CARDIS 2000...cost microprocessors with reasonable performance. We focus in this paper on the Intel 8051 family of microcontrollers popular in smart cards and other

  17. SHAMROCK: A Synthesizable High Assurance Cryptography and Key Management Coprocessor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    designers to readily and correctly incorporate cryptography and key management into embedded systems . SHAMROCK has been incorporated in multiple...lessened the burden on a system designer in meeting policy 2 as effective key management is easier to achieve and use in order to adequately protect...SHAMROCK operation. SHAMROCK has an internal bootloader embedded into the FPGA bitstream, which is protected with the FPGA’s built-in security

  18. Evolutionary Algorithms for Boolean Functions in Diverse Domains of Cryptography.

    PubMed

    Picek, Stjepan; Carlet, Claude; Guilley, Sylvain; Miller, Julian F; Jakobovic, Domagoj

    2016-01-01

    The role of Boolean functions is prominent in several areas including cryptography, sequences, and coding theory. Therefore, various methods for the construction of Boolean functions with desired properties are of direct interest. New motivations on the role of Boolean functions in cryptography with attendant new properties have emerged over the years. There are still many combinations of design criteria left unexplored and in this matter evolutionary computation can play a distinct role. This article concentrates on two scenarios for the use of Boolean functions in cryptography. The first uses Boolean functions as the source of the nonlinearity in filter and combiner generators. Although relatively well explored using evolutionary algorithms, it still presents an interesting goal in terms of the practical sizes of Boolean functions. The second scenario appeared rather recently where the objective is to find Boolean functions that have various orders of the correlation immunity and minimal Hamming weight. In both these scenarios we see that evolutionary algorithms are able to find high-quality solutions where genetic programming performs the best.

  19. Counterfactual quantum certificate authorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy H., Akshata; Srikanth, R.; Srinivas, T.

    2014-05-01

    We present a multipartite protocol in a counterfactual paradigm. In counterfactual quantum cryptography, secure information is transmitted between two spatially separated parties even when there is no physical travel of particles transferring the information between them. We propose here a tripartite counterfactual quantum protocol for the task of certificate authorization. Here a trusted third party, Alice, authenticates an entity Bob (e.g., a bank) that a client Charlie wishes to securely transact with. The protocol is counterfactual with respect to either Bob or Charlie. We prove its security against a general incoherent attack, where Eve attacks single particles.

  20. Quantum random number generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Zhen; Qi, Bing

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  1. Quantum random number generation

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; ...

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a highmore » speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.« less

  2. Practical quantum retrieval games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrazola, Juan Miguel; Karasamanis, Markos; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2016-06-01

    Complex cryptographic protocols are often constructed from simpler building blocks. In order to advance quantum cryptography, it is important to study practical building blocks that can be used to develop new protocols. An example is quantum retrieval games (QRGs), which have broad applicability and have already been used to construct quantum money schemes. In this work, we introduce a general construction of quantum retrieval games based on the hidden matching problem and show how they can be implemented in practice using available technology. More precisely, we provide a general method to construct (1-out-of-k ) QRGs, proving that their cheating probabilities decrease exponentially in k . In particular, we define QRGs based on coherent states of light, which can be implemented even in the presence of experimental imperfections. Our results constitute a tool in the arsenal of the practical quantum cryptographer.

  3. Quantum Public-Key Cryptosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Yun, Deng; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2012-03-01

    Quantum one-way functions play a fundamental role in cryptography because of its necessity for the secure encryption schemes taking into account the quantum computer. In this paper our purpose is to establish a theoretical framework for a candidate of the quantum one-way functions and quantum trapdoor functions based on one-parameter unitary groups. The dynamics of parameterized unitary groups ensure the one-wayness and quantum undistinguishability in different levels, and the physical feasibility are derived from the simultaneous approximation of its infinitesimal generators. Moreover, these special functions are used to construct new cryptosystems-the quantum public-key cryptosystems for encrypting both the classical and quantum information.

  4. Fully Distrustful Quantum Bit Commitment and Coin Flipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silman, J.; Chailloux, A.; Aharon, N.; Kerenidis, I.; Pironio, S.; Massar, S.

    2011-06-01

    In the distrustful quantum cryptography model the parties have conflicting interests and do not trust one another. Nevertheless, they trust the quantum devices in their labs. The aim of the device-independent approach to cryptography is to do away with the latter assumption, and, consequently, significantly increase security. It is an open question whether the scope of this approach also extends to protocols in the distrustful cryptography model, thereby rendering them “fully” distrustful. In this Letter, we show that for bit commitment—one of the most basic primitives within the model—the answer is positive. We present a device-independent (imperfect) bit-commitment protocol, where Alice’s and Bob’s cheating probabilities are ≃0.854 and (3)/(4), which we then use to construct a device-independent coin flipping protocol with bias ≲0.336.

  5. An application of different dioids in public key cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Durcheva, Mariana I.

    2014-11-18

    Dioids provide a natural framework for analyzing a broad class of discrete event dynamical systems such as the design and analysis of bus and railway timetables, scheduling of high-throughput industrial processes, solution of combinatorial optimization problems, the analysis and improvement of flow systems in communication networks. They have appeared in several branches of mathematics such as functional analysis, optimization, stochastic systems and dynamic programming, tropical geometry, fuzzy logic. In this paper we show how to involve dioids in public key cryptography. The main goal is to create key – exchange protocols based on dioids. Additionally the digital signature scheme is presented.

  6. Novel optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Aimin; Sun, Jianfeng; Hu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingtao; Liu, Liren

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new method called modified optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging technique for encryption and decryption of remote objects. An image or object can be optically encrypted on the fly by Fresnel telescope scanning system together with an encryption key. For image decryption, the encrypted signals are received and processed with an optical coherent heterodyne detection system. The proposed method has strong performance through use of secure Fresnel telescope scanning with orthogonal polarized beams and efficient all-optical information processing. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experimental results.

  7. Dynamic visual cryptography for optical assessment of chaotic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrauskiene, Vilma; Survila, Arvydas; Fedaravicius, Algimantas; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2014-04-01

    An optical experimental technique based on dynamic visual cryptography is proposed for the optical assessment of chaotic oscillations. The secret image is embedded into a single cover image which is fixed onto the surface of the oscillating structure. It is demonstrated that this visual scheme is applicable for the assessment of chaotic oscillations even though time-averaged moiré fringes do not form when the encoded cover image is oscillated by the chaotic law. The decoding process is completely visual - a simple visual inspection can be used to determine if the parameters of the chaotic oscillations are kept in the tolerated range.

  8. Quantum state targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, Terry; Spekkens, Robert W.

    2004-11-01

    We introduce a primitive for quantum cryptography that we term 'state targeting'. We show that increasing one's probability of success in this task above a minimum amount implies an unavoidable increase in the probability of a particular kind of failure. This is analogous to the unavoidable disturbance to a quantum state that results from gaining information about its identity, and can be shown to be a purely quantum effect. We solve various optimization problems for state targeting that are useful for the security analysis of two-party cryptographic tasks implemented between remote antagonistic parties. Although we focus on weak coin flipping, the results are significant for other two-party protocols, such as strong coin flipping, partially binding and concealing bit commitment, and bit escrow. Furthermore, the results have significance not only for the traditional notion of security in cryptography, that of restricting a cheater's ability to bias the outcome of the protocol, but also for a different notion of security that arises only in the quantum context, that of cheat sensitivity. Finally, our analysis leads to some interesting secondary results, namely, a generalization of Uhlmann's theorem and an operational interpretation of the fidelity between two mixed states.

  9. Quantum state targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Terry; Spekkens, Robert W.

    2004-11-01

    We introduce a primitive for quantum cryptography that we term “state targeting.” We show that increasing one’s probability of success in this task above a minimum amount implies an unavoidable increase in the probability of a particular kind of failure. This is analogous to the unavoidable disturbance to a quantum state that results from gaining information about its identity, and can be shown to be a purely quantum effect. We solve various optimization problems for state targeting that are useful for the security analysis of two-party cryptographic tasks implemented between remote antagonistic parties. Although we focus on weak coin flipping, the results are significant for other two-party protocols, such as strong coin flipping, partially binding and concealing bit commitment, and bit escrow. Furthermore, the results have significance not only for the traditional notion of security in cryptography, that of restricting a cheater’s ability to bias the outcome of the protocol, but also for a different notion of security that arises only in the quantum context, that of cheat sensitivity. Finally, our analysis leads to some interesting secondary results, namely, a generalization of Uhlmann’s theorem and an operational interpretation of the fidelity between two mixed states.

  10. Remapping the quantum frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, Christopher; Lukin, Mikhail

    2008-08-01

    In 1994 the mathematician Peter Shor, then working at AT&T Bell Laboratories in the US, applied quantum mechanics to an age-old problem in number theory and made a remarkable discovery. He showed that a computer that operates on and processes quantum systems could factor large integers exponentially faster than a conventional computer. This result attracted a lot of attention because the difficulty of factoring large numbers is what ensures the security of modern cryptography schemes - even the best conventional computer would take several thousand years to factor a number with more than about 150 digits. Shor's quantum factoring algorithm could, in principle, break such encryption standards - a possibility that led to an explosion of interest in quantum information science. Until then it was a field that had largely been a mere curiosity, despite notable contributions from the likes of Richard Feynman and David Deutsch.

  11. Quantum random number generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Qi, Bing; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which have important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness—coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. On the basis of the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modelling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, in which verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category that provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  12. Quantum circuits for cryptanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amento, Brittanney Jaclyn

    Finite fields of the form F2 m play an important role in coding theory and cryptography. We show that the choice of how to represent the elements of these fields can have a significant impact on the resource requirements for quantum arithmetic. In particular, we show how the Gaussian normal basis representations and "ghost-bit basis" representations can be used to implement inverters with a quantum circuit of depth O(mlog(m)). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first construction with subquadratic depth reported in the literature. Our quantum circuit for the computation of multiplicative inverses is based on the Itoh-Tsujii algorithm which exploits the property that, in a normal basis representation, squaring corresponds to a permutation of the coefficients. We give resource estimates for the resulting quantum circuit for inversion over binary fields F2 m based on an elementary gate set that is useful for fault-tolerant implementation. Elliptic curves over finite fields F2 m play a prominent role in modern cryptography. Published quantum algorithms dealing with such curves build on a short Weierstrass form in combination with affine or projective coordinates. In this thesis we show that changing the curve representation allows a substantial reduction in the number of T-gates needed to implement the curve arithmetic. As a tool, we present a quantum circuit for computing multiplicative inverses in F2m in depth O(m log m) using a polynomial basis representation, which may be of independent interest. Finally, we change our focus from the design of circuits which aim at attacking computational assumptions on asymmetric cryptographic algorithms to the design of a circuit attacking a symmetric cryptographic algorithm. We consider a block cipher, SERPENT, and our design of a quantum circuit implementing this cipher to be used for a key attack using Grover's algorithm as in [18]. This quantum circuit is essential for understanding the complexity of Grover's algorithm.

  13. Embracing the quantum limit in silicon computing.

    PubMed

    Morton, John J L; McCamey, Dane R; Eriksson, Mark A; Lyon, Stephen A

    2011-11-16

    Quantum computers hold the promise of massive performance enhancements across a range of applications, from cryptography and databases to revolutionary scientific simulation tools. Such computers would make use of the same quantum mechanical phenomena that pose limitations on the continued shrinking of conventional information processing devices. Many of the key requirements for quantum computing differ markedly from those of conventional computers. However, silicon, which plays a central part in conventional information processing, has many properties that make it a superb platform around which to build a quantum computer.

  14. Fourier-based automatic alignment for improved Visual Cryptography schemes.

    PubMed

    Machizaud, Jacques; Chavel, Pierre; Fournel, Thierry

    2011-11-07

    In Visual Cryptography, several images, called "shadow images", that separately contain no information, are overlapped to reveal a shared secret message. We develop a method to digitally register one printed shadow image acquired by a camera with a purely digital shadow image, stored in memory. Using Fourier techniques derived from Fourier Optics concepts, the idea is to enhance and exploit the quasi periodicity of the shadow images, composed by a random distribution of black and white patterns on a periodic sampling grid. The advantage is to speed up the security control or the access time to the message, in particular in the cases of a small pixel size or of large numbers of pixels. Furthermore, the interest of visual cryptography can be increased by embedding the initial message in two shadow images that do not have identical mathematical supports, making manual registration impractical. Experimental results demonstrate the successful operation of the method, including the possibility to directly project the result onto the printed shadow image.

  15. Towards a high-speed quantum random number generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Damien; Burri, Samuel; Charbon, Edoardo; Chunnilall, Christopher; Meneghetti, Alessio; Regazzoni, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Randomness is of fundamental importance in various fields, such as cryptography, numerical simulations, or the gaming industry. Quantum physics, which is fundamentally probabilistic, is the best option for a physical random number generator. In this article, we will present the work carried out in various projects in the context of the development of a commercial and certified high speed random number generator.

  16. Cryptanalysis and security enhancement of optical cryptography based on computational ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Sheng; Yao, Jianbin; Liu, Xuemei; Zhou, Xin; Li, Zhongyang

    2016-04-01

    Optical cryptography based on computational ghost imaging (CGI) has attracted much attention of researchers because it encrypts plaintext into a random intensity vector rather than complexed-valued function. This promising feature of the CGI-based cryptography reduces the amount of data to be transmitted and stored and therefore brings convenience in practice. However, we find that this cryptography is vulnerable to chosen-plaintext attack because of the linear relationship between the input and output of the encryption system, and three feasible strategies are proposed to break it in this paper. Even though a large number of plaintexts need to be chosen in these attack methods, it means that this cryptography still exists security risks. To avoid these attacks, a security enhancement method utilizing an invertible matrix modulation is further discussed and the feasibility is verified by numerical simulations.

  17. Image communication scheme based on dynamic visual cryptography and computer generated holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palevicius, Paulius; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2015-01-01

    Computer generated holograms are often exploited to implement optical encryption schemes. This paper proposes the integration of dynamic visual cryptography (an optical technique based on the interplay of visual cryptography and time-averaging geometric moiré) with Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. A stochastic moiré grating is used to embed the secret into a single cover image. The secret can be visually decoded by a naked eye if only the amplitude of harmonic oscillations corresponds to an accurately preselected value. The proposed visual image encryption scheme is based on computer generated holography, optical time-averaging moiré and principles of dynamic visual cryptography. Dynamic visual cryptography is used both for the initial encryption of the secret image and for the final decryption. Phase data of the encrypted image are computed by using Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. The optical image is decrypted using the computationally reconstructed field of amplitudes.

  18. Private quantum computation: an introduction to blind quantum computing and related protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2017-06-01

    Quantum technologies hold the promise of not only faster algorithmic processing of data, via quantum computation, but also of more secure communications, in the form of quantum cryptography. In recent years, a number of protocols have emerged which seek to marry these concepts for the purpose of securing computation rather than communication. These protocols address the task of securely delegating quantum computation to an untrusted device while maintaining the privacy, and in some instances the integrity, of the computation. We present a review of the progress to date in this emerging area.

  19. Quantum Oblivious Transfer Based on a Quantum Symmetrically Private Information Retrieval Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Sun, Si-Jia; Wang, Yan

    2015-03-01

    Private information retrieval implies oblivious transfer in classical cryptography. Following this clue, we present a novel quantum one-out-of-two OT protocol based on a practical quantum symmetrically private information retrieval protocol Jakobi et al. (Phys. Rev. A 83, 022301 2011), with changes only in the classical postprocessing of the key. While unconditionally secure oblivious transfer is known to be impossible, we argue that an interesting degree of security can be achieved by means of quantum physical principles instead of unproven security assumptions in order to protect both the sender and the receiver. The proposed OT protocol is loss tolerant, practical and robust against quantum memory attack.

  20. Step to improve neural cryptography against flipping attacks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiantao; Xu, Qinzhen; Pei, Wenjiang; He, Zhenya; Szu, Harold

    2004-12-01

    Synchronization of neural networks by mutual learning has been demonstrated to be possible for constructing key exchange protocol over public channel. However, the neural cryptography schemes presented so far are not the securest under regular flipping attack (RFA) and are completely insecure under majority flipping attack (MFA). We propose a scheme by splitting the mutual information and the training process to improve the security of neural cryptosystem against flipping attacks. Both analytical and simulation results show that the success probability of RFA on the proposed scheme can be decreased to the level of brute force attack (BFA) and the success probability of MFA still decays exponentially with the weights' level L. The synchronization time of the parties also remains polynomial with L. Moreover, we analyze the security under an advanced flipping attack.

  1. Dynamic visual cryptography on deformable finite element grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksiene, S.; Vaidelys, M.; Aleksa, A.; Ragulskis, M.

    2017-07-01

    Dynamic visual cryptography scheme based on time averaged moiré fringes on deformable finite element grids is introduced in this paper. A predefined Eigenshape function is used for the selection of the pitch of the moiré grating. The relationship between the pitch of moiré grating, the roots of the zero order Bessel function of the first kind and the amplitude of harmonic oscillations is derived and validated by computational experiments. Phase regularization algorithm is used in the entire area of the cover image in order to embed the secret image and to avoid large fluctuations of the moiré grating. Computational simulations are used to demonstrate the efficiency and the applicability of the proposed image hiding technique.

  2. Plasmonics for emerging quantum technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2017-01-01

    Expanding the frontiers of information processing technologies and, in particular, computing with ever-increasing speed and capacity has long been recognized as an important societal challenge, calling for the development of the next generation of quantum technologies. With its potential to exponentially increase computing power, quantum computing opens up possibilities to carry out calculations that ordinary computers could not finish in the lifetime of the universe, whereas optical communications based on quantum cryptography become completely secure. At the same time, the emergence of Big Data and the ever-increasing demands of miniaturization and energy-saving technologies bring about additional fundamental problems and technological challenges to be addressed in scientific disciplines dealing with light-matter interactions. In this context, quantum plasmonics represents one of the most promising and fundamental research directions and, indeed, the only one that enables the ultimate miniaturization of photonic components for quantum optics when being taken to extreme limits in light-matter interactions.

  3. Implementing Diffie-Hellman key exchange using quantum EPR pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sayonnha; Parakh, Abhishek

    2015-05-01

    This paper implements the concepts of perfect forward secrecy and the Diffie-Hellman key exchange using EPR pairs to establish and share a secret key between two non-authenticated parties and transfer messages between them without the risk of compromise. Current implementations of quantum cryptography are based on the BB84 protocol, which is susceptible to siphoning attacks on the multiple photons emitted by practical laser sources. This makes BB84-based quantum cryptography protocol unsuitable for network computing environments. Diffie-Hellman does not require the two parties to be mutually authenticated to each other, yet it can provide a basis for a number of authenticated protocols, most notably the concept of perfect forward secrecy. The work proposed in this paper provides a new direction in utilizing quantum EPR pairs in quantum key exchange. Although, classical cryptography boasts of efficient and robust protocols like the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, in the current times, with the advent of quantum computing they are very much vulnerable to eavesdropping and cryptanalytic attacks. Using quantum cryptographic principles, however, these classical encryption algorithms show more promise and a more robust and secure structure for applications. The unique properties of quantum EPR pairs also, on the other hand, go a long way in removing attacks like eavesdropping by their inherent nature of one particle of the pair losing its state if a measurement occurs on the other. The concept of perfect forward secrecy is revisited in this paper to attribute tighter security to the proposed protocol.

  4. Cryptanalysis and improvement of a quantum private set intersection protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaogang; Guo, Ren; Chen, Yonghong

    2017-02-01

    A recent Quantum Private Set Intersection (QPSI) scheme is crypt-analyzed. The original claimed communication overhead is shown to be not accurate. And the original security definition is passive and not fair. To ensure fairness, a passive third party is introduced. It is also shown that unconditional fairness of QPSI protocol is impossible. Since otherwise, it would violate a well-known impossible quantum cryptography result.

  5. Quantum Information with Structured Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhosseini, Mohammad

    Quantum information science promises dramatic progress in a variety of fields such as cryptography, computation, and metrology. Although the proof-of-principle attempts for implementing quantum protocols have often relied on only a few qubits, the utilization of more sophisticated quantum systems is required for practical applications. In this thesis, we investigate the emerging role of high-dimensional optical states as a resource for encoding quantum information. We begin the first chapter with a review of orbital angular momentum (OAM) as a prime candidate for realizing multilevel quantum states and follow with a brief introduction to the quantum measurement theory. The second and the third chapters are dedicated to the application of OAM modes in quantum cryptography. In the second chapter, we discuss the challenges of projective measurement of OAM at the single-photon level, a crucial task required for quantum information processing. We then present our development of an efficient and accurate mode-sorting device that is capable of projectively measuring the orbital angular momentum of single photons. In the third chapter, we discuss the role of OAM modes in increasing the information capacity of quantum cryptography. We start this chapter by establishing the merits of encoding information on the quantum index of OAM modes in a free-space link. We then generalizing the BB-84 QKD protocol to the Hilbert space spanned by a finite number of OAM modes and outline our experimental realization. The last two chapters are dedicated to the tomography of structured light fields. We start the fourth chapter by applying the recently found method of direct measurement to the characterization of OAM superpositions. We find the quantum state in the Hilbert space spanned by 27 OAM modes by performing a weak measurement of orbital angular momentum (OAM) followed by a strong measurement of azimuthal angle. We then introduce the concept of compressive direct measurement (CDM

  6. Prospects for quantum computation with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; James, D.F.V.

    1997-12-31

    Over the past decade information theory has been generalized to allow binary data to be represented by two-state quantum mechanical systems. (A single two-level system has come to be known as a qubit in this context.) The additional freedom introduced into information physics with quantum systems has opened up a variety of capabilities that go well beyond those of conventional information. For example, quantum cryptography allows two parties to generate a secret key even in the presence of eavesdropping. But perhaps the most remarkable capabilities have been predicted in the field of quantum computation. Here, a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, and an overview of the in trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos are presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are discussed.

  7. Authentication Protocol using Quantum Superposition States

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Yoshito; Yoo, Seong-Moo; Gregory, Don A.; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2009-01-01

    When it became known that quantum computers could break the RSA (named for its creators - Rivest, Shamir, and Adleman) encryption algorithm within a polynomial-time, quantum cryptography began to be actively studied. Other classical cryptographic algorithms are only secure when malicious users do not have sufficient computational power to break security within a practical amount of time. Recently, many quantum authentication protocols sharing quantum entangled particles between communicators have been proposed, providing unconditional security. An issue caused by sharing quantum entangled particles is that it may not be simple to apply these protocols to authenticate a specific user in a group of many users. An authentication protocol using quantum superposition states instead of quantum entangled particles is proposed. The random number shared between a sender and a receiver can be used for classical encryption after the authentication has succeeded. The proposed protocol can be implemented with the current technologies we introduce in this paper.

  8. Optimal architectures for long distance quantum communication

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Sreraman; Li, Linshu; Kim, Jungsang; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous progress of quantum cryptography, efficient quantum communication over long distances (≥1000 km) remains an outstanding challenge due to fiber attenuation and operation errors accumulated over the entire communication distance. Quantum repeaters (QRs), as a promising approach, can overcome both photon loss and operation errors, and hence significantly speedup the communication rate. Depending on the methods used to correct loss and operation errors, all the proposed QR schemes can be classified into three categories (generations). Here we present the first systematic comparison of three generations of quantum repeaters by evaluating the cost of both temporal and physical resources, and identify the optimized quantum repeater architecture for a given set of experimental parameters for use in quantum key distribution. Our work provides a roadmap for the experimental realizations of highly efficient quantum networks over transcontinental distances. PMID:26876670

  9. Optimal architectures for long distance quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Sreraman; Li, Linshu; Kim, Jungsang; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lukin, Mikhail D; Jiang, Liang

    2016-02-15

    Despite the tremendous progress of quantum cryptography, efficient quantum communication over long distances (≥ 1000 km) remains an outstanding challenge due to fiber attenuation and operation errors accumulated over the entire communication distance. Quantum repeaters (QRs), as a promising approach, can overcome both photon loss and operation errors, and hence significantly speedup the communication rate. Depending on the methods used to correct loss and operation errors, all the proposed QR schemes can be classified into three categories (generations). Here we present the first systematic comparison of three generations of quantum repeaters by evaluating the cost of both temporal and physical resources, and identify the optimized quantum repeater architecture for a given set of experimental parameters for use in quantum key distribution. Our work provides a roadmap for the experimental realizations of highly efficient quantum networks over transcontinental distances.

  10. High-dimensional quantum cloning and applications to quantum hacking

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Fickler, Robert; Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Attempts at cloning a quantum system result in the introduction of imperfections in the state of the copies. This is a consequence of the no-cloning theorem, which is a fundamental law of quantum physics and the backbone of security for quantum communications. Although perfect copies are prohibited, a quantum state may be copied with maximal accuracy via various optimal cloning schemes. Optimal quantum cloning, which lies at the border of the physical limit imposed by the no-signaling theorem and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, has been experimentally realized for low-dimensional photonic states. However, an increase in the dimensionality of quantum systems is greatly beneficial to quantum computation and communication protocols. Nonetheless, no experimental demonstration of optimal cloning machines has hitherto been shown for high-dimensional quantum systems. We perform optimal cloning of high-dimensional photonic states by means of the symmetrization method. We show the universality of our technique by conducting cloning of numerous arbitrary input states and fully characterize our cloning machine by performing quantum state tomography on cloned photons. In addition, a cloning attack on a Bennett and Brassard (BB84) quantum key distribution protocol is experimentally demonstrated to reveal the robustness of high-dimensional states in quantum cryptography. PMID:28168219

  11. High-dimensional quantum cloning and applications to quantum hacking.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Fickler, Robert; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-02-01

    Attempts at cloning a quantum system result in the introduction of imperfections in the state of the copies. This is a consequence of the no-cloning theorem, which is a fundamental law of quantum physics and the backbone of security for quantum communications. Although perfect copies are prohibited, a quantum state may be copied with maximal accuracy via various optimal cloning schemes. Optimal quantum cloning, which lies at the border of the physical limit imposed by the no-signaling theorem and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, has been experimentally realized for low-dimensional photonic states. However, an increase in the dimensionality of quantum systems is greatly beneficial to quantum computation and communication protocols. Nonetheless, no experimental demonstration of optimal cloning machines has hitherto been shown for high-dimensional quantum systems. We perform optimal cloning of high-dimensional photonic states by means of the symmetrization method. We show the universality of our technique by conducting cloning of numerous arbitrary input states and fully characterize our cloning machine by performing quantum state tomography on cloned photons. In addition, a cloning attack on a Bennett and Brassard (BB84) quantum key distribution protocol is experimentally demonstrated to reveal the robustness of high-dimensional states in quantum cryptography.

  12. Quantum Information Science: An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwek, L. C.; Zen, Freddy P.

    2016-08-01

    It is now roughly thirty years since the incipient ideas on quantum information science was concretely formalized. Over the last three decades, there has been much development in this field, and at least one technology, namely devices for quantum cryptography, is now commercialized. Yet, the holy grail of a workable quantum computing machine still lies faraway at the horizon. In any case, it took nearly several centuries before the vacuum tubes were invented after the first mechanical calculating were constructed, and several decades later, for the transistor to bring the current computer technology to fruition. In this review, we provide a short survey of the current development and progress in quantum information science. It clearly does not do justice to the amount of work in the past thirty years. Nevertheless, despite the modest attempt, this review hopes to induce younger researchers into this exciting field.

  13. Approach to design neural cryptography: a generalized architecture and a heuristic rule.

    PubMed

    Mu, Nankun; Liao, Xiaofeng; Huang, Tingwen

    2013-06-01

    Neural cryptography, a type of public key exchange protocol, is widely considered as an effective method for sharing a common secret key between two neural networks on public channels. How to design neural cryptography remains a great challenge. In this paper, in order to provide an approach to solve this challenge, a generalized network architecture and a significant heuristic rule are designed. The proposed generic framework is named as tree state classification machine (TSCM), which extends and unifies the existing structures, i.e., tree parity machine (TPM) and tree committee machine (TCM). Furthermore, we carefully study and find that the heuristic rule can improve the security of TSCM-based neural cryptography. Therefore, TSCM and the heuristic rule can guide us to designing a great deal of effective neural cryptography candidates, in which it is possible to achieve the more secure instances. Significantly, in the light of TSCM and the heuristic rule, we further expound that our designed neural cryptography outperforms TPM (the most secure model at present) on security. Finally, a series of numerical simulation experiments are provided to verify validity and applicability of our results.

  14. Approach to design neural cryptography: A generalized architecture and a heuristic rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Nankun; Liao, Xiaofeng; Huang, Tingwen

    2013-06-01

    Neural cryptography, a type of public key exchange protocol, is widely considered as an effective method for sharing a common secret key between two neural networks on public channels. How to design neural cryptography remains a great challenge. In this paper, in order to provide an approach to solve this challenge, a generalized network architecture and a significant heuristic rule are designed. The proposed generic framework is named as tree state classification machine (TSCM), which extends and unifies the existing structures, i.e., tree parity machine (TPM) and tree committee machine (TCM). Furthermore, we carefully study and find that the heuristic rule can improve the security of TSCM-based neural cryptography. Therefore, TSCM and the heuristic rule can guide us to designing a great deal of effective neural cryptography candidates, in which it is possible to achieve the more secure instances. Significantly, in the light of TSCM and the heuristic rule, we further expound that our designed neural cryptography outperforms TPM (the most secure model at present) on security. Finally, a series of numerical simulation experiments are provided to verify validity and applicability of our results.

  15. Optical cryptography with biometrics for multi-depth objects.

    PubMed

    Yan, Aimin; Wei, Yang; Hu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingtao; Tsang, Peter Wai Ming; Poon, Ting-Chung

    2017-10-11

    We propose an optical cryptosystem for encrypting images of multi-depth objects based on the combination of optical heterodyne technique and fingerprint keys. Optical heterodyning requires two optical beams to be mixed. For encryption, each optical beam is modulated by an optical mask containing either the fingerprint of the person who is sending, or receiving the image. The pair of optical masks are taken as the encryption keys. Subsequently, the two beams are used to scan over a multi-depth 3-D object to obtain an encrypted hologram. During the decryption process, each sectional image of the 3-D object is recovered by convolving its encrypted hologram (through numerical computation) with the encrypted hologram of a pinhole image that is positioned at the same depth as the sectional image. Our proposed method has three major advantages. First, the lost-key situation can be avoided with the use of fingerprints as the encryption keys. Second, the method can be applied to encrypt 3-D images for subsequent decrypted sectional images. Third, since optical heterodyning scanning is employed to encrypt a 3-D object, the optical system is incoherent, resulting in negligible amount of speckle noise upon decryption. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time optical cryptography of 3-D object images has been demonstrated in an incoherent optical system with biometric keys.

  16. A neural-network approach for visual cryptography and authorization.

    PubMed

    Yue, Tai-Wen; Chiang, Suchen

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a neural-network approach for visual authorization, which is an application of visual cryptography (VC). The scheme contains a key-share and a set of user-shares. The administrator owns the key-share, and each user owns a user-share issued by the administrator from the user-share set. The shares in the user-share set are visually indistinguishable, i.e. they have the same pictorial meaning. However, the stacking of the key-share with different user-shares will reveal significantly different images. Therefore, the administrator (in fact, only the administrator) can visually recognize the authority assigned to a particular user by viewing the information appearing in the superposed image of key-share and user-share. This approach is completely different from traditional VC approaches. The salient features include: (i) the access schemes are described using a set of graytone images, and (ii) the codebooks to fulfil them are not required; and (iii) the size of share images is the same as the size of target image.

  17. Application of visual cryptography for learning in optics and photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Avikarsha; Wozniak, Peter; Vauderwange, Oliver; Curticapean, Dan

    2016-09-01

    In the age data digitalization, important applications of optics and photonics based sensors and technology lie in the field of biometrics and image processing. Protecting user data in a safe and secure way is an essential task in this area. However, traditional cryptographic protocols rely heavily on computer aided computation. Secure protocols which rely only on human interactions are usually simpler to understand. In many scenarios development of such protocols are also important for ease of implementation and deployment. Visual cryptography (VC) is an encryption technique on images (or text) in which decryption is done by human visual system. In this technique, an image is encrypted into number of pieces (known as shares). When the printed shares are physically superimposed together, the image can be decrypted with human vision. Modern digital watermarking technologies can be combined with VC for image copyright protection where the shares can be watermarks (small identification) embedded in the image. Similarly, VC can be used for improving security of biometric authentication. This paper presents about design and implementation of a practical laboratory experiment based on the concept of VC for a course in media engineering. Specifically, our contribution deals with integration of VC in different schemes for applications like digital watermarking and biometric authentication in the field of optics and photonics. We describe theoretical concepts and propose our infrastructure for the experiment. Finally, we will evaluate the learning outcome of the experiment, performed by the students.

  18. Philosophy of Quantum Information and Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokulich, Alisa; Jaeger, Gregg

    2010-06-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Quantum Entanglement and Nonlocality: 1. Nonlocality beyond quantum mechanics Sandu Popescu; 2. Entanglement and subsystems, entanglement beyond subsystems, and all that Lorenza Viola and Howard Barnum; 3. Formalism locality in quantum theory and quantum gravity Lucien Hardy; Part II. Quantum Probability: 4. Bell's inequality from the contextual probabilistic viewpoint Andrei Khrennikov; 5. Probabilistic theories: what is special about quantum mechanics? Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano; 6. What probabilities tell about quantum systems, with application to entropy and entanglement John Myers and Hadi Madjid; 7. Bayesian updating and information gain in quantum measurements Leah Henderson; Part III. Quantum Information: 8. Schumacher information and the philosophy of physics Arnold Duwell; 9. From physics to information theory and back Wayne Myrvold; 10. Information, immaterialism, and instrumentalism: old and new in quantum information Chris Timpson; Part IV. Quantum Communication and Computing: 11. Quantum computation: where does the speed-up come from? Jeff Bub; 12. Quantum mechanics, quantum computing and quantum cryptography Tai Wu.

  19. A public-key cryptosystem for quantum message transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li

    2005-01-01

    We present a quantum public-key cryptography protocol for quantum message transmission. The private key of this protocol includes three classical matrices: a generator matrix of a Goppa code, an invertible matrix and a permutation matrix. The public key is product of these three matrices. The encryption and decryption algorithms are merely quantum computations related with the transformations between bases of the quantum registers. The security of this protocol is based on the hypothesis that there is no effective algorithm of NP-complete problem.

  20. Secure self-calibrating quantum random-bit generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentino, M.; Santori, C.; Spillane, S. M.; Beausoleil, R. G.; Munro, W. J.

    2007-03-15

    Random-bit generators (RBGs) are key components of a variety of information processing applications ranging from simulations to cryptography. In particular, cryptographic systems require 'strong' RBGs that produce high-entropy bit sequences, but traditional software pseudo-RBGs have very low entropy content and therefore are relatively weak for cryptography. Hardware RBGs yield entropy from chaotic or quantum physical systems and therefore are expected to exhibit high entropy, but in current implementations their exact entropy content is unknown. Here we report a quantum random-bit generator (QRBG) that harvests entropy by measuring single-photon and entangled two-photon polarization states. We introduce and implement a quantum tomographic method to measure a lower bound on the 'min-entropy' of the system, and we employ this value to distill a truly random-bit sequence. This approach is secure: even if an attacker takes control of the source of optical states, a secure random sequence can be distilled.

  1. Observable measure of quantum coherence in finite dimensional systems.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Davide

    2014-10-24

    Quantum coherence is the key resource for quantum technology, with applications in quantum optics, information processing, metrology, and cryptography. Yet, there is no universally efficient method for quantifying coherence either in theoretical or in experimental practice. I introduce a framework for measuring quantum coherence in finite dimensional systems. I define a theoretical measure which satisfies the reliability criteria established in the context of quantum resource theories. Then, I present an experimental scheme implementable with current technology which evaluates the quantum coherence of an unknown state of a d-dimensional system by performing two programmable measurements on an ancillary qubit, in place of the O(d2) direct measurements required by full state reconstruction. The result yields a benchmark for monitoring quantum effects in complex systems, e.g., certifying nonclassicality in quantum protocols and probing the quantum behavior of biological complexes.

  2. Quantum Information Science Using Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwmeester, D.; Howell, J. C.; Lamas-Linares, A.

    Contents: 1 Introduction 1.1 A Humble Point of View 1.2 Quantum Mystery 1.3 Maxwell's Demon 1.4 Shannon Entropy 1.5 Von Neumann Entropy 2 Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox and Bell's Inequalities 3 Producing Entangled Particles 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Parametric Down-Conversion 3.3 Franson's Proposal 3.4 Polarization Entanglement 4 The Beam Splitter Action on a Two-Photon State 4.1 Beamsplitter Transformation 4.2 Bell-State Analyzer 5 No-Cloning Theorem 6 Quantum Cryptography 7 Quantum Dense Coding 7.1 Theoretical Scheme 7.2 Experimental Dense Coding with Qubits 8 Quantum Teleportation 8.1 Theoretical Scheme 8.2 Experimental Quantum Teleportation of Qubits 8.3 Teleportation of Entanglement 8.4 A Two-Particle Scheme for Quantum Teleportation 9 Teleportation of Continuous Quantum Variables 9.1 Theoretical Scheme 9.2 Quantum Optical Implementation 10 Quantum Error Detection and Correction 10.1 Introduction 10.2 Quantum Error Detection 10.3 Avoiding Controlled-NOT Operations 10.4 Post-selection 11 Stimulated Entanglement 11.1 Theory 12 Bohm-Type Spin-s Entanglements

  3. Two-out-of-two color matching based visual cryptography schemes.

    PubMed

    Machizaud, Jacques; Fournel, Thierry

    2012-09-24

    Visual cryptography which consists in sharing a secret message between transparencies has been extended to color prints. In this paper, we propose a new visual cryptography scheme based on color matching. The stacked printed media reveal a uniformly colored message decoded by the human visual system. In contrast with the previous color visual cryptography schemes, the proposed one enables to share images without pixel expansion and to detect a forgery as the color of the message is kept secret. In order to correctly print the colors on the media and to increase the security of the scheme, we use spectral models developed for color reproduction describing printed colors from an optical point of view.

  4. Quantum technology and cryptology for information security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, Syed; Riguidel, Michel

    2007-04-01

    Cryptology and information security are set to play a more prominent role in the near future. In this regard, quantum communication and cryptography offer new opportunities to tackle ICT security. Quantum Information Processing and Communication (QIPC) is a scientific field where new conceptual foundations and techniques are being developed. They promise to play an important role in the future of information Security. It is therefore essential to have a cross-fertilizing development between quantum technology and cryptology in order to address the security challenges of the emerging quantum era. In this article, we discuss the impact of quantum technology on the current as well as future crypto-techniques. We then analyse the assumptions on which quantum computers may operate. Then we present our vision for the distribution of security attributes using a novel form of trust based on Heisenberg's uncertainty; and, building highly secure quantum networks based on the clear transmission of single photons and/or bundles of photons able to withstand unauthorized reading as a result of secure protocols based on the observations of quantum mechanics. We argue how quantum cryptographic systems need to be developed that can take advantage of the laws of physics to provide long-term security based on solid assumptions. This requires a structured integration effort to deploy quantum technologies within the existing security infrastructure. Finally, we conclude that classical cryptographic techniques need to be redesigned and upgraded in view of the growing threat of cryptanalytic attacks posed by quantum information processing devices leading to the development of post-quantum cryptography.

  5. Influence of satellite motion on polarization qubits in a Space-Earth quantum communication link.

    PubMed

    Bonato, Cristian; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Jennewein, Thomas; Pernechele, Claudio; Villoresi, Paolo; Zeilinger, Anton

    2006-10-16

    In a Space quantum-cryptography experiment a satellite pointing system is needed to send single photons emitted by the source on the satellite to the polarization analysis apparatus on Earth. In this paper a simulation is presented regarding how the satellite pointing systems affect the polarization state of the single photons, to help designing a proper compensation system.

  6. Information security: from classical to quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Brougham, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Quantum cryptography was designed to provide a new approach to the problem of distributing keys for private-key cryptography. The principal idea is that security can be ensured by exploiting the laws of quantum physics and, in particular, by the fact that any attempt to measure a quantum state will change it uncontrollably. This change can be detected by the legitimate users of the communication channel and so reveal to them the presence of an eavesdropper. In this paper I explain (briefly) how quantum key distribution works and some of the progress that has been made towards making this a viable technology. With the principles of quantum communication and quantum key distribution firmly established, it is perhaps time to consider how efficient it can be made. It is interesting to ask, in particular, how many bits of information might reasonably be encoded securely on each photon. The use of photons entangled in their time of arrival might make it possible to achieve data rates in excess of 10 bits per photon.

  7. Certified randomness in quantum physics.

    PubMed

    Acín, Antonio; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-12-07

    The concept of randomness plays an important part in many disciplines. On the one hand, the question of whether random processes exist is fundamental for our understanding of nature. On the other, randomness is a resource for cryptography, algorithms and simulations. Standard methods for generating randomness rely on assumptions about the devices that are often not valid in practice. However, quantum technologies enable new methods for generating certified randomness, based on the violation of Bell inequalities. These methods are referred to as device-independent because they do not rely on any modelling of the devices. Here we review efforts to design device-independent randomness generators and the associated challenges.

  8. Certified randomness in quantum physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acín, Antonio; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-12-01

    The concept of randomness plays an important part in many disciplines. On the one hand, the question of whether random processes exist is fundamental for our understanding of nature. On the other, randomness is a resource for cryptography, algorithms and simulations. Standard methods for generating randomness rely on assumptions about the devices that are often not valid in practice. However, quantum technologies enable new methods for generating certified randomness, based on the violation of Bell inequalities. These methods are referred to as device-independent because they do not rely on any modelling of the devices. Here we review efforts to design device-independent randomness generators and the associated challenges.

  9. Network-Centric Quantum Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Single-photon quantum communications (QC) offers ``future-proof'' cryptographic security rooted in the laws of physics. Today's quantum-secured communications cannot be compromised by unanticipated future technological advances. But to date, QC has only existed in point-to-point instantiations that have limited ability to address the cyber security challenges of our increasingly networked world. In my talk I will describe a fundamentally new paradigm of network-centric quantum communications (NQC) that leverages the network to bring scalable, QC-based security to user groups that may have no direct user-to-user QC connectivity. With QC links only between each of N users and a trusted network node, NQC brings quantum security to N2 user pairs, and to multi-user groups. I will describe a novel integrated photonics quantum smartcard (``QKarD'') and its operation in a multi-node NQC test bed. The QKarDs are used to implement the quantum cryptographic protocols of quantum identification, quantum key distribution and quantum secret splitting. I will explain how these cryptographic primitives are used to provide key management for encryption, authentication, and non-repudiation for user-to-user communications. My talk will conclude with a description of a recent demonstration that QC can meet both the security and quality-of-service (latency) requirements for electric grid control commands and data. These requirements cannot be met simultaneously with present-day cryptography.

  10. Quantum cloning disturbed by thermal Davies environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajka, Jerzy; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    A network of quantum gates designed to implement universal quantum cloning machine is studied. We analyze how thermal environment coupled to auxiliary qubits, `blank paper' and `toner' required at the preparation stage of copying, modifies an output fidelity of the cloner. Thermal environment is described in terms of the Markovian Davies theory. We show that such a cloning machine is not universal any more but its output is independent of at least a part of parameters of the environment. As a case study, we consider cloning of states in a six-state cryptography's protocol. We also briefly discuss cloning of arbitrary input states.

  11. A potential application in quantum networks—Deterministic quantum operation sharing schemes with Bell states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, KeJia; Zhang, Long; Song, TingTing; Yang, YingHui

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose certain different design ideas on a novel topic in quantum cryptographyquantum operation sharing (QOS). Following these unique ideas, three QOS schemes, the "HIEC" (The scheme whose messages are hidden in the entanglement correlation), "HIAO" (The scheme whose messages are hidden with the assistant operations) and "HIMB" (The scheme whose messages are hidden in the selected measurement basis), have been presented to share the single-qubit operations determinately on target states in a remote node. These schemes only require Bell states as quantum resources. Therefore, they can be directly applied in quantum networks, since Bell states are considered the basic quantum channels in quantum networks. Furthermore, after analyse on the security and resource consumptions, the task of QOS can be achieved securely and effectively in these schemes.

  12. Teleporting photonic qudits using multimode quantum scissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sandeep K.; Konrad, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Teleportation plays an important role in the communication of quantum information between the nodes of a quantum network and is viewed as an essential ingredient for long-distance Quantum Cryptography. We describe a method to teleport the quantum information carried by a photon in a superposition of a number d of light modes (a ``qudit'') by the help of d additional photons based on transcription. A qudit encoded into a single excitation of d light modes (in our case Laguerre-Gauss modes which carry orbital angular momentum) is transcribed to d single-rail photonic qubits, which are spatially separated. Each single-rail qubit consists of a superposition of vacuum and a single photon in each one of the modes. After successful teleportation of each of the d single-rail qubits by means of ``quantum scissors'' they are converted back into a qudit carried by a single photon which completes the teleportation scheme.

  13. Teleporting photonic qudits using multimode quantum scissors.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sandeep K; Konrad, Thomas

    2013-12-19

    Teleportation plays an important role in the communication of quantum information between the nodes of a quantum network and is viewed as an essential ingredient for long-distance Quantum Cryptography. We describe a method to teleport the quantum information carried by a photon in a superposition of a number d of light modes (a "qudit") by the help of d additional photons based on transcription. A qudit encoded into a single excitation of d light modes (in our case Laguerre-Gauss modes which carry orbital angular momentum) is transcribed to d single-rail photonic qubits, which are spatially separated. Each single-rail qubit consists of a superposition of vacuum and a single photon in each one of the modes. After successful teleportation of each of the d single-rail qubits by means of "quantum scissors" they are converted back into a qudit carried by a single photon which completes the teleportation scheme.

  14. Continuous-variable quantum homomorphic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Shang, Tao; Liu, Jian-wei

    2017-10-01

    Quantum cryptography is believed to be unconditionally secure because its security is ensured by physical laws rather than computational complexity. According to spectrum characteristic, quantum information can be classified into two categories, namely discrete variables and continuous variables. Continuous-variable quantum protocols have gained much attention for their ability to transmit more information with lower cost. To verify the identities of different data sources in a quantum network, we propose a continuous-variable quantum homomorphic signature scheme. It is based on continuous-variable entanglement swapping and provides additive and subtractive homomorphism. Security analysis shows the proposed scheme is secure against replay, forgery and repudiation. Even under nonideal conditions, it supports effective verification within a certain verification threshold.

  15. A broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme based on quantum GHZ entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuan; Chen, Hong; Gao, Yan; Zhuang, Honglin; Lian, Haigang; Han, Zhengping; Yu, Peng; Kong, Xiangze; Wen, Xiaojun

    2014-09-01

    Using the correlation of the GHZ triplet states, a broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme is proposed. Different from classical multiple signature and current quantum signature schemes, which could only deliver either multiple signature or unconditional security, our scheme guarantees both by adopting quantum key preparation, quantum encryption algorithm and quantum entanglement. Our proposed scheme has the properties of multiple signature, blindness, non-disavowal, non-forgery and traceability. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to propose the broadcasting multiple blind signature of quantum cryptography.

  16. Cryptographic Research and NSA: Report of the Public Cryptography Study Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davida, George I.

    1981-01-01

    The Public Cryptography Study Group accepted the claim made by the National Security Agency that some information in some publications concerning cryptology could be inimical to national security, and is allowing the establishment of a voluntary mechanism, on an experimental basis, for NSA to review cryptology manuscripts. (MLW)

  17. The Design and Evaluation of a Cryptography Teaching Strategy for Software Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, T.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper describes the design, implementation and evaluation of a cryptography module for final-year software engineering students. The emphasis is on implementation architectures and practical cryptanalysis rather than a standard mathematical approach. The competitive continuous assessment process reflects this approach and rewards…

  18. An Application-Independent Cryptography Model That Is Easy to Use for All Level Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabrielson, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptography libraries are inflexible and difficult for developers to integrate with their applications. These difficulties are often encountered by applications, like PGP, which are non-intuitive for end-users and are often used improperly or not at all. This thesis discusses the negative impact of the current prevailing poor usability on…

  19. An Anti-Cheating Visual Cryptography Scheme Based on Chaotic Encryption System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yanyan; Xu, Zhuolin; Ge, Xiaonan; He, Wencai

    By chaotic encryption system and introducing the trusted third party (TTP), in this paper, an anti-cheating visual cryptography scheme (VCS) is proposed. The scheme solved the problem of dishonest participants and improved the security of chaotic encryption system. Simulation results and analysis show that the recovery image is acceptable, the system can detect the cheating in participants effectively and with high security.

  20. The Design and Evaluation of a Cryptography Teaching Strategy for Software Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, T.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper describes the design, implementation and evaluation of a cryptography module for final-year software engineering students. The emphasis is on implementation architectures and practical cryptanalysis rather than a standard mathematical approach. The competitive continuous assessment process reflects this approach and rewards…

  1. An Application-Independent Cryptography Model That Is Easy to Use for All Level Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabrielson, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptography libraries are inflexible and difficult for developers to integrate with their applications. These difficulties are often encountered by applications, like PGP, which are non-intuitive for end-users and are often used improperly or not at all. This thesis discusses the negative impact of the current prevailing poor usability on…

  2. Cryptographic Research and NSA: Report of the Public Cryptography Study Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davida, George I.

    1981-01-01

    The Public Cryptography Study Group accepted the claim made by the National Security Agency that some information in some publications concerning cryptology could be inimical to national security, and is allowing the establishment of a voluntary mechanism, on an experimental basis, for NSA to review cryptology manuscripts. (MLW)

  3. Efficient Surgical Cutting with Position-Based Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Iago; Torchelsen, Rafael; Maciel, Anderson

    2017-01-01

    Simulations of cuts on deformable bodies have been an active research subject for more than two decades. However, previous works based on finite element methods and mass spring meshes cannot scale to complex surgical scenarios. This article presents a novel method that uses position-based dynamics (PBD) for mesh-free cutting simulation. The proposed solutions include a method to efficiently render force feedback while cutting, an efficient heat diffusion model to simulate electrocautery, and a novel adaptive skinning scheme based on oriented particles.https://extras.computer.org/extra/mcg2017030024s1.mp4.

  4. Elliptic Curve Cryptography with Security System in Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Sharma, Dharmendra

    2010-10-01

    The rapid progress of wireless communications and embedded micro-electro-system technologies has made wireless sensor networks (WSN) very popular and even become part of our daily life. WSNs design are generally application driven, namely a particular application's requirements will determine how the network behaves. However, the natures of WSN have attracted increasing attention in recent years due to its linear scalability, a small software footprint, low hardware implementation cost, low bandwidth requirement, and high device performance. It is noted that today's software applications are mainly characterized by their component-based structures which are usually heterogeneous and distributed, including the WSNs. But WSNs typically need to configure themselves automatically and support as hoc routing. Agent technology provides a method for handling increasing software complexity and supporting rapid and accurate decision making. This paper based on our previous works [1, 2], three contributions have made, namely (a) fuzzy controller for dynamic slide window size to improve the performance of running ECC (b) first presented a hidden generation point for protection from man-in-the middle attack and (c) we first investigates multi-agent applying for key exchange together. Security systems have been drawing great attentions as cryptographic algorithms have gained popularity due to the natures that make them suitable for use in constrained environment such as mobile sensor information applications, where computing resources and power availability are limited. Elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) is one of high potential candidates for WSNs, which requires less computational power, communication bandwidth, and memory in comparison with other cryptosystem. For saving pre-computing storages recently there is a trend for the sensor networks that the sensor group leaders rather than sensors communicate to the end database, which highlighted the needs to prevent from the man

  5. Entanglement purification for quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Pan, J W; Simon, C; Brukner, C; Zeilinger, A

    2001-04-26

    The distribution of entangled states between distant locations will be essential for the future large-scale realization of quantum communication schemes such as quantum cryptography and quantum teleportation. Because of unavoidable noise in the quantum communication channel, the entanglement between two particles is more and more degraded the further they propagate. Entanglement purification is thus essential to distil highly entangled states from less entangled ones. Existing general purification protocols are based on the quantum controlled-NOT (CNOT) or similar quantum logic operations, which are very difficult to implement experimentally. Present realizations of CNOT gates are much too imperfect to be useful for long-distance quantum communication. Here we present a scheme for the entanglement purification of general mixed entangled states, which achieves 50 per cent of the success probability of schemes based on the CNOT operation, but requires only simple linear optical elements. Because the perfection of such elements is very high, the local operations necessary for purification can be performed with the required precision. Our procedure is within the reach of current technology, and should significantly simplify the implementation of long-distance quantum communication.

  6. Quantum communication and information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beals, Travis Roland

    Quantum computers enable dramatically more efficient algorithms for solving certain classes of computational problems, but, in doing so, they create new problems. In particular, Shor's Algorithm allows for efficient cryptanalysis of many public-key cryptosystems. As public key cryptography is a critical component of present-day electronic commerce, it is crucial that a working, secure replacement be found. Quantum key distribution (QKD), first developed by C.H. Bennett and G. Brassard, offers a partial solution, but many challenges remain, both in terms of hardware limitations and in designing cryptographic protocols for a viable large-scale quantum communication infrastructure. In Part I, I investigate optical lattice-based approaches to quantum information processing. I look at details of a proposal for an optical lattice-based quantum computer, which could potentially be used for both quantum communications and for more sophisticated quantum information processing. In Part III, I propose a method for converting and storing photonic quantum bits in the internal state of periodically-spaced neutral atoms by generating and manipulating a photonic band gap and associated defect states. In Part II, I present a cryptographic protocol which allows for the extension of present-day QKD networks over much longer distances without the development of new hardware. I also present a second, related protocol which effectively solves the authentication problem faced by a large QKD network, thus making QKD a viable, information-theoretic secure replacement for public key cryptosystems.

  7. Insecurity of quantum secure computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    1997-08-01

    It had been widely claimed that quantum mechanics can protect private information during public decision in, for example, the so-called two-party secure computation. If this were the case, quantum smart-cards, storing confidential information accessible only to a proper reader, could prevent fake teller machines from learning the PIN (personal identification number) from the customers' input. Although such optimism has been challenged by the recent surprising discovery of the insecurity of the so-called quantum bit commitment, the security of quantum two-party computation itself remains unaddressed. Here I answer this question directly by showing that all one-sided two-party computations (which allow only one of the two parties to learn the result) are necessarily insecure. As corollaries to my results, quantum one-way oblivious password identification and the so-called quantum one-out-of-two oblivious transfer are impossible. I also construct a class of functions that cannot be computed securely in any two-sided two-party computation. Nevertheless, quantum cryptography remains useful in key distribution and can still provide partial security in ``quantum money'' proposed by Wiesner.

  8. Quantum rewinding via phase estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabia, Gelo Noel

    2015-03-01

    In cryptography, the notion of a zero-knowledge proof was introduced by Goldwasser, Micali, and Rackoff. An interactive proof system is said to be zero-knowledge if any verifier interacting with an honest prover learns nothing beyond the validity of the statement being proven. With recent advances in quantum information technologies, it has become interesting to ask if classical zero-knowledge proof systems remain secure against adversaries with quantum computers. The standard approach to show the zero-knowledge property involves constructing a simulator for a malicious verifier that can be rewinded to a previous step when the simulation fails. In the quantum setting, the simulator can be described by a quantum circuit that takes an arbitrary quantum state as auxiliary input but rewinding becomes a nontrivial issue. Watrous proposed a quantum rewinding technique in the case where the simulation's success probability is independent of the auxiliary input. Here I present a more general quantum rewinding scheme that employs the quantum phase estimation algorithm. This work was funded by institutional research grant IUT2-1 from the Estonian Research Council and by the European Union through the European Regional Development Fund.

  9. Three Quantum Leaps in the Development of Information Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaijser, Per

    2007-12-01

    This paper gives a coarse overview of the historical development of algorithms used for information security. It is shown that the development of these encryption algorithms has been made in small incremental steps for almost 2000 years until the latter part of the last century when three revolutionary inventions were made. The main properties of these new technologies, the public key encryption method, quantum cryptography and quantum computing are explained and demonstrates why they can be seen as quantum leaps in the development of information security.

  10. Bank Transfer Over Quantum Channel With Digital Checks

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Yoshito; Yoo, Seong-Moo; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, many quantum cryptographic schemes have been proposed. However, it seems that there are many technical difficulties to realize them (except Quantum Key Distributions) as practical applications. In this paper, we propose a bank transfer (i.e., funds or Electronic Funds Transfer) system utilizing both classical and quantum cryptography to provide theoretically unbreakable security. This system can be realized using current technologies (e.g., linear polarizers and Faraday rotators) and requires no additional authentication and no key distribution scheme. However, a trusted third party must keep all member banks' private keys for encryption, authentication and also for functions to generate classical digital signatures.

  11. On the passive probing of fiber optic quantum communication channels

    SciTech Connect

    Korol'kov, A. V.; Katamadze, K. G.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2010-04-15

    Avalanche photodetectors based on InGaAs:P are the most sensitive and only detectors operating in the telecommunication wavelength range 1.30-1.55 {mu}m in the fiber optic quantum cryptography systems that can operate in the single photon count mode. In contrast to the widely used silicon photodetectors for wavelengths up to 1 {mu}m operating in a waiting mode, these detectors always operate in a gated mode. The production of an electron-hole pair in the process of the absorption of a photon and the subsequent appearance of an avalanche of carriers can be accompanied by the inverse processes of the recombination and emission of photons. Such a backward emission can present a potential serious problem for the stability of fiber optic quantum cryptography systems against passive probing. The results of analyzing the detection of backscattered radiation are reported. The probability of such an emission has been estimated.

  12. Measures and applications of quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesso, Gerardo; Bromley, Thomas R.; Cianciaruso, Marco

    2016-11-01

    Quantum information theory is built upon the realisation that quantum resources like coherence and entanglement can be exploited for novel or enhanced ways of transmitting and manipulating information, such as quantum cryptography, teleportation, and quantum computing. We now know that there is potentially much more than entanglement behind the power of quantum information processing. There exist more general forms of non-classical correlations, stemming from fundamental principles such as the necessary disturbance induced by a local measurement, or the persistence of quantum coherence in all possible local bases. These signatures can be identified and are resilient in almost all quantum states, and have been linked to the enhanced performance of certain quantum protocols over classical ones in noisy conditions. Their presence represents, among other things, one of the most essential manifestations of quantumness in cooperative systems, from the subatomic to the macroscopic domain. In this work we give an overview of the current quest for a proper understanding and characterisation of the frontier between classical and quantum correlations (QCs) in composite states. We focus on various approaches to define and quantify general QCs, based on different yet interlinked physical perspectives, and comment on the operational significance of the ensuing measures for quantum technology tasks such as information encoding, distribution, discrimination and metrology. We then provide a broader outlook of a few applications in which quantumness beyond entanglement looks fit to play a key role.

  13. No extension of quantum theory can have improved predictive power.

    PubMed

    Colbeck, Roger; Renner, Renato

    2011-08-02

    According to quantum theory, measurements generate random outcomes, in stark contrast with classical mechanics. This raises the question of whether there could exist an extension of the theory that removes this indeterminism, as suspected by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen. Although this has been shown to be impossible, existing results do not imply that the current theory is maximally informative. Here we ask the more general question of whether any improved predictions can be achieved by any extension of quantum theory. Under the assumption that measurements can be chosen freely, we answer this question in the negative: no extension of quantum theory can give more information about the outcomes of future measurements than quantum theory itself. Our result has significance for the foundations of quantum mechanics, as well as applications to tasks that exploit the inherent randomness in quantum theory, such as quantum cryptography.

  14. Quantum Entanglement: A Fundamental Concept Finding its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Anton

    Entanglement, according to the Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger the Essence of Quantum Mechanics, has been known for a long time now to be the source of a number of paradoxical and counterintuitive phenomena. Of those the most remarkable one is usually called non-locality and it is at the heart of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox and of the fact that Quantum Mechanics violates Bell's inequalities. Recent years saw an emergence of novel ideas in entanglement of three or more particles. Most recently it turned out that entanglement is an important concept in the development of quantum communication, quantum cryptography and quantum computation. First explicit experimental realizations with two or more photons include quantum dense coding and quantum teleportation.

  15. Quantum entanglement between an optical photon and a solid-state spin qubit.

    PubMed

    Togan, E; Chu, Y; Trifonov, A S; Jiang, L; Maze, J; Childress, L; Dutt, M V G; Sørensen, A S; Hemmer, P R; Zibrov, A S; Lukin, M D

    2010-08-05

    Quantum entanglement is among the most fascinating aspects of quantum theory. Entangled optical photons are now widely used for fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and applications such as quantum cryptography. Several recent experiments demonstrated entanglement of optical photons with trapped ions, atoms and atomic ensembles, which are then used to connect remote long-term memory nodes in distributed quantum networks. Here we realize quantum entanglement between the polarization of a single optical photon and a solid-state qubit associated with the single electronic spin of a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. Our experimental entanglement verification uses the quantum eraser technique, and demonstrates that a high degree of control over interactions between a solid-state qubit and the quantum light field can be achieved. The reported entanglement source can be used in studies of fundamental quantum phenomena and provides a key building block for the solid-state realization of quantum optical networks.

  16. Memory-built-in quantum cloning in a hybrid solid-state spin register.

    PubMed

    Wang, W-B; Zu, C; He, L; Zhang, W-G; Duan, L-M

    2015-07-16

    As a way to circumvent the quantum no-cloning theorem, approximate quantum cloning protocols have received wide attention with remarkable applications. Copying of quantum states to memory qubits provides an important strategy for eavesdropping in quantum cryptography. We report an experiment that realizes cloning of quantum states from an electron spin to a nuclear spin in a hybrid solid-state spin register with near-optimal fidelity. The nuclear spin provides an ideal memory qubit at room temperature, which stores the cloned quantum states for a millisecond under ambient conditions, exceeding the lifetime of the original quantum state carried by the electron spin by orders of magnitude. The realization of a cloning machine with built-in quantum memory provides a key step for application of quantum cloning in quantum information science.

  17. A Lattice-Trapped and Cavity-Enhanced High-Quality Quantum Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Jun; Wang, Xu-Jie; Bao, Xiao-Hui; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Quantum memory plays an increasing essential part in many applications of quantum information science. Currently, the intense research and crucial challenge is that integration of a full functional quantum memory with various high-performance properties in a single system. Storage lifetime and retrieval efficiency are the two most important qualities of quantum memory, especially indispensable for quantum repeater and long-distance quantum communication. Here based on techniques of magic optical lattice trap and ring cavity enhancement, we experimentally achieved a high-quality cold atom quantum memory. The initial intrinsic retrieval efficiency is up to 77(5)%, with an e-1-storage lifetime about 0.25 sec for the first time. Such high effective and long-lived quantum memory should be significantly important for quantum communication and cryptography, and would truly stimulate a first practical demonstration of long distance quantum repeaters in the near future.

  18. Memory-built-in quantum cloning in a hybrid solid-state spin register

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.-B.; Zu, C.; He, L.; Zhang, W.-G.; Duan, L.-M.

    2015-07-01

    As a way to circumvent the quantum no-cloning theorem, approximate quantum cloning protocols have received wide attention with remarkable applications. Copying of quantum states to memory qubits provides an important strategy for eavesdropping in quantum cryptography. We report an experiment that realizes cloning of quantum states from an electron spin to a nuclear spin in a hybrid solid-state spin register with near-optimal fidelity. The nuclear spin provides an ideal memory qubit at room temperature, which stores the cloned quantum states for a millisecond under ambient conditions, exceeding the lifetime of the original quantum state carried by the electron spin by orders of magnitude. The realization of a cloning machine with built-in quantum memory provides a key step for application of quantum cloning in quantum information science.

  19. Memory-built-in quantum cloning in a hybrid solid-state spin register

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W.-B.; Zu, C.; He, L.; Zhang, W.-G.; Duan, L.-M.

    2015-01-01

    As a way to circumvent the quantum no-cloning theorem, approximate quantum cloning protocols have received wide attention with remarkable applications. Copying of quantum states to memory qubits provides an important strategy for eavesdropping in quantum cryptography. We report an experiment that realizes cloning of quantum states from an electron spin to a nuclear spin in a hybrid solid-state spin register with near-optimal fidelity. The nuclear spin provides an ideal memory qubit at room temperature, which stores the cloned quantum states for a millisecond under ambient conditions, exceeding the lifetime of the original quantum state carried by the electron spin by orders of magnitude. The realization of a cloning machine with built-in quantum memory provides a key step for application of quantum cloning in quantum information science. PMID:26178617

  20. Practical secure quantum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamanti, Eleni

    2015-05-01

    We review recent advances in the field of quantum cryptography, focusing in particular on practical implementations of two central protocols for quantum network applications, namely key distribution and coin flipping. The former allows two parties to share secret messages with information-theoretic security, even in the presence of a malicious eavesdropper in the communication channel, which is impossible with classical resources alone. The latter enables two distrustful parties to agree on a random bit, again with information-theoretic security, and with a cheating probability lower than the one that can be reached in a classical scenario. Our implementations rely on continuous-variable technology for quantum key distribution and on a plug and play discrete-variable system for coin flipping, and necessitate a rigorous security analysis adapted to the experimental schemes and their imperfections. In both cases, we demonstrate the protocols with provable security over record long distances in optical fibers and assess the performance of our systems as well as their limitations. The reported advances offer a powerful toolbox for practical applications of secure communications within future quantum networks.

  1. Quantum control on entangled bipartite qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado, Francisco

    2010-04-15

    Ising interactions between qubits can produce distortion on entangled pairs generated for engineering purposes (e.g., for quantum computation or quantum cryptography). The presence of parasite magnetic fields destroys or alters the expected behavior for which it was intended. In addition, these pairs are generated with some dispersion in their original configuration, so their discrimination is necessary for applications. Nevertheless, discrimination should be made after Ising distortion. Quantum control helps in both problems; making some projective measurements upon the pair to decide the original state to replace it, or just trying to reconstruct it using some procedures which do not alter their quantum nature. Results about the performance of these procedures are reported. First, we will work with pure systems studying restrictions and advantages. Then, we will extend these operations for mixed states generated with uncertainty in the time of distortion, correcting them by assuming the control prescriptions for the most probable one.

  2. Quantum photonic network and physical layer security.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Masahide; Endo, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Kitamura, Mitsuo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Toyoshima, Morio

    2017-08-06

    Quantum communication and quantum cryptography are expected to enhance the transmission rate and the security (confidentiality of data transmission), respectively. We study a new scheme which can potentially bridge an intermediate region covered by these two schemes, which is referred to as quantum photonic network. The basic framework is information theoretically secure communications in a free space optical (FSO) wiretap channel, in which an eavesdropper has physically limited access to the main channel between the legitimate sender and receiver. We first review a theoretical framework to quantify the optimal balance of the transmission efficiency and the security level under power constraint and at finite code length. We then present experimental results on channel characterization based on 10 MHz on-off keying transmission in a 7.8 km terrestrial FSO wiretap channel.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  3. Quantum photonic network and physical layer security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Masahide; Endo, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Kitamura, Mitsuo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Toyoshima, Morio

    2017-06-01

    Quantum communication and quantum cryptography are expected to enhance the transmission rate and the security (confidentiality of data transmission), respectively. We study a new scheme which can potentially bridge an intermediate region covered by these two schemes, which is referred to as quantum photonic network. The basic framework is information theoretically secure communications in a free space optical (FSO) wiretap channel, in which an eavesdropper has physically limited access to the main channel between the legitimate sender and receiver. We first review a theoretical framework to quantify the optimal balance of the transmission efficiency and the security level under power constraint and at finite code length. We then present experimental results on channel characterization based on 10 MHz on-off keying transmission in a 7.8 km terrestrial FSO wiretap channel. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  4. Subcarrier Wave Quantum Key Distribution in Telecommunication Network with Bitrate 800 kbit/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleim, A. V.; Nazarov, Yu. V.; Egorov, V. I.; Smirnov, S. V.; Bannik, O. I.; Chistyakov, V. V.; Kynev, S. M.; Anisimov, A. A.; Kozlov, S. A.; Vasiliev, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    In the course of work on creating the first quantum communication network in Russia we demonstrated quantum key distribution in metropolitan optical network infrastructure. A single-pass subcarrier wave quantum cryptography scheme was used in the experiments. BB84 protocol with strong reference was chosen for performing key distribution. The registered sifted key rate in an optical cable with 1.5 dB loss was 800 Kbit/s. Signal visibility exceeded 98%, and quantum bit error rate value was 1%. The achieved result is a record for this type of systems.

  5. Fault-tolerant quantum random-number generator certified by Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dong-Ling; Duan, Lu-Ming

    2013-07-01

    Braiding of Majorana fermions gives accurate topological quantum operations that are intrinsically robust to noise and imperfection, providing a natural method to realize fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Unfortunately, it is known that braiding of Majorana fermions is not sufficient for the implementation of universal quantum computation. Here we show that topological manipulation of Majorana fermions provides the full set of operations required to generate random numbers by way of quantum mechanics and to certify its genuine randomness through violation of a multipartite Bell inequality. The result opens a perspective to apply Majorana fermions for the robust generation of certified random numbers, which has important applications in cryptography and other related areas.

  6. Optical cryptography topology based on a three-dimensional particle-like distribution and diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2011-05-09

    In recent years, coherent diffractive imaging has been considered as a promising alternative for information retrieval instead of conventional interference methods. Coherent diffractive imaging using the X-ray light source has opened up a new research perspective for the measurement of non-crystalline and biological specimens, and can achieve unprecedentedly high resolutions. In this paper, we show how a three-dimensional (3D) particle-like distribution and coherent diffractive imaging can be applied for a study of optical cryptography. An optical multiple-random-phase-mask encoding approach is used, and the plaintext is considered as a series of particles distributed in a 3D space. A topology concept is also introduced into the proposed optical cryptosystem. During image decryption, a retrieval algorithm is developed to extract the plaintext from the ciphertexts. In addition, security and advantages of the proposed optical cryptography topology are also analyzed. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  7. Color image zero-watermarking based on SVD and visual cryptography in DWT domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xilin; Chen, Beijing; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Shu, Huazhong

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a novel robust color image zero-watermarking scheme based on SVD and visual cryptography. We firstly generate the image feature from the SVD of the image blocks, and then employ the visual secret sharing scheme to construct ownership share from the watermark and the image feature. The low frequency component of one level discrete wavelet transform of the color image is partitioned into blocks. Then we propose to use the feature generated from the first singular value of the blocks to construct the master share. When ownership debate occurs, the ownership share is used to extract the watermark. Experimental results show the better performance of the proposed watermarking system in terms of robustness to various attacks, including noise, filtering, JPEG compression and so on, than other visual cryptography based color image watermarking algorithm.

  8. DNA-Cryptography-Based Obfuscated Systolic Finite Field Multiplier for Secure Cryptosystem in Smart Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shaobo; Chen, Pingxiuqi; Shao, Qiliang; Basha Shaik, Nazeem; Xie, Jiafeng

    2017-05-01

    The elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) provides much stronger security per bits compared to the traditional cryptosystem, and hence it is an ideal role in secure communication in smart grid. On the other side, secure implementation of finite field multiplication over GF(2 m ) is considered as the bottle neck of ECC. In this paper, we present a novel obfuscation strategy for secure implementation of systolic field multiplier for ECC in smart grid. First, for the first time, we propose a novel obfuscation technique to derive a novel obfuscated systolic finite field multiplier for ECC implementation. Then, we employ the DNA cryptography coding strategy to obfuscate the field multiplier further. Finally, we obtain the area-time-power complexity of the proposed field multiplier to confirm the efficiency of the proposed design. The proposed design is highly obfuscated with low overhead, suitable for secure cryptosystem in smart grid.

  9. Reliable freestanding position-based routing in highway scenarios.

    PubMed

    Galaviz-Mosqueda, Gabriel A; Aquino-Santos, Raúl; Villarreal-Reyes, Salvador; Rivera-Rodríguez, Raúl; Villaseñor-González, Luis; Edwards, Arthur

    2012-10-24

    Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANETs) are considered by car manufacturers and the research community as the enabling technology to radically improve the safety, efficiency and comfort of everyday driving. However, before VANET technology can fulfill all its expected potential, several difficulties must be addressed. One key issue arising when working with VANETs is the complexity of the networking protocols compared to those used by traditional infrastructure networks. Therefore, proper design of the routing strategy becomes a main issue for the effective deployment of VANETs. In this paper, a reliable freestanding position-based routing algorithm (FPBR) for highway scenarios is proposed. For this scenario, several important issues such as the high mobility of vehicles and the propagation conditions may affect the performance of the routing strategy. These constraints have only been partially addressed in previous proposals. In contrast, the design approach used for developing FPBR considered the constraints imposed by a highway scenario and implements mechanisms to overcome them. FPBR performance is compared to one of the leading protocols for highway scenarios. Performance metrics show that FPBR yields similar results when considering freespace propagation conditions, and outperforms the leading protocol when considering a realistic highway path loss model.

  10. Reliable Freestanding Position-Based Routing in Highway Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Galaviz-Mosqueda, Gabriel A.; Aquino-Santos, Raúl; Villarreal-Reyes, Salvador; Rivera-Rodríguez, Raúl; Villaseñor-González, Luis; Edwards, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANETs) are considered by car manufacturers and the research community as the enabling technology to radically improve the safety, efficiency and comfort of everyday driving. However, before VANET technology can fulfill all its expected potential, several difficulties must be addressed. One key issue arising when working with VANETs is the complexity of the networking protocols compared to those used by traditional infrastructure networks. Therefore, proper design of the routing strategy becomes a main issue for the effective deployment of VANETs. In this paper, a reliable freestanding position-based routing algorithm (FPBR) for highway scenarios is proposed. For this scenario, several important issues such as the high mobility of vehicles and the propagation conditions may affect the performance of the routing strategy. These constraints have only been partially addressed in previous proposals. In contrast, the design approach used for developing FPBR considered the constraints imposed by a highway scenario and implements mechanisms to overcome them. FPBR performance is compared to one of the leading protocols for highway scenarios. Performance metrics show that FPBR yields similar results when considering freespace propagation conditions, and outperforms the leading protocol when considering a realistic highway path loss model. PMID:23202159

  11. Secure quantum signatures: a practical quantum technology (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Erika

    2016-10-01

    Modern cryptography encompasses much more than encryption of secret messages. Signature schemes are widely used to guarantee that messages cannot be forged or tampered with, for example in e-mail, software updates and electronic commerce. Messages are also transferrable, which distinguishes digital signatures from message authentication. Transferability means that messages can be forwarded; in other words, that a sender is unlikely to be able to make one recipient accept a message which is subsequently rejected by another recipient if the message is forwarded. Similar to public-key encryption, the security of commonly used signature schemes relies on the assumed computational difficulty of problems such as finding discrete logarithms or factoring large primes. With quantum computers, such assumptions would no longer be valid. Partly for this reason, it is desirable to develop signature schemes with unconditional or information-theoretic security. Quantum signature schemes are one possible solution. Similar to quantum key distribution (QKD), their unconditional security relies only on the laws of quantum mechanics. Quantum signatures can be realized with the same system components as QKD, but are so far less investigated. This talk aims to provide an introduction to quantum signatures and to review theoretical and experimental progress so far.

  12. Entropy-as-a-Service: Unlocking the Full Potential of Cryptography

    PubMed Central

    Vassilev, Apostol; Staples, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Securing the Internet requires strong cryptography, which depends on the availability of good entropy for generating unpredictable keys and accurate clocks. Attacks abusing weak keys or old inputs portend challenges for the Internet. EaaS is a novel architecture providing entropy and timestamps from a decentralized root of trust, scaling gracefully across diverse geopolitical locales and remaining trustworthy unless much of the collective is compromised. PMID:28003687

  13. Entropy-as-a-Service: Unlocking the Full Potential of Cryptography.

    PubMed

    Vassilev, Apostol; Staples, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Securing the Internet requires strong cryptography, which depends on the availability of good entropy for generating unpredictable keys and accurate clocks. Attacks abusing weak keys or old inputs portend challenges for the Internet. EaaS is a novel architecture providing entropy and timestamps from a decentralized root of trust, scaling gracefully across diverse geopolitical locales and remaining trustworthy unless much of the collective is compromised.

  14. Public channel cryptography by synchronization of neural networks and chaotic maps.

    PubMed

    Mislovaty, Rachel; Klein, Einat; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2003-09-12

    Two different kinds of synchronization have been applied to cryptography: synchronization of chaotic maps by one common external signal and synchronization of neural networks by mutual learning. By combining these two mechanisms, where the external signal to the chaotic maps is synchronized by the nets, we construct a hybrid network which allows a secure generation of secret encryption keys over a public channel. The security with respect to attacks, recently proposed by Shamir et al., is increased by chaotic synchronization.

  15. Quantum key distribution with an entangled light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect

    Dzurnak, B.; Stevenson, R. M.; Nilsson, J.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Skiba-Szymanska, J.; Shields, A. J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2015-12-28

    Measurements performed on entangled photon pairs shared between two parties can allow unique quantum cryptographic keys to be formed, creating secure links between users. An advantage of using such entangled photon links is that they can be adapted to propagate entanglement to end users of quantum networks with only untrusted nodes. However, demonstrations of quantum key distribution with entangled photons have so far relied on sources optically excited with lasers. Here, we realize a quantum cryptography system based on an electrically driven entangled-light-emitting diode. Measurement bases are passively chosen and we show formation of an error-free quantum key. Our measurements also simultaneously reveal Bell's parameter for the detected light, which exceeds the threshold for quantum entanglement.

  16. Improved uncertainty relation in the presence of quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan; Fei, Shao-Ming; Li-Jost, Xianqing

    2016-12-01

    Berta et al’s uncertainty principle in the presence of quantum memory (Berta et al 2010 Nat. Phys. 6 659) reveals uncertainties with quantum side information between the observables. In the recent important work of Coles and Piani (2014 Phys. Rev. A 89 022112), the entropic sum is controlled by the first and second maximum overlaps between the two projective measurements. We generalize the entropic uncertainty relation in the presence of quantum memory and find the exact dependence on all d largest overlaps between two measurements on any d-dimensional Hilbert space. Our bound is rigorously shown to be strictly tighter than previous entropic bounds in the presence of quantum memory, which have potential applications to quantum cryptography with entanglement witnesses and quantum key distributions.

  17. Optimal estimation of parameters of an entangled quantum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virzì, S.; Avella, A.; Piacentini, F.; Gramegna, M.; Brida, G.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Genovese, M.

    2017-05-01

    Two-photon entangled quantum states are a fundamental tool for quantum information and quantum cryptography. A complete description of a generic quantum state is provided by its density matrix: the technique allowing experimental reconstruction of the density matrix is called quantum state tomography. Entangled states density matrix reconstruction requires a large number of measurements on many identical copies of the quantum state. An alternative way of certifying the amount of entanglement in two-photon states is represented by the estimation of specific parameters, e.g., negativity and concurrence. If we have a priori partial knowledge of our state, it’s possible to develop several estimators for these parameters that require lower amount of measurements with respect to full density matrix reconstruction. The aim of this work is to introduce and test different estimators for negativity and concurrence for a specific class of two-photon states.

  18. Cryptanalysis of a Classical Chaos-Based Cryptosystem with Some Quantum Cryptography Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, David; Hernandez, Fernando; Orúe, Amalia B.

    The application of synchronization theory to build new cryptosystems has been a hot topic during the last two decades. In this paper, we analyze a recent proposal in this field. We pinpoint the main limitations of the software implementation of chaos-based systems designed on the grounds of synchronization theory. In addition, we show that the cryptosystem under evaluation possesses serious security problems that imply a clear reduction of the key space.

  19. Fish fat, quantum cryptography: All in a day's work at the news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Matthew

    Fellow scientists always get a laugh when I tell them my first publication was in The Dallas Morning News.That article (about fish fat and how it helps fight depression) was the first tangible product of my AGU-sponsored participation in the Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellows Program, sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The program sends science and engineering graduate students to media organizations across the country for 10-week summer stints as science journalists. The objective is to strengthen the connections between scientists and journalists and improve coverage of science in the media.

  20. Design of an Elliptic Curve Cryptography Processor for RFID Tag Chips

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zilong; Liu, Dongsheng; Zou, Xuecheng; Lin, Hui; Cheng, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an important technique for wireless sensor networks and the Internet of Things. Recently, considerable research has been performed in the combination of public key cryptography and RFID. In this paper, an efficient architecture of Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) Processor for RFID tag chip is presented. We adopt a new inversion algorithm which requires fewer registers to store variables than the traditional schemes. A new method for coordinate swapping is proposed, which can reduce the complexity of the controller and shorten the time of iterative calculation effectively. A modified circular shift register architecture is presented in this paper, which is an effective way to reduce the area of register files. Clock gating and asynchronous counter are exploited to reduce the power consumption. The simulation and synthesis results show that the time needed for one elliptic curve scalar point multiplication over GF(2163) is 176.7 K clock cycles and the gate area is 13.8 K with UMC 0.13 μm Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Moreover, the low power and low cost consumption make the Elliptic Curve Cryptography Processor (ECP) a prospective candidate for application in the RFID tag chip. PMID:25264952

  1. Design of an Elliptic Curve Cryptography processor for RFID tag chips.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zilong; Liu, Dongsheng; Zou, Xuecheng; Lin, Hui; Cheng, Jian

    2014-09-26

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an important technique for wireless sensor networks and the Internet of Things. Recently, considerable research has been performed in the combination of public key cryptography and RFID. In this paper, an efficient architecture of Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) Processor for RFID tag chip is presented. We adopt a new inversion algorithm which requires fewer registers to store variables than the traditional schemes. A new method for coordinate swapping is proposed, which can reduce the complexity of the controller and shorten the time of iterative calculation effectively. A modified circular shift register architecture is presented in this paper, which is an effective way to reduce the area of register files. Clock gating and asynchronous counter are exploited to reduce the power consumption. The simulation and synthesis results show that the time needed for one elliptic curve scalar point multiplication over GF(2163) is 176.7 K clock cycles and the gate area is 13.8 K with UMC 0.13 μm Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Moreover, the low power and low cost consumption make the Elliptic Curve Cryptography Processor (ECP) a prospective candidate for application in the RFID tag chip.

  2. A copyright protection scheme for digital images based on shuffled singular value decomposition and visual cryptography.

    PubMed

    Devi, B Pushpa; Singh, Kh Manglem; Roy, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new watermarking algorithm based on the shuffled singular value decomposition and the visual cryptography for copyright protection of digital images. It generates the ownership and identification shares of the image based on visual cryptography. It decomposes the image into low and high frequency sub-bands. The low frequency sub-band is further divided into blocks of same size after shuffling it and then the singular value decomposition is applied to each randomly selected block. Shares are generated by comparing one of the elements in the first column of the left orthogonal matrix with its corresponding element in the right orthogonal matrix of the singular value decomposition of the block of the low frequency sub-band. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme clearly verifies the copyright of the digital images, and is robust to withstand several image processing attacks. Comparison with the other related visual cryptography-based algorithms reveals that the proposed method gives better performance. The proposed method is especially resilient against the rotation attack.

  3. Adaptive pixel-selection using chaotic map lattices for image cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittigorn, Jirasak; Paithoonwattanakij, Kitti; Surawatpunya, Charray

    2014-01-01

    Chaotic theory has been used in cryptography application for generating a sequence of data that is close to pseudorandom number based on an adjusted initial condition and a parameter. However, data recovery becomes a crucial problem due to the precision of the parameters. This difficulty leads to limited usage of Chaotic-based cryptography especially for error sensitive applications such as voice cryptography. In order to enhance the encryption security and overcome this limitation, an Adaptive Pixel-Selection using Chaotic Map Lattices (APCML) is proposed. In APCML, the encryption sequence has been adaptively selected based on chaos generator. Moreover, the chaotic transformation and normalization boundary have been revised to alleviate the rounding error and inappropriate normalization boundary problems. In the experiments, the measurement indices of originality preservation, visual inspection, and statistical analysis are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed APCML compared to that of the original CML. Consequently, the APCML algorithm offers greater performance with full recovery of the original message.

  4. Authentication of quantum messages.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnum, Howard; Crépeau, Jean-Claude; Gottesman, D.; Smith, A.; Tapp, Alan

    2001-01-01

    Authentication is a well-studied area of classical cryptography: a sender A and a receiver B sharing a classical private key want to exchange a classical message with the guarantee that the message has not been modified or replaced by a dishonest party with control of the communication line. In this paper we study the authentication of messages composed of quantum states. We give a formal definition of authentication in the quantum setting. Assuming A and B have access to an insecure quantum channel and share a private, classical random key, we provide a non-interactive scheme that both enables A to encrypt and authenticate (with unconditional security) an m qubit message by encoding it into m + s qubits, where the probability decreases exponentially in the security parameter s. The scheme requires a private key of size 2m + O(s). To achieve this, we give a highly efficient protocol for testing the purity of shared EPR pairs. It has long been known that learning information about a general quantum state will necessarily disturb it. We refine this result to show that such a disturbance can be done with few side effects, allowing it to circumvent cryptographic protections. Consequently, any scheme to authenticate quantum messages must also encrypt them. In contrast, no such constraint exists classically: authentication and encryption are independent tasks, and one can authenticate a message while leaving it publicly readable. This reasoning has two important consequences: On one hand, it allows us to give a lower bound of 2m key bits for authenticating m qubits, which makes our protocol asymptotically optimal. On the other hand, we use it to show that digitally signing quantum states is impossible, even with only computational security.

  5. Ion Trap Quantum Computers: Performance Limits and Experimental Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard

    1998-03-01

    In a quantum computer information would be represented by the quantum mechanical states of suitable atomic-scale systems. (A single bit of information represented by a two-level quantum system is known as a qubit.) This notion leads to the possibility of computing with quantum mechanical superpositions of numbers ("quantum parallelism"), which for certain problems would make Quantum/quantum.html>quantum computation very much more efficient than classical computation. The possibility of rapidly factoring the large integers used in public-key cryptography is an important example. (Public key cryptosystems derive their security from the difficuty of factoring, and similar problems, with conventional computers.) Quantum computational hardware development is in its infancy, but an experimental study of quantum computation with laser-cooled trapped calcium ions that is under way at Los Alamos will be described. One of the pricipal obstacles to practical quantum computation is the inevitable loss of quantum coherence of the complex quantum states involved. The results of a theoretical analysis showing that quantum factoring of small integers should be possible with trapped ions will be presented. The prospects for larger-scale computations will be discussed.

  6. Bell's Theorem, Entaglement, Quantum Teleportation and All That

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Leggett

    2008-03-05

    One of the most surprising aspects of quantum mechanics is that under certain circumstances it does not allow individual physical systems, even when isolated, to possess properties in their own right. This feature, first clearly appreciated by John Bell in 1964, has in the last three decades been tested experimentally and found (in most people's opinion) to be spectacularly confirmed. More recently it has been realized that it permits various operations which are classically impossible, such as "teleportation" and secure-in-principle cryptography. This talk is a very basic introduction to the subject, which requires only elementary quantum mechanics.

  7. Bell's Theorem, Entanglement, Quantum Teleportation, and All That

    SciTech Connect

    Legett, Anthony

    2008-03-05

    One of the most surprising aspects of quantum mechanics is that under certain circumstances it does not allow individual physical systems, even when isolated, to possess properties in their own right. This feature, first clearly appreciated by John Bell in 1964, has in the last three decades been tested experimentally and found (in most people's opinion) to be spectacularly confirmed. More recently it has been realized that it permits various operations which are classically impossible, such as 'teleportation' and secure-in-principle cryptography. This talk is a very basic introduction to the subject, which requires only elementary quantum mechanics.

  8. Bell's Theorem, Entaglement, Quantum Teleportation and All That

    ScienceCinema

    Anthony Leggett

    2016-07-12

    One of the most surprising aspects of quantum mechanics is that under certain circumstances it does not allow individual physical systems, even when isolated, to possess properties in their own right. This feature, first clearly appreciated by John Bell in 1964, has in the last three decades been tested experimentally and found (in most people's opinion) to be spectacularly confirmed. More recently it has been realized that it permits various operations which are classically impossible, such as "teleportation" and secure-in-principle cryptography. This talk is a very basic introduction to the subject, which requires only elementary quantum mechanics.

  9. Experimental reversion of the optimal quantum cloning and flipping processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sciarrino, Fabio; Secondi, Veronica; De Martini, Francesco

    2006-04-15

    The quantum cloner machine maps an unknown arbitrary input qubit into two optimal clones and one optimal flipped qubit. By combining linear and nonlinear optical methods we experimentally implement a scheme that, after the cloning transformation, restores the original input qubit in one of the output channels, by using local measurements, classical communication, and feedforward. This nonlocal method demonstrates how the information on the input qubit can be restored after the cloning process. The realization of the reversion process is expected to find useful applications in the field of modern multipartite quantum cryptography.

  10. Entanglement enhances security in quantum communication

    SciTech Connect

    Demkowicz-Dobrzanski, Rafal; Sen, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2009-07-15

    Secret sharing is a protocol in which a 'boss' wants to send a classical message secretly to two 'subordinates', such that none of the subordinates is able to know the message alone, while they can find it if they cooperate. Quantum mechanics is known to allow for such a possibility. We analyze tolerable quantum bit error rates in such secret sharing protocols in the physically relevant case when the eavesdropping is local with respect to the two channels of information transfer from the boss to the two subordinates. We find that using entangled encoding states is advantageous to legitimate users of the protocol. We therefore find that entanglement is useful for secure quantum communication. We also find that bound entangled states with positive partial transpose are not useful as a local eavesdropping resource. Moreover, we provide a criterion for security in secret sharing--a parallel of the Csiszar-Koerner criterion in single-receiver classical cryptography.

  11. Experimental demonstration of counterfactual quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Ju, Lei; Liang, Xiao-Lei; Tang, Shi-Biao; Tu, Guo-Liang Shen; Zhou, Lei; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Chen, Kai; Chen, Teng-Yun; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2012-07-20

    Quantum effects, besides offering substantial superiority in many tasks over classical methods, are also expected to provide interesting ways to establish secret keys between remote parties. A striking scheme called "counterfactual quantum cryptography" proposed by Noh [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 230501 (2009).] allows one to maintain secure key distributions, in which particles carrying secret information are seemingly not being transmitted through quantum channels. We have experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, a faithful implementation for such a scheme with an on-table realization operating at telecom wavelengths. To verify its feasibility for extension over a long distance, we have furthermore reported an illustration on a 1 km fiber. In both cases, high visibilities of more than 98% are achieved through active stabilization of interferometers. Our demonstration is crucial as a direct verification of such a remarkable application, and this procedure can become a key communication module for revealing fundamental physics through counterfactuals.

  12. Short Review on Quantum Key Distribution Protocols.

    PubMed

    Giampouris, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    Cryptographic protocols and mechanisms are widely investigated under the notion of quantum computing. Quantum cryptography offers particular advantages over classical ones, whereas in some cases established protocols have to be revisited in order to maintain their functionality. The purpose of this paper is to provide the basic definitions and review the most important theoretical advancements concerning the BB84 and E91 protocols. It also aims to offer a summary on some key developments on the field of quantum key distribution, closely related with the two aforementioned protocols. The main goal of this study is to provide the necessary background information along with a thorough review on the theoretical aspects of QKD, concentrating on specific protocols. The BB84 and E91 protocols have been chosen because most other protocols are similar to these, a fact that makes them important for the general understanding of how the QKD mechanism functions.

  13. Quantum entanglement assisted key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ke; Ji, Ping; Zhang, Xiaowen

    2007-04-01

    Quantum correlations or entanglement is a basic ingredient for many applications of quantum information theory.One important application using quantum entanglement exploits the correlation nature of entangled photon states is quantum key distribution, which is proven unbreakable in principle and provides the highest possible security that is impossible in classical information theory. However, generating entangled photon pairs is not a simple task -- only approximately one out of a million pump photons decay into a signal and idler photon pair. This low rate of entangled photon pairs is further reduced by the overhead required in order for the rectification of the inevitable errors due to channel imperfections or caused by potential eavesdroppers. As a consequence, quantum key distribution suffers from a low bit rate, which is in the order of hundreds to thousands bits per second or below. On the other hand, the classical public key distribution does not impose a tight limit on the transmission rate. However, it is subject to the risks of eavesdroppers sitting in the middle of the insecure channel. In this paper, we propose a hybrid key distribution method which uses public key distribution method to generate a raw key, and then uses entanglement assisted communication to modify the raw key by inserting a number of quantum bits in the raw key. Building upon the foundation of the unconditional security of quantum key distribution, we use the privacy amplification to make the affection of inserted bits expand to a whole key. Our quantum entanglement assisted key distribution scheme greatly improves the efficiency of key distribution while without compromising the level of security achievable by quantum cryptography.

  14. The Quantum Information Revolution: 101 Uses for Schodinger's Cat

    SciTech Connect

    Kwait, Paul G.

    2007-09-05

    A century after Einstein's revolutionary suggestion that light is composed of particles, the quantum information revolution seeks to use the almost magical properties of non-classical physics to enable new feats in information processing. The critical quantum resource is entanglement, which can now be produced at high rates with exquisite precision, enabling such feats as quantum cryptography and teleportation. I will describe some of these "micracles," and our investigations into how the usual benefits can be further extended, by using more complex quantum states (e.g., "hyper-entanglement"), and by incorporating other elements of modern physics (e.g., special relativity). Time and appetites permitting, a brief lesson in quantum cooking may be forthcoming.

  15. Quantum key distribution session with 16-dimensional photonic states

    PubMed Central

    Etcheverry, S.; Cañas, G.; Gómez, E. S.; Nogueira, W. A. T.; Saavedra, C.; Xavier, G. B.; Lima, G.

    2013-01-01

    The secure transfer of information is an important problem in modern telecommunications. Quantum key distribution (QKD) provides a solution to this problem by using individual quantum systems to generate correlated bits between remote parties, that can be used to extract a secret key. QKD with D-dimensional quantum channels provides security advantages that grow with increasing D. However, the vast majority of QKD implementations has been restricted to two dimensions. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using higher dimensions for real-world quantum cryptography by performing, for the first time, a fully automated QKD session based on the BB84 protocol with 16-dimensional quantum states. Information is encoded in the single-photon transverse momentum and the required states are dynamically generated with programmable spatial light modulators. Our setup paves the way for future developments in the field of experimental high-dimensional QKD. PMID:23897033

  16. Quantum Attack-Resistent Certificateless Multi-Receiver Signcryption Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huixian; Chen, Xubao; Pang, Liaojun; Shi, Weisong

    2013-01-01

    The existing certificateless signcryption schemes were designed mainly based on the traditional public key cryptography, in which the security relies on the hard problems, such as factor decomposition and discrete logarithm. However, these problems will be easily solved by the quantum computing. So the existing certificateless signcryption schemes are vulnerable to the quantum attack. Multivariate public key cryptography (MPKC), which can resist the quantum attack, is one of the alternative solutions to guarantee the security of communications in the post-quantum age. Motivated by these concerns, we proposed a new construction of the certificateless multi-receiver signcryption scheme (CLMSC) based on MPKC. The new scheme inherits the security of MPKC, which can withstand the quantum attack. Multivariate quadratic polynomial operations, which have lower computation complexity than bilinear pairing operations, are employed in signcrypting a message for a certain number of receivers in our scheme. Security analysis shows that our scheme is a secure MPKC-based scheme. We proved its security under the hardness of the Multivariate Quadratic (MQ) problem and its unforgeability under the Isomorphism of Polynomials (IP) assumption in the random oracle model. The analysis results show that our scheme also has the security properties of non-repudiation, perfect forward secrecy, perfect backward secrecy and public verifiability. Compared with the existing schemes in terms of computation complexity and ciphertext length, our scheme is more efficient, which makes it suitable for terminals with low computation capacity like smart cards. PMID:23967037

  17. Quantum attack-resistent certificateless multi-receiver signcryption scheme.

    PubMed

    Li, Huixian; Chen, Xubao; Pang, Liaojun; Shi, Weisong

    2013-01-01

    The existing certificateless signcryption schemes were designed mainly based on the traditional public key cryptography, in which the security relies on the hard problems, such as factor decomposition and discrete logarithm. However, these problems will be easily solved by the quantum computing. So the existing certificateless signcryption schemes are vulnerable to the quantum attack. Multivariate public key cryptography (MPKC), which can resist the quantum attack, is one of the alternative solutions to guarantee the security of communications in the post-quantum age. Motivated by these concerns, we proposed a new construction of the certificateless multi-receiver signcryption scheme (CLMSC) based on MPKC. The new scheme inherits the security of MPKC, which can withstand the quantum attack. Multivariate quadratic polynomial operations, which have lower computation complexity than bilinear pairing operations, are employed in signcrypting a message for a certain number of receivers in our scheme. Security analysis shows that our scheme is a secure MPKC-based scheme. We proved its security under the hardness of the Multivariate Quadratic (MQ) problem and its unforgeability under the Isomorphism of Polynomials (IP) assumption in the random oracle model. The analysis results show that our scheme also has the security properties of non-repudiation, perfect forward secrecy, perfect backward secrecy and public verifiability. Compared with the existing schemes in terms of computation complexity and ciphertext length, our scheme is more efficient, which makes it suitable for terminals with low computation capacity like smart cards.

  18. Quantum crytography over 14km of installed optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Simmons, C.

    1995-09-01

    We have made the first demonstration that low error rate quantum cryptography over long distances (14km) of installed optical fiber in a real-world environment, subject to uncontrolled temperature and mechanical influences, representing an important new step towards incorporation of quantum cryptography into existing information security systems. We also point out that the high visibility single-photon interference in our experiment allows us to infer a test of the superposition principle of quantum mechanics: a photon reaching the detector has traveled over 14km of optical fiber in a wavepacket comprising a coherent superposition of two components that are spatially separated by about 2m. In principle, there are decoherence processes (or even possible modifications of quantum mechanics) that could cause the photon`s wavefunction to collapse into one component or the other during propagation, leading to a reduction in visibility. However, our results are consistent with no such loss of quantum coherence during the 67-{mu}s propagation time.

  19. Quantum entanglement and geometry of determinantal varieties

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hao

    2006-05-15

    Quantum entanglement was first recognized as a feature of quantum mechanics in the famous paper of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen. Recently it has been realized that quantum entanglement is a key ingredient in quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum cryptography. In this paper, we introduce algebraic sets, which are determinantal varieties in the complex projective spaces or the products of complex projective spaces, for the mixed states on bipartite or multipartite quantum systems as their invariants under local unitary transformations. These invariants are naturally arised from the physical consideration of measuring mixed states by separable pure states. Our construction has applications in the following important topics in quantum information theory: (1) separability criterion, it is proved that the algebraic sets must be a union of the linear subspaces if the mixed states are separable; (2) simulation of Hamiltonians, it is proved that the simulation of semipositive Hamiltonians of the same rank implies the projective isomorphisms of the corresponding algebraic sets; (3) construction of bound entangled mixed states, examples of the entangled mixed states which are invariant under partial transpositions (thus PPT bound entanglement) are constructed systematically from our new separability criterion.

  20. On the number of entangled qubits in quantum wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Amit Kumar; Balakrishnan, S.

    2016-08-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) can take the advantages by utilizing the security schemes based on the concepts of quantum computation and cryptography. However, quantum wireless sensor networks (QWSNs) are shown to have many practical constraints. One of the constraints is the number of entangled qubits which is very high in the quantum security scheme proposed by [Nagy et al., Nat. Comput. 9 (2010) 819]. In this work, we propose a modification of the security scheme introduced by Nagy et al. and hence the reduction in the number of entangled qubits is shown. Further, the modified scheme can overcome some of the constraints in the QWSNs.

  1. Quantum information with even and odd states of orbital angular momentum of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perumangatt, Chithrabhanu; Lal, Nijil; Anwar, Ali; Gangi Reddy, Salla; Singh, R. P.

    2017-06-01

    We address the possibility of using even/odd states of orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons for the quantum information tasks. Single photon qubit states and two photon entangled states in even/odd basis of OAM are considered. We present a method for the tomography and general projective measurement in even/odd basis. With the general projective measurement, we show the Bell violation and quantum cryptography with Bell's inequality. We also describe hyper and hybrid entanglement of even/odd OAM states along with polarization, which can be applied in the implementation of quantum protocols like super dense coding.

  2. Improving the security of arbitrated quantum signature against the forgery attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke-Jia; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Li, Dan

    2013-08-01

    As a feasible model for signing quantum messages, some cryptanalysis and improvement of arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) have received a great deal of attentions in recent years. However, in this paper we find the previous improvement is not suitable implemented in some typical AQS protocols in the sense that the receiver, Bob, can forge a valid signature under known message attack. We describe the forgery strategy and present some corresponding improved strategies to stand against the forgery attack by modifying the encryption algorithm, an important part of AQS. These works preserve the merits of AQS and lead some potential improvements of the security in quantum signature or other cryptography problems.

  3. Disorder generated by interacting neural networks: application to econophysics and cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2003-10-01

    When neural networks are trained on their own output signals they generate disordered time series. In particular, when two neural networks are trained on their mutual output they can synchronize; they relax to a time-dependent state with identical synaptic weights. Two applications of this phenomenon are discussed for (a) econophysics and (b) cryptography. (a) When agents competing in a closed market (minority game) are using neural networks to make their decisions, the total system relaxes to a state of good performance. (b) Two partners communicating over a public channel can find a common secret key.

  4. A secure RFID mutual authentication protocol for healthcare environments using elliptic curve cryptography.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chunhua; Xu, Chunxiang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhao, Jining

    2015-03-01

    Radio Frequency Identification(RFID) is an automatic identification technology, which can be widely used in healthcare environments to locate and track staff, equipment and patients. However, potential security and privacy problems in RFID system remain a challenge. In this paper, we design a mutual authentication protocol for RFID based on elliptic curve cryptography(ECC). We use pre-computing method within tag's communication, so that our protocol can get better efficiency. In terms of security, our protocol can achieve confidentiality, unforgeability, mutual authentication, tag's anonymity, availability and forward security. Our protocol also can overcome the weakness in the existing protocols. Therefore, our protocol is suitable for healthcare environments.

  5. Optical double-image cryptography based on diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2011-10-10

    In this paper, we propose a method using structured-illumination-based diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating for optical double-image cryptography. An optical cryptosystem is designed, and multiple random phase-only masks are placed in the optical path. When a phase grating is laterally translated just before the plaintexts, several diffraction intensity patterns (i.e., ciphertexts) can be correspondingly obtained. During image decryption, an iterative retrieval algorithm is developed to extract plaintexts from the ciphertexts. In addition, security and advantages of the proposed method are analyzed. Feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical simulation results. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  6. Secure information display with limited viewing zone by use of multi-color visual cryptography.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Hayasaki, Yoshio; Nishida, Nobuo

    2004-04-05

    We propose a display technique that ensures security of visual information by use of visual cryptography. A displayed image appears as a completely random pattern unless viewed through a decoding mask. The display has a limited viewing zone with the decoding mask. We have developed a multi-color encryption code set. Eight colors are represented in combinations of a displayed image composed of red, green, blue, and black subpixels and a decoding mask composed of transparent and opaque subpixels. Furthermore, we have demonstrated secure information display by use of an LCD panel.

  7. Information hiding based on double random-phase encoding and public-key cryptography.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yuan; Xin, Zhou; Alam, Mohammed S; Xi, Lu; Xiao-Feng, Li

    2009-03-02

    A novel information hiding method based on double random-phase encoding (DRPE) and Rivest-Shamir-Adleman (RSA) public-key cryptosystem is proposed. In the proposed technique, the inherent diffusion property of DRPE is cleverly utilized to make up the diffusion insufficiency of RSA public-key cryptography, while the RSA cryptosystem is utilized for simultaneous transmission of the cipher text and the two phase-masks, which is not possible under the DRPE technique. This technique combines the complementary advantages of the DPRE and RSA encryption techniques and brings security and convenience for efficient information transmission. Extensive numerical simulation results are presented to verify the performance of the proposed technique.

  8. Design and Implementation of KSP on the Next Generation Cryptography API

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lina, Zhang

    With good seamless connectivity and higher safety, KSP (Key Storage Providers) is the inexorable trend of security requirements and development to take the place of CSP (Cryptographic Service Provider). But the study on KSP has just started in our country, and almost no reports of its implementation can be found. Based on the analysis of function modules and the architecture of Cryptography API (Next Generation (CNG)), this paper discusses the design and implementation of KSP (key storage providers) based on smart card in detail, and an example is also presented to illustrate how to use KSP in Windows Vista.

  9. Implementation of Pollard Rho attack on elliptic curve cryptography over binary fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienardo, Yuliawan, Fajar; Muchtadi-Alamsyah, Intan; Rahardjo, Budi

    2015-09-01

    Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) is a public key cryptosystem with a security level determined by discrete logarithm problem called Elliptic Curve Discrete Logarithm Problem (ECDLP). John M. Pollard proposed an algorithm for discrete logarithm problem based on Monte Carlo method and known as Pollard Rho algorithm. The best current brute-force attack for ECC is Pollard Rho algorithm. In this research we implement modified Pollard Rho algorithm on ECC over GF (241). As the result, the runtime of Pollard Rho algorithm increases exponentially with the increase of the ECC key length. This work also presents the estimated runtime of Pollard Rho attack on ECC over longer bits.

  10. A quantum Fredkin gate (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Raj B.; Ho, Joseph; Ferreyrol, Franck; Ralph, Timothy C.; Pryde, Geoff J.

    2016-10-01

    One of the greatest challenges in modern science is the realisation of quantum computers which, as their scale increases, will allow enhanced performance of tasks across many areas of quantum information processing. Quantum logic gates play a vital role in realising these applications by carrying out the elementary operations on the qubits; a key aim is minimising the resources needed to build these gates into useful circuits. While the salient features of a quantum computer have been shown in proof-of-principle experiments, e.g., single- and two-qubit gates, difficulties in scaling quantum systems to encode and manipulate multiple qubits has hindered demonstrations of more complex operations. This is exemplified by the classical Fredkin (or controlled-SWAP) gate [1] for which, despite many theoretical proposals [2,3] relying on concatenating multiple two-qubit gates, a quantum analogue has yet to be realised. Here, by directly adding control to a two-qubit SWAP unitary [4], we use photonic qubit logic to report the first experimental demonstration of a quantum Fredkin gate [5]. Our scheme uses linear optics and improves on the overall probability of success by an order of magnitude over previous proposals [2,3]. This optical approach allows us to add control an arbitrary black-box unitary which is otherwise forbidden in the standard circuit model [6]. Additionally, the action of our gate exhibits quantum coherence allowing the generation of the highest fidelity three-photon GHZ states to date. The quantum Fredkin gate has many applications in quantum computing, quantum measurements [7] and cryptography [8,9]. Using our scheme, we apply the Fredkin gate to the task of direct measurements of the purity and state overlap of a quantum system [7] without recourse to quantum state tomography.

  11. Single-dot optical emission from ultralow density well-isolated InP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Ugur, A.; Hatami, F.; Masselink, W. T.; Vamivakas, A. N.; Lombez, L.; Atatuere, M.

    2008-10-06

    We demonstrate a straightforward way to obtain single well-isolated quantum dots emitting in the visible part of the spectrum and characterize the optical emission from single quantum dots using this method. Self-assembled InP quantum dots are grown using gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy over a wide range of InP deposition rates, using an ultralow growth rate of about 0.01 atomic monolayers/s, a quantum-dot density of 1 dot/{mu}m{sup 2} is realized. The resulting isolated InP quantum dots embedded in an InGaP matrix are individually characterized without the need for lithographical patterning and masks on the substrate. Such low-density quantum dots show excitonic emission at around 670 nm with a linewidth limited by instrument resolution. This system is applicable as a single-photon source for applications such as quantum cryptography.

  12. Fully integrated quantum photonic circuit with an electrically driven light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Pyatkov, Felix; Słowik, Karolina; Ferrari, Simone; Kahl, Oliver; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Rath, Patrik; Vetter, Andreas; Hennrich, Frank; Kappes, Manfred M.; Gol'Tsman, G.; Korneev, A.; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Krupke, Ralph; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2016-11-01

    Photonic quantum technologies allow quantum phenomena to be exploited in applications such as quantum cryptography, quantum simulation and quantum computation. A key requirement for practical devices is the scalable integration of single-photon sources, detectors and linear optical elements on a common platform. Nanophotonic circuits enable the realization of complex linear optical systems, while non-classical light can be measured with waveguide-integrated detectors. However, reproducible single-photon sources with high brightness and compatibility with photonic devices remain elusive for fully integrated systems. Here, we report the observation of antibunching in the light emitted from an electrically driven carbon nanotube embedded within a photonic quantum circuit. Non-classical light generated on chip is recorded under cryogenic conditions with waveguide-integrated superconducting single-photon detectors, without requiring optical filtering. Because exclusively scalable fabrication and deposition methods are used, our results establish carbon nanotubes as promising nanoscale single-photon emitters for hybrid quantum photonic devices.

  13. Temporal steering and security of quantum key distribution with mutually unbiased bases against individual attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Černoch, Antonín; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Nori, Franco

    2016-06-01

    Temporal steering, which is a temporal analog of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering, refers to temporal quantum correlations between the initial and final state of a quantum system. Our analysis of temporal steering inequalities in relation to the average quantum bit error rates reveals the interplay between temporal steering and quantum cloning, which guarantees the security of quantum key distribution based on mutually unbiased bases against individual attacks. The key distributions analyzed here include the Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol and the six-state 1998 protocol by Bruss. Moreover, we define a temporal steerable weight, which enables us to identify a kind of monogamy of temporal correlation that is essential to quantum cryptography and useful for analyzing various scenarios of quantum causality.

  14. Efficient quantum optical state engineering and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCusker, Kevin T.

    Over a century after the modern prediction of the existence of individual particles of light by Albert Einstein, a reliable source of this simple quantum state of one photon does not exist. While common light sources such as a light bulb, LED, or laser can produce a pulse of light with an average of one photon, there is (currently) no way of knowing the number of photons in that pulse without first absorbing (and thereby destroying) them. Spontaneous parametric down-conversion, a process in which one high-energy photon splits into two lower-energy photons, allows us to prepare a single-photon state by detecting one of the photons, which then heralds the existence of its twin. This process has been the workhorse of quantum optics, allowing demonstrations of a myriad of quantum processes and protocols, such as entanglement, cryptography, superdense coding, teleportation, and simple quantum computing demonstrations. All of these processes would benefit from better engineering of the underlying down-conversion process, but despite significant effort (both theoretical and experimental), optimization of this process is ongoing. The focus of this work is to optimize certain aspects of a down-conversion source, and then use this tool in novel experiments not otherwise feasible. Specifically, the goal is to optimize the heralding efficiency of the down-conversion photons, i.e., the probability that if one photon is detected, the other photon is also detected. This source is then applied to two experiments (a single-photon source, and a quantum cryptography implementation), and the detailed theory of an additional application (a source of Fock states and path-entangled states, called N00N states) is discussed, along with some other possible applications.

  15. Security and implementation of differential phase shift quantum key distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamanti, Eleni

    Quantum information processing has attracted a lot of attention in recent years because of the promise it holds for faster, better, and more secure future communications. The most advanced field in quantum information processing is quantum cryptography, also referred to as quantum key distribution (QKD), which uses the quantum properties of light to ensure the unconditionally secure transmission of a secret message between two parties. Despite the significant progress achieved in the performance of quantum cryptography systems, the communication distance has been limited to a few tens of kilometers and the communication speed remains very low, preventing the integration of these systems into current telecommunication networks. The main limiting factors are the vulnerability of existing QKD algorithms to powerful eavesdropping attacks, and the characteristics of the single-photon detectors employed in the system. This work addresses both of these limiting factors. We introduce and prove the security of a new quantum cryptography algorithm, the differential phase shift QKD protocol, which requires a very simple system architecture and only standard telecommunication components, such as lasers, detectors, and linear optics. The security proof against the most general attacks allowed by quantum mechanics reveals that this protocol is very robust to powerful eavesdropping attacks. Furthermore, we develop a new single-photon detector, which combines frequency up-conversion in a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide and a silicon avalanche photodiode to achieve high speed and efficient single-photon detection in the telecommunication wavelength band. By combining these key elements of a quantum cryptography system, we demonstrate the experimental realization of practical and efficient fiber-optic QKD systems, with which we achieved communication at a rate of 2 Mbit/s over 10 km, and transmission of secure messages over 100 km of optical fiber. Compared to existing

  16. On the improvement of neural cryptography using erroneous transmitted information with error prediction.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ahmed M; Abbas, Hazem M

    2010-12-01

    Neural cryptography deals with the problem of "key exchange" between two neural networks using the mutual learning concept. The two networks exchange their outputs (in bits) and the key between the two communicating parties is eventually represented in the final learned weights, when the two networks are said to be synchronized. Security of neural synchronization is put at risk if an attacker is capable of synchronizing with any of the two parties during the training process. Therefore, diminishing the probability of such a threat improves the reliability of exchanging the output bits through a public channel. The synchronization with feedback algorithm is one of the existing algorithms that enhances the security of neural cryptography. This paper proposes three new algorithms to enhance the mutual learning process. They mainly depend on disrupting the attacker confidence in the exchanged outputs and input patterns during training. The first algorithm is called "Do not Trust My Partner" (DTMP), which relies on one party sending erroneous output bits, with the other party being capable of predicting and correcting this error. The second algorithm is called "Synchronization with Common Secret Feedback" (SCSFB), where inputs are kept partially secret and the attacker has to train its network on input patterns that are different from the training sets used by the communicating parties. The third algorithm is a hybrid technique combining the features of the DTMP and SCSFB. The proposed approaches are shown to outperform the synchronization with feedback algorithm in the time needed for the parties to synchronize.

  17. Robust quantum data locking from phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Wilde, Mark M.; Lloyd, Seth

    2014-08-01

    Quantum data locking is a uniquely quantum phenomenon that allows a relatively short key of constant size to (un)lock an arbitrarily long message encoded in a quantum state, in such a way that an eavesdropper who measures the state but does not know the key has essentially no information about the message. The application of quantum data locking in cryptography would allow one to overcome the limitations of the one-time pad encryption, which requires the key to have the same length as the message. However, it is known that the strength of quantum data locking is also its Achilles heel, as the leakage of a few bits of the key or the message may in principle allow the eavesdropper to unlock a disproportionate amount of information. In this paper we show that there exist quantum data locking schemes that can be made robust against information leakage by increasing the length of the key by a proportionate amount. This implies that a constant size key can still lock an arbitrarily long message as long as a fraction of it remains secret to the eavesdropper. Moreover, we greatly simplify the structure of the protocol by proving that phase modulation suffices to generate strong locking schemes, paving the way to optical experimental realizations. Also, we show that successful data locking protocols can be constructed using random code words, which very well could be helpful in discovering random codes for data locking over noisy quantum channels.

  18. BOOK REVIEW Quantum Measurement and Control Quantum Measurement and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2010-12-01

    In the last two decades there has been an enormous progress in the experimental investigation of single quantum systems. This progress covers fields such as quantum optics, quantum computation, quantum cryptography, and quantum metrology, which are sometimes summarized as `quantum technologies'. A key issue there is entanglement, which can be considered as the characteristic feature of quantum theory. As disparate as these various fields maybe, they all have to deal with a quantum mechanical treatment of the measurement process and, in particular, the control process. Quantum control is, according to the authors, `control for which the design requires knowledge of quantum mechanics'. Quantum control situations in which measurements occur at important steps are called feedback (or feedforward) control of quantum systems and play a central role here. This book presents a comprehensive and accessible treatment of the theoretical tools that are needed to cope with these situations. It also provides the reader with the necessary background information about the experimental developments. The authors are both experts in this field to which they have made significant contributions. After an introduction to quantum measurement theory and a chapter on quantum parameter estimation, the central topic of open quantum systems is treated at some length. This chapter includes a derivation of master equations, the discussion of the Lindblad form, and decoherence - the irreversible emergence of classical properties through interaction with the environment. A separate chapter is devoted to the description of open systems by the method of quantum trajectories. Two chapters then deal with the central topic of quantum feedback control, while the last chapter gives a concise introduction to one of the central applications - quantum information. All sections contain a bunch of exercises which serve as a useful tool in learning the material. Especially helpful are also various separate

  19. Trichocyanines: a Red-Hair-Inspired Modular Platform for Dye-Based One-Time-Pad Molecular Cryptography

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Loredana; Pezzella, Alessandro; Crescenzi, Orlando; Napolitano, Alessandra; Barone, Vincenzo; d’Ischia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Current molecular cryptography (MoCryp) systems are almost exclusively based on DNA chemistry and reports of cryptography technologies based on other less complex chemical systems are lacking. We describe herein, as proof of concept, the prototype of the first asymmetric MoCryp system, based on an 8-compound set of a novel bioinspired class of cyanine-type dyes called trichocyanines. These novel acidichromic cyanine-type dyes inspired by red hair pigments were synthesized and characterized with the aid of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Trichocyanines consist of a modular scaffold easily accessible via an expedient condensation of 3-phenyl- or 3-methyl-2H-1,4-benzothiazines with N-dimethyl- or o-methoxyhydroxy-substituted benzaldehyde or cinnamaldehyde derivatives. The eight representative members synthesized herein can be classified as belonging to two three-state systems tunable through four different control points. This versatile dye platform can generate an expandable palette of colors and appears to be specifically suited to implement an unprecedented single-use asymmetric molecular cryptography system. With this system, we intend to pioneer the translation of digital public-key cryptography into a chemical-coding one-time-pad-like system. PMID:26246999

  20. Encrypted Objects and Decryption Processes: Problem-Solving with Functions in a Learning Environment Based on Cryptography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Tobin

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces an applied problem-solving task, set in the context of cryptography and embedded in a network of computer-based tools. This designed learning environment engaged students in a series of collaborative problem-solving activities intended to introduce the topic of functions through a set of linked representations. In a…

  1. Trichocyanines: a Red-Hair-Inspired Modular Platform for Dye-Based One-Time-Pad Molecular Cryptography.

    PubMed

    Leone, Loredana; Pezzella, Alessandro; Crescenzi, Orlando; Napolitano, Alessandra; Barone, Vincenzo; d'Ischia, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Current molecular cryptography (MoCryp) systems are almost exclusively based on DNA chemistry and reports of cryptography technologies based on other less complex chemical systems are lacking. We describe herein, as proof of concept, the prototype of the first asymmetric MoCryp system, based on an 8-compound set of a novel bioinspired class of cyanine-type dyes called trichocyanines. These novel acidichromic cyanine-type dyes inspired by red hair pigments were synthesized and characterized with the aid of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Trichocyanines consist of a modular scaffold easily accessible via an expedient condensation of 3-phenyl- or 3-methyl-2H-1,4-benzothiazines with N-dimethyl- or o-methoxyhydroxy-substituted benzaldehyde or cinnamaldehyde derivatives. The eight representative members synthesized herein can be classified as belonging to two three-state systems tunable through four different control points. This versatile dye platform can generate an expandable palette of colors and appears to be specifically suited to implement an unprecedented single-use asymmetric molecular cryptography system. With this system, we intend to pioneer the translation of digital public-key cryptography into a chemical-coding one-time-pad-like system.

  2. Loss-tolerant quantum secure positioning with weak laser sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Xu, Feihu; Siopsis, George; Chitambar, Eric; Evans, Philip G.; Qi, Bing

    2016-09-14

    Quantum position verification (QPV) is the art of verifying the geographical location of an untrusted party. It has recently been shown that the widely studied Bennett & Brassard 1984 (BB84) QPV protocol is insecure after the 3 dB loss point assuming local operations and classical communication (LOCC) adversaries. Here in this paper, we propose a time-reversed entanglement swapping QPV protocol (based on measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography) that is highly robust against quantum channel loss. First, assuming ideal qubit sources, we show that the protocol is secure against LOCC adversaries for any quantum channel loss, thereby overcoming the 3 dB loss limit. Then, we analyze the security of the protocol in a more practical setting involving weak laser sources and linear optics. Lastly, in this setting, we find that the security only degrades by an additive constant and the protocol is able to verify positions up to 47 dB channel loss.

  3. Loss-tolerant quantum secure positioning with weak laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Xu, Feihu; Siopsis, George; Chitambar, Eric; Evans, Philip G.; Qi, Bing

    2016-09-01

    Quantum position verification (QPV) is the art of verifying the geographical location of an untrusted party. Recently, it has been shown that the widely studied Bennett & Brassard 1984 (BB84) QPV protocol is insecure after the 3 dB loss point assuming local operations and classical communication (LOCC) adversaries. Here, we propose a time-reversed entanglement swapping QPV protocol (based on measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography) that is highly robust against quantum channel loss. First, assuming ideal qubit sources, we show that the protocol is secure against LOCC adversaries for any quantum channel loss, thereby overcoming the 3 dB loss limit. Then, we analyze the security of the protocol in a more practical setting involving weak laser sources and linear optics. In this setting, we find that the security only degrades by an additive constant and the protocol is able to verify positions up to 47 dB channel loss.

  4. Quantum Public Key Cryptosystem Based on Bell States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, WanQing; Cai, QingYu; Zhang, HuanGuo; Liang, XiaoYan

    2017-08-01

    Classical public key cryptosystems (P K C), such as R S A, E I G a m a l, E C C, are no longer secure in quantum algorithms, and quantum cryptography has become a novel research topic. In this paper we present a quantum asymmetrical cryptosystem i.e. quantum public key cryptosystem (Q P K C) based on the Bell states. In particular, in the proposed QPKC the public key are given by the first n particles of Bell states and generalized Pauli operations. The corresponding secret key are the last n particles of Bell states and the inverse of generalized Pauli operations. The proposed QPKC encrypts the message using a public key and decrypts the ciphertext using a private key. By H o l e v o ' s theorem, we proved the security of the secret key and messages during the QPKC.

  5. Quantum key distribution for composite dimensional finite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, Mohamed; Kamal, Yasser

    2017-06-01

    The application of quantum mechanics contributes to the field of cryptography with very important advantage as it offers a mechanism for detecting the eavesdropper. The pioneering work of quantum key distribution uses mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) to prepare and measure qubits (or qudits). Weak mutually unbiased bases (WMUBs) have weaker properties than MUBs properties, however, unlike MUBs, a complete set of WMUBs can be constructed for systems with composite dimensions. In this paper, we study the use of weak mutually unbiased bases (WMUBs) in quantum key distribution for composite dimensional finite systems. We prove that the security analysis of using a complete set of WMUBs to prepare and measure the quantum states in the generalized BB84 protocol, gives better results than using the maximum number of MUBs that can be constructed, when they are analyzed against the intercept and resend attack.

  6. Fully guided-wave photon pair source for quantum applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergyris, P.; Kaiser, F.; Gouzien, E.; Sauder, G.; Lunghi, T.; Tanzilli, S.

    2017-06-01

    We report a fully guided-wave source of polarisation entangled photons based on a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide mounted in a Sagnac interferometer. We demonstrate the source’s quality by converting polarisation entanglement to postselection-free energy-time entanglement for which we obtain a near-optimal S-parameter of 2.75 ± 0.02, i.e. a violation of the Bell inequality by more than 35 standard deviations. The exclusive use of guided-wave components makes our source compact and stable which is a prerequisite for increasingly complex quantum applications. Additionally, our source offers a great versatility in terms of photon pair emission spectrum and generated quantum state, making it suitable for a broad range of quantum applications such as cryptography and metrology. In this sense, we show how to use our source for chromatic dispersion measurements in optical fibres which opens new avenues in the field of quantum metrology.

  7. Quantum secure direct communication with frequency coding scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xue-Liang; Ruan, Dong

    2016-11-01

    Quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) is an important branch of quantum cryptography. It can transmit secret information directly without establishing a key first, unlike quantum key distribution which requires this precursive event. One of the most highlighted QSDC protocol is the Two-step protocol. This paper will focus on proposing a frequency coding scheme in the Two-step protocol, while retaining other contents of the QSDC protocol. This new coding scheme will significantly increase the protocol's ability against channel noise and loss, and provides an efficient protocol for secure direct quantum communication in a noisy environment. Besides, the frequency coding technology is also easy to understand and highly practical. After numerically simulating the performance of the protocol in a noisy channel, the results showed that the scheme was robust against channel noise and loss.

  8. Enhanced security for multi-detector quantum random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangon, Davide G.; Vallone, Giuseppe; Zanforlin, Ugo; Villoresi, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    Quantum random number generators (QRNG) represent an advanced solution for randomness generation, which is essential in every cryptographic application. In this context, integrated arrays of single-photon detectors have promising applications as QRNGs based on the spatial detection of photons. For the employment of QRNGs in cryptography, it is necessary to have efficient methods to evaluate the so-called quantum min-entropy that corresponds to the amount of the true extractable quantum randomness from the QRNG. Here, we present an efficient method that allows the estimation of the quantum min-entropy for a multi-detector QRNG. In particular, we consider a scenario in which an attacker can control the efficiency of the detectors and knows the emitted number of photons. Eventually, we apply the method to a QRNG with 103 detectors.

  9. Fault tolerant quantum random number generator certified by Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dong-Ling; Duan, Lu-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Braiding of Majorana fermions gives accurate topological quantum operations that are intrinsically robust to noise and imperfection, providing a natural method to realize fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Unfortunately, it is known that braiding of Majorana fermions is not sufficient for implementation of universal quantum computation. Here we show that topological manipulation of Majorana fermions provides the full set of operations required to generate random numbers by way of quantum mechanics and to certify its genuine randomness through violation of a multipartite Bell inequality. The result opens a new perspective to apply Majorana fermions for robust generation of certified random numbers, which has important applications in cryptography and other related areas. This work was supported by the NBRPC (973 Program) 2011CBA00300 (2011CBA00302), the IARPA MUSIQC program, the ARO and the AFOSR MURI program.

  10. Loss-tolerant quantum secure positioning with weak laser sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Xu, Feihu; Siopsis, George; Chitambar, Eric; Evans, Philip G.; Qi, Bing

    2016-09-14

    Quantum position verification (QPV) is the art of verifying the geographical location of an untrusted party. It has recently been shown that the widely studied Bennett & Brassard 1984 (BB84) QPV protocol is insecure after the 3 dB loss point assuming local operations and classical communication (LOCC) adversaries. Here in this paper, we propose a time-reversed entanglement swapping QPV protocol (based on measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography) that is highly robust against quantum channel loss. First, assuming ideal qubit sources, we show that the protocol is secure against LOCC adversaries for any quantum channel loss, thereby overcoming the 3 dB loss limit. Then, we analyze the security of the protocol in a more practical setting involving weak laser sources and linear optics. Lastly, in this setting, we find that the security only degrades by an additive constant and the protocol is able to verify positions up to 47 dB channel loss.

  11. LDRD final report on quantum computing using interacting semiconductor quantum wires.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Dunn, Roberto G.; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Tibbetts, Denise R. ); Stephenson, Larry L.; Seamons, John Andrew; Reno, John Louis; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Simmons, Jerry Alvon

    2006-01-01

    For several years now quantum computing has been viewed as a new paradigm for certain computing applications. Of particular importance to this burgeoning field is the development of an algorithm for factoring large numbers which obviously has deep implications for cryptography and national security. Implementation of these theoretical ideas faces extraordinary challenges in preparing and manipulating quantum states. The quantum transport group at Sandia has demonstrated world-leading, unique double quantum wires devices where we have unprecedented control over the coupling strength, number of 1 D channels, overlap and interaction strength in this nanoelectronic system. In this project, we study 1D-1D tunneling with the ultimate aim of preparing and detecting quantum states of the coupled wires. In a region of strong tunneling, electrons can coherently oscillate from one wire to the other. By controlling the velocity of the electrons, length of the coupling region and tunneling strength we will attempt to observe tunneling oscillations. This first step is critical for further development double quantum wires into the basic building block for a quantum computer, and indeed for other coupled nanoelectronic devices that will rely on coherent transport. If successful, this project will have important implications for nanoelectronics, quantum computing and information technology.

  12. Long-distance continuous-variable quantum key distribution by controlling excess noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Duan; Huang, Peng; Lin, Dakai; Zeng, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cryptography founded on the laws of physics could revolutionize the way in which communication information is protected. Significant progresses in long-distance quantum key distribution based on discrete variables have led to the secure quantum communication in real-world conditions being available. However, the alternative approach implemented with continuous variables has not yet reached the secure distance beyond 100 km. Here, we overcome the previous range limitation by controlling system excess noise and report such a long distance continuous-variable quantum key distribution experiment. Our result paves the road to the large-scale secure quantum communication with continuous variables and serves as a stepping stone in the quest for quantum network.

  13. Long-distance continuous-variable quantum key distribution by controlling excess noise

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Duan; Huang, Peng; Lin, Dakai; Zeng, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cryptography founded on the laws of physics could revolutionize the way in which communication information is protected. Significant progresses in long-distance quantum key distribution based on discrete variables have led to the secure quantum communication in real-world conditions being available. However, the alternative approach implemented with continuous variables has not yet reached the secure distance beyond 100 km. Here, we overcome the previous range limitation by controlling system excess noise and report such a long distance continuous-variable quantum key distribution experiment. Our result paves the road to the large-scale secure quantum communication with continuous variables and serves as a stepping stone in the quest for quantum network. PMID:26758727

  14. Memory assisted free space quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordaan, Bertus; Namazi, Mehdi; Goham, Connor; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo; Figueroa, Eden

    2016-05-01

    A quantum memory assisted node between different quantum channels has the capability to modify and synchronize its output, allowing for easy connectivity, and advanced cryptography protocols. We present the experimental progress towards the storage of single photon level pulses carrying random polarization qubits into a dual rail room temperature quantum memory (RTQM) after ~ 20m of free space propagation. The RTQM coherently stores the input pulses through electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) of a warm 87 Rb vapor and filters the output by polarization elements and temperature-controlled etalon resonators. This allows the characterization of error rates for each polarization basis and the testing of the synchronization ability of the quantum memory. This work presents a steppingstone towards quantum key distribution and quantum repeater networks. The work was supported by the US-Navy Office of Naval Research, Grant Number N00141410801 and the Simons Foundation, Grant Number SBF241180.B. J. acknowledges financial assistance of the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa.

  15. Fully device-independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidick, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The laws of quantum mechanics allow unconditionally secure key distribution protocols. Nevertheless, security proofs of traditional quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols rely on a crucial assumption, the trustworthiness of the quantum devices used in the protocol. In device-independent QKD, even this last assumption is relaxed: the devices used in the protocol may have been adversarially prepared, and there is no a priori guarantee that they perform according to specification. Proving security in this setting had been a central open problem in quantum cryptography. We give the first device-independent proof of security of a protocol for quantum key distribution that guarantees the extraction of a linear amount of key even when the devices are subject to a constant rate of noise. Our only assumptions are that the laboratories in which each party holds his or her own device are spatially isolated, and that both devices, as well as the eavesdropper, are bound by the laws of quantum mechanics. All previous proofs of security relied either on the use of many independent pairs of devices, or on the absence of noise.

  16. Ultrafast Quantum Control and Quantum Processing in the Vibronic States of Molecules and Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Benjamin; Bustard, Philip; England, Duncan; Lausten, Rune

    2014-05-01

    The unusual features of quantum mechanics are enabling the development of technologies not possible with classical physics, including applications in secure communications, quantum processing, and enhanced measurement. Efforts to build these devices utilize nonclassical states in numerous quantum systems, including cavity quantum electrodynamics, trap ions, nuclear spins, etc. as the basis for many prototypes. Here we investigate vibronic states in both molecules and bulk solids as distinct alternatives. We demonstrate a memory for light based on storing photons in the vibrations of hydrogen molecules and the optical phonons of diamond. Both classical and nonclassical photon states are used. These THz-bandwidth memories can be used to store femtosecond pulses for many operational time bins before the states decohere, making them viable for local photonic processing. We investigate decoherence and major sources of competing noise. While sustaining quantum coherence is critical for most quantum processing, rapid dephasing can also be used as a resource in these systems for rapid quantum random number generation, suitable for high-performance cryptography. NSERC

  17. An efficient RFID authentication protocol to enhance patient medication safety using elliptic curve cryptography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zezhong; Qi, Qingqing

    2014-05-01

    Medication errors are very dangerous even fatal since it could cause serious even fatal harm to patients. In order to reduce medication errors, automated patient medication systems using the Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology have been used in many hospitals. The data transmitted in those medication systems is very important and sensitive. In the past decade, many security protocols have been proposed to ensure its secure transition attracted wide attention. Due to providing mutual authentication between the medication server and the tag, the RFID authentication protocol is considered as the most important security protocols in those systems. In this paper, we propose a RFID authentication protocol to enhance patient medication safety using elliptic curve cryptography (ECC). The analysis shows the proposed protocol could overcome security weaknesses in previous protocols and has better performance. Therefore, the proposed protocol is very suitable for automated patient medication systems.

  18. Synchronization of random bit generators based on coupled chaotic lasers and application to cryptography.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Ido; Butkovski, Maria; Peleg, Yitzhak; Zigzag, Meital; Aviad, Yaara; Reidler, Igor; Rosenbluh, Michael; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2010-08-16

    Random bit generators (RBGs) constitute an important tool in cryptography, stochastic simulations and secure communications. The later in particular has some difficult requirements: high generation rate of unpredictable bit strings and secure key-exchange protocols over public channels. Deterministic algorithms generate pseudo-random number sequences at high rates, however, their unpredictability is limited by the very nature of their deterministic origin. Recently, physical RBGs based on chaotic semiconductor lasers were shown to exceed Gbit/s rates. Whether secure synchronization of two high rate physical RBGs is possible remains an open question. Here we propose a method, whereby two fast RBGs based on mutually coupled chaotic lasers, are synchronized. Using information theoretic analysis we demonstrate security against a powerful computational eavesdropper, capable of noiseless amplification, where all parameters are publicly known. The method is also extended to secure synchronization of a small network of three RBGs.

  19. Image size invariant visual cryptography for general access structures subject to display quality constraints.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kai-Hui; Chiu, Pei-Ling

    2013-10-01

    Conventional visual cryptography (VC) suffers from a pixel-expansion problem, or an uncontrollable display quality problem for recovered images, and lacks a general approach to construct visual secret sharing schemes for general access structures. We propose a general and systematic approach to address these issues without sophisticated codebook design. This approach can be used for binary secret images in non-computer-aided decryption environments. To avoid pixel expansion, we design a set of column vectors to encrypt secret pixels rather than using the conventional VC-based approach. We begin by formulating a mathematic model for the VC construction problem to find the column vectors for the optimal VC construction, after which we develop a simulated-annealing-based algorithm to solve the problem. The experimental results show that the display quality of the recovered image is superior to that of previous papers.

  20. A User Authentication Scheme Based on Elliptic Curves Cryptography for Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huifang; Ge, Linlin; Xie, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The feature of non-infrastructure support in a wireless ad hoc network (WANET) makes it suffer from various attacks. Moreover, user authentication is the first safety barrier in a network. A mutual trust is achieved by a protocol which enables communicating parties to authenticate each other at the same time and to exchange session keys. For the resource-constrained WANET, an efficient and lightweight user authentication scheme is necessary. In this paper, we propose a user authentication scheme based on the self-certified public key system and elliptic curves cryptography for a WANET. Using the proposed scheme, an efficient two-way user authentication and secure session key agreement can be achieved. Security analysis shows that our proposed scheme is resilient to common known attacks. In addition, the performance analysis shows that our proposed scheme performs similar or better compared with some existing user authentication schemes. PMID:26184224

  1. Optical asymmetric cryptography based on elliptical polarized light linear truncation and a numerical reconstruction technique.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao; Shen, Xueju; Wang, Zhisong; Zhao, Cheng

    2014-06-20

    We demonstrate a novel optical asymmetric cryptosystem based on the principle of elliptical polarized light linear truncation and a numerical reconstruction technique. The device of an array of linear polarizers is introduced to achieve linear truncation on the spatially resolved elliptical polarization distribution during image encryption. This encoding process can be characterized as confusion-based optical cryptography that involves no Fourier lens and diffusion operation. Based on the Jones matrix formalism, the intensity transmittance for this truncation is deduced to perform elliptical polarized light reconstruction based on two intensity measurements. Use of a quick response code makes the proposed cryptosystem practical, with versatile key sensitivity and fault tolerance. Both simulation and preliminary experimental results that support theoretical analysis are presented. An analysis of the resistance of the proposed method on a known public key attack is also provided.

  2. A User Authentication Scheme Based on Elliptic Curves Cryptography for Wireless Ad Hoc Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huifang; Ge, Linlin; Xie, Lei

    2015-07-14

    The feature of non-infrastructure support in a wireless ad hoc network (WANET) makes it suffer from various attacks. Moreover, user authentication is the first safety barrier in a network. A mutual trust is achieved by a protocol which enables communicating parties to authenticate each other at the same time and to exchange session keys. For the resource-constrained WANET, an efficient and lightweight user authentication scheme is necessary. In this paper, we propose a user authentication scheme based on the self-certified public key system and elliptic curves cryptography for a WANET. Using the proposed scheme, an efficient two-way user authentication and secure session key agreement can be achieved. Security analysis shows that our proposed scheme is resilient to common known attacks. In addition, the performance analysis shows that our proposed scheme performs similar or better compared with some existing user authentication schemes.

  3. A Novel Image Steganography Technique for Secured Online Transaction Using DWT and Visual Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitha Devi, M. D.; ShivaKumar, K. B.

    2017-08-01

    Online payment eco system is the main target especially for cyber frauds. Therefore end to end encryption is very much needed in order to maintain the integrity of secret information related to transactions carried online. With access to payment related sensitive information, which enables lot of money transactions every day, the payment infrastructure is a major target for hackers. The proposed system highlights, an ideal approach for secure online transaction for fund transfer with a unique combination of visual cryptography and Haar based discrete wavelet transform steganography technique. This combination of data hiding technique reduces the amount of information shared between consumer and online merchant needed for successful online transaction along with providing enhanced security to customer’s account details and thereby increasing customer’s confidence preventing “Identity theft” and “Phishing”. To evaluate the effectiveness of proposed algorithm Root mean square error, Peak signal to noise ratio have been used as evaluation parameters

  4. Image encryption using fingerprint as key based on phase retrieval algorithm and public key cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tieyu; Ran, Qiwen; Yuan, Lin; Chi, Yingying; Ma, Jing

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a novel image encryption system with fingerprint used as a secret key is proposed based on the phase retrieval algorithm and RSA public key algorithm. In the system, the encryption keys include the fingerprint and the public key of RSA algorithm, while the decryption keys are the fingerprint and the private key of RSA algorithm. If the users share the fingerprint, then the system will meet the basic agreement of asymmetric cryptography. The system is also applicable for the information authentication. The fingerprint as secret key is used in both the encryption and decryption processes so that the receiver can identify the authenticity of the ciphertext by using the fingerprint in decryption process. Finally, the simulation results show the validity of the encryption scheme and the high robustness against attacks based on the phase retrieval technique.

  5. An entangled-LED-driven quantum relay over 1 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnava, Christiana; Stevenson, R. Mark; Nilsson, Jonas; Skiba-Szymanska, Joanna; Dzurňák, Branislav; Lucamarini, Marco; Penty, Richard V.; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Shields, Andrew J.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum cryptography allows confidential information to be communicated between two parties, with secrecy guaranteed by the laws of nature alone. However, upholding guaranteed secrecy over networks poses a further challenge, as classical receive-and-resend routing nodes can only be used conditional of trust by the communicating parties, which arguably diminishes the value of the underlying quantum cryptography. Quantum relays offer a potential solution by teleporting qubits from a sender to a receiver, without demanding additional trust from end users. Here we demonstrate the operation of a quantum relay over 1 km of optical fibre, which teleports a sequence of photonic quantum bits to a receiver by utilising entangled photons emitted by a semiconductor light-emitting diode. The average relay fidelity of the link is 0.90±0.03, exceeding the classical bound of 0.75 for the set of states used, and sufficiently high to allow error correction. The fundamentally low multiphoton emission statistics and the integration potential of the source present an appealing platform for future quantum networks.

  6. Two-layer tree-connected feed-forward neural network model for neural cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xinyu; Liao, Xiaofeng; Chen, Fei; Huang, Tingwen

    2013-03-01

    Neural synchronization by means of mutual learning provides an avenue to design public key exchange protocols, bringing about what is known as neural cryptography. Two identically structured neural networks learn from each other and reach full synchronization eventually. The full synchronization enables two networks to have the same weight, which can be used as a secret key for many subsequent cryptographic purposes. It is striking to observe that after the first decade of neural cryptography, the tree parity machine (TPM) network with hidden unit K=3 appears to be the sole network that is suitable for a neural protocol. No convincingly secure neural protocol is well designed by using other network structures despite considerable research efforts. With the goal of overcoming the limitations of a suitable network structure, in this paper we develop a two-layer tree-connected feed-forward neural network (TTFNN) model for a neural protocol. The TTFNN model captures the notion that two partners are capable of exchanging a vector with multiple bits in each time step. An in-depth study of the dynamic process of TTFNN-based protocols is then undertaken, based upon which a feasible condition is theoretically obtained to seek applicable protocols. Afterward, according to two analytically derived heuristic rules, a complete methodology for designing feasible TTFNN-based protocols is elaborated. A variety of feasible neural protocols are constructed, which exhibit the effectiveness and benefits of the proposed model. With another look from the perspective of application, TTFNN-based instances, which can outperform the conventional TPM-based protocol with respect to synchronization speed, are also experimentally confirmed.

  7. Quantum computing accelerator I/O : LDRD 52750 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Modine, Normand Arthur; Ganti, Anand; Pierson, Lyndon George; Tigges, Christopher P.

    2003-12-01

    In a superposition of quantum states, a bit can be in both the states '0' and '1' at the same time. This feature of the quantum bit or qubit has no parallel in classical systems. Currently, quantum computers consisting of 4 to 7 qubits in a 'quantum computing register' have been built. Innovative algorithms suited to quantum computing are now beginning to emerge, applicable to sorting and cryptanalysis, and other applications. A framework for overcoming slightly inaccurate quantum gate interactions and for causing quantum states to survive interactions with surrounding environment is emerging, called quantum error correction. Thus there is the potential for rapid advances in this field. Although quantum information processing can be applied to secure communication links (quantum cryptography) and to crack conventional cryptosystems, the first few computing applications will likely involve a 'quantum computing accelerator' similar to a 'floating point arithmetic accelerator' interfaced to a conventional Von Neumann computer architecture. This research is to develop a roadmap for applying Sandia's capabilities to the solution of some of the problems associated with maintaining quantum information, and with getting data into and out of such a 'quantum computing accelerator'. We propose to focus this work on 'quantum I/O technologies' by applying quantum optics on semiconductor nanostructures to leverage Sandia's expertise in semiconductor microelectronic/photonic fabrication techniques, as well as its expertise in information theory, processing, and algorithms. The work will be guided by understanding of practical requirements of computing and communication architectures. This effort will incorporate ongoing collaboration between 9000, 6000 and 1000 and between junior and senior personnel. Follow-on work to fabricate and evaluate appropriate experimental nano/microstructures will be proposed as a result of this work.

  8. General A Scheme to Share Information via Employing Discrete Algorithm to Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Guo-Dong; Fang, Mao-Fa

    2011-02-01

    We propose a protocol for information sharing between two legitimate parties (Bob and Alice) via public-key cryptography. In particular, we specialize the protocol by employing discrete algorithm under mod that maps integers to quantum states via photon rotations. Based on this algorithm, we find that the protocol is secure under various classes of attacks. Specially, owe to the algorithm, the security of the classical privacy contained in the quantum public-key and the corresponding ciphertext is guaranteed. And the protocol is robust against the impersonation attack and the active wiretapping attack by designing particular checking processing, thus the protocol is valid.

  9. Nanostructured current-confined single quantum dot light-emitting diode at 1300 nm.

    PubMed

    Monat, Christelle; Alloing, Blandine; Zinoni, Carl; Li, Lianhe H; Fiore, Andrea

    2006-07-01

    A novel light-emitting-diode structure is demonstrated, which relies on nanoscale current injection through an oxide aperture to achieve selective excitation of single InAs/GaAs quantum dots. Low-temperature electroluminescence spectra evidence discrete narrow lines around 1300 nm (line width approximately 75 microeV) at ultralow currents, which are assigned to the emission from single excitons and multiexcitons. This approach, which enables the fabrication of efficient nanoscale active devices at 1300 nm, can provide single-photon-emitting diodes for fiber-based quantum cryptography.

  10. Quantum random bit generation using stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; Moffatt, Doug; Lausten, Rune; Wu, Guorong; Walmsley, Ian A; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2011-12-05

    Random number sequences are a critical resource in a wide variety of information systems, including applications in cryptography, simulation, and data sampling. We introduce a quantum random number generator based on the phase measurement of Stokes light generated by amplification of zero-point vacuum fluctuations using stimulated Raman scattering. This is an example of quantum noise amplification using the most noise-free process possible: near unitary quantum evolution. The use of phase offers robustness to classical pump noise and the ability to generate multiple bits per measurement. The Stokes light is generated with high intensity and as a result, fast detectors with high signal-to-noise ratios can be used for measurement, eliminating the need for single-photon sensitive devices. The demonstrated implementation uses optical phonons in bulk diamond.

  11. Measurement-device-independent entanglement-based quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiuqing; Wei, Kejin; Ma, Haiqiang; Sun, Shihai; Liu, Hongwei; Yin, Zhenqiang; Li, Zuohan; Lian, Shibin; Du, Yungang; Wu, Lingan

    2016-05-01

    We present a quantum key distribution protocol in a model in which the legitimate users gather statistics as in the measurement-device-independent entanglement witness to certify the sources and the measurement devices. We show that the task of measurement-device-independent quantum communication can be accomplished based on monogamy of entanglement, and it is fairly loss tolerate including source and detector flaws. We derive a tight bound for collective attacks on the Holevo information between the authorized parties and the eavesdropper. Then with this bound, the final secret key rate with the source flaws can be obtained. The results show that long-distance quantum cryptography over 144 km can be made secure using only standard threshold detectors.

  12. Network-based Arbitrated Quantum Signature Scheme with Graph State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongling; Li, Fei; Mao, Ningyi; Wang, Yijun; Guo, Ying

    2017-08-01

    Implementing an arbitrated quantum signature(QAS) through complex networks is an interesting cryptography technology in the literature. In this paper, we propose an arbitrated quantum signature for the multi-user-involved networks, whose topological structures are established by the encoded graph state. The determinative transmission of the shared keys, is enabled by the appropriate stabilizers performed on the graph state. The implementation of this scheme depends on the deterministic distribution of the multi-user-shared graph state on which the encoded message can be processed in signing and verifying phases. There are four parties involved, the signatory Alice, the verifier Bob, the arbitrator Trent and Dealer who assists the legal participants in the signature generation and verification. The security is guaranteed by the entanglement of the encoded graph state which is cooperatively prepared by legal participants in complex quantum networks.

  13. Secret sharing with a single d -level quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Armin; Herbauts, Isabelle; Żukowski, Marek; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    We give an example of a wide class of problems for which quantum-information protocols based on multisystem entanglement can be mapped into much simpler ones involving one system. Secret sharing is a cryptographic primitive which plays a central role in various secure multiparty computation tasks and management of keys in cryptography. In secret sharing protocols, a classical message is divided into shares given to recipient parties in such a way that some number of parties need to collaborate in order to reconstruct the message. Quantum protocols for the task commonly rely on multipartite GHZ entanglement. We present a multiparty secret sharing protocol which requires only sequential communication of a single quantum d -level system (for any prime d ). It has huge advantages in scalability and can be realized with state-of-the-art technology.

  14. Eavesdropping on counterfactual quantum key distribution with finite resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingtong; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Jian; Tang, Chaojing; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhang, Sheng

    2014-08-01

    A striking scheme called "counterfactual quantum cryptography" gives a conceptually new approach to accomplish the task of key distribution. It allows two legitimate parties to share a secret even though a particle carrying secret information is not, in fact, transmitted through the quantum channel. Since an eavesdropper cannot directly access the entire quantum system of each signal particle, the protocol seems to provide practical security advantages. However, here we propose an eavesdropping method which works on the scheme in a finite key scenario. We show that, for practical systems only generating a finite number of keys, the eavesdropping can obtain all of the secret information without being detected. We also present a improved protocol as a countermeasure against this attack.

  15. Industrial application for global quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, A.; Petruccione, F.

    2012-09-01

    In the last decade the quantum communication community has witnessed great advances in photonic quantum cryptography technology with the research, development and commercialization of automated Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) devices. These first generation devices are however bottlenecked by the achievable spatial coverage. This is due to the intrinsic absorption of the quantum particle into the communication medium. As QKD is of paramount importance in the future ICT landscape, various innovative solutions have been developed and tested to expand the spatial coverage of these networks such as the Quantum City initiative in Durban, South Africa. To expand this further into a global QKD-secured network, recent efforts have focussed on high-altitude free-space techniques through the use of satellites. This couples the QKD-secured Metropolitan Area Networks (MANs) with secured ground-tosatellite links as access points to a global network. Such a solution, however, has critical limitations that reduce its commercial feasibility. As parallel step to the development of satellitebased global QKD networks, we investigate the use of the commercial aircrafts' network as secure transport mechanisms in a global QKD network. This QKD-secured global network will provide a robust infrastructure to create, distribute and manage encryption keys between the MANs of the participating cities.

  16. Control of entanglement dynamics in a system of three coupled quantum oscillators.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Henao, J C; Pugliese, E; Euzzor, S; Meucci, R; Roversi, J A; Arecchi, F T

    2017-08-30

    Dynamical control of entanglement and its connection with the classical concept of instability is an intriguing matter which deserves accurate investigation for its important role in information processing, cryptography and quantum computing. Here we consider a tripartite quantum system made of three coupled quantum parametric oscillators in equilibrium with a common heat bath. The introduced parametrization consists of a pulse train with adjustable amplitude and duty cycle representing a more general case for the perturbation. From the experimental observation of the instability in the classical system we are able to predict the parameter values for which the entangled states exist. A different amount of entanglement and different onset times emerge when comparing two and three quantum oscillators. The system and the parametrization considered here open new perspectives for manipulating quantum features at high temperatures.

  17. Long-distance quantum communication over noisy networks without long-time quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, Paweł; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Łodyga, Justyna; Pankowski, Łukasz; PrzysieŻna, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The problem of sharing entanglement over large distances is crucial for implementations of quantum cryptography. A possible scheme for long-distance entanglement sharing and quantum communication exploits networks whose nodes share Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pairs. In Perseguers et al. [Phys. Rev. A 78, 062324 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.78.062324] the authors put forward an important isomorphism between storing quantum information in a dimension D and transmission of quantum information in a D +1 -dimensional network. We show that it is possible to obtain long-distance entanglement in a noisy two-dimensional (2D) network, even when taking into account that encoding and decoding of a state is exposed to an error. For 3D networks we propose a simple encoding and decoding scheme based solely on syndrome measurements on 2D Kitaev topological quantum memory. Our procedure constitutes an alternative scheme of state injection that can be used for universal quantum computation on 2D Kitaev code. It is shown that the encoding scheme is equivalent to teleporting the state, from a specific node into a whole two-dimensional network, through some virtual EPR pair existing within the rest of network qubits. We present an analytic lower bound on fidelity of the encoding and decoding procedure, using as our main tool a modified metric on space-time lattice, deviating from a taxicab metric at the first and the last time slices.

  18. All-optical cryptography of M-QAM formats by using two-dimensional spectrally sliced keys.

    PubMed

    Abbade, Marcelo L F; Cvijetic, Milorad; Messani, Carlos A; Alves, Cleiton J; Tenenbaum, Stefan

    2015-05-10

    There has been an increased interest in enhancing the security of optical communications systems and networks. All-optical cryptography methods have been considered as an alternative to electronic data encryption. In this paper we propose and verify the use of a novel all-optical scheme based on cryptographic keys applied on the spectral signal for encryption of the M-QAM modulated data with bit rates of up to 200 gigabits per second.

  19. Quantum computing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Shen; Long, Gui-Lu; Bai, Feng-Shan; Feng, Song-Lin; Zheng, Hou-Zhi

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computing is a quickly growing research field. This article introduces the basic concepts of quantum computing, recent developments in quantum searching, and decoherence in a possible quantum dot realization. PMID:11562459

  20. Analysis and Proposal of Position-Based Routing Protocols for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hiraku; Takano, Akira; Mase, Kenichi

    One of the most promising applications of a mobile ad hoc network is a vehicular ad hoc network (VANET). Each vehicle is aware of its position information by GPS or other methods, so position-based routing is a useful approach in VANET. The position-based routing protocol can be classified roughly into a next-hop forwarding method and a directed flooding method. We evaluate performance of both methods by analytic approach and compare them in this paper. From the evaluation results, we conclude that it is effective for the position-based routing to choose either the next-hop forwarding method or the directed flooding method according to the environment. Then we propose the hybrid transmission method which can select one of them according to the environment, and clarify that the proposed method can keep the packet delivery ratio at a high level and reduce the delay time.

  1. Security of Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2007-03-01

    Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) is the most advanced application of Quantum Information Science. It allows extending secret keys over some distances in such a way that the security of the resulting key material can be guaranteed by the laws of quantum mechanics. In contrast to presently used encryption techniques, the security of QKD can be proven in terms of information-theoretic measures. The resulting key can then be used for many tasks, including exchanging secret messages. QKD has been developed in the language of abstract two-level systems, the qubits. They cannot be easily implemented in optical signals. It took some time to bring the protocols and theory of QKD to the point where they fit to the realities of fiber-optical or free-space applications, including lossy channels. Today, QKD schemes can be implemented reliably using standard off-the-shelf components. Information theoretic security is a theoretical concept. Naturally, it is impossible to demonstrate directly that a given experimental set-up indeed creates a secret key. What one can do is to show that the experiment can give data within a certain parameters regime, such as error rate and loss rate, for which a security proof exists. I will discuss what parameter regime gives provable secure key and which parameter regime cannot lead to secret key. It is desirable to prove `unconditional security,' as it is termed in the world of classical cryptography: no assumption is made about the attacks of an eavesdropper on the quantum channel. However, one has to assume that the signal structure and the measurement device are correctly described by the adopted model and that no eavesdropper can intrude the sender or receiver unit. In this talk I will briefly introduce the concept of QKD and optical implementations. Especially I will discuss security aspects of modern approaches of QKD schemes that allow us to increase the covered distance and the achievable rate.

  2. Transforming quantum operations: Quantum supermaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiribella, G.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.

    2008-08-01

    We introduce the concept of quantum supermap, describing the most general transformation that maps an input quantum operation into an output quantum operation. Since quantum operations include as special cases quantum states, effects, and measurements, quantum supermaps describe all possible transformations between elementary quantum objects (quantum systems as well as quantum devices). After giving the axiomatic definition of supermap, we prove a realization theorem, which shows that any supermap can be physically implemented as a simple quantum circuit. Applications to quantum programming, cloning, discrimination, estimation, information-disturbance trade-off, and tomography of channels are outlined.

  3. Single-photon experiments with liquid crystals for quantum science and quantum engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukishova, Svetlana G.; Liapis, Andreas C.; Bissell, Luke J.; Gehring, George M.; Winkler, Justin M.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2015-03-01

    We present here our results on using liquid crystals in experiments with nonclassical light sources: (1) single-photon sources exhibiting antibunching (separation of all photons in time), which are key components for secure quantum communication systems, and (2) entangled photon source with photons exhibiting quantum interference in a Hong-Ou- Mandel interferometer. In the first part, cholesteric liquid crystal hosts were used to create definite circular polarization of antibunched photons emitted by nanocrystal quantum dots. If the photon has unknown polarization, filtering it through a polarizer to produce the desired polarization for quantum key distribution with bits based on polarization states of photons will reduce by half the efficiency of a quantum cryptography system. In the first part, we also provide our results on observation of a circular polarized microcavity resonance in nanocrystal quantum dot fluorescence in a 1-D chiral photonic bandgap cholesteric liquid crystal microcavity. In the second part of this paper with indistinguishable, time-entangled photons, we demonstrate our experimental results on simulating quantum-mechanical barrier tunnelling phenomena. A Hong-Ou-Mandel dip (quantum interference effect) is shifted when a phase change was introduced on the way of one of entangled photons in pair (one arm of the interferometer) by inserting in this arm an electrically controlled planar-aligned nematic liquid crystal layer between two prisms in the conditions close to a frustrated total internal reflection. By applying different AC-voltages to the planar-aligned nematic layer and changing its refractive index, we can obtain various conditions for incident photon propagation - from total reflection to total transmission. Measuring changes of tunnelling times of photon through this structure with femtosecond resolution permitted us to answer some unresolved questions in quantum-mechanical barrier tunnelling phenomena.

  4. Security Enhanced User Authentication Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks Using Elliptic Curves Cryptography

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Younsung; Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Jiye; Jung, Jaewook; Nam, Junghyun; Won, Dongho

    2014-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) consist of sensors, gateways and users. Sensors are widely distributed to monitor various conditions, such as temperature, sound, speed and pressure but they have limited computational ability and energy. To reduce the resource use of sensors and enhance the security of WSNs, various user authentication protocols have been proposed. In 2011, Yeh et al. first proposed a user authentication protocol based on elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) for WSNs. However, it turned out that Yeh et al.'s protocol does not provide mutual authentication, perfect forward secrecy, and key agreement between the user and sensor. Later in 2013, Shi et al. proposed a new user authentication protocol that improves both security and efficiency of Yeh et al.'s protocol. However, Shi et al.'s improvement introduces other security weaknesses. In this paper, we show that Shi et al.'s improved protocol is vulnerable to session key attack, stolen smart card attack, and sensor energy exhausting attack. In addition, we propose a new, security-enhanced user authentication protocol using ECC for WSNs. PMID:24919012

  5. Elliptic Curve Cryptography-Based Authentication with Identity Protection for Smart Grids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liping; Tang, Shanyu; Luo, He

    2016-01-01

    In a smart grid, the power service provider enables the expected power generation amount to be measured according to current power consumption, thus stabilizing the power system. However, the data transmitted over smart grids are not protected, and then suffer from several types of security threats and attacks. Thus, a robust and efficient authentication protocol should be provided to strength the security of smart grid networks. As the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition system provides the security protection between the control center and substations in most smart grid environments, we focus on how to secure the communications between the substations and smart appliances. Existing security approaches fail to address the performance-security balance. In this study, we suggest a mitigation authentication protocol based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography with privacy protection by using a tamper-resistant device at the smart appliance side to achieve a delicate balance between performance and security of smart grids. The proposed protocol provides some attractive features such as identity protection, mutual authentication and key agreement. Finally, we demonstrate the completeness of the proposed protocol using the Gong-Needham-Yahalom logic.

  6. Deciphering the language of nature: cryptography, secrecy, and alterity in Francis Bacon.

    PubMed

    Clody, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    The essay argues that Francis Bacon's considerations of parables and cryptography reflect larger interpretative concerns of his natural philosophic project. Bacon describes nature as having a language distinct from those of God and man, and, in so doing, establishes a central problem of his natural philosophy—namely, how can the language of nature be accessed through scientific representation? Ultimately, Bacon's solution relies on a theory of differential and duplicitous signs that conceal within them the hidden voice of nature, which is best recognized in the natural forms of efficient causality. The "alphabet of nature"—those tables of natural occurrences—consequently plays a central role in his program, as it renders nature's language susceptible to a process and decryption that mirrors the model of the bilateral cipher. It is argued that while the writing of Bacon's natural philosophy strives for literality, its investigative process preserves a space for alterity within scientific representation, that is made accessible to those with the interpretative key.

  7. An Interoperability Consideration in Selecting Domain Parameters for Elliptic Curve Cryptography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, Will (Technical Monitor); Eddy, Wesley M.

    2005-01-01

    Elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) will be an important technology for electronic privacy and authentication in the near future. There are many published specifications for elliptic curve cryptosystems, most of which contain detailed descriptions of the process for the selection of domain parameters. Selecting strong domain parameters ensures that the cryptosystem is robust to attacks. Due to a limitation in several published algorithms for doubling points on elliptic curves, some ECC implementations may produce incorrect, inconsistent, and incompatible results if domain parameters are not carefully chosen under a criterion that we describe. Few documents specify the addition or doubling of points in such a manner as to avoid this problematic situation. The safety criterion we present is not listed in any ECC specification we are aware of, although several other guidelines for domain selection are discussed in the literature. We provide a simple example of how a set of domain parameters not meeting this criterion can produce catastrophic results, and outline a simple means of testing curve parameters for interoperable safety over doubling.

  8. Elliptic Curve Cryptography-Based Authentication with Identity Protection for Smart Grids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liping; Tang, Shanyu; Luo, He

    2016-01-01

    In a smart grid, the power service provider enables the expected power generation amount to be measured according to current power consumption, thus stabilizing the power system. However, the data transmitted over smart grids are not protected, and then suffer from several types of security threats and attacks. Thus, a robust and efficient authentication protocol should be provided to strength the security of smart grid networks. As the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition system provides the security protection between the control center and substations in most smart grid environments, we focus on how to secure the communications between the substations and smart appliances. Existing security approaches fail to address the performance-security balance. In this study, we suggest a mitigation authentication protocol based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography with privacy protection by using a tamper-resistant device at the smart appliance side to achieve a delicate balance between performance and security of smart grids. The proposed protocol provides some attractive features such as identity protection, mutual authentication and key agreement. Finally, we demonstrate the completeness of the proposed protocol using the Gong-Needham- Yahalom logic. PMID:27007951

  9. Security enhanced user authentication protocol for wireless sensor networks using elliptic curves cryptography.

    PubMed

    Choi, Younsung; Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Jiye; Jung, Jaewook; Nam, Junghyun; Won, Dongho

    2014-06-10

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) consist of sensors, gateways and users. Sensors are widely distributed to monitor various conditions, such as temperature, sound, speed and pressure but they have limited computational ability and energy. To reduce the resource use of sensors and enhance the security of WSNs, various user authentication protocols have been proposed. In 2011, Yeh et al. first proposed a user authentication protocol based on elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) for WSNs. However, it turned out that Yeh et al.'s protocol does not provide mutual authentication, perfect forward secrecy, and key agreement between the user and sensor. Later in 2013, Shi et al. proposed a new user authentication protocol that improves both security and efficiency of Yeh et al.'s protocol. However, Shi et al.'s improvement introduces other security weaknesses. In this paper, we show that Shi et al.'s improved protocol is vulnerable to session key attack, stolen smart card attack, and sensor energy exhausting attack. In addition, we propose a new, security-enhanced user authentication protocol using ECC for WSNs.

  10. Resource efficiency of hardware extensions of a 4-issue VLIW processor for elliptic curve cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungeblut, T.; Puttmann, C.; Dreesen, R.; Porrmann, M.; Thies, M.; Rückert, U.; Kastens, U.

    2010-12-01

    The secure transmission of data plays a significant role in today's information era. Especially in the area of public-key-cryptography methods, which are based on elliptic curves (ECC), gain more and more importance. Compared to asymmetric algorithms, like RSA, ECC can be used with shorter key lengths, while achieving an equal level of security. The performance of ECC-algorithms can be increased significantly by adding application specific hardware extensions. Due to their fine grained parallelism, VLIW-processors are well suited for the execution of ECC algorithms. In this work, we extended the fourfold parallel CoreVA-VLIW-architecture by several hardware accelerators to increase the resource efficiency of the overall system. For the design-space exploration we use a dual design flow, which is based on the automatic generation of a complete C-compiler based tool chain from a central processor specification. Using the hardware accelerators the performance of the scalar multiplication on binary fields can be increased by the factor of 29. The energy consumption can be reduced by up to 90%. The extended processor hardware was mapped on a current 65 nm low-power standard-cell-technology. The chip area of the CoreVA-VLIW-architecture is 0.24 mm2 at a power consumption of 29 mW/MHz. The performance gain is analyzed in respect to the increased hardware costs, as chip area or power consumption.

  11. Evaluating security of a clone preventive techinque using physical randomness and cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Tsutomu

    2000-04-01

    Clone resistance of most of all anti-counterfeiting techniques depends upon secret identifiers or difficulty of reproduction. However, these kinds of techniques are no use if a counterfeiter has enough financial a power to work the secret out or toe overcome the difficulty. We have focused on, among others, random patterns which can be inevitably difficult to reproduce. Consequently, we have developed a document protection system which utilizes random patterns of magnetic micro-fibers in substrates of documents. We have also applied cryptography to the system. The system verifies and authenticates a stochastic feature using pre-stored template data and a digital signature. The stochastic feature and the digital signature respectively prevent 'dead copying' and counterfeiting/alteration of the recorded data such as a value of the card. Therefore security of the system depends upon difficulty both in reproduction of the stochastic feature and in analysis of the digital signature. We have evalut3ed the security of the system for several kinds of criminal attacks. Some criminals may try to counterfeit a stochastic feature by modeling on a genuine document. In our paper we discuss security evaluation of our document protection system against such kinds of criminal methods and also discus a countermeasure and its difficulty.

  12. Experimental Eavesdropping Based on Optimal Quantum Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Lemr, Karel; Černoch, Antonín; Soubusta, Jan; Miranowicz, Adam

    2013-04-01

    The security of quantum cryptography is guaranteed by the no-cloning theorem, which implies that an eavesdropper copying transmitted qubits in unknown states causes their disturbance. Nevertheless, in real cryptographic systems some level of disturbance has to be allowed to cover, e.g., transmission losses. An eavesdropper can attack such systems by replacing a noisy channel by a better one and by performing approximate cloning of transmitted qubits which disturb them but below the noise level assumed by legitimate users. We experimentally demonstrate such symmetric individual eavesdropping on the quantum key distribution protocols of Bennett and Brassard (BB84) and the trine-state spherical code of Renes (R04) with two-level probes prepared using a recently developed photonic multifunctional quantum cloner [Lemr et al., Phys. Rev. A 85, 050307(R) (2012)PLRAAN1050-2947]. We demonstrated that our optimal cloning device with high-success rate makes the eavesdropping possible by hiding it in usual transmission losses. We believe that this experiment can stimulate the quest for other operational applications of quantum cloning.

  13. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering and quantum steering ellipsoids: Optimal two-qubit states and projective measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, R.; Ferraro, A.; Paternostro, M.

    2017-01-01

    We identify the families of states that maximize some recently proposed quantifiers of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering and the volume of the quantum steering ellipsoid (QSE). The optimal measurements which maximize genuine EPR steering measures are discussed and we develop a way to find them using the QSE. We thus explore the links between genuine EPR steering and the QSE and introduce states that can be the most useful for one-sided device-independent quantum cryptography for a given amount of noise.

  14. Analysis of quantum error-correcting codes: Symplectic lattice codes and toric codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, James William

    Quantum information theory is concerned with identifying how quantum mechanical resources (such as entangled quantum states) can be utilized for a number of information processing tasks, including data storage, computation, communication, and cryptography. Efficient quantum algorithms and protocols have been developed for performing some tasks (e.g. , factoring large numbers, securely communicating over a public channel, and simulating quantum mechanical systems) that appear to be very difficult with just classical resources. In addition to identifying the separation between classical and quantum computational power, much of the theoretical focus in this field over the last decade has been concerned with finding novel ways of encoding quantum information that are robust against errors, which is an important step toward building practical quantum information processing devices. In this thesis I present some results on the quantum error-correcting properties of oscillator codes (also described as symplectic lattice codes) and toric codes. Any harmonic oscillator system (such as a mode of light) can be encoded with quantum information via symplectic lattice codes that are robust against shifts in the system's continuous quantum variables. I show the existence of lattice codes whose achievable rates match the one-shot coherent information over the Gaussian quantum channel. Also, I construct a family of symplectic self-dual lattices and search for optimal encodings of quantum information distributed between several oscillators. Toric codes provide encodings of quantum information into two-dimensional spin lattices that are robust against local clusters of errors and which require only local quantum operations for error correction. Numerical simulations of this system under various error models provide a calculation of the accuracy threshold for quantum memory using toric codes, which can be related to phase transitions in certain condensed matter models. I also present

  15. Probabilistic Model of Fault Detection in Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, A.; Pathak, A.

    Since the introduction of quantum computation, several protocols (such as quantum cryptography, quantum algorithm, quantum teleportation) have established quantum computing as a superior future technology. Each of these processes involves quantum circuits, which are prone to different kinds of faults. Consequently, it is important to verify whether the circuit hardware is defective or not. The systematic procedure to do so is known as fault testing. Normally testing is done by providing a set of valid input states and measuring the corresponding output states and comparing the output states with the expected output states of the perfect (fault less) circuit. This particular set of input vectors are known as test set [6]. If there exists a fault then the next step would be to find the exact location and nature of the defect. This is known as fault localization. A model that explains the logical or functional faults in the circuit is a fault model. Conventional fault models include (i) stuck at faults, (ii) bridge faults, and (iii) delay faults. These fault models have been rigorously studied for conventional irreversible circuit. But with the advent of reversible classical computing and quantum computing it has become important to enlarge the domain of the study on test vectors.

  16. Two-slit experiment: quantum and classical probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    Inter-relation between quantum and classical probability models is one of the most fundamental problems of quantum foundations. Nowadays this problem also plays an important role in quantum technologies, in quantum cryptography and the theory of quantum random generators. In this letter, we compare the viewpoint of Richard Feynman that the behavior of quantum particles cannot be described by classical probability theory with the viewpoint that quantum-classical inter-relation is more complicated (cf, in particular, with the tomographic model of quantum mechanics developed in detail by Vladimir Man'ko). As a basic example, we consider the two-slit experiment, which played a crucial role in quantum foundational debates at the beginning of quantum mechanics (QM). In particular, its analysis led Niels Bohr to the formulation of the principle of complementarity. First, we demonstrate that in complete accordance with Feynman's viewpoint, the probabilities for the two-slit experiment have the non-Kolmogorovian structure, since they violate one of basic laws of classical probability theory, the law of total probability (the heart of the Bayesian analysis). However, then we show that these probabilities can be embedded in a natural way into the classical (Kolmogorov, 1933) probability model. To do this, one has to take into account the randomness of selection of different experimental contexts, the joint consideration of which led Feynman to a conclusion about the non-classicality of quantum probability. We compare this embedding of non-Kolmogorovian quantum probabilities into the Kolmogorov model with well-known embeddings of non-Euclidean geometries into Euclidean space (e.g., the Poincaré disk model for the Lobachvesky plane).

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum Squeezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubairy, Suhail

    2005-05-01

    Langevin formalism for squeezing in lasing systems. In the last article of this part, Wiseman deals with squeezing systems when the system's environment can be deliberately engineered so that the feedback is important. The third part of the book includes four articles dealing with the applications of quantum squeezing. In the first article, Yuen presents a discussion of communications and measurement using squeezed states and discusses the advantages of using nonclassical light over classical light in communications and measurement. In the second article, Swain deals with the interaction of squeezed light with the atomic systems and presents a review of novel phenomena in spectroscopy. This chapter on two-level atomic system is followed by Ficek's article on squeezed-light based spectroscopy in three-level atomic systems. In the last article, Reid again addresses the advantages of squeezed light in communications, but her emphasis is different from that of Yuen's article. Here she discusses EPR correlations for squeezed light and presents squeezed-light based methods for quantum cryptography. All the authors are leading figures in the field of squeezed states who have made pioneering contributions to various aspects of the field over the years. This is reflected in the authoritative style with which all the articles are written. These articles are rich in content, easy to read and cover a broad base. The emphasis is however on the theoretical aspects with occasional references to experimental work. This book is an excellent collection of articles on quantum squeezing that are highly useful both for beginners who would like to learn about squeezing and its applications, as well as for experts who would like to learn about the frontiers.

  18. Robust Operation of Tendon-Driven Robot Fingers Using Force and Position-Based Control Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E (Inventor); Platt, Jr., Robert J. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A (Inventor); Strawser, Philip A (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a tendon-driven finger and a control system. The system controls the finger via a force-based control law when a tension sensor is available, and via a position-based control law when a sensor is not available. Multiple tendons may each have a corresponding sensor. The system selectively injects a compliance value into the position-based control law when only some sensors are available. A control system includes a host machine and a non-transitory computer-readable medium having a control process, which is executed by the host machine to control the finger via the force- or position-based control law. A method for controlling the finger includes determining the availability of a tension sensor(s), and selectively controlling the finger, using the control system, via the force or position-based control law. The position control law allows the control system to resist disturbances while nominally maintaining the initial state of internal tendon tensions.

  19. Quantum-locked key distribution at nearly the classical capacity rate.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Cosmo; Lloyd, Seth

    2014-10-17

    Quantum data locking is a protocol that allows for a small secret key to (un)lock an exponentially larger amount of information, hence yielding the strongest violation of the classical one-time pad encryption in the quantum setting. This violation mirrors a large gap existing between two security criteria for quantum cryptography quantified by two entropic quantities: the Holevo information and the accessible information. We show that the latter becomes a sensible security criterion if an upper bound on the coherence time of the eavesdropper's quantum memory is known. Under this condition, we introduce a protocol for secret key generation through a memoryless qudit channel. For channels with enough symmetry, such as the d-dimensional erasure and depolarizing channels, this protocol allows secret key generation at an asymptotic rate as high as the classical capacity minus one bit.

  20. Quantum-Locked Key Distribution at Nearly the Classical Capacity Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Lloyd, Seth

    2014-10-01

    Quantum data locking is a protocol that allows for a small secret key to (un)lock an exponentially larger amount of information, hence yielding the strongest violation of the classical one-time pad encryption in the quantum setting. This violation mirrors a large gap existing between two security criteria for quantum cryptography quantified by two entropic quantities: the Holevo information and the accessible information. We show that the latter becomes a sensible security criterion if an upper bound on the coherence time of the eavesdropper's quantum memory is known. Under this condition, we introduce a protocol for secret key generation through a memoryless qudit channel. For channels with enough symmetry, such as the d-dimensional erasure and depolarizing channels, this protocol allows secret key generation at an asymptotic rate as high as the classical capacity minus one bit.

  1. Generation and confirmation of a (100 × 100)-dimensional entangled quantum system

    PubMed Central

    Krenn, Mario; Huber, Marcus; Fickler, Robert; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Ramelow, Sven; Zeilinger, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Entangled quantum systems have properties that have fundamentally overthrown the classical worldview. Increasing the complexity of entangled states by expanding their dimensionality allows the implementation of novel fundamental tests of nature, and moreover also enables genuinely new protocols for quantum information processing. Here we present the creation of a (100 × 100)-dimensional entangled quantum system, using spatial modes of photons. For its verification we develop a novel nonlinear criterion which infers entanglement dimensionality of a global state by using only information about its subspace correlations. This allows very practical experimental implementation as well as highly efficient extraction of entanglement dimensionality information. Applications in quantum cryptography and other protocols are very promising. PMID:24706902

  2. On the vulnerability of basic quantum key distribution protocols and three protocols stable to attack with 'blinding' of avalanche photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2012-05-15

    The fundamental quantum mechanics prohibitions on the measurability of quantum states allow secure key distribution between spatially remote users to be performed. Experimental and commercial implementations of quantum cryptography systems, however, use components that exist at the current technology level, in particular, one-photon avalanche photodetectors. These detectors are subject to the blinding effect. It was shown that all the known basic quantum key distribution protocols and systems based on them are vulnerable to attacks with blinding of photodetectors. In such attacks, an eavesdropper knows all the key transferred, does not produce errors at the reception side, and remains undetected. Three protocols of quantum key distribution stable toward such attacks are suggested. The security of keys and detection of eavesdropping attempts are guaranteed by the internal structure of protocols themselves rather than additional technical improvements.

  3. On the vulnerability of basic quantum key distribution protocols and three protocols stable to attack with "blinding" of avalanche photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2012-05-01

    The fundamental quantum mechanics prohibitions on the measurability of quantum states allow secure key distribution between spatially remote users to be performed. Experimental and commercial implementations of quantum cryptography systems, however, use components that exist at the current technology level, in particular, one-photon avalanche photodetectors. These detectors are subject to the blinding effect. It was shown that all the known basic quantum key distribution protocols and systems based on them are vulnerable to attacks with blinding of photodetectors. In such attacks, an eavesdropper knows all the key transferred, does not produce errors at the reception side, and remains undetected. Three protocols of quantum key distribution stable toward such attacks are suggested. The security of keys and detection of eavesdropping attempts are guaranteed by the internal structure of protocols themselves rather than additional technical improvements.

  4. Source-Device-Independent Ultrafast Quantum Random Number Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangon, Davide G.; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    Secure random numbers are a fundamental element of many applications in science, statistics, cryptography and more in general in security protocols. We present a method that enables the generation of high-speed unpredictable random numbers from the quadratures of an electromagnetic field without any assumption on the input state. The method allows us to eliminate the numbers that can be predicted due to the presence of classical and quantum side information. In particular, we introduce a procedure to estimate a bound on the conditional min-entropy based on the entropic uncertainty principle for position and momentum observables of infinite dimensional quantum systems. By the above method, we experimentally demonstrated the generation of secure true random bits at a rate greater than 1.7 Gbit /s .

  5. Quantum-secure covert communication on bosonic channels

    PubMed Central

    Bash, Boulat A.; Gheorghe, Andrei H.; Patel, Monika; Habif, Jonathan L.; Goeckel, Dennis; Towsley, Don; Guha, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Computational encryption, information-theoretic secrecy and quantum cryptography offer progressively stronger security against unauthorized decoding of messages contained in communication transmissions. However, these approaches do not ensure stealth—that the mere presence of message-bearing transmissions be undetectable. We characterize the ultimate limit of how much data can be reliably and covertly communicated over the lossy thermal-noise bosonic channel (which models various practical communication channels). We show that whenever there is some channel noise that cannot in principle be controlled by an otherwise arbitrarily powerful adversary—for example, thermal noise from blackbody radiation—the number of reliably transmissible covert bits is at most proportional to the square root of the number of orthogonal modes (the time-bandwidth product) available in the transmission interval. We demonstrate this in a proof-of-principle experiment. Our result paves the way to realizing communications that are kept covert from an all-powerful quantum adversary. PMID:26478089

  6. Quantum-secure covert communication on bosonic channels.

    PubMed

    Bash, Boulat A; Gheorghe, Andrei H; Patel, Monika; Habif, Jonathan L; Goeckel, Dennis; Towsley, Don; Guha, Saikat

    2015-10-19

    Computational encryption, information-theoretic secrecy and quantum cryptography offer progressively stronger security against unauthorized decoding of messages contained in communication transmissions. However, these approaches do not ensure stealth--that the mere presence of message-bearing transmissions be undetectable. We characterize the ultimate limit of how much data can be reliably and covertly communicated over the lossy thermal-noise bosonic channel (which models various practical communication channels). We show that whenever there is some channel noise that cannot in principle be controlled by an otherwise arbitrarily powerful adversary--for example, thermal noise from blackbody radiation--the number of reliably transmissible covert bits is at most proportional to the square root of the number of orthogonal modes (the time-bandwidth product) available in the transmission interval. We demonstrate this in a proof-of-principle experiment. Our result paves the way to realizing communications that are kept covert from an all-powerful quantum adversary.

  7. Quantum-secure covert communication on bosonic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, Boulat A.; Gheorghe, Andrei H.; Patel, Monika; Habif, Jonathan L.; Goeckel, Dennis; Towsley, Don; Guha, Saikat

    2015-10-01

    Computational encryption, information-theoretic secrecy and quantum cryptography offer progressively stronger security against unauthorized decoding of messages contained in communication transmissions. However, these approaches do not ensure stealth--that the mere presence of message-bearing transmissions be undetectable. We characterize the ultimate limit of how much data can be reliably and covertly communicated over the lossy thermal-noise bosonic channel (which models various practical communication channels). We show that whenever there is some channel noise that cannot in principle be controlled by an otherwise arbitrarily powerful adversary--for example, thermal noise from blackbody radiation--the number of reliably transmissible covert bits is at most proportional to the square root of the number of orthogonal modes (the time-bandwidth product) available in the transmission interval. We demonstrate this in a proof-of-principle experiment. Our result paves the way to realizing communications that are kept covert from an all-powerful quantum adversary.

  8. Source-Device-Independent Ultrafast Quantum Random Number Generation.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Davide G; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2017-02-10

    Secure random numbers are a fundamental element of many applications in science, statistics, cryptography and more in general in security protocols. We present a method that enables the generation of high-speed unpredictable random numbers from the quadratures of an electromagnetic field without any assumption on the input state. The method allows us to eliminate the numbers that can be predicted due to the presence of classical and quantum side information. In particular, we introduce a procedure to estimate a bound on the conditional min-entropy based on the entropic uncertainty principle for position and momentum observables of infinite dimensional quantum systems. By the above method, we experimentally demonstrated the generation of secure true random bits at a rate greater than 1.7 Gbit/s.

  9. Revisiting optimal eavesdropping in quantum cryptography: Optimal interaction is unique up to rotation of the underlying basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Atanu; Paul, Goutam

    2017-02-01

    A general framework of optimal eavesdropping on BB84 protocol was provided by Fuchs et al. [Phys. Rev. A 56, 1163 (1997), 10.1103/PhysRevA.56.1163]. An upper bound on mutual information was derived, which could be achieved by a specific type of interaction and the corresponding measurement. However, uniqueness of optimal interaction was posed as an unsolved problem there and it has remained open for almost two decades now. In this paper, we solve this open problem and establish the uniqueness of optimal interaction up to rotation. The specific choice of optimal interaction by Fuchs et al. is shown to be a special case of the form derived in our work.

  10. Phonon-Assisted Two-Photon Interference from Remote Quantum Emitters

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Photonic quantum technologies are on the verge of finding applications in everyday life with quantum cryptography and quantum simulators on the horizon. Extensive research has been carried out to identify suitable quantum emitters and single epitaxial quantum dots have emerged as near-optimal sources of bright, on-demand, highly indistinguishable single photons and entangled photon-pairs. In order to build up quantum networks, it is essential to interface remote quantum emitters. However, this is still an outstanding challenge, as the quantum states of dissimilar “artificial atoms” have to be prepared on-demand with high fidelity and the generated photons have to be made indistinguishable in all possible degrees of freedom. Here, we overcome this major obstacle and show an unprecedented two-photon interference (visibility of 51 ± 5%) from remote strain-tunable GaAs quantum dots emitting on-demand photon-pairs. We achieve this result by exploiting for the first time the full potential of a novel phonon-assisted two-photon excitation scheme, which allows for the generation of highly indistinguishable (visibility of 71 ± 9%) entangled photon-pairs (fidelity of 90 ± 2%), enables push-button biexciton state preparation (fidelity of 80 ± 2%) and outperforms conventional resonant two-photon excitation schemes in terms of robustness against environmental decoherence. Our results mark an important milestone for the practical realization of quantum repeaters and complex multiphoton entanglement experiments involving dissimilar artificial atoms. PMID:28557459

  11. Phonon-Assisted Two-Photon Interference from Remote Quantum Emitters.

    PubMed

    Reindl, Marcus; Jöns, Klaus D; Huber, Daniel; Schimpf, Christian; Huo, Yongheng; Zwiller, Val; Rastelli, Armando; Trotta, Rinaldo

    2017-07-12

    Photonic quantum technologies are on the verge of finding applications in everyday life with quantum cryptography and quantum simulators on the horizon. Extensive research has been carried out to identify suitable quantum emitters and single epitaxial quantum dots have emerged as near-optimal sources of bright, on-demand, highly indistinguishable single photons and entangled photon-pairs. In order to build up quantum networks, it is essential to interface remote quantum emitters. However, this is still an outstanding challenge, as the quantum states of dissimilar "artificial atoms" have to be prepared on-demand with high fidelity and the generated photons have to be made indistinguishable in all possible degrees of freedom. Here, we overcome this major obstacle and show an unprecedented two-photon interference (visibility of 51 ± 5%) from remote strain-tunable GaAs quantum dots emitting on-demand photon-pairs. We achieve this result by exploiting for the first time the full potential of a novel phonon-assisted two-photon excitation scheme, which allows for the generation of highly indistinguishable (visibility of 71 ± 9%) entangled photon-pairs (fidelity of 90 ± 2%), enables push-button biexciton state preparation (fidelity of 80 ± 2%) and outperforms conventional resonant two-photon excitation schemes in terms of robustness against environmental decoherence. Our results mark an important milestone for the practical realization of quantum repeaters and complex multiphoton entanglement experiments involving dissimilar artificial atoms.

  12. Arbitrated Quantum Signature Scheme with Continuous-Variable Coherent States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Feng, Yanyan; Huang, Dazu; Shi, Jinjing

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by the revealing features of the continuous-variable (CV) quantum cryptography, we suggest an arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) protocol with CV coherent states. It involves three participants, i.e., the signer Alice, the verifier Bob and the arbitrator Charlie who is trustworthy by Alice and Bob. Three phases initializing phase, signing phase and verifying phase are included in our protocol. The security of the signature scheme is guaranteed by the generation of the shared keys via the CV-based quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) and the implementation process of the CV-based quantum teleportation as well. Security analysis demonstrates that the signature can be neither forged by anyone nor disavowed by the receiver and signer. Moreover, the authenticity and integrality of the transmitted messages can be ensured. The paper shows that a potential high-speed quantum signature scheme with high detection efficiency and repetition rate can be realized when compared to the discrete-variable (DV) quantum signature scheme attributing to the well characteristics of CV-QKD.

  13. Pseudo random number generator based on quantum chaotic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhshani, A.; Akhavan, A.; Mobaraki, A.; Lim, S.-C.; Hassan, Z.

    2014-01-01

    For many years dissipative quantum maps were widely used as informative models of quantum chaos. In this paper, a new scheme for generating good pseudo-random numbers (PRNG), based on quantum logistic map is proposed. Note that the PRNG merely relies on the equations used in the quantum chaotic map. The algorithm is not complex, which does not impose high requirement on computer hardware and thus computation speed is fast. In order to face the challenge of using the proposed PRNG in quantum cryptography and other practical applications, the proposed PRNG is subjected to statistical tests using well-known test suites such as NIST, DIEHARD, ENT and TestU01. The results of the statistical tests were promising, as the proposed PRNG successfully passed all these tests. Moreover, the degree of non-periodicity of the chaotic sequences of the quantum map is investigated through the Scale index technique. The obtained result shows that, the sequence is more non-periodic. From these results it can be concluded that, the new scheme can generate a high percentage of usable pseudo-random numbers for simulation and other applications in scientific computing.

  14. Efficient Multiphoton Generation in Waveguide Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    González-Tudela, A; Paulisch, V; Kimble, H J; Cirac, J I

    2017-05-26

    Engineering quantum states of light is at the basis of many quantum technologies such as quantum cryptography, teleportation, or metrology among others. Though, single photons can be generated in many scenarios, the efficient and reliable generation of complex single-mode multiphoton states is still a long-standing goal in the field, as current methods either suffer from low fidelities or small probabilities. Here we discuss several protocols which harness the strong and long-range atomic interactions induced by waveguide QED to efficiently load excitations in a collection of atoms, which can then be triggered to produce the desired multiphoton state. In order to boost the success probability and fidelity of each excitation process, atoms are used to both generate the excitations in the rest, as well as to herald the successful generation. Furthermore, to overcome the exponential scaling of the probability of success with the number of excitations, we design a protocol to merge excitations that are present in different internal atomic levels with a polynomial scaling.

  15. Efficient Multiphoton Generation in Waveguide Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Tudela, A.; Paulisch, V.; Kimble, H. J.; Cirac, J. I.

    2017-05-01

    Engineering quantum states of light is at the basis of many quantum technologies such as quantum cryptography, teleportation, or metrology among others. Though, single photons can be generated in many scenarios, the efficient and reliable generation of complex single-mode multiphoton states is still a long-standing goal in the field, as current methods either suffer from low fidelities or small probabilities. Here we discuss several protocols which harness the strong and long-range atomic interactions induced by waveguide QED to efficiently load excitations in a collection of atoms, which can then be triggered to produce the desired multiphoton state. In order to boost the success probability and fidelity of each excitation process, atoms are used to both generate the excitations in the rest, as well as to herald the successful generation. Furthermore, to overcome the exponential scaling of the probability of success with the number of excitations, we design a protocol to merge excitations that are present in different internal atomic levels with a polynomial scaling.

  16. Light for the quantum. Entangled photons and their applications: a very personal perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-07-01

    The quantum physics of light is a most fascinating field. Here I present a very personal viewpoint, focusing on my own path to quantum entanglement and then on to applications. I have been fascinated by quantum physics ever since I heard about it for the first time in school. The theory struck me immediately for two reasons: (1) its immense mathematical beauty, and (2) the unparalleled precision to which its predictions have been verified again and again. Particularly fascinating for me were the predictions of quantum mechanics for individual particles, individual quantum systems. Surprisingly, the experimental realization of many of these fundamental phenomena has led to novel ideas for applications. Starting from my early experiments with neutrons, I later became interested in quantum entanglement, initially focusing on multi-particle entanglement like GHZ states. This work opened the experimental possibility to do quantum teleportation and quantum hyper-dense coding. The latter became the first entanglement-based quantum experiment breaking a classical limitation. One of the most fascinating phenomena is entanglement swapping, the teleportation of an entangled state. This phenomenon is fundamentally interesting because it can entangle two pairs of particles which do not share any common past. Surprisingly, it also became an important ingredient in a number of applications, including quantum repeaters which will connect future quantum computers with each other. Another application is entanglement-based quantum cryptography where I present some recent long-distance experiments. Entanglement swapping has also been applied in very recent so-called loophole-free tests of Bell’s theorem. Within the physics community such loophole-free experiments are perceived as providing nearly definitive proof that local realism is untenable. While, out of principle, local realism can never be excluded entirely, the 2015 achievements narrow down the remaining possibilities for

  17. Complete Insecurity of Quantum Protocols for Classical Two-Party Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhrman, Harry; Christandl, Matthias; Schaffner, Christian

    2012-10-01

    A fundamental task in modern cryptography is the joint computation of a function which has two inputs, one from Alice and one from Bob, such that neither of the two can learn more about the other’s input than what is implied by the value of the function. In this Letter, we show that any quantum protocol for the computation of a classical deterministic function that outputs the result to both parties (two-sided computation) and that is secure against a cheating Bob can be completely broken by a cheating Alice. Whereas it is known that quantum protocols for this task cannot be completely secure, our result implies that security for one party implies complete insecurity for the other. Our findings stand in stark contrast to recent protocols for weak coin tossing and highlight the limits of cryptography within quantum mechanics. We remark that our conclusions remain valid, even if security is only required to be approximate and if the function that is computed for Bob is different from that of Alice.

  18. Complete insecurity of quantum protocols for classical two-party computation.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Harry; Christandl, Matthias; Schaffner, Christian

    2012-10-19

    A fundamental task in modern cryptography is the joint computation of a function which has two inputs, one from Alice and one from Bob, such that neither of the two can learn more about the other's input than what is implied by the value of the function. In this Letter, we show that any quantum protocol for the computation of a classical deterministic function that outputs the result to both parties (two-sided computation) and that is secure against a cheating Bob can be completely broken by a cheating Alice. Whereas it is known that quantum protocols for this task cannot be completely secure, our result implies that security for one party implies complete insecurity for the other. Our findings stand in stark contrast to recent protocols for weak coin tossing and highlight the limits of cryptography within quantum mechanics. We remark that our conclusions remain valid, even if security is only required to be approximate and if the function that is computed for Bob is different from that of Alice.

  19. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  20. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E.; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-01

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven `quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.